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Sample records for radical perineal prostatectomy

  1. Parameters of two-dimensional perineal ultrasonography for evaluation of urinary incontinence after Radical Prostatectomy

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    Danilo Souza Lima da Costa Cruz; Carlos Arturo Levi D’Ancona; Jamal Baracat; Marco Antonio Dionisio Alves; Marcelo Cartapatti; Ronaldo Damião

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Urinary incontinence remains a major concern for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Its prevalence can reach 20% in the late postoperative period. Materials and Methods This clinical study investigated the differences of a dynamic evaluation of the urethra and pelvic floor contraction using perineal ultrasound in men without prostate surgery and in men submitted to radical prostatectomy with and without stress urinary incontinence. Ninety two male patients were includ...

  2. Parameters of two-dimensional perineal ultrasonography for evaluation of urinary incontinence after Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Cruz, Danilo Souza Lima da; D'Ancona, Carlos Arturo Levi; Baracat, Jamal; Alves, Marco Antonio Dionisio; Cartapatti, Marcelo; Damião, Ronaldo

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence remains a major concern for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Its prevalence can reach 20% in the late postoperative period. This clinical study investigated the differences of a dynamic evaluation of the urethra and pelvic floor contraction using perineal ultrasound in men without prostate surgery and in men submitted to radical prostatectomy with and without stress urinary incontinence. Ninety two male patients were included, which 70% of them underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) for more than one year. Thirty one men with clinically post prostatectomy incontinence were compared by two-dimensional (2D) perineal ultrasound to 34 patients without post prostatectomy incontinence and to 27 men without surgery in two centers in Brazil. Our results showed that the continent group presented the urethral angle at rest significantly lower than the prostate group (p = 0.0002). We also observed that the incontinent group showed the displacement of the anterior bladder neck during contraction significantly lower than the continent group (p = 0.008). We found that the continent group presented the urethral angle at rest significantly lower than the prostate group. The incontinent group also showed the anterior bladder neck displacement during contraction significantly lower than the continent group. It was more evident when the severe incontinent group and the continent group were compared.

  3. Parameters of two-dimensional perineal ultrasonography for evaluation of urinary incontinence after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Souza Lima da Costa Cruz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Urinary incontinence remains a major concern for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Its prevalence can reach 20% in the late postoperative period. Materials and Methods This clinical study investigated the differences of a dynamic evaluation of the urethra and pelvic floor contraction using perineal ultrasound in men without prostate surgery and in men submitted to radical prostatectomy with and without stress urinary incontinence. Ninety two male patients were included, which 70% of them underwent radical prostatectomy (RP for more than one year. Thirty one men with clinically post prostatectomy incontinence were compared by two-dimensional (2D perineal ultrasound to 34 patients without post prostatectomy incontinence and to 27 men without surgery in two centers in Brazil. Results Our results showed that the continent group presented the urethral angle at rest significantly lower than the prostate group (p = 0.0002. We also observed that the incontinent group showed the displacement of the anterior bladder neck during contraction significantly lower than the continent group (p = 0.008. Conclusions We found that the continent group presented the urethral angle at rest significantly lower than the prostate group. The incontinent group also showed the anterior bladder neck displacement during contraction significantly lower than the continent group. It was more evident when the severe incontinent group and the continent group were compared.

  4. Radical perineal prostatectomy: cost efficient, outcome effective, minimally invasive prostate cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael J

    2003-09-01

    Localized prostate cancer is a common disease for which minimally invasive treatment methods are being explored. Perineal prostatectomy, as a historical open procedure, is modified to incorporate contemporary surgical ideas. There is relatively little in the literature regarding modern adaptations of perineal prostatectomy. This method of anatomic radical perineal prostatectomy has been developed to accomplish a minimally invasive method of achieving goals of disease control and preservation of genito-urinary functions. Prospective outcome data is accumulated on 508 consecutive radical perineal prostatectomies by a single surgeon. Pathologic stage and PSA detectability are measures of cancer control. Pad use and ability to complete intercourse measure urinary and sexual function. General complications and other outcome measures are evaluated. Freedom from PSA detectability by pathologic stage is 96.3%, 79.4%, and 69.4% for organ confined, specimen confined and margin positive in the absence of seminal vesical invasion with an average 4 years follow up (3-114 months). Margins are positive in 18% of cases. The average cancer size is 9.4g and 36% of cases have extracapsular invasion. By the first, third, sixth months and one year, 38%, 65%, 88% and 96% are free of pad use and report being dry. While over 80% of nerve-spared patients enjoy the return of spontaneous erectile function, the men with bilateral nerve preservation note earlier and more complete return of function. There are no cardiopulmonary complications or deaths. Transfusions occurred in 1%, none in the past 400 cases. Average total hospital charges are USD$4889.00 in 1999 and 2000. Anterior urethral strictures, anastomotic strictures and fecal urgency/stress flatus occur 2%, 2% and 2-4%, respectively. This method of prostatectomy is able to achieve complete cancer resection while preserving urinary and sexual function as well as laparoscopic or retropubic prostatectomy. The simplicity and minimally

  5. Orgasm after radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeman, M; VanDriel, MF; Schultz, WCMW; Mensink, HJA

    Objective To evaluate the ability to obtain and the quality of orgasm after radical prostatectomy, Patients and methods The orgasms experienced after undergoing radical prostatectomy were evaluated in 20 men (median age 65 years, range 56-76) using a semi-structured interview and a self-administered

  6. Salvage robotic radical prostatectomy

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    Samuel D Kaffenberger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of non-surgical primary treatment for localized prostate cancer is a common occurrence, with rates of disease recurrence ranging from 20% to 60%. In a large proportion of patients, disease recurrence is clinically localized and therefore potentially curable. Unfortunately, due to the complex and potentially morbid nature of salvage treatment, radical salvage surgery is uncommonly performed. In an attempt to decrease the morbidity of salvage therapy without sacrificing oncologic efficacy, a number of experienced centers have utilized robotic assistance to perform minimally invasive salvage radical prostatectomy. Herein, we critically evaluate the existing literature on salvage robotic radical prostatectomy with a focus on patient selection, perioperative complications and functional and early oncologic outcomes. These results are compared with contemporary and historical open salvage radical prostatectomy series and supplemented with insights we have gained from our experience with salvage robotic radical prostatectomy. The body of evidence by which conclusions regarding the efficacy and safety of robotic salvage radical prostatectomy can be drawn comprises fewer than 200 patients with limited follow-up. Preliminary results are promising and some outcomes have been favorable when compared with contemporary open salvage prostatectomy series. Advantages of the robotic platform in the performance of salvage radical prostatectomy include decreased blood loss, short length of stay and improved visualization. Greater experience is required to confirm the long-term oncologic efficacy and functional outcomes as well as the generalizability of results achieved at experienced centers.

  7. Sexuality Following Radical Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Serefoglu, Ege C; Albersen, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    incontinence in relation to sexual activity after surgery. This can present at the time of orgasm (ie, climacturia) or arise during arousal. In general, the problem subsides with time and pelvic floor training and tension penile loops can be used as treatments. Orgasmic disturbances after radical prostatectomy...

  8. Trends in radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, James; Tokuda, Yuji; Scardino, Peter

    2009-02-01

    The surgical treatment of prostate cancer ideally removes the entire cancer, avoids excessive blood loss or serious perioperative complications, and results in complete recovery of continence and potency. To achieve this, the surgeon must excise sufficient periprostatic tissue to cure the cancer while preserving the cavernosal nerves required for erectile function and the neuromusculature required for normal urinary and bowel function. Here we will examine recent trends in radical prostatectomy, focusing on surgical technique.

  9. Penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Ralph, David

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy (RP) is believed to include neuropraxia, which leads to temporarily reduced oxygenation and subsequent structural changes in penile tissue. This results in veno-occlusive dysfunction, therefore, penile rehabilitation programmes...

  10. Radical prostatectomy. Results and indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacqmin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy is the surgical curative treatment of localized prostate cancer. The survival is good in young patients (<70) with T2 N0M0 tumors and more than 10 year's life expectancy. Side-effects are urinary incontinence, impotence and anastomosis stricture. Quality of life should be considered as an important factor for the choice of the patient between radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy and follow-up. (author)

  11. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  12. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  13. Erectile function after radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Frey, Anders; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    collected database and a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study in patients following radical prostatectomy. Erectile function was assessed with the IIEF-5 and the question "Is your erectile function as good as before the surgery (yes/no)". Patients were included if they were sexually active before...

  14. Orgasmic Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

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    Paolo Capogrosso

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In addition to urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, several other impairments of sexual function potentially occurring after radical prostatectomy (RP have been described; as a whole, these less frequently assessed disorders are referred to as neglected side effects. In particular, orgasmic dysfunctions (ODs have been reported in a non-negligible number of cases, with detrimental impacts on patients’ overall sexual life. This review aimed to comprehensively discuss the prevalence and physiopathology of post-RP ODs, as well as potential treatment options. Orgasm-associated incontinence (climacturia has been reported to occur in between 20% and 93% of patients after RP. Similarly, up to 19% of patients complain of postoperative orgasm-associated pain, mainly referred pain at the level of the penis. Moreover, impairment in the sensation of orgasm or even complete anorgasmia has been reported in 33% to 77% of patients after surgery. Clinical and surgical factors including age, the use of a nerve-sparing technique, and robotic surgery have been variably associated with the risk of ODs after RP, although robust and reliable data allowing for a proper estimation of the risk of postoperative orgasmic function impairment are still lacking. Likewise, little evidence regarding the management of postoperative ODs is currently available. In general, physicians should be aware of the prevalence of ODs after RP, in order to properly counsel all patients both preoperatively and immediately post-RP about the potential occurrence of bothersome and distressful changes in their overall sexual function.

  15. Orgasmic Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventimiglia, Eugenio; Cazzaniga, Walter; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In addition to urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, several other impairments of sexual function potentially occurring after radical prostatectomy (RP) have been described; as a whole, these less frequently assessed disorders are referred to as neglected side effects. In particular, orgasmic dysfunctions (ODs) have been reported in a non-negligible number of cases, with detrimental impacts on patients' overall sexual life. This review aimed to comprehensively discuss the prevalence and physiopathology of post-RP ODs, as well as potential treatment options. Orgasm-associated incontinence (climacturia) has been reported to occur in between 20% and 93% of patients after RP. Similarly, up to 19% of patients complain of postoperative orgasm-associated pain, mainly referred pain at the level of the penis. Moreover, impairment in the sensation of orgasm or even complete anorgasmia has been reported in 33% to 77% of patients after surgery. Clinical and surgical factors including age, the use of a nerve-sparing technique, and robotic surgery have been variably associated with the risk of ODs after RP, although robust and reliable data allowing for a proper estimation of the risk of postoperative orgasmic function impairment are still lacking. Likewise, little evidence regarding the management of postoperative ODs is currently available. In general, physicians should be aware of the prevalence of ODs after RP, in order to properly counsel all patients both preoperatively and immediately post-RP about the potential occurrence of bothersome and distressful changes in their overall sexual function. PMID:28459142

  16. ORGASMIC FUNCTION AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study orgasmic function (OF in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RPE.Subjects and methods. Seventy-nine patients who had undergone RPE for locally advanced prostate cancer without hormone and radiation therapies were examined. The patients’ mean age was 59.3 years. The mean EF-IIEF domain score was 24.4. OF was estimated by IIEF question 10 and the authors’ questionnaire. The Spearman rank correction coefficient and Mann-Whitney U-Wilcoxon tests were used.Results. After RPE, there was a reduction in the mean IIEF question 10 score from 3.9 (confidence interval 3.7–4.1 to 3.3 (3–3.5 (p = 0.000. The following changes were found in orgasm intensity: no changes in 43 %, mild worsening in 42 %, severe worsening in 8 %, and enhancement in 4 %; orgasm could not be achieved in 4 % of the patients. Pain usually of low intensity was reported by 8.8 %. The poor factors for preserving OF were its low baseline level, elderly age, or severe post-RPE erectile dysfunction.Conclusion. There were significant OF changes after RPE, which should be kept in mind while treating this category of patients.

  17. Karolinska prostatectomy: a robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy technique.

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    Nilsson, Andreas E; Carlsson, Stefan; Laven, Brett A; Wiklund, N Peter

    2006-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an increasing trend towards minimally invasive management of prostate cancer, including laparoscopic and, more recently, robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. Several different laparoscopic approaches have been continuously developed during the last 5 years and it is still unclear which technique yields the best outcome. We present our current technique of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The technique described has evolved during the course of >400 robotic prostatectomies performed by the robotic team since the robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy program was introduced at Karolinska University Hospital in January 2002. Our procedure comprises several modifications of previously reported ones, and we utilize fewer robotic instruments to reduce costs. An extended posterior dissection is performed to aid in the bladder neck-sparing dissection. In nerve-sparing procedures the vesicles are divided to avoid damage to the erectile nerves. In order to preserve the apical anatomy the dorsal venous complex is incised sharply and is first over-sewn after the apical dissection is completed. Our technique enables a more fluent dissection than previously described robotic techniques. Minimizing changes of instruments and the camera not only cuts costs but also reduces inefficient operating maneuvers, such as switching between 30 degrees and 0 degrees lenses during the procedure. We present a technique which in our hands has achieved excellent functional and oncological results.

  18. Optimal pain management for radical prostatectomy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Grish P; Jaschinski, Thomas; Bonnet, Francis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increase in the diagnosis of prostate cancer has increased the incidence of radical prostatectomy. However, the literature assessing pain therapy for this procedure has not been systematically evaluated. Thus, optimal pain therapy for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy remains...... controversial. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for studies assessing the effects of analgesic and anesthetic interventions on pain after radical prostatectomy. All searches were conducted in October 2012 and updated in June 2015. RESULTS: Most...... treatments studied improved pain relief and/or reduced opioid requirements. However, there were significant differences in the study designs and the variables evaluated, precluding quantitative analysis and consensus recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review reveals that there is a lack...

  19. Pertinent issues related to laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

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    Sidney C. Abreu

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We describe the critical steps of the laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP technique and discuss how they impact upon the pertinent issues regarding prostate cancer surgery: blood loss, potency and continence. RESULTS: A major advantage of LRP is the reduced operative blood loss. The precise placement of the dorsal vein complex stitch associated with the tamponading effect of the CO2 pneumoperitoneum significantly decrease venous bleeding, which is the main source of blood loss during radical prostatectomy. At the Cleveland Clinic, the average blood loss of our first 100 patients was 322.5 ml, resulting in low transfusion rates. The continuous venous bleeding narrowed pelvic surgical field and poor visibility can adversely impact on nerve preservation during open radical prostatectomy. Laparoscopy, with its enhanced and magnified vision in a relatively bloodless field allows for excellent identification and handling of the neurovascular bundles. During open retropubic radical prostatectomy, the pubic bone may impair visibility and access to the urethral stump, and the surgeon must tie the knots relying on tactile sensation alone. Consequently, open prostatectomy is associated with a prolonged catheterization period of 2 - 3 weeks. Comparatively, during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy all sutures are meticulously placed and each is tied under complete visual control, resulting in a precise mucosa-to-mucosa approximation. CONCLUSION: The laparoscopic approach may represent a reliable less invasive alternative to the conventional open approach. Despite the encouraging preliminary anatomical and functional outcomes, prospective randomized comparative trials are required to critically evaluate the role of laparoscopy for this sophisticated and delicate operation.

  20. Neglected Side Effects After Radical Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anders Ullmann; Sønksen, Jens; Fode, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A series of previously neglected sexually related side effects to radical prostatectomy (RP) has been identified over the recent years. These include orgasm-associated incontinence (OAI), urinary incontinence in relation to sexual stimulation (UISS), altered perception of orgasm, or...

  1. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in the canine model.

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    Price, D T; Chari, R S; Neighbors, J D; Eubanks, S; Schuessler, W W; Preminger, G M

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of performing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in a canine model. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was performed on six adult male canines. A new endoscopic needle driver was used to construct a secure vesicourethral anastomosis. Average operative time required to complete the procedure was 304 min (range 270-345 min). Dissection of the prostate gland took an average of 67 min (range 35-90 min), and construction of the vesicourethral anastomosis took 154 min (rage 80-240 min). There were no intraoperative complications and only one postoperative complication (anastomotic leak). Five of the six animals recovered uneventfully from the procedure, and their foley catheters were removed 10-14 days postoperatively after a retrograde cystourethrogram demonstrated an intact vesicourethral anastomosis. Four (80%) of the surviving animals were clinically continent within 10 days after catheter removal. Post mortem examination confirmed that the vesicourethral anastomosis was intact with no evidence of urine extravasation. These data demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in a canine model, and suggest that additional work with this technique should be continued to develop its potential clinical application.

  2. Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction Following Radical Prostatectomy: A Review

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    Gerasimos Alivizatos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy remains the treatment of choice for localized prostate cancer in age-appropriate and health-appropriate men. Although cancer control is the most important aspect of a radical prostatectomy, minimization of postoperative morbidity, especially urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, is becoming a greater concern. We reviewed recent data available on Medline regarding the incidence, pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of incontinence and sexual dysfunction after radical prostatectomy. Health-related quality of life issues have been specifically addressed. Although low incidences of incontinence and erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy have been reported in the hands of experienced surgeons, the literature review revealed a great variety, with incontinence rates ranging from 0.3–65.6% and potency rates ranging from 11–87%. Several factors contribute to this wide difference, the most important being the application of a meticulous surgical technique. General and cancer-specific health-related quality of life is not being affected after radical prostatectomy. The incidence of incontinence and erectile dysfunction is higher after radical prostatectomy when compared to the incidence observed when other therapies for localized prostate cancer are applied. However, the majority of the patients undergoing radical prostatectomy would vote for the operation again. Today, avoidance of major complications after radical prostatectomy depends mostly on a high-quality surgical technique. When incontinence or erectile dysfunction persists after radical prostatectomy, the majority of the treated patients can be managed effectively by various methods.

  3. Adjustable perineal male sling using tissue expander as an effective treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence

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    Melih Balci

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To report our intermediate experience in treating patients with severe incontinence using an adjustable perineal male sling with a tissue expander. Materials and Methods An adjustable male sling procedure was performed on 21 patients with severe incontinence. The underlying etiology of urinary incontinence was radical prostatectomy in 13 patients, open prostatectomy in 5 patients and transurethral prostate resection in 3 patients. The difference between the classical and the adjustable sling is that in the latter there is a 25 mL tissue expander between the two layers of polypropylene mesh with an injection port. Adjustment of the sling was performed with saline via an inflation port, in case of recurrence or persistence of incontinence. Results The mean age of the patients was 66.2±7.3 (50-79 years and mean pad usage was 6.4±0.6 per day. The mean follow-up time was 40.1±23.2 (6-74 months. The balloon was postoperatively inflated on average with 11.6±5.7 (5-25 mL. After the mean 40.1 months of follow-up, 16 of the 21 patients (76.2% were dry (11 patients, 0 pads; 5 patients using safety pads, 3 patients (14% had mild and 2 (9.8% had moderate degree post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPI. The average maximum urine flow rate of the patients was 15.6±4.7 (10-31 mL/s. No residual urine was found. In 2 patients, all parts of the device were removed due to infection and discomfort, and in 3 patients only the inflation component was removed due to local scrotal infection. Conclusions Our results show that using an adjustable perineal male sling with a tissue expander seems to be an efficient, and safe surgical treatment option in patients with PPI.

  4. Critical appraisal of outcomes following open radical prostatectomy.

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    Galvin, David J; Eastham, James A

    2009-05-01

    Radical prostatectomy has evolved enormously over the last 25 years. Improvements include the use of smaller incisions, reduced blood loss, shorter hospital stays, and surgical refinement to improve the recovery of continence and potency. In addition, new technologies and minimally invasive techniques with the potential to further improve patient outcomes have been introduced. This article focuses on outcomes with open radical prostatectomy and is not meant to compare open radical prostatectomy and minimally invasive approaches. Despite a lack of randomized controlled trials, strong observational cohort studies demonstrate lower rates of positive surgical margins, high 10-year and 15-year biochemical recurrence-free rates, excellent prostate cancer-specific mortality rates, and improved recovery of urinary incontinence and erectile function after open radical prostatectomy. We review publications from the past 24 months regarding oncologic outcome, continence, and erectile function, as well as some earlier manuscripts that emphasize key aspects of open radical prostatectomy. Today open radical prostatectomy is a less-invasive procedure with low morbidity providing excellent control of clinically localized prostate cancer. Although open radical prostatectomy now accounts for a minority of radical prostatectomies in the United States, the concepts that have improved oncologic and quality-of-life outcomes are equally applicable to minimally invasive procedures.

  5. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is a safe procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Hvarness, Helle

    2013-01-01

    We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients.......We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients....

  6. Factors predicting early return of continence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Jaspreet S; Eastham, James A

    2010-05-01

    Success of radical prostatectomy is measured by control of cancer and return of urinary and sexual function. Urinary incontinence is generally considered the greatest impairment in immediate postoperative urinary function. Multiple factors are associated with earlier return of urinary continence after radical prostatectomy. These factors can be divided into those known prior to surgery, and therefore possibly not modifiable, and factors that can be controlled during surgery or surgical planning. In addition, various postoperative maneuvers can help hasten urinary continence. This article examines the effect of known factors related to early return of urinary continence after radical prostatectomy.

  7. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    Yu. L. Demidko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  8. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    Yu. L. Demidko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  9. Radical prostatectomy. Results and indications; Indications et resultats de la prostatectomie radicale

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    Jacqmin, D. [Hopitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    1997-12-31

    Radical prostatectomy is the surgical curative treatment of localized prostate cancer. The survival is good in young patients (<70) with T2 N0M0 tumors and more than 10 year`s life expectancy. Side-effects are urinary incontinence, impotence and anastomosis stricture. Quality of life should be considered as an important factor for the choice of the patient between radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy and follow-up. (author)

  10. FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF ENDOSCOPIC EXTRAPERITONEAL RADICAL INTRAFASCIAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    D. V. Perlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endoscopic radical prostatectomy is a highly effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Intrafascial prostate dissection ensures early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. This article sums up our own experience of performing intrafascial endoscopic prostatectomy.Materials and methods. 25 patients have undergone this procedure. 12 months after surgery 88.2 % of the patients were fully continent, 11.7 % had symptoms of minimal stress urinary incontinence. We encountered no cases of positive surgical margins and one case of bio-chemical recurrence of the disease.Conclusion. Oncologically, intrafascial endoscopic radical prostatectomy is as effective as other modifications of radical prostatectomy and has the benefits of early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. 

  11. Radical prostatectomy: positive surgical margins matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Joshua J; Eastham, James A

    2013-10-01

    A positive surgical margin (PSM) in the radical prostatectomy (RP) specimen is associated with biochemical recurrence (BCR) and the need for adjuvant radiation therapy, and is a surrogate for surgical quality. We review the available data describing the identification, anatomy, and management of PSM after RP. A PubMed search (using English language as a filter) was performed to identify factors affecting PSMs and their management. PSMs are associated with an increased likelihood of BCR after RP. The most common location for a PSM is the apex, followed by the posterolateral edge of the prostate. The risk of recurrence in a patient with a PSM is associated with the location, length, and Gleason score of the PSM. The management of a patient with a PSM remains controversial, with some recommending adjuvant radiation therapy for all PSMs and others suggesting only salvage radiation therapy for men who experience BCR. PSMs are associated with an increased likelihood of BCR and often result in initiation of adjuvant treatment. Therefore, the goal of surgery should be to minimize the likelihood of a PSM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Learning curve for radical retropubic prostatectomy

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    Fernando J. A. Saito

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The learning curve is a period in which the surgical procedure is performed with difficulty and slowness, leading to a higher risk of complications and reduced effectiveness due the surgeon's inexperience. We sought to analyze the residents' learning curve for open radical prostatectomy (RP in a training program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective study from June 2006 to January 2008 in the academic environment of the University of São Paulo. Five residents operated on 184 patients during a four-month rotation in the urologic oncology division, mentored by the same physician assistants. We performed sequential analyses according to the number of surgeries, as follows: = 10, 11 to 19, 20 to 28, and = 29. RESULTS: The residents performed an average of 37 RP each. The average psa was 9.3 ng/mL and clinical stage T1c in 71% of the patients. The pathological stage was pT2 (73%, pT3 (23%, pT4 (4%, and 46% of the patients had a Gleason score 7 or higher. In all surgeries, the average operative time and estimated blood loss was 140 minutes and 488 mL. Overall, 7.2% of patients required blood transfusion, and 23% had positive surgical margins. CONCLUSION: During the initial RP learning curve, we found a significant reduction in the operative time; blood transfusion during the procedures and positive surgical margin rate were stable in our series.

  13. Radical prostatectomies in Austria, 1997–2004

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    Schatzl Georg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of PSA testing in Austria led to a steep increase of the incidence of prostate cancer. We want to present the course of the number of newly diagnosed cases of prostate cancer in Austria since 1997, and set these numbers in relation to the total of radical prostatectomies (with resection of lymph nodes in the same time period. All numbers were retrieved from health statistics of Statistics Austria. The report period of cancer cases and of RPE comprises the years 1997–2004. All calculations were performed for totals as well as for 5-year age groups (40–89 years of age. Findings The number of prostate cancer cases rose from 1997 to 2004 by 35%, while the number of RPE rose by 94% in the same time period. The proportion of RPE in relation to new cases rose from 41% in 1997 to 59% in 2004. Conclusion A slight decrease of prostate cancer mortality can already be observed in Austria, but the question of over-treatment still awaits analysis.

  14. REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    V. N. Pavlov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available According to the data obtained by Russian and foreign investigators, the major complication after radical prostatectomy (RPE is urinaryincontinence that is recorded in 20-30% of cases.Objective. To improve the results of surgical treatment in patients with prostate cancer, by developing and introducing a well-rounded post-operative rehabilitation program.Subjects and methods. Seventy-four patients who were treated at the urology clinic, Bashkir State Medical University, and underwent RPEin 2005 to 2007 have been examined; 27 of them were diagnosed as having urinary incontinence (UI. After discharge from the clinic, acontrol group received rehabilitative treatment at the sanatorium “Krasnousolsk” of the Republic of Bashkortostan. Results and discussion. Therapeutic exercises and pelvic floor electrostimulation halve the number of day urinations and paddings used inpatients with UI, by increasing the bladder capacity from 138.2±12.7 to 196±11.2 ml and improving the trophism of the bladder neck andurethra in the sphincteral area. 

  15. Predicting an optimal outcome after radical prostatectomy: the trifecta nomogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, James A; Scardino, Peter T; Kattan, Michael W

    2008-06-01

    The optimal outcome after radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer is freedom from biochemical recurrence along with the recovery of continence and erectile function, a so-called trifecta. We evaluated our series of open radical prostatectomy cases to determine the likelihood of this outcome and develop a nomogram predicting the trifecta. We reviewed the records of patients undergoing open radical prostatectomy for clinical stage T1c-T3a prostate cancer at our center during 2000 to 2006. Men were excluded if they received preoperative hormonal therapy, chemotherapy or radiation therapy, if pretreatment prostate specific antigen was more than 50 ng/ml, or if they were impotent or incontinent before radical prostatectomy. A total of 1,577 men were included in the study. Freedom from biochemical recurrence was defined as post-radical prostatectomy prostate specific antigen less than 0.2 ng/ml. Continence was defined as not having to wear any protective pads. Potency was defined as erection adequate for intercourse upon most attempts with or without phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor. Mean patient age was 58 years and mean pretreatment prostate specific antigen was 6.4 ng/ml. A trifecta outcome (cancer-free status with recovery of continence and potency) was achieved in 62% of patients. In a nomogram developed to predict the likelihood of the trifecta baseline prostate specific antigen was the major predictive factor. Area under the ROC curve for the nomogram was 0.773 and calibration appeared excellent. A trifecta (optimal) outcome can be achieved in most men undergoing radical prostatectomy. The nomogram permits patients to estimate preoperatively their likelihood of an optimal outcome after radical prostatectomy.

  16. Seminal vesicle involvement at salvage radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Joshua J; Walker, Marc; Bernstein, Melanie; Eastham, James A

    2013-06-01

    To describe the incidence and clinical outcomes of seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) at salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) and to describe the accuracy of SV biopsy. As SRP is used after biochemical recurrence (BCR) of prostate cancer after radiotherapy (RT) to gain local oncological control. The SVs receive lower doses of radiation from external-beam RT (EBRT) to avoid rectal exposure and are not targeted with brachytherapy (BT) with low-risk prostate cancer. SRP was performed on 206 men with BCR after RT at a tertiary care institution between 1998 and 2011. Post-RT biopsy and SRP specimens were reviewed by a genitourinary pathologist. SVI was detected in 65 (32%) of 206 patients. No difference was found between EBRT alone (65% vs 63%) and BT (29% vs 31%) with or without EBRT in patients with SVI. Men with SVI had higher rates of cT3 disease (20% vs 8%) and Gleason score ≥ 8 at SRP (52% vs 21%). BCR-free survival at 5 years was 18% and 56% in patients with and without SVI (hazard ratio 2.85, 95% confidence interval 1.87-4.36, P < 0.001), yet the rate of local recurrence was low (11%). Prostate cancer was identified in nine of 18 patients who underwent SV biopsy and was the only location of prostate cancer in two patients. SVI is a prognostic indicator for BCR after SRP, but local recurrence in patients with SVI after SRP remains low. We recommend SV biopsy to improve staging and cancer detection in men with BCR after radiotherapy. © 2013 BJU International.

  17. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: omitting a pelvic drain

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    David Canes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Our goal was to assess outcomes of a selective drain placement strategy during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP with a running urethrovesical anastomosis (RUVA using cystographic imaging in all patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients undergoing LRP between January 2003 and December 2004. The anastomosis was performed using a modified van Velthoven technique. A drain was placed at the discretion of the senior surgeon when a urinary leak was demonstrated with bladder irrigation, clinical suspicion for a urinary leak was high, or a complex bladder neck reconstruction was performed. Routine postoperative cystograms were obtained. RESULTS: 208 patients underwent LRP with a RUVA. Data including cystogram was available for 206 patients. The overall rate of cystographic urine leak was 5.8%. A drain was placed in 51 patients. Of these, 8 (15.6% had a postoperative leak on cystogram. Of the 157 undrained patients, urine leak was radiographically visible in 4 (2.5%. The higher leak rate in the drained vs. undrained cohort was statistically significant (p = 0.002. Twenty-four patients underwent pelvic lymph node dissection (8 drained, 16 undrained. Three undrained patients developed lymphoceles, which presented clinically on average 3 weeks postoperatively. There were no urinomas or hematomas in either group. CONCLUSIONS: Routine placement of a pelvic drain after LRP with a RUVA is not necessary, unless the anastomotic integrity is suboptimal intraoperatively. Experienced clinical judgment is essential and accurate in identifying patients at risk for postoperative leakage. When suspicion is low, omitting a drain does not increase morbidity.

  18. Hemodynamic changes during robotic radical prostatectomy

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    Vanlal Darlong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effect on hemodynamic changes and experience of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP in steep Trendelenburg position (45° with high-pressure CO 2 pneumoperitoneum is very limited. Therefore, we planned this prospective clinical trial to study the effect of steep Tredelenburg position with high-pressure CO 2 pneumoperitoneum on hemodynamic parameters in a patient undergoing RALRP using FloTrac/Vigileo™1.10. Methods: After ethical approval and informed consent, 15 patients scheduled for RALRP were included in the study. In the operation room, after attaching standard monitors, the radial artery was cannulated. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl (2 μg/kg and thiopentone (4-7 mg/kg, and tracheal intubation was facilitated by vecuronium bromide (0.1 mg/kg. The patient′s right internal jugular vein was cannulated and the Pre Sep™ central venous oximetry catheter was connected to it. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and nitrous oxide and intermittent boluses of vecuronium. Intermittent positive-pressure ventilation was provided to maintain normocapnea. After CO 2 pneumoperitoneum, position of the patient was gradually changed to 45° Trendelenburg over 5 min. The robot was then docked and the robot-assisted surgery started. Intraoperative monitoring included central venous pressure (CVP, stroke volume (SV, stroke volume variation (SVV, cardiac output (CO, cardiac index (CI and central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO 2 . Results: After induction of anesthesia, heart rate (HR, SV, CO and CI were decreased significantly from the baseline value (P>0.05. SV, CO and CI further decreased significantly after creating pneumoperitoneum (P>0.05. At the 45° Trendelenburg position, HR, SV, CO and CI were significantly decreased compared with baseline. Thereafter, CO and CI were persistently low throughout the 45° Trendelenburg position (P=0.001. HR at 20 min and 1 h, SV and mean arterial blood pressure

  19. Rupture of vesicourethral anastomosis following radical retropubic prostatectomy

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    Marcos Dall'oglio

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Rupture of vesicourethral anastomosis following radical retropubic prostatectomy is a complication that requires immediate management. We evaluated the morbidity of this rare complication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed retrospectively 5 cases of disruption of vesicourethral anastomosis during post-operative period in a consecutive series of 1,600 radical retropubic prostatectomies, performed by a single surgeon. RESULTS: It occurred in a ratio of 1:320 prostatectomies (0,3%. Management was conservative in all the cases with an average catheter permanence time of 28 days, being its removal preceded by cystography. Two cases were secondary to bleeding, 1 followed the change of vesical catheter and 2 by unknown causes after removing the Foley catheter. Only one patient evolved with urethral stenosis, in the period ranging from 6 to 120 months. CONCLUSION: Rupture of vesicourethral anastomosis is not related to the surgeon's experience, and conservative treatment has shown to be effective.

  20. Gleason Score Correlation Between Prostate Biopsy and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

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    Erdem Öztürk

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and the second cause of cancer-related mortality. Prostate biopsy and the Gleason score guide treatment decisions in prostate cancer. Several studies have investigated the correlation between biopsy scores and radical prostatectomy specimen scores. We also evaluated the correlation of Gleason scores of these specimens in our patient series. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data of 468 men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer and underwent radical prostatectomy between 2008 and 2017. Patients’ age, prostate-specific antigen levels at diagnosis, and prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimen Gleason scores were recorded. Upgrading and downgrading were defined as increase or decrease of Gleason score of radical prostate specimen compared to Gleason score of prostate biopsy. Results: A total of 442 men diagnosed with prostate cancer were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 62.62±6.26 years (44-84 years and mean prostate specific antigen level was 9.01±6.84 ng/mL (1.09-49 ng/mL. Prostate biopsy Gleason score was 7 in 27 (6.1% men. Radical prostatectomy specimen Gleason score was 7 in 62 (14% men. Gleason correlation was highest in the 240 patients (71.6% with score <7 and was lowest in the 31 (38.75% patients with score =7. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the discordance rate between Gleason scores of prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens was 35.7%.

  1. Early Experience with Robot-assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

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    Hong Gee Sim

    2004-10-01

    Conclusions: rLRP is feasible in a practice with a low volume of radical prostatectomies. Significant improvement in perioperative parameters occurs after the first eight cases. This technique confers the benefits of enhanced precision and dexterity for complex laparoscopic work in the pelvic cavity.

  2. First Danish single-institution experience with radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, Marie-Louise; Røder, Martin Andreas; Vainer, Ben

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the impact of positive surgical margins (PSMs), stratified by location and extension, on biochemical outcome after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included data from 605 consecutive patients treated with RRP for lo...

  3. Cystectomy with orthotopic reconstruction following radical retropubic prostatectomy

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    Ari Miotto Jr

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of infiltrative bladder carcinoma in patients previously treated with radical prostatectomy due to prostate adenocarcinoma represents a challenging perspective. Radical cystectomy remains the best option for invasive bladder cancer, however, there are few reports about the best approach to such individuals. Nevertheless, despite possible technical difficulties found during surgery, the orthotopic urinary shunt is a reasonable option in selected cases.

  4. Morbidity of laparoscopic extraperitoneal versus transperitoneal radical prostatectomy verus open retropubic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remzi, M; Klingler, H C; Tinzl, M V; Fong, Y K; Lodde, M; Kiss, B; Marberger, M

    2005-07-01

    Morbidity and postoperative pain after extraperitoneal (E-LRPE) and transperitoneal (T-LRPE) laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was compared to open extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (O-RPE). Between January 2002 and October 2003, we evaluated 41 E-LRPE, 39 T-LRPE and 41 O-RPE prospectively. All operations were performed as standard procedures by the same group of surgeons and perioperative results and complications were evaluated. Pain management was performed with tramadol 50-100 mg on demand, and no other form of anaesthesia was given. Postoperative pain was assessed daily in all patients quantifying analgesic requirement and evaluation of Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). All patients had at least a 12 month follow-up. Mean age, prostate volume, PSA and Gleason score were comparable between all three groups (p>0.05). Mean blood loss was lower with laparoscopy (189+/-140 and 290+/-254 ml), as compared to 385+/-410 ml for O-RPE (p=0.002). However, mean operating times were significantly longer in L-TRPE (279+/-70 min) as compared to E-LRPE (217+/-51 min) and O-RPE (195+/-72 min) (ppain (p=0.029) in all groups, especially for T-LRPE (p=0.007). Likewise, increased operating times (>240 min) were associated with increased post-operative pain (p=0.049). Full continence defined as no pads at one year was achieved in 36/41 (88%, E-LRPE) versus 33/39 (85%, T-LRPE) versus 33/41 (81%, O-RPE), respectively (p=0.2). E-LRPE resulted in a significant subjective (VAS Score, ppain reduction compared to T-LRPE, but only in VAS Score compared to O-RPE (p=0.008). Analgetic consumption during first postoperative week was equal in E-LRPE (290 mg) and O-RPE (300 mg) (p=0.550). Shorter operating times, lower urinary leakage rates, lower stricture rates and lower blood loss in E-LRPE compared to T-LRPE are mainly explained due to the long learning curve in LRPE, which we did not overcome yet, and not due to the approach (extraperitoneal versus transperitoneal).

  5. Contemporary open and robotic radical prostatectomy practice patterns among urologists in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, William T; Eastham, James A; Savage, Caroline; Maschino, A C; Laudone, Vincent P; Dechet, Christopher B; Stephenson, Robert A; Scardino, Peter T; Sandhu, Jaspreet S

    2012-06-01

    We describe current trends in robotic and open radical prostatectomy in the United States after examining case logs for American Board of Urology certification. American urologists submit case logs for initial board certification and recertification. We analyzed logs from 2004 to 2010 for trends and used logistic regression to assess the impact of urologist age on robotic radical prostatectomy use. A total of 4,709 urologists submitted case logs for certification between 2004 and 2010. Of these logs 3,374 included 1 or more radical prostatectomy cases. Of the urologists 2,413 (72%) reported performing open radical prostatectomy only while 961 (28%) reported 1 or more robotic radical prostatectomies and 308 (9%) reported robotic radical prostatectomy only. During this 7-year period we observed a large increase in the number of urologists who performed robotic radical prostatectomy and a smaller corresponding decrease in those who performed open radical prostatectomy. Only 8% of patients were treated with robotic radical prostatectomy by urologists who were certified in 2004 while 67% underwent that procedure in 2010. Median age of urologists who exclusively performed open radical prostatectomy was 43 years (IQR 38-51) vs 41 (IQR 35-46) for those who performed only robotic radical prostatectomy. While the rate was not as high as the greater than 85% industry estimate, 67% of radical prostatectomies were done robotically among urologists who underwent board certification or recertification in 2010. Total radical prostatectomy volume almost doubled during the study period. These data provide nonindustry based estimates of current radical prostatectomy practice patterns and further our understanding of the evolving surgical treatment of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Initial consecutive 125 cases of robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy performed in Ireland's first robotic radical prostatectomy centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bouchier-Hayes, D M

    2012-03-01

    We examined the patient characteristics, operative proceedings and the outcomes of the initial series of 125 cases of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) in an independent hospital in Ireland, performed by two surgeons using the da Vinci(®) surgical system.

  7. Robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: a different treatment for prostate cancer?

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    Alexandre Den Julio

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the Health Care System in Brazil, a developing country,and public healthcare policies, robotic surgery is a reality to veryfew citizens. Therefore, robotic assisted radical prostatectomy isfar removed from the daily practice of the vast majority of Brazilianurologists. Scientific evidence of the superiority of robotic assistedradical prostatectomy does not presently justify public investmentsfor widespread development of robotic centers. Maybe over timeand with reductions in costs, robotic technology will become amore established practice, as observed in other countries, and morefeasible for the Brazilian urological community.

  8. Erectile dysfunction in robotic radical prostatectomy: Outcomes and management

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    Patrick Whelan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP has emerged as the most common treatment for localized prostate cancer. With improved surgical precision, RALP has produced hope of improved potency rates, especially with the advent of nerve-sparing and other modified techniques. However, erectile dysfunction (ED remains a significant problem for many men regardless of surgical technique. To identify the functional outcomes of robotic versus open and laparoscopic techniques, new robotic surgical techniques and current treatment options of ED following RALP. A Medline search was performed in March 2014 to identify studies comparing RALP with open retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, modified RALP techniques and treatment options and management for ED following radical prostatectomy. RALP demonstrates adequate potency rates without compromising oncologic benefit, with observed benefit for potency rates compared with RRP. Additionally, specific surgical technical modifications appear to provide benefit over traditional RALP. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5I demonstrate benefit for ED treatment compared with placebo. However, long-term benefit is often lost after use. Other therapies have been less extensively studied. Additionally, correct patient identification is important for greatest clinical benefit. RALP appears to provide beneficial potency rates compared with RRP; however, these effects are most pronounced at high-volume centers with experienced surgeons. No optimal rehabilitation program with PDE5Is has been identified based on current data. Additionally, vacuum erection devices, intracavernosal injections and other techniques have not been well validated for post RALP ED treatment.

  9. [Relationship between tumor volume and PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Momose, Akishi; Okamoto, Akiko; Yamamoto, Hayato; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Iwabuchi, Ikuya; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Kamimura, Noritaka; Ohyama, Chikara

    2010-02-01

    We examined whether the tumor volume (TV) is a good predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Data were collected for 158 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy without neoadjuvant hormonal therapy in our hospital since April 2005 to September 2007. Along with the routine pathological assessment, TV was assessed in all prostatectomy specimens. PSA recurrence was defined as PSA levels of greater than 0.2 ng/ml. The TVs were 1.81+/-1.66 ml (mean +/-SD) ranging from 0.02 to 8.20 ml. The TV in cT1c was 1.77+/-1.64, and 1.89+/-1.72 ml in cT2 (not significant). Significant differences were observed between TV and pT. The TVs in pT2a, pT2b and pT3/4 were 0.54+/-0.54, 1.63+/-1.47 and 2.67+/-1.80 ml, respectively. The median follow-up period was 32.3 months (range from 15 to 45) after radical prostatectomy, and PSA recurrence was observed in 32 cases. Patients with smaller TV (TV TV (TV > or = 1.3 ml, 66.7%) with a significant difference atp TV, pT, Gleason Score (GS), and surgical margins. Significant differences were observed for GS, and surgical margins, but not for TV. Clinically organ-confined disease in Japanese patients with prostate cancer included various cancers from clinically insignificant to locally advanced ones. In our series, TV was not regarded as a predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

  10. Effects of Biofeedback in Preventing Urinary Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

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    Fabiana S. B. Perez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a biofeedback method for the strengthening of perineal muscles during the preoperative procedures for radical prostatectomy, and we evaluate this technique as a prevention measure against complications such as urinary incontinence (UI and erectile dysfunction (ED, which affect prostatectomy patients after surgery. In the experimental protocol, the patients performed specific exercises with the help of a device that provided the patient with visual biofeedback, based on a plot of the anal pressure. For the experimental protocol, we selected 20 male patients, with an average age of 64.0 years, and submitted them to ten therapeutic sessions each. A control group consisting of 32 men with an average age of 66.3 years, who were treated with the same surgical procedure but not with the preoperative procedures, also took part in the experiment. To evaluate UI and ED after the surgery in both control and experimental groups, we used two validated questionnaires—to assess UI, we used the King’s Health Questionnaire (KHQ and, for ED, we used the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5 Questionnaire. We compared the variables associated with UI and ED after the surgery for the control and experimental groups. The occurrence of UI after radical prostatectomy in the control group (100% of the patients was higher than that for the experimental group (5% of the patients, with p < 0.0001. Likewise, the occurrence of erectile dysfunction after prostatectomy in the control group (48.6% of the patients was higher than that for the experimental group (5% of the patients, with p < 0.0001. The number of nocturia events also decreased as a consequence of the intervention (p < 0.0001, as did the number of disposable underwear units for urinary incontinence (p < 0.0001. Furthermore, we compared, only for the experimental group, the anal pressure before the biofeedback intervention and after the surgery, and we

  11. Blunt apical dissection during anatomic radical retropubic prostatectomy

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    Yacoub Saif

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meticulous apical dissection during a radical prostatectomy is imperative to achieve desirable pathologic and quality of life outcomes. Findings We describe a novel technique using careful blunt dissection to better delineate the apex of the prostate, providing a simple means to potentially lessen positive surgical margins at the apex and promote better continence and erectile function in men undergoing an anatomic radical prostatectomy. Median operative time and blood loss were 190 minutes and 675 mL, respectively. Only 10 percent of the patients with positive surgical margins were found to have apical positive surgical margins. Ninety-three percent of patients reported no urinary leakage. Conclusion We believe our technique of isolating the DVC with blunt dissection and then ligating and transecting the DVC to be feasible approach that requires larger studies to truly confirm its utility.

  12. Consumerism and its impact on robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Sultan; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2011-12-01

    • Many experts consider that media coverage, marketing and/or direct-to-consumer advertising, particularly Internet-based forms, are fundamental to the widespread adoption of robotic-assisted prostatectomy (RARP). However, this has not been explored previously. • The primary objective of the present study was to delineate the role of media coverage and marketing of RARP on the Internet, whereas the secondary goal focused on website quality with respect to the presentation of prostatectomy. • Website content was evaluated for direct-to-consumer advertising after the retrieval of the first 50 websites using Google and Yahoo for each of the terms: 'robotic prostatectomy, laparoscopic prostatectomy (LP) and open radical prostatectomy (ORP)'. • A linear regression analysis was performed for the annual number of Internet news hits over the last decade for each procedure. Website quality assessment was performed using WHO Honesty on the Internet (HON) code principles. • Of the retrieved sites, the proportion containing direct-to-consumer advertising for RARP vs LP vs ORP using Google was 64% vs 14% vs 0%, respectively (P 0.05). • Media coverage and marketing of RARP on the Internet is more widespread compared to LP and ORP. • Disturbingly, the quality of websites using any technique for prostatectomy was of poor quality when using principles of honest information presenting and such findings need to be discussed with respect to obtaining informed consent from patients. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  13. Dynamic MRI evaluation of urethral hypermobility post-radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suskind, Anne M; DeLancey, John O L; Hussain, Hero K; Montgomery, Jeffrey S; Latini, Jerilyn M; Cameron, Anne P

    2014-03-01

    One postulated cause of post-prostatectomy incontinence is urethral and bladder neck hypermobility. The objective of this study was to determine the magnitude of anatomical differences of urethral and bladder neck position at rest and with valsalva in continent and incontinent men post-prostatectomy based on dynamic MRI. All subjects underwent a dynamic MRI protocol with valsalva and non-valsalva images and a standard urodynamic evaluation. MRI measurements were taken at rest and with valsalva, including (1) bladder neck to sacrococcygeal inferior pubic point line (SCIPP), (2) urethra to pubis, and (3) bulbar urethra to SCIPP. Data were analyzed in SAS using two-tailed t tests. A total of 21 subjects (13 incontinent and 8 continent) had complete data and were included in the final analysis. The two groups had similar demographic characteristics. On MRI, there were no statistically significant differences in anatomic position of the bladder neck or urethra either at rest or with valsalva. The amount of hypermobility ranged from 0.8 to 2 mm in all measures. There were also no differences in the amount of hypermobility (position at rest minus position at valsalva) between groups. We found no statistically significant differences in bladder neck and urethral position or mobility on dynamic MRI evaluation between continent and incontinent men status post-radical prostatectomy. A more complex mechanism for post-prostatectomy incontinence needs to be modeled in order to better understand the continence mechanism in this select group of men. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. HYDRODISSECTION FOR PRESERVATION OF NEUROVASCULAR BUNDLE DURING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    H. S. Gevorgyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy is one of the high-tech operations in urology, and the challenge of the surgeon is not only to remove the prostate tumor, but also to provide a high quality of life. The fact that most questions devoted from patients in a conversation with the surgeon before the operation are devoted to this issue, shows the importance and relevance. At present, the diagnostic methods allow significantly more likely to detect early  prostate cancer, making finding and treatment of these patients more affordable and allows to apply this operation.Lately, it seems urgent to explore the possibility of water jet dissection in the field of urology, in particular, for nerve-sparing prostatectomy. Preservation of erectile function depends largely on the quality of separating the neurovascular bundle. Standard use of electrocautery is associated with damage to the neurovascular bundle.  When performing operations using water-jet mobilization of prostate the selective dissection of tissue is performed. This avoids injury of neurovascular bundle and further postoperative complications. The use of this technique may allow the surgeon to provide a more accurate mobilization prostate and selectively controlled intersection vessels heading to the prostate from the neurovascular bundle, reduce intraoperative blood loss,  maintaining continence, erectile function.This literature review is considered by the experience of using nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy using a water-jet dissector, estimated intraoperative parameters using this method.However, we have the lack of extensive research capabilities of this technique when performing nerve-preserving radical prostatectomy, that does not allow to make a comprehensive presentation on the benefits of this technique and its effects on erectile function and quality of urination, further study of this issue in such a difficult category of patients.

  15. Management of erectile dysfunction post-radical prostatectomy

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    Saleh A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Alan Saleh, Hamid Abboudi, MB Ghazal-Aswad, Erik K Mayer, Justin A Vale Division of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Radical prostatectomy is a commonly performed procedure for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. One of the long-term complications is erectile dysfunction. There is little consensus on the optimal management; however, it is agreed that treatment must be prompt to prevent fibrosis and increase oxygenation of penile tissue. It is vital that patient expectations are discussed, a realistic time frame of treatment provided, and treatment started as close to the prostatectomy as possible. Current treatment regimens rely on phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors as a first-line therapy, with vacuum erection devices and intraurethral suppositories of alprostadil as possible treatment combination options. With nonresponders to these therapies, intracavernosal injections are resorted to. As a final measure, patients undergo the highly invasive penile prosthesis implantation. There is no uniform, objective treatment program for erectile dysfunction post-radical prostatectomy. Management plans are based on poorly conducted and often underpowered studies in combination with physician and patient preferences. They involve the aforementioned drugs and treatment methods in different sequences and doses. Prospective treatments include dietary supplements and gene therapy, which have shown promise with there proposed mechanisms of improving erectile function but are yet to be applied successfully in human patients. Keywords: erectile dysfunction, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, vacuum erection devices, intraurethral suppositories, intracavernosal injections

  16. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Brazil: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Roberto Colombo Junior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the initial experience on robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Brazil. Methods: From March 2008 to March 2009, a hundred patients were treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Patient’s demographic data, as well as perioperative results of the procedures, are described in this study. Rresults: Patients’ mean age and mean PSA were 58 years and 7.58 ng/ml, respectively. All procedures were performed through transperitoneal approach, with a mean bleeding of 480 mL and surgical time of 298 minutes. A surgical margin affected by cancer was present in 16% of the cases. There were four complications: bleeding requiring transfusion (two cases, rectal perforation corrected on the spot and inadequate functioning of the robot. There was no conversion to another access or obit occurrences in this caseload. Cconclusions: Robot-assisted prostatectomy is a reality in Brazil and the results herein presented demonstrate that this procedure can be safely performed. Long-term follow-up is still necessary to assess the oncological and functional outcomes.

  17. Learning curve of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for a single experienced surgeon: comparison with simultaneous laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Ja Yoon; Ha, Hong Koo

    2015-04-01

    Despite the large number of analytical reports regarding the learning curve in the transition from open to robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), few comparative results with laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) have been reported. Thus, we evaluated operative and postoperative outcomes in RARP versus 100 simultaneously performed LRPs. A single surgeon had performed more than 1,000 laparoscopic operations, including 415 cases of radical nephrectomy, 85 radical cystectomies, 369 radical prostatectomies, and treatment of 212 other urological tumors, since 2009. We evaluated operative (operation time, intraoperative transfusion, complications, hospital stay, margin status, pathological stage, Gleason score) and postoperative (continence and erectile function) parameters in initial cases of RARP without tutoring compared with 100 recently performed LRPs. Mean operation time and length of hospital stay for RARP and LRP were 145.5±43.6 minutes and 118.1±39.1 minutes, and 6.4±0.9 days and 6.6±1.1 days, respectively (p=0.003 and p=0.721). After 17 cases, the mean operation time for RARP was similar to LRP (less than 2 hours). Positive surgical margins in localized cancer were seen in 11.1% and 8.9% of cases in RARP and LRP, respectively (p=0.733). At postoperative 3 months, sexual intercourse was reported in 14.0% and 12.0%, and pad-free continence in 96.0% and 81.0% in patients with RARP and LRP, respectively (p=0.796 and p=0.012). Previous large-volume experience of LRPs may shorten the learning curve for RARP in terms of oncological outcome. Additionally, previous experience with laparoscopy may improve the functional outcomes of RARP.

  18. TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR EARLY CONTINENCE RECOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Perepechay

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the technical characteristics of radical prostatectomy (RPE for early continence recovery in patients with prostate cancer. Restoration of the fascial structures of the small pelvis after RPE has been found to promote early urinary continence recovery. A method for total restoration of the fascial structures of the small pelvis (an operation after A. Tewari and a procedure for performing posterior suspension of urethrocystic neoanastomosis in Denonvilliers’ fascia length deficit are considered, which show the similar results in the time of continence recovery.

  19. Quality of life in patients submitted to radical prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Débora Moura Miranda Goluart; Mário Alfredo Silveira Miranzi; Paulo Eduardo Nunes Goulart

    2014-01-01

    A cross-sectional study with a descriptive analysis of 81 patients submitted to radical prostatectomy (RP). Our objective was to correlate quality of life (QL) according to the EORTC-QLQ C30 with age group and time after surgery. Mean age was 65.7 years. Most sought the care of urology, asymptomatic. Some referred former smoking (49.9%) and high blood pressure (53.1%). Mean preoperative SBP was 8.4 ng/ml. Most participants were in stages T2c to T3, Gleason ?6 and over a year after surgery. Er...

  20. Peri-operative comparison between daVinci-assisted radical prostatectomy and open radical prostatectomy in obese patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Carter Q.; Ho, Khai-Linh V.; Slezak, Jeffrey M.; Blute, Michael L.; Gettman, Matthew T.

    2007-02-01

    Introduction: While the effects of increasing body mass index on prostate cancer epidemiology and surgical approach have recently been studied, its effects on surgical outcomes are less clear. We studied the perioperative outcomes of obese (BMI >= 30) men treated with daVinci-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (DLP) and compared them to those treated with open radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) in a contemporary time frame. Method: After Institutional Review Board approval, we used the Mayo Clinic Radical Prostatectomy database to identify patients who had undergone DLP by a single surgeon and those who had undergone open RRP by a single surgeon between December 2002 and March 2005. Baseline demographics, peri- and post-operative courses, and complications were collected by retrospective chart review, and variables from the two cohorts compared using chi-square method and least-squares method of linear regression where appropriate. Results: 59 patients who had DLP and 76 undergoing RRP were available for study. Baseline demographics were not statistically different between the two cohorts. Although DLP had a significantly lower clinical stage than RRP (p=0.02), pathological stage was not statistically different (p=0.10). Transfusion rates, hospital stay, overall complications, and pathological Gleason were also not significantly different, nor were PSA progression, positive margin rate, or continence at 1 year. After bilateral nerve-sparing, erections suitable for intercourse with or without therapy at 1 year was 88.5% (23/26) for DLP and 61.2% (30/49) for RRP (p=0.01). Follow-up time was similar. Conclusion: For obese patients, DLP appears to have similar perioperative, as well as short-term oncologic and functional outcomes when compared to open RRP.

  1. Biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy: what does it mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourinho-Barbosa, Rafael; Srougi, Victor; Nunes-Silva, Igor; Baghdadi, Mohammed; Rembeyo, Gregory; Eiffel, Sophie S.; Barret, Eric; Rozet, Francois; Galiano, Marc; Cathelineau, Xavier; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Radical prostatectomy (RP) has been used as the main primary treatment for prostate cancer (PCa) for many years with excellent oncologic results. However, approximately 20-40% of those patients has failed to RP and presented biochemical recurrence (BCR). Prostatic specific antigen (PSA) has been the pivotal tool for recurrence diagnosis, but there is no consensus about the best PSA threshold to define BCR until this moment. The natural history of BCR after surgical procedure is highly variable, but it is important to distinguish biochemical and clinical recurrence and to find the correct timing to start multimodal treatment strategy. Also, it is important to understand the role of each clinical and pathological feature of prostate cancer in BCR, progression to metastatic disease and cancer specific mortality (CSM). Review design A simple review was made in Medline for articles written in English language about biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Objective To provide an updated assessment of BCR definition, its meaning, PCa natural history after BCR and the weight of each clinical/pathological feature and risk group classifications in BCR, metastatic disease and CSM. PMID:29039897

  2. Iatrogenic Rectal Injury During Radical Prostatectomy: Is Colostomy Inevitable End?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Topaktas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Radical prostatectomy (RP is the gold standard treatment method for localized prostate cancer, because of its high oncological success. Iatrogenic rectal injury (IRI during RP is rarely seen, but it may causes serious complications because of the close anatomic relationship between the prostate and rectum. Aim is to present our series about management of IRI without colostomy. Material and Method: Between June 1999 and June 2013, radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP was performed to 372 patients by a single surgeon. 10 cases (%2,6 were complicated by a rectal injury during RRP. Instant rectal closure was performed in 3 layers without a diverting colostomy, at the time of surgery. Omental vascular flap was placed between rectum and vesicourethral anastomosis. Results: The clinical stages of IRI cases were T1c, T2a and T2c in 2, 3 and 5 patients, respectively. Their preoperative Gleason scores were 6, 7 and 8 in 3, 5 and 2 patient, respectively. None of the 10 had undergone previous prostatic or rectal surgery, or received preoperative radiotherapy or hormonal therapy. Discussion: Instant diagnosis and rectal wall closures by three layers are essential for successful repair. Our technique seems as a safe, minimal invasive and highly effective option for the management of IRI.

  3. Robots drive the German radical prostatectomy market: a total population analysis from 2006 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeben, C; Koch, R; Baunacke, M; Wirth, M P; Huber, J

    2016-12-01

    To assess trends in the distribution of patients for radical prostatectomy in Germany from 2006 to 2013 and the impact of robotic surgery on annual caseloads. We hypothesized that the advent of robotics and the establishment of certified prostate cancer centers caused centralization in the German radical prostatectomy market. Using remote data processing we analyzed the nationwide German billing data from 2006 to 2013. We supplemented this database with additional hospital characteristics like the prostate cancer center certification status. Inclusion criteria were a prostate cancer diagnosis combined with radical prostatectomy. Hospitals with certification or a surgical robot in 2009 were defined as 'early' group. Linear covariant-analytic models were applied to describe trends over time. Annual radical prostatectomy numbers declined from 28 374 (2006) to 21 850 (2013). High-volume hospitals (⩾100 cases) decreased from 87 (22.0%) in 2006 to 43 (10.4%) in 2013. Low-volume hospitals (200 cases per year contrary to the overall trend (Pdecentralization of radical prostatectomy in Germany. The driving force for this development might consist in the overall decline of radical prostatectomy numbers. The most important factor for achieving higher caseloads was the presence of a robotic system. In order to optimize outcomes of radical prostatectomy additional health policy measures might be necessary.

  4. Anatomic Considerations for Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy in an Achondroplastic Dwarf

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    Dennis Gyomber

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first report of a radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP in an achondroplastic dwarf. We highlight the pelvic anatomy, precluding laparoscopic or robotic prostatectomy, and making open surgery extremely difficult. We review relevant literature regarding general, urological, and orthopedic abnormalities of achondroplasia (ACH and present a clinical case. No reports of RRP in achondroplastic dwarfs exist, with only one case of an abandoned RRP due to similar pelvic anatomy in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta. Significant lumbar lordosis found in ACH results in a short anteroposterior dimension, severely limiting access to the prostate. We present a case of a 62-year-old achondroplastic dwarf who had Gleason 3+4 disease on transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy in four from 12 cores. Surgery was difficult due to narrow anteroposterior pelvic dimension, but achievable. Histological analysis revealed multifocal prostate cancer, with negative surgical margins and no extraprostatic extension. RRP in ACH patients, although possible, should be approached with caution due to the abnormal pelvic dimensions, and discussions regarding potential abandonment of surgery should be included during informed consent. This case highlights the preoperative use of computed tomography to assist in the surgical planning for patients with difficult pelvic anatomy.

  5. Radical prostatectomy in clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    ) is regarded as primary therapy by others. This study examined the outcome for high-risk localized PCa patients treated with RP. Material and methods. Of 1300 patients who underwent RP, 231 were identified as high-risk. Patients were followed for biochemical recurrence (BCR) (defined as prostate-specific......Abstract Objective. The optimal therapeutic strategy for high-risk localized prostate cancer (PCa) is controversial. Supported by randomized trials, the combination of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and endocrine therapy (ET) is advocated by many, while radical prostatectomy (RP...... antigen ≥ 0.2 ng/ml), metastatic disease and survival. Excluding node-positive patients, none of the patients received adjuvant therapy before BCR was confirmed. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard models. Results. Median follow-up was 4.4 years...

  6. Literature review of factors affecting continence after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalibor Pacik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy (RP is the most common cause of stress urinary incontinence (UI in men. Several anatomic structures affect or may affect urinary continence - urethral sphincter, levator ani muscle, puboprostatic ligaments, bladder neck, endopelvic fascia, neurovascular bundle - and understanding of the anatomy of pelvic floor and urethra is crucial for satisfactory functional outcome of the procedure. Surgical techniques implemented to improve continence rates include nerve-sparing procedure, bladder neck preservation/plication, urethral length preservation, musculofascial reconstruction, puboprostatic ligaments preservation or seminal vesicle preservation. Perioperative (preoperative and postoperative pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT aims to shorten the duration of postoperative UI and thus, improve early continence rates postoperatively. In the review, complex information regarding anatomical, intra- and perioperative factors affecting urinary continence after RP is provided, including description of important anatomical structures, possible implications for surgical technique and evaluation of different PFMT strategies in perioperative period.

  7. Advances in Robotic-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma F. P. Jacobs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP, robotics has become increasingly more commonplace in the armamentarium of the urologic surgeon. Robotic utilization has exploded across surgical disciplines well beyond the fields of urology and prostate surgery. The literature detailing technical steps, comparison of large surgical series, and even robotically focused randomized control trials are available for review. RALP, the first robot-assisted surgical procedure to achieve widespread use, has recently become the primary approach for the surgical management of localized prostate cancer. As a result, surgeons are constantly trying to refine and improve upon current technical aspects of the operation. Recent areas of published modifications include bladder neck anastomosis and reconstruction, bladder drainage, nerve sparing approaches and techniques, and perioperative and postoperative management including penile rehabilitation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in perioperative management and surgical technique for RALP.

  8. Radical prostatectomy, sparing of the seminal vesicles, and painful orgasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogorovich, Andrea; Nilsson, Andreas E; Tyritzis, Stavros I; Carlsson, Stefan; Jonsson, Martin; Haendler, Leif; Nyberg, Tommy; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, N Peter

    2013-05-01

    Erectile dysfunction has been widely investigated as the major factor responsible for sexual bother in patients after radical prostatectomy (RP); painful orgasm (PO) is one element of this bother, but little is known about its prevalence and its effects on sexual health. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of PO and to identify potential risk factors. A total of 1,411 consecutive patients underwent open (radical retropubic prostatectomy) or robot-assisted laparoscopic RP between 2002 and 2006. The patients were asked to complete a study-specific questionnaire. Of a total of 145 questions, 5 dealt with the orgasmic characteristics. The questionnaire was also administered to a comparison group of 442 persons, matched for age and area of residency. The response rate was 91% (1,288 patients). A total of 143 (11%) patients reported PO. Among the 834 men being able to have an orgasm, the prevalence was 18% vs. 6% in the comparison group (relative risk [RR] 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7-4.5). When analyzed as independent variables, bilateral seminal vesicle (SV)-sparing approach (RR 2.33, 95% CI 1.0-5.3, P = 0.045) and age <60 years were significantly related to the presence of PO (95% CI 0.5-0.9, P = 0.019). After adjustment for age, bilateral SV-sparing still remained a significant predictor for occurrence of PO. We found that PO occurs significantly more often in patients undergoing bilateral SV-sparing RP when compared with age-matched comparison population. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  9. Outcome of Robotic Radical Prostatectomy in Men Over 74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubrig, Burkhard; Boy, Anselm; Heiland, Markus; Roosen, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    We set out to evaluate outcomes in patients over 74 after robotic radical prostatectomy. Six hundred forty-seven patients over 74 (≥75) were analyzed for preoperative factors (body mass index [BMI], American Society of Anestesiologists classification [ASA], prostate-specific antigen [PSA], International prostate symptome score [IPSS], International index of erectile function [IIEF]), operative and perioperative characteristics (technique, erythrocyte conc., complications), and histopathological results. After 12 months, following items were assessed: PSA, frequency of urine loss, number of pads used (including safety), incontinence at night, and potency as quantified by IIEF-5. Mean age in the group Clavien-Dindo III) were found in 1.6% vs. 1.3% (≥75) of cases. Minor complications were encountered in 22.8% vs. 26.3% (≥75). There was a remarkably high percentage of locally advanced disease (73.3% vs. 71.0%) in both groups. Patients ≥75 showed a tendency toward more aggressive cancer and more frequent nodal involvement; we found a higher percentage of R1-resections (19.5% vs. 30.4%, p < 0.05) and PSA relapse after 1 year (12.3% vs. 22.8%, p < 0.05). Twelve months pad-free continence rate (69.9% vs. 63.2%) showed no statistically significant difference between both groups as did the preservation rate of erectile function. We could show that robotic prostatectomy can be carried out safely with good functional and histopathological results in patients ≥75. It is therefore questionable if elderly patients can be precluded from curative radical treatment solely because of their age.

  10. A new nomogram to predict pathologic outcome following radical prostatectomy

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    Alexandre Crippa

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop a preoperative nomogram to predict pathologic outcome in patients submitted to radical prostatectomy for clinical localized prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine hundred and sixty patients with clinical stage T1 and T2 prostate cancer were evaluated following radical prostatectomy, and 898 were included in the study. Following a multivariate analysis, nomograms were developed incorporating serum PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and percentage of positive biopsy cores in order to predict the risks of extraprostatic tumor extension, and seminal vesicle involvement. RESULTS: In univariate analysis there was a significant association between percentage of positive biopsy cores (p < 0.001, serum PSA (p = 0.001 and biopsy Gleason score (p < 0.001 with extraprostatic tumor extension. A similar pathologic outcome was seen among tumors with Gleason score 7, and Gleason score 8 to 10. In multivariate analysis, the 3 preoperative variables showed independent significance to predict tumor extension. This allowed the development of nomogram-1 (using Gleason scores in 3 categories - 2 to 6, 7 and 8 to 10 and nomogram-2 (using Gleason scores in 2 categories - 2 to 6 and 7 to 10 to predict disease extension based on these 3 parameters. In the validation analysis, 87% and 91.1% of the time the nomograms-1 and 2, correctly predicted the probability of a pathological stage to within 10% respectively. CONCLUSION: Incorporating percent of positive biopsy cores to a nomogram that includes preoperative serum PSA and biopsy Gleason score, can accurately predict the presence of extraprostatic disease extension in patients with clinical localized prostate cancer.

  11. Outcomes after radical prostatectomy in the PSA era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardino, Peter T.

    1996-01-01

    This year 317,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 41,400 will die of this disease. Prostate cancer will kill nearly 1 million men alive today who are now over 50 years old. Since the mortality rate from prostate cancer increases more rapidly with age than any other cancer, and the most rapidly growing segment of the population is those > 80 years old, and mortality from other causes is declining, the number of deaths from prostate cancer is expected to increase inexorably for many years. Among the clinical prognostic factors that have been established as important predictors of the natural history of prostate cancer in conservatively treated patients, none is more important than the grade of the tumor. A similar influence of grade has been reported in patients treated surgically. At Baylor we assessed a variety of clinical prognostic factors in 728 men treated with radical prostatectomy and followed with serial PSA levels with no other therapy before proven recurrence of the cancer. While a variety of factors were significant in univariate analyses, in multivariate analysis only grade and serum PSA levels were significant clinical prognostic factors. Once the prostate was removed and pathologic information was available, however, pathologic stage became the most important factor (especially seminal vesicle or lymph node involvement), but Gleason grade was also a powerful independent factor. Surgical margin status and the presence of extracapsular extension were also independent predictors of recurrence, but total tumor volume added little additional information. Once the pathological information is available, none of the prognostic factors known before the operation, including PSA, PSA density, and clinical, have any independent power to predict prognosis. While radical prostatectomy may carry greater risk of complications than radiotherapy, its major advantage is the high probability that the cancer can be completely eradicated, especially if it is

  12. Risk of incisional hernia after minimally invasive and open radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Sigrid V; Ehdaie, Behfar; Atoria, Coral L; Elkin, Elena B; Eastham, James A

    2013-11-01

    The number of radical prostatectomies has increased. Many urologists have shifted from the open surgical approach to minimally invasive techniques. It is not clear whether the risk of post-prostatectomy incisional hernia varies by surgical approach. In the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data set we identified men 66 years old or older who were treated with minimally invasive or open radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer diagnosed from 2003 to 2007. The main study outcome was incisional hernia repair, as identified in Medicare claims after prostatectomy. We also examined the frequency of umbilical, inguinal and other hernia repairs. We identified 3,199 and 6,795 patients who underwent minimally invasive and open radical prostatectomy, respectively. The frequency of incisional hernia repair was 5.3% at a median 3.1-year followup in the minimally invasive group and 1.9% at a 4.4-year median followup in the open group, corresponding to an incidence rate of 16.1 and 4.5/1,000 person-years, respectively. Compared to the open technique, the minimally invasive procedure was associated with more than a threefold increased risk of incisional hernia repair when controlling for patient and disease characteristics (adjusted HR 3.39, 95% CI 2.63-4.38, p<0.0001). Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy was associated with an attenuated but increased risk of any hernia repair compared with open radical prostatectomy (adjusted HR 1.48, 95% CI 1.29-1.70, p<0.0001). Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy was associated with a significantly increased risk of incisional hernia compared with open radical prostatectomy. This is a potentially remediable complication of prostate cancer surgery that warrants increased vigilance with respect to surgical technique. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy has lower biochemical recurrence than laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon Heui Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the effectiveness and safety of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP versus laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP in the treatment of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Existing systematic reviews were updated to investigate the effectiveness and safety of RARP. Electronic databases, including Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, the Cochrane Library, KoreaMed, Kmbase, and others, were searched through July 2014. The quality of the selected systematic reviews was assessed by using the revised assessment of multiple systematic reviews (R-Amstar and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Meta-analysis was performed by using Revman 5.2 (Cochrane Community and Comprehensive Meta-Analysis 2.0 (CMA; Biostat. Cochrane Q and I2 statistics were used to assess heterogeneity. Results: Two systematic reviews and 16 additional studies were selected from a search performed of existing systematic reviews. These included 2 randomized controlled clinical trials and 28 nonrandomized comparative studies. The risk of complications, such as injury to organs by the Clavien-Dindo classification, was lower with RARP than with LRP (relative risk [RR], 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23–0.85; p=0.01. The risk of urinary incontinence was lower (RR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.31–0.60; p<0.000001 and the potency rate was significantly higher with RARP than with LRP (RR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.11–1.70; I2 =78%; p=0.003. Regarding positive surgical margins, no significant difference in risk between the 2 groups was observed; however, the biochemical recurrence rate was lower after RARP than after LRP (RR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.48–0.73; I2 =21%; p<0.00001. Conclusions: RARP appears to be a safe and effective technique compared with LRP with a lower complication rate, better potency, a higher continence rate, and a decreased rate of biochemical recurrence.

  14. Prevalence and Predicting Factors for Commonly Neglected Sexual Side Effects to Radical Prostatectomies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anders; Sønksen, Jens; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Altered perception of orgasm, orgasm-associated pain, penile sensory changes, urinary incontinence (UI) during sexual activity, penile shortening (PS), and penile deformity following radical prostatectomy (RP) have received increasing attention from researchers. AIM: The aim...

  15. Radical prostatectomy: evolution of surgical technique from the laparoscopic point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Cathelineau

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To review the literature and present a current picture of the evolution in radical prostatectomy from the laparoscopic point of view. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted an extensive Medline literature search. Articles obtained regarding laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP and our experience at Institut Montsouris were used for reassessing anatomical and technical issues in radical prostatectomy. RESULTS: LRP nuances were reassessed by surgical teams in order to verify possible weaknesses in their performance. Our basic approach was to carefully study the anatomy and pioneer open surgery descriptions in order to standardized and master a technique. The learning curve is presented in terms of an objective evaluation of outcomes for cancer control and functional results. In terms of technique-outcomes, there are several key elements in radical prostatectomy, such as dorsal vein control-apex exposure and nerve sparing with particular implications in oncological and functional results. Major variations among the surgical teams' performance and follow-up prevented objective comparisons in radical prostatectomy. The remarkable evolution of LRP needs to be supported by comprehensive results. CONCLUSIONS: Radical prostatectomy is a complex surgical operation with difficult objectives. Surgical technique should be standardized in order to allow an adequate and reliable performance in all settings, keeping in mind that cancer control remains the primary objective. Reassessing anatomy and a return to basics in surgical technique is the means to improve outcomes and overcome the difficult task of the learning curve, especially in minimally access urological surgery.

  16. Prognostic significance of lymphovascular invasion in radical prostatectomy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, David S; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Lowrance, William T; Maschino, Alexandra C; Savage, Caroline J; Cronin, Angel M; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2011-08-01

    Study Type - Prognosis (case series). 4. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The reported incidence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) in radical prostatectomy specimens ranges from 5% to 53%. Although LVI has a strong and significant association with adverse clinicopathologic features, it has almost uniformly not been found to be a predictor of biochemical recurrence (BR) on multivariate analysis. This study confirms that LVI is associated with features of aggressive disease and is an independent predictor of BCR. Given that LVI may play a role in the metastatic process, it may be useful in clinical decision-making regarding adjuvant therapy for patients treated with RP. To determine whether lymphovascular invasion (LVI) in radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens has prognostic significance. The study examined whether LVI is associated with clinicopathological characteristics and biochemical recurrence (BCR). LVI was evaluated based on routine pathology reports on 1298 patients treated with RP for clinically localized prostate cancer between 2004 and 2007. LVI was defined as the unequivocal presence of tumour cells within an endothelium-lined space. The association between LVI and clinicopathological features was assessed with univariate logistic regression. Cox regression was used to test the association between LVI and BCR. LVI was identified in 10% (129/1298) of patients. The presence of LVI increased with advancing pathological stage: 2% (20/820) in pT2N0 patients, 16% (58/363) in pT3N0 patients and 17% (2/12) in pT4N0 patients; and was highest in patients with pN1 disease (52%; 49/94). Univariate analysis showed an association between LVI and higher preoperative prostate-specific antigen levels and Gleason scores, and a greater likelihood of extraprostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node metastasis and positive surgical margins (all P < 0.001). With a median follow-up of 27 months, LVI was significantly associated with an

  17. Single plus one port robotic radical prostatectomy (SPORP; Initial experience

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    Volkan Tugcu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This article reports on patients with early stage prostate cancer treated with single plus one port robotic radical prostatectomy (SPORP. Materials and methods: Since January 2014, we performed SPORP in 8 patients with localized prostate cancer. Age of patients, clinical stage, operation time, intraoperative and postoperative complications, blood loss, histopathological evaluation, postoperative continence, serum level of PSA were evaluated. Results: Mean age of the 8 patients was 59.85 years. All operations were completed without conversion to standard robotic procedure or open surgery. No intra operative complications occurred. Mean operating time was 143 minutes; prostate excision 123 minutes and urethrovesical anastomosis 20 minutes. Mean blood loss was 45 ml. Preoperative Gleason scores were (3 + 4 in one patient and (3 + 3 in 7 patients. Postoperative Gleason scores were (3 + 4 in 2 patients, and (3 + 3 in 6 patients. All these 8 cases were in T1c clinical stage. Early postoperative complications were drain leakage (n = 1, atelectasis (n = 1, wound infection (n = 1 and fever (n = 1. There was no positive surgical margin. The serum level of PSA was less than 0.2 ng/ml and no other complications happened during the 4 to 12 months follow-up period. Postoperative continence and cosmetic results were excellent. Conclusions: It is relatively easy for urologists who are skilled in traditional laparoscopic and robotic surgeries to master SPORP. However long-term outcomes of this surgery need further investigations.

  18. Open radical prostatectomy after transurethral resection: perioperative, functional, oncologic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkoulis, Charalampos; Pappas, Athanasios; Theocharis, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Stathouros, Georgios; Ntoumas, Konstantinos

    2018-04-01

    To demonstrate any differences in the perioperative, functional and oncologic outcomes after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) among those patients having previously performed transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) and those not. A total of 35 patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer (T1a and T1b) after TURP, underwent RRP and completed a 1 year follow up (group A). They were matched with a cohort of another 35 men (group B) in terms of age, body mass index (BMI), prostatic specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, prostate volume (before surgery), pathological stage and neurovascular bundle-sparing technique. That was a retrospective study completed between September 2011 and March 2014. Not a significant difference was demonstrated among the two groups of patients concerning the functional and oncologic results. On the other hand, previous prostate surgery made the operation procedure more demanding. Besides, operative time and blood loss (though not translated in transfusion rates) were higher among patients in group A. Besides, catheter removal in group A patients was performed later than their counterparts of group B. RRP after TURP is a relatively safe procedure and in the hands of experienced surgeons, a previously performed TURP, does not seem to compromise oncologic outcomes of the operation. Continence is preserved, though erectile function seems to be compromised compared with patients undergoing RRP without prior TURP. Moreover, defining the prostate and bladder neck margins can be challenging and the surgeon has to be aware of the difficulties that might confront.

  19. Radical prostatectomy for high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yossepowitch, Ofer; Eastham, James A

    2008-06-01

    Consensus recommendations for the identification and treatment of men whose apparent organ confined prostate cancer has high risk features are lacking. Despite ongoing refinements in surgical technique and improvements in morbidity and functional outcomes, the tradition of steering high-risk patients away from radical prostatectomy (RP) remains steadfast. We performed a medical literature search in English using MEDLINE/PubMed that addressed high risk prostate cancer. We analyzed the literature with respect to the historical evolution of this concept, current risk stratification schemes and treatment guidelines and related short and long term outcomes following RP. Contemporary evidence suggest that patients classified with high-risk prostate cancer by commonly used definitions do not have a uniformly poor prognosis after RP. Many cancers categorized clinically as high risk are actually pathologically confined to the prostate, and most men with such cancers who undergo RP are alive and free of additional therapy long after surgery. RP in the high-risk setting appears to be associated with a similar morbidity as in lower-risk patients. Men with clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer should not be categorically disqualified from local definitive therapy with RP. With careful attention to surgical technique, cancer control rates should improve further, and adverse effects on quality of life after RP should continue to decrease.

  20. Accuracy of post-radiotherapy biopsy before salvage radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Joshua J; Walker, Marc; Bernstein, Melanie; Kent, Matthew; Eastham, James A

    2013-08-01

    To determine whether post-radiotherapy (RT) biopsy (PRB) adequately predicts the presence, location, and histological features of cancer in the salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) specimen. Before salvage treatment, a PRB is required to confirm the presence of locally recurrent or persistent cancer and to determine the extent and location of the prostate cancer. SRP was performed between 1998 and 2011 on 198 patients. All patients underwent a PRB. PRB and SRP specimens were evaluated by a genitourinary pathologist. Patients had external-beam RT alone (EBRT; 71%) or brachytherapy with or without EBRT (29%). Of the men undergoing SRP, 26 (14%) were clinical stage ≥T3, with 13% of PRBs with Gleason score ≥8. Cancer was unilateral in 120 (61%) biopsies, with contralateral or bilateral prostate cancer at SRP in 49%. In the SRP specimen, cancer was multifocal in 57%. Cancer was upgraded at SRP in 58% of men, with 20% having an increase in primary Gleason grade. The accuracy of PRB varied by region from 62% to 76%, with undetected cancers ranging from 12% to 26% and most likely to occur at the mid-gland. Radiation-recurrent prostate cancers were often multifocal, and biopsy missed up to 20% of tumours. More than half of the cancers were upgraded at SRP, and many that were unilateral on PRB were bilateral at SRP. © 2013 BJU International.

  1. Quality of life in patients submitted to radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Moura Miranda Goluart

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study with a descriptive analysis of 81 patients submitted to radical prostatectomy (RP. Our objective was to correlate quality of life (QL according to the EORTC-QLQ C30 with age group and time after surgery. Mean age was 65.7 years. Most sought the care of urology, asymptomatic. Some referred former smoking (49.9% and high blood pressure (53.1%. Mean preoperative SBP was 8.4 ng/ml. Most participants were in stages T2c to T3, Gleason ?6 and over a year after surgery. Erectile dysfunction presented in 90.1%, and urinary incontinence in 33.3%. Functional and overall health scales presented high QL indexes, and symptomatology, with low ones. Older adults presented higher QL regarding emotional functioning, financial difficulties and overall health, as well as those with over a year after surgery, regarding cognitive functioning and fatigue. Although QL was not greatly affected, there were differences between age groups and time after surgery. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i3.21589.

  2. Radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Immediate or early delayed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottke, D.; Bartkowiak, D.; Schrader, M.; Wiegel, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP) is associated with risk indicators, including Gleason score, preoperative PSA level, tumor stage, seminal vesicle invasion, and positive surgical margins. The 5-year biochemical progression rate among predisposed patients is as high as 50-70%. Post-RP treatment options include adjuvant radiotherapy (ART, for men with undetectable PSA) or salvage radiotherapy (SRT, for PSA persisting or re-rising above detection threshold). Presently, there are no published randomized trials evaluating ART vs. SRT directly. Methods: Published data on ART and SRT were reviewed to allow a comparison of the two treatment approaches. Results: Three randomized phase III trials demonstrated an almost 20% absolute benefit for biochemical progression-free survival after ART (60-64 Gy) compared to a 'wait and see' policy. The greatest benefit was achieved in patients with positive margins and pT3 tumors. SRT can be offered to patients with elevated PSA after RP. In 30-70% of SRT patients, PSA will decrease to an undetectable level, thus giving a second curative chance. The rate of side effects for both treatments is comparably low. The role of irradiation of pelvic lymph nodes and the additional use of hormone therapy and radiation dose are discussed. Conclusion: It remains unclear whether early SRT initiated after PSA failure is equivalent to ART. Where SRT is indicated, it should be started as early as possible. (orig.)

  3. Outcomes After Radical Prostatectomy in Men Receiving Prior Pelvic Radiation for Non-Prostate Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Timothy A.; Wedmid, Alexei; Sandhu, Jaspreet S.; Eastham, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Morbidity associated with salvage radical prostatectomy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary radiotherapy is well documented, but little is known about the impact on surgical difficulty and outcomes for radical prostatectomy in men who have had prior pelvic radiotherapy for non-prostate malignancies. We report functional outcomes of 9 patients treated at our institution. Materials and Methods From 1993 to 2007, 9 patients underwent radical prostatectomy following external beam radiotherapy for testicular seminoma (6), anorectal cancer (2), and colon cancer (1). Clinical information was obtained from a prospective prostate cancer database. Results Radical prostatectomy was completed without identifiable injury to adjacent structures in all 9 patients. Four patients had significant pelvic fibrosis, 3 required bilateral neurovascular bundle resection. Neurovascular bundle preservation was performed in the remaining 6 patients, 4 with good preoperative erectile function. However, no patient recovered erectile function postoperatively at a median follow-up time of 75 months (range 12 to 172). Of preoperatively continent men, 57% required ≤1 pad daily and 43% were completely dry, achieving complete urinary control at a median follow-up time of 7.5 months (range 2 to 20). Two patients developed anastomotic stricture, one being associated with concomitant ureteral stricture. Conclusions Radical prostatectomy after pelvic radiotherapy for non-prostate malignancies was not associated with increased intraoperative morbidity. However, rates of anastomotic stricture, erectile dysfunction, and urinary incontinence appear to be higher than those observed after radical prostatectomy in men with no prior radiotherapy and comparable to those seen in the salvage radical prostatectomy setting. PMID:19239447

  4. Systematic Review of Studies Reporting Positive Surgical Margins After Bladder Neck Sparing Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellangino, Mariangela; Verrill, Clare; Leslie, Tom; Bell, Richard W; Hamdy, Freddie C; Lamb, Alastair D

    2017-11-07

    Bladder neck preservation (BNP) during radical prostatectomy (RP) has been proposed as a method to improve early recovery of urinary continence after radical prostatectomy. However, there is concern over a possible increase in the risk of positive surgical margins and prostate cancer recurrence rate. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis reported improved early recovery and overall long-term urinary continence without compromising oncologic control. The aim of our study was to perform a critical review of the literature to assess the impact on bladder neck and base margins after bladder neck sparing radical prostatectomy. We carried out a systematic review of the literature using Pubmed, Scopus and Cochrane library databases in May 2017 using medical subject headings and free-text protocol according to PRISMA guidelines. We used the following search terms: bladder neck preservation, prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy and surgical margins. Studies focusing on positive surgical margins (PSM) in bladder neck sparing RP pertinent to the objective of this review were included. Overall, we found 15 relevant studies reporting overall and site-specific positive surgical margins rate after bladder neck sparing radical prostatectomy. This included two RCTs, seven prospective comparative studies, two retrospective comparative studies and four case series. All studies were published between 1993 and 2015 with sample sizes ranging between 50 and 1067. Surgical approaches included open, laparoscopic and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. The overall and base-specific PSM rates ranged between 7-36% and 0-16.3%, respectively. Mean base PSM was 4.9% in those patients where bladder neck sparing was performed, but only 1.85% in those without sparing. Bladder neck preservation during radical prostatectomy may increase base-positive margins. Further studies are needed to better investigate the impact of this technique on oncological outcomes. A future paradigm could

  5. Trends in radical prostatectomy: centralization, robotics, and access to urologic cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Wong, Yu-Ning; Nielsen, Matthew E; Egleston, Brian L; Uzzo, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    Robotic surgery has been widely adopted for radical prostatectomy. We hypothesized that this change is rapidly shifting procedures away from hospitals that do not offer robotics and consequently increasing patient travel. A population-based observational study of all prostatectomies for cancer in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania from 2000 to 2009 was performed using hospital discharge data. Hospital procedure volume was defined as the number of prostatectomies performed for cancer in a given year. Straight-line travel distance to the treating hospital was calculated for each case. Hospitals were contacted to determine the year of acquisition of the first robot. From 2000 to 2009, the total number of prostatectomies performed annually increased substantially. The increase occurred almost entirely at the very high-volume centers (≥ 106 prostatectomies/year). The number of hospitals performing prostatectomy fell 37% from 2000 to 2009. By 2009, the 9% (21/244) of hospitals that had very high volume performed 57% of all prostatectomies, and the 35% (86/244) of hospitals with a robot performed 85% of all prostatectomies. The median travel distance increased 54% from 2000 to 2009 (Probotic surgery. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  6. Robotic-assisted transperitoneal radical prostatectomy in a patient with pelvic kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabah, Danny M.; Alyami, Fahad A.

    2008-01-01

    Robots are increasingly utilized in urology, due to their favorable performance characteristics especially in prostatectomy and pyeloplasty. However, preoperative diagnosis of urogenital congenital anomalies and preoperative planning are important aspects to be considered. The presence of ectopic pelvic kidney is a challenge for the surgeon to perform robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) without injury to the pelvic kidney (PC) or its blood supply. We report our experience of performing RARP in a patient with a PK. (author)

  7. Clinical outcome of radical prostatectomy for stage C prostate cancer. Comparison with other treatment modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Osamu; Meguro, Norio; Saiki, Shigeru; Kinouchi, Toshiaki; Kuroda, Masao; Usami, Michiyuki; Kotake, Toshihiko

    1997-01-01

    Of the 69 patients with clinical stage C prostate cancer under 75 years old and with good performance status between 1986 and 1995, 29 underwent radical prostatectomy combined with endocrine therapy, 21 underwent radiation therapy combined with endocrine therapy and remaining 19 patients were treated by endocrine therapy alone. The median follow-up was 44 months (range 4 to 122). Radical prostatectomy resulted in progression-free rates of 79% and 61% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Progression-free rates were lower in patients with lymph node metastasis or positive surgical margins. In patients with clinical stage T3a-c and well or moderately differentiated tumor, radical prostatectomy resulted in a progression-free rate of 100% at 5 years. However, in patients with clinical stage T4a or poorly differentiated tumor, radiation therapy resulted in a better progression-free rate than radical prostatectomy. These findings suggest that patients with clinical stage T3a-c and well or moderately differentiated tumor will benefit from radical prostatectomy combined with endocrine therapy and that radiation therapy will be effective for advanced diseases. (author)

  8. Agent Orange and long-term outcomes after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadia, Aaron E; Terris, Martha K; Aronson, William J; Kane, Christopher J; Amling, Christopher L; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Freedland, Stephen J; Abern, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the association between Agent Orange (AO) exposure and long-term prostate cancer (PC) outcomes. Data from 1,882 men undergoing radical prostatectomy for PC between 1988 and 2011 at Veterans Affairs Health Care Facilities were analyzed from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database. Men were stratified by AO exposure (binary). Associations between AO exposure and biopsy and pathologic Gleason sum (GS) and pathologic stage were determined by logistic regression models adjusted for preoperative characteristics. Hazard ratios for biochemical recurrence (BCR), secondary treatment, metastases, and PC-specific mortality were determined by Cox models adjusted for preoperative characteristics. There were 333 (17.7%) men with AO exposure. AO-exposed men were younger (median 59 vs. 62 y), had lower preoperative prostate-specific antigen levels (5.8 vs. 6.7 ng/ml), lower clinical category (25% vs. 38% palpable), and higher body mass index (28.2 vs. 27.6 kg/m(2)), all P<0.01. Biopsy GS, pathologic GS, positive surgical margins, lymph node positivity, and extracapsular extension did not differ with AO exposure. At a median follow-up of 85 months, 702 (37.4%) patients had BCR, 603 (32.2%) patients received secondary treatment, 78 (4.1%) had metastases, and 39 (2.1%) died of PC. On multivariable analysis, AO exposure was not associated with BCR, secondary treatment, metastases, or PC mortality. AO exposure was not associated with worse preoperative characteristics such as elevated prostate-specific antigen levels or biopsy GS nor with BCR, secondary treatment, metastases, or PC death. Thus, as data on AO-exposed men mature, possible differences in PC outcomes observed previously are no longer apparent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intrafascial nerve-sparing endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Rabenalt, Robert; Do, Minh; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Winkler, Mathias; Dietel, Anja; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2008-05-01

    Based on our recently published anatomic studies, we present the most recent refinement of the endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE), the intrafascial nerve-sparing EERPE (nsEERPE). As part of the intrafascial technique, the dissection plane is directly on the prostatic capsule, freeing the prostate laterally from its thin surrounding fascia that contains small vessels and nerves. The technique enables puboprostatic ligament preservation, leaving intact endopelvic fascia, periprostatic fascia, and neurovascular bundles. The operation was performed in 150 patients with indications for nerve-sparing procedure. The mean operative time was 131 min (range: 50-210 min) and the mean catheterization time was 5.9 d (range: 4-20 d). Twelve months postoperatively, 94.3% of the patients were continent (no need for pads), 4.6% had minimal stress incontinence, and one patient required >2 pads/d. At the 12-mo follow-up, the potency rates (erections sufficient for intercourse with or without the use of phosphodiesterase 5 [PDE5] inhibitors) of the patients who underwent bilateral intrafascial nsEERPE were 89.7% (age: 44-55 yr), 81.1% (age: 56-65 yr), and 61.9% (age: >65 yr). Positive surgical margins in pT2 and pT3 tumors were 4.5% and 29.4%, respectively. The intrafascial nsEERPE enables the dissection of the prostate with limited trauma to the surrounding fascias and the enclosed neurovascular bundles. We propose that the preserved neurovascular bundles with intrafascial nsEERPE are more viable. The results advocate this proposition.

  10. Oncologic outcome and patterns of recurrence after salvage radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparel, Philippe; Cronin, Angel M; Savage, Caroline; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2009-02-01

    Limited data on patterns of recurrence (local or metastatic) after salvage radical prostatectomy (SP) is available. To examine biochemical, local and metastatic patterns of recurrence in patients undergoing SP for radiation-recurrent prostate cancer. 146 patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy treated with SP were evaluated in a retrospective study at a single institution. All patients underwent SP by mainly two surgeons. Biochemical recurrence (BCR) after SP was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of >or=0.2 ng/ml or was defined by the initiation of androgen deprivation therapy. All predictors analyzed were determined after radiotherapy, before SP, and included PSA level, clinical stage, biopsy Gleason score, age at SP, and time interval from radiotherapy to SP. Of the 146 patients treated with SP, 65 developed BCR. The median follow-up period for recurrence-free patients was 3.8 yr; 43 patients (29%) were followed for >5 yr. Overall, the 5-yr recurrence-free probability was 54% (95% CI, 44-63%). Clinical local recurrence occurred in only one patient who also had bone metastases. Overall, there were 16 prostate cancer-specific deaths and 19 deaths from other causes. The 5-yr cumulative incidence of death from prostate cancer was 4% (95% CI, 2-11%). Pre-SP serum PSA level and biopsy Gleason score were significantly associated with death due to prostate cancer (p<0.0005 and p=0.002, respectively). This study is retrospective and included carefully selected patients treated over a long period by, mainly, two experienced surgeons. SP provides excellent local cancer control; only one patient in our series experienced a clinical local recurrence. Earlier identification of patients with persistent, viable local cancer despite radiation therapy will appropriately select patients for SP.

  11. Continence following radical retropubic prostatectomy using self-reporting instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepor, Herbert; Kaci, Ledia; Xue, Xiaonan

    2004-03-01

    We performed a global self-assessment of continence following radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) and determined how this global self-assessment of continence correlates with commonly used definitions of continence. Between October 2000 and February 2002 all men who underwent RRP were encouraged to complete the University of California-Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index 3, 6, 12 and 24 months postoperatively. Beginning October 2002 a single question capturing the patient global self-assessment of continence status was added to the postoperative continence assessment. The study design was cross-sectional since only continence surveys submitted between October 2002 through February 2003 were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa coefficient was determined for the relationship between the patient global assessment of continence vs the definition of continence based on pad requirement, problem due to incontinence and frequency of incontinence. Continence progressively improved 3 to 24 months following RRP for all continence outcomes. At 24 months following RRP 97.1% of men considered themselves continent, while 97.1%, 94.1% and 97.1% were considered continent using continence definitions, including the requirement of no or 1 pad in a 24-hour interval, no or slight bother due to incontinence and total control or occasional dribbling, respectively. Our 3 definitions of continence derived from responses to the University of California-Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index had excellent agreement with patient global self-assessment of continence (kappa coefficients between 0.76 and 0.83). The majority of men achieve continence without invasive intervention following RRP. Final continence status should be ascertained at 24 months. The patient global assessment of continence provides face validity for other definitions of continence based on responses to validated self-administered questionnaires.

  12. Anastomotic complications after robot-assisted laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, André; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Iversen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anastomotic complications are well known after radical prostatectomy (RP). The vesicourethral anastomotic technique is handled differently between open and robotic RP. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the frequency of anastomotic leakages and strictures differed between...... patients undergoing retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and to identify risk factors associated with these complications. Materials and methods The study included 735 consecutive patients who underwent RRP (n = 499) or RARP (236) at the Department...... of Urology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, in a complete 3 year period from 2010 to 2012. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyse associations between surgical procedure (RRP vs RARP) and anastomotic complications. Analyses included age, smoking status, diabetes, hypertension...

  13. Novel technique to enhance bladder neck dissection with traction of Foley catheter during extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Y. Lin

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Improved bladder neck enhancement provides a clearer vision during bladder neck dissection. Similar functional results and cancer control rates were also encountered during modified extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy. This novel technique is a feasible method for performing endoscopic radical prostatectomy using four ports instead of five.

  14. An unusual localization of seven months delayed pelvic lymphocele following radical retropubic prostatectomy: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berk Hazır

    Full Text Available Introduction: A pelvic lymphocele is a collection of lymphatic fluid that develops after extensive lymphadenectomies in surgeries such as urological malignancies or renal transplantation. Pelvic lymphoceles may cause complications such as fever, abdominal pain, leg swelling, genital swelling and flank pain. This report summarizes the management of a pelvic lymphocele after open radical retropubic prostatectomy with bilateral lymphadenectomy. Presentation of case: Herein, we present a case in which a pelvic lymphocele developed seven months post-radical open retropubic prostatectomy and through this patient we discussed the lymphocele following radical prostatectomy. The pelvic lymphocele occurred along the sciatic nerve from the sciatica foramen to the intergluteal muscles. The patient was treated with three drainage catheters. This localization is an atypical and unusual for lymphocele after radical retropubic prostatectomy. Discussion: Lymphocele formation that leads to major complications after radical prostatectomy is rare. Lymphocele formation is most commonly seen in the early postoperative period, but it should be considered in patients with fever, abdominal pain or leg swelling during the late postoperative period. Lymphocele formation was the most common cause of hospital readmission after radical prostatectomy. Conclusion: Lymphocele formation can be seen in atypical regions and can lead to unexpected complications after radical prostatectomy. Therefore, it should be brought to mind when complaints such as fever and lower extremity swelling occurred in patients underwent extensive lymph node dissection. Surgical treatment options are available, but percutaneous interventions can also be used. Keywords: Radical retropubic prostatectomy, Pelvic lymphocele, Percutaneous drainage, Prostate cancer, Case-report

  15. Impact of metabolic syndrome on early recovery of continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Masatomo; Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Kurahashi, Toshifumi

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of metabolic syndrome on the early recovery of urinary continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. The present study included a total of 302 consecutive Japanese patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. In this study, postoperative urinary continence was defined as no leak or the use of a security pad. The continence status was assessed by interviews before and 1 and 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Metabolic syndrome was defined as follows: body mass index ≥25 kg/m 2 and two or more of the following: hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia. The effect of the presence of metabolic syndrome on the continence status of these patients was retrospectively examined. A total of 116 (38.4%) and 203 (67.2%) of the 302 patients were continent at 1 and 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, respectively. A total of 31 (10.3%) patients were judged to have metabolic syndrome. Despite the operative time being longer in patients with metabolic syndrome, no significant differences were observed in the remaining preoperative, intraoperative or postoperative variables between patients with or without metabolic syndrome. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, metabolic syndrome and the duration of hospitalization were significantly correlated with the 1-month continence status. Similarly, metabolic syndrome and estimated blood loss during surgery were independent predictors of continence rates at 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. These findings suggest that the presence of metabolic syndrome could have a significant impact on the early recovery of urinary continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. The problem of early continence recovery after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kachmazov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The highest rate of incontinence after radical prostatectomy (RP is observed in the first 2–6 months after surgery. In order  to decrease the period of incontinence, virous surgical methods aimed at preservation and reconstruction of structures participating  in the mechanism of urine retention has been developed and improved.The study objective is to evaluate effectiveness of an original method of formation of an urethral anastomosis in the early continence recovery.Materials and methods. Data on 126 patients who underwent retropubic RP were analyzed. Depending on the method of urethral anastomosis formation, patients were divided into 2 groups: in the 1st group (n = 52 the patients underwent PR with urethra suspension m. levator ani, in the 2nd (n = 74 – standard RP. In the 1st group, 6 ligatures were applied to the anterior and posterior urethra walls: at the 12 and 6 hour projections through the mucosa, submucosa, and smooth muscle; at the 10, 2, 4, and 8 hour projections – more laterally with capture of the m. levator ani medial margins. Continence recovery was evaluated on days 1, 7, and 14 after urinary catheter removal and then at days 30, 90, 180, and 365 after RP. The criteria of continence were absence of urine leakage at rest and during physical activity and a necessity of using a safety liner.Results. There weren’t any significant differences at day 1 after urinary catheter removal between the two groups (р > 0.05. In the 1st group, continence values at days 30, 90, and 180 after RP were significantly higher (57.7, 69.2, and 71.1 %, respectively compared to the 2nd group (35.1, 41.9, and 51.3 %, respectively (р <0.05.Conclusion. Results of this work show significant benefits of RP with urethra suspension m. levator ani compared to standard RP per continence recovery criteria at days 7, 14, 30, 90, and 180 after the surgery. The technique of urethra suspension m. levator ani is easy to perform and ensures

  17. Adjuvant and salvage irradiation following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, M M; Dallow, K C; Zietman, A L; Althausen, A F; Heney, N M; McGovern, F J; Shipley, W U

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the ability of adjuvant irradiation to prevent PSA failure in cases of pT3N0 disease, and of salvage irradiation to durably suppress a rising PSA following radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: 62 patients treated by post-operative radiation therapy (60-64Gy in 1.8Gy fractions to the tumor bed) between 1988 and 1993 were evaluated. All had complete pre- and post-radiation PSA data. Median follow up was 3.2 years from time of surgery and 2.2 years from irradiation. 20 patients had Gleason grade 3 disease (moderately differentiated) and 41 Gleason 4-5 (poorly differentiated). 46 had positive inked surgical margins, 18 involved seminal vesicles and 5 had palpable recurrent disease. None had known nodal or metastatic disease. 32 patients underwent adjuvant treatment (undetectable PSA at time of irradiation) and 30 salvage (detectable PSA at time of irradiation). Kaplan-Meier life table analysis was employed. The endpoint studied was freedom from biochemical failure. This was defined as a rise in the PSA of greater than 10% (intra laboratory error <8%) or a previously undetectable PSA becoming detectable. Results: The overall actuarial freedom from biochemical failure at 4 years from radiotherapy was 59%. A significant difference was seen between those receiving adjuvant and those receiving salvage irradiation (71% vs 51%, p=0.03). Amongst those in the salvage group neither the PSA prior to surgery, the PSA at the time of irradiation, the seminal vesicle status, nor the Gleason score (3 vs 4-5) correlated significantly with outcome. The time interval between surgery and irradiation was, however, significant. Those being treated within 6 months fared better than those treated later (60% vs 36%, p=0.04). Further, those treated early were more likely to achieve an undetectable nadir PSA level (94% vs 71%). Conclusion: The addition of adjuvant irradiation appears to improve the 4 year biochemical disease-free survival of patients with poor

  18. Does penile rehabilitation have a role in the treatment of erectile dysfunction following radical prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecher, Gideon; Almekaty, Khaled; Kalejaiye, Odunayo; Minhas, Suks

    2017-01-01

    In men undergoing radical treatment for prostate cancer, erectile function is one of the most important health-related quality-of-life outcomes influencing patient choice in treatment. Penile rehabilitation has emerged as a therapeutic measure to prevent erectile dysfunction and expedite return of erectile function after radical prostatectomy. Penile rehabilitation involves a program designed to increase the likelihood of return to baseline-level erectile function, as opposed to treatment, which implies the therapeutic treatment of symptoms, a key component of post-radical prostatectomy management. Several pathological theories form the basis for rehabilitation, and a plethora of treatments are currently in widespread use. However, whilst there is some evidence supporting the concept of penile rehabilitation from animal studies, randomised controlled trials are contradictory in outcomes. Similarly, urological guidelines are conflicted in terms of recommendations. Furthermore, it is clear that in spite of the lack of evidence for the role of penile rehabilitation, many urologists continue to employ some form of rehabilitation in their patients after radical prostatectomy. This is a significant burden to health resources in public-funded health economies, and no effective cost-benefit analysis has been undertaken to support this practice. Thus, further research is warranted to provide both scientific and clinical evidence for this contemporary practice and the development of preventative strategies in treating erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy.

  19. Surgical complications of radical retropubic prostatectomy: A single institutional experience of seven years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj K Goyal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the surgical complications of open retropubic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods: Fifty-nine cases of localized prostate cancer underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy in our department in the last seven years. Standard technique of open retropubic radical prostatectomy as described by Walsh was used. During follow-up cancer control and quality of life indices (potency and urinary continence were noted. Result: Postoperative recovery of all patients except one was excellent. This patient required cardio-respiratory support and nine units of blood transfusion. Forty-nine out of 52 patients were continent, two had stress incontinence and one was totally incontinent at one year. Bladder neck contracture was present in eight out of 52 patients at one year. Forty-five patients were impotent at one year with or without oral tablet sildenafil. Cancer control was present in 45 out of 52 cases. Seven cases had biochemical failure at one year. Conclusion: Though retropubic radical prostatectomy is the standard treatment for early prostate cancer it is not without complications. It has a steep learning curve. More number of cases and refinement in technique is required to achieve world-class results.

  20. Radical Prostatectomy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancers-Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsa, N; Nagaraja, H; Shweta, S; Raghunath, S K

    2017-06-01

    Twenty-five to thirty percent of patients with prostate cancer present with locally advanced disease. While risk stratification remains the same with high incidence of upstaging of disease on imaging and histopathological evaluation; there have been progressive refinements in surgical therapy. With availability of reasonably robust data, radical prostatectomy in men with locally advanced prostate cancers seems to effect improvement in both cancer specific and overall survival rates in comparison to the current standard of care of radiation with androgen deprivation therapy. Studies using radical prostatectomy as a part of multimodality approach have also shown promising results. There is an imminent need for well-designed prospective studies of benefits of radical prostatectomy over radiation and androgen deprivation as well as benefits of multimodality therapy over monotherapy. Surgery for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer is technically challenging. Surgical outcomes are comparable to those of organ-confined disease when performed in high-volume centers. Neoadjuvant therapies prior to radical prostatectomy might improve surgical outcomes, but whether they will translate into a better cancer specific and overall survival are yet to be ascertained.

  1. Tandem-robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy to improve the neurovascular bundle visualization: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Misop; Kim, Chunwoo; Mozer, Pierre; Schäfer, Felix; Badaan, Shadie; Vigaru, Bogdan; Tseng, Kenneth; Petrisor, Doru; Trock, Bruce; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-02-01

    To examine the feasibility of image-guided navigation using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) to visualize the neurovascular bundle (NVB) during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP). The preservation of the NVB during radical prostatectomy improves the postoperative recovery of sexual potency. The accompanying blood vessels in the NVB can serve as a macroscopic landmark to localize the microscopic cavernous nerves in the NVB. A novel, robotic transrectal ultrasound probe manipulator (TRUS Robot) and three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction software were developed and used concurrently with the daVinci surgical robot (Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) in a tandem-robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (T-RALP). After appropriate approval and informed consent were obtained, 3 subjects underwent T-RALP without associated complications. The TRUS Robot allowed a steady handling and remote manipulation of the TRUS probe during T-RALP. It also tracked the TRUS probe position accurately and allowed 3-D image reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding structures. Image navigation was performed by observing the tips of the daVinci surgical instruments in the live TRUS image. Blood vessels in the NVB were visualized using Doppler ultrasound. Intraoperative 3-D image-guided navigation in T-RALP is feasible. The use of TRUS during radical prostatectomy can potentially improve the visualization and preservation of the NVB. Further studies are needed to assess the clinical benefit of T-RALP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Validation study of a web-based assessment of functional recovery after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers Andrew J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good clinical care of prostate cancer patients after radical prostatectomy depends on careful assessment of post-operative morbidities, yet physicians do not always judge patient symptoms accurately. Logistical problems associated with using paper questionnaire limit their use in the clinic. We have implemented a web-interface ("STAR" for patient-reported outcomes after radical prostatectomy. Methods We analyzed data on the first 9 months of clinical implementation to evaluate the validity of the STAR questionnaire to assess functional outcomes following radical prostatectomy. We assessed response rate, internal consistency within domains, and the association between survey responses and known predictors of sexual and urinary function, including age, time from surgery, nerve sparing status and co-morbidities. Results Of 1581 men sent an invitation to complete the instrument online, 1235 responded for a response rate of 78%. Cronbach's alpha was 0.84, 0.86 and 0.97 for bowel, urinary and sexual function respectively. All known predictors of sexual and urinary function were significantly associated with survey responses in the hypothesized direction. Conclusions We have found that web-based assessment of functional recovery after radical prostatectomy is practical and feasible. The instrument demonstrated excellent psychometric properties, suggested that validity is maintained when questions are transferred from paper to electronic format and when patients give responses that they know will be seen by their doctor and added to their clinic record. As such, our system allows ready implementation of patient-reported outcomes into routine clinical practice.

  3. Time from first detectable PSA following radical prostatectomy to biochemical recurrence: A competing risk analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. De Boo (Leonora); M. Pintilie (Melania); P. Yip (Paul); J. Baniel (Jack); N.E. Fleshner (Neil); D. Margel (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In this study, we estimated the time from first detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) following radical prostatectomy (RP) to commonly used definitions of biochemical recurrence (BCR). We also identified the predictors of time to BCR. Methods: We identified subjects

  4. Late urinary morbidity and quality of life after radical prostatectomy and salvage radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ervandian, Maria; Hoyer, Morten; Petersen, Stine Elleberg

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is a paucity of knowledge of long-term urinary morbidity in patients treated for prostate cancer (PCa) with radical prostatectomy (RP) and salvage radiotherapy (SRT). Improved long-term survival calls for heightened awareness of late effects from radiotherapy after RP. The purpos...

  5. [Organisation and early outcome after radical prostatectomy in Denmark 2004-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, M.; Iversen, P.; Bendixen, A.

    2008-01-01

    .2%. CONCLUSION: There is an increasing rate of radical prostatectomies in Denmark. It is proposed that a national database be established to monitor early and long-term outcomes, including the role of surgical technique (nerve sparing, laparoscopic/robotic surgery, etc.) in order to ensure optimal organisation...

  6. Surgeon Experience is Strongly Associated with Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy for all Preoperative Risk Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Eric A; Bianco, Fernando J; Serio, Angel M; Eastham, James A; Kattan, Michael W; Pontes, J. Edson; Vickers, Andrew J; Scardino, Peter T

    2013-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated that there is a learning curve for open radical prostatectomy. In this study we sought to determine whether the effects of the learning curve are modified by patient risk as defined by preoperative tumor characteristics. Methods The study included 7,683 eligible prostate cancer patients treated with open radical prostatectomy by one of 72 surgeons. Surgeon experience was coded as the total prior number of radical prostatectomies conducted by the surgeon prior to a patient’s surgery. Multivariable survival-time regression models were used to evaluate the association between surgeon experience and biochemical recurrence, separately for each preoperative risk group. Results We saw no evidence that patient risk affects the learning curve: there was a statistically significant association between biochemical recurrence and surgeon experience in all analyses. The absolute risk difference for a patient receiving treatment from a surgeon with 10 compared to 250 prior radical prostatectomies was 6.6% (95% C.I. 3.4%, 10.3%), 12.0% (6.9%, 18.2%) and 9.7% (1.2%, 18.2%) for patients at low, medium and high preoperative risk patients. Recurrence-free probability for patients with low risk disease approached 100% for the most experienced surgeons Conclusions Cancer control after radical prostatectomy improves with increasing surgeon experience irrespective of patient risk. Excellent rates of cancer control for patients with low risk disease treated by the most experienced surgeons suggests that the primary reason such patients recur is inadequate surgical technique. The results have significant implications for clinical care. PMID:18423716

  7. Robotic radical perineal cystectomy and extended pelvic lymphadenectomy: initial investigation using a purpose-built single-port robotic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Matthew J; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2017-12-01

    To assess the feasibility of radical perineal cystoprostatectomy using the latest generation purpose-built single-port robotic surgical system. In two male cadavers the da Vinci ® SP1098 Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) was used to perform radical perineal cystoprostatectomy and bilateral extended pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND). New features in this model include enhanced high-definition three-dimensional optics, improved instrument manoeuvrability, and a real-time instrument tracking and guidance system. The surgery was accomplished through a 3-cm perineal incision via a novel robotic single-port system, which accommodates three double-jointed articulating robotic instruments, an articulating camera, and an accessory laparoscopic instrument. The primary outcomes were technical feasibility, intraoperative complications, and total robotic operative time. The cases were completed successfully without conversion. There were no accidental punctures or lacerations. The robotic operative times were 197 and 202 min. In this preclinical model, robotic radical perineal cystoprostatectomy and ePLND was feasible using the SP1098 robotic platform. Further investigation is needed to assess the feasibility of urinary diversion using this novel approach and new technology. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Risk factors predicting the outcome of salvage radiotherapy in patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Shimizu, Yosuke; Mizowaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Salvage radiotherapy is the only curative treatment for patients with prostate cancer showing biochemical progression after radical prostatectomy. In this study, we evaluated the clinicopathological parameters that influence the outcome of salvage radiotherapy. Medical records of 49 patients who underwent salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy from 1997 to 2008 at the Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, were retrospectively reviewed. Radiotherapy was carried out with 66 Gy on the prostatic bed. Biochemical progression-free survival after salvage radiotherapy at 2, 5 and 7 years was 51.0%, 42.2% and 42.2%, respectively. Significant parameters predicting biochemical progression after salvage radiotherapy by Cox regression analysis were prostatectomy Gleason score sum ≥8 (hazard ratio 0.08; 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.22; P=0.001), prostate-specific antigen nadir after radical prostatectomy ≥0.04 ng/mL (hazard ratio 0.30; 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.69; P=0.005) and negative surgical margin (hazard ratio 0.28; 95% confidence interval 0.12-0.70; P=0.006). When the patients were subgrouped by these risk factors, the 5-year progression-free survival rates after salvage radiotherapy were 77.8%, 50.0% and 6.7% in patients with 0, 1 and ≥2 predictors, respectively. In order to discriminate favorable candidates for salvage radiotherapy, Gleason score of prostatectomy, prostate-specific antigen nadir after prostatectomy and positive surgical margin represent independent predictors. Thus, progression-free survival might be more precisely predicted according to the presence/absence of these risk factors. The significance of this risk classification should be confirmed by large prospective studies. (author)

  9. Statin use and risk of disease recurrence and death after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskiväli, Teemu; Kujala, Paula; Visakorpi, Tapio; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Murtola, Teemu J

    2016-04-01

    Statins have been linked with improved prostate cancer survival and lower risk of recurrence in men treated with radiation therapy. However, the association is unclear for surgically-treated men. We studied the risk of prostate cancer recurrence and death by statin usage after radical prostatectomy in a cohort of prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy. A cohort of 1,314 men who underwent curative-intent radical prostatectomy at the Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland during 1995-2009 were linked to national prescription database to obtain detailed information on statin purchases. The risk of PSA recurrence and death (overall and prostate cancer-specific) by statin use before and after the surgery were evaluated using Cox regression with model adjustment for tumor characteristics, total cholesterol and simultaneous use of antidiabetic and antihypertensive drugs. Tissue expression of putative prognostic markers were measured from a subgroup of 323 men. During the median follow-up of 8.6 years after surgery 484 men recurred, while 244 men died (32 due to prostate cancer). In general statin use before or after prostatectomy was not associated with risk of disease recurrence or death. Tissue expression of Ki-67 and ERG modified the association between statin use and risk of disease recurrence; the risk estimates were lower in men with Ki-67 expression above the median (P for interaction 0.001 and 0.004 for statin use before and after prostatectomy, respectively) and no ERG expression in the tumor tissue (P for interaction 0.006 and 0.011). Statin use generally did not affect prostate cancer prognosis after prostatectomy. The effect on disease recurrence may depend on tumor properties, such as proliferation activity. Thus possible future prospective studies should recognize and enroll subgroups of prostate cancer patients most likely to benefit from statins. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and resection of rectum performed together: first experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodak, Milos; Orhalmi, Julius; Kosina, Josef; Balik, Michal; Pacovsky, Jaroslav

    2015-09-01

    Laparoscopy is an increasingly used approach in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer and prostate cancer. The anatomical proximity of the two organs is the main reason to consider performing both procedures simultaneously. To present our first experience of laparoscopic rectal resection and radical prostatectomy, performed simultaneously, in 3 patients. The first patient was diagnosed with locally advanced rectal cancer and tumor infiltration of the prostate and seminal vesicles. The other 2 patients were diagnosed with tumor duplicity. The surgery of the first patient started with laparoscopic prostatectomy except division of the prostate from the rectal wall. The next step was resection of the rectum, extralevator amputation of the rectum and vesicourethral anastomosis. In the other patients, resection of the rectum, followed by radical prostatectomy, was performed. The median follow-up was 12 months. The median operation time was 4 h 40 min, with blood loss of 300 ml. The operations and postoperative course were without incident in the case of 2 patients. However, 1 patient had stercoral peritonitis and a vesicorectal fistula in the early postoperative stage. Sigmoidostomy and postponed ureteroileal conduit were carried out. All patients were in oncologic remission. Combined laparoscopic rectal resection and radical prostatectomy is a viable option for selected patients with locally advanced rectal cancer or tumor duplication. The procedures were completed without complications in 2 out of 3 patients.

  11. Oncological outcomes of high-risk prostate cancer patients between robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Chun Liao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare pathological and oncological outcomes between robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RaLRP and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP among high-risk prostate cancer patient in a tertiary center in Taiwan. Materials and methods: From November 2003 to October 2013, 129 high-risk prostate cancer patients receiving minimally-invasive radical prostatectomy were included. The Kaplan–Meier analysis was used for measuring biochemical recurrence-free survival (BFS. Multivariate logistic regression models and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to determine predictors of positive surgical margin and BFS. Results: Among the 129 high-risk prostate cancer patients included, 80 (62% patients received LRP and 49 (38% patients received RaLRP. There was no significant difference of positive surgical margin and biochemical recurrence rate between RaLRP and LRP group (P = 0.802 and 0.292. Higher pathological T stage predicted an increased likelihood of positive margins (OR = 3.44, 95% CI [1.45, 8.18], P = 0.005. Higher initial PSA level (HR = 2.88, 95% CI [1.04, 7.94], P = 0.041 and positive surgical margin (HR = 2.55, 95% CI [1.20, 5.44], P = 0.015 were poor prognostic factors for BFS. Conclusion: RaLRP can be considered among high-risk prostate cancer in Asian people with comparable oncological outcomes to LRP. Higher pathological T stage was associated with increased likelihood of positive margins, patients with higher iPSA level and positive surgical margin had worsen biochemical recurrence-free survival.

  12. Percutaneous cystostomy drainage for early removing urethral catheter in robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: Improving on patients' discomfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Jui Yang

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The use of a percutaneous cystostomy device is feasible and safe for the early removal of urethral Foley catheter in robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy to decrease penile pain and patient discomfort.

  13. Predicting biochemical recurrence-free survival for patients with positive pelvic lymph nodes at radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bodman, Christian; Godoy, Guilherme; Chade, Daher C; Cronin, Angel; Tafe, Laura J; Fine, Samson W; Laudone, Vincent; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2010-07-01

    We evaluated predictors of freedom from biochemical recurrence in patients with pelvic lymph node metastasis at radical prostatectomy. Of 207 patients with lymph node metastasis treated with radical prostatectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection 45 received adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy and 162 did not. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to investigate predictors of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Recurrence probability was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A median of 13 lymph nodes were removed. Of the patients 122 had 1, 44 had 2 and 41 had 3 or greater positive lymph nodes. Of patients without androgen deprivation therapy 103 had 1, 35 had 2 and 24 had 3 or greater positive lymph nodes while 69 experienced biochemical recurrence. Median time to recurrence in patients with 1, 2 and 3 or greater lymph nodes was 59, 13 and 3 months, respectively. Only specimen Gleason score and the number of positive lymph nodes were independent predictors of biochemical recurrence. Recurrence-free probability 2 years after prostatectomy in men without androgen deprivation with 1 positive lymph node and a prostatectomy Gleason score of 7 or less was 79% vs 29% in those with Gleason score 8 or greater and 2 or more positive lymph nodes. Prognosis in patients with lymph node metastasis depends on the number of positive lymph nodes and primary tumor Gleason grade. Of all patients with lymph node metastasis 80% had 1 or 2 positive nodes. A large subset of those patients had a favorable prognosis. Full bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection should be done in patients with intermediate and high risk cancer to identify those likely to benefit from metastatic node removal. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy: A failure of marketing-based medicine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for high-risk patients after radical prostatectomy has been shown to reduce local and metastatic failure, improve overall survival and improve quality of life (QOL). The evidence, based on three randomised studies and a meta-analysis, is so compelling that the national and internatioanl professional bodies, representing urologists and radiation oncologist alike, recommend that high-risk patients be offered immediate adjuvant radiotherapy. Despite this being the standard of care, few patients fo on to recive it. This paper looks at the possibilities of why this is so, highlighting that it could possibly be related to poor marketing, communication and delivery of health information to patients and professional alike. It concludes that we need a more coordinated way to increase utilisation of the gold standard adjuvant radiotherapy post-radical prostatectomy, perhaps learning some valuable lessons from the business community.

  15. Preoperative Nomogram Predicting the 10-Year Probability of Prostate Cancer Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Andrew J.; Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James A.; Bianco, Fernando J.; Dotan, Zohar A.; Fearn, Paul A.; Kattan, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    An existing preoperative nomogram predicts the probability of prostate cancer recurrence, defined by prostate-specific antigen (PSA), at 5 years after radical prostatectomy based on clinical stage, serum PSA, and biopsy Gleason grade. In an updated and enhanced nomogram, we have extended the predictions to 10 years, added the prognostic information of systematic biopsy results, and enabled the predictions to be adjusted for the year of surgery. Cox regression analysis was used to model the clinical information for 1978 patients treated by two high-volume surgeons from our institution. The nomogram was externally validated on an independent cohort of 1545 patients with a concordance index of 0.79 and was well calibrated with respect to observed outcome. The inclusion of the number of positive and negative biopsy cores enhanced the predictive accuracy of the model. Thus, a new preoperative nomogram provides robust predictions of prostate cancer recurrence up to 10 years after radical prostatectomy. PMID:16705126

  16. Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a better survival than the background population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreas Røder, Martin; Brasso, Klaus; Drimer Berg, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    underwent radical prostatectomy. Patients were followed prospectively per protocol. No patients were lost to follow-up. Overall and cause-specific survival were described using Kaplan-Meier plots. Standardized relative survival and mortality ratio were calculated based on expected survival in the age......INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to investigate standardised relative survival and mortality ratio for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer at our institution. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between 1995 and 2010, a total of 1,350 consecutive patients......-matched Danish population using the methods and macros described by Dickmann. The country-specific population mortality rates used for calculation of the expected survival were based on data from The Human Mortality Database. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 3.4 years (range: 0-14.3 years). A total of 59 (4...

  17. Orgasm-associated urinary incontinence and sexual life after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Andreas E; Carlsson, Stefan; Johansson, Eva; Jonsson, Martin N; Adding, Christofer; Nyberg, Tommy; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, N Peter

    2011-09-01

    Involuntary release of urine during sexual climax, orgasm-associated urinary incontinence, occurs frequently after radical prostatectomy. We know little about its prevalence and its effect on sexual satisfaction. To determine the prevalence of orgasm-associated incontinence after radical prostatectomy and its effect on sexual satisfaction. Consecutive series, follow-up at one point in calendar time of men having undergone radical prostatectomy (open surgery or robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery) at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, 2002-2006. Of the 1,411 eligible men, 1,288 (91%) men completed a study-specific questionnaire. Prevalence rate of orgasm-associated incontinence. Of the 1,288 men providing information, 691 were sexually active. Altogether, 268 men reported orgasm-associated urinary incontinence, of whom 230 (86%) were otherwise continent. When comparing them with the 422 not reporting the symptom but being sexually active, we found a prevalence ratio (with 95% confidence interval) of 1.5 (1.2-1.8) for not being able to satisfy the partner, 2.1 (1.1-3.5) for avoiding sexual activity because of fear of failing, 1.5 (1.1-2.1) for low orgasmic satisfaction, and 1.4 (1.2-1.7) for having sexual intercourse infrequently. Prevalence ratios increase in prostate-cancer survivors with a higher frequency of orgasm-associated urinary incontinence. We found orgasm-associated urinary incontinence to occur among a fifth of prostate cancer survivors having undergone radical prostatectomy, most of whom are continent when not engaged in sexual activity. The symptom was associated with several aspects of sexual life. © 2011 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  18. A simple method to take urethral sutures for neobladder reconstruction and radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Satheesan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available For the reconstruction of urethra-vesical anastamosis after radical prostatectomy and for neobladder reconstruction, taking adequate sutures to include the urethral mucosa is vital. Due to the retraction of the urethra and unfriendly pelvis, the process of taking satisfactory urethral sutures may be laborious. Here, we describe a simple method by which we could overcome similar technical problems during surgery using Foley catheter as the guide for the suture.

  19. Oncologic Outcomes of Patients With Gleason Score 7 and Tertiary Gleason Pattern 5 After Radical Prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Leng, Yi-Hsueh; Lee, Won Jun; Yang, Seung Ok; Lee, Jeong Ki; Jung, Tae Young; Kim, Yun Beom

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated oncologic outcomes following radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with a Gleason score (GS) of 7 with tertiary Gleason pattern 5 (TGP5). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 310 patients who underwent RP from 2005 to 2010. Twenty-four patients who received neoadjuvant or adjuvant antiandrogen deprivation or radiation therapy were excluded. Just 239 (GS 6 to 8) of the remaining 286 patients were included in the study. Patients were cla...

  20. Training in exercises for pelvic floor muscles of patients with an urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Glybochko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Training of muscles of a pelvic bottom under control of biofeedback is applied at 87 patients with an urinary incontinence after a radical prostatectomy. Biofeedback increases management and control of a pelvic floor. At good ability of management of muscles of a pelvic floor the median of restoration was 4 months. Without opportunity of management of muscles of pelvic floor restoration was 9.4 months.

  1. Training in exercises for pelvic floor muscles of patients with an urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Glybochko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Training of muscles of a pelvic bottom under control of biofeedback is applied at 87 patients with an urinary incontinence after a radical prostatectomy. Biofeedback increases management and control of a pelvic floor. At good ability of management of muscles of a pelvic floor the median of restoration was 4 months. Without opportunity of management of muscles of pelvic floor restoration was 9.4 months.

  2. Preliminary experience with extraperitoneal endoscopic radical prostatectomy through duplication of the open technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tobias-Machado

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe surgical and functional results with extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with duplication of the open technique, from the experience obtained in the treatment of 28 initial cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a 36-month period, we prospectively analyzed 28 patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer undergoing extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. RESULTS: Mean surgical time was 280 min, with mean blood loss of 320 mL. As intraoperative complications, there were 2 rectal lesions repaired with laparoscopic suture in 2 planes. There was no conversion to open surgery. Median hospital stay was 3 days, with return to oral diet in the first post-operative day in patients. As post-operative complications, there were 3 cases of extraperitoneal urinary fistula. Two of these cases were resolved by maintaining a Foley catheter for 21 days, and the other one by late endoscopic reintervention for repositioning the catheter. Five out of 18 previously potent patients evolved with erectile dysfunction. The diagnosis of prostate cancer was confirmed in all patients, with focal positive margin occurring in 3 cases. During a mean follow-up of 18 months, 2 patients presented increased PSA, with no clinical evidence of disease. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is a laborious and difficult procedure, with a long learning curve. Extraperitoneal access is feasible, and it is possible to practically duplicate the principles of open surgery. The present technique can possibly offer advantages in terms of decreased blood loss, preservation of erectile function and prevention of positive margins.

  3. Impact of robotic technique and surgical volume on the cost of radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyams, Elias S; Mullins, Jeffrey K; Pierorazio, Phillip M; Partin, Alan W; Allaf, Mohamad E; Matlaga, Brian R

    2013-03-01

    Our present understanding of the effect of robotic surgery and surgical volume on the cost of radical prostatectomy (RP) is limited. Given the increasing pressures placed on healthcare resource utilization, such determinations of healthcare value are becoming increasingly important. Therefore, we performed a study to define the effect of robotic technology and surgical volume on the cost of RP. The state of Maryland mandates that all acute-care hospitals report encounter-level and hospital discharge data to the Health Service Cost Review Commission (HSCRC). The HSCRC was queried for men undergoing RP between 2008 and 2011 (the period during which robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy [RALRP] was coded separately). High-volume hospitals were defined as >60 cases per year, and high-volume surgeons were defined as >40 cases per year. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to evaluate whether robotic technique and high surgical volume impacted the cost of RP. There were 1499 patients who underwent RALRP and 2565 who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) during the study period. The total cost for RALRP was higher than for RRP ($14,000 vs 10,100; Probotic surgery has come to dominate the healthcare marketplace, strategies to increase the role of high-volume providers may be needed to improve the cost-effectiveness of prostate cancer surgical therapy.

  4. Late-onset incontinence in a cohort of radical prostatectomy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naselli, A.; Introini, C.; Andreatta, R.; Puppo, P.; Simone, G.; Papalia, R.; Gallucci, M.

    2011-01-01

    A cohort of 235 subjects, who underwent radical prostatectomy from 1994 to 2002, completely continent at the 2-year follow up and with the last follow-up visit in 2009, was examined to assess incidence and risk factors of late-onset incontinence. Median follow up was 100 months, range 84-176. At the last follow-up visit, 209 (89%) maintained continence, and 26 (11%) became incontinent. Specifically 14 out of 26 (6%) used one pad and 12 (5%) used two or more pads daily. Incidence of age ≥65 years at radical prostatectomy was greater in the subgroup who developed late incontinence, 109/209 (52%) vs 19/26 (73%). Incidence of adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy, of hormonal manipulation and of extraprostatic disease was similar in the two subgroups. Univariate and multivariate analysis did not disclose any difference. Late-onset incontinence is to be expected in about 10% of subjects who became completely continent after radical prostatectomy. The cause is likely to be related to ageing. Patients should be informed about the long-term risk of becoming incontinent. (author)

  5. Preliminary experience with extraperitoneal endoscopic radical prostatectomy through duplication of the open technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias-Machado, M; Lasmar, Marco T C; Medina, Jimmy J A; Forseto, Pedro H; Juliano, Roberto V; Wroclawski, Eric R

    2005-01-01

    To describe surgical and functional results with extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with duplication of the open technique, from the experience obtained in the treatment of 28 initial cases. In a 36-month period, we prospectively analyzed 28 patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer undergoing extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Mean surgical time was 280 min, with mean blood loss of 320 mL. As intraoperative complications, there were 2 rectal lesions repaired with laparoscopic suture in 2 planes. There was no conversion to open surgery. Median hospital stay was 3 days, with return to oral diet in the first post-operative day in patients. As post-operative complications, there were 3 cases of extraperitoneal urinary fistula. Two of these cases were resolved by maintaining a Foley catheter for 21 days, and the other one by late endoscopic reintervention for repositioning the catheter. Five out of 18 previously potent patients evolved with erectile dysfunction. The diagnosis of prostate cancer was confirmed in all patients, with focal positive margin occurring in 3 cases. During a mean follow-up of 18 months, 2 patients presented increased PSA, with no clinical evidence of disease. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is a laborious and difficult procedure, with a long learning curve. Extraperitoneal access is feasible, and it is possible to practically duplicate the principles of open surgery. The present technique can possibly offer advantages in terms of decreased blood loss, preservation of erectile function and prevention of positive margins.

  6. Phase II prospective randomized trial of weight loss prior to radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Susanne M; Galet, Colette; Gollapudi, Kiran; Byrd, Joshua B; Liang, Pei; Li, Zhaoping; Grogan, Tristan; Elashoff, David; Magyar, Clara E; Said, Jonathan; Cohen, Pinchas; Aronson, William J

    2017-12-04

    Obesity is associated with poorly differentiated and advanced prostate cancer and increased mortality. In preclinical models, caloric restriction delays prostate cancer progression and prolongs survival. We sought to determine if weight loss (WL) in men with prostate cancer prior to radical prostatectomy affects tumor apoptosis and proliferation, and if WL effects other metabolic biomarkers. In this Phase II prospective trial, overweight and obese men scheduled for radical prostatectomy were randomized to a 5-8 week WL program consisting of standard structured energy-restricted meal plans (1200-1500 Kcal/day) and physical activity or to a control group. The primary endpoint was apoptotic index in the radical prostatectomy malignant epithelium. Secondary endpoints were proliferation (Ki67) in the radical prostatectomy tissue, body weight, body mass index (BMI), waist to hip ratio, body composition, and serum PSA, insulin, triglyceride, cholesterol, testosterone, estradiol, leptin, adiponectin, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, insulin-like growth factor 1, and IGF binding protein 1. In total 23 patients were randomized to the WL intervention and 21 patients to the control group. Subjects in the intervention group had significantly more weight loss (WL:-3.7 ± 0.5 kg; Control:-1.6 ± 0.5 kg; p = 0.007) than the control group and total fat mass was significantly reduced (WL:-2.1 ± 0.4; Control: 0.1 ± 0.3; p = 0.015). There was no significant difference in apoptotic or proliferation index between the groups. Among the other biomarkers, triglyceride, and insulin levels were significantly decreased in the WL compared with the control group. In summary, this short-term WL program prior to radical prostatectomy resulted in significantly more WL in the intervention vs. the control group and was accompanied by significant reductions in body fat mass, circulating triglycerides, and insulin. However, no significant changes were observed in malignant

  7. Prostate cancer-related anxiety in long-term survivors after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Valentin H; Herkommer, Kathleen; Marten-Mittag, Birgitt; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Dinkel, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge of the psychological distress of long- and very long-term (>10 years) prostate cancer (PC) survivors is limited. This study intended to examine the parameters influencing anxiety related to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and PC in long-term survivors after radical prostatectomy. We surveyed 4719 PC survivors from the German multicenter prospective database "Familial Prostate Cancer." We evaluated the association of PC-related anxiety (MAX-PC) with sociodemographic characteristics, family history of PC, global health status/quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30), depression and anxiety (PHQ-2; GAD-2), latest PSA level, time since radical prostatectomy, and current therapy. The survey participants' mean age was 75.2 years (SD = 6.5). Median follow-up was 11.5 years, and 19.5% of participants had survived more than 15 years since the initial treatment. The final regression analysis found that younger age, lower global health status/quality of life, higher depression and anxiety scores, higher latest PSA level, and shorter time since radical prostatectomy predicted increased PSA-related anxiety and PC anxiety. Familial PC was predictive only of PSA anxiety (all p anxiety and 24% for PC anxiety. PC-related anxiety remained relevant many years after prostatectomy and was influenced by younger age, psychological status, rising PSA level, and shorter time since initial treatment. Survivors with these characteristics are at increased risk of PC-related anxieties, which should be considered by the treating physician during follow-up.

  8. VERIFICATION OF A TUMOR LESION OF INTRAPELVIC LYMPH NODES AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY. THE FIRST EXPERIENCE

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    V. V. Kapustin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the possibilities of transrectal ultrasound scan (TRUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in identifying and verifying a tumor lesion of intrapelvic lymph nodes (LN in patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.Subjects and methods. Metastatic tumor lesion of intrapelvic LNs was verified in 4 patients by transrectal ultrasound (US-guided needle biopsies. All the patients underwent multi-parametric MRI studies and TRUS.Results. The application of current MRI technologies (for qualitative and quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted images and for postcontrast sequences could detect and judge with confidence the metastatic lesion of intrapelvic LNs. TRUS permits clearly visualizing pathologically altered LNs, by taking into account their MRI pattern and verifying their tumor lesion by US-guided core needle biopsy.Conclusion. The combined use of multi-parametric MRI and TRUS provides a means for diagnosing and verifying the tumor lesion of pelvic LNs in patients after prostatectomy.

  9. VERIFICATION OF A TUMOR LESION OF INTRAPELVIC LYMPH NODES AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY. THE FIRST EXPERIENCE

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    V. V. Kapustin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the possibilities of transrectal ultrasound scan (TRUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in identifying and verifying a tumor lesion of intrapelvic lymph nodes (LN in patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.Subjects and methods. Metastatic tumor lesion of intrapelvic LNs was verified in 4 patients by transrectal ultrasound (US-guided needle biopsies. All the patients underwent multi-parametric MRI studies and TRUS.Results. The application of current MRI technologies (for qualitative and quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted images and for postcontrast sequences could detect and judge with confidence the metastatic lesion of intrapelvic LNs. TRUS permits clearly visualizing pathologically altered LNs, by taking into account their MRI pattern and verifying their tumor lesion by US-guided core needle biopsy.Conclusion. The combined use of multi-parametric MRI and TRUS provides a means for diagnosing and verifying the tumor lesion of pelvic LNs in patients after prostatectomy.

  10. Treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

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    Wadasaki, Koichi; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Matsuura, Kanji; Murakami, Yuji; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi; Ito, Katsuhide; Kiriu, Hiroshi; Ito, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    The indications for and the efficacy of radiation therapy after radical operation for patients with prostate cancer are not clear. We analyzed the treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Between September 1997 and November 2004, 57 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Fifteen patients received radiation therapy because of positive margins and/or extracapsular invasion in surgical specimens (adjuvant group). Forty-two patients received radiation therapy because of rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) during follow-up (salvage group). Radiation therapy was delivered to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles by a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique to a total dose of 60-66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Biochemical control was defined as the maintenance of a PSA level of less than 0.2 ng/ml. The median follow-up period after radiation therapy was 33 months (range, 12-98 months). Three-year biochemical control rates were 87% for the adjuvant group and 61% for the salvage group. For patients in the salvage group treated without hormone therapy, the preradiation PSA value was the most significant factor for the biochemical control rate. The 3-year biochemical control rate was 93% in patients whose preradiation PSA was 0.5 ng/ml or less and 29% in patients whose preradiation PSA was more than 0.5 ng/ml. No severe adverse effects (equal to or more than grade 3) were seen in treated patients. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy seemed to be effective for adjuvant therapy and for salvage therapy in patients with a preradiation PSA of 0.5 ng/ml or less. Also, radiation to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles, to a total dose of 60-66 Gy, using a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique, seemed to be safe. (author)

  11. Monotherapy of androgen deprivation therapy versus radical prostatectomy among veterans with localized prostate cancer: comparative effectiveness analysis of retrospective cohorts

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    Liu J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Jinan Liu1,2, Lizheng Shi1,2,3, Oliver Sartor31Tulane University, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 2Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System, Tulane University, 3School of Medicine and Tulane Cancer Center, New Orleans, LA, USABackground: This retrospective cohort study aimed to examine the comparative effectiveness of monotherapy of primary androgen deprivation therapy or radical prostatectomy.Methods: Male patients with localized prostate cancer (T1-T2, N0, M0 were identified in the Veterans Affairs Veterans Integrated Service Network 16 data warehouse (January 2003 to June 2006, with one-year baseline and at least three-year follow-up data (until June 2009. Patients were required to be 18–75 years old and without other recorded cancer history. The initiation of primary androgen deprivation therapy or monotherapy of radical prostatectomy within six months after the first diagnosis of prostate cancer was used as the index date. Primary androgen deprivation therapy patients were matched to the radical prostatectomy patients via propensity score, which was predicted from a logistic regression of treatment selection (primary androgen deprivation therapy versus radical prostatectomy on age, race, marital status, insurance type, cancer stage, Charlson comorbidity index, and alcohol and tobacco use. The overall survival from initiation of index treatment was then analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards model.Results: The two cohorts were well matched at baseline (all P > 0.05. During a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the cumulative incidence of death was 13 (10.57% among 123 primary androgen deprivation therapy patients and four (3.25% among 123 radical prostatectomy patients (P < 0.05. The overall three-year survival rate was 92.68% for primary androgen deprivation therapy and 98.37% for radical prostatectomy (P < 0.05. Patients who received primary androgen deprivation therapy had almost three times as

  12. Is There a Concordance Between the Gleason Scores of Needle Biopsy and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Prostatic Carsinoma?

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    Faruk Özgör

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the concordance between the Gleason Scores (GS of prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens. Methods: Prostate biopsy was performed in 1135 patients with the suspicion of prostate cancer in our clinic between 2008 and 2012. A total of 366 patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Radical prostatectomy was performed in 73 of these patients and GS of pathology specimens were included in this study for comparison. The patients were divided into three groups (low intermediate- and high-risk patients according to the D’amico risk classification for prostate cancer. Results: The median age of the patients was 64.2±6.1 years (54- 73. The mean prostate specific antigen level was 20.34 ng/mL and the mean biopsy core number was 12±0.58. A statistically significant concordance was detected between the GS of biopsy specimens and radical prostatectomy materials in 65.7% of patients (p<0.01. There were 40 patients in the low-risk group, however, 8 (20% of them were identified to be intermediate-risk patients and one (2.5% was found to be a high-risk patient after radical prostatectomy. Conclusion: Concordance between the GS of prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy materials are important for selection of the appropriate treatment

  13. Outcome of postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy: a single institutional experience

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    Lee, Sea Won; Chung, Mi Joo; Jeong, Song Mi; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Tae Kon; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Jang, Hong Seok [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sei Chul [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This single institutional study is aimed to observe the outcome of patients who received postoperative radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. A total of 59 men with histologically identified prostate adenocarcinoma who had received postoperative radiation after radical prostatectomy from August 2005 to July 2011 in Seoul St. Mary's Hospital of the Catholic University of Korea, was included. They received 45-50 Gy to the pelvis and boost on the prostate bed was given up to total dose of 63-72 Gy (median, 64.8 Gy) in conventional fractionation. The proportion of patients given hormonal therapy and the pattern in which it was given were analyzed. Primary endpoint was biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) after radiotherapy completion. Secondary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Biochemical relapse was defined as a prostate-specific antigen level above 0.2 ng/mL. After median follow-up of 53 months (range, 0 to 104 months), the 5-year bRFS of all patients was estimated 80.4%. The 5-year OS was estimated 96.6%. Patients who were given androgen deprivation therapy had a 5-year bRFS of 95.1% while the ones who were not given any had that of 40.0% (p < 0.01). However, the statistical significance in survival difference did not persist in multivariate analysis. The 3-year actuarial grade 3 chronic toxicity was 1.7% and no grade 3 acute toxicity was observed. The biochemical and toxicity outcome of post-radical prostatectomy radiotherapy in our institution is favorable and comparable to those of other studies.

  14. Posterior muscolofascial reconstruction incorporated into urethrovescical anastomosis during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

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    Ficarra, Vincenzo; Gan, Melanie; Borghesi, Marco; Zattoni, Fabio; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2012-12-01

    The rationale of posterior musculofascial plate reconstruction during radical prostatectomy is to shorten the time to reach urinary continence recovery and to reduce the risk of bleeding and anastomosis leakage. We describe our original technique incorporating the posterior muscolofascial reconstruction into urethrovesical anastomosis using robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). For this reconstructive step, we use a 30-cm V-Loc 90 3-0 barbed suture (V-20 tapered needle). Specifically, the free edge of the posterior layer of the Denonvilliers fascia is approximated to the posterior part of the sphincteric apparatus in a running fashion from left to right. The musculature of the urethral wall is incorporated in this first layer of the running suture. This suture is then continued back to the left in a second layer incorporating the anterior layer of the Denonvilliers fascia (or prostatovesical muscle), the bladder neck, and again the urethra, this time also with urethral mucosa. The urethrovesical anastomosis is completed using a second running barbed suture (15-cm V-Loc 90 3-0 barbed suture, V-20 tapered needle). No intraoperative complications were observed during this step of the procedure. Anastomotic leakages were observed only in 2% of cases. Only 12.5% showed urinary incontinence after catheter removal (1-2 pads). At mean follow-up of 9 months, the urinary continence recovery was 95%, and an anastomosis stricture necessitating an endoscopic incision developed in only three (1.5%) patients. Recent systematic reviews of the literature showed only a minimal advantage in favor of posterior musculofascial reconstruction in terms of urinary continence recovery within 1 month after radical prostatectomy. We support the use of this step of RARP because it is simple, reproducible, with a very limited increase in operative time, and with only a slight risk of potential harm to the patient. Moreover, it could improve hemostasis and provide greater support for a

  15. Salvage conformal radiotherapy for biochemical recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

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    Carlos R. Monti

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assess the results of salvage conformal radiotherapy in patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy and identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence and toxicity of the treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From June 1998 to November 2001, 35 patients were submitted to conformal radiotherapy for PSA > 0.2 ng/mL in progression after radical prostatectomy and were retrospectively analyzed. The mean dose of radiation in prostatic bed was of 77.4 Gy (68-81. Variables related to the treatment and to tumor were assessed to identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence after salvage radiotherapy. RESULTS: The median follow-up was of 55 months (17-83. The actuarial survival rates free of biochemical recurrence and free of metastasis at a distance of 5 years were 79.7% e 84.7%, respectively. The actuarial global survival rate in 5 years was 96.1%.The actuarial survival rate free of biochemical recurrence in 5 years was 83.3% with PSA pre-radiotherapy 1 and 2 (p = 0.023. Dose > 70 Gy in 30% of the bladder volume implied in more acute urinary toxicity (p = 0.035. The mean time for the development of late urinary toxicity was 21 months (12-51. Dose > 55 Gy in 50% bladder volume implied in more late urinary toxicity (p = 0.018. A patient presented late rectal toxicity of 2nd grade. CONCLUSIONS: Conformal radiotherapy showed to be effective for the control of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Patients with pre-therapy PSA < 2 ng/mL have more biochemical control.

  16. Preoperative predictive model of recovery of urinary continence after radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kazuhito; Kent, Matthew T.; Vickers, Andrew J.; von Bodman, Christian; Bernstein, Melanie; Touijer, Karim A.; Coleman, Jonathan; Laudone, Vincent; Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James A.; Akin, Oguz; Sandhu, Jaspreet S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective ● To build a predictive model of urinary continence recovery following radical prostatectomy that incorporates magnetic resonance imaging parameters and clinical data. Patients and Methods ● We conducted a retrospective review of data from 2,849 patients who underwent pelvic staging magnetic resonance imaging prior to radical prostatectomy from November 2001 to June 2010. ● We used logistic regression to evaluate the association between each MRI variable and continence at 6 or 12 months, adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score and then used multivariable logistic regression to create our model. ● A nomogram was constructed using the multivariable logistic regression models. Results ● In total, 68% (n=1,742/2,559) and 82% (n=2,205/2,689) regained function at 6 and 12 months, respectively. ● In the base model, age, BMI, and ASA score were significant predictors of continence at 6 or 12 months on univariate analysis (p <0.005). ● Among the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging measurements, membranous urethral length, which showed great significance, was incorporated into the base model to create the full model. ● For continence recovery at 6 months, the addition of membranous urethral length increased the AUC to 0.664 for the validation set, an increase of 0.064 over the base model. For continence recovery at 12 months, the AUC was 0.674, an increase of 0.085 over the base model. Conclusions ● Using our model, the likelihood of continence recovery increases with membranous urethral length and decreases with age, body mass index, and ASA score. ● This model could be used for patient counseling and for the identification of patients at high risk for urinary incontinence in whom to study changes in operative technique that improve urinary function after radical prostatectomy. PMID:25682782

  17. Feasibility study of a clinically-integrated randomized trial of modifications to radical prostatectomy

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    Vickers Andrew J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous technical modifications to radical prostatectomy have been proposed. Such modifications are likely to lead to only slight improvements in outcomes. Although small differences would be worthwhile, an appropriately powered randomized trial would need to be very large, and thus of doubtful feasibility given the expense, complexity and regulatory burden of contemporary clinical trials. We have proposed a novel methodology, the clinically-integrated randomized trial, which dramatically streamlines trial procedures in order to reduce the marginal cost of an additional patient towards zero. We aimed to determine the feasibility of implementing such a trial for radical prostatectomy. Methods Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy as initial treatment for prostate cancer were randomized in a factorial design to involvement of the fascia during placement of the anastomotic sutures, urethral irrigation, both or neither. Endpoint data were obtained from routine clinical documentation. Accrual and compliance rates were monitored to determine the feasibility of the trial. Results From a total of 260 eligible patients, 154 (59% consented; 56 patients declined to participate, 20 were not approached on recommendation of the treating surgeon, and 30 were not approached for logistical reasons. Although recording by surgeons of the procedure used was incomplete (~80%, compliance with randomization was excellent when it was recorded, with only 6% of procedures inconsistent with allocation. Outcomes data was received from 71% of patients at one year. This improved to 83% as the trial progressed. Conclusions A clinically-integrated randomized trial was conducted at low cost, with excellent accrual, and acceptable compliance with treatment allocation and outcomes reporting. This demonstrates the feasibility of the methodology. Improved methods to ensure documentation of surgical procedures would be required before wider implementation

  18. Physician social networks and variation in rates of complications after radical prostatectomy.

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    Evan Pollack, Craig; Wang, Hao; Bekelman, Justin E; Weissman, Gary; Epstein, Andrew J; Liao, Kaijun; Dugoff, Eva H; Armstrong, Katrina

    2014-07-01

    Variation in care within and across geographic areas remains poorly understood. The goal of this article was to examine whether physician social networks-as defined by shared patients-are associated with rates of complications after radical prostatectomy. In five cities, we constructed networks of physicians on the basis of their shared patients in 2004-2005 Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data. From these networks, we identified subgroups of urologists who most frequently shared patients with one another. Among men with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy, we used multilevel analysis with generalized linear mixed-effect models to examine whether physician network structure-along with specific characteristics of the network subgroups-was associated with rates of 30-day and late urinary complications, and long-term incontinence after accounting for patient-level sociodemographic, clinical factors, and urologist patient volume. Networks included 2677 men in five cities who underwent radical prostatectomy. The unadjusted rate of 30-day surgical complications varied across network subgroups from an 18.8 percentage-point difference in the rate of complications across network subgroups in city 1 to a 26.9 percentage-point difference in city 5. Large differences in unadjusted rates of late urinary complications and long-term incontinence across subgroups were similarly found. Network subgroup characteristics-average urologist centrality and patient racial composition-were significantly associated with rates of surgical complications. Analysis of physician networks using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data provides insight into observed variation in rates of complications for localized prostate cancer. If validated, such approaches may be used to target future quality improvement interventions. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier

  19. Salvage conformal radiotherapy for biochemical recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, Carlos R.; Nakamura, Ricardo A.; Ferrigno, Robson; Rossi Junior, Aristides; Kawakami, Neusa S.; Trevisan, Felipe A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Assess the results of salvage conformal radiotherapy in patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy and identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence and toxicity of the treatment. Materials and methods: From June 1998 to November 2001, 35 patients were submitted to conformal radiotherapy for PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/mL in progression after radical prostatectomy and were retrospectively analyzed. The mean dose of radiation in prostatic bed was of 77.4 Gy (68-81). Variables related to the treatment and to tumor were assessed to identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence after salvage radiotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was of 55 months (17-83). The actuarial survival rates free of biochemical recurrence and free of metastasis at a distance of 5 years were 79.7% e 84.7%, respectively. The actuarial global survival rate in 5 years was 96.1%.The actuarial survival rate free of biochemical recurrence in 5 years was 83.3% with PSA pre-radiotherapy ≤ 1, 100% when > 1 and ≤ 2, and 57.1% when > 2 (p = 0.023). Dose > 70 Gy in 30% of the bladder volume implied in more acute urinary toxicity (p = 0.035). The mean time for the development of late urinary toxicity was 21 months (12-51). Dose > 55 Gy in 50% bladder volume implied in more late urinary toxicity (p = 0.018). A patient presented late rectal toxicity of second grade. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy showed to be effective for the control of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Patients with pre-therapy PSA < 2 ng/mL have more biochemical control. (author)

  20. Salvage radiotherapy for prostate-specific antigen relapse after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. A single-center experience

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    Yoshida, Takahiro; Nakayama, Masashi; Suzuki, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and prognostic factors of salvage radiotherapy for prostate-specific antigen relapse after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer at a single center in Japan. A retrospective review of the medical records of 51 patients who underwent salvage radiotherapy for prostate-specific antigen relapse after radical prostatectomy was carried out. Salvage radiotherapy was undergone for the single indication of at least two consecutive prostate-specific antigen elevations >0.1 ng/ml. Salvage radiotherapy was delivered to the prostatic bed at a total dose of 60 or 64 Gy. Late toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. A total dose of 60 and 64 Gy were administered to 26 and 25 patients, respectively. The median prostate-specific antigen level at the initiation of radiotherapy was 0.29 ng/ml (range, 0.11-1.10 ng/ml). With a median follow-up of 57.3 months (range, 9.9-134.0 months), the prostate-specific antigen relapse-free rate at 5 years was 50.7%. Multivariate analysis using Cox's proportional hazards regression model revealed that the Gleason score at radical prostatectomy ≥8 significantly predicted prostate-specific antigen relapse after salvage radiotherapy (hazard ratio 4.531; 95% confidence interval 1.413-14.535; P=0.011). The prostate-specific antigen relapse-free rate at 5 years in the Gleason score at radical prostatectomy ≤7 and at radical prostatectomy ≥8 was 62.7 and 15.4%, respectively. Salvage radiotherapy was effective for prostate-specific antigen relapse after radical prostatectomy with tolerable toxicities in Japanese patients. A high Gleason score seemed to be a poor prognostic factor. (author)

  1. Early catheter removal after radical retropubic prostatectomy: long-term followup.

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    Koch, Michael O; Nayee, Anish H; Sloan, James; Gardner, Thomas; Wahle, Greg R; Bihrle, Richard; Foster, Richard S

    2003-06-01

    We examine the complication and continence rates with early catheter removal (day 3 or 4) after radical retropubic prostatectomy. A total of 365 patients with localized prostate cancer underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy at Indiana University Hospital with planned urethral catheter removal before discharge home. Low pressure cystograms were performed on postoperative day 3 or 4 to determine if catheter removal was possible. A subset of patients were analyzed using a validated prostate cancer specific questionnaire (University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Symptom Index) to determine quality of life outcomes. The catheter was removed on postoperative day 3 or 4 in 263 patients (72%). The reasons for leaving the catheter indwelling were significant leak on cystogram or excessive suprapubic drainage (21%), extensive bladder neck reconstruction (1%) and prolonged hospitalization because of an ileus or other complicating factor (6%). Thirteen patients (3.6%) were either unable to void after catheter removal or presented with retention (not associated with hematuria or clots) after hospital discharge, requiring reinsertion of the Foley catheter. A total of 41 patients (11%) had either an early or late complication (excluding incontinence). There were 3 complications (0.8%) that were considered major because they were potentially life threatening or required a return to the operating room. A pelvic abscess developed in 2 patients and a lymphocele in 1, which required percutaneous drainage. After at least 6 months (mean 20.9 months) 140 patients (89.2%) and 14 (8.9%) reported excellent and good continence, respectively. The patient questionnaire demonstrated bother scores to be minimal to no bother for 95% to 98% of patients at 6 and 12 months. This study confirms that it is safe to remove catheters in most patients 3 to 4 days after prostatectomy if a cystogram demonstrates no extravasation. Complication rates and continence rates with this approach

  2. Ex vivo metabolic fingerprinting identifies biomarkers predictive of prostate cancer recurrence following radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braadland, Peder R; Giskeødegård, Guro; Sandsmark, Elise; Bertilsson, Helena; Euceda, Leslie R; Hansen, Ailin F; Guldvik, Ingrid J; Selnæs, Kirsten M; Grytli, Helene H; Katz, Betina; Svindland, Aud; Bathen, Tone F; Eri, Lars M; Nygård, Ståle; Berge, Viktor; Taskén, Kristin A; Tessem, May-Britt

    2017-11-21

    Robust biomarkers that identify prostate cancer patients with high risk of recurrence will improve personalised cancer care. In this study, we investigated whether tissue metabolites detectable by high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS MRS) were associated with recurrence following radical prostatectomy. We performed a retrospective ex vivo study using HR-MAS MRS on tissue samples from 110 radical prostatectomy specimens obtained from three different Norwegian cohorts collected between 2002 and 2010. At the time of analysis, 50 patients had experienced prostate cancer recurrence. Associations between metabolites, clinicopathological variables, and recurrence-free survival were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression modelling, Kaplan-Meier survival analyses and concordance index (C-index). High intratumoural spermine and citrate concentrations were associated with longer recurrence-free survival, whereas high (total-choline+creatine)/spermine (tChoCre/Spm) and higher (total-choline+creatine)/citrate (tChoCre/Cit) ratios were associated with shorter time to recurrence. Spermine concentration and tChoCre/Spm were independently associated with recurrence in multivariate Cox proportional hazards modelling after adjusting for clinically relevant risk factors (C-index: 0.769; HR: 0.72; P=0.016 and C-index: 0.765; HR: 1.43; P=0.014, respectively). Spermine concentration and tChoCre/Spm ratio in prostatectomy specimens were independent prognostic markers of recurrence. These metabolites can be noninvasively measured in vivo and may thus offer predictive value to establish preoperative risk assessment nomograms.

  3. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015

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    Augusto Cesar Soares dos Santos Junior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5. The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years, was 44% (n=40. The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years. Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7% resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3% additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1% underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%. Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%. In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices.

  4. What if the hand piece spring disassembles during robotic radical prostatectomy?

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    Akbulut, Ziya; Canda, Abdullah Erdem; Atmaca, Ali Fuat; Asil, Erem; Isgoren, Egemen; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2011-01-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) is successfully being performed for treating prostate cancer (PCa). However, instrumentation failure associated with robotic procedures represents a unique new problem. We report the successful completion of RALRP in spite of a disassembled hand piece spring during the procedure. A PubMed/Medline search was made concerning robotic malfunction and robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy to discuss our experience. We performed RALRP in a 60-year-old male patient with localized PCa. During the procedure, the spring of the hand piece disassembled, and we were not able to reassemble it. We completed the procedure successfully however without fixing the disassembled hand piece spring. We were able to grasp tissue and needles when we brought our fingers together. The only movement we needed to do was to move fingers apart to release tissue or needles caught by robotic instrument. Although malfunction risk related to the da Vinci Surgical System seems to be very low, it might still occur. Sometimes, simple maneuvers may compensate for the failed function as occurred in our case. However, patients should be informed before the operation about the possibility of converting their procedure to laparoscopic or open due to robotic malfunction.

  5. Life experiences of Brazilian men with urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction following radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes Lopes, Maria Helena Baena; Higa, Rosângela; Cordeiro, Sílvia Nogueira; Rodrigues Estapê, Nuri Aparecida; Levi D'ancona, Carlos Arturo; Turato, Egberto Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the psychosocial meaning and repercussions on lifestyle associated with erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence (UI) in men following radical prostatectomy. Ten men from Southeastern Brazil who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer were interviewed. All participants underwent treatment at a urology clinic during the period of September 2007 to February 2009. A clinical-qualitative study was conducted, using semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Each man was interviewed once. The average length of the interviews was 37 minutes (range: 16 to 81 minutes). Data from the interviews were subjected to content thematic analysis and development of categories based on psychodynamic references. Three themes were identified: (1) sexuality called into question; (2) a body without governance; and (3) experiencing loss. These men reported difficulties in dealing both with the physical and emotional impotence resulting from the treatment. Urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction affected their body by accentuating conflicts related to masculinity, triggering subjective feelings of powerlessness, and psychological distress. Study respondents assigned multiple psychological meanings to issues related to feelings of powerlessness in general, leading to a narcissistic wound. The men experienced UI as a bodily deficiency, and erectile dysfunction was experienced as a feeling of being devitalized. These results suggest that UI from prostate cancer treatment affects sexuality and self-esteem.

  6. Prostate size and adverse pathologic features in men undergoing radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Kyu; Poon, Bing Ying; Sjoberg, Daniel D; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the relationship between prostate volume measured from preoperative imaging and adverse pathologic features at the time of radical prostatectomy and evaluate the potential effect of clinical stage on such relationship. In 1756 men who underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and radical prostatectomy from 2000 to 2010, we examined associations of magnetic resonance imaging-measured prostate volume with pathologic outcomes using univariate logistic regression and with postoperative biochemical recurrence using Cox proportional hazards models. We also analyzed the effects of clinical stage on the relationship between prostate volume and adverse pathologic features via interaction analyses. In univariate analyses, smaller prostate volume was significantly associated with high pathologic Gleason score (P.05). The association between prostate volume and recurrence was significant in a multivariable analysis adjusting for postoperative variables (P=.031) but missed statistical significance in the preoperative model (P=.053). Addition of prostate volume did not change C-Indices (0.78 and 0.83) of either model. Although prostate size did not enhance the prediction of recurrence, it is associated with aggressiveness of prostate cancer. There is no evidence that this association differs depending on clinical stage. Prospective studies are warranted assessing the effect of initial method of detection on the relationship between volume and outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Relationship of age to outcome and clinicopathologic findings in men submitted to radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanase Billis

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It is controversial whether age is associated with higher grade and worse outcome. Some studies have not found age to be related to outcome nor younger age to be associated with better response to therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population consisted of 27 patients aged 55 years or younger and 173 patients 56 years or older submitted to radical prostatectomy. The variables studied were preoperative PSA, time to PSA progression following radical prostatectomy and pathologic findings in surgical specimens: Gleason score, Gleason predominant grade, positive surgical margins, tumor extent, extraprostatic extension (pT3a, and seminal vesicle invasion (pT3b. RESULTS: Comparing patients aged 55 years or younger and 56 years or older, there was no statistically significant difference for all variables studied: preoperative PSA (p = 0.4417, Gleason score (p = 0.3934, Gleason predominant grade (p = 0.2653, tumor extent (p = 0.1190, positive surgical margins (p = 0.8335, extraprostatic extension (p = 0.3447 and seminal vesicle invasion (p > 0.9999. During the study period, 44 patients (22% developed PSA progression. No difference was found in the time to biochemical progression between men aged 55 years or younger and 56 years or older. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that age alone do not influence the biological aggressiveness of prostate cancer.

  8. Multimedia support in preoperative patient education for radical prostatectomy: the physicians' point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrig, Andreas; Herzog, Wolfgang; Huber, Christian G; Hadaschik, Boris; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus; Huber, Johannes

    2012-05-01

    To systematically assess the physicians' point of view of multimedia support in preoperative patient education for radical prostatectomy. We evaluated the view of physicians performing multimedia supported preoperative educations within a randomized controlled trial. Therein 8 physicians educated 203 patients for radical prostatectomy. All physicians rated multimedia supported education better than the standard procedure. Main reasons were better comprehensibility, the visual presentation, and greater ease in explaining complex issues. Objective time measurement showed no difference between both educations. The major disadvantage was the impression, that multimedia supported education lasted longer. Moreover, they had the impression that some details could be further improved. Given the choice, every physician would decide for multimedia support. Physicians appreciate multimedia support in preoperative education and contrary to their impression, multimedia support does not prolong patient education. Therefore, patients and physicians likewise profit from multimedia support for education and counseling. The readiness of physicians is a possible obstacle to this improvement, as their view is a key factor for the transition to everyday routine. Therefore, our results could alleviate this possible barrier for establishing multimedia supported education in clinical routine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of secondary diagnoses in the development of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Padilla-Fernández

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study whether there are factors related to secondary diagnoses (SDg present in patients with prostate cancer that influence the development of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy (RP. Materials and methods: A retrospective multicenter observational study was performed reviewing the medical records of 430 men who underwent RP due to organ-confined prostate cancer in 9 different hospitals. Two study groups were distinguished: Group A (GA: Patients without urinary incontinence after RP; Group B (GB: patients with any degree of post-surgical urinary incontinence. Results: Average age at surgery was 63.42 years (range 45-73. 258 patients were continent after surgery and 172 patients complaint of any degree of incontinence after RP. A higher percentage of healthy patients was found in group A (continent after surgery than in group B (p = 0.001. The most common SDg prior to surgery were hypertension, lower urinary tract symptoms, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus and erectile dysfunction, but none did show a greater trend towards post-surgical incontinence. Conclusions: A better health status prior to surgery is associated to a lower incidence of new-onset urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. However, no correlation was found between the most common medical disorders and the development of post-surgical urinary incontinence.

  10. Does penile rehabilitation have a role in the treatment of erectile dysfunction following radical prostatectomy? [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Blecher

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In men undergoing radical treatment for prostate cancer, erectile function is one of the most important health-related quality-of-life outcomes influencing patient choice in treatment. Penile rehabilitation has emerged as a therapeutic measure to prevent erectile dysfunction and expedite return of erectile function after radical prostatectomy. Penile rehabilitation involves a program designed to increase the likelihood of return to baseline-level erectile function, as opposed to treatment, which implies the therapeutic treatment of symptoms, a key component of post–radical prostatectomy management. Several pathological theories form the basis for rehabilitation, and a plethora of treatments are currently in widespread use. However, whilst there is some evidence supporting the concept of penile rehabilitation from animal studies, randomised controlled trials are contradictory in outcomes. Similarly, urological guidelines are conflicted in terms of recommendations. Furthermore, it is clear that in spite of the lack of evidence for the role of penile rehabilitation, many urologists continue to employ some form of rehabilitation in their patients after radical prostatectomy. This is a significant burden to health resources in public-funded health economies, and no effective cost-benefit analysis has been undertaken to support this practice. Thus, further research is warranted to provide both scientific and clinical evidence for this contemporary practice and the development of preventative strategies in treating erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy.

  11. The "halo effect" in Korea: change in practice patterns since the introduction of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ee-Rah; Jeong, Wooju; Park, Sung Yul; Ham, Won Sik; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon; Rha, Koon Ho

    2009-03-01

    Acquisition of the da Vinci surgical system (Intuitive Surgical, Mountain View, USA) has enabled robot-assisted surgery to become an acceptable alternative to open radical prostatectomy (ORP). Implementation of robotics at a single institution in Korea induced a gradual increase in the number of performances of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) to surgically treat localized prostate cancer. We analyzed the impact of robotic instrumentation on practice patterns among urologists and explain the change in value in ORP and RALP-the standard treatment and the new approach or innovation of robotic technology. The overall number of prostatectomies has increased over time because the number of RALPs has grown drastically whereas the number of OPRs did not decrease during the period of evaluation. Our experience emphasizes the potential of RALP to become the gold standard in the treatment of localized prostate cancer in various parts of the world.

  12. Radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risks of this procedure are: Problems controlling bowel movements ( bowel incontinence ) Problems controlling urine ( urinary incontinence ) Erection problems (impotence) Injury to the rectum Urethral stricture (tightening of the urinary opening due ...

  13. Radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    surgery and at follow-up and they were asked to report their use of pads/diapers. Potency was defined as an IIEF-5 score of at least 17 with or without phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. Patients using up to one pad daily for security reasons only were considered continent. Positive surgical margins, blood...

  14. Biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy in intermediate-risk group men increases with the number of risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuki Furubayashi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The number of intermediate risk factors is significantly associated with the PSA failure-free survival rate after radical prostatectomy in the intermediate-risk group. Patients classified into the intermediate-risk group based on all three intermediate risk factors are less likely to achieve a complete cure through surgery alone.

  15. Risk of biochemical recurrence and positive surgical margins in patients with pT2 prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To investigate risk factors associated with positive surgical margins (PSM) and biochemical recurrence (BR) in organ confined tumors (pT2) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS: Between 1995 and 2011, 1,649 patients underwent RP...

  16. Meta-analysis of comparison between brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xiaodong; Jiang Qing; Yuan Gengbiao; Wang Jiawu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the therapeutic effect of brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer using a Meta-analysis. Methods: The published data with randomized control trials (RCT) on comparison of brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer in PubMed, Wanfang database, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBMdisc), the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Ovid and Cochrane library were searched and screened. The quality of the studies included was evaluated and the data with 5-year event free survival rate for comparison were extracted. Meta-analysis was performed by RevMan 5.0 (Cochrane reviews software). Results: From six trials, there were 5903 patients that were eligible for the analysis, in which 3323 patients were treated by brachytherapy and other 2580 by radical prostatectomy. The odds ratio of all trials was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.69-1.45, P=0.99) and there was no significant difference of 5-year event free survival rate between two treatment groups. Conclusion: This Meta analysis shows that brachytherapy may have comparable treatment effect than radical prostatectomy. (authors)

  17. Predictors of prostate cancer specific mortality after radical prostatectomy: 10 year oncologic outcomes from the Victorian Radical Prostatectomy Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Damien M; Papa, Nathan; Ta, Anthony D; Millar, Jeremy; Davidson, Adee-Jonathan; Pedersen, John; Syme, Rodney; Patel, Manish I; Giles, Graham G

    2015-10-01

    To identify the ability of multiple variables to predict prostate cancer specific mortality (PCSM) in a whole of population series of all radical prostatectomies (RP) performed in Victoria, Australia. A total of 2154 open RPs were performed in Victoria between July 1995 and December 2000. Subjects without follow up data, Gleason grade, pathological stage were excluded as were those who had pT4 disease or received neoadjuvant treatment. 1967 cases (91.3% of total) met the inclusion criteria for this study. Tumour characteristics were collated via a central registry. We used competing hazards regression models to investigate associations. At median follow up of 10.3 years pT stage of RP (P pattern at RP in this whole of population study suggests a need to avoid understaging/grading in the process of cancer diagnosis and active surveillance protocols. Multi-modality therapy is likely to have a greater impact on PCSM in higher stage and Gleason grade disease. Identification of increased PCSM with rural residency and with involvement of a trainee urologist, and reduction in PCSM with higher surgeon volume all suggest potential for improved PC outcomes to be achieved with changes to surgical training and service delivery. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A natural language processing program effectively extracts key pathologic findings from radical prostatectomy reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Brian J; Merchant, Madhur; Zheng, Chengyi; Thomas, Anil A; Contreras, Richard; Jacobsen, Steven J; Chien, Gary W

    2014-12-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) software programs have been widely developed to transform complex free text into simplified organized data. Potential applications in the field of medicine include automated report summaries, physician alerts, patient repositories, electronic medical record (EMR) billing, and quality metric reports. Despite these prospects and the recent widespread adoption of EMR, NLP has been relatively underutilized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of an internally developed NLP program in extracting select pathologic findings from radical prostatectomy specimen reports in the EMR. An NLP program was generated by a software engineer to extract key variables from prostatectomy reports in the EMR within our healthcare system, which included the TNM stage, Gleason grade, presence of a tertiary Gleason pattern, histologic subtype, size of dominant tumor nodule, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), perineural invasion (PNI), angiolymphatic invasion (ALI), extracapsular extension (ECE), and surgical margin status (SMS). The program was validated by comparing NLP results to a gold standard compiled by two blinded manual reviewers for 100 random pathology reports. NLP demonstrated 100% accuracy for identifying the Gleason grade, presence of a tertiary Gleason pattern, SVI, ALI, and ECE. It also demonstrated near-perfect accuracy for extracting histologic subtype (99.0%), PNI (98.9%), TNM stage (98.0%), SMS (97.0%), and dominant tumor size (95.7%). The overall accuracy of NLP was 98.7%. NLP generated a result in report. This novel program demonstrated high accuracy and efficiency identifying key pathologic details from the prostatectomy report within an EMR system. NLP has the potential to assist urologists by summarizing and highlighting relevant information from verbose pathology reports. It may also facilitate future urologic research through the rapid and automated creation of large databases.

  19. Comparison of mortality outcomes after radical prostatectomy versus radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer. A population-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollah, F.; Schmitges, J.; Sun, M.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the mortality outcomes of radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy as treatment modalities for patients with localized prostate cancer. Our cohort consisted of 68 665 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy, between 1992 and 2005. Propensity-score matching was used to minimize potential bias related to treatment assignment. Competing-risks analyses tested the effect of treatment type on cancer-specific mortality, after accounting for other-cause mortality. All analyses were stratified according to prostate cancer risk groups, baseline Charlson Comorbidity Index and age. For patients treated with radical prostatectomy versus radiotherapy, the 10-year cancer-specific mortality rates were 1.4 versus 3.9% in low-intermediate risk prostate cancer and 6.8 versus 11.5% in high-risk prostate cancer, respectively. Rates were 2.4 versus 5.9% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of 0, 2.4 versus 5.1% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of 1, and 2.9 versus 5.2% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of ≥2. Rates were 2.1 versus 5.0% in patients aged 65-69 years, 2.8 versus 5.5% in patients aged 70-74 years, and 2.9 versus 7.6% in patients aged 75-80 years (all P<0.001). At multivariable analyses, radiotherapy was associated with less favorable cancer-specific mortality in all categories (all P<0.001). Patients treated with radical prostatectomy fare substantially better than those treated with radiotherapy. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer benefit the most from radical prostatectomy. Conversely, the lowest benefit was observed in patients with low-intermediate risk prostate cancer and/or multiple comorbidities. An intermediate benefit was observed in the other examined categories. (author)

  20. Exploring gay couples' experience with sexual dysfunction after radical prostatectomy: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Mary-Ellen; Irvine, Jane; Currie, Kristen L; Ritvo, Paul; Trachtenberg, Lianne; Louis, Alyssa; Trachtenberg, John; Jamnicky, Leah; Matthew, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the experience of three gay couples managing sexual dysfunction as a result of undergoing a radical prostatectomy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted as part of a larger study at an urban hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Interview transcripts were transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The authors clustered 18 subordinate themes under 3 superordinate themes: (a) acknowledging change in sexual experience (libido, erectile function, sexual activity, orgasmic function); (b) accommodating change in sexual experience (strategies: emphasizing intimacy, embracing plan B, focus on the other; barriers: side-effect concerns, loss of naturalness, communication breakdown, failure to initiate, trial and failure, partner confounds); and (c) accepting change in sexual experience (indicators: emphasizing health, age attributions, finding a new normal; barriers: uncertain outcomes, treatment regrets). Although gay couples and heterosexual couples share many similar challenges, we discovered that gay men have particular sexual roles and can engage in novel accommodation practices, such as open relationships, that have not been noted in heterosexual couples. All couples, regardless of their level of sexual functioning, highlighted the need for more extensive programming related to sexual rehabilitation. Equitable rehabilitative support is critical to assist homosexual couples manage distress associated with prostatectomy-related sexual dysfunction.

  1. Is a wider angle of the membranous urethra associated with incontinence after radical prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soljanik, Irina; Bauer, Ricarda M; Becker, Armin J; Stief, Christian G; Gozzi, Christian; Solyanik, Olga; Brocker, Kerstin A; Kirchhoff, Sonja M

    2014-12-01

    To investigate whether differences in the anatomy and dynamics of the pelvic floor (PF) in patients after radical prostatectomy (RP) depicted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are associated with continence status. In the prospective designed study, 24 patients with post-prostatectomy stress urinary incontinence were enrolled. Additionally, 10 continent patients after RP were matched for age, body mass index and perioperative parameters. All patients underwent continence assessment and MRI (TrueFISP sequence; TR 4.57 ms; TE 2.29 ms; slice thickness 7 mm; FOV 270 mm) 12 months after RP. Images were analyzed for membranous urethra length (MUL), angle of the membranous urethra (AMU), severity of periurethral/urethral fibrosis, lifting of the levator ani muscle, lowering of the posterior bladder wall (BPW), bladder neck (BN) and external urinary sphincter (EUS), and symphyseal rotation of these structures during the Valsalva maneuver and voiding. Compared to continent controls, incontinent patients showed a significant wider AMU during voiding (p = 0.002) and more pronounced lowering of the BN and EUS (p urethra as a result of anchoring of the BN and EUS in the PF appears to be an important functional factor with an essential impact on continence after RP. Functional MRI seems to be a helpful imaging tool for morphologic and dynamic evaluation of the PF.

  2. Neoadjuvant Treatment of High-Risk, Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Prior to Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietzak, Eugene J; Eastham, James A

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal strategies combining local and systemic therapy offer the greatest chance of cure for many with men with high-risk prostate cancer who may harbor occult metastatic disease. However, no systemic therapy combined with radical prostatectomy has proven beneficial. This was in part due to a lack of effective systemic agents; however, there have been several advancements in the metastatic and castrate-resistant prostate cancer that might prove beneficial if given earlier in the natural history of the disease. For example, novel hormonal agents have recently been approved for castration-resistant prostate cancer with some early phase II neoadjuvant showing promise. Additionally, combination therapy with docetaxel-based chemohormonal has demonstrated a profound survival benefit in metastatic hormone-naïve patients and might have a role in eliminating pre-existing ADT-resistant tumor cells in the neoadjuvant setting. The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB)/Alliance 90203 trial has finished accrual and should answer the question as to whether neoadjuvant docetaxel-based chemohormonal therapy provides an advantage over prostatectomy alone. There are also several promising targeted agents and immunotherapies under investigation in phase I/II trials with the potential to provide benefit in the neoadjuvant setting.

  3. Radical prostatectomy outcome when performed with PSA above 20 ng/ml.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connolly, S S

    2012-02-01

    Many centres currently do not offer radical prostatectomy (RP) to men with high-risk localised prostate cancer due to concerns regarding poor outcome, despite evidence to the contrary. We identified 18 men undergoing RP with serum PSA >20 ng\\/ml (high-risk by National Comprehensive Cancer Network definition) and minimum follow-up of 12 years (mean 13.5). Mean preoperative PSA was 37.0 ng\\/ml (Range 21.1-94.0). Prostatectomy pathology reported extracapsular disease in 16 (88.9%), positive surgical margins in 15 (83%) and positive pelvic lymph nodes in 5 (27.8%). Overall and cancer-specific survival at 5 and 10-years was 83.3%, 88.2%, 72% and 76.5% respectively. With complete follow-up 11 (61.1%) are alive, and 5 (27.8%) avoided any adjuvant therapy. Complete continence (defined as no involuntary urine leakage and no use of pads) was achieved in 60%, with partial continence in the remainder. We conclude that surgery for this aggressive variant of localised prostate cancer can result in satisfactory outcome.

  4. A short-term cost-effectiveness study comparing robot-assisted laparoscopic and open retropubic radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohwü, Lena; Borre, Michael; Ehlers, Lars

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cost effectiveness and cost utility comparing robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) versus retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP). METHODS: In a retrospective cohort study a total of 231 men between the age of 50 and 69 years and with clinically localised prostate....... An economic evaluation was made to estimate direct costs of the first postoperative year and an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) per successful surgical treatment and per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). A successful RP was defined as: no residual cancer (PSA ... high volume urology centres and utilise the full potential of each robot....

  5. VACUUM THERAPY – PREVENTION OF HYPOXIA OF CAVERNOUS TISSUE PATIENTS AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Osadchinskii

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients, after radical prostatectomy with the use of nerve-sparing techniques, without carrying out penile rehabilitation, are at risk of forming cavernous fibrosis with the emergence of subsequent persistent erectile dysfunction. In order to minimize damage to cavernous tissue and early restoration of erectile function during the period of neuropraxia, it is necessary to ensure a sufficient level of oxygenation. The role of applying vacuum in penile rehabilitation for the prevention of hypoxia of cavernous tissue is not fully understood, due to the lack of data on the gaseous composition of the blood at the time of reaching the vacuum of erection. The purpose of this work was to review the scientific studies devoted to the study of vacuum induced penile erection in animals or humans, which indicates high results due to increased oxygenation of cavernous tissue.

  6. DNA methylation signatures for prediction of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy of clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Christa; Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Vestergaard, Else Marie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Diagnostic and prognostic tools for prostate cancer (PC) are suboptimal, causing overtreatment of indolent PC and risk of delayed treatment of aggressive PC. Here, we identify six novel candidate DNA methylation markers for PC with promising diagnostic and prognostic potential. Methods...... Microarray-based screening and bisulfite sequencing of 20 nonmalignant and 29 PC tissue specimens were used to identify new candidate DNA hypermethylation markers for PC. Diagnostic and prognostic potential was evaluated in 35 nonmalignant prostate tissue samples, 293 radical prostatectomy (RP) samples...... into low- and high-methylation subgroups, was trained in cohort 1 (HR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.26 to 2.90) and validated in cohort 2 (HR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.31 to 4.13). Conclusion We identified six novel candidate DNA methylation markers for PC. C1orf114 hypermethylation and a three-gene methylation signature were...

  7. Chemotherapy and novel therapeutics before radical prostatectomy for high-risk clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Eugene K; Eastham, James A

    2015-05-01

    Although both surgery and radiation are potential curative options for men with clinically localized prostate cancer, a significant proportion of men with high-risk and locally advanced disease will demonstrate biochemical and potentially clinical progression of their disease. Neoadjuvant systemic therapy before radical prostatectomy (RP) is a logical strategy to improve treatment outcomes for men with clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer. Furthermore, delivery of chemotherapy and other systemic agents before RP affords an opportunity to explore the efficacy of these agents with pathologic end points. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, primarily with docetaxel (with or without androgen deprivation therapy), has demonstrated feasibility and safety in men undergoing RP, but no study to date has established the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapies. Other novel agents, such as those targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, clusterin, and immunomodulatory therapeutics, are currently under investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Early biochemical recurrence, urinary continence and potency outcomes following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Hvarness, Helle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe recovery of urinary continence and potency and report oncological and functional outcomes using the survival, continence and potency (SCP) system for patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: From 2009...... with preoperative ESI, 77.6% (67.9-86.1) and 34.4% (24.1-47.5) maintained ESI 12 months postoperatively after bilateral and unilateral nerve-sparing surgery (NS), respectively. NS (p .... Using the SCP system and defining potency as ESI, functional and oncological success 12 months after surgery was achieved in 69 out of 135 (51.1%) preoperative continent and potent patients who underwent unilateral or bilateral NS, and did not require adjuvant treatment; when defining potency as IIEF...

  9. Salvage radical prostatectomy after external radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Indications, morbidity and results. Review from CCAFU prostate section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paparel, P.; Soulie, M.; Mongiat-Artus, P.; Cornud, F.; Borgogno, C.; Les membres du sous-comite prostate du CCAFU

    2010-01-01

    Local recurrence after external radiotherapy for prostate cancer occurs in 30 to 50 % and is often diagnosed by a rising PSA. The absence of local control after radiotherapy is a risk factor of metastases and specific mortality. There are several therapeutic options to treat these patients: surveillance, hormonotherapy and salvage therapies (radical prostatectomy, cysto-prostatectomy, brachytherapy, high intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU] and cryotherapy). Hormonotherapy is not a curative treatment and after a couple of years, the disease will progress again. Local salvage therapies are the only treatment to have the potential to cure these patients with the condition of very strict inclusion criteria. Among these therapies, only radical prostatectomy demonstrated his efficacy with a follow-up of 10 years on specific survival and survival without biological progression respectively from 70 to 77 % and from 30 to 43 %. During last decade, morbidity of RP has strongly decreased with a percentage of rectal and ureteral injury at 3 %. Nevertheless, percentage of urinary incontinence remains high from 29 to 50 %. Salvage mini-invasive therapies (cryotherapy, HIFU and cryotherapy) are under constant evolution due to progress of technology. Functional and oncological results are better with last generation devices but need to be evaluated and compared with radical prostatectomy. (authors)

  10. Reconstruction of radical prostatectomy-induced urethral damage using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Akio; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Tono, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshinori; Akatsuka, Akira; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2008-06-15

    Postoperative damage of the urethral rhabdosphincter (URS) and neurovascular bundle (NVB) is a major operative complication of radical prostatectomy. It is generally recognized to be caused by unavoidable surgical damage to the muscle-nerve-blood vessel units around the urethra. We attempted to treat this damage using skeletal muscle-derived stem cells, which are able to reconstitute muscle-nerve-blood vessel units. Cells were enzymatically extracted and sorted by flow cytometry as CD34/45 (Sk-34) and CD34/45 (Sk-DN) cells from green fluorescent protein transgenic mice and rats. URS-NVB damage was induced by manually removing one-third of the total URS and unilateral invasion of NVB in wild-type Sprague-Dawley and node rats. Freshly isolated Sk-34, Sk-34+Sk-DN cells, and cultured Sk-DN cells were directly transplanted into the damaged portion. At 4 and 12 weeks after transplantation, urethral pressure profile by electrical stimulation through the sacral surface (L6-S1) was evaluated as functional recovery. The recovery ratio in the control and transplanted groups was 37.6% and 72.9%, at 4 weeks, and 41.6% and 78.4% at 12 weeks, respectively (Pcells differentiated into numerous skeletal muscle fibers having neuromuscular junctions (innervation) and nerve bundle-related Schwann cells and perineurium, and blood vessel-related endothelial cells and pericyte around the urethra. Thus, we conclude that transplantation of skeletal muscle-derived multipotent Sk-34 and Sk-DN cells is potentially useful for the reconstitution of postoperative damage of URS and NVB after radical prostatectomy.

  11. Effect of Nerve-Sparing Radical Prostatectomy on Urinary Continence in Patients With Preoperative Erectile Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hyun Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We aimed to assess whether nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (nsRP is associated with improved recovery of urinary continence compared to non–nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (nnsRP in patients with localized prostate cancer and preoperative erectile dysfunction. Methods: A total of 360 patients with organ-confined prostate cancer and an International Index of Erectile Function score of less than 17 were treated with nsRP or nnsRP in Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital. Patients who received neoadjuvant or adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy or had a history of prostate-related surgery were excluded. Recovery of urinary continence was assessed at 0, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Postoperative recovery of continence was defined as zero pad usage. The association between nerve-sparing status and urinary continence was assessed by using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses after controlling for known predictive factors. Results: Urinary continence recovered in 279 patients (77.5% within the mean follow-up period of 22.5 months (range, 6–123 months. Recovery of urinary continence was reported in 74.6% and 86.4% of patients after nnsRP and nsRP, respectively, at 12 months (P=0.022. All groups had comparable perioperative criteria and had no significant preoperative morbidities. Age, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, and nerve-sparing status were significantly associated with recovery of urinary continence on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.254; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.002–1.478; P=0.026 and nerve-sparing status (HR, 0.713; 95% CI, 0.548–0.929; P=0.012 were independently associated with recovery of urinary continence. Conclusions: nsRP, as compared to nnsRP, improves recovery rates of urinary incontinence and decreases surgical morbidity without compromising pathologic outcomes.

  12. Associations between ABO blood groups and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshio; Ohori, Makoto; Nakashima, Jun; Okubo, Hidenori; Satake, Naoya; Takizawa, Issei; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Hamada, Riu; Nakagami, Yoshihiro; Yoshioka, Kunihiko; Tachibana, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated associations between ABO blood groups and prognosis in various types of cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ABO blood groups and biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). A total of 555 patients with prostate cancer who underwent RP were included in the study. No patients received neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant therapy. The effect of ABO blood groups on BCR was examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. During the follow-up period (mean, 52.0 months), 166 patients (29.9%) experienced BCR, with a 5-year BCR-free rate of 67.3%. Although the ABO blood group was not a significantly associated with BCR in the univariate analysis, it was an independent predictor of BCR in the multivariate analysis: blood type O patients had a significantly lower risk of BCR compared to type A patients (Hazard ratio, 0.608; 95% confidence interval, 0.410-0.902; P = 0.014). Further analyses revealed that surgical margin status confounded the assessment of the association between the ABO blood group and BCR. In the analyses of patients with a negative surgical margin, the 5-year BCR-free rate in blood type O patients was a significantly higher than that in type A patients (91.2% vs. 71.0%; P = 0.026). Blood type O is significantly associated with a decreased risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Further studies are needed to clarify the nature of this association.

  13. Comprehensive analysis of sexual function outcome in prostate cancer patients after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seung Hyo; Kang, Dong Il; Ha, Yun-Sok; Salmasi, Amirali Hassanzadeh; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Wun-Jae; Kim, Isaac Yi

    2014-02-01

    The recovery of potency following radical prostatectomy is complex and has a very wide range. In this study, we analyzed in detail the precise pattern of recovery of potency following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Prospectively collected database of patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year after RARP were evaluated retrospectively. Of 503 patients identified, 483 patients completed the sexual health inventory for men (SHIM) preoperatively and postoperatively every 3 months for the first 12 months. Overall potency, usage of phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors, and return to baseline erectile function were evaluated. Potency was defined as having erection that is sufficient for sexual intercourse more than 50% of attempts, while quality potency was defined as being potent without the use of PDE-5 inhibitors. Preoperatively, the overall potency and quality potency rate were 67.1% and 48.1%, respectively. Postoperatively, the overall potency rate was 61.4%, while the quality potency rate was 37.2%. In multivariate regression analysis, independent predictors of potency recovery were young age (21, the overall potency and quality potency rate were 79.7% and 41.2%, respectively. More importantly, only 21.4% of the men with normal erection preoperatively (SHIM>21) returned to baseline erectile function (SHIM>21) 12 months after surgery. This study indicates that young age (<60), preoperative potency, and bilateral preservation of NVBs were positive predictors of potency recovery following RARP. However, an overwhelming majority of men experience a deterioration in the overall quality of erection after RARP.

  14. Intraoperative registered transrectal ultrasound guidance for robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

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    Mohareri, Omid; Ischia, Joseph; Black, Peter C; Schneider, Caitlin; Lobo, Julio; Goldenberg, Larry; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2015-01-01

    To provide unencumbered real-time ultrasound image guidance during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, we developed a robotic transrectal ultrasound system that tracks the da Vinci® Surgical System instruments. We describe our initial clinical experience with this system. After an evaluation in a canine model, 20 patients were enrolled in the study. During each procedure the transrectal ultrasound transducer was manually positioned using a brachytherapy stabilizer to provide good imaging of the prostate. Then the transrectal ultrasound was registered to the da Vinci robot by a previously validated procedure. Finally, automatic rotation of the transrectal ultrasound was enabled such that the transrectal ultrasound imaging plane safely tracked the tip of the da Vinci instrument controlled by the surgeon, while real-time transrectal ultrasound images were relayed to the surgeon at the da Vinci console. Tracking was activated during all critical stages of the surgery. The transrectal ultrasound robot was easy to set up and use, adding 7 minutes (range 5 to 14) to the procedure. It did not require an assistant or additional control devices. Qualitative feedback was acquired from the surgeons, who found transrectal ultrasound useful in identifying the urethra while passing the dorsal venous complex suture, defining the prostate-bladder interface during bladder neck dissection, identifying the seminal vesicles and their location with respect to the rectal wall, and identifying the distal prostate boundary at the apex. Real-time, registered robotic transrectal ultrasound guidance with automatic instrument tracking during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is feasible and potentially useful. The results justify further studies to establish whether the approach can improve procedure outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Temporal trends and predictors of pelvic lymph node dissection in open or minimally invasive radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feifer, Andrew H; Elkin, Elena B; Lowrance, William T; Denton, Brian; Jacks, Lindsay; Yee, David S; Coleman, Jonathan A; Laudone, Vincent P; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2011-09-01

    Pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) is an important component of prostate cancer staging and treatment, especially for surgical patients who have high-risk tumor features. It is not clear how the shift from open radical prostatectomy (ORP) to minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (MIRP) has affected the use of PLND. The objectives of this study were to identify predictors of PLND and to assess the impact of surgical technique in a contemporary, population-based cohort. In Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registry data linked with Medicare claims, the authors identified men who underwent ORP or MIRP for prostate cancer during 2003 to 2007. The impact of surgical approach on PLND was evaluated, and interactions were examined between surgical procedure, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and Gleason score with the analysis controlled for patient and tumor characteristics. Of 6608 men who underwent ORP or MIRP, 70% (n = 4600) underwent PLND. The use of PLND declined over time both overall and within subgroups defined by procedure type. PLND was 5 times more likely in men who underwent ORP than in men who underwent MIRP when the analysis was controlled for patient and tumor characteristics. Elevated PSA and biopsy Gleason score, but not clinical stage, were associated with a greater odds of PLND in both the ORP group and the MIRP group. However, the magnitude of the association between these factors and PLND was significantly greater for patients in the ORP group. PLND was less common among men who underwent MIRP, independent of tumor risk factors. A decline in PLND rates was not fully explained by an increase in MIRP. The authors concluded that these trends may signal a surgical approach-dependent disparity in prostate cancer staging and therapy. Cancer 2011 © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  16. Predicting an Optimal Outcome after Radical Prostatectomy: The “Trifecta” Nomogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, James A.; Scardino, Peter T.; Kattan, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The optimal outcome after radical prostatectomy (RP) for clinically localized prostate cancer is freedom from biochemical recurrence (BCR) along with recovery of continence and erectile function, a so-called trifecta. We evaluated our series of open radical prostatectomy patients to determine the likelihood of this outcome and to develop a nomogram predicting the trifecta. Material and Methods We reviewed records of patients undergoing open RP for clinical stage T1c–T3a prostate cancer at our center during 2000–2006. Men were excluded if they received preoperative hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy; if their pre-treatment PSA was >50 ng/ml; or if they were impotent or incontinent before RP; 1577 men were included in the study. Freedom from BCR was defined as post-RP PSA <0.2 ng/ml. Continence was defined as not having to wear any protective pads. Potency was defined as erections adequate for intercourse on the majority of attempts, with or without a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor. Results Mean patient age was 58 years and mean pretreatment PSA was 6.4 ng/ml. A trifecta outcome (cancer-free status with recovery of continence and potency) was achieved in 62% of patients. In a nomogram developed to predict the likelihood of the trifecta, baseline PSA was the major predictive factor. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the nomogram was 0.773, and calibration appeared excellent. Conclusions A trifecta (optimal) outcome can be achieved in the majority of men undergoing RP. The nomogram will permit patients to estimate preoperatively their likelihood of an optimal outcome after RP. PMID:18423693

  17. Reverse Stage Shift at a Tertiary Care Center: Escalating Risk in Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Jonathan L.; Vickers, Andrew J.; Power, Nicholas E.; Fine, Samson W.; Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James A.; Laudone, Vincent P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate changes in clinical and pathological characteristics of prostate cancer in patients treated surgically at a large tertiary care center in the context of increased use of active surveillance (AS) and minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Materials We performed retrospective review of 6,624 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy from 2000–2010 at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Patients were stratified by surgical approach (open, laparoscopic or robotic) and risk categories (low, intermediate, or high). Patients with low-risk disease, without intervention and minimum followup of 6 months were considered to have elected AS. Results AS cases increased from <20 per year between 2000–2004 to ≥100 per year between 2007–2009. Over the same decade MIS cases (laparoscopic or robotic) increased from zero to 63% of all surgical cases. The percentage of patients in intermediate- and high-risk categories increased over time, while the percentage in the low-risk category decreased (OR per year 0.91, 95% CI 0.89, 0.92, p <0.0005). The proportion of surgery patients with Gleason 6 tumors decreased over time (OR per year 0.87, 95% CI 0.85, 0.88; p <0.0005) while pathologic stage and Gleason score increased (p <0.0005). The proportion of low-risk cases decreased across all types of surgery, with the largest decrease in robotic surgery (p <0.0005). Conclusions We observed a reverse stage shift in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy since 2000 despite the introduction and rapid proliferation of MIS. These findings may be due to increased use of AS and institutional focus on treatment of higher-risk disease. PMID:21484780

  18. Correlation between MRS and serum PSA in the diagnosis of local recurrence after radical prostatectomy

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    Ghafuri M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multifocality, multicentricity and extension beyond the prostate capsule are all characteristics of prostatic adenocarcinoma that may escape diagnosis by conventional CT scanning or MRI. This study was designed to assess the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS in prostatic carcinoma and its compatibility with prostatic specific antigen (PSA as the conventional method.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we recruited 139 patients with previous radical prostatectomy referring to Radiology department of Hazrate-e-Rasul Hospital during the first half of 2011 for the evaluation of local recurrence. Traditionally, local recurrence is defined as serum PSA concentration >0.2 ng/dl. We used 1.5-tesla Siemens Avanto MRI unit with endorectal coil and measured creatine, choline and citrate levels before calculating choline-creatine/citrate ratio. Correlation between MRS findings with PSA concentration was evaluated in regards to the multiple levels of the previously mentioned ratio.Results: Local recurrence was found in 107 (77% patients based on PSA levels. The mean values for serum PSA levels and creatine-choline/citrate ratio were significantly different in patients with and without local recurrence. Creatine-choline/citrate ratios greater than 50, 100 and 150 (as different cut-off points of recurrence were respectively seen in 104, 102 and 97 patients and agreement ratio between MRS and PSA in these levels were 94.1%, 94.4% and 85.1%, respectively. Correlation coefficient between these two methods was 0.481.Conclusion: MRS is a valuable tool for evaluating recurrence inpatients with prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy and it is in good agreement with serum PSA levels.

  19. A new technique of bladder neck reconstruction during radical prostatectomy in patients with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Tolkach

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:To evaluate continence after radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients, in whom a new method of the bladder neck reconstruction (BNR using deep dorsal stitch was implemented (deep single stitch through all bladder layers directly dorsal to the bladder opening after “tennis racket” reconstruction and to provide justification for its use by means of anatomical study in cadavers.Material and Methods:Open radical retropubic prostatectomy was performed in 84 patients: 39 patients with a new BNR method used to improve continence and control group of 45 patients with standard “tennis racket” BNR. Median follow-up was 14 months in control group and 12 months in study group. Continence recovery was accessed early postoperatively and every 3 months thereafter. Anatomical study was performed on 2 male fresh cadavers reproducing two different BNR techniques to clarify any underlying continence related mechanisms.Results:Patients with new BNR achieved full continence significantly faster (p=0.041, but the continence rates after 12 months were similar between groups. The severity of incontinence up to month 9 was significantly reduced in BNR group. The anastomotic stricture rate was not affected. Applying new BNR to the cadaver model revealed effects on early continence, namely presence of proximal passive closure mechanism in area of bladder neck.Conclusions:Continence in patients with the new BNR method using deep dorsal stitch recovered significantly faster. Moreover, a reduced grade of residual incontinence was documented. The effect was non-significant at month 12 of follow-up, meaning that only early effect was present.

  20. Robotic and open radical prostatectomy in the public health sector: cost comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Rohan Matthew; Linklater, Nicholas; Coughlin, Geoff

    2014-06-01

    During 2008, the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital became the first public hospital in Australia to have a da Vinci Surgical Robot purchased by government funding. The cost of performing robotic surgery in the public sector is a contentious issue. This study is a single centre, cost analysis comparing open radical prostatectomy (RRP) and robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP) based on the newly introduced pure case-mix funding model. A retrospective chart review was performed for the first 100 RALPs and the previous 100 RRPs. Estimates of tangible costing and funding were generated for each admission and readmission, using the Royal Brisbane Hospital Transition II database, based on pure case-mix funding. The average cost for admission for RRP was A$13 605, compared to A$17 582 for the RALP. The average funding received for a RRP was A$11 781 compared to A$5496 for a RALP based on the newly introduced case-mix model. The average length of stay for RRP was 4.4 days (2-14) and for RALP, 1.2 days (1-4). The total cost of readmissions for RRP patients was A$70 487, compared to that of the RALP patients, A$7160. These were funded at A$55 639 and A$7624, respectively. RALP has shown a significant advantage with respect to length of stay and readmission rate. Based on the case-mix funding model RALP is poorly funded compared to its open equivalent. Queensland Health needs to plan on how robotic surgery is implemented and assess whether this technology is truly affordable in the public sector. © 2013 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  1. Technical Note: Method to correlate whole-specimen histopathology of radical prostatectomy with diagnostic MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Deirdre M., E-mail: d.mcgrath@sheffield.ac.uk; Lee, Jenny; Foltz, Warren D. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Samavati, Navid [Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9 (Canada); Jewett, Michael A. S. [Departments of Surgery (Urology) and Surgical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Kwast, Theo van der [Pathology Department, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4 (Canada); Chung, Peter [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Ménard, Cynthia [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal, 1058 Rue Saint-Denis, Montréal, Québec H2X 3J4 (Canada); Brock, Kristy K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Validation of MRI-guided tumor boundary delineation for targeted prostate cancer therapy is achieved via correlation with gold-standard histopathology of radical prostatectomy specimens. Challenges to accurate correlation include matching the pathology sectioning plane with the in vivo imaging slice plane and correction for the deformation that occurs between in vivo imaging and histology. A methodology is presented for matching of the histological sectioning angle and position to the in vivo imaging slices. Methods: Patients (n = 4) with biochemical failure following external beam radiotherapy underwent diagnostic MRI to confirm localized recurrence of prostate cancer, followed by salvage radical prostatectomy. High-resolution 3-D MRI of the ex vivo specimens was acquired to determine the pathology sectioning angle that best matched the in vivo imaging slice plane, using matching anatomical features and implanted fiducials. A novel sectioning device was developed to guide sectioning at the correct angle, and to assist the insertion of reference dye marks to aid in histopathology reconstruction. Results: The percentage difference in the positioning of the urethra in the ex vivo pathology sections compared to the positioning in in vivo images was reduced from 34% to 7% through slicing at the best match angle. Reference dye marks were generated, which were visible in ex vivo imaging, in the tissue sections before and after processing, and in histology sections. Conclusions: The method achieved an almost fivefold reduction in the slice-matching error and is readily implementable in combination with standard MRI technology. The technique will be employed to generate datasets for correlation of whole-specimen prostate histopathology with in vivo diagnostic MRI using 3-D deformable registration, allowing assessment of the sensitivity and specificity of MRI parameters for prostate cancer. Although developed specifically for prostate, the method is readily

  2. A Literature-Based Analysis of the Learning Curves of Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Good

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a trend for the increased adoption of minimally invasive techniques of radical prostatectomy (RP – laparoscopic (LRP and robotic assisted (RARP – from the traditional open radical retropubic prostatectomy (ORP, popularised by Partin et al. Recently there has been a dramatic expansion in the rates of RARP being performed, and there have been many early reports postulating that the learning curve for RARP is shorter than for LRP. The aim of this study was to review the literature and analyse the length of the LRP learning curves for the various outcome measures: perioperative, oncologic, and functional outcomes. A broad search of the literature was performed in November 2013 using the PubMed database. Only studies of real patients and those from 2004 until 2013 were included; those on simulators were excluded. In total, 239 studies were identified after which 13 were included. The learning curve is a heterogeneous entity, depending entirely on the criteria used to define it. There is evidence of multiple learning curves; however the length of these is dependent on the definitions used by the authors. Few studies use the more rigorous definition of plateauing of the curve. Perioperative learning curve takes approximately 150-200 cases to plateau, oncologic curve approximately 200 cases, and the functional learning curve up to 700 cases to plateau (700 for potency, 200 cases for continence. In this review, we have analysed the literature with respect to the learning curve for LRP. It is clear that the learning curve is long. This necessitates centralising LRP to high volume centres such that surgeons, trainees, and patients are able to utilise the benefits of LRP.

  3. Technical Note: Method to correlate whole-specimen histopathology of radical prostatectomy with diagnostic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, Deirdre M.; Lee, Jenny; Foltz, Warren D.; Samavati, Navid; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Kwast, Theo van der; Chung, Peter; Ménard, Cynthia; Brock, Kristy K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Validation of MRI-guided tumor boundary delineation for targeted prostate cancer therapy is achieved via correlation with gold-standard histopathology of radical prostatectomy specimens. Challenges to accurate correlation include matching the pathology sectioning plane with the in vivo imaging slice plane and correction for the deformation that occurs between in vivo imaging and histology. A methodology is presented for matching of the histological sectioning angle and position to the in vivo imaging slices. Methods: Patients (n = 4) with biochemical failure following external beam radiotherapy underwent diagnostic MRI to confirm localized recurrence of prostate cancer, followed by salvage radical prostatectomy. High-resolution 3-D MRI of the ex vivo specimens was acquired to determine the pathology sectioning angle that best matched the in vivo imaging slice plane, using matching anatomical features and implanted fiducials. A novel sectioning device was developed to guide sectioning at the correct angle, and to assist the insertion of reference dye marks to aid in histopathology reconstruction. Results: The percentage difference in the positioning of the urethra in the ex vivo pathology sections compared to the positioning in in vivo images was reduced from 34% to 7% through slicing at the best match angle. Reference dye marks were generated, which were visible in ex vivo imaging, in the tissue sections before and after processing, and in histology sections. Conclusions: The method achieved an almost fivefold reduction in the slice-matching error and is readily implementable in combination with standard MRI technology. The technique will be employed to generate datasets for correlation of whole-specimen prostate histopathology with in vivo diagnostic MRI using 3-D deformable registration, allowing assessment of the sensitivity and specificity of MRI parameters for prostate cancer. Although developed specifically for prostate, the method is readily

  4. Role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the management of high-risk prostate cancer

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    Akshay Sood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP in the management of high-risk prostate cancer (PCa, with a focus on oncological, functional and perioperative outcomes. Further, we also aimed to briefly describe our novel modification to conventional RARP that allows immediate organ retrieval and examination for intra-operative surgical margin assessment. A literature search of PubMed was performed for articles on the management of high-risk PCa. Papers written in English and concerning clinical outcomes following RARP for locally advanced and high-risk PCa were selected. Outcomes data from our own center were also included. A total of 10 contemporary series were evaluated. Biopsy Gleason score ≥ 8 was the most common cause for classification of patients into the high-risk PCa group. Biochemical failure rate, in the few series that looked at long-term follow-up, varied from 9% to 26% at 1 year. The positive surgical margin rate varied from 12% to 53.3%. Urinary continence rates varied from 78% to 92% at 1 year. The overall complication rates varied from 2.4% to 30%, with anastomotic leak and lymphocele being the most common complications. Long-term data on oncological control following RARP in high-risk patients is lacking. Short-term oncological outcomes and functional outcomes are equivalent to open radical prostatectomy (RP. Safety outcomes are better in patients undergoing RARP when compared with open RP. Improved tools for predicting the presence of organ-confined disease (OCD are available. High-risk patients with OCD would be ideal candidates for RARP and would benefit most from surgery alone.

  5. Clinical results of radical prostatectomy for patients with prostate cancer in Macau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Son-fat; Lao, Hio-fai; Li, Kin; Tse, Men-kin

    2008-02-20

    Incidence of prostate cancer has been increasing in recent decades. In the year 2005, prostate cancer became the second most common cancer in males in Macau. The purpose of this report was to review and summarize the clinical features and prognosis of the 54 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy in Macau Special Administrative Region (SAR), China. From November 2000 to November 2006, retropubic radical prostatectomy were performed in 54 cases for the treatment of prostate cancer. The mean age of patients was 69.8 years (range from 54 to 79). The preoperative prostate specific antigen (PSA) level, postoperative pathologic stage and Gleason's score, operation duration, intraoperative bleeding and intraoperative and postoperative complications were reported. The follow-up duration was 3 months to 6.25 years with a mean of 2.1 years. Postoperative parameters including PSA alteration, biochemical recurrence, local recurrence, distant metastasis and mortality were observed. Most of the patients in our study were diagnosed as localized prostate cancer. The patients' preoperative serum PSA was 0-4.0 ng/ml (16.7%), 4.0-10.0 ng/ml (51.8%), 10.1-20.0 ng/ml (24.1%) and above 20.0 ng/ml (7.4%). The TNM stage T1a+T1b comprised 7.6% of patients, stage T2a+T2b comprised 20.3%, stage T2c 38.9%, stage T3a 20.3% and over T3a only 12.9%. There were 9.5% cases with Gleason scores of 2-4, 41.5% with scores of 5-6, 30.2% with scores of 7 and 18.8% with scores of 8 - 10. The average operative duration was 216 minutes and the average intraoperative bleeding was 760 ml. Intraoperative complications included one massive hemorrhage (1.9%), one rectal injury (1.9%) and one obturator nerve injury (1.9%). Early postoperative complications consisted of urinary incontinence (14 cases, 25.9%), bladder neck stricture (5 cases, 9.3%), acute urinary retention (4 cases, 7.4%), pelvic effusion (2 cases, 3.8%), lymphocele (1 case, 1.9%) and vesicorectal fistula (only 1 case, 1.9%). For late

  6. Prostate Cancer–Specific Mortality After Radical Prostatectomy for Patients Treated in the Prostate-Specific Antigen Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Andrew J.; Kattan, Michael W.; Eastham, James A.; Bianco, Fernando J.; Yossepowitch, Ofer; Vickers, Andrew J.; Klein, Eric A.; Wood, David P.; Scardino, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The long-term risk of prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) after radical prostatectomy is poorly defined for patients treated in the era of widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening. Models that predict the risk of PCSM are needed for patient counseling and clinical trial design. Methods A multi-institutional cohort of 12,677 patients treated with radical prostatectomy between 1987 and 2005 was analyzed for the risk of PCSM. Patient clinical information and treatment outcome was modeled using Fine and Gray competing risk regression analysis to predict PCSM. Results Fifteen-year PCSM and all-cause mortality were 12% and 38%, respectively. The estimated PCSM ranged from 5% to 38% for patients in the lowest and highest quartiles of predicted risk of PSA-defined recurrence, based on a popular nomogram. Biopsy Gleason grade, PSA, and year of surgery were associated with PCSM. A nomogram predicting the 15-year risk of PCSM was developed, and the externally validated concordance index was 0.82. Neither preoperative PSA velocity nor body mass index improved the model's accuracy. Only 4% of contemporary patients had a predicted 15-year PCSM of greater than 5%. Conclusion Few patients will die from prostate cancer within 15 years of radical prostatectomy, despite the presence of adverse clinical features. This favorable prognosis may be related to the effectiveness of radical prostatectomy (with or without secondary therapy) or the low lethality of screen-detected cancers. Given the limited ability to identify contemporary patients at substantially elevated risk of PCSM on the basis of clinical features alone, the need for novel markers specifically associated with the biology of lethal prostate cancer is evident. PMID:19636023

  7. Stratified analysis of 800 Asian patients after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy with a median 64 months of follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Raheem, Ali; Kim, Dae Keun; Santok, Glen Denmer; Alabdulaali, Ibrahim; Chung, Byung Ha; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho

    2016-09-01

    To report the 5-year oncological outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from the largest series ever reported from Asia. A retrospective analysis of 800 Asian patients who were treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from July 2005 to May 2010 in the Department of Urology and Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea was carried out. The primary end-point was to evaluate the biochemical recurrence. The secondary end-point was to show the biochemical recurrence-free survival, metastasis-free survival and cancer-specific survival. A total of 197 (24.65%), 218 (27.3%), and 385 (48.1%) patients were classified as low-, intermediate- and high-risk patients according to the D'Amico risk stratification risk criteria, respectively. The median follow-up period was 64 months (interquartile range 28-71 months). The overall incidence of positive surgical margin was 36.6%. There was biochemical recurrence in 183 patients (22.9%), 38 patients (4.8%) developed distant metastasis and 24 patients (3%) died from prostate cancer. Actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates at 5 years were 76.4%, 94.6% and 96.7%, respectively. Positive lymph node was associated with lower 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival (9.1%), cancer-specific survival (75.7%) and metastasis-free survival (61.9%) rates (P < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, among all the predictors, positive lymph node was the strongest predictor of biochemical recurrence, cancer-specific survival and metastasis-free survival (P < 0.001). Herein we report the largest robot-assisted radical prostatectomy series from Asia. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is confirmed to be an oncologically safe procedure that is able to provide effective 5-year cancer control, even in patients with high-risk disease. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. Proposed salvage treatment strategy for biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy in patients with prostate cancer: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Makito; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Morizawa, Yosuke; Anai, Satoshi; Torimoto, Kazumasa; Aoki, Katsuya; Yoneda, Tatsuo; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy include salvage radiotherapy of the prostatic bed and/or androgen deprivation therapy. To establish an effective treatment strategy for recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy, we retrospectively analyzed the outcome of salvage radiation monotherapy in such cases. Data from 61 men who had undergone salvage radiation monotherapy for biochemical recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy were retrospectively reviewed. In all patients, salvage radiotherapy consisted of iraradiation to the prostatic bed (70 Gy) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy techniques. Treatment outcome was analyzed to identify predictive factors of salvage radiotherapy. The biochemical recurrence-free survival after salvage radiation monotherapy at 2 and 5 years was 55% and 38%, respectively. Cox proportional regression models revealed that the independent predictive factors for biochemical recurrence were Gleason Score ≥ 8, negative surgical margin, and PSA velocity ≥ 0.38 ng/mL/year. Negative surgical margin and PSA velocity ≥ 0.8 ng/mL/year were significantly associated with poor response in the serum PSA levels after salvage radiotherapy. Based on our findings, we propose a treatment strategy for biochemical recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy. Patients with Gleason score ≤ 7, positive surgical margin, and PSA velocity < 0.38 ng/mL/year are categorized the most favorable group, so that eradication by salvage radiation monotherapy could be expected. Other patients could be divided to two groups depending on surgical margin status and PSA velocity: 1) patients who might require combination of SRT and short-term androgen deprivation therapy and 2) patients who should be treated by androgen deprivation monotherapy

  9. Predictor of response to salvage radiotherapy in patients with PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. The usefulness of PSA doubling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numata, Kousaku; Azuma, Koji; Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru

    2005-01-01

    We assessed predictors of response to salvage radiotherapy (sRT) in patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence after radical prostatectomy. A total of 21 patients receiving sRT for PSA recurrence without systemic progression after radical prostatectomy had medical records available for retrospective review. We defined sRT as external beam radiotherapy for patients with a continuous increase in PSA level≥0.2 ng/ml after radical prostatectomy. Response was defined as achievement of a PSA nadir of ≤0.1 ng/ml. Various pre-treatment parameters were evaluated retrospectively. The median follow-up period after sRT was 38 months. Of the 21 patients, 15 were good responders (71%). The only predictive factor was PSA doubling time (PSADT). Age and PSA level at diagnosis, Gleason score and surgical margin status were not significant predictors of response. The median PSADT in responders was 6.2 months versus 1.9 months in non-responders (P=0.019). The patients with a PSADT of ≥5 months were all responders. PSADT appears to be a good predictor of response to sRT. sRT was especially effective when PSADT was ≥5 months. (author)

  10. Radical prostatectomy and positive surgical margins: relationship with prostate cancer outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo L. R. Felts de La Roca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Positive surgical margins (PSMs are an adverse factor that may predict a worse outcome in patients submitted to radical prostatectomy (RP. However, not all of these cases will evolve to biochemical (BCR or clinical (CR recurrence, therefore relationship between PSMs and these recurrent events has to be correlated with other clinical and pathologic findings to indicate complementary treatment for selected patients. Materials and Methods Of 1250 patients submitted to open retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP, between March 1991 and June 2008, the outcome of 161 patients with PSMs and of 67 without PSMs as a control group, comprising a total of 228 cases were retrospectively reviewed. A minimum follow-up time of 2 years after surgery was considered. BCR was determined when PSA ≥ 0.2ng/mL. CR was determined whenever there was clinical evidence of tumor. Chi-square test was used to correlate clinical and pathologic variables with PSMs. Time interval to biochemical recurrence was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier product limit analysis using the log-rank test for comparison between groups. Univariate and multivariate Cox stepwise logistic regression models were used to identify significant predictors of risk of shorter intervals to BCR. Results Prostate circumference margin was the most common site with 78 cases (48.44%. Regarding the outcome of 228 cases from both groups, BCR occurred in 68 patients (29.82%, and CR in 10 (4.38%. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant associations (p < 0.001 between presence of PSMs with BCR, but not with CR (p = 0.05. At follow-up of the 161 patients with PSMs, only 61(37.8% presented BCR, while 100 (62.8% did not. BCR correlated with pathologic stage; Gleason score; preoperative PSA; tumor volume in the specimen; capsular and perineural invasion; presence and number of PSMs. CR correlated only with angiolymphatic invasion and Gleason score. Considering univariate analysis of clinical and

  11. Pathological confirmation of nerve-sparing types performed during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP).

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    Ko, Woo Jin; Hruby, Gregory W; Turk, Andrew T; Landman, Jaime; Badani, Ketan K

    2013-03-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: Incremental nerve-sparing techniques (NSTs) improve postoperative erectile function after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). However, there are no studies to date that histologically confirm the surgeon intended NST. Thus, in the present study, we histologically confirmed that the surgeon performed the nerve preservation as his intended NSTs during RARP. Also, we found that there was more variability in fascia width outcome on the left side compared with the right. Therefore, when performing nerve preservation on the surgeon's non-dominant side, we need to pay more close attention. To confirm that the surgeon achieved true intended histological nerve sparing during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) by studying RP specimens. To aid the novice robotic surgeon to develop the skills of RARP. Between June 2008 and May 2009, 122 consecutive patients underwent RARP by a single surgeon (K.K.B.). The degree of nerve sparing (wide resection [WR], interfascial nerve sparing [ITE-NS], intrafascial nerve sparing [ITR-NS]) on both sides was recorded. The posterior sectors of RP specimens from distal, mid, and proximal parts were evaluated. Fascia width (FW) of each position in RP specimens were compared across nerve-sparing types (NSTs). FW was recorded at 15 ° intervals (3-9 o'clock position), measured as the distance between the outermost prostate gland and surgical margin. The slides were reviewed by an experienced uropathologist who was 'blinded' to the NST. In all, 93 men were included. The overall mean (sd) FW was the greatest in the order of WR, ITE-NS, and ITR-NS, at 2.42 (1.62), 1.71 (1.40) and 1.16 (1.08) mm, respectively (P ITE-NS, bilateral ITE-NS, ITE-NS/WR, and bilateral WR, respectively. To further validate and confirm these preliminary findings, additional studies involving multicentre cohorts would be required. The surgeon intended dissection and FW correlate, with ITR

  12. Salvage radiotherapy for macroscopic local recurrences after radical prostatectomy. A national survey on patterns of practice

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    Dal Pra, Alan [Bern University Hospital, Inselspital Bern, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bern (Switzerland); Panje, Cedric; Glatzer, Markus; Putora, Paul Martin [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Zilli, Thomas [Hospitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneve (Switzerland); Arnold, Winfried [Luzerner Kantonsspital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luzerner (Switzerland); Brouwer, Kathrin [Stadtspital Triemli, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Garcia, Helena [Universitaetsspital Zuerich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Gomez, Silvia [Kantonsspital Aarau, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); Herrera, Fernanda [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Kaouthar, Khanfir [Hopital du Valais, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sion (Switzerland); Papachristofilou, Alexandros [Universitaetsspital Basel, Department of Radiation Oncology, Basel (Switzerland); Pesce, Gianfranco [EOC Bellinzona, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Reuter, Christiane [Kantonsspital Muensterlingen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muensterlingen (Switzerland); Vees, Hansjoerg [Klinik Hirslanden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Zwahlen, Daniel Rudolf [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chur (Switzerland); Engeler, Daniel [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Urology, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2018-01-15

    Although salvage radiotherapy (SRT) for PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy provides better oncological outcomes when delivered early, in the absence of detectable disease many patients are treated for macroscopic locally recurrent tumors. Due to limited data from prospective studies, we hypothesized an important variability in the SRT management of these patients. Our aim was to investigate current practice patterns of SRT for local macroscopic recurrence after radical prostatectomy. A total of 14 Swiss radiation oncology centers were asked to complete a survey on treatment specifications for macroscopic locally recurrent disease including information on pretherapeutic diagnostic procedures, dose prescription, radiation delivery techniques and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Treatment recommendations on ADT were analyzed using the objective consensus methodology. The majority of centers recommended pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pelvis and choline positron emission tomography (PET). The median prescribed dose to the prostate bed was 66 Gy (range 65-72 Gy) with a boost to the macroscopic lesion used by 79% of the centers with a median total dose of 72 Gy (range 70-80 Gy). Intensity-modulated rotational techniques were used by all centers and daily cone beam computed tomography (CT) was recommended by 43%. The use of concomitant ADT for any macroscopic recurrence was recommended by 43% of the centers while the remaining centers recommended it only for high-risk disease, which was not consistently defined. We observed a high variability of treatment paradigms when SRT is indicated for macroscopic local recurrences after prostatectomy. These data reflect the need for more standardized approaches and ultimately further research in this field. (orig.) [German] Obwohl die Evidenz fuer eine fruehzeitige Salvage-Radiotherapie (SRT) bei einem PSA-Rezidiv nach radikaler Prostatektomie spricht, werden viele Patienten erst bei einem

  13. Ultrasensitive prostate specific antigen assay following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy--an outcome measure for defining the learning curve.

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    Viney, R; Gommersall, L; Zeif, J; Hayne, D; Shah, Z H; Doherty, A

    2009-07-01

    Radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) performed laparoscopically is a popular treatment with curative intent for organ-confined prostate cancer. After surgery, prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels drop to low levels which can be measured with ultrasensitive assays. This has been described in the literature for open RRP but not for laparoscopic RRP. This paper describes PSA changes in the first 300 consecutive patients undergoing non-robotic laparoscopic RRP by a single surgeon. To use ultrasensitive PSA (uPSA) assays to measure a PSA nadir in patients having laparoscopic radical prostatectomy below levels recorded by standard assays. The aim was to use uPSA nadir at 3 months' post-prostatectomy as an early surrogate end-point of oncological outcome. In so doing, laparoscopic oncological outcomes could then be compared with published results from other open radical prostatectomy series with similar end-points. Furthermore, this end-point could be used in the assessment of the surgeon's learning curve. Prospective, comprehensive, demographic, clinical, biochemical and operative data were collected from all patients undergoing non-robotic laparoscopic RRP. We present data from the first 300 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic RRP by a single surgeon. uPSA was measured every 3 months post surgery. Median follow-up was 29 months (minimum 3 months). The likelihood of reaching a uPSA of bench-marking performance. With experience, a surgeon can achieve in excess of an 80% chance of obtaining a uPSA nadir of < or = 0.01 ng/ml at 3 months after laparoscopic RRP for a British population. This is equivalent to most published open series.

  14. Return to work and sick leave after radical prostatectomy: a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Sigrun; Steinsvik, Eivind A S; Dahl, Alv A; Loge, Jon Håvard; Cvancarova, Milada; Fosså, Sophie D

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate work status at three months after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with prostate cancer (PCa) in relation to socio-demographics, urinary incontinence and bother, medical complications health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and surgical methods. To identify pre-RP available factors that can predict the duration of immediate post-RP sick leave. This prospective questionnaire-based study included 264 men with PCaPatients' work status was defined as either "stable/improved" or "declined" at three months compared to work status at baseline. Duration of immediate post-RP sick leave was considered as prolonged when lasting >6 weeks. Associations were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Almost 30% of the patients had declined work status three months after RP. Change of physical HRQOL was the only factor remaining significantly associated with declined work status in the multivariate analysis. Half of the patients had prolonged immediate sick leave. Having physically strenuous work was the strongest predictor for this outcome. Long periods of sick leave and reduced workforce participation after RP should be considered potential adverse effects of this treatment.

  15. Does a previous prostate biopsy-related acute bacterial prostatitis affect the results of radical prostatectomy?

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    Türk, Hakan; Ün, Sitki; Arslan, Erkan; Zorlu, Ferruh

    2018-01-01

    To The standard technique for obtaining a histologic diagnosis of prostatic carcinomas is transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Acute prostatitis which might develop after prostate biopsy can cause periprostatic inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, we performed a retrospective review of our database to determine whether ABP history might affect the outcome of RP. 441 RP patients who were operated in our clinic from 2002 to 2014 were included in our study group. All patients' demographic values, PSA levels, biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimen pathology results and their perioperative/postoperative complications were evaluated. There were 41 patients in patients with acute prostatitis following biopsy and 397 patients that did not develop acute prostatitis. Mean blood loss, transfusion rate and operation period were found to be significantly higher in ABP patients. Hospitalization period and reoperation rates were similar in both groups. However, post-op complications were significantly higher in ABP group. Even though it does not affect oncological outcomes, we would like to warn the surgeons for potential complaints during surgery in ABP patients. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  16. Does a previous prostate biopsy-related acute bacterial prostatitis affect the results of radical prostatectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Türk

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To The standard technique for obtaining a histologic diagnosis of prostatic carcinomas is transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Acute prostatitis which might develop after prostate biopsy can cause periprostatic inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, we performed a retrospective review of our database to determine whether ABP history might affect the outcome of RP. Materials and Methods 441 RP patients who were operated in our clinic from 2002 to 2014 were included in our study group. All patients’ demographic values, PSA levels, biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimen pathology results and their perioperative/ postoperative complications were evaluated. Results There were 41 patients in patients with acute prostatitis following biopsy and 397 patients that did not develop acute prostatitis. Mean blood loss, transfusion rate and operation period were found to be significantly higher in ABP patients. Hospitalization period and reoperation rates were similar in both groups. However, post-op complications were significantly higher in ABP group. Conclusion Even though it does not affect oncological outcomes, we would like to warn the surgeons for potential complaints during surgery in ABP patients.

  17. TREATMENT OF ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE TUMOR AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    A. V. Babintsev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC treatment is a pressing problem both inRussiaand worldwide. According to data for Saint-Petersburg, from 1990 to 2002 morbidity increase rate for PC was 141.3 %. Even after nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP erectile dysfunction of some level is observed in 65–75 % of patients. During follow-up examination, data on sexual history were gathered including information on past and current sexual contacts. A questionnaire based on the International Index of Erectile Function was used which allows to evaluate different parameters of sexual function (sexual drive, erection, orgasm, ejaculation, sexual act, and satisfaction with sexual relationships, as well as determine treatment effectiveness. We performed combined two-stage treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with PC after RP. At the first stage, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (sildenafil 100 mg were used. If the drug was ineffective, the second stage was initiated (intracavernosal alprostadil injections. Drug effectiveness, complications, patient compliancy were evaluated.

  18. Erectile function following brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, or radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putora, P.M.; Buchauer, K.; Plasswilm, L.; Engeler, D.; Schmid, H.P.; Haile, S.R.; Graf, N.

    2016-01-01

    For localized prostate cancer, treatment options include external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), radical prostatectomy (RP), and brachytherapy (BT). Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common side-effect. Our aim was to evaluate penile erectile function (EF) before and after BT, EBRT, or RP using a validated self-administered quality-of-life survey from a prospective registry. Analysis included 478 patients undergoing RP (n = 252), EBRT (n = 91), and BT (n = 135) with at least 1 year of follow-up and EF documented using IIEF-5 scores at baseline, 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and annually thereafter. Differences among treatments were most pronounced among patients with no or mild initial ED (IIEF-5 ≥ 17). Overall, corrected for baseline EF and age, BT was associated with higher IIEF-5 scores than RP (+ 7.8 IIEF-5 score) or EBRT (+ 3.1 IIEF-5 score). EBRT was associated with better IIEF-5 scores than RP (+ 4.7 IIEF-5 score). In patients undergoing EBRT or RP with bilateral nerve sparing (NS), recovery of EF was observed and during follow-up, the differences to BT were not statistically significant. Overall age had a negative impact on EF preservation (corrected for baseline IIEF). In our series, EF was adversely affected by each treatment modality. Considered overall, BT provided the best EF preservation in comparison to EBRT or RP. (orig.) [de

  19. Vacuum therapy in penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy: review of hemodynamic and antihypoxic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Sheng-Qiang; Gao, Liang; Wei, Qiang; Yuan, Jiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Generally, hypoxia is a normal physiological condition in the flaccid penis, which is interrupted by regular nocturnal erections in men with normal erectile function. [1] Lack of spontaneous and nocturnal erections after radical prostatectomy due to neuropraxia results in persistent hypoxia of cavernosal tissue, which leads to apoptosis and degeneration of cavernosal smooth muscle fibers. Therefore, overcoming hypoxia is believed to play a crucial role during neuropraxia. The use of a vacuum erectile device (VED) in penile rehabilitation is reportedly effective and may prevent loss of penile length. The corporal blood after VED use is increased and consists of both arterial and venous blood, as revealed by color Doppler sonography and blood gas analysis. A similar phenomenon was observed in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, NPWT employs a lower negative pressure than VED, and a hypoperfused zone, which increases in response to negative pressure adjacent to the wound edge, was observed. Nonetheless, questions regarding ideal subatmospheric pressure levels, modes of action, and therapeutic duration of VED remain unanswered. Moreover, it remains unclear whether a hypoperfused zone or PO 2 gradient appears in the penis during VED therapy. To optimize a clinical VED protocol in penile rehabilitation, further research on the mechanism of VED, especially real-time PO 2 measurements in different parts of the penis, should be performed.

  20. The Da Vinci Xi and robotic radical prostatectomy-an evolution in learning and technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonewardene, S S; Cahill, D

    2017-06-01

    The da Vinci Xi robot has been introduced as the successor to the Si platform. The promise of the Xi is to open the door to new surgical procedures. For robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP)/pelvic surgery, the potential is better vision and longer instruments. How has the Xi impacted on operative and pathological parameters as indicators of surgical performance? This is a comparison of an initial series of 42 RARPs with the Xi system in 2015 with a series using the Si system immediately before Xi uptake in the same calendar year, and an Si series by the same surgeon synchronously as the Xi series using operative time, blood loss, and positive margins as surrogates of surgical performance. Subjectively and objectively, there is a learning curve to Xi uptake in longer operative times but no impact on T2 positive margins which are the most reflective single measure of RARP outcomes. Subjectively, the vision of the Xi is inferior to the Si system, and the integrated diathermy system and automated setup are quirky. All require experience to overcome. There is a learning curve to progress from the Si to Xi da Vinci surgical platforms, but this does not negatively impact the outcome.

  1. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy by extraperitoneal access with duplication of the open technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tobias-Machado

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is a continually developing technique. Transperitoneal access has been preferred by the majority of centers that employ this technique. Endoscopic extraperitoneal access is used by a few groups, nevertheless it is currently receiving a higher acceptance. In general, the antegrade technique is used, with dissection from the bladder neck to the prostate apex. The objective of the present paper is to describe the extraperitoneal technique with reproduction of the open surgery's surgical steps. SURGICAL TECHNIQUE: With this technique, the dissection of the prostate apex is performed and, following the section of the urethra while preserving the sphincteric apparatus, the Foley catheter is externally tied and internally recovered, which allows cranial traction, similarly to the way it is performed in conventional surgery. The retroprostatic space is posteriorly dissected and the seminal vesicles are identified by anterior and posterior approach, obtaining with this method an optimal exposure of the posterolateral pedicles and the prostate contour. The initial impression is that this technique does not present higher bleeding rate or difficulty level when compared with antegrade surgery. Potential advantages of this technique would be the greater familiarity with surgical steps, isolated extraperitoneal drainage of urine and secretions and a good definition of prostate limits and lateral pedicles, which are critical factors for preserving the neurovascular bundles and avoiding positive surgical margins. A higher number of cases and a long-term follow-up will demonstrate its actual value as a technical option for endoscopic access to the prostate.

  2. Neuroanatomy of the male pelvis in respect to radical prostatectomy including three-dimensional visualization.

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    Schwalenberg, Thilo; Neuhaus, Jochen; Liatsikos, Evangelos; Winkler, Mathias; Löffler, Sabine; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe

    2010-01-01

    The neuroanatomical structures of the radical prostatectomy (RP) are extensively discussed for their existence, localization and function. Especially structures, e.g. the so-called neurovascular bundle (NVB) that are points of debate in numerous anatomical studies. We review the literature and present our observations in cadaveric specimens, to reconstruct neuroanatomical structures in three dimensions (3D) with the use of appropriate computer applications and produce images of operative fields. We used an internet PubMed survey (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) to review recent publications and included back copies of historical neuroanatomical studies from our own library. Our own experimental cadaveric (specimens preserved in Thiel's solution) studies of the autonomic nerve supply of the lower urinary tract were also reviewed. Visualization of the pelvic anatomy and neuroanatomy was done using computer-based software packages. No unified terminology for the structures of the NVBs can be presented to date. The innervation of the smooth muscular structures of the urethra and the complex morphology of urethral sphincter remain unclear. Our cadaveric studies showed that nerves are located on the lateral aspect of the prostate in addition to the NVBs described at the dorsolateral side of the prostate. The neuroanatomical investigations of the male pelvis and visualization of the structures in 3D enable the presentation of operative sites as seen intraoperatively. Moreover, dynamic depiction of the pelvic floor is also possible.

  3. Significance and management of positive surgical margins at the time of radical prostatectomy.

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    Silberstein, Jonathan L; Eastham, James A

    2014-10-01

    Positive surgical margins (PSM) at the time of radical prostatectomy (RP) result in an increased risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) and secondary treatment. We review current literature with a focus on stratifying the characteristics of the PSM that may define its significance, the impact of modern imaging and surgical approaches in avoidance of PSM, and management strategies when PSM do occur. We performed a review of the available literature to identify factors associated with PSM and their management. PSM have been repeatedly demonstrated to be associated with an increased risk of BCR following RP. The specific characteristics (size, number, location, Gleason score at the margin) of the PSM may influence the risk of recurrence. Novel imaging and surgical approaches are being investigated and may allow for reductions of PSM in the future. The use of adjuvant treatment for a PSM remains controversial and should be decided on an individual basis after a discussion about the risks and benefits. The goal of RP is complete resection of the tumor. PSM are associated with increased risk of BCR and secondary treatments. Of the risk factors associated with BCR after RP, a PSM is directly influenced by surgical technique.

  4. Outcomes after radical prostatectomy in men receiving previous pelvic radiation for non-prostate malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Timothy A; Wedmid, Alexei; Sandhu, Jaspreet S; Eastham, James A

    2009-08-01

    To report the perioperative and functional outcomes of nine patients treated at our institution who had radical prostatectomy (RP) after previous pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for non-prostate malignancies. From 1993 to 2007, nine patients had RP after external beam RT for testicular seminoma (six), anorectal cancer (two) and colon cancer (one). Clinical information was obtained from a prospective prostate cancer database. RP was completed with no identifiable injury to adjacent structures in all nine patients. Four patients had significant pelvic fibrosis, and three required bilateral neurovascular bundle (NVB) resection. The NVB was preserved in the remaining six patients, four with good preoperative erectile function. However, no patient recovered erectile function after RP at a median (range) follow-up of 75 (12-172) months. Of seven men continent before RP, four required one or fewer pads daily and three were completely dry, achieving complete urinary control at a median (range) time of 7.5 (2-20) months. Two patients developed an anastomotic stricture, one being associated with concomitant ureteric stricture. RP after pelvic RT for non-prostate malignancies was not associated with increased intraoperative morbidity. However, rates of anastomotic stricture, erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence appeared to be higher than those reported after RP in men with no previous RT, and comparable with those seen in the salvage RP setting.

  5. Significance and management of positive surgical margins at the time of radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L. Silberstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive surgical margins (PSM at the time of radical prostatectomy (RP result in an increased risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR and secondary treatment. We review current literature with a focus on stratifying the characteristics of the PSM that may define its significance, the impact of modern imaging and surgical approaches in avoidance of PSM, and management strategies when PSM do occur. We performed a review of the available literature to identify factors associated with PSM and their management. PSM have been repeatedly demonstrated to be associated with an increased risk of BCR following RP. The specific characteristics (size, number, location, Gleason score at the margin of the PSM may influence the risk of recurrence. Novel imaging and surgical approaches are being investigated and may allow for reductions of PSM in the future. The use of adjuvant treatment for a PSM remains controversial and should be decided on an individual basis after a discussion about the risks and benefits. The goal of RP is complete resection of the tumor. PSM are associated with increased risk of BCR and secondary treatments. Of the risk factors associated with BCR after RP, a PSM is directly influenced by surgical technique.

  6. Defining biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy and timing of early salvage radiotherapy. Informing the debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budaeus, Lars; Schiffmann, Jonas; Graefen, Markus; Huland, Hartwig; Tennstedt, Pierre; Siegmann, Alessandra; Boehmer, Dirk; Budach, Volker; Bartkowiak, Detlef; Wiegel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The optimal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after radical prostatectomy (RP) for defining biochemical recurrence and initiating salvage radiation therapy (SRT) is still debatable. Whereas adjuvant or extremely early SRT irrespective of PSA progression might be overtreatment for some patients, SRT at PSA >0.2 ng/ml might be undertreatment for others. The current study addresses the optimal timing of radiation therapy after RP. Cohort 1 comprised 293 men with PSA 0.1-0.19 ng/ml after RP. Cohort 2 comprised 198 men with SRT. PSA progression and metastases were assessed in cohort 1. In cohort 2, we compared freedom from progression according to pre-SRT PSA (0.03-0.19 vs. 0.2-0.499 ng/ml). Multivariable Cox regression analyses predicted progression after SRT. In cohort 1, 281 (95.9%) men had further PSA progression ≥0.2 ng/ml and 27 (9.2%) men developed metastases within a median follow-up of 74.3 months. In cohort 2, we recorded improved freedom from progression according to lower pre-SRT PSA (0.03-0.19 vs. 0.2-0.499 ng/ml: 69 vs. 53%; log-rank p = 0.051). Patients with higher pre-SRT PSA ≥0.2 ng/ml were at a higher risk of progression after SRT (hazard ratio: 1.8; p [de

  7. Advanced Imaging for the Early Diagnosis of Local Recurrence Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Panebianco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently the diagnosis of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa after radical prostatectomy (RT is based on the onset of biochemical failure which is defined by two consecutive values of prostate-specific antigen (PSA higher than 0.2 ng/mL. The aim of this paper was to review the current roles of advanced imaging in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A nonsystematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of PET/CT in the restaging of PCa after RP; the second part is intended to provide the impact of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence, while the performance of PET/CT still remains unclear. Moreover Mp-MRI, thanks to functional techniques, allows to distinguish between residual glandular healthy tissue, scar/fibrotic tissue, granulation tissue, and tumour recurrence and it may also be able to assess the aggressiveness of nodule recurrence.

  8. Urinary incontinence and voiding dysfunction after radical retropubic prostatectomy (prospective urodynamic study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majoros, Attila; Bach, Dietmar; Keszthelyi, Attila; Hamvas, Antal; Romics, Imre

    2006-01-01

    During this prospective study we analyzed the effects of radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) on bladder and sphincter function by comparing preoperative and postoperative urodynamic data. The aim of the study was to determine the reason for urinary incontinence after RRP and explain why one group of patients will be immediately continent after catheter removal, while others need some time to reach complete continence. Urodynamic examination was performed in 63 patients 3-7 days before and 2 months after surgery. Forty-three (68.2%) and 53 (84.1%) patients regained continence at 2 and 9 months following RRP, respectively. Ten patients (15.9%) were immediately continent after catheter removal. Urodynamic stress incontinence was detected in 18 (28.6%), and detrusor overactivity incontinence in 2 (3.2%) patients 2 months after surgery. The amplitude of preoperative maximal voluntary sphincteric contractions was significantly higher in the postoperative continent group (125 vs. 96.5 cmH(2)O, P continent following catheter removal had no lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and urodynamic abnormality preoperatively, and they had significantly higher preoperative and postoperative maximum urethral closure pressure (at rest and during voluntary sphincter contraction) than those who became continent later on. These data suggest that the main cause of incontinence after RRP is sphincteric weakness. In the continent group, those who became immediately continent had significantly higher maximum urethral closure pressure values at rest and at voluntary sphincteric contraction even before the surgery. Neurourol. Urodynam. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Vacuum therapy in penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy: review of hemodynamic and antihypoxic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Qiang Qian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally, hypoxia is a normal physiological condition in the flaccid penis, which is interrupted by regular nocturnal erections in men with normal erectile function. [1] Lack of spontaneous and nocturnal erections after radical prostatectomy due to neuropraxia results in persistent hypoxia of cavernosal tissue, which leads to apoptosis and degeneration of cavernosal smooth muscle fibers. Therefore, overcoming hypoxia is believed to play a crucial role during neuropraxia. The use of a vacuum erectile device (VED in penile rehabilitation is reportedly effective and may prevent loss of penile length. The corporal blood after VED use is increased and consists of both arterial and venous blood, as revealed by color Doppler sonography and blood gas analysis. A similar phenomenon was observed in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT. However, NPWT employs a lower negative pressure than VED, and a hypoperfused zone, which increases in response to negative pressure adjacent to the wound edge, was observed. Nonetheless, questions regarding ideal subatmospheric pressure levels, modes of action, and therapeutic duration of VED remain unanswered. Moreover, it remains unclear whether a hypoperfused zone or PO 2 gradient appears in the penis during VED therapy. To optimize a clinical VED protocol in penile rehabilitation, further research on the mechanism of VED, especially real-time PO 2 measurements in different parts of the penis, should be performed.

  10. Retropubic radical prostatectomy: Clinicopathological observations and outcome analysis of 428 consecutive patients

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    Jagdeesh N Kulkarni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : We report the outcome analysis of retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP performed in 428 patients in terms of pathological findings, complications, and survival. Materials and Methods : Systematically recorded case reports forms of consecutive 428 RRPs done over a 14-year period were analyzed using the SPSS 14 software. Secondary analysis was done to evaluate era specific (pre and post 2002 changes in clinical features and survivals. Results : Seven-year overall survival (OAS, cancer-specific survival (CSS, and event-free survival (EFS was 83.2%, 82.8%, and 69.8% respectively in our series. Era-specific survival showed higher CSS post 2002, and there was an increase in presentation with organ-confined disease. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed statistically significant impact on era specific outcome. With the improvement in techniques decrease in complications rate and increase in quality of life was noted. Conclusions : Our series spanning over decade demonstrates that RRP is viable option to offer cure to organ-confined carcinoma prostate. Further, there is evidence of stage migration and improvements in outcome in post 2002 patients. Although our series is modest in number, the success rates and outcome data matches those reported in the literature.

  11. Outcome of salvage radiotherapy for biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy with or without hormonal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Rex; Kamat, Ashish M.; Crevoisier, Renaud de; Allen, Pamela K.; Lee, Andrew K.; Tucker, Susan L.; Pisters, Louis; Babaian, Richard J.; Kuban, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Background: This study analyzed the outcome of salvage radiotherapy for biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP). By comparing the outcomes for patients who received RT alone and for those who received combined RT and hormonal therapy, we assessed the potential benefits of hormonal therapy. Patients and Methods: This cohort was comprised of 101 patients who received salvage RT between 1990 and 2001 for biochemical failure after RP. Fifty-nine of these patients also received hormone. Margin status (positive vs. negative), extracapsular extension (yes vs. no), seminal vesicle involvement (yes vs. no), pathologic stage, Gleason score, pre-RP PSA, post-RP PSA, pre-RT PSA, hormonal use, radiotherapy dose and technique, RP at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, and time from RP to salvage RT were analyzed. Statistically significant variables were used to construct prognostic groups. Results: Independent prognostic factors for the RT-alone group were margin status and pre-RT PSA. RP at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center was marginally significant (p = 0.06) in multivariate analysis. Pre-RT PSA was the only significant prognostic factor for the combined-therapy group. We used a combination of margin status and pre-RT PSA to construct a prognostic model for response to the salvage treatment based on the RT group. We identified the favorable group as those patients with positive margin and pre-RT PSA ≤0.5 ng/mL vs. the unfavorable group as otherwise. This stratification separates patients into clinically meaningful groups. The 5-year PSA control probabilities for the favorable vs. the unfavorable group were 83.7% vs. 61.7% with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.03). Androgen ablation seemed to be most beneficial in the unfavorable group. Conclusion: After prostatectomy, favorable-group patients may fare well with salvage radiotherapy alone. These patients may be spared the toxicity of androgen ablation. The other patients may benefit most from a combined approach with hormonal

  12. Urinary engrailed-2 (EN2) levels predict tumour volume in men undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandha, Hardev; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2012-01-01

    ELISA test and is not dependent on other parameters, even PSA, unlike all the other current biomarkers under evaluation. To date, no marker correlates with the amount of cancer present - the present study shows this positive correlation with EN2 in men undergoing prostatectomy. The potential utility...... in men who had undergone radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer. To date, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels have not reliably predicted prostate cancer volume. Reliable volume indicator biomarker(s) may aid management decisions, e.g. active treatment vs active surveillance. PATIENTS......: In all, 88 of the whole cohort of 125 men (70%) were positive for EN2 in their urine (>42.5 µg/L); 38/58 (65%) men where cancer volume data was available. There was no statistical relationship between urinary EN2 levels and serum PSA levels. PSA levels did not correlate with tumour stage, combined...

  13. Perineal massage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Duarte González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most women want to give birth without perineal tears, cuts or sutures, because these often cause back pain and discomfort and may have a negative impact on sexual functioning. It is suggested that perineal massage during the last month of pregnancy as a possible way of allowing the perineal tissue to expand more easily during birth. Perineal massage, which makes the woman or her partner (for only one or two times a week from 35 weeks reduces the likelihood of perineal trauma (mainly episiotomies and perineal pain during and after birth.The FAME (Federation of Associations for Midwives in Spain recognizes that perineal massage during pregnancy reduces perineal trauma (episiotomy and tears during childbirth.

  14. Pad use and patient reported bother from urinary leakage after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstedt, Anna; Carlsson, Stefan; Nilsson, Andreas E; Johansson, Eva; Nyberg, Tommy; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, N Peter

    2012-01-01

    To better understand clinically significant definitions of urinary incontinence we investigated the relationship between urinary leakage and patient reported bother from urinary leakage. A consecutive series of 1,411 men who underwent radical prostatectomy at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, from 2002 to 2006 were invited to complete a study specific questionnaire with questions on pad status, urinary leakage and bother from urinary leakage. Questionnaires were received from 1,179 men with a followup of greater than 1 year (median 2.2). Results showed that even a small amount of urinary leakage resulted in a high risk of urinary bother. Of 775 survivors 46 (6%) reporting 0 pads indicated moderate or much bother compared to 38 of 123 (31%) who reported using a security pad. When comparing the 2 groups, the risk of bother from urinary leakage was more than 5 times higher in the safety pad vs the 0 pad group (RR 5.2, 95% CI 3.5-7.7). As the number of pads increased, we noted a higher bother risk. Cross-tabulation of pad use and urinary leakage revealed wide variation in pad requirements despite the same answer to urinary leakage questions. If the definition of continence is based on pad use, for example safety pads, a certain number of men who report moderate or much bother from urinary leakage will be defined as continent. Our results also show that for each stated rate of urinary leakage men prove to have a major variation in the pad requirement. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical and biochemical outcomes of men undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, David; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Safdieh, Joseph; Weiner, Joseph; Rotman, Marvin; Schwartz, David [Veterans Affairs, New York Harbor Healthcare System, Brooklyn (United States); Rineer, Justin [University of Florida Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health, Orlando (United States)

    2015-03-15

    We analyzed outcomes of patients with prostate cancer undergoing either radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) +/- salvage radiation or definitive radiation therapy (RT) +/- androgen deprivation. From 2003-2010 there were 251 patients who underwent RRP and 469 patients who received RT (> or =7,560 cGy) for prostate cancer. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed with the log-rank test to compare biochemical control (bCR), distant metastatic-free survival (DMPFS), and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) between the two groups. The median follow-up was 70 months and 61.3% of the men were African American. For low risk disease the 6-year bCR were 90.3% for RT and 85.6% for RRP (p = 0.23) and the 6-year post-salvage bCR were 90.3% vs. 90.9%, respectively (p = 0.84). For intermediate risk disease the 6-year bCR were 82.6% for RT and 59.7% for RRP (p < 0.001) and 82.6% vs. 74.0%, respectively, after including those salvaged with RT (p = 0.06). For high risk disease, the 6-year bCR were 67.4% for RT and 41.3% for RRP (p < 0.001) and after including those salvaged with RT was 67.4% vs. 43.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to DMPFS or PCSS. Treatment approaches utilizing RRP +/- salvage radiation or RT +/- androgen deprivation yielded equivalent DMPFS and PCSS outcomes. Biochemical control rates, using their respective definitions, appeared equivalent or better in those who received treatment with RT.

  16. Modular Training for Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Where to Begin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Catherine; Ahmed, Kamran; Novara, Giacomo; Guru, Khurshid; Mottrie, Alex; Challacombe, Ben; der Poel, Henk Van; Peabody, James; Dasgupta, Prokar

    Effective training is paramount for patient safety. Modular training entails advancing through surgical steps of increasing difficulty. This study aimed to construct a modular training pathway for use in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). It aims to identify the sequence of procedural steps that are learnt before surgeons are able to perform a full procedure without an intervention from mentor. This is a multi-institutional, prospective, observational, longitudinal study. We used a validated training tool (RARP Score). Data regarding surgeons' stage of training and progress were collected for analysis. A modular training pathway was constructed with consensus on the level of difficulty and evaluation of individual steps. We identified and recorded the sequence of steps performed by fellows during their learning curves. We included 15 urology fellows from UK, Europe, and Australia. A total of 15 surgeons were assessed by mentors in 425 RARP cases over 8 months (range: 7-79) across 15 international centers. There were substantial differences in the sequence of RARP steps according to the chronology of the procedure, difficulty level, and the order in which surgeons actually learned steps. Steps were not attempted in chronological order. The greater the difficulty, the later the cohort first undertook the step (p = 0.021). The cohort undertook steps of difficulty level I at median case number 1. Steps of difficulty levels II, III, and IV showed more variation in median case number of the first attempt. We recommend that, in the operating theater, steps be learned in order of increasing difficulty. A new modular training route has been designed. This incorporates the steps of RARP with the following order of priority: difficulty level > median case number of first attempt > most frequently undertaken in surgical training. An evidence-based modular training pathway has been developed that facilitates a safe introduction to RARP for novice surgeons. Copyright

  17. Does nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy increase the risk of positive surgical margins and biochemical progression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhateeb Sultan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the introduction of nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (NSRP, there have been concerns about the increased risks of positive surgical margins (PSM and biochemical progression (BP. We examined the relationship of NSRP with PSM and BP using a large, mature dataset. Materials and Methods: Patients who underwent RP for clinically localized prostate cancer at our center between 1997 and 2008 were identified. Patients who received neoadjuvant therapy were excluded. We examined the relation of NSRP to the rate of PSM and BP in univariate and multivariate analyses adjusting for clinical and pathological variables including age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels and doubling time, and pathological stage and grade. Results: In total, 856 patients were included, 70.9% underwent NSRP and 29.1% had non-NSRP. PSM rates were 13.5% in the NSRP group compared to 17.7% in non-NSRP (P=0.11. In a multivariate analysis, non-NSRP was preformed in patients with a higher pathological stage (HR 1.95, 95% CI 1.25-3.04, P=0.003 and a higher baseline PSA level (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.08, P=0.005. With a median follow-up of 41 months, BP-free survival was 88% for non-NSRP compared to 92% for the NSRP group (log rank P=0.018; this difference was not significant in a multivariate Cox regression analysis (HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.28-1.06, P=0.09. Conclusion: When used in properly selected patients, NSRP does not seem to increase the risk of PSM and disease progression. The most effective way of resolving this issue is through a randomized clinical trial; however, such a trial is not feasible.

  18. The results of radical retropubic prostatectomy and adjuvant therapy for pathologic stage C prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schild, Steven E.; Wong, William W.; Grado, Gordon L.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Novicki, Donald E.; Swanson, Scott K.; Larson, Thayne R.; Ferrigni, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The results of therapy in 288 men with pathologic Stage C prostate cancer who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) were analyzed to determine the effects of adjuvant therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven of the 288 patients received preoperative neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (leuprolide acetate). Postoperatively, 60 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) to the prostate bed. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 83 months (median = 32 months). Freedom from failure (FFF) was defined as maintaining a serum PSA level of ≤ 0.3 ng/ml. Results: The FFF was 61% at 3 years and 45% at 5 years for the entire group. The FFF following RRP plus RT was 75% at 3 years and 57% at 5 years as compared to 56% at 3 years and 40% at 5 years for RRP without RT (p = 0.049). The FFF following RRP plus neoadjuvant hormonal therapy was 58% at 3 years and 40% at 5 years as compared to 60% at 3 years and 45% at 5 years following RRP without hormonal therapy (p = 0.3). In patients without seminal vesicle (SV) invasion, the FFF was 81% at 3 and 5 years for RRP plus RT as compared to 61% at 3 years and 50% at 5 years for RRP without RT (p = 0.01). In patients with SV invasion, the FFF was 61% at 3 years and 36% at 5 years for RRP plus RT as compared to 44% at 3 years and 23% at 5 years for RRP without RT (p = 0.23). The projected local control rate was 83% at 5 years for those with RRP alone as compared to 100% for RRP plus RT (p = 0.02). Survival at 5 years was projected to be 92% and was not significantly altered by the administration of adjuvant therapies. Conclusions: Postoperative RT was associated with significantly improved local control and FFF rates, especially in patients with tumors which did not involve the seminal vesicles

  19. Comparative Study of Inguinal Hernia Repair Rates After Radical Prostatectomy or External Beam Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lughezzani, Giovanni; Sun, Maxine; Perrotte, Paul; Alasker, Ahmed; Jeldres, Claudio; Isbarn, Hendrik; Budaeus, Lars; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Valiquette, Luc; Benard, Francois; Saad, Fred; Graefen, Markus; Montorsi, Francesco; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We tested the hypothesis that patients treated for localized prostate cancer with radical prostatectomy (RP) have a higher risk of requiring an inguinal hernia (IH) repair than their counterparts treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Within the Quebec Health Plan database, we identified 6,422 men treated with RP and 4,685 men treated with EBRT for localized prostate cancer between 1990 and 2000, in addition to 6,933 control patients who underwent a prostate biopsy. From among that population, we identified patients who underwent a unilateral or bilateral hernia repair after either RP or EBRT. Kaplan-Meier plots showed IH repair-free survival rates. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression models tested the predictors of IH repair after RP or EBRT. Covariates consisted of age, year of surgery, and Charlson Comorbidity Index. Results: IH repair-free survival rates at 1, 2, 5, and 10 years were 96.8, 94.3, 90.5, and 86.2% vs. 98.9, 98.0, 95.4, and 92.2%, respectively, in RP vs. EBRT patients (log-rank test, p < 0.001). IH repair-free survival rates in the biopsy population were 98.3, 97.1, 94.9, and 90.2% at the same four time points. In multivariable Cox regression models, RP predisposed to a 2.3-fold higher risk of IH repair than EBRT (p < 0.001). Besides therapy type, patient age (p < 0.001) represented the only other independent predictor of IH repair. Conclusions: RP predisposes to a higher rate of IH repair relative to EBRT. This observation should be considered at informed consent.

  20. Hormonal changes after localized prostate cancer treatment. Comparison between external beam radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, J; Celma, A; Placer, J; Maldonado, X; Trilla, E; Salvador, C; Lorente, D; Regis, L; Cuadras, M; Carles, J; Morote, J

    2016-11-01

    To determine the influence of radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on the hypothalamic pituitary axis of 120 men with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with RP or EBRT exclusively. 120 patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled. Ninety two patients underwent RP and 28 patients EBRT exclusively. We measured serum levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone (T), free testosterone, and estradiol at baseline and at 3 and 12 months after treatment completion. Patients undergoing RP were younger and presented a higher prostate volume (64.3 vs. 71.1 years, p<0.0001 and 55.1 vs. 36.5 g, p<0.0001; respectively). No differences regarding serum hormonal levels were found at baseline. Luteinizing hormone and FSH levels were significantly higher in those patients treated with EBRT at three months (luteinizing hormone 8,54 vs. 4,76 U/l, FSH 22,96 vs. 8,18 U/l, p<0,0001) while T and free testosterone levels were significantly lower (T 360,3 vs. 414,83ng/dl, p 0,039; free testosterone 5,94 vs. 7,5pg/ml, p 0,018). At 12 months FSH levels remained significantly higher in patients treated with EBRT compared to patients treated with RP (21,01 vs. 8,51 U/l, p<0,001) while T levels remained significantly lower (339,89 vs. 402,39ng/dl, p 0,03). Prostate cancer treatment influences the hypothalamic pituitary axis. This influence seems to be more important when patients with prostate cancer are treated with EBRT rather than RP. More studies are needed to elucidate the role that prostate may play as an endocrine organ. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Long-term oncologic results of salvage radical prostatectomy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, Fernando J.; Scardino, Peter T.; Stephenson, Andrew J.; DiBlasio, Christopher J.; Fearn, Paul A.; Eastham, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Salvage radical prostatectomy (RP) may potentially cure patients who have isolated local prostate cancer recurrence after radiotherapy (RT). We report the long-term cancer control associated with salvage RP in a consecutive cohort of patients and identify the variables associated with disease progression and cancer survival. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 consecutive patients underwent salvage RP with curative intent for biopsy-confirmed, locally recurrent, prostate cancer after RT. Disease progression after salvage RP was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of ≥0.2 ng/mL or by initiation of androgen deprivation therapy. Cancer-specific mortality was defined as active clinical disease progression despite castration. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate these endpoints. The median follow-up from RT was 10 years (range, 3-27 years) and from salvage RP was 5 years (range, 1-20 years). Results: Overall, the 5-year progression-free probability was 55% (95% confidence interval, 46-64%), and the median progression-free interval was 6.4 years. The preoperative PSA level was the only significant pretreatment predictor of disease progression in the multivariate analysis (p = 0.01). The 5-year progression-free probability for patients with a preoperative PSA level of 10 ng/mL was 86%, 55%, and 37%, respectively. The 10-year and 15-year cancer-specific mortality after salvage RP was 27% and 40%, respectively. The median time from disease progression to cancer-specific death was 10.3 years (95% confidence interval, 7.6-12.9). After multivariate analysis, the preoperative serum PSA level and seminal vesicle or lymph node status correlated independently with disease progression. Conclusions: Greater preoperative PSA levels are associated with disease progression and cancer-specific death. Long-term control of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive RT is possible when salvage RP is performed early in the course of recurrent

  2. Neoadjuvant treatment and adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with high risk prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scorticati, Carlos; Aguilar, Jorge A.; Gonzalez Granda, Pablo; Mendez, Fernando; Montiel, Raul; Rege, Eduardo; Alvarez, Patricio; Lopez, Miguel A.; Rizzi, Alfredo; Mazza, Osvaldo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: To analyze the results of the treatment in patients with cancer of prostate of high risk. Material and Method: Retrospective and observational analysis of 130 patients operated by CAP of high risk (criteria of D'Amico) average 41,48 months, divided in form nonrandomized in three groups 1: radical prostatectomy, 2: neoadjuvant hormonoterapy (BAC) + PR, 3: BAC + PR + x-ray (RT). Statistical analysis: multivaried, test of curved Chi2 and p statistical and of Kaplan Meier. Results: Biochemical relapse 68 patients (52.3%), average 23,37 months. Without differences according to therapeutic modality (p: 0.043). In the multivaried analysis of the 3 factors of presurgical, single risk we found a statistically significant relation in the coexistence of the 3 factors with the presence of positive margin in the PR piece. (p: 0,002). The analysis to make or not, neoadjuvant BAC without significant difference (p: 0,403) evaluating in such the rate of M+, actuarial global survival according to curves of Kaplan Meier to 5 and 10 years (P: 0,5257) and survival 5 actuarial specific cancer to and 10a (P: 0,2165). Conclusions: Without significant differences in: RB, clinical progression, pathological relapse, global and specific survival, rate of positive surgical margins. The 3 criteria of D'Amico were predictive of positive surgical margins and RB, the patients with RB in group 2 presented/displayed greater risk of clinical progression, the PR demonstrated a global survival and specify actuarial to 10 years greater to 50%, considering it therapeutic an option been worth. (authors) [es

  3. Adjuvant Versus Salvage Radiotherapy for Patients With Adverse Pathological Findings Following Radical Prostatectomy: A Decision Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. D. Wallis MD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients undergoing surgery for prostate cancer who have adverse pathological findings experience high rates of recurrence. While there are data supporting adjuvant radiotherapy compared to a wait-and-watch strategy to reduce recurrence rates, there are no randomized controlled trials comparing adjuvant radiotherapy with the other standard of care, salvage radiotherapy (radiotherapy administered at the time of recurrence. Methods: We constructed a health state transition (Markov model employing two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation using a lifetime horizon to compare the quality-adjusted survival associated with postoperative strategies using adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy. Prior to analysis, we calibrated and validated our model using the results of previous randomized controlled trials. We considered clinically important oncological health states from immediately postoperative to prostate cancer–specific death, commonly described complications from prostate cancer treatment, and other causes of mortality. Transition probabilities and utilities for disease states were derived from a literature search of MEDLINE and expert consensus. Results: Salvage radiotherapy was associated with an increased quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE (58.3 months as compared with adjuvant radiotherapy (53.7 months, a difference of 4.6 months (standard deviation 8.8. Salvage radiotherapy had higher QALE in 53% of hypothetical cohorts. There was a minimal difference in overall life expectancy (-0.1 months. Examining recurrence rates, our model showed validity when compared with available randomized controlled data. Conclusions: A salvage radiotherapy strategy appears to provide improved QALE for patients with adverse pathological findings following radical prostatectomy, compared with adjuvant radiotherapy. As these findings reflect, population averages, specific patient and tumor factors, and patient preferences remain central for individualized

  4. Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy: the University of Leipzig experience of 1,300 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Rabenalt, Robert; Do, Minh; Truss, Michael C; Burchardt, Martin; Herrmann, Thomas R; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Liatsikos, Evangelos N

    2007-03-01

    We herein review our experience with endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE) as a first line therapy for localized prostate cancer. A series of 1,300 patients underwent EERPE ("wide excision", standard nervesparing technique (nsEERPE), or intrafascial nsEERPE). The mean age of the patients was 63.3 years. Preoperative PSA mean value was 10.1 ng/ml. A total of 415 patients had undergone previous surgical procedure in the lower abdomen (n = 336) and prior surgery of the prostate (n = 79), respectively. The EERPE was employed in all cases without any specific selection criteria. Mean operative time was 153 (50-320) min. including lymphadenectomy with no conversion to open surgery. Seven intraoperative, 91 early and 4 late complications occurred. The transfusion rate was 0.9%. Positive surgical margins were found in 83 patients with pT2 stage (9.8%) and in 154 patients in pT3 stage (34.3%). The mean catheterization time was 6.2 days. The 12 month follow up indicated continence rate of 91.9% and potency rates of 34% in the unilateral nerve sparing group and 69.8% in the bilateral group. In the intrafascial nsEERPE group potency rates were 33.3% (unilateral) and 79.1% (bilateral) after 12 months. Postoperative positive surgical margins rate were 6.1% for pT2 and 20% for pT3 and the complications rate 4%. The results of this large series of 1,300 patients are promising. The recently introduced intrafascial nsEERPE further ameliorates the outcome of the procedure.

  5. Salvage radical prostatectomy for radiation-recurrent prostate cancer: a multi-institutional collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chade, Daher C; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Cronin, Angel M; Savage, Caroline J; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Blute, Michael L; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco; van der Poel, Henk G; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Joniau, Steven; Godoy, Guilherme; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Gleave, Martin E; Dall'Oglio, Marcos; Srougi, Miguel; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2011-08-01

    Oncologic outcomes in men with radiation-recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) treated with salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) are poorly defined. To identify predictors of biochemical recurrence (BCR), metastasis, and death following SRP to help select patients who may benefit from SRP. This is a retrospective, international, multi-institutional cohort analysis. There was a median follow-up of 4.4 yr following SRP performed on 404 men with radiation-recurrent PCa from 1985 to 2009 in tertiary centers. Open SRP. BCR after SRP was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≥ 0.1 or ≥ 0.2 ng/ml (depending on the institution). Secondary end points included progression to metastasis and cancer-specific death. Median age at SRP was 65 yr of age, and median pre-SRP PSA was 4.5 ng/ml. Following SRP, 195 patients experienced BCR, 64 developed metastases, and 40 died from PCa. At 10 yr after SRP, BCR-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) probabilities were 37% (95% confidence interval [CI], 31-43), 77% (95% CI, 71-82), and 83% (95% CI, 76-88), respectively. On preoperative multivariable analysis, pre-SRP PSA and Gleason score at postradiation prostate biopsy predicted BCR (p = 0.022; global p 75% of patients 10 yr after surgery. Patients with lower pre-SRP PSA levels and lower postradiation prostate biopsy Gleason score have the highest probability of cure from SRP. Copyright © 2011 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Postoperative Nomogram Predicting the 10-Year Probability of Prostate Cancer Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Andrew J.; Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James A.; Bianco, Fernando J.; Dotan, Zohar A.; DiBlasio, Christopher J.; Reuther, Alwyn; Klein, Eric A.; Kattan, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose A postoperative nomogram for prostate cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP) has been independently validated as accurate and discriminating. We have updated the nomogram by extending the predictions to 10 years after RP and have enabled the nomogram predictions to be adjusted for the disease-free interval that a patient has maintained after RP. Methods Cox regression analysis was used to model the clinical information for 1,881 patients who underwent RP for clinically-localized prostate cancer by two high-volume surgeons. The model was externally validated separately on two independent cohorts of 1,782 patients and 1,357 patients, respectively. Disease progression was defined as a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, clinical progression, radiotherapy more than 12 months postoperatively, or initiation of systemic therapy. Results The 10-year progression-free probability for the modeling set was 79% (95% CI, 75% to 82%). Significant variables in the multivariable model included PSA (P = .002), primary (P < .0001) and secondary Gleason grade (P = .0006), extracapsular extension (P < .0001), positive surgical margins (P = .028), seminal vesicle invasion (P < .0001), lymph node involvement (P = .030), treatment year (P = .008), and adjuvant radiotherapy (P = .046). The concordance index of the nomogram when applied to the independent validation sets was 0.81 and 0.79. Conclusion We have developed and validated as a robust predictive model an enhanced postoperative nomogram for prostate cancer recurrence after RP. Unique to predictive models, the nomogram predictions can be adjusted for the disease-free interval that a patient has achieved after RP. PMID:16192588

  7. Time from first detectable PSA following radical prostatectomy to biochemical recurrence: A competing risk analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boo, Leonora; Pintilie, Melania; Yip, Paul; Baniel, Jack; Fleshner, Neil; Margel, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we estimated the time from first detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) following radical prostatectomy (RP) to commonly used definitions of biochemical recurrence (BCR). We also identified the predictors of time to BCR. Methods: We identified subjects who underwent a RP and had an undetectable PSA after surgery followed by at least 1 detectable PSA between 2000 and 2011. The primary outcome was time to BCR (PSA ≥0.2 and successive PSA ≥0.2) and prediction of the rate of PSA rise. Outcomes were calculated using a competing risk analysis, with univariable and multivariable Fine and Grey models. We employed a mixed effect model to test clinical predictors that are associated with the rate of PSA rise. Results: The cohort included 376 patients. The median follow-up from surgery was 60.5 months (interquartile range [IQR] 40.8–91.5) and from detectable PSA was 18 months (IQR 11–32). Only 45.74% (n = 172) had PSA values ≥0.2 ng/mL, while 15.16% (n = 57) reached the PSA level of ≥0.4 ng/mL and rising. On multivariable analysis, the values of the first detectable PSA and pathologic Gleason grade 8 or higher were consistently independent predictors of time to BCR. In the mixed effect model rate, the PSA rise was associated with time from surgery to first detectable PSA, Gleason score, and prostate volume. The main limitation of this study is the large proportion of patients that received treatment without reaching BCR. It is plausible that shorter estimated median times would occur at a centre that does not use salvage therapy at such an early state. Conclusion: The time from first detectable PSA to BCR may be lengthy. Our analyses of the predictors of the rate of PSA rise can help determine a personalized approach for patients with a detectable PSA after surgery. PMID:25624961

  8. Low serum testosterone predicts upgrading and upstaging of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Often, pathological Gleason Score (GS and stage of prostate cancer (PCa were inconsistent with biopsy GS and clinical stage. However, there were no widely accepted methods predicting upgrading and upstaging PCa. In our study, we investigated the association between serum testosterone and upgrading or upstaging of PCa after radical prostatectomy (RP. We enrolled 167 patients with PCa with biopsy GS ≤6, clinical stage ≤T2c, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA <10 ng ml−1 from April 2009 to April 2015. Data including age, body mass index, preoperative PSA level, comorbidity, clinical presentation, and preoperative serum total testosterone level were collected. Upgrading occurred in 62 (37.1% patients, and upstaging occurred in 73 (43.7% patients. Preoperative testosterone was lower in the upgrading than nonupgrading group (3.72 vs 4.56, P< 0.01. Patients in the upstaging group had lower preoperative testosterone than those in the nonupstaging group (3.84 vs 4.57, P= 0.01. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, as both continuous and categorical variables, low serum testosterone was confirmed to be an independent predictor of pathological upgrading (P = 0.01 and P= 0.01 and upstaging (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02 after RP. We suggest that low serum testosterone (<3 ng ml−1 is associated with a high rate of upgrading and upstaging after RP. It is better for surgeons to ensure close monitoring of PSA levels and imaging examination when selecting non-RP treatment, to be cautious in proceeding with nerve-sparing surgery, and to be enthusiastic in performing extended lymph node dissection when selecting RP treatment for patients with low serum testosterone.

  9. The Effect of Tumor-Prostate Ratio on Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Yong Cho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Prostate tumor volume calculated after surgery using pathologic tissue has been shown to be an independent risk factor for biochemical recurrence. Nonetheless, prostate size varies among individuals, regardless of the presence or absence of cancer. We assumed to be lower margin positive rate in the surgical operation, when the prostate volume is larger and the tumor lesion is same. Thus, we defined the tumor-prostate ratio in the ratio of tumor volume to prostate volume. In order to compensate the prostate tumor volume, the effect of tumor-prostate ratio on biochemical recurrence was examined. Materials and Methods: This study included 251 patients who underwent open retropubic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer in a single hospital. We analyzed the effects of tumor volume and tumor-prostate ratio, as well as the effects of known risk factors for biochemical recurrence, on the duration of disease-free survival. Results: In the univariate analysis, the risk factors that significantly impacted disease-free survival time were found to be a prostate-specific antigen level ≥10 ng/mL, a tumor volume ≥5 mL, tumor-prostate ratio ≥10%, tumor capsular invasion, lymph node invasion, positive surgical margins, and seminal vesicle invasion. In the multivariate analysis performed to evaluate the risk factors found to be significant in the univariate analysis, positive surgical margins (hazard ratio=3.066 and a tumor density ≥10% (hazard ratio=1.991 were shown to be significant risk factors for biochemical recurrence. Conclusions: Tumor-prostate ratio, rather than tumor volume, should be regarded as a significant risk factor for biochemical recurrence.

  10. Race and risk of metastases and survival after radical prostatectomy: Results from the SEARCH database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Stephen J; Vidal, Adriana C; Howard, Lauren E; Terris, Martha K; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Amling, Christopher L; Kane, Christopher J; Aronson, William J

    2017-11-01

    Black race is associated with prostate cancer (PC) diagnosis and poor outcome. Previously, the authors reported that black men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) in equal-access hospitals had an increased risk of biochemical disease recurrence (BCR), but recurrences were equally aggressive as those occurring in white men. The authors examined the association between race and long-term outcomes after RP. Data regarding 1665 black men (37%) and 2791 white men (63%) undergoing RP were analyzed. Using Cox models, the authors tested the association between race and BCR, BCR with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling time black men (all PBlack men were found to have a more recent surgery year (Pblack race was associated with increased BCR (P = .003) and reduced overall death (P = .017). On multivariable analysis, black race was not found to be associated with BCR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.07; P = .26), aggressive recurrence (HR, 1.14; P = .42), metastasis (HR, 1.24; P = .21), PC-specific death (HR, 1.03; P = .91), or overall death (HR, 1.03; P = .67). Among men undergoing RP at equal-access centers, although black men were found to have an increased risk of BCR, they had similar risks of aggressive disease recurrence, metastasis, and PC-specific death compared with white men, and the risk of BCR was found to be similar after controlling for risk parameters. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm these findings. Cancer 2017;123:4199-4206. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  11. Wrong to be Right: Margin Laterality is an Independent Predictor of Biochemical Failure After Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung J; Reiter, Robert E; Kummer, Nicolas; DeKernion, Jean; Steinberg, Michael L; King, Christopher R

    2018-01-01

    To examine the impact of positive surgical margin (PSM) laterality on failure after radical prostatectomy (RP). A PSM can influence local recurrence and outcomes after salvage radiation. Unlike intrinsic risk factors, a PSM is caused by intervention and thus iatrogenic failures may be elucidated by analyzing margin laterality as surgical approach is itself lateralized. We reviewed 226 RP patients between 1991 and 2013 with PSM. Data includes operation type, pre/postoperative PSA, surgical pathology, and margin type (location, focality, laterality). The median follow-up was 47 months. Biochemical recurrence after RP was defined as PSA≥0.1 ng/mL or 2 consecutive rises above nadir. Ninety-two patients received salvage radiation therapy (SRT). Failure after SRT was defined as any PSA≥0.2 ng/mL or greater than presalvage. Kaplan-Meier and Cox multivariate analyses compared relapse rates. The majority of PSM were iatrogenic (58%). Laterality was associated with differences in median relapse: right 20 versus left 51 versus bilateral 14 months (PRight-sided margins were more likely to progress than left (hazard ratio, 1.67; P=0.04). More right-sided margins were referred for SRT (55% right vs. 23% left vs. 22% bilateral), but were equally salvaged. Only T-stage and pre-SRT PSA independently influenced SRT success. Most PSM are iatrogenic, with right-sided more likely to progress (and sooner) than left sided. Margin laterality is a heretofore unrecognized independent predictor of biochemical relapse and hints at the need to modify the traditional unilateral surgical technique.

  12. Clinical and biochemical outcomes of men undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, David; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Safdieh, Joseph; Weiner, Joseph; Rotman, Marvin; Schwartz, David; Rineer, Justin

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed outcomes of patients with prostate cancer undergoing either radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) +/- salvage radiation or definitive radiation therapy (RT) +/- androgen deprivation. From 2003-2010 there were 251 patients who underwent RRP and 469 patients who received RT (> or =7,560 cGy) for prostate cancer. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed with the log-rank test to compare biochemical control (bCR), distant metastatic-free survival (DMPFS), and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) between the two groups. The median follow-up was 70 months and 61.3% of the men were African American. For low risk disease the 6-year bCR were 90.3% for RT and 85.6% for RRP (p = 0.23) and the 6-year post-salvage bCR were 90.3% vs. 90.9%, respectively (p = 0.84). For intermediate risk disease the 6-year bCR were 82.6% for RT and 59.7% for RRP (p < 0.001) and 82.6% vs. 74.0%, respectively, after including those salvaged with RT (p = 0.06). For high risk disease, the 6-year bCR were 67.4% for RT and 41.3% for RRP (p < 0.001) and after including those salvaged with RT was 67.4% vs. 43.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to DMPFS or PCSS. Treatment approaches utilizing RRP +/- salvage radiation or RT +/- androgen deprivation yielded equivalent DMPFS and PCSS outcomes. Biochemical control rates, using their respective definitions, appeared equivalent or better in those who received treatment with RT.

  13. Optimal timing of early versus delayed adjuvant radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy for locally advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Keith J; Gu, Xiangmei; Nguyen, Paul L; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P; Hu, Jim C

    2014-04-01

    Although post-radical prostatectomy (RP) adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) benefits disease that is staged as pT3 or higher, the optimal ART timing remains unknown. Our objective is to characterize the outcomes and optimal timing of early vs. delayed ART. From the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data from 1995 to 2007, we identified 963 men with pT3N0 disease receiving early (statistic approach to determine at what time post-RP ART had the most significant effect on outcomes of interest in men with pT3N0 disease. When compared with delayed ART in men with pT3 disease, early ART was associated with improved PCSM (0.47 vs. 1.02 events per 100 person-years; P = 0.038) and less salvage hormonal therapy (2.88 vs. 4.59 events per 100 person-years; P = 0.001). Delaying ART beyond 5 months is associated with worse PCSM (hazard ratio [HR] 2.3; P = 0.020), beyond 3 months is associated with more BRE (HR 1.6; P = 0.025), and beyond 4 months is associated higher rates of salvage hormonal therapy (HR 1.6; P = 0.002). ART performed after 9 months was associated with fewer urethral strictures (HR 0.6; P = 0.042). Initiating ART less than 5 months after RP for pT3 is associated with improved PCSM. Early ART is also associated with fewer BRE and less use of salvage hormonal therapy if administered earlier than 3 and 4 months after RP, respectively. However, ART administered later than 9 months after RP is associated with fewer urethral strictures. Our population-based findings complement randomized trials designed with fixed ART timing. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Anatomic Boundaries of the Clinical Target Volume (Prostate Bed) After Radical Prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Brock, Kristy K.; Haider, Masoom A.; Zwahlen, Daniel; Kong, Vickie; Chan, Elisa; Moseley, Joanne; Bayley, Andrew; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter W.M.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Milosevic, Michael; Kneebone, Andrew; Warde, Padraig; Menard, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to derive and validate an interdisciplinary consensus definition for the anatomic boundaries of the postoperative clinical target volume (CTV, prostate bed). Methods and Materials: Thirty one patients who had planned for radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy were enrolled and underwent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulation prior to radiotherapy. Through an iterative process of consultation and discussion, an interdisciplinary consensus definition was derived based on a review of published data, patterns of local failure, surgical practice, and radiologic anatomy. In validation, we analyzed the distribution of surgical clips in reference to the consensus CTV and measured spatial uncertainties in delineating the CTV and vesicourethral anastomosis. Clinical radiotherapy plans were retrospectively evaluated against the consensus CTV (prostate bed). Results: Anatomic boundaries of the consensus CTV (prostate bed) are described. Surgical clips (n = 339) were well distributed throughout the CTV. The vesicourethral anastomosis was accurately localized using central sagittal computed tomography reconstruction, with a mean ± standard deviation uncertainty of 1.8 ± 2.5 mm. Delineation uncertainties were small for both MRI and computed tomography (mean reproducibility, 0-3.8 mm; standard deviation, 1.0-2.3); they were most pronounced in the anteroposterior and superoinferior dimensions and at the superior/posterior-most aspect of the CTV. Retrospectively, the mean ± standard deviation CTV (prostate bed) percentage of volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose was only 77% ± 26%. Conclusions: We propose anatomic boundaries for the CTV (prostate bed) and present evidence supporting its validity. In the absence of gross recurrence, the role of MRI in delineating the CTV remains to be confirmed. The CTV is larger than historically practiced at our institution and should be encompassed by a microscopic tumoricidal dose

  15. Critical analysis of salvage radical prostatectomy in the management of radioresistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seabra, Daniel; Faria, Eliney; Dauster, Breno; Rodrigues, Gunther; Fava, Gilberto [Pio XII Foundation, Barretos, SP (Brazil). Section of Urology], e-mail: daniel.seabra@terra.com.br

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To critically evaluate salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) in the treatment of patients with recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). Materials and Methods: From January 2005 to June 2007, we assessed patients with recurrent localized PCa. Recurrence was suspected when there were three or more successive increases in prostate specific antigen (PSA) after nadir. After the routine imagery examinations, and once localized PCa was confirmed, patients were offered SRP. Following surgery, we evaluated bleeding, rectal injury, urinary incontinence or obstruction and impotence. PSA values were measured at 1, 3, 6, months and thereafter twice a year. Results: Forty-two patients underwent SRP. The average age was 61 years. Following radiotherapy , the mean PSA nadir was 1.5 ng/mL (0.57-5.5). The mean prostate specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT) was 14 months (6-20). Prior to SRP, the mean PSA was 5.7 ng/mL (2.9-18). The pathologic staging was pT2a: 13%; pT2b: 34%; pT2c: 27%; pT3a: 13%; and pT3b: 13%. Bleeding > 600 mL occurred in 14% of the cases; urethral stenosis in 50%; and urinary incontinence (two or more pads/day) in 72%. The mean follow-up post-SRP ranged from 6 to 30 months. The PSA level rose in 9, of which 6 had PSA-DT < 10 months. Conclusions: SRP is a feasible method in the management of localized radioresistant PCa. PSA-DT has shown to be important for the selection and SRP should not be performed if PSA-DT > 10 months. Due to its increased morbidity, SRP should be only offered to the patients who are more concerned about survival rather than quality of life. (author)

  16. Electrocautery-induced cavernous nerve injury in rats that mimics radical prostatectomy in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lu-Jie; Zhu, Jian-Qiang; Xie, Min-Kai; Wang, Yong-Chuan; Li, Hong-Bin; Cui, Zhi-Qiang; Lu, Hong-Kai; Xu, Yue-Min

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the early and delayed effects of cavernous nerve electrocautery injury (CNEI) in a rat model, with the expectation that this model could be used to test rehabilitation therapies for erectile dysfunction (ED) after radical prostatectomy (RP). In all, 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided equally into two groups (15 per group). The control group received CNs exposure surgery only and the experimental group received bilateral CNEI. At 1, 4 and 16 weeks after surgery (five rats at each time point), the ratio of maximal intracavernosal pressure (ICP) to mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured in the two groups. Neurofilament expression in the dorsal penile nerves was assessed by immunofluorescent staining and Masson's trichrome staining was used to assess the smooth muscle to collagen ratio in both groups. At the 1-week follow-up, the mean ICP/MAP was significantly lower in the CNEI group compared with the control group, at 9.94% vs 70.06% (P 0.05). The smooth muscle to collagen ratio in the CNEI group was significantly lower than in the control group at the 4- and 16-week follow-ups (P < 0.05), and the ratio at 16 weeks was further reduced compared with that at 4 weeks (P < 0.05). In the CNEI rat model, we found the damaging effects of CNEI were accompanied by a decline in ICP, reduced numbers of nerve fibres in the dorsal penile nerve, and exacerbated fibrosis in the corpus cavernosum. This may provide a basis for studying potential preventative measures or treatment strategies to ameliorate ED caused by CNEI during RP. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  17. Seminal vesicle sparing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy using a low-energy source: Better continence and potency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrenik J Shah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Ongoing with the newer developments in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP, we report our experience in a consecutive series of 42 patients with a mean 18-month follow-up. We also studied the use of a low-energy source, especially in the region of the prostatic apex and the neurovascular bundle and evaluated its outcome on continence and potency. Materials and Methods: Between November 2003 and December 2008, 50 patients aged 50-80 yrs underwent LRP with vesicourethral anastomosis and of these, 42 patients who had a minimum follow-up of 3 months were selected for the study. Of these, the initial 16 patients were operated by the routine method and the 26 patients operated in the later part of our experience were operated upon using a minimal energy source. Results: The mean follow-up was 18 months (range 3-60. Continence was evaluated at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Eleven of the 16 patients in Group I were continent as compared with 21 of 26 patients in Group II. The difference in continence rates was mainly due to less use of electrocautery and harmonic scalpel at the bladder neck. Of the eight patients who were potent pre-operatively in Group I, four remained potent 3 months after LRP. In Group II, 20 of the 26 patients were potent pre-operatively and 16 remained potent 3 months after LRP. Conclusions: Use of a low-energy source at the bladder neck and neurovascular bundle, sparing of seminal vesicle, and leaving behind a long, healthy stump of the urethra during apical dissection, is associated with better continence and potency without compromising oncological outcome.

  18. Optic nerve sheath diameter remains constant during robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Verdonck

    Full Text Available During robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP, a CO2 pneumoperitoneum (CO2PP is applied and the patient is placed in a head-down position. Intracranial pressure (ICP is expected to acutely increase under these conditions. A non-invasive method, the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD measurement, may warn us that the mechanism of protective cerebrospinal fluid (CSF shifts becomes exhausted.After obtaining IRB approval and written informed consent, ONSD was measured by ocular ultrasound in 20 ASA I-II patients at various stages of the RALRP procedure: baseline awake, after induction, after applying the CO2PP, during head-down position, after resuming the supine position, in the postoperative anaesthesia care unit, and on day one postoperatively. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP was calculated as the mean arterial (MAP minus central venous pressure (CVP.The ONSD did not change during head-down position, although the CVP increased from 4.2(2.5 mm Hg to 27.6(3.8 mm Hg. The CPP was decreased 70 min after assuming the head-down position until 15 min after resuming the supine position, but remained above 60 mm Hg at all times.Even though ICP has been documented to increase during CO2PP and head-down positioning, we did not find any changes in ONSD during head-down position. These results indicate that intracranial blood volume does not increase up to a point that CSF migration as a compensation mechanism becomes exhausted, suggesting any increases in ICP are likely to be small.

  19. Psychotherapy: a missing piece in the puzzle of post radical prostatectomy erectile dysfunction rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarato, A M; Reis, L O; Zani, E L; Cartapatti, M; Denardi, F

    2014-01-01

    To measure the impact of psychotherapy associated to the use of Tadalafil in the improvement of erectile function after radical prostatectomy. From 132 patients surgically treated for prostate cancer, thirty sequential patients with bilateral nerve sparing, low risk controlled disease and post-surgery erectile dysfunction (ED) took Tadalafil 20mg and underwent psychotherapy sessions, both weekly for three months. Patients were interviewed to establish the quality of erection using the instrument IIEF-5 and to measure psychological features impacting erectile function, aspects related to function, dysfunction, physical and emotional discomfort were evaluated with the help of an intensity scale. The average age was 62.5 (46 to 77 years), 96.7% had a stable relationship, 56.6% of the patients accepted the diagnosis and 43.2% exhibited defense mechanisms (3.3% negation, 6.6% revulsion, 33.3% concern). A positive correlation was observed between erectile function and time exposed to treatment (IIEF-5 - 9.7 to 13.3, p=0.0006), with increased satisfaction with life in general (2.1 to 2.7, P=.028) and sexual life (3.1 to 3.7, P=.028), added to facilitation of expressing feelings/emotions (1.8 to 3.0, P=.0008). Satisfaction with relationship and intimacy with partner did not present significant improve (P=.12 and P=.61, respectively). A holistic patient care with more complete ED rehabilitation includes psychotherapy with a positive correlation between erectile function and treatment exposition. Psychotherapy allowed the identification of important spouse related factors in this scenario. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Augmented Reality Using Transurethral Ultrasound for Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy: Preclinical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanchon, Cecilia; Custillon, Guillaume; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Descotes, Jean-Luc; Long, Jean-Alexandre; Fiard, Gaelle; Voros, Sandrine

    2016-07-01

    To guide the surgeon during laparoscopic or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy an innovative laparoscopic/ultrasound fusion platform was developed using a motorized 3-dimensional transurethral ultrasound probe. We present what is to our knowledge the first preclinical evaluation of 3-dimensional prostate visualization using transurethral ultrasound and the preliminary results of this new augmented reality. The transurethral probe and laparoscopic/ultrasound registration were tested on realistic prostate phantoms made of standard polyvinyl chloride. The quality of transurethral ultrasound images and the detection of passive markers placed on the prostate surface were evaluated on 2-dimensional dynamic views and 3-dimensional reconstructions. The feasibility, precision and reproducibility of laparoscopic/transurethral ultrasound registration was then determined using 4, 5, 6 and 7 markers to assess the optimal amount needed. The root mean square error was calculated for each registration and the median root mean square error and IQR were calculated according to the number of markers. The transurethral ultrasound probe was easy to manipulate and the prostatic capsule was well visualized in 2 and 3 dimensions. Passive markers could precisely be localized in the volume. Laparoscopic/transurethral ultrasound registration procedures were performed on 74 phantoms of various sizes and shapes. All were successful. The median root mean square error of 1.1 mm (IQR 0.8-1.4) was significantly associated with the number of landmarks (p = 0.001). The highest accuracy was achieved using 6 markers. However, prostate volume did not affect registration precision. Transurethral ultrasound provided high quality prostate reconstruction and easy marker detection. Laparoscopic/ultrasound registration was successful with acceptable mm precision. Further investigations are necessary to achieve sub mm accuracy and assess feasibility in a human model. Copyright © 2016 American Urological

  1. Experience with open prostatectomy in Bingham University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 8, No 4 (2017) > ... The standard of care for benign prostatic hyperplasia is still the open prostatectomy ... Keywords: Open prostatectomy, benign prostatic hyperplasia, Complications, Assisted robotic radical prostatectomy ...

  2. A matched-pair comparison of single plus one port versus standard extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy by a single urologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Xu Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We conducted this study to report on our initial experience and assess the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of extraperitoneal single plus one port laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (SPOPL-RP, and determine whether it shows any objective advantage over standard laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. From June 2009 to September 2011, 15 extraperitoneal SPOPL-RPs were performed through a 2–3-cm subumbilical longitudinal incision and another 5-mm trocar placed at the McBurney point. This cohort was compared with 37 contemporary patients who underwent standard extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy performed by the same urologist. Peri- and postoperative outcomes, including continence, potency, and scar length, were statistically analyzed. The two groups were comparable with respect to patient demographics, estimated blood loss, drainage time, duration of catheterization, catheterization rate >14 days, complication rate, postoperative hospitalization, and postoperative functional and oncologic outcomes (p > 0.05. The SPOPL-RP procedures had a longer mean operative time (170.1 minutes vs. 139.5 minutes, p = 0.005, but with fewer patients requiring analgesics (20% vs. 54.1%, p = 0.038 and earlier resumption of oral intake (20.7 hours vs. 26.8 hours, p = 0.037. The mean scar length in the SPOPL-RP group was much smaller (3.4 cm vs. 5.8 cm, p = 0.000 owing to the significant reduction of the skin incision. The peri- and postoperative outcomes of SPOPL-RP for low-risk prostate cancer are comparable to those with the standard laparoscopic approach. In addition, SPOPL-RP provides better postoperative pain control, faster recovery of bowel function, and smaller scar length than standard laparoscopy, albeit with a longer operative time.

  3. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle and endopelvic fascia sparing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Augusto Monteiro Lins de Albuquerque

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RAP is the dominant minimally invasive surgical treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer. The introduction of robotic assistance has the potential to improve surgical outcomes and reduce the steep learning curve associated with conventional laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle without open the endopelvic fascia during RAP. Materials and Methods A 51-year old male, presenting histological diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6 (3+3, in 4 cores of 12, with an initial PSA=3.41ng/dl and the digital rectal examination demonstrating a prostate with hardened nodule in the right lobe of the prostate base (clinical stage T2a. Surgical treatment with the robot-assisted technique was offered as initial therapeutic option and the critical technical point was the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle with endopelvic fascia preservation, during radical prostatectomy. Results The operative time was of 89 minutes, blood loss was 100ml. No drain was left in the peritoneal cavity. The patient was discharged within 24 hours. There were no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complications. The pathological evaluation revealed prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6, with free surgical margins and seminal vesicles free of neoplastic involvement (pathologic stage T2a. At 3-month-follow-up, the patient lies with undetectable PSA, continent and potent. Conclusion This is a feasible technique combining the benefits of retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle, the preservation of the pubo-prostatic collar and the preservation of the antero-lateral cavernous nerves.

  4. Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy after radical resection of pT1-pT2 rectal cancer: a report of thirty cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuo; Li, Dechuan; Chen, Yinbo

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE) has gained popularity for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. However, prior complex lower abdominal or pelvic surgery can complicate subsequent EERPE. To date, there have been few reports on patients who underwent EERPE after radical resection of pT1-pT2 rectal cancer. To present our experience with EERPE in patients after radical resection of pT1-pT2 rectal carcinoma and introduce a simple and effective way to create an extraperitoneal working space. Thirty patients after radical resection of pT1-pT2 rectal carcinoma were treated with EERPE for biopsy-proven localized prostate cancer. Operation time, estimated blood loss, conversion to open surgery rate, transfusion rate and transurethral catheter time were recorded. Meanwhile, functional outcome (continence and potency) and oncological outcome were reviewed. The average operative time was 168 min. Mean blood loss was 195 ml. There was no need for conversion to open surgery or transfusion. The catheter was removed on postoperative day (POD) 7.8. After a mean follow-up time of 53.1 months, 3 patients had a prostate-specific antigen level relapse over 0.1 ng/ml. At the follow-up time, 26 patients were completely continent, and 4 needed 1-2 pads/day. Of the 6 patients who underwent neurovascular bundle preservation, none have experienced return of erections at the last follow-up time. Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy after radical resection of rectal carcinoma appears promising, with feasibility in experienced hands. The operative data, postoperative urinary incontinence and oncological outcomes appear encouraging, but the rate of erectile dysfunction seems to be disappointing.

  5. A comparison of bladder neck preservation and bladder neck reconstruction for urinary incontinence after radical retro pubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Izadpanahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and will include about 30% of all malignancies in men. Since the initial report of the anatomic radical prostatectomy, refinements in the surgical technique have been made. Several studies show that bladder neck preservation (BNP during radical prostatectomy makes improve early return of urinary continence, erectile function or both. However, some clinical trials have suggested little difference between the return of continence while using modifications. In this study, we compared outcomes of BNP and bladder neck reconstruction (BNR during radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was performed on 60 patients at a referral university hospital from March 2010 to March 2012. Study population was all patients candidate for RRP (RRP in this period. All patients divided into two groups, A and B (30 patients in each group. Group A (n = 30 who preserved bladder neck (BNP and Group B (n = 30 who had BNR. Prostate specific antigen (PSA before and at 2, 6, 9, 12 and18 months after surgery, anastomotic stricture symptoms, positive bladder neck margin, Gleason score and urine incontinence were compared between two groups. Also, we compared bladder neck contracture, urinary continence and positive surgical margin rates after BNP and BNR while retropubic prostatectomy in 24 months period follow-up. Results: The mean age of the patients was 61.81 ± 7.15 years (range, 50-74 years. After a follow-up period of 24 months, the PSA rising was not different between the two groups. After 2 months, 19 (63.33% of patients in A group and the same number in B group were continent (P = 0.78. Stricture of the bladder neck at the anastomosis site requiring transurethral dilation occurred in 7 (23.33% and 3 (10.0% patients in groups A and B, respectively (P = 0.04. Conclusion: Although there was no difference in prevalence and duration of return of urinary

  6. High-Dose Adjuvant Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ost, Piet; Cozzarini, Cesare; De Meerleer, Gert; Fiorino, Claudio; De Potter, Bruno; Briganti, Alberto; Nagler, Evi V.T.; Montorsi, Francesco; Fonteyne, Valérie; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and toxicity in patients receiving high-dose (>69 Gy) adjuvant radiotherapy (HD-ART) and the impact of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 225 node-negative patients were referred for HD-ART with or without ADT to two large academic institutions. Indications for HD-ART were extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and/or positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy (RP). A dose of at least 69.1 Gy was prescribed to the prostate bed and seminal vesicle bed. The ADT consisted of a luteinizing hormone–releasing hormone analog. The duration and indication of ADT was left at the discretion of the treating physician. The effect of HD-ART and ADT on biochemical (bRFS) and clinical (cRFS) relapse-free survival was examined through univariate and multivariate analysis, with correction for known patient- and treatment-related variables. Interaction terms were introduced to evaluate effect modification. Results: After a median follow-up time of 5 years, the 7-year bRFS and cRFS were 84% and 88%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the addition of ADT was independently associated with an improved bRFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.4, p = 0.02) and cRFS (HR 0.2, p = 0.008). Higher Gleason scores and SVI were associated with decreased bRFS and cRFS. A lymphadenectomy at the time of RP independently improved cRFS (HR 0.09, p = 0.009). The 7-year probability of late Grade 2–3 toxicity was 29% and 5% for genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, respectively. The absolute incidence of Grade 3 toxicity was <1% and 10% for GI and GU symptoms, respectively. The study is limited by its retrospective design and the lack of a standardized use of ADT. Conclusions: This retrospective study shows significantly improved bRFS and cRFS rates with the addition of ADT to HD-ART, with low Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and 10% Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity.

  7. Radical prostatectomy and positive surgical margins: tumor volume and Gleason score predicts cancer outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Roca, Ricardo L.R. Felts de; Fonseca, Francisco Paula da; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Bezerra, Stephania Martins

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: positive surgical margins (PSMs) are common adverse factors to predict the outcome of a patient submitted to radical prostatectomy (PR). However, not all of these men will follow with biochemical (BCR) or clinical (CR) recurrence. Relationship between PSMs with these recurrent events has to be correlated with other clinicopathological findings in order to recognize more aggressive tumors in order to recommend complementary treatment to these selected patients. Materials and methods: we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 228 patients submitted to open retropubic RP between March 1991 and June 2008, where 161 had and 67 did not have PSMs. Minimum follow-up time was considered 2 years after surgery. BCR was considered when PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/ml. CR was determined when clinical evidence of tumor appeared. Chi-square test was used to correlate clinical and pathologic variables with PSMs. The estimated 5-year risk of BCR and CR in presence of PSMs was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to log-rank tests. Results: from the total of 228 patients, 161 (71%) had PSMs, while 67 (29%) had negative surgical margins (NSMs). Prostatic circumferential margin was the most common (43.4%) site. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) associations between the presence of PSMs and BCR, but not with CR (p = 0.06). Among 161 patients with PSMs, 61 (37.8%) presented BCR, while 100 (62.8%) did not. Predicting progression-free survival for 5 years, BCR was correlated with pathological stage; Gleason score; pre-treatment PSA; tumor volume in specimen; capsular and perineural invasion; presence and number of PSMs. RC correlated only with angiolymphatic invasion and Gleason score. Considering univariate analyses the clinicopathological factors predicting BCR for 5 years, results statistically significant links with prostate weight; pre-treatment PSA; Gleason score; pathological stage; tumor volume; PSMs; capsular and perineural

  8. Radical prostatectomy and positive surgical margins: tumor volume and Gleason score predicts cancer outcome

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    La Roca, Ricardo L.R. Felts de, E-mail: Ricardo@delarocaurologia.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Francisco Paula da, E-mail: fpf@uol.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Urologia. Dept. de Cirurgia Pelvica; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Bezerra, Stephania Martins, E-mail: iwerneck@gmail.com, E-mail: stephaniab@gmail.com [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Patologia

    2013-07-01

    Introduction: positive surgical margins (PSMs) are common adverse factors to predict the outcome of a patient submitted to radical prostatectomy (PR). However, not all of these men will follow with biochemical (BCR) or clinical (CR) recurrence. Relationship between PSMs with these recurrent events has to be correlated with other clinicopathological findings in order to recognize more aggressive tumors in order to recommend complementary treatment to these selected patients. Materials and methods: we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 228 patients submitted to open retropubic RP between March 1991 and June 2008, where 161 had and 67 did not have PSMs. Minimum follow-up time was considered 2 years after surgery. BCR was considered when PSA {>=} 0.2 ng/ml. CR was determined when clinical evidence of tumor appeared. Chi-square test was used to correlate clinical and pathologic variables with PSMs. The estimated 5-year risk of BCR and CR in presence of PSMs was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to log-rank tests. Results: from the total of 228 patients, 161 (71%) had PSMs, while 67 (29%) had negative surgical margins (NSMs). Prostatic circumferential margin was the most common (43.4%) site. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) associations between the presence of PSMs and BCR, but not with CR (p = 0.06). Among 161 patients with PSMs, 61 (37.8%) presented BCR, while 100 (62.8%) did not. Predicting progression-free survival for 5 years, BCR was correlated with pathological stage; Gleason score; pre-treatment PSA; tumor volume in specimen; capsular and perineural invasion; presence and number of PSMs. RC correlated only with angiolymphatic invasion and Gleason score. Considering univariate analyses the clinicopathological factors predicting BCR for 5 years, results statistically significant links with prostate weight; pre-treatment PSA; Gleason score; pathological stage; tumor volume; PSMs; capsular and perineural

  9. Machine learning approaches to analyze histological images of tissues from radical prostatectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertych, Arkadiusz; Ing, Nathan; Ma, Zhaoxuan; Fuchs, Thomas J; Salman, Sadri; Mohanty, Sambit; Bhele, Sanica; Velásquez-Vacca, Adriana; Amin, Mahul B; Knudsen, Beatrice S

    2015-12-01

    Computerized evaluation of histological preparations of prostate tissues involves identification of tissue components such as stroma (ST), benign/normal epithelium (BN) and prostate cancer (PCa). Image classification approaches have been developed to identify and classify glandular regions in digital images of prostate tissues; however their success has been limited by difficulties in cellular segmentation and tissue heterogeneity. We hypothesized that utilizing image pixels to generate intensity histograms of hematoxylin (H) and eosin (E) stains deconvoluted from H&E images numerically captures the architectural difference between glands and stroma. In addition, we postulated that joint histograms of local binary patterns and local variance (LBPxVAR) can be used as sensitive textural features to differentiate benign/normal tissue from cancer. Here we utilized a machine learning approach comprising of a support vector machine (SVM) followed by a random forest (RF) classifier to digitally stratify prostate tissue into ST, BN and PCa areas. Two pathologists manually annotated 210 images of low- and high-grade tumors from slides that were selected from 20 radical prostatectomies and digitized at high-resolution. The 210 images were split into the training (n=19) and test (n=191) sets. Local intensity histograms of H and E were used to train a SVM classifier to separate ST from epithelium (BN+PCa). The performance of SVM prediction was evaluated by measuring the accuracy of delineating epithelial areas. The Jaccard J=59.5 ± 14.6 and Rand Ri=62.0 ± 7.5 indices reported a significantly better prediction when compared to a reference method (Chen et al., Clinical Proteomics 2013, 10:18) based on the averaged values from the test set. To distinguish BN from PCa we trained a RF classifier with LBPxVAR and local intensity histograms and obtained separate performance values for BN and PCa: JBN=35.2 ± 24.9, OBN=49.6 ± 32, JPCa=49.5 ± 18.5, OPCa=72.7 ± 14.8 and Ri=60.6

  10. Definitive pathology at radical prostatectomy is commonly favorable in men following initial active surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Kyu; Sternberg, Itay A; Keren Paz, Gal E; Kim, Philip H; Touijer, Karim A; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2014-08-01

    Limited data are currently available regarding the outcomes of radical prostatectomy (RP) in men with low-risk prostate cancer who were initially managed by active surveillance (AS). To evaluate the pathologic outcomes of patients who underwent RP following initial AS. We analyzed the records of 67 patients who underwent RP following initial AS begun between 1993 and 2011. All patients underwent confirmatory biopsy to reassess eligibility for AS. RP was recommended for disease progression suggested by follow-up biopsies or imaging. Unfavorable disease was defined as having at least one of the following pathologic findings: Gleason score (GS) ≥4+3, extracapsular extension of tumor, seminal vesicle invasion, or lymph node involvement. A descriptive analysis was performed to assess pathologic features. Median time from confirmatory biopsy to RP was 1.7 yr (range: 0.3-7.8). Reasons for discontinuing AS to undergo RP included evidence of increased tumor volume or grade on follow-up biopsy, patient preference/anxiety, and findings on follow-up imaging in 46 patients (68.7%), 17 patients (25.3%), and 4 patients (6.0%), respectively. Pathologic analyses revealed organ-confined disease in 55 patients (82.1%), and GS was ≥4+3 in 9 (13.4%). Positive nodes were observed in three patients (4.4%) and positive surgical margin in two (3.0%). Overall, 19 patients (28.4%) had unfavorable disease. Of the biopsy criteria for triggering RP, Gleason patterns >3 were the most frequently associated with unfavorable disease (43.3%). One patient (1.5%) experienced biochemical recurrence during postoperative follow-up (median: 3.2 yr). Our study may be limited by its retrospective and single-institution nature. Most patients who started initially on AS after undergoing confirmatory biopsy showed pathologically organ-confined disease with a low GS at RP. Such findings provide further evidence that, overall, AS is a safe treatment approach. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Correlation of pretherapy prostate cancer characteristics with seminal vesicle invasion in radical prostatectomy specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisansky, Thomas M.; Blute, Michael L.; Suman, Vera J.; Bostwick, David G.; Earle, John D.; Zincke, Horst

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to identify pretherapy factors associated with seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) in patients with localized carcinoma of the prostate (CaP), and to develop a model that would allow estimation of the likelihood for SVI at the time of initial diagnosis. Methods and Materials: Between January 1988 and December 1993, 2959 patients underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy, with or without pelvic lymph node dissection, as initial therapy for clinical Stage T1a-3bN0-XM0 CaP. Preoperative patient and tumor-related characteristics were evaluated for an association with SVI in univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. A model was developed and probability plots were constructed to display the estimated likelihood for SVI in the patient with a new diagnosis of localized CaP. Results: Within clinical tumor stage, three groups (T1a-2a, T2b-c, and T3a-b) were observed to have a distinctly different rate of SVI. Gleason primary grades were combined (1-2, 3, and 4-5) because of a similar observation. Univariate analysis identified clinical tumor stage (p < 0.0001), Gleason primary grade (p < 0.0001), and serum prostate-specific antigen level (p < 0.0001) as factors associated with the likelihood for SVI. Multivariate analysis confirmed the independent significance (p = 0.0001) of each of these factors. Patient age (p = 0.16) and history of prior transurethral resection of the prostate (p = 0.82) were not associated with this end point. Probability plots were constructed to display the likelihood of SVI as a function of pretherapy clinical tumor stage, Gleason primary grade, and serum prostate-specific antigen value. Conclusion: In the patient with a new diagnosis of localized CaP, clinical tumor stage as determined by digital rectal examination, diagnostic biopsy tumor (Gleason primary) grade, and pretherapy serum prostate-specific antigen value were significant factors for development of a model that estimated the likelihood of SVI

  12. Results of tadalafil treatment in patients following an open nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Hirik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postoperatively administering a low daily dose of tadalafil on the erectile function of patients who underwent a nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy(NSRP due to localized prostate cancer (PCa. Materials and Methods: Of 138 patients, who underwent NSRP due to PCa between 2012 and 2014, 55 patients who had not had pre-operative erectile dysfunction (ED were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 64 (54-72. On the 15th day after surgery, after ultrasound evaluation, all 55 patients started on a daily dose of 5 mg tadalafil that was continued for 2.5 months. The erectile function of patients was evaluated pre-operatively, post-operatively, and at the 3rd and 6th month after surgery using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5 test. None of the patients was treated with hormonal therapy or radiotherapy before or after surgery. Results: Three patients were excluded from the study due to the adverse effects of tadalafil and two patients elected to discontinue the treatment. Of the remaining 50 patients whose pre-operative erectile function had been found normal, at 3 months after surgery, 36 (72% had normal erectile function; of the remaining patients in the study six (12% presented with mild, two (4% with moderate, and six (12% with severe ED. Six months after surgery, 35 patients (70% had normal erectile function while seven (14% had mild, three (6% moderate and five (10% severe ED. There was no statistically significant difference between the results obtained at the 3rd and 6thmonth follow-up (p > 0.05. Three patients reported adverse effects with tadalafil including flushes in 2 (3.6% and a headache in 1 (1.8%. Conclusions: The administration of a 5 mg post-operative dose of tadalafil to patients that had undergone a bilateral NSRP was found to have a positive effect on the recovery and maintenance of erectile function. However, there is still a need to investigate a larger series of

  13. Psychotherapy and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor in early rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy: a prospective randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarato, A M E P; Reis, L O; Ferreira, U; Denardi, F

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of group psychotherapy and the use of a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor (PDE-5i) in the early rehabilitation stage of patients with prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). Fifty-six patients undergoing RP for prostate cancer were randomised into four groups, and 53 completed the protocol: Group 1 - control (n = 11), Group 2 - group psychotherapy (n = 16), Group 3 - lodenafil 80 mg/one tablet per week (n = 12) and Group 4 - group psychotherapy + lodenafil 80 mg/one tablet per week (n = 14). The groups were individually evaluated for erectile function (IIEF-5) and quality of life - QoL (SF-36) weekly, with two meetings held a week apart before the RP and 12 weekly meetings after surgery. The ages ranged from 39 to 76 years, average 61.84. There were no significant medication side effects. Only Group 4 showed improvement in intimacy with a partner and satisfaction with their sex life (P = 0.045 and P = 0.013 respectively), and with no significant worsening of the IIEF-5 (P = 0.250) reported. All groups showed worsening in the final result of the role limitations caused by physical problems (P = 0.009) and role limitations caused by emotional problems (P = 0.002) of the SF-36, but Group 4 had a significantly higher score for the role limitations caused by physical problems (P = 0.009) than the other groups. In conclusion, precocious integral treatment involving group psychotherapy and PDE-5i before and after RP led to less deterioration of erectile function and other domains related to physical aspects (SF-36), with improvement in intimacy with their partner and satisfaction in their sex life, being superior to single treatments. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Evaluation of the Prostate Bed for Local Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy Using Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Pitroda, Sean P.; Eggener, Scott E.; Stadler, Walter M.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Vannier, Michael W.; Oto, Aytek

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of a 4-year period in which endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was considered for all men referred for salvage radiation therapy (RT) at a single academic center; to describe the incidence and location of locally recurrent disease in a contemporary cohort of men with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP), and to identify prognostic variables associated with MRI findings in order to define which patients may have the highest yield of the study. Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2011, 88 men without clinically palpable disease underwent eMRI for detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after RP. The median interval between RP and eMRI was 32 months (interquartile range, 14-57 months), and the median PSA level was 0.30 ng/mL (interquartile range, 0.19-0.72 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging scans consisting of T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging were evaluated for features consistent with local recurrence. The prostate bed was scored from 0-4, whereby 0 was definitely normal, 1 probably normal, 2 indeterminate, 3 probably abnormal, and 4 definitely abnormal. Local recurrence was defined as having a score of 3-4. Results: Local recurrence was identified in 21 men (24%). Abnormalities were best appreciated on T2-weighted axial images (90%) as focal hypointense lesions. Recurrence locations were perianastomotic (67%) or retrovesical (33%). The only risk factor associated with local recurrence was PSA; recurrence was seen in 37% of men with PSA >0.3 ng/mL vs 13% if PSA ≤0.3 ng/mL (P 3 and was directly associated with PSA (r=0.5, P=.02). The correlation between MRI-based tumor volume and PSA was even stronger in men with positive margins (r=0.8, P<.01). Conclusions: Endorectal MRI can define areas of local recurrence after RP in a minority of men without clinical evidence of disease, with yield related to PSA. Further study is necessary to determine whether eMRI can

  15. Comparison of Biochemical Recurrence-Free Survival after Radical Prostatectomy Triggered by Grade Reclassification during Active Surveillance and in Men Newly Diagnosed with Similar Grade Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Clarissa P; Landis, Patricia; Carter, H Ballentine; Epstein, Jonathan I; Mamawala, Mufaddal

    2017-09-01

    We compared biochemical recurrence between men on active surveillance who underwent radical prostatectomy triggered by grade reclassification and men diagnosed with similar grade disease treated with immediate radical prostatectomy. We retrospectively analyzed the records of men who underwent surgery from 1995 to 2015 at our institution. We identified 4 groups, including 94 and 56 men on active surveillance who underwent radical prostatectomy following reclassification to Gleason 7 (3 + 4) or greater (grade groups 2 or greater) and Gleason 7 (3 + 4) (grade group 2), and 3,504 and 1,979 in the immediate prostatectomy group diagnosed with grade group 2 or greater and 2, respectively. Biochemical recurrence was assessed by Kaplan-Meir analysis and a multivariable Cox model. Men on active surveillance had a lower incidence of biochemical recurrence than men in the immediate radical prostatectomy groups for biopsy grade groups 2 or greater and 2 (each p <0.05). One, 5 and 10-year biochemical recurrence-free survival for men in the active surveillance group vs the immediate radical prostatectomy group was 97.9% vs 85.5%, 76.6% vs 65.1% and 69.0% vs 54.2% in biopsy grade groups 2 or greater (p = 0.009) and 96.4% vs 91.2%, 89.6% vs 74.0% and 89.6% vs 63.9%, respectively, in biopsy grade group 2 (p = 0.071). For biopsy grade groups 2 or greater there was no significant difference in the risk of biochemical recurrence between the groups after adjusting for age, biopsy extent of cancer and prostate specific antigen density. Patients on active surveillance reclassified to grade groups 2 or greater are at no greater risk for treatment failure than men newly diagnosed with similar grades. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Results of preoperative electrical stimulation of pelvic floor muscles in the continence status following radical retropubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Elaine Laurienzo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate preoperative rectal electrical stimulation in the recovery of urinary continence in patients who undergo radical retropubic prostatectomy. Materials and Methods Patients were divided into 3 randomized groups: control, pelvic exercises, and electrical stimulation. A 1 hour pad-test, the ICIQ-SF, and the SF-36 were performed 1, 3, and 6 months after the surgical procedure. Results Of the 58 patients who were initially included in the study, 9 were excluded due to radiotherapy after surgical intervention, an indwelling urethral catheter for more than 30 days, high surgical risk, loss of follow-up, or incomplete participation in the study routines and spontaneous interruption. Forty-nine patients concluded the study (15 in the control group, 17 in the exercise group, and 17 in the electrical stimulation group. We did not observe any significant difference in the pad test (p > 0.05, the 8 domains of the SF-36, or ICIQ-SF score compared with control groups (control, exercise, and electrical stimulation. Conclusion Preoperative rectal electrical stimulation has no impact on continence status in patients who undergo radical retropubic prostatectomy. There is no difference in the three above mentioned groups with regard to urinary leakage and quality of life.

  17. Discordance between location of positive cores in biopsy and location of positive surgical margin following radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Won; Park, Hyoung Keun; Kim, Hyeong Gon; Ham, Dong Yeub; Paick, Sung Hyun; Lho, Yong Soo; Choi, Woo Suk

    2015-10-01

    We compared location of positive cores in biopsy and location of positive surgical margin (PSM) following radical prostatectomy. This retrospective analysis included patients who were diagnosed as prostate cancer by standard 12-core transrectal ultrasonography guided prostate biopsy, and who have PSM after radical prostatectomy. After exclusion of number of biopsy cores location data, 46 patients with PSM were identified. Locations of PSM in pathologic specimen were reported as 6 difference sites (apex, base and lateral in both sides). Discordance of biopsy result and PSM was defined when no positive cores in biopsy was identified at the location of PSM. Most common location of PSM were right apex (n=21) and left apex (n=15). Multiple PSM was reported in 21 specimens (45.7%). In 32 specimens (69.6%) with PSM, one or more concordant positive biopsy cores were identified, but 14 specimens (28%) had no concordant biopsy cores at PSM location. When discordant rate was separated by locations of PSM, right apex PSM had highest rate of discordant (38%). The discordant group had significantly lower prostate volume and lower number of positive cores in biopsy than concordant group. This study showed that one fourth of PSM occurred at location where tumor was not detected at biopsy and that apex PSM had highest rate of discordant. Careful dissection to avoid PSM should be performed in every location, including where tumor was not identified in biopsy.

  18. Comparative analysis of whole mount processing and systematic sampling of radical prostatectomy specimens: pathological outcomes and risk of biochemical recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Shady; Chang, Sam S; Clark, Peter E; Davis, Rodney; Herrell, S Duke; Kordan, Yakup; Wills, Marcia L; Shappell, Scott B; Baumgartner, Roxelyn; Phillips, Sharon; Smith, Joseph A; Cookson, Michael S; Barocas, Daniel A

    2010-10-01

    Whole mount processing is more resource intensive than routine systematic sampling of radical retropubic prostatectomy specimens. We compared whole mount and systematic sampling for detecting pathological outcomes, and compared the prognostic value of pathological findings across pathological methods. We included men (608 whole mount and 525 systematic sampling samples) with no prior treatment who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center between January 2000 and June 2008. We used univariate and multivariate analysis to compare the pathological outcome detection rate between pathological methods. Kaplan-Meier curves and the log rank test were used to compare the prognostic value of pathological findings across pathological methods. There were no significant differences between the whole mount and the systematic sampling groups in detecting extraprostatic extension (25% vs 30%), positive surgical margins (31% vs 31%), pathological Gleason score less than 7 (49% vs 43%), 7 (39% vs 43%) or greater than 7 (12% vs 13%), seminal vesicle invasion (8% vs 10%) or lymph node involvement (3% vs 5%). Tumor volume was higher in the systematic sampling group and whole mount detected more multiple surgical margins (each p systematic sampling yield similar pathological information. Each method stratifies patients into comparable risk groups for biochemical recurrence. Thus, while whole mount is more resource intensive, it does not appear to result in improved detection of clinically important pathological outcomes or prognostication. Copyright © 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of serum testosterone and percent tumor volume on extra-prostatic extension and biochemical recurrence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eu Chang Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have revealed that the preoperative serum testosterone and percent tumor volume (PTV predict extra-prostatic extension (EPE and biochemical recurrence (BCR after radical prostatectomy. This study investigated the prognostic significance of serum testosterone and PTV in relation to EPE and BCR after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP. We reviewed 520 patients who underwent LRP between 2004 and 2012. PTV was determined as the sum of all visually estimated tumor foci in every section. BCR was defined as two consecutive increases in the postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA >0.2 ng ml−1 . The threshold for serum total testosterone was 3.0 ng ml−1 . Multivariate logistic regression was used to define the effect of variables on the risk of EPE and BCR. A low serum testosterone (<3.0 ng ml−1 was associated with a high serum PSA, Gleason score, positive core percentage of the prostate biopsy, PTV, and all pathological variables. On multivariate analysis, similar to previous studies, the serum PSA, biopsy positive core percentage, Gleason score, and pathological variables predicted EPE and BCR. In addition, low serum testosterone (<3.0 ng ml−1 , adjusted OR, 8.52; 95% CI, 5.04-14.4, P= 0.001 predicted EPE and PTV (adjusted OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.05, P= 0.046 predicted BCR. In addition to previous predictors of EPE and BCR, low serum testosterone and PTV are valuable predictors of EPE and BCR after LRP.

  20. Is there any change in pelvic floor electromyography during the first 6 months after radical retropubic prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacad, Claudia R; Glazer, Howard I; Zambon, João Paulo C; Burti, Juliana S; Almeida, Fernando G

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine electromyographic pelvic floor muscles activity during the first 6 months post RRP and its relationship to urinary continence. Thirty-eight men (mean age of 63.1 ± 5.7 year) with prostate cancer scheduled for open radical retropubic prostatectomy were evaluated. pelvic radiotherapy, systemic or neurologic diseases, pre-operative International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) >7 and OABq ≥8. Surface electromyography (sEMG) evaluation, IPSS, Urinary Distress Inventory, Incontinence Impact Questionnaire, and Overactive Bladder Questionnaire-short form were applied before and at 1, 3, and 6 months after RRP. Six months after surgery, 18 men (47.4 %) presented urinary leakage. The sEMG evaluations within the first 6 months presented changes in fast contraction amplitude (p = 0.006), rest amplitude after fast contraction (p = 0.04), 10 s sustained contraction mean amplitude (p = 0.024) and final rest amplitude (p = 0.011). We observed that continent and incontinent patients as a group presented electromyographic changes during the first 6 months after radical prostatectomy that could be justified by the denervation/reinnervation of the external urethral sphincter. This finding is consistent with the adaptation of the pelvic floor musculature to the new urethral sphincter condition following surgery.

  1. Radical prostatectomy in the 21st century - the gold standard for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schostak, M; Miller, K; Schrader, M

    2008-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy for treatment of prostate cancer is a technically sophisticated operation. Simpler therapies have therefore been developed in the course of decades. The decisive advantage of a radical operation is the chance of a cure with minimal collateral damage. It is the only approach that enables precise tumor staging. The 10-year progression-free survival probability is approximately 85% for a localized tumor with negative resection margins. This high cure rate is unsurpassed by competitive treatment modalities. Nowadays, experienced surgeons achieve excellent functional results (for example, recovery of continence and erectile function) with minimum morbidity. Even in the locally advanced stage, results are very good compared to those obtained with other treatment modalities. Pathological staging enables stratified adjuvant therapy based on concrete information. The overall prognosis can thus be significantly improved.

  2. The new era of minimally invasive interventions for prostate cancer: robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and focal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schatloff O

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Schatloff1, Alyssa S Louis2, Uri Lindner21Global Robotics Institute, Florida Hospital Celebration Health, Celebration, FL, USA; 2Division of Urology, Department of Surgical Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Prostate cancer remains a common but highly treatable disease. Innovations in prostate cancer treatment have allowed a transition toward minimally invasive approaches in an attempt to avoid treatment-related morbidities. In the middle of the treatment spectrum between radical open surgeries and active surveillance lies robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP and focal therapy (FT. This review sets out the most current information on RALP and FT (including laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and irreversible electroporation.Keywords: PCa, RALP, FT, laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, irreversible electroporation

  3. Inguinal hernia in stage M0 prostate cancer: a comparison of incidence in men treated with and without radical retropubic prostatectomy--an analysis of 1105 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranne, Johan; Hugosson, Jonas; Iversen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    To analyze the incidence of inguinal hernia (IH) in a large group of patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer who were treated nonoperatively, and to compare it with the incidence in a subset of patients who had undergone radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). IH has been reported in 12% to 2...

  4. Health-related quality-of-life effects of radical prostatectomy and primary radiotherapy for screen-detected or clinically diagnosed localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madalinska, J. B.; Essink-Bot, M. L.; de Koning, H. J.; Kirkels, W. J.; van der Maas, P. J.; Schröder, F. H.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: The current study was undertaken within the framework of a screening trial to compare the health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes of two primary treatment modalities for localized prostate cancer: radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We

  5. Erectile function following brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, or radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putora, P.M.; Buchauer, K.; Plasswilm, L. [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Engeler, D.; Schmid, H.P. [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Urology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Haile, S.R.; Graf, N. [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Clinical Trials Unit, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    For localized prostate cancer, treatment options include external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), radical prostatectomy (RP), and brachytherapy (BT). Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common side-effect. Our aim was to evaluate penile erectile function (EF) before and after BT, EBRT, or RP using a validated self-administered quality-of-life survey from a prospective registry. Analysis included 478 patients undergoing RP (n = 252), EBRT (n = 91), and BT (n = 135) with at least 1 year of follow-up and EF documented using IIEF-5 scores at baseline, 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and annually thereafter. Differences among treatments were most pronounced among patients with no or mild initial ED (IIEF-5 ≥ 17). Overall, corrected for baseline EF and age, BT was associated with higher IIEF-5 scores than RP (+ 7.8 IIEF-5 score) or EBRT (+ 3.1 IIEF-5 score). EBRT was associated with better IIEF-5 scores than RP (+ 4.7 IIEF-5 score). In patients undergoing EBRT or RP with bilateral nerve sparing (NS), recovery of EF was observed and during follow-up, the differences to BT were not statistically significant. Overall age had a negative impact on EF preservation (corrected for baseline IIEF). In our series, EF was adversely affected by each treatment modality. Considered overall, BT provided the best EF preservation in comparison to EBRT or RP. (orig.) [German] Die externe Radiotherapie (EBRT), die radikale Prostatektomie (RP) sowie die Brachytherapie (BT) stellen Behandlungsoptionen fuer das lokalisierte Prostatakarzinom dar. Die erektile Dysfunktion (ED) ist eine haeufige Nebenwirkung dieser Therapien. Unser Ziel war es, die penile erektile Funktion (EF) vor und nach BT, EBRT und RP mit Hilfe eines validierten, vom Patienten ausgefuellten Lebensqualitaetsfragebogens aus einer prospektiven Datenbank zu beurteilen. Mit einer minimalen Nachbeobachtungszeit von einem Jahr wurden 478 Patienten analysiert, die eine RP (n = 252), EBRT (n = 91) oder BT (n = 135) erhalten hatten und deren EF mit

  6. ROBOT-ASSISTED RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST 80 CASES

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    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. As a common disease, prostate cancer (PC has taken now first place among all malignancies in many countries of the world.The authors have analyzed the results of their series of robot-assisted radical laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP in patients with PC. They also present a number of surgical techniques that may be useful for novice surgeons. Materials and methods. In November 2008 to November 2009, the Department of Urology, Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry, performed 80 RALPs using the da Vinci S surgical robotic system. The patients’ mean age was 63.7 (49–71 years; the mean blood level of total prostate-specific antigen was 6.1 (2.1–20.84 ng/ml; the mean prostate volume was 44 (18–94 cm3, as evidenced by transrectal ultrasound study. The authors analyzed the following indicators: operating time, degree of blood loss, conversion of surgical intervention,degrees of intra- and postoperative complications, and oncological and functional results. Results. In our series, RALP was performed without preserving neurovascular bundles or by using a nerve-sparing procedure in 66 (82.5% and 14 (17.5%, respectively; 22 (27.5% patients underwent lymphadenectomy. The average length of hospital stay was 7 (4–21 days; the mean time of urethral catheter removal was 10 (6–21 days postoperatively. The mean time of surgical intervention was 174 (121–276 min. Mean blood loss was 248 (35–1950 ml. Postmortem study revealed a positive surgical margin in 19 (24% cases and tumor invasion into the seminal vesicles in 5 (6% patients. Stages pT2 and pT3 were found in 56 (70% and 24 (30%, respectively; total Gleason scores were 6 (3+3, 7 (3+4, 7 (4+3, 8 (4+4 in 38 (47.5%, 35 (43.75%, 5 (6.25%, and 2 (2.5% patients, respectively. Among 34 patients examined 3 months after RALP, 28 (82.4% patients completely retained urine; 5 (14.7% applied not more than a pad a day. In patients with preserved erectile function, the

  7. Clinical role of pathological downgrading after radical prostatectomy in patients with biopsy-proven Gleason score 3+4 prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondo, Tatsuo; Poon, Bing Ying; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Bernstein, Melanie; Sjoberg, Daniel D.; Eastham, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify preoperative factors predicting Gleason score downgrading after radical prostatectomy in patients with biopsy Gleason score 3+4 prostate cancer. To determine if prediction of downgrading can identify potential candidates for active surveillance. Patients and Methods We identified 1317 patients with biopsy Gleason score 3+4 prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 2005 and 2013. Several preoperative and biopsy characteristics were evaluated by forward selection regression, and selected predictors of downgrading were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression. Decision curve analysis was performed to evaluate the clinical utility of the multivariate model. Results Gleason score was downgraded after radical prostatectomy in 115 patients (9%). We developed a multivariable model using age, prostate specific antigen density, percent of positive cores with Gleason 4 cancer out of all cores taken, and maximum percent of cancer involvement within a positive core with Gleason 4 cancer. The area under the curve for this model was 0.75 after ten-fold cross validation. However, decision curve analysis revealed that the model was not clinically helpful in identifying patients who will downgrade at radical prostatectomy for the purpose of reassigning them to active surveillance. Conclusion While patients with pathology Gleason score 3+3 with tertiary Gleason pattern 4 or lower at radical prostatectomy in patients with biopsy Gleason score 3+4 prostate cancer may be potential candidates for active surveillance, decision curve analysis showed limited utility of our model to identify such men. Future study is needed to identify new predictors to help identify potential candidates for active surveillance among patients with biopsy-proven Gleason score 3+4 prostate cancer. PMID:24725760

  8. Feasibility of robotic radical prostatectomy for medication refractory chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: Initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Chopra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Four patients diagnosed with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS, met criteria for National Institute of Health (NIH Category III prostatitis, failed multiple medicinal treatments and underwent robotic radical prostatectomy (RRP. Median operative time (range: 157 (127–259 min. Validated functional questionnaires responses and NIH CP symptom index (NIH-CPSI score were collected for each patient's status at different time points pre- and post-operatively. Median decreases (range were: International Prostate Symptom Score - 14 (1–19; Sexual Health Inventory for Men - 6 (−14–22; and NIH-CPSI total - 23.5 (13–33. Median length of follow-up (range was 34 (24–43 months. RRP appears to be an option for carefully selected patients with medication-refractory CP/CPPS who understand that baseline sexual function may not be restored postoperatively.

  9. Penile vibratory stimulation in the recovery of urinary continence and erectile function after nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Borre, Michael; Ohl, Dana A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) in the preservation and restoration of erectile function and urinary continence in conjunction with nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The present study was conducted between July 2010 and March 2013...... were instructed in using a PVS device (FERTI CARE(®) vibrator). Stimulation was performed at the frenulum once daily by the patients in their own homes for at least 1 week before surgery. After catheter removal, daily PVS was re-initiated for a period of 6 weeks. Participants were evaluated at 3, 6...... for analyses (30 patients randomized to PVS and 38 patients randomized to the control group). The IIEF-5 score was highest in the PVS group at all time points after surgery with a median score of 18 vs 7.5 in the control group at 12 months (P = 0.09), but the difference only reached borderline significance...

  10. A Retrospective Study of Erectile Function and Use of Erectile Aids in Prostate Cancer Patients After Radical Prostatectomy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Martha Kirstine; Azawi, Nessn H; Andersen, Line Grønbaek

    2017-01-01

    -nerve-sparing RP had ESI 12 months after RP. Age older than 60.5 years, a high body mass index, comorbidity, and a high American Society of Anesthesiologists score were negative predictors of erectile function 12 months after RP. CONCLUSION: Twelve months after RP, 32.1% of men had ESI; half these men required...... the use of erectile aids. Age older than 60.5 years, a high body mass index, comorbidity, and a high American Society of Anesthesiologists score were negative predictors for ED 12 months after RP. Haahr MK, Azawi NH, Andersen LG, et al. A Retrospective Study of Erectile Function and Use of Erectile Aids......INTRODUCTION: Radical prostatectomy (RP) offers a good long-term cancer control for clinically localized prostate cancer. However, complications such as erectile dysfunction and substantial decreases quality of life of the afflicted men and their sexual partners. Identification of pre-, per...

  11. A comparative analysis of primary and secondary Gleason pattern predictive ability for positive surgical margins after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfoungaristos, S; Kavouras, A; Kanatas, P; Polimeros, N; Perimenis, P

    2011-01-01

    To compare the predictive ability of primary and secondary Gleason pattern for positive surgical margins in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer and a preoperative Gleason score ≤ 6. A retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients undergone a radical prostatectomy between January 2005 and October 2010 was conducted. Patients' age, prostate volume, preoperative PSA, biopsy Gleason score, the 1st and 2nd Gleason pattern were entered a univariate and multivariate analysis. The 1st and 2nd pattern were tested for their ability to predict positive surgical margins using receiver operating characteristic curves. Positive surgical margins were noticed in 56 cases (38.1%) out of 147 studied patients. The 2nd pattern was significantly greater in those with positive surgical margins while the 1st pattern was not significantly different between the 2 groups of patients. ROC analysis revealed that area under the curve was 0.53 (p=0.538) for the 1st pattern and 0.60 (p=0.048) for the 2nd pattern. Concerning the cases with PSA <10 ng/ml, it was also found that only the 2nd pattern had a predictive ability (p=0.050). When multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted it was found that the 2nd pattern was the only independent predictor. The second Gleason pattern was found to be of higher value than the 1st one for the prediction of positive surgical margins in patients with preoperative Gleason score ≤ 6 and this should be considered especially when a neurovascular bundle sparing radical prostatectomy is planned, in order not to harm the oncological outcome.

  12. Long-term morbidity and quality of life in patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing definitive radiotherapy or radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilleby, Wolfgang; Fossaa, Sophie D.; Waehre, Haakon R.; Olsen, Dag Rune

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess morbidity, side effects, and quality of life (QoL) in patients treated for localized prostate cancer with curative aim. Methods and Materials: This descriptive cross-sectional study comprises 154 patients who had undergone definitive radiotherapy (RAD) and 108 patients with radical prostatectomy (PRECT) at the Norwegian Radium Hospital during 1987-1995. At least 1 year after treatment the patients completed several questionnaires assessing quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 instrument [EORTC QLQ-C30]), lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS): International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), or sexuality (selected questions from the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale [PAIS]). Urinary incontinence and bowel distress were evaluated by ad hoc constructed questionnaires. A control group (OBS) consisted of 38 patients following the watch-and-wait policy. Results: Twenty percent of the patients from the RAD Group had moderate (14%) or severe (6%) LUTS as compared to 12% in the PRECT group. However, 35% of men from the latter group reported moderate to severe urinary incontinence. 'Overall' sexuality was moderately or severely impaired in 71% of the PRECT and 50% of the RAD patients. In the former group high age was correlated with erectile impotency (p 1 year after definitive radiotherapy or radical prostatectomy with no difference as compared to the age-matched normal population. Clinicians should be aware of the fact that general QoL dimensions (physical function, emotional function, fatigue) are as a rule of greater significance for QoL than sexuality and lower urinary tract symptoms

  13. Secondary Circulating Prostate Cells Predict Biochemical Failure in Prostate Cancer Patients after Radical Prostatectomy and without Evidence of Disease

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    Nigel P. Murray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although 90% of prostate cancer is considered to be localized, 20%–30% of patients will experience biochemical failure (BF, defined as serum PSA >0.2 ng/mL, after radical prostatectomy (RP. The presence of circulating prostate cells (CPCs in men without evidence of BF may be useful to predict patients at risk for BF. We describe the frequency of CPCs detected after RP, relation with clinicopathological parameters, and association with biochemical failure. Methods and Patients. Serial blood samples were taken during followup after RP, mononuclear cells were obtained by differential gel centrifugation, and CPCs identified using standard immunocytochemistry using anti-PSA monoclonal antibodies. Age, pathological stage (organ confined, nonorgan confined, pathological grade, margin status (positive, negative, extracapsular extension, perineural, vascular, and lymphatic infiltration (positive, negative were compared with the presence/absence of CPCs and with and without biochemical failure. Kaplan Meier methods were used to compare the unadjusted biochemical failure free survival of patients with and without CPCs. Results. 114 men participated, and secondary CPCs were detected more frequently in patients with positive margins, extracapsular extension, and vascular and lymphatic infiltration and were associated with biochemical failure independent of these clinicopathological variables, and with a shorter time to BF. Conclusions. Secondary CPCs are an independent risk factor associated with increased BF in men with a PSA <0.2 ng/mL after radical prostatectomy, but do not determine if the recurrence is due to local or systemic disease. These results warrant larger studies to confirm the findings.

  14. Association of Cysteine-Rich Secretory Protein 3 and β-Microseminoprotein with Outcome after Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjartell, Anders S.; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Serio, Angel M.; Eastham, James A.; Eggener, Scott E.; Fine, Samson W.; Udby, Lene; Gerald, William L.; Vickers, Andrew J.; Lilja, Hans; Reuter, Victor E.; Scardino, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose It has been suggested that cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3) and β-microseminoprotein (MSP) are associated with outcome in prostate cancer. We investigated whether these markers are related to biochemical recurrence and whether addition of the markers improves prediction of recurring disease. Experimental Design Tissue microarrays of radical prostatectomy specimens were analyzed for CRISP-3 and MSP by immunohistochemistry. Associations between marker positivity and postprostatectomy biochemical recurrence [prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >0.2 ng/mL with a confirmatory level] were evaluated by univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Multivariable analyses controlled for preoperative PSA and pathologic stage and grade. Results Among 945 patients, 224 had recurrence. Median follow-up for survivors was 6.0 years. Patients positive for CRISP-3 had smaller recurrence-free probabilities, whereas MSP-positive patients had larger recurrence-free probabilities. On univariate analysis, the hazard ratio for patients positive versus negative for CRISP-3 was1.53 (P = 0.010) and for MSP was 0.63 (P = 0.004). On multivariable analysis, both CRISP-3 (P = 0.007) and MSP (P = 0.002) were associated with recurrence. The hazard ratio among CRISP-3– positive/MSP-negative patients compared with CRISP-3– negative/MSP-positive patients was 2.38. Adding CRISP-3 to a base model that included PSA and pathologic stage and grade did not enhance the prediction of recurrence, but adding MSP increased the concordance index minimally from 0.778 to 0.781. Conclusion We report evidence that CRISP-3 and MSP are independent predictors of recurrence after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. However, addition of the markers does not importantly improve the performance of existing predictive models. Further research should aim to elucidate the functions of CRISP-3 and MSP in prostate cancer cells. PMID:17634540

  15. High serum folate is associated with reduced biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy: Results from the SEARCH Database

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    Daniel M. Moreira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction To analyze the association between serum levels of folate and risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy among men from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH database. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of 135 subjects from the SEARCH database treated between 1991-2009 with available preoperative serum folate levels. Patients' characteristics at the time of the surgery were analyzed with ranksum and linear regression. Uni- and multivariable analyses of folate levels (log-transformed and time to biochemical recurrence were performed with Cox proportional hazards. Results The median preoperative folate level was 11.6ng/mL (reference = 1.5-20.0ng/mL. Folate levels were significantly lower among African-American men than Caucasians (P = 0.003. In univariable analysis, higher folate levels were associated with more recent year of surgery (P < 0.001 and lower preoperative PSA (P = 0.003. In univariable analysis, there was a trend towards lower risk of biochemical recurrence among men with high folate levels (HR = 0.61, 95%CI = 0.37-1.03, P = 0.064. After adjustments for patients characteristics' and pre- and post-operative clinical and pathological findings, higher serum levels of folate were independently associated with lower risk for biochemical recurrence (HR = 0.42, 95%CI = 0.20-0.89, P = 0.023. Conclusion In a cohort of men undergoing radical prostatectomy at several VAs across the country, higher serum folate levels were associated with lower PSA and lower risk for biochemical failure. While the source of the folate in the serum in this study is unknown (i.e. diet vs. supplement, these findings, if confirmed, suggest a potential role of folic acid supplementation or increased consumption of folate rich foods to reduce the risk of recurrence.

  16. Reduction in incidence of lymphocele following extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection by bilateral peritoneal fenestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Wasserscheid, Johanna; Rabenalt, Robert; Do, Minh; Schwalenberg, Thilo; McNeill, Alan; Constantinides, Costantinos; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Ganzer, Roman; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2008-12-01

    In our series of 1,900 endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomies (EERPE) the incidence of symptomatic lymphocele following simultaneous pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) is between 3 and 14% depending on the extent of lymph node dissection. We report the impact of bilateral peritoneal fenestration after completion of extraperitoneal prostatectomy and PLND on the incidence of lymphocele, postoperative pain and complications. A total of 100 consecutive patients undergoing EERPE and extended PLND were allocated into two groups. In Group A (n = 50) a 4-6 cm incision was performed bilaterally over the external iliac vessels down to the obturator fossa after completion of the main procedure. In Group B (n = 50) no peritoneal incisions were made. The postoperative assessment protocol included a visual analogue pain scale administered three times daily for 6 days, analgesia requirement, and ultrasound examination on 4th and 8th days, and 3 months postoperatively. CRP and leucocyte counts were measured on 1st and 2nd postoperative days. Complications were recorded according to our standard protocol using the Clavien classification. Three patients (6%) in Group A were found to have lymphoceles, none of which were symptomatic. Significantly more patients in Group B developed a lymphocele, (n = 16, 32%, P < 0.001) of which a significant number were symptomatic (n = 7, 14%, P < 0.001) and required laparoscopic fenestration. No significant difference was observed between the pain score in either group. Mean pain scores were 3.4 versus 3.8 at 6 h, and 0.8 versus 1.1 at 6 days, respectively. No difference in analgesia requirement, serum inflammatory markers and return to normal bowel activity was observed between the groups. This study demonstrates that peritoneal fenestration significantly reduces the incidence of both symptomatic and asymptomatic lymphocele, without an increase in postoperative morbidity. As symptomatic lymphocele is one of the most common

  17. Defining biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy and timing of early salvage radiotherapy. Informing the debate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budaeus, Lars; Schiffmann, Jonas; Graefen, Markus; Huland, Hartwig; Tennstedt, Pierre [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martini-Clinic, Prostate Cancer Center, Hamburg (Germany); Siegmann, Alessandra; Boehmer, Dirk; Budach, Volker [Charite University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Bartkowiak, Detlef; Wiegel, Thomas [University Hospital Ulm, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ulm (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    The optimal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after radical prostatectomy (RP) for defining biochemical recurrence and initiating salvage radiation therapy (SRT) is still debatable. Whereas adjuvant or extremely early SRT irrespective of PSA progression might be overtreatment for some patients, SRT at PSA >0.2 ng/ml might be undertreatment for others. The current study addresses the optimal timing of radiation therapy after RP. Cohort 1 comprised 293 men with PSA 0.1-0.19 ng/ml after RP. Cohort 2 comprised 198 men with SRT. PSA progression and metastases were assessed in cohort 1. In cohort 2, we compared freedom from progression according to pre-SRT PSA (0.03-0.19 vs. 0.2-0.499 ng/ml). Multivariable Cox regression analyses predicted progression after SRT. In cohort 1, 281 (95.9%) men had further PSA progression ≥0.2 ng/ml and 27 (9.2%) men developed metastases within a median follow-up of 74.3 months. In cohort 2, we recorded improved freedom from progression according to lower pre-SRT PSA (0.03-0.19 vs. 0.2-0.499 ng/ml: 69 vs. 53%; log-rank p = 0.051). Patients with higher pre-SRT PSA ≥0.2 ng/ml were at a higher risk of progression after SRT (hazard ratio: 1.8; p < 0.05). The vast majority of patients with PSA ≥0.1 ng/ml after RP will progress to PSA ≥0.2 ng/ml. Additionally, early administration of SRT at post-RP PSA level <0.2 ng/ml might improve freedom from progression. Consequently, we suggest a PSA threshold of 0.1 ng/ml to define biochemical recurrence after RP. (orig.) [German] Der optimale Wert des prostataspezifischen Antigens (PSA) nach radikaler Prostatektomie (RP) zur Definition eines biochemischen Rezidivs und zur Initiierung einer Salvage-Strahlentherapie (SRT) ist noch immer umstritten. Waehrend eine adjuvante oder extrem fruehe SRT unabhaengig vom PSA-Verlauf fuer einige Patienten eine Uebertherapie bedeuten wuerde, waere eine SRT bei einem PSA >0,2 ng/ml fuer andere eine Untertherapie. In der vorliegenden Studie wird der optimale

  18. Optimum slicing of radical prostatectomy specimens for correlation between histopathology and medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Li Hong; Ng, Wan Sing; Ho, Henry; Yuen, John; Cheng, Chris; Lazaro, Richie; Thng, Choon Hua

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for methods which enable precise correlation of histologic sections with in vivo prostate images. Such methods would allow direct comparison between imaging features and functional or histopathological heterogeneity of tumors. Correlation would be particularly useful for validating the accuracy of imaging modalities, developing imaging techniques, assessing image-guided therapy, etc. An optimum prostate slicing method for accurate correlation between the histopathological and medical imaging planes in terms of section angle, thickness and level was sought. Literature review (51 references from 1986-2009 were cited) was done on the various sectioning apparatus or techniques used to slice the prostate specimen for accurate correlation between histopathological data and medical imaging. Technology evaluation was performed with review and discussion of various methods used to section other organs and their possible applications for sectioning prostatectomy specimens. No consensus has been achieved on how the prostate should be dissected to achieve a good correlation. Various customized sectioning instruments and techniques working with different mechanism are used in different research institutes to improve the correlation. Some of the methods have convincingly shown significant potential for improving image-specimen correlation. However, the semisolid consistent property of prostate tissue and the lack of identifiable landmarks remain challenges to be overcome, especially for fresh prostate sectioning and microtomy without external fiducials. A standardized optimum protocol to dissect prostatectomy specimens is needed for the validation of medical imaging modalities by histologic correlation. These standards can enhance disease management by improving the comparability between different modalities. (orig.)

  19. Adjuvant and salvage therapy following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer: effect of combined transient androgen deprivation and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eulau, Stephen M.; Tate, David J.; Cox, Richard S.; Bagshaw, Malcolm A.; Hancock, Steven L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant and salvage irradiation have been shown to improve local control after radical prostatectomy for prostatic cancer in patients with high risk pathologic features, rising PSA, or evidence of local failure. Transient androgen deprivation combined with primary irradiation has resulted in improved local control and biochemical disease free survival in patients with locally advanced, unresected, prostate cancer. This retrospective study evaluates whether transient androgen blockade improves the outcome from post-prostatectomy irradiation given as either adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods: From August, 1985 to December, 1995, 105 patients were treated with radiotherapy to the prostatic fossa following radical prostatectomy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. No patient had clinically or radiographically evident distant disease. Median follow-up was 4.6 years from the date of surgery and 3.2 years from completion of radiotherapy. Findings at prostatectomy included capsular penetration in 38 patients, seminal vesicle involvement in 42 patients, lymph node involvement in 15 patients, and positive surgical margins in 70 patients. Treatment was administered as adjuvant therapy for high risk pathologic features in 39 patients, for persistent or rising PSA in 52 patients, or for clinically evident local recurrence in 14 patients. Of the 105 patients, 32 received combined androgen deprivation/radiotherapy and 73 received radiotherapy alone. Both groups received 60-70 Gy in 2 Gy daily fractions to the prostatic fossa. Selected patients with poor prognostic features received pelvic irradiation to a median dose of 50 Gy. Androgen deprivation typically consisted of Lupron and Flutamide for 4 to 6 months before, during, and in selected cases, after irradiation. No patients received maintenance androgen deprivation or underwent orchiectomy. Tumor stage, lymph node status, Gleason sum, and indications for treatment did not differ significantly between the two groups

  20. Predictors and rate of adjuvant radiation therapy following radical prostatectomy: A report from the Prostate Cancer Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, Christopher P.; Millar, Jeremy L.; Spelman, Tim; Sengupta, Shomik; Evans, Sue M.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term data from three randomized trials have demonstrated that adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) reduces the rate of biochemical failure in high-risk men following radical prostatectomy (RP). One of these trials has shown a survival advantage. We investigated the rate of ART in Victoria and the predictors for this treatment. We analysed data from eligible patients who were notified to the Victorian Prostate Cancer Registry (PCR) by 37 Victorian hospitals between 1 August 2008 and 31 October 2011. We defined ART as radiation therapy (RT) delivered within 6 months of RP. Predictors of ART receipt were modelled using adjusted and unadjusted logistic regression. There were 4626 eligible cases from which 2018 underwent RP with recorded date of surgery. Of these eligible prostatectomy cases, a total of 89 received ART. A subgroup of 833 men had an adverse pathologic feature, of whom 78 received ART. In a multivariate model, pathologic tumour stage pT3a (odds ratio (OR) 2.64; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–5.00; P = 0.003), pT3b (OR 4.58; 95% CI 2.12–9.89; P = 0.000), a positive surgical margin (OR 8.91; 95% CI 4.61–17.2; P = 0.000) and pathologic Gleason grade >7 (OR 7.18; 95% CI 1.54–33.6; P = 0.012) predicted receipt of ART. Adverse pathologic features and high pathologic Gleason score predict for receiving ART in Victorian men after RP, but overall, ART is not commonly prescribed. This finding is consistent with other published series and may reflect clinician scepticism regarding the benefit of ART over salvage RT and concern about toxicity and the risk of over treatment.

  1. Comparative biomarker expression and RNA integrity in biospecimens derived from radical retropubic and robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardelli, Carmela; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Jindal, Shalini; Dodd, Thomas J; Cohen, Penelope A; Marshall, Villis R; Sutherland, Peter D; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Kench, James G; Dong, Ying; Wang, Hong; Clements, Judith A; Risbridger, Gail P; Sutherland, Robert L; Tilley, Wayne D; Horsfall, David J

    2010-07-01

    Knowledge of preanalytic conditions that biospecimens are subjected to is critically important because novel surgical procedures, tissue sampling, handling, and storage might affect biomarker expression or invalidate tissue samples as analytes for some technologies. We investigated differences in RNA quality, gene expression by quantitative real-time PCR, and immunoreactive protein expression of selected prostate cancer biomarkers between tissues from retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) and robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). Sections of tissue microarray of 23 RALP and 22 RRP samples were stained with antibodies to androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as intersite controls, and 14 other candidate biomarkers of research interest to three laboratories within the Australian Prostate Cancer BioResource tissue banking network. Quantitative real-time PCR was done for AR, PSA (KLK3), KLK2, KLK4, and HIF1A on RNA extracted from five RALP and five RRP frozen tissue cores. No histologic differences were observed between RALP and RRP tissue. Biomarker staining grouped these samples into those with increased (PSA, CK8/18, CKHMW, KLK4), decreased (KLK2, KLK14), or no change in expression (AR, ghrelin, Ki67, PCNA, VEGF-C, PAR2, YB1, p63, versican, and chondroitin 0-sulfate) in RALP compared with RRP tissue. No difference in RNA quality or gene expression was detected between RALP and RRP tissue. Changes in biomarker expression between RALP and RRP tissue exist at the immunoreactive protein level, but the etiology is unclear. Future studies should account for changes in biomarker expression when using RALP tissues, and mixed cohorts of RALP and RRP tissue should be avoided.

  2. Optimal timing of salvage radiotherapy for biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy: is ultra-early salvage radiotherapy beneficial?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Satoru; Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Morikawa, Teppei; Naito, Akihiro; Kakutani, Shigenori; Takeshima, Yuta; Miyazaki, Hideyo; Nakagawa, Tohru; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Kume, Haruki; Homma, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The optimal timing of salvage radiotherapy for biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy is controversial. In particular, the prognostic significance of salvage radiotherapy delivered before a current definition of biochemical recurrence, i.e. ultra-early salvage radiotherapy, is unclear. We reviewed 76 patients with pT2-3N0M0 prostate cancer who underwent salvage radiotherapy for post-prostatectomy biochemical recurrence at the following three timings: ultra-early salvage radiotherapy (n = 20) delivered before meeting a current definition of biochemical recurrence (two consecutive prostate-specific antigen [PSA] values ≥0.2 ng/mL); early salvage radiotherapy (n = 40) delivered after meeting the definition but before PSA reached 0.5 ng/mL; and delayed salvage radiotherapy (n = 16) delivered after PSA reached 0.5 ng/mL. The primary endpoint was failure of salvage radiotherapy, defined as a PSA value ≥0.2 ng/mL. The log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards model were used for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively. During the follow-up period (median: 70 months), four of 20 (20 %), nine of 40 (23 %) and seven of 16 (44 %) patients failed biochemically in the ultra-early, early and delayed salvage radiotherapy groups, respectively. On univariate analyses, the outcome of delayed salvage radiotherapy was worse than the others, while there was no significant difference between ultra-early and early groups. Multivariate analysis demonstrated the presence of Gleason pattern 5, perineural invasion and delayed salvage radiotherapy as independent predictors of poorer survival. No survival benefit of ultra-early salvage radiotherapy was demonstrated, whereas delayed salvage radiotherapy was associated with worse outcome as reported in previous studies. Our results may support the current recommendations that salvage radiotherapy should be undertaken after two consecutive PSA values ≥0.2 ng/mL and before reaching 0.5 ng/mL

  3. Active patient decision making regarding nerve sparing during radical prostatectomy: a novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Hugh J; Prall, David N; Abaza, Ronney

    2011-08-01

    The motivation to preserve sexual function can vary widely among patients before prostatectomy. Increasing patient involvement may allow a more personalized experience and may improve satisfaction. We assessed a strategy of surgeon deference to patient choice in regard to nerve sparing to determine to what degree patients are rational actors and capable of active decision making. A total of 150 patients treated with prostatectomy participated in a standardized preoperative discussion regarding the concept of nerve sparing, extracapsular extension and the potential need for adjuvant radiation in the event of local recurrence. Each patient was given his nomogram predicted risk of extracapsular extension and then elected nerve sparing or nonnerve sparing. The corresponding procedure was performed unless grossly invasive disease was encountered. Of the 150 patients 109 chose nerve sparing (73%) and 41 chose nonnerve sparing (27%). In patients with a nomogram predicted risk of extracapsular extension less than 20%, 20% to 50% and greater than 50%, nerve sparing was elected by 88%, 41% and 25%, respectively. Patients with lower risks of extracapsular extension electing nonnerve sparing were older and had higher rates of erectile dysfunction. Empowering patients to decide on their nerve sparing status is a reasonable strategy that did not lead to a high rate of patients with a high risk of extracapsular extension electing nerve sparing. With proper counseling informed patients made reasonable decisions, and appeared to be conservative, prioritizing cancer control in the majority of instances where extracapsular extension risk was high. In addition, they may have been overly conservative in electing nonnerve sparing when the risk was low. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Ureteral Stent Placement Before Radical Prostatectomy on the Safety of Ureteral Dissection and the Surgeon’s Comfort

    OpenAIRE

    Fatih Akdemir; Emrah Okulu; Önder Kayıgil

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the role of preoperative ureteral stent placement in reducing the risk of ureteral injury, an intraoperative complication of radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP), and its contribution to the surgeon’s comfort. Materials and Methods: Open RRP was performed in 66 patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer in our clinic between 2010 and 2015. The patients were divided into two groups; group 1 (n=34) underwent surgery without ureteral stent placement...

  5. Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy for Patients with Prostatic Cancer and Factors Promoting Installation of the Robotic Surgical Equipment-Questionnaire Survey

    OpenAIRE

    塚本, 泰司; 田中, 滋

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey of hospitals with robot-assisted surgical equipment to study changes of the surgical case loads after its installation and the managerial strategies for its purchase. The study included 154 hospitals (as of April 2014) that were queried about their radical prostatectomy case loads from January 2009 to December 2013, strategies for installation of the equipment in their hospitals, and other topics related to the study purpose. The overall response rate of ho...

  6. Feasibility of minimally invasive radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients with high prostate-specific antigen. Feasibility and 1-year outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, M.; Ragavan, N.; Dietel, A.; Liatsikos, E.; Stolzenburg, J.U.; Anderson, C.; McNeill, A.

    2012-01-01

    Urologists are cautious to offer minimally invasive radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients with high prostate-specific antigen (and therefore anticipated to have locally advanced or metastatic disease) because of concerns regarding lack of complete cure after minimally invasive radical prostatectomy and of worsening of continence if adjuvant radiotherapy is used. A retrospective review of our institutional database was carried out to identify patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) ≥20 ng/mL who underwent minimally invasive radical prostatectomy between January 2002 and October 2010. Intraoperative, pathological, functional and short-term oncological outcomes were assessed. Overall, 233 patients met study criteria and were included in the analysis. The median prostate-specific antigen and prostate size were 28.5 ng/mL and 47 mL, respectively. Intraoperative complications were the following: rectal injury (0.86%) and blood transfusion (1.7%). Early postoperative complications included prolonged (>6 days) catheterization (9.4%), hematoma (4.7%), deep venous thrombosis (0.86%) and lymphocele (5.1%). Late postoperative complications included cerebrovascular accident (0.4%) and anastomotic stricture (0.8%). Pathology revealed poorly differentiated cancer in 48.9%, pT3/pT4 disease in 55.8%, positive margins in 28.3% and lymph node disease in 20.2% of the cases. Adverse pathological findings were more frequent in patients with prostate-specific antigen >40 ng/mL and (or) in those with locally advanced disease (pT3/pT4). In 62.2% of the cases, adjuvant radiotherapy was used. At 1-year follow up, 80% of patients did not show evidence of biochemical recurrence and 98.8% of them had good recovery of continence. Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy might represent a reasonable option in prostate cancer patients with high prostate-specific antigen as a part of a multimodality treatment approach. (author)

  7. A prospective evaluation of conventional cystography for detection of urine leakage at the vesicourethral anastomosis site after radical prostatectomy based on computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K S; Choi, H J; Jung, D C; Park, S; Cho, K S; Joung, J Y; Seo, H K; Chung, J; Lee, K H

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of conventional cystography for the detection of urine leakage at the vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA) site after radical prostatectomy based on computed tomography (CT) cystography. Patients who underwent radical prostatectomies at a single tertiary cancer centre were prospectively enrolled. Conventional cystography was routinely performed on postoperative day 7. Non-enhanced pelvic CT images were obtained after retrograde instillation of the same contrast material for a reference standard of urine leakage at the VUA site. Urine leakage was classified as follows: none; a plication abnormality; mild; moderate; and excessive. One hundred and twenty consecutive patients were enrolled. Conventional cystography detected 14 urine leakages, but CT cystography detected 40 urine leakages, which consisted of 28 mild and 12 moderate urine leakages. When using CT cystography as the standard measurement, conventional cystography showed a diagnostic accuracy of 17.8% (5/28) for mild urine leakage and 75% (9/12) for moderate leakage. Of nine patients diagnosed with mild leakage on conventional cystography, four (44.4%) had complicated moderate urine leakages based on CT cystography, requiring prolonged catheterization. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of conventional cystography were 35, 100, 100, 75.4, and 78.3%, respectively. Conventional cystography is less accurate than CT cystography for diagnosing urine leakage at the VUA site after a radical prostatectomy. The present results suggest that CT cystography is a good choice for diagnostic imaging of urine leakage after radical prostatectomy. Copyright © 2010 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgery-related complications in 1253 robot-assisted and 485 open retropubic radical prostatectomies at the Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Stefan; Nilsson, Andreas E; Schumacher, Martin C; Jonsson, Martin N; Volz, Daniela S; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, Peter N

    2010-05-01

    To quantify complications to surgery in patients treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and open retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) at our institution. Radical prostatectomy is associated with specific complications that can affect outcome results in patients. Between January 2002 and August 2007, a series of 1738 consecutive patients underwent RARP (n = 1253) or RRP (n = 485) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Surgery-related complications were assessed using a prospective hospital-based complication registry. The baseline characteristics of all patients were documented preoperatively. Overall, 170 patients required blood transfusions (9.7%), 112 patients (23%) in the RRP group compared with 58 patients (4.8%) in the RARP group. Infectious complications occurred in 44 RRP patients (9%) compared with 18 (1%) in the RARP group. Bladder neck contracture was treated in 22 (4.5%) patients who had undergone RRP compared with 3 (0.2%) in the RARP group. Clavien grade IIIb-V complications were more common in RRP patients (n = 63; 12.9%) than in RARP patients (n = 46; 3.7%). The introduction of RARP at our institution has resulted in decreased number of patients with Clavien grade IIIb-V complications, such as bladder neck contractures, a decrease in the number of patients who require blood transfusions, and decreased numbers of patients with postoperative wound infections. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of preoperative consumption of high carbohydrate drink (Pre-Op) on postoperative metabolic stress reaction in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbay, Özgür; Adar, Serdar; Karagöz, Ayşe Heves; Çelebi, Nalan; Bilen, Cenk Yücel

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effects of oral carbohydrate solution consumed until 2 h before the surgery in the patients that would undergo open radical retropubic prostatectomy on postoperative metabolic stress, patient anxiety, and comfort. A total of 50 adult patients, who were in ASA I-II group and would undergo open radical retropubic prostatectomy, were included in the study. While Group 1 = CH (n = 25) received oral glucose solution, Group 2 = FAM (n = 25) was famished starting from 24:00 h. Blood glucose, insulin, and procalcitonin levels of the patients were recorded, and the patients completed state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) test, which reflects the anxiety level of the patients, both before surgery and on the postoperative 24th hour. In order to evaluate patient comfort, senses of hunger, thirst, nausea, and cold were assessed in the morning prior to the surgery. No difference was observed between the two groups in terms of demographic data and insulin resistance levels (p > 0.05). Comparing with the preoperative levels, insulin resistance showed statistically significant elevation in both groups (p 0.05). With regard to preoperative patient comfort, sense of hunger was present in lesser number of subjects and at lower level in Group 1 (p hunger and thirst in the preoperative period in open radical retropubic prostatectomies.

  10. Effects of Pathologic Stage on the Learning Curve for Radical Prostatectomy: Evidence That Recurrence in Organ-Confined Cancer Is Largely Related to Inadequate Surgical Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Bianco, Fernando J.; Gonen, Mithat; Cronin, Angel M.; Eastham, James A.; Schrag, Deborah; Klein, Eric A.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Kattan, Michael W.; Pontes, J. Edson; Scardino, Peter T.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We previously demonstrated that there is a learning curve for open radical prostatectomy. We sought to determine whether the effects of the learning curve are modified by pathologic stage. Methods The study included 7765 eligible prostate cancer patients treated with open radical prostatectomy by one of 72 surgeons. Surgeon experience was coded as the total number of radical prostatectomies conducted by the surgeon prior to a patient’s surgery. Multivariable regression models of survival time were used to evaluate the association between surgeon experience and biochemical recurrence, with adjustment for PSA, stage, and grade. Analyses were conducted separately for patients with organ-confined and locally advanced disease. Results Five-year recurrence-free probability for patients with organ-confined disease approached 100% for the most experienced surgeons. Conversely, the learning curve for patients with locally advanced disease reached a plateau at approximately 70%, suggesting that about a third of these patients cannot be cured by surgery alone. Conclusions Excellent rates of cancer control for patients with organ-confined disease treated by the most experienced surgeons suggest that the primary reason such patients recur is inadequate surgical technique. PMID:18207316

  11. Salvage radiotherapy for patients with P.S.A. relapse after radical prostatectomy: comparisons among Astro and Phoenix biochemical failure definitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quero, L.; Hennequin, V.; Maylin, C.; Hennequin, C.; Ravery, V.; Mongiat-Artus, P.; Desgrandchamps, F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Study about the efficacy of salvage radiotherapy (R.T.), in terms of biochemical disease free survival (b.D.F.S.), according to Astro and Phoenix (nadir + 2) definitions, for persistent or rising P.S.A. after radical prostatectomy. Patients and methods Retrospective analysis of 59 patients who underwent R.T. between 1990 and 2003 for P.S.A. recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Patients received a median of 66 Gy to the prostate bed with 3D or 2D R.T.. The main end point was b.D.F.S. according to Astro and Phoenix (nadir + 2) definitions. Different criterion sets were analysed to calculate b.D.F.S. and pretreatment factors that might predict biochemical relapse were sought for each. Results After a 38-month median follow-up, the 3-year b.D.F.S. rates were: 60 and 72% for Astro and Phoenix (nadir + 2 ng/ml) definitions respectively. According to univariate analysis, pre-R.T. P.S.A. = 1 ng/ml and seminal vesicle involvement were associated with biochemical relapse. Multivariate analysis retained only pre-R.T. P.S.A. = 1 ng/ml as an independent predictor of biochemical relapse for the two definitions. Conclusion Salvage R.T. is an effective treatment after radical prostatectomy according to Astro or Phoenix definitions. Only pre-R.T. P.S.A. = 1 ng/ml predicted relapse. (authors)

  12. Outcome after PSMA PET/CT based radiotherapy in patients with biochemical persistence or recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hegemann, Nina-Sophie; Fendler, Wolfgang Peter; Ilhan, Harun; Herlemann, Annika; Buchner, Alexander; Stief, Christian; Eze, Chukwuka; Rogowski, Paul; Li, Minglun; Bartenstein, Peter; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus

    2018-03-02

    PSMA PET/CT visualises prostate cancer residual disease or recurrence at lower PSA levels compared to conventional imaging and results in a change of treatment in a remarkable high number of patients. Radiotherapy with dose escalation to the former prostate bed has been associated with improved biochemical recurrence-free survival. Thus, it can be hypothesised that PSMA PET/CT-based radiotherapy might improve the prognosis of these patients. One hundred twenty-nine patients underwent PSMA PET/CT due to biochemical persistence (52%) or recurrence (48%) after radical prostatectomy without evidence of distant metastases (February 2014-May 2017) and received PSMA PET/CT-based radiotherapy. Biochemical recurrence free survival (PSA ≤ 0.2 ng/ml) was defined as the study endpoint. Patients with biochemical persistence were significantly more often high-risk patients with significantly shorter time interval before PSMA PET/CT than patients with biochemical recurrence. Patients with biochemical recurrence had significantly more often no evidence of disease or local recurrence only in PSMA PET/CT, whereas patients with biochemical persistence had significantly more often lymph node involvement. Seventy-three patients were started on antiandrogen therapy prior to radiotherapy due to macroscopic disease in PSMA PET/CT. Cumulatively, 70 (66-70.6) Gy was delivered to local macroscopic tumor, 66 (63-66) Gy to the prostate fossa, 61.6 (53.2-66) Gy to PET-positive lymph nodes and 50.4 (45-52.3) Gy to lymphatic pathways. Median PSA after radiotherapy was 0.07 ng/ml with 74% of patients having a PSA ≤ 0.1 ng/ml. After a median follow-up of 20 months, median PSA was 0.07 ng/ml with ongoing antiandrogen therapy in 30 patients. PET-positive patients without antiandrogen therapy at last follow-up (45 patients) had a median PSA of 0.05 ng/ml with 89% of all patients, 94% of patients with biochemical recurrence and 82% of patients with biochemical persistence having a

  13. Clinical map document based on XML (cMDX: document architecture with mapping feature for reporting and analysing prostate cancer in radical prostatectomy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettendorf Olaf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathology report of radical prostatectomy specimens plays an important role in clinical decisions and the prognostic evaluation in Prostate Cancer (PCa. The anatomical schema is a helpful tool to document PCa extension for clinical and research purposes. To achieve electronic documentation and analysis, an appropriate documentation model for anatomical schemas is needed. For this purpose we developed cMDX. Methods The document architecture of cMDX was designed according to Open Packaging Conventions by separating the whole data into template data and patient data. Analogue custom XML elements were considered to harmonize the graphical representation (e.g. tumour extension with the textual data (e.g. histological patterns. The graphical documentation was based on the four-layer visualization model that forms the interaction between different custom XML elements. Sensible personal data were encrypted with a 256-bit cryptographic algorithm to avoid misuse. In order to assess the clinical value, we retrospectively analysed the tumour extension in 255 patients after radical prostatectomy. Results The pathology report with cMDX can represent pathological findings of the prostate in schematic styles. Such reports can be integrated into the hospital information system. "cMDX" documents can be converted into different data formats like text, graphics and PDF. Supplementary tools like cMDX Editor and an analyser tool were implemented. The graphical analysis of 255 prostatectomy specimens showed that PCa were mostly localized in the peripheral zone (Mean: 73% ± 25. 54% of PCa showed a multifocal growth pattern. Conclusions cMDX can be used for routine histopathological reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens and provide data for scientific analysis.

  14. Clinical map document based on XML (cMDX): document architecture with mapping feature for reporting and analysing prostate cancer in radical prostatectomy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eminaga, Okyaz; Hinkelammert, Reemt; Semjonow, Axel; Neumann, Joerg; Abbas, Mahmoud; Koepke, Thomas; Bettendorf, Olaf; Eltze, Elke; Dugas, Martin

    2010-11-15

    The pathology report of radical prostatectomy specimens plays an important role in clinical decisions and the prognostic evaluation in Prostate Cancer (PCa). The anatomical schema is a helpful tool to document PCa extension for clinical and research purposes. To achieve electronic documentation and analysis, an appropriate documentation model for anatomical schemas is needed. For this purpose we developed cMDX. The document architecture of cMDX was designed according to Open Packaging Conventions by separating the whole data into template data and patient data. Analogue custom XML elements were considered to harmonize the graphical representation (e.g. tumour extension) with the textual data (e.g. histological patterns). The graphical documentation was based on the four-layer visualization model that forms the interaction between different custom XML elements. Sensible personal data were encrypted with a 256-bit cryptographic algorithm to avoid misuse. In order to assess the clinical value, we retrospectively analysed the tumour extension in 255 patients after radical prostatectomy. The pathology report with cMDX can represent pathological findings of the prostate in schematic styles. Such reports can be integrated into the hospital information system. "cMDX" documents can be converted into different data formats like text, graphics and PDF. Supplementary tools like cMDX Editor and an analyser tool were implemented. The graphical analysis of 255 prostatectomy specimens showed that PCa were mostly localized in the peripheral zone (Mean: 73% ± 25). 54% of PCa showed a multifocal growth pattern. cMDX can be used for routine histopathological reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens and provide data for scientific analysis.

  15. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Montserrat; Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  16. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: Multiparametric MR imaging-directed intraoperative frozen-section analysis to reduce the rate of positive surgical margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, Giuseppe; Musi, Gennaro; Padhani, Anwar R; Summers, Paul; Renne, Giuseppe; Alessi, Sarah; Raimondi, Sara; Matei, Deliu V; Renne, Salvatore L; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    To investigate whether use of multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-directed intraoperative frozen-section (IFS) analysis during nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy reduces the rate of positive surgical margins. This retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data was approved by an institutional ethics committee, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Data were reviewed for 134 patients who underwent preoperative multiparametric MR imaging (T2 weighted, diffusion weighted, and dynamic contrast-material enhanced) and nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, during which IFS analysis was used, and secondary resections were performed when IFS results were positive for cancer. Control patients (n = 134) matched for age, prostate-specific antigen level, and stage were selected from a pool of 322 patients who underwent nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy without multiparametric MR imaging and IFS analysis. Rates of positive surgical margins were compared by means of the McNemar test, and a multivariate conditional logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratio of positive surgical margins for patients who underwent MR imaging and IFS analysis compared with control subjects. Eighteen patients who underwent MR imaging and IFS analysis underwent secondary resections, and 13 of these patients were found to have negative surgical margins at final pathologic examination. Positive surgical margins were found less frequently in the patients who underwent MR imaging and IFS analysis than in control patients (7.5% vs 18.7%, P = .01). When the differences in risk factors are taken into account, patients who underwent MR imaging and IFS had one-seventh the risk of having positive surgical margins relative to control patients (adjusted odds ratio: 0.15; 95% confidence interval: 0.04, 0.61). The significantly lower rate of positive surgical margins compared with that in control patients provides

  17. Investigating the mechanism underlying urinary continence recovery after radical prostatectomy: effectiveness of a longer urethral stump to prevent urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadono, Yoshifumi; Nohara, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Shohei; Naito, Renato; Urata, Satoko; Nakashima, Kazufumi; Iijima, Masashi; Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Izumi, Kouji; Gabata, Toshifumi; Mizokami, Atsushi

    2018-02-28

    To assess the chronological changes in urinary incontinence and urethral function before and after radical prostatectomy (RP), and to compare the findings of pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after RP to evaluate the anatomical changes. In total, 185 patients were evaluated with regard to the position of the distal end of the membranous urethra (DMU) on a mid-sagittal MRI slice and urethral sphincter function using the urethral pressure profilometry. The patients also underwent an abdominal leak point pressure test before RP and at 10 days and 12 months after RP. The results were then compared with the chronological changes in urinary incontinence. The MRI results showed that the DMU shifted proximally to an average distance of 4 mm at 10 days after RP and returned to the preoperative position at 12 months after RP. Urethral sphincter function also worsened 10 days after RP, with recovery after 12 months. The residual length of the urethral stump and urinary incontinence were significantly associated with the migration length of the DMU at 10 days after RP. The residual length of the urethral stump was a significant predictor of urinary incontinence after RP. This is the first study to elucidate that the slight vertical repositioning of the membranous urethra after RP causes chronological changes in urinary incontinence. A long urethral residual stump reduces urinary incontinence after RP. © 2018 The Authors BJU International © 2018 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Impact of posterior rhabdosphincter reconstruction during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: retrospective analysis of time to continence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jason R; Shikanov, Sergey; Zorn, Kevin C; Shalhav, Arieh L; Zagaja, Gregory P

    2009-12-01

    Posterior rhabdosphincter (PR) reconstruction during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) was introduced in an attempt to improve postoperative continence. In the present study, we evaluate time to achieve continence in patients who are undergoing RARP with and without PR reconstruction. A prospective RARP database was searched for most recent cases that were accomplished with PR reconstruction (group 1, n = 69) or with standard technique (group 2, n = 63). We performed the analysis applying two definitions of continence: 0 pads per day or 0-1 security pad per day. Patients were evaluated by telephone interview. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. With PR reconstruction, continence was improved when defined as 0-1 security pad per day (median time of 90 vs 150 days; P = 0.01). This difference did not achieve statistical significance when continence was defined as 0 pads per day (P = 0.12). A statistically significant improvement in continence rate and time to achieve continence is seen in patients who are undergoing PR reconstruction during RARP, with continence defined as 0-1 security/safety pad per day. A larger, prospective and randomized study is needed to better understand the impact of this technique on postoperative continence.

  19. Impact of salvage therapy for biochemical recurrence on health-related quality of life following radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namiki, Shunichi; Saito, Seiichi; Arai, Yoichi; Tochigi, Tatsuo; Ioritani, Naomasa; Terai, Akito

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of salvage therapy for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RP). Between January 2000 and December 2003, a total of 249 patients who underwent RP were available for 2-year follow up. Of the respondents, 203 men did not show evidence of recurrence (group A), and 46 men received salvage hormonal therapy and/or radiotherapy after RP because of a rise in PSA (group B). The general and prostate-target HRQOL was assessed with the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form and University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index, respectively. Patients completed the HRQOL instruments by mail at baseline and at 24 months after RP. All of the patients completed both questionnaires. At baseline no significant differences were found between the two groups in any of the HRQOL domains. There were significant improvements in mental health and social function for the patients without biochemical recurrence postoperatively. Repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significantly different patterns of alteration in several general HRQOL domains among the treatment groups. The urinary and bowel domains were equivalent between the two treatment groups at baseline and 24 months after RP. The patients treated with salvage hormonal therapy tended to show delayed recovery of sexual function. Using a self-administered questionnaire, biochemical recurrence following RP was found to impose a substantial burden in patients with localized prostate cancer. (author)

  20. The prostate health index PHI predicts oncological outcome and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy - analysis in 437 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxeiner, Andreas; Kilic, Ergin; Matalon, Julia; Friedersdorff, Frank; Miller, Kurt; Jung, Klaus; Stephan, Carsten; Busch, Jonas

    2017-10-03

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the Prostate-Health-Index (PHI) for pathological outcome prediction following radical prostatectomy and also for biochemical recurrence prediction in comparison to established parameters such as Gleason-score, pathological tumor stage, resection status (R0/1) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Out of a cohort of 460 cases with preoperative PHI-measurements (World Health Organization calibration: Beckman Coulter Access-2-Immunoassay) between 2001 and 2014, 437 patients with complete follow up data were included. From these 437 patients, 87 (19.9%) developed a biochemical recurrence. Patient characteristics were compared by using chi-square test. Predictors were analyzed by multivariate adjusted logistic and Cox regression. The median follow up for a biochemical recurrence was 65 (range 3-161) months. PHI, PSA, [-2]proPSA, PHI- and PSA-density performed as significant variables (p PHI, PSA, %fPSA, [-2]proPSA, PHI- and PSA-density significantly discriminated between stages PHI. In biochemical recurrence prediction PHI, PSA, [-2]proPSA, PHI- and PSA-density were the strongest predictors. In conclusion, due to heterogeneity of time spans to biochemical recurrence, longer follow up periods are crucial. This study with a median follow up of more than 5 years, confirmed a clinical value for PHI as an independent biomarker essential for biochemical recurrence prediction.

  1. A reappraisal of the role of vesicourethral anastomosis biopsy in patient candidates for salvage radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roscigno, Marco; Cozzarini, Cesare; Scattoni, Vincenzo; Bertini, Roberto; Da Pozzo, Luigi; Pasta, Alessandra; Montorsi, Francesco; Bolognesi, Angelo; Fiorino, Claudio; Colombo, Renzo; Fazio, Ferruccio; Rigatti, Patrizio

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the usefulness of vesicourethral anastomotic biopsy (VUBx) in patients who are candidates for salvage radiotherapy (SalvRT) after radical prostatectomy (RRP). Material and methods: From 1992 to 2001, 98 patients with a PSA failure (PSAf) after RRP underwent SalvRT to the prostatic bed (median dose 70 Gy). In 50/98 patients the VUBx was positive, in 26 negative; 22 patients underwent SalvRT without a prior VUBx. The prognostic impact on biochemical disease-free survival (bNEDs) of histologic confirmation of the local failure was evaluated retrospectively. Results: In the 40 patients with pre-RT PSA ≤ 0.9 ng/mL, no additional prognostic information derived from the VUBx, while, for higher PSA values, a positive histology resulted as a covariate independently predictive of post-RT outcome (5-year bNEDs: 74% vs 42% in the 35 and 23 patients with a positive or negative/not performed VUBx, respectively, P = .03), together with pT, pre-RT PSA ≤1.5 ng/mL, and PSA doubling time. Conclusions: In case of PSAf after RRP, VUBx before SalvRT seems unnecessary for PSA ≤ 0.9 ng/mL. For higher values, a positive VUBx seems to always justify a SalvRT, which may not be recommendable, given the nonnegligible risk of an already micrometastatic disease, if the biopsy results are negative

  2. Noninvasive continuous blood pressure monitoring by the ClearSight system during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yoko; Yasuo M, Tsutsumi; Oyama, Takuro; Murakami, Chiaki; Kakuta, Nami; Tanaka, Katsuya

    2018-01-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) is commonly performed in the surgical treatment of prostate cancer. However, the steep Trendelenburg position (25) and pneumoperitoneum required for this procedure can sometimes cause hemodynamic changes. Although blood pressure is traditionally monitored invasively during RALRP, the ClearSight system (BMEYE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) enables a totally noninvasive and simple continuous blood pressure and cardiac output monitoring based on finger arterial pressure pulse contour analysis. We therefore investigated whether noninvasive continuous arterial blood pressure measurements using the ClearSight system were comparable to those obtained invasively in patients undergoing RALRP. Ten patients scheduled for RALRP with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II were included in this study. At each of the seven defined time points, noninvasive and invasive blood pressure measurements were documented and compared in each patient using Bland-Altman analysis. Although the blood pressure measured with the ClearSight system correlated with that measured invasively, a large difference between the values obtained by the two devices was noted. The ClearSight system was unable to detect blood pressure accurately during RALRP, suggesting that blood pressure monitoring using this device alone is not feasible in this small patient population. J. Med. Invest. 65:69-73, February, 2018.

  3. Accuracy of pelvic multiparametric MRI in diagnosing local recurrence following radical prostatectomy. Case report and revision of the literature

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    Pietro Pepe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A Caucasian man (73 years old six years from radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer (PCa showed biochemical recurrence (BCR; the follow up based on PSA evaluated every 6 months was negative (0.1 ng/ml for 5 years, but in the last year PSA increased to 0.3 vs 0.5 ng/ml. The patient was asymptomatic and underwent 3.0 Tesla mpMRI equipped with surface 16 channels phased-array coil placed around the pelvic area; multiplanar turbo spin-echo T2-weighted (T2W, axial diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, axial dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE and spectroscopy were performed. Pelvic mpMRI demonstrated the presence of a nodular tissue with a diameter of 10 mm. located on the left of the prostatic fossa near the rectum that was higly sospicious for local PCa recurrence. The patient underwent salvage RT (64 Gy; one year from RT PSA was 0.1 ng/ml suggesting that the patient was free from recurrence. In conclusion, mpMRI could be combined with PSA kinetics in the evaluation of men with BRC also in the presence of PSA values < 1 ng/ml.

  4. Suggestion for the prostatic fossa clinical target volume in adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy after a radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Su; Park, Won; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Park, Byung Kwan; Park, Sung Yoon; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hyun Moo; Jeon, Seong Soo; Seo, Seong Il; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Hwang Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the location of recurrent tumors and suggest the optimal target volume in adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy (RT) after a radical prostatectomy (RP). Material and methods: From January 2000 to December 2012, 113 patients had been diagnosed with suspected recurrent prostate cancer by MRI scan and received salvage RT in the Samsung Medical Center. This study assessed the location of the suspected tumor recurrences and used the inferior border of the pubic symphysis as a point of reference. Results: There were 118 suspect tumor recurrences. The most common site of recurrence was the anastomotic site (78.8%), followed by the bladder neck (15.3%) and retrovesical area (5.9%). In the cranial direction, 106 (87.3%) lesions were located within 30 mm of the reference point. In the caudal direction, 12 lesions (10.2%) were located below the reference point. In the transverse plane, 112 lesions (94.9%) were located within 10 mm of the midline. Conclusions: A MRI scan acquired before salvage RT is useful for the localization of recurrent tumors and the delineation of the target volume. We suggest the optimal target volume in adjuvant or salvage RT after RP, which includes 97% of suspected tumor recurrences

  5. Meta-analysis of studies comparing oncologic outcomes of radical prostatectomy and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer.

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    Cozzi, Gabriele; Musi, Gennaro; Bianchi, Roberto; Bottero, Danilo; Brescia, Antonio; Cioffi, Antonio; Cordima, Giovanni; Delor, Maurizio; Di Trapani, Ettore; Ferro, Matteo; Matei, Deliu Victor; Russo, Andrea; Mistretta, Francesco Alessandro; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare oncologic outcomes of radical prostatectomy (RP) with brachytherapy (BT). A literature review was conducted according to the 'Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses' (PRISMA) statement. We included studies reporting comparative oncologic outcomes of RP versus BT for localized prostate cancer (PCa). From each comparative study, we extracted the study design, the number and features of the included patients, and the oncologic outcomes expressed as all-cause mortality (ACM), PCa-specific mortality (PCSM) or, when the former were unavailable, as biochemical recurrence (BCR). All of the data retrieved from the selected studies were recorded in an electronic database. Cumulative analysis was conducted using the Review Manager version 5.3 software, designed for composing Cochrane Reviews (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK). Statistical heterogeneity was tested using the Chi-square test. Our cumulative analysis did not show any significant difference in terms of BCR, ACM or PCSM rates between the RP and BT cohorts. Only three studies reported risk-stratified outcomes of intermediate- and high-risk patients, which are the most prone to treatment failure. our analysis suggested that RP and BT may have similar oncologic outcomes. However, the analysis included a limited number of studies, and most of them were retrospective, making it impossible to derive any definitive conclusion, especially for intermediate- and high-risk patients. In this scenario, appropriate urologic counseling remains of utmost importance.

  6. Intraoperative frozen pathology during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: can ALEXIS™ trocar make it easy and fast?

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    Almeida, Gilberto Laurino; Musi, Gennaro; Mazzoleni, Federica; Matei, Deliu Victor; Brescia, Antonio; Detti, Serena; de Cobelli, Ottavio

    2013-10-01

    To describe the first series of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) using the ALEXIS™ trocar device when removal of the specimen is necessary for intraoperative frozen-section pathology. Consecutive RALP using the ALEXIS were prospectively catalogue. Perioperative data, including preoperative oncologic diagnosis, operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), size of incision for umbilical trocar, complications related to trocar, and length of hospital stay, were analyzed. One hundred twenty-eight patients were analyzed. The mean operative time was 216 minutes, mean time to trocar placement was 4 minutes, and mean EBL was 172 mL. The incision size for a trocar was 2-3 cm in 117 patients and 1 incisional hernia was observed. The mean hospital stay was 3 days and mean follow-up was 4 months. The ALEXIS trocar provides an easy and fast intraoperative removal of the specimen for frozen pathology during RALP, even for large prostates. Safe and cosmetic results with a low intraoperative complication rate are acquired with the wound retractor.

  7. The relationship between geographic remoteness and intentions to use a telephone support service among Australian men following radical prostatectomy.

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    Corboy, Denise; McLaren, Suzanne; Jenkins, Megan; McDonald, John

    2014-11-01

    The objective is to investigate the influence of characteristics related to place of residence (self-reliance and stoicism) on men's intentions to use a telephone support service following radical prostatectomy. A community sample of 447 prostate cancer patients (31% response), recruited via Medicare Australia, completed a survey to assess levels of self-reliance and stoicism, and beliefs about addressing emotional distress through using telephone support services. Results indicated that the model was a partially mediated model. Geographic remoteness was directly related to intention, and indirectly related through stoicism and subjective norms. Men from rural and remote areas in Australia might face particular challenges in seeking support following treatment for prostate cancer. These challenges appear to relate to the influence of stoic attitudes and normative expectations, than to issues of access and availability. Addressing stoic attitudes in the clinical setting, through normalising emotional reactions to cancer diagnosis and treatment, and the act of help-seeking for emotional support, may be beneficial. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Localization of higher grade tumor foci in potential candidates for active surveillance who opt for radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Kyu; Eastham, James A.; Fine, Samson W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate actual intraprostatic location of higher graded tumor foci undetected via standard transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy amongst patients who would be clinically considered appropriate candidates for active surveillance (AS) but underwent radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods: We reviewed entirely-submitted and whole-mounted RP specimens from 169 men who were deemed appropriate for AS clinically, but opted for RP and were found to have higher grade tumors. For each case, tumor nodules were circled and color-coded in a grade-specific manner and digitally scanned to created tumor maps. The locations of tumor foci with Gleason grade ≥4 were stratified by specific sites: anterior, anterolateral, lateral only (not clearly anterior or posterior), posterior, and posterolateral area. Results: Of 169 patients, 86% had clinical stage T1c and 14% T2a. RP Gleason score 7 in all but two men. Higher-grade tumor foci were localized to: anterior (n=66, 39%), anterolateral (n=4, 2%), lateral only (not clearly anterior or posterior) (n=5, 3%), posterior (n=52, 31%), and posterolateral (n=42, 25%) prostate, respectively. Conclusions: Among patients deemed clinically appropriate for AS, higher-grade tumor foci missed by standard prostate biopsies were localized to both the anterior and posterior prostate, without predominance of a particular area. These findings lend additional support to performing repeat standard prostate biopsy in potential candidates for AS and should be considered in efforts to optimize current biopsy strategies for the selection of AS patients. PMID:24392439

  9. Lateral view dissection of the prostato-urethral junction to reduce positive apical margin in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hiroshi; Miki, Jun; Kimura, Takahiro; Sanuki, Kunitaro; Miki, Kenta; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Egawa, Shin

    2009-08-01

    To assess the impact of lateral view apical dissection in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) on the reduction of positive surgical margin rates and recovery of postoperative continence. One hundred and forty-four consecutive patients underwent LRP from October 2004 to March 2008. Lateral view dissection of the prostato-urethral junction was conducted in 76 of them (Group 2). Standard dissection was used in the remaining patients (Group 1). The effect of this technical modification on the reduction of positive surgical margin rates and postoperative recovery of urinary continence was assessed in the two groups. Overall, the incidence of positive margins decreased from 23 (35.9%) in Group 1 to 16 cases (21.9%) in Group 2 (P = 0.07). Positive margin rates in pT2 decreased from 30.6% to 6.5% (P = 0.006). Apical and dorso-apical margins were reduced from 26.5% to 4.3% (P = 0.009) and from 10.2% to 0% (P Lateral view dissection of the prostato-urethral junction is an easily applicable technical modification. It provides better visualization of apical anatomy substantially contributing to the reduction of positive surgical margin rates, especially at the level of prostatic apex.

  10. Survey of factors underlying treatment choice for patients with localized prostate cancer (radical prostatectomy vs extrabeam radiotherapy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teramoto, Sakiko; Ota, Tomonori; Itaya, Naoshi; Maniwa, Akimitsu; Matsui, Takashi; Nishimura, Yoji; Shoji, Kazufusa

    2006-01-01

    Little is known regarding factors for decision-making on treatment by localized prostate cancer patients. We therefore conducted a survey series of cases for influence on treatment decision making, and also satisfaction after therapy. A total of 51 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) were mailed original questionnaires about their treatment decision-making factors and satisfaction and the results compared between the two groups. Some 48 (94.1%) patients responded to the questionnaire, 38 (79.2%) and 10 (20.8%) after RP and EBRT, respectively. The major factor determining the decision as to treatment approach was the physician in both groups (more than 90%). Excluding physicians, family or others were more important in the RP group than the EBRT group (p=0.023). RP group patients desired removal of their prostate for cancer control, while, EBRT group patients favored the less invasive approach in consideration of side effects. Over 80% patients indicated they would definitely or probably choose the same treatment again, although some of the RP group would switch to watchful-waiting because of sexual dysfunction, urinary incontinence and the invasive nature of the procedure. Physicians are in a most important position to help patients understand prostate cancer and treatment, outcomes, and need to help them make their best choice, with appropriate follow up including mental care. (author)

  11. [Individual learning curve for radical robot-assisted prostatectomy based on the example of three professionals working in one clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasner, P I; Pushkar', D Iu; Kolontarev, K B; Kotenkov, D V

    2014-01-01

    The appearance of new surgical technique always requires evaluation of its effectiveness and ease of acquisition. A comparative study of the results of the first three series of successive robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed on at time by three surgeons, was conducted. The series consisted of 40 procedures, and were divided into 4 groups of 10 operations for the analysis. When comparing data, statistically significant improvement of intra- and postoperative performance in each series was revealed, with increase in the number of operations performed, and in each subsequent series compared with the preceding one. We recommend to perform the planned conversion at the first operation. In our study, previous laparoscopic experience did not provide any significant advantages in the acquisition of robot-assisted technology. To characterize the individual learning curve, we recommend the use of the number of operations that the surgeon looked in the life-surgery regimen and/or in which he participated as an assistant before his own surgical activity, as well as the indicator "technical defect". In addition to the term "individual learning curve", we propose to introduce the terms "surgeon's individual training phase", and "clinic's learning curve".

  12. Multimedia support for improving preoperative patient education: a randomized controlled trial using the example of radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Johannes; Ihrig, Andreas; Yass, Mohammed; Bruckner, Tom; Peters, Tim; Huber, Christian G; Konyango, Beryl; Lozankovski, Novica; Stredele, Regina J F; Moll, Peter; Schneider, Meike; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the use of multimedia presentations for informing patients. Therefore, we supported preoperative education by adding a multimedia tool and examined the effects in a randomized controlled trial. We randomized German-speaking patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy at our center to receive either a multimedia-supported (MME) or a standard education (SE). Outcomes were measured in a structured interview. Primary outcome was patient satisfaction. In addition, we applied validated instruments to determine anxiety and measures of decision-making. Results were given by mean and standard deviation. For comparison of groups we used t test and chi-square test. For an explorative analysis we applied multivariate logistic regression. We randomized 203 patients to receive MME (n=102) or SE (n=101). Complete satisfaction with preoperative education was more frequent in the MME group (69 vs 52%, p=.016) and patients after MME reported more questions (5.7 vs 4.2, p=.018). There was no difference concerning the duration of talks and the number of recalled risks. However, perceived knowledge was higher after MME (1.3 vs 1.6, p=.037). Anxiety and measures of decision-making were comparable. Patients judged the multimedia tool very positive, and 74% of the MME group thought that their preoperative education had been superior to SE. Multimedia support should be considered worthwhile for improving the informed consent process before surgery (www.germanctr.de; DRKS00000096).

  13. Predicting Pathological Features at Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Prostate Cancer Eligible for Active Surveillance by Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

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    Ottavio de Cobelli

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic performance of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI and Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PIRADS score in predicting pathologic features in a cohort of patients eligible for active surveillance who underwent radical prostatectomy.A total of 223 patients who fulfilled the criteria for "Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance", were included. Mp-1.5 Tesla MRI examination staging with endorectal coil was performed at least 6-8 weeks after TRUS-guided biopsy. In all patients, the likelihood of the presence of cancer was assigned using PIRADS score between 1 and 5. Outcomes of interest were: Gleason score upgrading, extra capsular extension (ECE, unfavorable prognosis (occurrence of both upgrading and ECE, large tumor volume (≥ 0.5 ml, and seminal vesicle invasion (SVI. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curves and Decision Curve Analyses (DCA were performed for models with and without inclusion of PIRADS score.Multivariate analysis demonstrated the association of PIRADS score with upgrading (P < 0.0001, ECE (P < 0.0001, unfavorable prognosis (P < 0.0001, and large tumor volume (P = 0.002. ROC curves and DCA showed that models including PIRADS score resulted in greater net benefit for almost all the outcomes of interest, with the only exception of SVI.mpMRI and PIRADS scoring are feasible tools in clinical setting and could be used as decision-support systems for a more accurate selection of patients eligible for AS.

  14. Prostate volume measurement by TRUS using heights obtained by transaxial and midsagittal scaning: comparison with specimen volume following radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Bung Bin; Kim, Jae Kyun; Choi, Sung Hoon; Noh, Han Na; Ji, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyoung Sik

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, when measuring prostate volume by TRUS, whether height is more accurately determined by transaxial or midsagittal scanning. Sixteen patients who between March 1995 and March 1998 underwent both preoperative TRUS and radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer were included in this study. Using prolate ellipse volume calculation (height x length x width x π/6), TRUS prostate volume was determined, and was compared with the measured volume of the specimen. Prostate volume measured by TRUS, regardless of whether height was determined transaxially or midsagittally, correlated closely with real specimen volume. When height was measured in one of these planes, a paired t test revealed no significant difference between TRUS prostate volume and real specimen volume (p = .411 and p = .740, respectively), nor were there significant differences between the findings of transaxial and midsagittal scanning (p = .570). A paired sample test, however, indicated that TRUS prostate volumes determined transaxially showed a higher correlation coefficient (0.833) and a lower standard deviation (9.04) than those determined midsagittally (0.714 and 11.48, respectively). Prostate volume measured by TRUS closely correlates with real prostate volume. Furthermore, we suggest that when measuring prostate volume in this way, height is more accurately determined by transaxial than by midsagittal scanning

  15. Socioeconomic status is an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence among patients with prostate cancer who undergo radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Srougi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Socioeconomic status (SES may influence cancer characteristics and behavior in several aspects. We analyzed PCa characteristics and behavior among low income uninsured men, and compare them to high income patients with health insurance in a developing country. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective case-control study was performed on 934 patients with clinically localized PCa who underwent radical prostatectomy between March, 1999 and July, 2009. Patients were divided in two groups, according to their SES. In group 1 (n=380, all had low income, low educational levels and couldn't afford medical insurance. In group 2 (n=554, all had higher income, higher education and had medical insurance. RESULTS: Patients from group 1 were older, had higher Gleason scores, higher rates of seminal vesicle and bladder neck involvement. The Kaplan Meier disease-free survival curve demonstrated that after a follow-up of four years, about 50% of uninsured patients had biochemical recurrence, versus 21% of insured patients (Log rank test: p < 0.001. A multivariate Cox regression analysis for the risk of disease recurrence demonstrated that only PSA levels, Gleason score, seminal vesicle involvement and SES were statistically significant variables. Patients with a low SES presented 1.8 times the risk of recurrence as compared to patients with a high SES. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with low SES were older, presented more aggressive PCa characteristics and a high rate of disease recurrence. A low SES constituted an independent predictor for disease recurrence.

  16. Intrafascial versus interfascial nerve sparing in radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hong; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Li, Sheng; Meng, Xiang-Yu; Shi, Ming-Jun; He, Da-Lin; Wang, Xing-Huan

    2017-09-13

    The present study aimed to systematically evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the intrafascial and interfascial nerve sparing (ITR-NS and ITE-NS) radical prostatectomy. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for eligible studies. Meta-analysis with random-effects model was performed. Six comparative trials were selected and embraced in this research, including one randomized controlled trial, three prospective comparative trials, and two retrospective comparative trials. With regard to perioperative parameters, no significant association of operative time, blood loss, transfusion rates, duration of catheterization, and hospital stay existed between ITR-NS and ITE-NS. With respect to the functional results, ITR-NS had advantages in terms of both continence and potency recovery compared with ITE-NS. In reference to the oncologic results, the ITR-NS showed lower overall positive surgical margin (PSM) compared with ITE-NS but pT2 PSM and biochemical recurrence free rates were similar to the two surgical types. This study demonstrates that ITR-NS has better continence at 6 mo and 36 mo and better potency recovery at 6 mo and 12 mo postoperatively, regardless of the surgical technique. The cancer control of ITR-NS was also better than that of ITE-NS. This may be explained by the fact that patients in ITE-NS group present higher risk cancer than patients in ITR-NS group.

  17. Higher Prostate Weight Is Inversely Associated with Gleason Score Upgrading in Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

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    Leonardo Oliveira Reis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Protective factors against Gleason upgrading and its impact on outcomes after surgery warrant better definition. Patients and Methods. Consecutive 343 patients were categorized at biopsy (BGS and prostatectomy (PGS as Gleason score, ≤6, 7, and ≥8; 94 patients (27.4% had PSA recurrence, mean followup 80.2 months (median 99. Independent predictors of Gleason upgrading (logistic regression and disease-free survival (DFS (Kaplan-Meier, log-rank were determined. Results. Gleason discordance was 45.7% (37.32% upgrading and 8.45% downgrading. Upgrading risk decreased by 2.4% for each 1 g of prostate weight increment, while it increased by 10.2% for every 1 ng/mL of PSA, 72.0% for every 0.1 unity of PSA density and was 21 times higher for those with BGS 7. Gleason upgrading showed increased clinical stage (P=0.019, higher tumor extent (P=0.009, extraprostatic extension (P=0.04, positive surgical margins (P<0.001, seminal vesicle invasion (P=0.003, less “insignificant” tumors (P<0.001, and also worse DFS, χ2=4.28, df=1, P=0.039. However, when setting the final Gleason score (BGS ≤6 to PGS 7 versus BGS 7 to PGS 7, avoiding allocation bias, DFS impact is not confirmed, χ2=0.40, df=1, P=0.530.Conclusions. Gleason upgrading is substantial and confers worse outcomes. Prostate weight is inversely related to upgrading and its protective effect warrants further evaluation.

  18. A phase 3, placebo controlled study of the safety and efficacy of avanafil for the treatment of erectile dysfunction after nerve sparing radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhall, John P; Burnett, Arthur L; Wang, Run; McVary, Kevin T; Moul, Judd W; Bowden, Charles H; DiDonato, Karen; Shih, Winnie; Day, Wesley W

    2013-06-01

    We evaluated the safety and efficacy of 100 and 200 mg avanafil for the treatment of adult males with erectile dysfunction after bilateral nerve sparing radical prostatectomy. This was a double-blind, placebo controlled, parallel group, phase 3 study in males age 18 to 70 years with a history of erectile dysfunction of 6 months or more after bilateral nerve sparing radical prostatectomy. Patients were randomized to 100 or 200 mg avanafil or placebo (taken 30 minutes before sexual activity) for 12 weeks. Primary end points included successful vaginal insertion (Sexual Encounter Profile [SEP] question 2), successful intercourse (SEP3) and change in score on the erectile function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-EF) questionnaire. A total of 298 patients were randomized and 84.6% completed the study. At baseline 16.1% were age 65 years or older and 71.5% had severe erectile dysfunction (mean overall IIEF-EF domain score 9.2). After 12 weeks there were significantly greater increases in SEP2 and SEP3 and change in mean IIEF-EF domain score with 100 and 200 mg avanafil vs placebo (p erectile function after prostatectomy. Results suggest a rapid onset of action and sustained duration of effect, with all 3 primary end points being achieved at both dose levels. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation therapy alone is not successful as salvage treatment for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

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    Oas, Lute G; Zagars, Gunar K; Pollack, Alan

    1995-07-01

    whose disease relapsed after XRT received androgen ablation. Although the majority of patients relapsed, survival at 5 years after XRT was 85% - no different from the expected survival for age-matched men in the general population. Conclusion: Using PSA as a disease endpoint, reveals that radiation therapy rarely salvages patients with apparently localized relapse after radical prostatectomy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Patients with indications for XRT after RP are better treated immediately rather than waiting for recurrence.

  20. MRI-derived Restriction Spectrum Imaging Cellularity Index is Associated with High Grade Prostate Cancer on Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

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    Michael Andre Liss

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We evaluate a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technique to improve detection of aggressive prostate cancer. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of presurgical prostate MRI scans using an advanced diffusion weighted imaging technique called Restriction Spectrum Imaging (RSI, which can be presented as a normalized z-score statistic (RSI z-score. Scans were acquired prior to radical prostatectomy. Prostatectomy specimens were processed using whole mount sectioning and regions of interest (ROIs were drawn around individual prostate cancer (PCa tumors. Corresponding ROIs were drawn on the MRI imaging and paired with ROIs in regions with no pathology. RSI z-score and conventional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values were recorded for each ROI. Paired t-test, ANOVA and logistic regression analyses were performed.Results: We evaluated 28 patients with 64 regions of interest (28 benign and 36 PCa. The mean difference in RSI z-score (PCa ROI – Benign ROI was 2.17 (SE = 0.11; p <0.001 and in ADC was 551 mm2/sec (SE = 80 mm2/sec; paired t-test, p <0.001. The differences in the means among all groups (benign, primary Gleason 3 and primary Gleason 4 was significant for both RSI z-score (F3,64 = 97.7, p <0.001 and ADC (F3,64 = 13.9, p <0.001. A t-test was performed on only PCa tumor ROIs (n=36 to determine prostate cancer aggressiveness (Gleason 3 vs. Gleason 4 revealing that RSI z-score was still significant (p = 0.03, whereas, ADC values were no longer significant (p = 0.08. In multivariable analysis adjusting for age and race, RSI z-score was associated with PCa aggressiveness (OR 10.3, 95%CI: 1.4-78.0, p=0.02 while ADC trended to significance (p=0.07. Conclusions: The RSI derived normalized cellularity index (RSI z-score is associated with aggressive prostate cancer as determined by pathologic Gleason scores. Further utilization of RSI techniques may serve to enhance standardized reporting systems.

  1. Unidirectional barbed suture versus standard monofilament for urethrovesical anastomosis during robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Manganiello

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: V-LocTM180 (Covidien Healthcare, Mansfield, MA is a new unidirectional barbed suture that may reduce loss of tension during a running closure. We evaluated the use of the barbed suture for urethrovesical anastomosis (UVA during robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP. Time to completion of UVA, post-operative anastomotic leak rate, and urinary incontinence were compared in patients undergoing UVA with 3-0 unidirectional-barbed suture vs. 3-0 MonocrylTM (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were prospectively collected for 70 consecutive patients undergoing RALP for prostate cancer between November 2009 and October 2010. In the first 35 patients, the UVA was performed using a modified running van Velthoven anastomosis technique using two separate 3-0 monofilament sutures. In the subsequent 35 patients, the UVA was performed using two running novel unidirectional barbed sutures. At 7-12 days postoperatively, all patients were evaluated with a cystogram to determine anastomotic integrity. Urinary incontinence was assessed at two months and five months by total daily pad usage. Clinical symptoms suggestive of bladder neck contracture were elicited. RESULTS: Age, PSA, Gleason score, prostate size, estimated blood loss, body mass index, and clinical and pathologic stage between the 2 groups were similar. Comparing the monofilament group and V-LocTM180 cohorts, average time to complete the anastomosis was similar (27.4 vs. 26.4 minutes, p = 0.73 as was the rate of urinary extravasation on cystogram (5.7 % vs. 8.6%, p = 0.65. There were no symptomatic bladder neck contractures noted at 5 months of follow-up. At 2 months, the percentage of patients using 2 or more pads per day was lower in the V-LocTM180 cohort (24% vs. 44%, p < 0.02. At 5 months, this difference was no longer evident. CONCLUSIONS: Time to complete the UVA was similar in the intervention and control groups. Rates of urine leak were also comparable

  2. Patterns-of-care and health economic analysis of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the Australian public health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basto, Marnique; Sathianathen, Niranjan; Te Marvelde, Luc; Ryan, Shane; Goad, Jeremy; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Costello, Anthony J; Moon, Daniel A; Heriot, Alexander G; Butler, Jim; Murphy, Declan G

    2016-06-01

    To compare patterns of care and peri-operative outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) with other surgical approaches, and to create an economic model to assess the viability of RARP in the public case-mix funding system. We retrospectively reviewed all radical prostatectomies (RPs) performed for localized prostate cancer in Victoria, Australia, from the Victorian Admitted Episode Dataset, a large administrative database that records all hospital inpatient episodes in Victoria. The first database, covering the period from July 2010 to April 2013 (n = 5 130), was used to compare length of hospital stay (LOS) and blood transfusion rates between surgical approaches. This was subsequently integrated into an economic model. A second database (n = 5 581) was extracted to cover the period between July 2010 and June 2013, three full financial years, to depict patterns of care and make future predictions for the 2014-2015 financial year, and to perform a hospital volume analysis. We then created an economic model to evaluate the incremental cost of RARP vs open RP (ORP) and laparoscopic RP (LRP), incorporating the cost-offset from differences in LOS and blood transfusion rate. The economic model constructs estimates of the diagnosis-related group (DRG) costs of ORP and LRP, adds the gross cost of the surgical robot (capital, consumables, maintenance and repairs), and manipulates these DRG costs to obtain a DRG cost per day, which can be used to estimate the cost-offset associated with RARP in comparison with ORP and LRP. Economic modelling was performed around a base-case scenario, assuming a 7-year robot lifespan and 124 RARPs performed per financial year. One- and two-way sensitivity analyses were performed for the four-arm da Vinci SHD, Si and Si dual surgical systems (Intuitive Surgical Ltd, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). We identified 5 581 patients who underwent RP in 20 hospitals in Victoria with an open, laparoscopic or robot-assisted surgical approach in the

  3. Perioperative Blood Transfusion as a Significant Predictor of Biochemical Recurrence and Survival after Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Prostate Cancer.

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    Jung Kwon Kim

    Full Text Available There have been conflicting reports regarding the association of perioperative blood transfusion (PBT with oncologic outcomes including recurrence rates and survival outcomes in prostate cancer. We aimed to evaluate whether perioperative blood transfusion (PBT affects biochemical recurrence-free survival (BRFS, cancer-specific survival (CSS, and overall survival (OS following radical prostatectomy (RP for patients with prostate cancer.A total of 2,713 patients who underwent RP for clinically localized prostate cancer between 1993 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. We performed a comparative analysis based on receipt of transfusion (PBT group vs. no-PBT group and transfusion type (autologous PBT vs. allogeneic PBT. Univariate and multivariate Cox-proportional hazard regression analysis were performed to evaluate variables associated with BRFS, CSS, and OS. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival estimates for BRFS, CSS, and OS, and log-rank test was used to conduct comparisons between the groups.The number of patients who received PBT was 440 (16.5%. Among these patients, 350 (79.5% received allogeneic transfusion and the other 90 (20.5% received autologous transfusion. In a multivariate analysis, allogeneic PBT was found to be statistically significant predictors of BRFS, CSS, and OS; conversely, autologous PBT was not. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly decreased 5-year BRFS (79.2% vs. 70.1%, log-rank, p = 0.001, CSS (98.5% vs. 96.7%, log-rank, p = 0.012, and OS (95.5% vs. 90.6%, log-rank, p < 0.001 in the allogeneic PBT group compared to the no-allogeneic PBT group. In the autologous PBT group, however, none of these were statistically significant compared to the no-autologous PBT group.We found that allogeneic PBT was significantly associated with decreased BRFS, CSS, and OS. This provides further support for the immunomodulation hypothesis for allogeneic PBT.

  4. Anesthesiologic Effects of Transperitoneal Versus Extraperitoneal Approach During Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Results of a Prospective Randomized Study

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    Fabrizio Dal Moro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjectives:To compare the effects of CO2 insufflation on hemodynamics and oxygen levels and on acid-base level during Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy (RARP with transperitoneal (TP versus extra-peritoneal (EP accesses.Materials and Methods:Sixty-two patients were randomly assigned to TP (32 and EP (30 to RARP. Pre-operation data were collected for all patients. Hemodynamic, respiratory and blood acid-base parameters were measured at the moment of induction of anesthesia (T0, after starting CO2 insuffation (T1, and at 60 (T2 and 120 minutes (T3 after insufflation. In all cases, the abdominal pressure was set at 15 mmHg. Complications were reported according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Student's two–t-test, with a significance level set at pResults:The demographic characteristics of the patients in both groups were statistically comparable. Analysis of intra-operative anesthesiologic parameters showed that partial CO2 pressure during EP was significantly higher than during TP, with a consequent decrease in arterial pH. Other parameters analysed were similar in the two groups. Postoperative complications were comparable between groups. The most important limitations of this study were the small size of the patient groups and the impossibility of maintaining standard abdominal pressure throughout the operational phases, despite attempts to regulate it.Conclusions:This prospective randomized study demonstrates that, from the anesthesiologic viewpoint, during RARP the TP approach is preferable to EP, because of lower CO2 reabsorption and risk of acidosis.

  5. Ex vivo MRI evaluation of prostate cancer: Localization and margin status prediction of prostate cancer in fresh radical prostatectomy specimens.

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    Heidkamp, Jan; Hoogenboom, Martijn; Kovacs, Iringo E; Veltien, Andor; Maat, Arie; Sedelaar, J P Michiel; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A; Fütterer, Jurgen J

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the ability of high field ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to localize prostate cancer (PCa) and to predict the margin status in fresh radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens using histology as the reference standard. This Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved study had written informed consent. Patients with biopsy-proved PCa and a diagnostic multiparametric 3T MRI examination of the prostate prior to undergoing RP were prospectively included. A custom-made container provided reference between the 7T ex vivo MRI obtained from fresh RP specimens and histological slicing. On ex vivo MRI, PCa was localized and the presence of positive surgical margins was determined in a double-reading session. These findings were compared with histological findings obtained from completely cut, whole-mount embedded, prostate specimens. In 12 RP specimens, histopathology revealed 36 PCa lesions, of which 17 (47%) and 20 (56%) were correlated with the ex vivo MRI in the first and second reading session, respectively. Nine of 12 (75%) index lesions were localized in the first session, in the second 10 of 12 (83%). Seven and 8 lesions of 11 lesions with Gleason score >6 and >0.5 cc were localized in the first and second session, respectively. In the first session none of the four histologically positive surgical margins (sensitivity 0%) and 9 of 13 negative margins (specificity 69%) were detected. In second session the sensitivity and specificity were 25% and 88%, respectively. Ex vivo MRI enabled accurate localization of PCa in fresh RP specimens, and the technique provided information on the margin status with high specificity. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:439-448. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Time course of recovery of erectile function after radical retropubic prostatectomy: does anyone recover after 2 years?

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    Rabbani, Farhang; Schiff, Jeffrey; Piecuch, Michael; Yunis, Luis Herran; Eastham, James A; Scardino, Peter T; Mulhall, John P

    2010-12-01

    Given the paucity of literature on the time course of recovery of erectile function (EF) after radical prostatectomy (RP), many publications have led patients and clinicians to believe that erections are unlikely to recover beyond 2 years after RP. We sought to determine the time course of recovery of EF beyond 2 years after bilateral nerve sparing (BNS) RP and to determine factors predictive of continued improved recovery beyond 2 years. EF was assessed prospectively on a 5-point scale: (i) full erections; (ii) diminished erections routinely sufficient for intercourse; (iii) partial erections occasionally satisfactory for intercourse; (iv) partial erections unsatisfactory for intercourse; and (v) no erections. From 01/1999 to 01/2007, 136 preoperatively potent (levels 1-2) men who underwent BNS RP without prior treatment and who had not recovered consistently functional erections (levels 1-2) at 24 months had further follow-up regarding EF. Median follow-up after the 2-year visit was 36.0 months. Recovery of improved erections at a later date: recovery of EF level 1-2 in those with level 3 EF at 2 years and recovery of EF level 1-3 in those with level 4-5 EF at 2 years. The actuarial rates of further improved recovery of EF to level 1-2 in those with level 3 EF at 2 years and to level 1-3 in those with level 4-5 EF at 2 years were 8%, 20%, and 23% at 3, 4, and 5 years postoperatively, and 5%, 17%, and 21% at 3, 4, and 5 years postoperatively, respectively. Younger age was predictive of greater likelihood of recovery beyond 2 years. There is continued improvement in EF beyond 2 years after BNS RP. Discussion of this prolonged time course of recovery may allow patients to have a more realistic expectation. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  7. Increased prostate cancer specific mortality following radical prostatectomy in men presenting with voiding symptoms-A whole of population study.

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    Ta, Anthony D; Papa, Nathan P; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Millar, Jeremy L; Syme, Rodney; Giles, Graham G; Bolton, Damien M

    2015-09-01

    Whole of population studies reporting long-term outcomes following radical prostatectomy (RP) are scarce. We aimed to evaluate the long-term outcomes in men with prostate cancer (PC) treated with RP in a whole of population cohort. A secondary objective was to evaluate the influence of mode of presentation on PC specific mortality (PCSM). A prospective database of all cases of RP performed in Victoria, Australia between 1995 and 2000 was established within the Victorian Cancer Registry. Specimen histopathology reports and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values were obtained by record linkage to pathology laboratories. Mode of presentation was recorded as either PSA screened (PSA testing offered in absence of voiding symptoms) or symptomatic (diagnosis of PC following presentation with voiding symptoms). Multivariate Cox and competing risk regression models were fitted to analyze all-cause mortality, biochemical recurrence, and PCSM. Between 1995 and 2000, 2,154 men underwent RP in Victoria. During median follow up of 10.2 years (range 0.26-13.5 years), 74 men died from PC. In addition to Gleason score and pathological stage, symptomatic presentation was associated with PCSM. After adjusting for stage and PSA, no difference in PCSM was found between men with Gleason score ≤ 6 and Gleason score 3 + 4 = 7. Men with Gleason score 4 + 3 had significantly greater cumulative incidence of PCSM compared with men with Gleason score 3 + 4. Primary Gleason pattern in Gleason 7 PC is an important prognosticator of survival. Our findings suggest that concomitant voiding symptoms should be considered in the work-up and treatment of PC.

  8. Pain, psychological distress and health-related quality of life at baseline and 3 months after radical prostatectomy

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    Johansson Fannie

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate management of postoperative pain is common, and postoperative pain is a risk factor for prolonged pain. In addition to medical and technical factors, psychological factors may also influence the experience of postoperative pain. Methods Pain was measured postoperatively at 24, 48, and 72 hr in hospital and after 3 months at home in 140 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP. Patients answered questionnaires about anxiety and depression (HAD scale and health-related quality of life (SF-36 at baseline and 3 months after surgery. Results In the first 3 postoperative days, mild pain was reported by 45 patients (32%, moderate pain by 64 (45%, and severe pain by 31 (22% on one or more days. High postoperative pain scores were correlated with length of hospital stay and with high pain scores at home. Forty patients (29% reported moderate (n = 35 or severe (n = 5 pain after discharge from hospital. Patients who experienced anxiety and depression preoperatively had higher postoperative pain scores and remained anxious and depressed 3 months after surgery. The scores for the physical domains in the SF-36 were decreased, while the mental health scores were increased at 3 months. Anxiety and depression were negatively correlated with all domains of the SF-36. Conclusion There is a need for nurses to be aware of the psychological status of RP patients and its impact upon patients' experience of postoperative pain and recovery. The ability to identify patients with psychological distress and to target interventions is an important goal for future research.

  9. Clinical Significance of Serum Adipokines according to Body Mass Index in Patients with Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy

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    Minyong Kang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of 7 circulating adipokines according to body mass index (BMI in Korean men with localized prostate cancer (PCa undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP. Materials and Methods: Sixty-two of 65 prospectively enrolled patients with clinically localized PCa who underwent RP between 2015 and 2016 were evaluated. Patients were classified into 2 groups according to their BMI: non-obese (<25 kg/m2 and obese (≥25 kg/m2. The adipokines evaluated were interleukin-2, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1, chemerin, C-X-C motif chemokine 10, adiponectin, leptin, and resistin. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the independent predictors of advanced tumor stage. Results: We found that obese patients with PCa who underwent RP had a higher incidence of tumors with a high Gleason score (≥8, pathological T3 (pT3 stage, and positive extraprostatic extension than patients with a normal BMI. Additionally, patients with obesity showed significantly lower serum adiponectin and higher serum leptin levels, but did not show differences in other adipokines. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that IGF-1 (odds ratio [OR]=1.03 was identified as a predictor of advanced tumor stage (≥pT3 in the overall population. However, only leptin remained an independent predictive factor for advanced tumor stage (≥pT3 (OR=1.15 in patients with obesity. Conclusions: In conclusion, our results indicate that a higher leptin level in obese men can be considered a risk factor for aggressive PCa. This prospective study provides greater insight into the role of circulating adipokines in Korean patients with PCa undergoing RP, particularly in patients with obesity.

  10. Modified risk stratification grouping using standard clinical and biopsy information for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy: Results from SEARCH.

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    Zumsteg, Zachary S; Chen, Zinan; Howard, Lauren E; Amling, Christopher L; Aronson, William J; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Kane, Christopher J; Terris, Martha K; Spratt, Daniel E; Sandler, Howard M; Freedland, Stephen J

    2017-12-01

    Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and risk stratification systems have been proposed to guide treatment decisions. However, significant heterogeneity remains for those with unfavorable-risk disease. This study included 3335 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy without adjuvant radiotherapy in the SEARCH database. High-risk patients were dichotomized into standard and very high-risk (VHR) groups based on primary Gleason pattern, percentage of positive biopsy cores (PPBC), number of NCCN high-risk factors, and stage T3b-T4 disease. Similarly, intermediate-risk prostate cancer was separated into favorable and unfavorable groups based on primary Gleason pattern, PPBC, and number of NCCN intermediate-risk factors. Median follow-up was 78 months. Patients with VHR prostate cancer had significantly worse PSA relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS, P < 0.001), distant metastasis (DM, P = 0.004), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM, P = 0.015) in comparison to standard high-risk (SHR) patients in multivariable analyses. By contrast, there was no significant difference in PSA-RFS, DM, or PCSM between SHR and unfavorable intermediate-risk (UIR) patients. Therefore, we propose a novel risk stratification system: Group 1 (low-risk), Group 2 (favorable intermediate-risk), Group 3 (UIR and SHR), and Group 4 (VHR). The c-index of this new grouping was 0.683 for PSA-RFS and 0.800 for metastases, compared to NCCN-risk groups which yield 0.666 for PSA-RFS and 0.764 for metastases. Patients classified as VHR have markedly increased rates of PSA relapse, DM, and PCSM in comparison to SHR patients, whereas UIR and SHR patients have similar prognosis. Novel therapeutic strategies are needed for patients with VHR, likely involving multimodality therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The impact of bladder neck sparing on urinary continence during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy; Results from a high volume centre

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    Ali Serdar Gozen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effects of bladder neck reconstruction techniques on early continence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP. Materials and methods: This non-randomized retrospective study analyzed prospectively collected data concerning LRP. In total, 3107 patients underwent LRP between March 1999 and December 2016. Exclusion criteria were preoperative urinary incontinence, previous history of external beam radiotherapy, co-morbities which may affect urinary continence such as diabetes mellitus and/or neurogenic disorders, irregular followup, and follow-up shorter than 24 months. All patients were divided into one of three groups, posterior reconstruction being performed in Group 1 (n = 112, anterior reconstruction in Group 2 (n = 762, and bladder neck sparing (BNS in Group 3 (n = 987. Demographic and pre-, peri-, and postoperative data were collected. Multivariate analyses were performed to determine factors affecting early continence after LRP. Results: 1861 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean follow-up period was 48.12 ± 29.8 months, and subjects’ mean age was 63.6 ± 6.2 years. There was no significant difference among the groups in terms of demographic or preoperative data. Postoperative data, including oncological outcomes, were similar among the groups. The level of early continence was higher in Group 3 than in the other groups (p < 0.001. Multivariate analyses identified BNS and age as parameters significantly affecting early continence levels after LRP (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively. Bladder neck reconstruction provided less earlier continence than BNS.

  12. The risk of urinary retention following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and its impact on early continence outcomes.

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    Alnazari, Mansour; Zanaty, Marc; Ajib, Khaled; El-Hakim, Assaad; Zorn, Kevin C

    2017-12-22

    We aimed to evaluate the risk factors of acute urinary retention (AUR) following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), as well as the relationship of AUR with early continence outcomes. The records of 740 consecutive patients who underwent RARP by two experienced surgeons at our institution were retrospectively reviewed from a prospectively collected database. Multiple factors, including age, body mass index (BMI), international prostate symptom score (IPSS), prostate volume, presence of median lobe, nerve preservation status, anastomosis time, and catheter removal time (Day 4 vs. 7), were evaluated as risk factors for AUR using univariate and multivariate analysis. The relation between AUR and early return of continence (one and three months) post-RARP was also evaluated. The incidence of clinically significant vesico-urethral anastomotic (VUA) leak and AUR following catheter removal were 0.9% and 2.2% (17/740), respectively. In men who developed AUR, there was no significant relationship with regards to age, BMI, IPSS, prostatic volume, median lobe, nerve preservation, or anastomosis time; however, the incidence of AUR was significantly higher for men with catheter removal at Day 4 (4.5% [16/351]) vs. Day 7 (0.2% [1/389]) (p=0.004). Moreover, patients with early removal of the catheter (Day 4) who developed AUR had an earlier one-month return of 0-pad continence 87.5% (14/16) compared to patients without AUR 45.6% (153/335), with no significant difference at three months. While AUR is an uncommon complication of RARP, its incidence is much higher than VUA leakage. Further, it is often not well-discussed during patient counselling preoperatively. Moreover, earlier return of urinary continence was observed in patients experiencing AUR following RARP exclusively with catheter removal at Day 4. Future studies are warranted to validate the long-term impact of AUR on continence outcomes.

  13. Recovery of Urinary Function after Radical Prostatectomy: Predictors of Urinary Function on Preoperative Prostate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    von Bodman, Christian; Matsushita, Kazuhito; Savage, Caroline; Matikainen, Mika P.; Eastham, James A.; Scardino, Peter T.; Rabbani, Farhang; Akin, Oguz; Sandhu, Jaspreet S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine if pelvic soft tissue and bony dimensions on endorectal MRI influence recovery of continence after radical prostatectomy (RP) and whether adding significant MRI variables to a statistical model improves prediction of continence recovery. Materials and Methods Between 2001 and 2004, 967 men undergoing RP had preoperative MRI. Soft tissue and bony dimensions were retrospectively measured by two raters blinded to clinical and pathological data. Patients who received neoadjuvant therapy, were preoperatively incontinent, or had missing followup for continence were excluded, leaving 600 patients eligible for analysis. No pad usage defined continent. Logistic regression was used to identify variables associated with continence recovery at 6 and 12 months. We evaluated whether predictive accuracy of a base model improved by adding independently significant MRI variables. Results Urethral length and urethral volume were both significantly associated with recovery of continence at 6 and 12 months. Larger inner and outer levator distances were significantly associated with a decreased probability of regaining continence at either 6 or 12 months; they did not reach statistical significance for the other time point. Addition of these four MRI variables to a base model including age, clinical stage, PSA and comorbidities marginally improved the discrimination (12 months AUC improved from 0.587 to 0.634). Conclusions Membranous urethral length, urethral volume and an anatomically close relation between the levator muscle and membranous urethra on preoperative MRI are independent predictors of continence recovery after RP. Addition of MRI variables to a base model improved the predictive accuracy for continence recovery but predictive accuracy remains low. PMID:22264458

  14. Clinical role of pathological downgrading after radical prostatectomy in patients with biopsy confirmed Gleason score 3 + 4 prostate cancer.

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    Gondo, Tatsuo; Poon, Bing Ying; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Bernstein, Melanie; Sjoberg, Daniel D; Eastham, James A

    2015-01-01

    To identify preoperative factors predicting Gleason score downgrading after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with biopsy Gleason score 3+4 prostate cancer and to determine if prediction of downgrading can identify potential candidates for active surveillance (AS). We identified 1317 patients with biopsy Gleason score 3+4 prostate cancers who underwent RP at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 2005 and 2013. Several preoperative and biopsy characteristics were evaluated by forward selection regression, and selected predictors of downgrading were analysed by multivariable logistic regression. Decision curve analysis was used to evaluate the clinical utility of the multivariate model. Gleason score was downgraded after RP in 115 patients (9%). We developed a multivariable model using age, prostate-specific antigen density, percentage of positive cores with Gleason pattern 4 cancer out of all cores taken, and maximum percentage of cancer involvement within a positive core with Gleason pattern 4 cancer. The area under the curve for this model was 0.75 after 10-fold cross validation. However, decision curve analysis revealed that the model was not clinically helpful in identifying patients who will downgrade at RP for the purpose of reassigning them to AS. While patients with pathological Gleason score 3 + 3 with tertiary Gleason pattern ≤4 at RP in patients with biopsy Gleason score 3 + 4 prostate cancer may be potential candidates for AS, decision curve analysis showed limited utility of our model to identify such men. Future study is needed to identify new predictors to help identify potential candidates for AS among patients with biopsy confirmed Gleason score 3 + 4 prostate cancer. © 2014 The Authors. BJU International © 2014 BJU International.

  15. Can pelvic node dissection at radical prostatectomy influence the nodal recurrence at salvage lymphadenectomy for prostate cancer?

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    Arjun Sivaraman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To verify the quality of pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND performed at radical prostatectomy (RP and its impact on nodal recurrence in patients undergoing salvage lymph node dissection (sLND. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of 48 patients who underwent sLND for presumed nodal recurrence, to describe the PLND characteristics at RP and correlate the anatomical sites and number of suspicious nodes reported in radiological imaging and final pathology of sLND. Results: Overall, at RP, 8 (16.7% did not undergo PLND, 32 (66.7% and 8 (16.7% received a “limited” (between external iliac vein and obturator nerve and an “extended” (external iliac, hypogastric, and obturator dissection, respectively. Median nodes removed during limited and extended dissection were 2 and 24, respectively. At sLND, the mean age was 61.3 years and median prostate specific antigen (PSA was 1.07 ng/mL. Median nodes removed at sLND were 17 with a median of 2 positive nodes. Recurrent nodes were identified within the template of an extended PLND in 62.5%, 50.0% and 12.5% patients, respectively, following prior no, limited and extended dissection at RP. Recurrence outside the expected lymphatic drainage pathway was noted in 37.5% patients with prior extended dissection at RP. There was a correlation between imaging and pathology specimen in 83% for node location and 58.3% for number of anatomical sites involved. Conclusions: In prostate cancer patients undergoing sLND, most had inadequate PLND at the original RP. Pattern of nodal recurrence may be influenced by the prior dissection and pre sLND imaging appears to underestimate the nodal recurrence.

  16. Can pelvic node dissection at radical prostatectomy influence the nodal recurrence at salvage lymphadenectomy for prostate cancer?

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    Sivaraman, Arjun; Benfante, Nicole; Touijer, Karim; Coleman, Jonathan; Scardino, Peter; Laudone, Vincent; Eastham, James

    2018-03-01

    To verify the quality of pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) performed at radical prostatectomy (RP) and its impact on nodal recurrence in patients undergoing salvage lymph node dissection (sLND). Retrospective review of 48 patients who underwent sLND for presumed nodal recurrence, to describe the PLND characteristics at RP and correlate the anatomical sites and number of suspicious nodes reported in radiological imaging and final pathology of sLND. Overall, at RP, 8 (16.7%) did not undergo PLND, 32 (66.7%) and 8 (16.7%) received a "limited" (between external iliac vein and obturator nerve) and an "extended" (external iliac, hypogastric, and obturator) dissection, respectively. Median nodes removed during limited and extended dissection were 2 and 24, respectively. At sLND, the mean age was 61.3 years and median prostate specific antigen (PSA) was 1.07 ng/mL. Median nodes removed at sLND were 17 with a median of 2 positive nodes. Recurrent nodes were identified within the template of an extended PLND in 62.5%, 50.0% and 12.5% patients, respectively, following prior no, limited and extended dissection at RP. Recurrence outside the expected lymphatic drainage pathway was noted in 37.5% patients with prior extended dissection at RP. There was a correlation between imaging and pathology specimen in 83% for node location and 58.3% for number of anatomical sites involved. In prostate cancer patients undergoing sLND, most had inadequate PLND at the original RP. Pattern of nodal recurrence may be influenced by the prior dissection and pre sLND imaging appears to underestimate the nodal recurrence.

  17. Analysis of risk factors of involvement of seminal vesicles in patients with prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy

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    Marcos F. Dall'Oglio

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine through preoperative serum PSA level, Gleason score on biopsy and percentage of fragments affected by tumor on biopsy, the probability of involvement of the seminal vesicles. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During the period between March 1991 to December 2002, we selected 899 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for treatment of localized prostate adenocarcinoma. The analyzed preoperative variables were PSA, percentage of positive fragments and Gleason score on the biopsy. Pre-operative PSA was divided in scales from 0 to 4.0 ng/mL, 4.1 to 10 ng/mL, 10.1 to 20 ng/mL and > 20 ng/mL, Gleason score was categorized in scales from 2 to 6. 7 and 8 to 10, and the percentage of affected fragments was divided in 0 to 25%, 25.1% to 50%, 50.1% to 75%, and 75.1% to 100%. All these variables were correlated with the involvement of seminal vesicles in the surgical specimen. RESULTS: Of the 899 patients under study, approximately 11% (95% CI, [9% - 13%] had involvement of seminal vesicles. On the multivariate analysis, when PSA was < 4, the Gleason score was 2 to 6, and less than 25% of fragments were involved on the biopsy, only 3.6%, 7.6% and 6.2% of patients respectively, had involvement of seminal vesicles. On the multivariate analysis, we observed that PSA, Gleason score and the percentage of involved fragments were independent prognostic factors for invasion of seminal vesicles. CONCLUSION: The preoperative variables used in the present study allow the identification of men with minimal risk (lower than 5% if involvement of seminal vesicles.

  18. Can Single Positive Core Prostate Cancer at biopsy be Considered a Low-Risk Disease after Radical Prostatectomy?

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    Ricardo Kupka da Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Single positive core in a prostate biopsy is usually associated with indolent prostate cancer (PCa and is one of the active surveillance (AS inclusion criteria. We investigated whether single positive core PCa at biopsy could define an archetype of low-risk disease. Materials and Methods A total of 1320 consecutive patients were enrolled. Among them, 249 patients with single positive core PCa were followed up, and the clinical and pathological parameters influencing prognosis were analyzed. Results Out of the 249 patients, 172 (69.0% had pathological findings ≥ pT2c and 87 (34.9% had an undergraded Gleason Score (GS based on the biopsy. Positive surgical margins (PSMs, extraprostatic extension (EPE and seminal vesicle invasion (SVI were found in 20.8%, 10.0% and 6.0% of patients, respectively. In a comparative analysis, we found that the PSA level, prostate weight and number of cores at biopsy are essential to correctly predict an indolent PCa. A total of 125 patients (67.3% with nonpalpable tumors became high-risk tumors (pT2c-T3. Analyzing only nonpalpable tumors with a GS of 6 at biopsy (156 patients, we noted that 106 (67.9% of cT1 progressed from cT1c to pT2c-pT3. Conclusions Single core PCa have clinically significant disease in the Radical Prostatectomy specimens, with considerable rates of overgrading for the GS, pT2c-pT3, PSMs, EPE and SVI. The treatment plan must be evaluated individually for patients with single core PCa and must take into account other prognostic factors when determining whether a patient should be managed with AS.

  19. Influence of radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer on work status and working life 3 years after surgery.

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    Dahl, Sigrun; Loge, Jon Håvard; Berge, Viktor; Dahl, Alv Andreas; Cvancarova, Milada; Fosså, Sophie Dorothea

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to study the influence of radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer on work status and working life in men 3 years after surgery. In a prospective, questionnaire-based study on adverse effects after RP, 330 prostate cancer (PCa) patients who had been active in the workforce before RP described their work status 3 years after having surgery. We dichotomized their postoperative work status into "unchanged or increased" versus "reduced." The participants also reported whether their working life was influenced by the PCa trajectory to no, some, or a great extent. Univariate and multiple logistic regression models were established with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics as independent variables and "work status" or "influence of PCa trajectory on working life" as dependent variables. Twenty-five percent of the participants had retired. Of the remaining participants, approximately 20 % had a reduced work status, which in the multivariate analyses was significantly associated with increasing age. One third of the men still active in the workforce considered the PCa to negatively influence their working life. This was independently associated with bother related to urinary leakage, fatigue, and having undergone additional oncological therapy (pelvic radiotherapy and/or hormone treatment). Though RP does not affect work status in most men, approximately one third of them experience problems in their working life due to adverse effects related to RP and/or additional post-RP anti-cancer therapy. Most PCa survivors can expect to remain in the workforce for at least 3 years after RP, but for some, persistent adverse effects after RP and /or additional anti-cancer treatment negatively affect their working life. Pre-RP counseling of men within the workforce should cover possible post-RP changes concerning work status and working life.

  20. Utilizing Machine Learning and Automated Performance Metrics to Evaluate Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Performance and Predict Outcomes.

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    Hung, Andrew J; Chen, Jian; Che, Zhengping; Nilanon, Tanachat; Jarc, Anthony; Titus, Micha; Oh, Paul J; Gill, Inderbir S; Liu, Yan

    2018-05-01

    Surgical performance is critical for clinical outcomes. We present a novel machine learning (ML) method of processing automated performance metrics (APMs) to evaluate surgical performance and predict clinical outcomes after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). We trained three ML algorithms utilizing APMs directly from robot system data (training material) and hospital length of stay (LOS; training label) (≤2 days and >2 days) from 78 RARP cases, and selected the algorithm with the best performance. The selected algorithm categorized the cases as "Predicted as expected LOS (pExp-LOS)" and "Predicted as extended LOS (pExt-LOS)." We compared postoperative outcomes of the two groups (Kruskal-Wallis/Fisher's exact tests). The algorithm then predicted individual clinical outcomes, which we compared with actual outcomes (Spearman's correlation/Fisher's exact tests). Finally, we identified five most relevant APMs adopted by the algorithm during predicting. The "Random Forest-50" (RF-50) algorithm had the best performance, reaching 87.2% accuracy in predicting LOS (73 cases as "pExp-LOS" and 5 cases as "pExt-LOS"). The "pExp-LOS" cases outperformed the "pExt-LOS" cases in surgery time (3.7 hours vs 4.6 hours, p = 0.007), LOS (2 days vs 4 days, p = 0.02), and Foley duration (9 days vs 14 days, p = 0.02). Patient outcomes predicted by the algorithm had significant association with the "ground truth" in surgery time (p algorithm in predicting, were largely related to camera manipulation. To our knowledge, ours is the first study to show that APMs and ML algorithms may help assess surgical RARP performance and predict clinical outcomes. With further accrual of clinical data (oncologic and functional data), this process will become increasingly relevant and valuable in surgical assessment and training.

  1. Detection of urinary leakage after radical retropubic prostatectomy by contrast enhanced ultrasound - do we still need conventional retrograde cystography?

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    Schoeppler, Gita M; Buchner, Alexander; Zaak, Dirk; Khoder, Wael; Staehler, Michael; Stief, Christian G; Reiser, Maximilian F; Clevert, Dirk-Andre

    2010-12-01

    To prospectively evaluate the accuracy of transvesical contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) as an alternative method for the detection of anastomotic leakage after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) in comparison with the current standard method of conventional retrograde cystography (CG). Forty-three patients underwent RRP for histologically proven localized prostate cancer. The vesico-urethral anastomosis was evaluated 8 days after RRP by CG and CEUS. Any peri-anastomotic leakage was assessed and determined in CG and CEUS as follows: no extravasation (EV), small leakage (≤0.5 cm), moderate leakage (>0.5 cm to ≤2 cm), large leakage (>2 cm diameter of EV seen). In total, 21 (49%) patients showed a watertight anastomosis. Ten (23%), two (4.7%) and ten (23%) patients showed a small, intermediate and large EV, respectively. In 31 cases (72%) there was 100% agreement of CG and CEUS for detection of no, moderate and large EV, respectively. In nine cases a small and in two cases a moderate EV was categorized as watertight anastomosis by CEUS. Only in one case did CG detect a small EV where a large EV was detected in CEUS. The agreement between both methods was 95% for detecting absence or large leakages. CEUS is a promising imaging modality that seems to be equivalent to CG for detecting the presence of a large anastomotic leakage that is clinically relevant for postoperative persistence of the indwelling catheter. CEUS could be a cheap and time-saving alternative to the CG without exposure of the patient to radiation. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  2. Radical prostatectomy vs high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Health-related quality-of-life effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Yoshimasa; Fujisawa, Masato

    2004-01-01

    A screening comparison was made of health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes between two primary treatment modalities for localized prostate cancer: radical prostatectomy (RP) and iridium-192 (Ir-192) high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The subjects were 182 patients diagnosed with T1c to T3bN0M0 prostate cancer between October 1997 through August 2002 who underwent RP (n=89) or HDR-BT with 36.8 Gy of EBRT (n=93) and follow-up for at least 6 months. A postal survey was sent, in which HRQOL was assessed using the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and disease-specific QOL using the University of California Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI). We obtained responses to questionnaires from 151 out of 182 patients (83.0%; RP, 78.7%, HDR-BT, 87.1%). No significant difference was observed in SF-36 scale scores between RP and HDR-BT. In the UCLA-PCI, the HDR-BT group had better urinary function (UF, p<0.001) and sexual function (SF, p=0.0272), whereas the RP group had better bowel bother (BB, p=0.0425). In patients with at least 2 years of follow-up, UF (p<0.001) and sexual bother (SB, p=0.0286) were better for the HDR-BT group than for the RP group. HDR-BT patients had significantly better UF (p=0.009) and SB (p=0.0134) than even patients with uni-lateral nerve-sparing RP (n=30). When planning treatment, QOL concerns including mental health issues associated with prostate cancer need to be addressed with the patients, as well as the potential side effects. (author)

  3. Health related quality of life in Japanese men after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namiki, Shunichi

    2004-01-01

    We performed a retrospective survey of general and disease specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiotherapy (XRT) in Japanese men. A total of 186 patients underwent RP and 78 underwent XRT for clinically localized prostate cancer between 2000 and 2002. We measured the general and disease specific HRQOL with the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Health Survey and the University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index, respectively. Each treatment group was further divided into four subgroups according to the time scale. Patients from the RP group were significantly younger than those from the XRT group. The tumor characteristics differed significantly in their distributions among the treatment groups. Patients undergoing XRT had low scores in most of the general measures of HRQOL just after treatment, but after 6 months there were no differences between the treatment groups, except for the physical domains. The RP group was associated with worse urinary function, whereas the XRT group had worse bowel function and bother during the first 6 months after treatment. Thereafter, however, urinary and bowel domain did not differ between the groups. Both groups reported poor sexual function, although the RP group scored lower sexual bother. The patients who underwent RP had significantly worse urinary and better bowel function than those treated with XRT. Both treatment groups had decrements in sexual function throughout the post-treatment period; careful attention should be paid to this side-effect in preoperative counselling, especially in younger patients, regardless of the primary treatments. (author)

  4. Disseminated Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer Patients after Radical Prostatectomy and without Evidence of Disease Predicts Biochemical Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Todd M.; Lange, Paul H.; Porter, Michael P.; Lin, Daniel W.; Ellis, William J.; Gallaher, Ian S.; Vessella, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Men with apparently localized prostate cancer often relapse years after radical prostatectomy (RP). We sought to determine if epithelial-like cells identified from bone marrow (BM) in patients after RP (commonly called disseminated tumor cells, DTC) were associated with biochemical recurrence (BR). Experimental Design We obtained BM aspirates from 569 men prior to RP and from 34 healthy men with PSA<2.5 ng/ml to establish a comparison group. Additionally, an analytic cohort consisting of 98 patients after RP with no evidence of disease (NED) was established to evaluate the relationship between DTC and BR. Epithelial cells in the BM were detected by magnetic bead enrichment with antibodies to CD45 and CD61 (negative selection) followed by antibodies to human epithelial antigen (positive selection) and confirmation with FITC-labeled anti-BerEP4 antibody. Results DTC were present in 72% (408/569) of patients prior to RP. There was no correlation with pathologic stage, Gleason grade, or pre-operative PSA. Three of 34 controls (8.8%) had DTC present. In patients NED post-RP, DTC were present in 56/98 (57%). DTC were detected in 12/14 (86%) NED patients post-RP who subsequently suffered BR. Presence of DTC in NED patients was an independent predictor of recurrence (HR 6.9, CI 1.03–45.9). Conclusions Approximately 70% of men undergoing RP had DTC detected in their BM prior to surgery, suggesting that these cells escape early in the disease. Though pre-operative DTC status does not correlate with pathologic risk factors, persistence of DTC after RP in NED patients was an independent predictor of recurrence. PMID:19147774

  5. Men's Experience with Penile Rehabilitation Following Radical Prostatectomy: A Qualitative Study with the Goal of Informing a Therapeutic Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christian J.; Lacey, Stephanie; Kenowitz, Joslyn; Pessin, Hayley; Shuk, Elyse; Mulhall, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Erectile rehabilitation (ER) following radical prostatectomy (RP) is considered an essential component to help men regain erectile functioning; however many men have difficulty adhering to this type of a program. This qualitative study explored men's experience with ER, erectile dysfunction (ED), and ED treatments to inform a psychological intervention designed to help men adhere to ER post-RP. Methods Thirty men, one to three years post-RP, who took part in an ER program, participated in one of four focus groups. Thematic analysis was used to identify the primary themes. Results Average age was 59 (SD=7); mean time since surgery was 26 months (SD=6). Six primary themes emerged: 1) frustration with the lack of information about post-surgery ED; 2) negative emotional impact of ED and avoidance of sexual situations; 3) negative emotional experience with penile injections and barriers leading to avoidance; 4) the benefit of focusing on the long-term advantage of ER versus short-term anxiety; 5) using humor to help cope; and 6) the benefit of support from partners and peers. Conclusions Men's frustration surrounding ED can lead to avoidance of sexual situations and ED treatments, which negatively impact men's adherence to an ER program. The theoretical construct of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) was used to place the themes into a framework to conceptualize the mechanisms underlying both avoidance and adherence in this population. As such, ACT has the potential to serve as a conceptual underpinning of a psychological intervention to help men reduce avoidance to penile injections and adhere to an ER program. PMID:25707812

  6. Impact of tamsulosin on urinary retention following early catheter removal after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Gab; You, Dalsan; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Hong, Sungwoo; Lim, Ju Hyun; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Choo, Myung-Soo; Ahn, Hanjong; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2014-02-01

    To examine the impact of tamsulosin on the rate of acute urinary retention following early catheter removal after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. A total of 236 patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer carried out by a single surgeon were enrolled in this randomized study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: treatment with tamsulosin (0.4 mg) from 1 day before to 14 days after surgery (tamsulosin group), or no tamsulosin treatment (control group). The urethral catheter was removed on the fifth postoperative day. The primary end-point was the acute urinary retention rate. Changes in each domain of the International Continence Society male short-form questionnaire and uroflowmetry parameters were secondary end-points. The primary end-point was assessed in 218 patients (92.4%; n = 109 in each group). It was not assessed in 18 patients because of cystographic leak from the vesicourethral anastomosis. The acute urinary retention rate was lower in the tamsulosin group (7.3%) than in the control group (17.4%, P = 0.018). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified tamsulosin treatment and the operative experience of the surgeon as independent risk factors for acute urinary retention. Tamsulosin-treated patients had a 0.30-fold lower risk of developing acute urinary retention compared with control patients (95% confidence interval 0.12-0.76; P = 0.011). None of the International Continence Society male questionnaire domain scores showed significant changes between the groups. Perioperative treatment with tamsulosin in patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy reduces the rate of acute urinary retention after early catheter removal, without aggravating urinary incontinence. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. Pelvic lymph node dissection during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: efficacy, limitations, and complications-a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploussard, Guillaume; Briganti, Alberto; de la Taille, Alexandre; Haese, Alexander; Heidenreich, Axel; Menon, Mani; Sulser, Tullio; Tewari, Ashutosh K; Eastham, James A

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) in prostate cancer is the most effective method for detecting lymph node metastases. However, a decline in the rate of PLND during radical prostatectomy (RP) has been noted. This is likely the result of prostate cancer stage migration in the prostate-specific antigen-screening era, and the introduction of minimally invasive approaches such as robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). To assess the efficacy, limitations, and complications of PLND during RARP. A review of the literature was performed using the Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science databases with no restriction of language from January 1990 to December 2012. The literature search used the following terms: prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy, robot-assisted, and lymph node dissection. The median value of nodal yield at PLND during RARP ranged from 3 to 24 nodes. As seen in open and laparoscopic RP series, the lymph node positivity rate increased with the extent of dissection during RARP. Overall, PLND-only related complications are rare. The most frequent complication after PLND is symptomatic pelvic lymphocele, with occurrence ranging from 0% to 8% of cases. The rate of PLND-associated grade 3-4 complications ranged from 0% to 5%. PLND is associated with increased operative time. Available data suggest equivalence of PLND between RARP and other surgical approaches in terms of nodal yield, node positivity, and intraoperative and postoperative complications. PLND during RARP can be performed effectively and safely. The overall number of nodes removed, the likelihood of node positivity, and the types and rates of complications of PLND are similar to pure laparoscopic and open retropubic procedures. Copyright © 2013 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative sensitivities of functional MRI sequences in detection of local recurrence of prostate carcinoma after radical prostatectomy or external-beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Catherine; Foudi, Fatah; Charton, Jeanne; Jung, Michel; Lang, Hervé; Saussine, Christian; Jacqmin, Didier

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the respective accuracies of three types of functional MRI sequences-diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, and 3D (1)H-MR spectroscopy (MRS)-in the depiction of local prostate cancer recurrence after two different initial therapy options. From a cohort of 83 patients with suspicion of local recurrence based on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics who were imaged on a 3-T MRI unit using an identical protocol including the three functional sequences with an endorectal coil, we selected 60 patients (group A, 28 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy; group B, 32 patients who underwent external-beam radiation) who had local recurrence ascertained on the basis of a transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy results and a reduction in PSA level after salvage therapy. All patients presented with a local relapse. Sensitivity with T2-weighted MRI and 3D (1)H-MRS sequences was 57% and 53%, respectively, for group A and 71% and 78%, respectively, for group B. DCE-MRI alone showed a sensitivity of 100% and 96%, respectively, for groups A and B. DWI alone had a higher sensitivity for group B (96%) than for group A (71%). The combination of T2-weighted imaging plus DWI plus DCE-MRI provided a sensitivity as high as 100% in group B. The performance of functional imaging sequences for detecting recurrence is different after radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy. DCE-MRI is a valid and efficient tool to detect prostate cancer recurrence in radical prostatectomy as well as in external-beam radiotherapy. The combination of DCE-MRI and DWI is highly efficient after radiation therapy. Three-dimensional (1)H-MRS needs to be improved. Even though it is not accurate enough, T2-weighted imaging remains essential for the morphologic analysis of the area.

  9. Transumbilical laparoendoscopic single-site radical prostatectomy and cystectomy with the aid of a transurethral port: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jian; Zhu, Qingyi; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Qingling; Wei, Yunfei

    2018-01-01

    To describe the surgical technique and report early outcomes of transurethral assisted laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) radical prostatectomy (RP) and LESS radical cystectomy (RC) in a single institution. Between December 2014 and March 2016, a total of 114 LESS RPs and RCs were performed, comprising 68 LESS RPs, 38 LESS RCs with cutaneous ureterostomy (CU) and eight LESS RCs with orthotopic ileal neobladder (OIN). Access was achieved via a single-port, with four channels placed through a transumblical incision. After the apex of prostate was separated from the urethra, a self-developed port ('Zhu's port') was inserted through the urethra to facilitate resection of prostate and urethrovesical anastomosis. The peri-operative and postoperative data were collected and analysed retrospectively. Patients were followed up postoperatively for evidence of long-term side effects. All the procedures were completed successfully. No conversion to conventional laparoscopic surgery was necessary. For LESS RP, the average operating time was 152 min. Estimated blood loss was 117 mL. The mean hospital stay was 16.4 days after surgery. For LESS RC with CU and LESS RC with OIN, the mean operating times were 215 and 328 min, mean estimated blood loss was 175 and 252 mL, and mean hospital stay was 9.4 and 18.2 days, respectively. Six patients required blood transfusion (5.26%). Intra-operative complications occurred in two patients (1.75%), and postoperative complications in nine (7.89%). Fourteen out of 68 (20.6%) patients who underwent LESS RP had positive surgical margins. Follow-up ranged from 10 to 30.6 months. In the prostate cancer cases, good urinary control was observed in 35.3%, 97.1% and 100% of patients at 1, 6 and 12 months after the operation, respectively, while biochemical recurrence was observed in 11.8% patients. In the bladder cancer cases, two patients had local recurrence and two patients had distant metastasis. Our results showed that LESS RP and LESS RC

  10. Radical prostatectomy and postoperative irradiation in patients with pathological stage C (T3) carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovich, Zbigniew; Lieskovsky, Gary; Langholz, Bryan; Formenti, Silvia; Baert, Luc; Streeter, Oscar; Skinner, Donald G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Adenocarcinoma of the prostate is the most common human cancer of internal organs. Radical surgery is regarded by many to be the treatment of choice for capsule confined disease. Since accurate preoperative assessment of tumor stage is difficult to define, many patients are subsequently found to have pathological stage C (T3) disease. These patients should be considered for adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A group of 201 PS C (T3) unselected patients, treated with radical prostatectomy and limited pelvic lymphadenectomy, received postoperative irradiation to the prostate bed. This radiotherapy was given between 42-90 days after surgery and consisted of a median dose of 48 Gy. Patient survival, disease free survival, time to clinical and chemical relapse and the incidence of local and systemic relapse were analyzed. The influence of multiple parameters on the treatment outcome including patient age, treatment period, clinical stage, pathological stage, Gleason's score, prostate specific antigen (PSA), radiotherapy techniques and radiation dose were examined using univariate and multivariate analysis. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 15 years, with a median of 5 years. Results: The overall 5- and 10-year actuarial survival was 92% and 83% (median > 10 years), respectively and the 5- and 10-year disease-free survival (clinical and PSA) was 67% and 53% (median > 10 years), respectively. A total of 61 (30%) patients had a recurrence, including 23 (11%) patients who had clinical and 38 (19%) who had PSA recurrence. Of the 23 patients with clinical recurrence, 10 (5%) had local recurrence, including two patients who had local and systemic recurrence. Pathological stage and Gleason's score were independently predictive of recurrence (each with p 25 ng/ml) was also an important independent factor predicting tumor recurrence, p = 0.05. All other investigated parameters were not significant in predicting tumor recurrence. This treatment program was very well

  11. Health-related quality-of-life effects of radical prostatectomy and primary radiotherapy for screen-detected or clinically diagnosed localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madalinska, J B; Essink-Bot, M L; de Koning, H J; Kirkels, W J; van der Maas, P J; Schröder, F H

    2001-03-15

    The current study was undertaken within the framework of a screening trial to compare the health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes of two primary treatment modalities for localized prostate cancer: radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy. We conducted a prospective longitudinal cohort study among 278 patients with early screen-detected (59%) or clinically diagnosed (41%) prostate cancer using both generic and disease-specific HRQOL measures (SF-36, UCLA Prostate Cancer Index [urinary and bowel modules] and items relating to sexual functioning) at three points in time: t1 (baseline), t2 (6 months later), and t3 (12 months after t1). Questionnaires were completed by 88% to 93% of all initially enrolled patients. Patients referred for primary radiotherapy were significantly older than prostatectomy patients (63 v 68 years, P screen-detected and clinically diagnosed cancer reported similar posttreatment HRQOL. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy differed in the type of HRQOL impairment. Because the HRQOL effects may be valued differently at the individual level, patients should be made fully aware of the potential benefits and adverse consequences of therapies for early prostate cancer. Differences in posttreatment HRQOL were not related to the method of cancer detection.

  12. Pathological differences in radical prostatectomy specimens between low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. Indications for permanent seed implantation monotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Naotaka; Monji, Keisuke; Yuuki, Kohei; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Iguchi, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    To clarify the indications for permanent seed implantation monotherapy in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, pathological differences in radical prostatectomy specimens between low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were assessed. Fifty-three cases in the low-risk group and 96 cases in the intermediate-risk group had their radical prostatectomy specimens pathologically evaluated between April 2000 and January 2009. Patients with radical prostatectomy specimens of pT2 and Gleason score ≤3+4 were defined as the favorable group, while those with ≥pT3a and/or Gleason score ≥4+3 were defined as the unfavorable group. The favorable group was made up of 67.9%, 81.2%, 73.9%, 73.3%, 23.5% and 24.0% low-risk group cases, ≤T2a, GS 3+3 and 10< prostatic specific antigen (PSA)≤20 ng/ml cases, ≤T2a, GS 3+4 and PSA ≤10 ng/ml cases, ≤T2a, GS 3+4 and 10< PSA≤20 ng/ml cases, ≤T2a, GS 4+3 and PSA ≤20 ng/ml cases and T2b, GS ≤4+3 and PSA ≤20 ng/ml cases, respectively. The rate of unfavorable group in cases with ≤T2a, GS 4+3 and PSA ≤20 ng/ml, and cases with T2b, GS ≤4+3 and PSA ≤20 ng/ml was statistically higher than that in the low-risk group. Accordingly, cancer volume in cases with T2b, GS ≤4+3 and PSA ≤ 20 ng/ml was statistically larger than that in the low-risk group. Cancer volume in intermediate-risk groups other than ≤T2a, GS 3+4 and PSA ≤10 ng/ml tended to be larger than that in the low-risk group. As for radical prostatectomy specimens, the pathological findings of cases with ≤T2a, GS 3+4 and PSA ≤10 ng/ml were similar to those of cases in the low-risk group. The outcome for permanent seed implantation monotherapy with a conventional dose in cases with ≤T2a, GS 3+4 and PSA ≤10 ng/ml may be similar to that of cases in the low-risk group from a pathological aspect. (author)

  13. Pathological and 3 Tesla Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predictors of Biochemical Recurrence after Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Correlation with Whole Mount Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Nelly; Shen, Luyao; Khoshnoodi, Pooria; Alcalá, Héctor E; Yu, Weixia; Hsu, William; Reiter, Robert E; Lu, David Y; Raman, Steven S

    2018-05-01

    We sought to identify the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging variables predictive of biochemical recurrence after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy in patients who underwent multiparametric 3 Tesla prostate magnetic resonance imaging. We performed an institutional review board approved, HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) compliant, single arm observational study of 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging prior to robotic assisted radical prostatectomy from December 2009 to March 2016. Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging and pathological information, and clinical outcomes were compiled. Biochemical recurrence was defined as prostate specific antigen 0.2 ng/cc or greater. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was performed. Biochemical recurrence had developed in 62 of the 255 men (24.3%) included in the study at a median followup of 23.5 months. Compared to the subcohort without biochemical recurrence the subcohort with biochemical recurrence had a greater proportion of patients with a high grade biopsy Gleason score, higher preoperative prostate specific antigen (7.4 vs 5.6 ng/ml), intermediate and high D'Amico classifications, larger tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (0.66 vs 0.30 ml), higher PI-RADS® (Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System) version 2 category lesions, a greater proportion of intermediate and high grade radical prostatectomy Gleason score lesions, higher pathological T3 stage (all p <0.01) and a higher positive surgical margin rate (19.3% vs 7.8%, p = 0.016). On multivariable analysis only tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (adjusted OR 1.57, p = 0.016), pathological T stage (adjusted OR 2.26, p = 0.02), positive surgical margin (adjusted OR 5.0, p = 0.004) and radical prostatectomy Gleason score (adjusted OR 2.29, p = 0.004) predicted biochemical recurrence. In this cohort tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging and pathological variables, including Gleason score

  14. Larger Maximum Tumor Diameter at Radical Prostatectomy Is Associated With Increased Biochemical Failure, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer After Salvage Radiation for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Skyler B.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Jackson, William C.; Zhou, Jessica; Foster, Benjamin; Foster, Corey; Song, Yeohan; Li, Darren; Palapattu, Ganesh S.; Kunju, Lakshmi; Mehra, Rohit; Sandler, Howard; Feng, Felix Y.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the maximum tumor diameter (MTD) of the dominant prostate cancer nodule in the radical prostatectomy specimen as a prognostic factor for outcome in patients treated with salvage external beam radiation therapy (SRT) for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: From an institutional cohort of 575 patients treated with SRT, data on MTD were retrospectively collected. The impact of MTD on biochemical failure (BF), metastasis, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) was assessed on univariate and multivariate analysis using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: In the 173 patients with MTD data available, median follow-up was 77 months (interquartile range, 47-104 months) after SRT, and median MTD was 18 mm (interquartile range, 13-22 mm). Increasing MTD correlated with increasing pT stage, Gleason score, presence of seminal vesicle invasion, and lymph node invasion. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified MTD of >14 mm to be the optimal cut-point. On univariate analysis, MTD >14 mm was associated with an increased risk of BF (P=.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.8), metastasis (P=.002, HR 4.0, 95% CI 2.1-7.5), and PCSM (P=.02, HR 8.0, 95% CI 2.9-21.8). On multivariate analysis MTD >14 mm remained associated with increased BF (P=.02, HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.2), metastasis (P=.02, HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.2-9.2), and PCSM (P=.05, HR 9.7, 95% CI 1.0-92.4), independent of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, pre-RT PSA value, Gleason score, and pre-RT PSA doubling time. Conclusions: For patients treated with SRT for a rising PSA value after prostatectomy, MTD at time of radical prostatectomy is independently associated with BF, metastasis, and PCSM. Maximum tumor diameter should be incorporated into clinical decision making and future clinical risk assessment tools for those patients

  15. Correlation of endorectal coil magnetic resonance, transrectal ultrasound and radical prostatectomy findings in assessing extent of prostate cancer in referred urology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoipierre, A.; Little, A.F.; Greive, K.A.; Royce, P.L.; Snow, R.M.; Frydenberg, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to compare findings at prostate MR to ultrasound findings and pathology specimens in patients who subsequently underwent radical prostatectomy. Of the 61 patients who underwent composite MR prostate imaging, 39 patients with elevated PSA levels and / or abnormal DRE findings were found to have cancer on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and biopsy (random sextant and targeted biopsies). MRI was performed using composite phased array and endorectal coils, using axial T1 and axial, coronal and sagittal T2 weighted images through the prostate, together with axial T1 weighted imaging through the pelvis. Fifteen patients out the 39 patients with documented cancer then underwent radical prostatectomy. The resected specimen pathology was then compared with the MR and TRUS findings. Comparison of findings at MRI with those at prostatectomy indicated approximately 82.4% correlation comparing right side and left side disease (TRUS = 80%). There was a 13.3% false positive for seminal vesicle involvement on MR (TRUS = 0%) and a 10% false negative rate on MR (TRUS 10%) compared with pathology specimens.There was a 26.7% false positive rate of extracapsular extension on MR (TRUS = 0%) and a 6.6% false negative rate on MR (TRUS = 20%) compared with the pathology specimens. Of the 39 patients who had undergone TRUS and biopsy, the disease appeared more extensive on MRI than suspected at ultrasound in 14/39 (35.9%). High resolution MR imaging of the prostate is an acceptable method for assessing the presence of prostate cancer. However, our early experience, in this small series, suggests that there is a high mis-staging of disease on MR as is the case with TRUS, although MR is better than TRUS. The results underscore the need for additional assessment with MR spectroscopy. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. Oncologic control obtained after radical prostatectomy in men with a pathological Gleason score ≥ 8: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audenet, François; Comperat, Eva; Seringe, Elise; Drouin, Sarah J; Richard, François; Cussenot, Olivier; Bitker, Marc-Olivier; Rouprêt, Morgan

    2011-01-01

    To assess the oncologic control afforded by radical prostatectomy (RP) in high-risk prostate cancers with a Gleason score ≥ 8. We performed a retrospective review of prostate cancer patients who underwent RP between 1995 and 2005 for prostate cancer and who had a pathologic Gleason score ≥ 8. Biochemical recurrence was defined as a single rise in PSA levels over 0.2 ng/ml after surgery. Overall, 64 patients were included and followed for a median time of 84.3 months. The mean age was 63 ± 5.2 years. The mean preoperative PSA was 11.9 ± 7.3 ng/ml (1.9-31), and 29 patients (46%) had a PSA > 10 ng/ml. The biopsy Gleason score was ≤ 7 for 49 patients (76.6%). After pathologic analysis, there were 25 (39%) stage pT2, 37 (58%) stage pT3, and 2 (3%) stage pT4 patients. Nine patients had lymph node involvement (14%). The surgical margins were positive in 25 patients (39%). In 51 patients, (80%) the Gleason score was underestimated by biopsies: 40 patients with a definitive score of Gleason 8 had a Gleason score of 6 or 7 on biopsies, while 11 patients with a Gleason score of 9 initially, had a Gleason score of 7 or 8. Twenty-seven patients underwent adjuvant treatment: external radiation therapy (n = 19), HRT (n = 3), or both (n = 5). During follow-up, 41 patients (64%) presented with a biochemical recurrence, and 11 (17%) died. The PSA-free survival rate at five year was 44%. RP remains a possible therapeutic option in certain cases of the high-risk cohort of patients with a Gleason score ≥ 8. However, patients should be warned that surgery might only be the first step of a multi-modal treatment approach. The modalities of adjuvant treatments and the right schedule to deliver it following RP still need to be defined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Oncological and functional outcomes of elderly men treated with HIFU vs. minimally invasive radical prostatectomy: A propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capogrosso, Paolo; Barret, Eric; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Nunes-Silva, Igor; Rozet, François; Galiano, Marc; Ventimiglia, Eugenio; Briganti, Alberto; Salonia, Andrea; Montorsi, Francesco; Cathelineau, Xavier

    2018-01-01

    To assess outcomes of whole gland high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) as compared with minimally-invasive radical prostatectomy (MIRP) in elderly patients. Patients aged ≥70 years with, cT1-cT2 disease, biopsy Gleason score (GS) 3 + 3 or 3 + 4 and preoperative PSA ≤10 ng/mL were submitted to either whole-gland HIFU or MIRP. Propensity-score matching analysis was performed to ensure the baseline equivalence of groups. Follow-up visits were routinely performed assessing PSA and urinary function according to the International Continence Score (ICS) and the International Prostatic Symptoms Score (IPSS) questionnaires. Estimated rates of salvage-treatment free survival (SFS) overall-survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS) and metastasis-free survival (MTS) were assessed and compared. Overall, 84 (33.3%) and 168 (66.7%) patients were treated with HIFU and MIRP, respectively. MIRP was associated with a 5-yrs SFS of 93.4% compared to 74.8% for HIFU (p < 0.01). The two groups did not differ in terms of OS and MTS. No cancer-related deaths were registered. Patients treated with HIFU showed better short-term (6-mos) continence outcomes [mean-ICS: 1.7 vs. 4.8; p = 0.005] but higher IPSS mean scores at 12-mos assessment. A comparable rate of patients experiencing post-treatment Clavien-Dindo grade ≥III complications was observed within the two groups. Whole-gland HIFU is a feasible treatment in elderly men with low-to intermediate-risk PCa and could be considered for patients either unfit for surgery, or willing a non-invasive treatment with a low morbidity burden, although a non-negligible risk of requiring subsequent treatment for recurrence should be expected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-term outcomes of patients with lymph node metastasis treated with radical prostatectomy without adjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touijer, Karim A; Mazzola, Clarisse R; Sjoberg, Daniel D; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2014-01-01

    The presence of lymph node metastasis (LNM) at radical prostatectomy (RP) is associated with poor outcome, and optimal treatment remains undefined. An understanding of the natural history of node-positive prostate cancer (PCa) and identifying prognostic factors is needed. To assess outcomes for patients with LNM treated with RP and lymph node dissection (LND) alone. We analyzed data from a consecutive cohort of 369 men with LNM treated at a single institution from 1988 to 2010. RP and extended LND. Our primary aim was to model overall survival, PCa-specific survival, metastasis-free progression, and freedom from biochemical recurrence (BCR). We used univariate Cox proportional hazard regression models for survival outcomes. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression models were used for freedom from metastasis and freedom from BCR, with prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, extraprostatic extension, seminal vesical invasion, surgical margin status, and number of positive nodes as predictors. Sixty-four patients with LNM died, 37 from disease. Seventy patients developed metastasis, and 201 experienced BCR. The predicted 10-yr overall survival and cancer-specific survival were 60% (95% confidence interval [CI], 49-69) and 72% (95% CI, 61-80), respectively. The 10-yr probability of freedom from distant metastasis and freedom from BCR were 65% (95% CI, 56-73) and 28% (95% CI, 21-36), respectively. Higher pathologic Gleason score (>7 compared with ≤ 7; hazard ratio [HR]: 2.23; 95% CI, 1.64-3.04; p < 0.0001) and three or more positive lymph nodes (HR: 2.61; 95% CI, 1.81-3.76; p < 0.0001) were significantly associated with increased risk of BCR on multivariable analysis. The retrospective nature and single-center source of data are study limitations. A considerable subset of men with LNM remained free of disease 10 yr after RP and extended LND alone. Patients with pathologic Gleason score <8 and low nodal metastatic burden represent a favorable group. Our data

  19. Catheter-less robotic radical prostatectomy using a custom-made synchronous anastomotic splint and vesical urinary diversion device: report of the initial series and perioperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Ashutosh; Rao, Sandhya; Mandhani, Anil

    2008-09-01

    To study the feasibility of avoiding a urethral catheter after robotic radical prostatectomy by using suprapubic diversion with a urethral splint, as urethral catheterization is often a source of major discomfort and pain to the patient, and can cause more concern to the patient than the procedure; we present the outcomes of a pilot study. This pilot study involved 30 patients; in group 1 (the study group of 10 patients) we used a custom-made suprapubic catheter which provided a small anastomotic splint, multiple holes for drainage and the ability to retract the splint to give a voiding trial before removing the drainage device. Group 2 was a control group of 20 patients who had standard urethral catheterization with an 18 F Silastic Foley catheter. Demographic, intraoperative and outcome data were measured and analysed. Urethral symptoms were recorded using a specially developed questionnaire. The two groups were comparable in terms of age, serum prostate specific antigen level, body mass index, Gleason scores, tumour stage, operative duration, amount of bleeding, console times, anastomotic leakage and postoperative retention rates. The study group had significantly less penile shaft or tip pain and discomfort during walking or sleeping. No patient in either group had haematuria or clot retention requiring irrigation. Urethral catheter-less robotic radical prostatectomy is feasible. The advantages are decreased penile shaft and tip pain, and decreased patient discomfort and an earlier return of continence.

  20. Safety and Potential Effect of a Single Intracavernous Injection of Autologous Adipose-Derived Regenerative Cells in Patients with Erectile Dysfunction Following Radical Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Martha Kirstine; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, and radical prostatectomy (RP) often results in erectile dysfunction (ED) and a substantially reduced quality of life. The efficacy of current interventions, principal treatment with PDE-5 inhibitors, is not satisfactory and this condi......BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, and radical prostatectomy (RP) often results in erectile dysfunction (ED) and a substantially reduced quality of life. The efficacy of current interventions, principal treatment with PDE-5 inhibitors, is not satisfactory...... and this condition presents an unmet medical need. Preclinical studies using adipose-derived stem cells to treat ED have shown promising results. Herein, we report the results of a human phase 1 trial with autologous adipose-derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) freshly isolated after a liposuction. METHODS: Seventeen...... men suffering from post RP ED, with no recovery using conventional therapy, were enrolled in a prospective phase 1 open-label and single-arm study. All subjects had RP performed 5-18 months before enrolment, and were followed for 6 months after intracavernosal transplantation. ADRCs were analyzed...

  1. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs towards management of men with locally advanced prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy: an Australian survey of urologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bernadette; Young, Jane; Kneebone, Andrew B; Brooks, Andrew J; Dominello, Amanda; Haines, Mary

    2016-04-01

    To investigate Australian urologists' knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, and the association of these with treatment preferences relating to guideline-recommended adjuvant radiotherapy for men with adverse pathologic features following radical prostatectomy. A nationwide mailed and web-based survey of Australian urologist members of the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand (USANZ). 157 surveys were included in the analysis (45% response rate). Just over half of respondents (54%) were aware of national clinical practice guidelines for the management of prostate cancer. Urologists' attitudes and beliefs towards the specific recommendation for post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy for men with locally advanced prostate cancer were mixed. Just over half agreed the recommendation is based on a valid interpretation of the underpinning evidence (54.1%, 95% CI [46%, 62.2%]) but less than one third agreed adjuvant radiotherapy will lead to improved patient outcomes (30.2%, 95% CI [22.8%, 37.6%]). Treatment preferences were varied, demonstrating clinical equipoise. A positive attitude towards the clinical practice recommendation was significantly associated with treatment preference for adjuvant radiotherapy (rho = 0.520, P towards clinical practice guidelines in general were positive. There remains clinical equipoise among Australian urologists in relation to adjuvant radiotherapy for men with adverse pathologic features following radical prostatectomy. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Comparison of efficacy and satisfaction profile, between penile prosthesis implantation and oral PDE5 inhibitor tadalafil therapy, in men with nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megas, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Stathouros, Georgios; Moschonas, Dimitrios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Ntoumas, Konstantinos

    2013-07-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: Erectile dysfunction after nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy constitutes a challenge to the urologist. The mainstay of medical treatment after radical prostatectomy to restore spontaneous erectile function remains phosphodiesterase (PDE5) inhibitors, despite the fact that data from animal studies suggesting that PDE5 inhibitors can prevent smooth muscle apoptosis and fibrosis have not yet been extrapolated to humans because of a lack of standardized protocols. If the above treatment fails, second-line therapies such as intraurethral prostaglandins, penile injection therapy and vacuum devices are offered. When less invasive therapies are ineffective, interventions that preserve sexual function such as penile prosthesis implantation become the treatment of choice. Our study reveals the alternative of penile prosthesis implantation as first-line treatment in erectile dysfunction after nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy. It also highlights its superiority to the oral PDE5 inhibitor treatment, regarding the erection, frequency, firmness, maintenance and penetration ability. This suggests that a concept of an early penile intervention in the future would be promising for those patients who wish to remain sexually active without depending on oral formulations with doubtful and delayed results. To evaluate the outcome of penile prosthesis surgery in comparison to oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor administration, in men with erectile dysfunction after nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy, as early penile intervention therapy. A total of 174 patients treated by nerve-sparing retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) for clinically localized prostate cancer, between January 2006 and September 2009 enrolled in the study, 153 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and 69 (45%) patients presented with post-RRP erectile dysfunction 6 months after primary surgery. Fifty-four patients were disease

  3. Radical prostatectomy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to close your skin. Cover the incision with plastic wrap before showering for the first week if ... After your catheter is removed: You may have burning when you pee, blood in the urine, frequent ...

  4. Pre-emptive analgesia using intravenous fentanyl plus low-dose ketamine for radical prostatectomy under general anesthesia does not produce short-term or long-term reductions in pain or analgesic use.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katz, J.; Schmid, R.L.; Snijdelaar, D.G.; Coderre, T.J.; McCartney, C.J.; Wowk, A.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate post-operative pain and analgesic use after pre-operative or post-incisional i.v. fentanyl plus low dose i.v. ketamine vs. a standard treatment receiving i.v. fentanyl but not ketamine. Men undergoing radical prostatectomy under general anesthesia were randomly

  5. [Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy for Patients with Prostatic Cancer and Factors Promoting Installation of the Robotic Surgical Equipment-Questionnaire Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Taiji; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey of hospitals with robot-assisted surgical equipment to study changes of the surgical case loads after its installation and the managerial strategies for its purchase. The study included 154 hospitals (as of April 2014) that were queried about their radical prostatectomy case loads from January 2009 to December 2013, strategies for installation of the equipment in their hospitals, and other topics related to the study purpose. The overall response rate of hospitals was 63%, though it marginally varied according to type and area. The annual case load was determined based on the results of the questionnaire and other modalities. It increased from 3,518 in 2009 to 6,425 in 2013. The case load seemed to be concentrated in hospitals with robot equipment since the increase of their number was very minimal over the 5 years. The hospitals with the robot treated a larger number of newly diagnosed patients with the disease than before. Most of the patients were those having localized cancer that was indicated for radical surgery, suggesting again the concentration of the surgical case loads in the hospitals with robots. While most hospitals believed that installation of a robot was necessary as an option for treatment procedures, the future strategy of the hospital, and other reasons, the action of the hospital to gain prestige may be involved in the process of purchasing the equipment. In conclusion, robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy has become popular as a surgical procedure for prostate cancer in our society. This may lead to a concentration of the surgical case load in a limited number of hospitals with robots. We also discuss the typical action of an acute-care hospital when it purchases expensive clinical medical equipment.

  6. Functional and anatomical differences between continent and incontinent men post radical prostatectomy on urodynamics and 3T MRI: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Anne P; Suskind, Anne M; Neer, Charlene; Hussain, Hero; Montgomery, Jeffrey; Latini, Jerilyn M; DeLancey, John O

    2015-08-01

    There are competing hypotheses about the etiology of post prostatectomy incontinence (PPI). The purpose of this study was to determine the anatomical and functional differences between men with and without PPI. Case-control study of continent and incontinent men after radical prostatectomy who underwent functional and anatomic studies with urodynamics and 3.0 Tesla MRI. All men were at least 12 months post prostatectomy and none had a history of pelvic radiation or any prior surgery for incontinence. Baseline demographics, surgical approach, and pathology were similar between incontinent (cases) (n = 14) and continent (controls) (n = 12) men. Among the cases, the average 24 hr pad weight was 400.0 ± 176.9 g with a mean of 2.4 ± 0.7 pads per day. Urethral pressure profiles at rest did not significantly differ between groups; however, with a Kegel maneuver the rise in urethral pressure was 2.6 fold higher in controls. On MRI, the urethral length was 31-35% shorter and the bladder neck was 28.9° more funneled in cases. There were no differences in levator ani muscle size between groups. There was distortion of the sphincter area in 85.7% of cases and in 16.7% of controls (P = 0.001). Men with PPI were not able to increase urethral pressure with a Kegel maneuver despite similar resting urethral pressure profiles. Additionally, incontinent men had shorter urethras and were more likely to have distortion of the sphincter area. All suggesting that the sphincter in men with PPI is both diminutive and poorly functional. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Impact of complete bladder neck preservation on urinary continence, quality of life and surgical margins after radical prostatectomy: a randomized, controlled, single blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyarangi-Dix, Joanne N; Radtke, Jan Philipp; Hadaschik, Boris; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the influence of bladder neck preservation on urinary continence, quality of life and surgical margins after radical prostatectomy. A total of 208 men who presented for radical prostatectomy were randomized to complete bladder neck preservation with subsequent urethro-urethral anastomosis or to no preservation as controls. Patients with failed bladder neck preservation were not included in study. We documented objective continence by the 24-hour pad test, social continence by the number of pads per day and quality of life outcomes by the validated Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire in a single blind setting. Cancer resection was assessed by surgical margin status. At 0, 3, 6 and 12 months mean urine loss in the control vs the bladder neck preservation group was 713.3 vs 237.0, 49.6 vs 15.6, 44.4 vs 5.5 and 25.4 vs 3.1 gm, respectively (each p <0.001). At 3, 6 and 12 months in the control vs the preservation group the social continence rate was 55.3% vs 84.2% (p <0.001), 74.8% vs 89.5% (p = 0.05) and 81.4% vs 94.7% (p = 0.027), and the quality of life score was 80.4 vs 90.3 (p <0.001), 85.4 vs 91.7 (p = 0.016) and 86.0 vs 93.8 (p = 0.001), respectively. We noted significantly less urine loss, higher objective and social continence rates, and higher quality of life scores after complete bladder neck preservation at all followup points. On multiple logistic regression analysis complete bladder neck preservation was an independent positive predictor of continence. No significant difference was found in surgical margin status between the control and bladder neck preservation groups (12.5% vs 14.7%, p = 0.65). In what is to our knowledge the first prospective, randomized, controlled, single blind trial complete bladder neck preservation during radical prostatectomy was associated with a significantly higher urinary continence rate and increased patient satisfaction without compromising resection margins. Copyright © 2013 American Urological

  8. Initial evaluation of prostate cancer with real-time elastography based on step-section pathologic analysis after radical prostatectomy. A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumura, Masahiro; Shigeno, Kazushi; Hyuga, Taiju; Yoneda, Tatsuaki; Shiina, Hiroaki; Igawa, Mikio

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether real-time elastography can be used to detect prostate cancer as a relatively non-invasive modality based on the tissue strain value. Seventeen patients underwent real-time elastography in conjunction with digital rectal examination (DRE), conventional gray-scale transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS), color Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to radical prostatectomy. The elastogram was compared to findings of conventional modalities and pathological findings of prostatectomy specimens. To obtain the elastogram, compression of the prostate was performed along with a visual indicator on a video screen. Twenty of 27 pathologically confirmed tumors were detected with real-time elastography. The cancer detection rate with real-time elastography was superior to the rates of other modalities and nearly equal to both on the anterior side (75.0%) and the posterior side (73.7%) of the prostate. A higher tumor detection rate for real-time elastography was observed for tumors with a higher Gleason score and larger tumor volume. In our preliminary study, real-time elastography in conjunction with gray-scale TRUS is a non-invasive modality to detect prostate cancer. (author)

  9. Tissue-Based MicroRNAs as Predictors of Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy: What Can We Learn from Past Studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwei Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing understanding of the molecular mechanism of the microRNAs (miRNAs in prostate cancer (PCa, the predictive potential of miRNAs has received more attention by clinicians and laboratory scientists. Compared with the traditional prognostic tools based on clinicopathological variables, including the prostate-specific antigen, miRNAs may be helpful novel molecular biomarkers of biochemical recurrence for a more accurate risk stratification of PCa patients after radical prostatectomy and may contribute to personalized treatment. Tissue samples from prostatectomy specimens are easily available for miRNA isolation. Numerous studies from different countries have investigated the role of tissue-miRNAs as independent predictors of disease recurrence, either alone or in combination with other clinicopathological factors. For this purpose, a PubMed search was performed for articles published between 2008 and 2017. We compiled a profile of dysregulated miRNAs as potential predictors of biochemical recurrence and discussed their current clinical relevance. Because of differences in analytics, insufficient power and the heterogeneity of studies, and different statistical evaluation methods, limited consistency in results was obvious. Prospective multi-institutional studies with larger sample sizes, harmonized analytics, well-structured external validations, and reasonable study designs are necessary to assess the real prognostic information of miRNAs, in combination with conventional clinicopathological factors, as predictors of biochemical recurrence.

  10. Detection of local recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in terms of salvage radiotherapy using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI without endorectal coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rischke Hans Christian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the value of dynamic contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI without endorectal coil (EC in the detection of local recurrent prostate cancer (PC after radical prostatectomy (RP. Material and methods Thirty-three patients with recurrent PC underwent DCE-MRI without EC before salvage radiotherapy (RT. At median 15 (mean 16±4.9, range 12–27 months after completion of RT all patients showed complete biochemical response. Additional follow up post RT DCE-MRI scans were available. Prostate specific antigen (PSA levels at the time of imaging were correlated to the imaging findings. Results In 22/33 patients (67% early contrast enhancing nodules were detected in the post-prostatectomy fossa on pre-RT DCE-MRI images. The average pre-RT PSA level of the 22 patients with positive pre-RT DCE-MRI findings was significantly higher (mean, 0.74±0.64 ng/mL compared to the pre-RT PSA level of the 11 patients with negative pre-RT DCE-MRI (mean, 0.24±0.13 ng/mL (p Conclusions This is the first study that shows that DCE-MRI without EC can detect local recurrent PC with an estimated accuracy of 83% at low PSA levels. All false negative DCE-MRI scans were detected using a PSA cut-off of ≥0.54 ng/mL.

  11. Temporal Trends in Clinical and Pathological Characteristics for Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy Between 1995 and 2013 at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark, and Stanford University Hospital, United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Mathias Dyrberg; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Kjaer, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze how prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening and practice patterns has affected trends in tumor characteristics in men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) in the United States and Denmark. Unlike in the United States, PSA screening has not been recommended in Denmark...... evaluated with Cochran-Armitage test for trends and chi-square testing. Results: A total of 4404 patients were included. Temporal changes in preoperative PSA, age, grade, and stage was found in both cohorts. Median preoperative PSA declined in both cohorts, while median age increased, with the Danish cohort...... showing the greatest changes in both PSA and age. In both cohorts, there was a trend for higher-risk preoperative features before RP over time. In 2010-2013, 27.7% and 21.8% of the patients were in the D'Amico high-risk group at Copenhagen and Stanford, respectively. Conclusion: Despite recommendation...

  12. Establishment of a Web-based System for Collection of Patient-reported Outcomes After Radical Prostatectomy in a Statewide Quality Improvement Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Steven M; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Ghani, Khurshid R; Miller, David C; Linsell, Susan; Starr, Jay; Peabody, James O; Hurley, Patrick; Montie, James; Cher, Michael L

    2017-09-01

    To report on the establishment of a unified, electronic patient-reported outcome (PRO) infrastructure and pilot results from the first 5 practices enrolled in the web-based collection system developed by the Michigan Urological Surgery Improvement Collaborative. Eligible patients were those undergoing radical prostatectomy of 5 academic and community practices. PRO was obtained using a validated 21-item web-based questionnaire, regarding urinary function, erection function, and sexual interest and satisfaction. Data were collected preoperatively, at 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively. Patients were provided a link via email to complete the surveys. Perioperative and PRO data were analyzed as reports for individual patients and summary performance reports for individual surgeons. Among 773 eligible patients, 688 (89%) were enrolled preoperatively. Survey completion rate was 88%, 84%, and 90% preoperatively, at 3 months, and 6 months. Electronic completion rates preoperatively, at 3 months, and 6 months were 70%, 70%, and 68%, respectively. Mean urinary function scores were 18.3, 14.3, and 16.6 (good function ≥ 17), whereas mean erection scores were 18.7, 7.3, and 9.1 (good erection score ≥ 22) before surgery, at 3 months, and 6 months. Variation was noted for erectile function among the practices. Collection of electronic PRO via this unified, web-based format was successful and provided results that reflect expected recovery and identify opportunities for improvement. This will be extended to more practices statewide to improve outcomes after radical prostatectomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The efficacy and utilisation of preoperative multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: does it change the surgical dissection plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavukçu, Hasan Hüseyin; Aytaç, Ömer; Balcı, Numan Cem; Kulaksızoğlu, Haluk; Atuğ, Fatih

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the effect of the use of multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) on the dissection plan of the neurovascular bundle and the oncological results of our patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. We prospectively evaluated 60 consecutive patients, including 30 patients who had (Group 1), and 30 patients who had not (Group 2) mp-MRI before robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Based on the findings of mp-MRI, the dissection plan was changed as intrafascial, interfascial, and extrafascial in the mp-MRI group. Two groups were compared in terms of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason sum scores and surgical margin positivity. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, PSA, biopsy Gleason score, final pathological Gleason score and surgical margin positivity. mp-MRI changed the initial surgical plan in 18 of 30 patients (60%) in Group 1. In seventeen of these patients (56%) surgical plan was changed from non-nerve sparing to interfascial nerve sparing plan. In one patient dissection plan was changed to non-nerve sparing technique which had extraprostatic extension on final pathology. Surgical margin positivity was similar in Groups 1, and 2 (16% and 13%, respectively) although, Group 1 had higher number of high- risk patients. mp-MRI confirmed the primary tumour localisation in the final pathology in 27 of of 30 patients (90%). Preoperative mp-MRI effected the decision to perform a nerve-sparing technique in 56% of the patients in our study; moreover, changing the dissection plan from non-nerve-sparing technique to a nerve sparing technique did not increase the rate of surgical margin positivity.

  14. Exclusive image guided IMRT vs. radical prostatectomy followed by postoperative IMRT for localized prostate cancer: a matched-pair analysis based on risk-groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azelie, Caroline; Créhange, Gilles; Gauthier, Mélanie; Mirjolet, Céline; Cormier, Luc; Martin, Etienne; Peignaux-Casasnovas, Karine; Truc, Gilles; Chamois, Jérôme; Maingon, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether patients treated for a localized prostate cancer (PCa) require a radical prostatectomy followed by postoperative radiotherapy or exclusive radiotherapy, in the modern era of image guided IMRT. 178 patients with PCa were referred for daily exclusive image guided IMRT (IG-IMRT) using an on-line 3D ultra-sound based system and 69 patients were referred for postoperative IMRT without image guidance after radical prostatectomy (RP + IMRT). Patients were matched in a 1:1 ratio according to their baseline risk group before any treatment. Late toxicity was scored using the CTV v3.0 scale. Biochemical failure was defined as a postoperative PSA ≤ 0.1 ng/mL followed by 1 consecutive rising PSA for the postoperative group of patients and by the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/mL) for the group of patients treated with exclusive radiotherapy. A total of 98 patients were matched (49:49). From the start of any treatment, the median follow-up was 56.6 months (CI 95% = [49.6-61.2], range [18.2-115.1]). No patient had late gastrointestinal grade ≥ 2 toxicity in the IG-IMRT group vs. 4% in the RP + IMRT group. Forty two percent of the patients in both groups had late grade ≥ 2 genitourinary toxicity. The 5-year FFF rates in the IG-IMRT group and in the RP + IMRT groups were 93.1% [80.0-97.8] and 76.5% [58.3-87.5], respectively (p = 0.031). Patients with a localized PCa treated with IG-IMRT had better oncological outcome than patients treated with RP + IMRT. Further improvements in postoperative IMRT using image guidance and dose escalation are urgently needed

  15. Comparison of biochemical failure rates between permanent prostate brachytherapy and radical retropubic prostatectomy as a function of posttherapy PSA nadir plus ‘X’

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Kamran A; Davis, Brian J; Mynderse, Lance A; Slezak, Jeffrey M; Bergstralh, Eric J; Wilson, Torrence M; Choo, C Richard

    2014-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir + 2 ng/mL, also known as the Phoenix definition, is the definition most commonly used to establish biochemical failure (BF) after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer management. The purpose of this study is to compare BF rates between permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) and radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) as a function of PSA nadir plus varying values of X and examine the associated implications. We retrospectively searched for patients who underwent PPB or RRP at our institution between 1998 and 2004. Only primary patients not receiving androgen-deprivation therapy were included in the study. Three RRP patients were matched to each PPB patient on the basis of prognostic factors. BF rates were estimated for PSA nadirs + different values of X. A total of 1,164 patients were used for analysis: 873 in the RRP group and 291 in the PPB group. Patients were equally matched by clinical stage, biopsy Gleason sum, primary Gleason grade, and pretherapy PSA value. Median follow-up was 3.1 years for RRP patients and 3.6 years in the PPB group (P = .01). Using PSA nadir + 0.1 ng/mL for the definition of BF, the 5-year BF rate was 16.3% for PPB patients and 13.5% for RRP patients (P = .007), whereas at nadir + 2 ng/mL or greater, the BF rates were less than 3% and were indistinguishable between PPB and RRP patients. In a cohort of well-matched patients who had prostatectomy or brachytherapy, we examined BF as a function of nadir + X, where X was treated as a continuous variable. As X increases from 0.1 to 2.0 ng/mL, the BF curves converge, and above 2.0 ng/mL they are essentially indistinguishable. The data presented are of interest as BF definitions continue to evolve

  16. Detection of local recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in terms of salvage radiotherapy using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI without endorectal coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rischke, Hans Christian; Schäfer, Arnd O; Nestle, Ursula; Volegova-Neher, Natalja; Henne, Karl; Benz, Matthias R; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Langer, Mathias; Grosu, Anca L

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the value of dynamic contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) without endorectal coil (EC) in the detection of local recurrent prostate cancer (PC) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Thirty-three patients with recurrent PC underwent DCE-MRI without EC before salvage radiotherapy (RT). At median 15 (mean 16±4.9, range 12–27) months after completion of RT all patients showed complete biochemical response. Additional follow up post RT DCE-MRI scans were available. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels at the time of imaging were correlated to the imaging findings. In 22/33 patients (67%) early contrast enhancing nodules were detected in the post-prostatectomy fossa on pre-RT DCE-MRI images. The average pre-RT PSA level of the 22 patients with positive pre-RT DCE-MRI findings was significantly higher (mean, 0.74±0.64 ng/mL) compared to the pre-RT PSA level of the 11 patients with negative pre-RT DCE-MRI (mean, 0.24±0.13 ng/mL) (p<0.001). All post-RT DCE-MRI images showed complete resolution of initial suspicious lesions. A pre-RT PSA cut-off value of ≥0.54 ng/ml readily predicted a positive DCE-MRI finding. This is the first study that shows that DCE-MRI without EC can detect local recurrent PC with an estimated accuracy of 83% at low PSA levels. All false negative DCE-MRI scans were detected using a PSA cut-off of ≥0.54 ng/mL

  17. Effects of Tadalafil Once-Daily or On-Demand vs Placebo on Return to Baseline Erectile Function After Bilateral Nerve-Sparing Radical Prostatectomy - Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial (REACTT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulhall, John P; Brock, Gerald; Oelke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND AIM: The multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled REACTT trial suggested that treatment with tadalafil once daily (OaD) started early after bilateral nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (nsRP) for prostate cancer may contribute to erectile function......: REACTT included 422 men blind treatment (DBT) with tadalafil 5 mg OaD (n = 139), tadalafil 20 mg on...

  18. Significant correlation between rectal DVH and late bleeding in patients treated after radical prostatectomy with conformal or conventional radiotherapy (66.6-70.2 Gy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Fiorino, Claudio; Ceresoli, Giovanni Luca; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Bolognesi, Angelo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Villa, Eugenio

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Investigating the correlation between dosimetric/clinical parameters and late rectal bleeding in patients treated with adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Data of 154 consecutive patients, including three-dimensional treatment planning and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum (including filling), were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-six of 154 patients presenting a (full) rectal volume >100 cc were excluded from the analysis. All patients considered for the analysis (n=128) were treated at a nominal dose equal to 66.6-70.2 Gy (ICRU dose 68-72.5 Gy; median 70 Gy) with conformal (n=76) or conventional (n=52) four-field technique (1.8 Gy/fr). Clinical parameters such as diabetes mellitus, acute rectal bleeding, hypertension, age, and hormonal therapy were considered. Late rectal bleeding was scored using a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, and patients experiencing ≥Grade 2 were considered bleeders. Median follow-up was 36 months (range 12-72). Mean and median rectal dose were considered, together with rectal volume and the % fraction of rectum receiving more than 50, 55, 60, and 65 Gy (V50, V55, V60, V65, respectively). Median and quartile values of all parameters were taken as cutoff for statistical analysis. Univariate (log-rank) and multivariate (Cox hazard model) analyses were performed. Results: Fourteen of 128 patients experienced ≥Grade 2 late bleeding (3-year actuarial incidence 10.5%). A significant correlation between a number of cutoff values and late rectal bleeding was found. In particular, a mean dose ≥54 Gy, V50 ≥63%, V55 ≥57%, and V60 ≥50% was highly predictive of late bleeding (p≤0.01). A rectal volume <60 cc and type of treatment (conventional vs. conformal) were also significantly predictive of late bleeding (p=0.05). Concerning clinical variables, acute bleeding (p < 0.001) was significantly related to late bleeding, and a trend was found for

  19. Metabolic syndrome is associated with advanced prostate cancer in patients treated with radical retropubic prostatectomy: results from a multicentre prospective study

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    De Nunzio, Cosimo; Simone, Giuseppe; Brassetti, Aldo; Mastroianni, Riccardo; Collura, Devis; Muto, Giovanni; Gallucci, Michele; Tubaro, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common non-skin cancer in USA and the second leading cause of cancer death in Western Countries. Despite the high mortality associated with PCa, the only established risk factors are age, race and family history. A possible association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and PCa was firstly described in 2004 and several subsequent studies in biopsy cohorts have shown conflicting results. Aim of our multicentre prospective study was to investigate the association between MetS and PCa in men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). From January 2012 to June 2015, 349 consecutive men undergoing RP for PCa at three centres in Italy were enrolled into a prospective database. Body Mass Index (BMI) as well as waist circumference was measured before RP. Blood samples were also collected and tested for total PSA, fasting glucose, triglycerides and HDLs. Blood pressure was also recorded. We evaluated the association between MetS, defined according to Adult Treatment Panel III, PCa stage (advanced stage defined as pT ≥ 3 or N1) and grade (high grade defined as Gleason Score ≥ 4 + 3) using logistic regression analyses. Median age and preoperative PSA levels were 66 years (IQR: 61-69) and 7 ng/ml (IQR: 5-10), respectively. Median BMI was 26.12 kg/m 2 (IQR 24-29) with 56 (16 %) obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 ) patients and 87 (25 %) patients with MetS. At pathological evaluation, advanced PCa and high-grade disease were present in 126 (36 %) and 145 (41.5 %) patients, respectively. MetS was significantly associated with advanced PCa (45/87, 51 % vs 81/262, 31 %; p = 0.008) and high-grade disease (47/87, 54 % vs 98/262, 37 %; p = 0.001). On multivariable analysis, MetS was an independent predictor of pathological stage ≥ pT3a or N1 (OR: 2.227; CI: 1.273-3.893; p = 0.005) and Gleason score ≥ 4 + 3 (OR: 2.007, CI: 1.175-3.428; p = 0.011). We firstly demonstrated in a European radical retropubic prostatectomy cohort study that MetS is associated with

  20. Positive resection margin and/or pathologic T3 adenocarcinoma of prostate with undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy: to irradiate or not?

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    Choo, Richard; Hruby, George; Hong, Julie; Hong, Eugene; DeBoer, Gerrit; Danjoux, Cyril; Morton, Gerard; Klotz, Laurence; Bhak, Edward; Flavin, Aileen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for positive resection margin and/or pathologic T3 (pT3) adenocarcinoma of the prostate with undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. Methods and materials: We retrospectively analyzed 125 patients with a positive resection margin and/or pT3 adenocarcinoma of the prostate who had undetectable postoperative serum PSA levels after radical prostatectomy. Seventy-three patients received postoperative adjuvant RT and 52 did not. Follow-up ranged from 1.5 to 12.0 years (median 4.2 for the irradiated group and 4.9 for the nonirradiated group). PSA outcome was available for all patients. Freedom from failure was defined as the maintenance of a serum PSA level of ≤0.2 ng/mL, as well as the absence of clinical local recurrence and distant metastasis. Results: No difference was found in the 5-year actuarial overall survival between the irradiated and nonirradiated group (94% vs. 95%). However, patients receiving adjuvant RT had a statistically superior 5-year actuarial relapse-free rate, including freedom from PSA failure, compared with those treated with surgery alone (88% vs. 65%, p=0.0013). In the irradiated group, 8 patients had relapse with PSA failure alone. None had local or distant recurrence. In the nonirradiated group, 15, 1, and 2 had PSA failure, local recurrence, and distant metastasis, respectively. On Cox regression analysis, pre-radical prostatectomy PSA level and adjuvant RT were statistically significant predictive factors for relapse, and Gleason score, extracapsular invasion, and resection margin status were not. There was a suggestion that seminal vesicle invasion was associated with an increased risk of relapse. The morbidity of postoperative adjuvant RT was acceptable, with only 2 patients developing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 genitourinary complications. Adjuvant RT had a minimal adverse effect on urinary continence and did not cause

  1. Importance of prostate-specific antigen (PSA as a predictive factor for concordance between the Gleason scores of prostate biopsies and RADICAL prostatectomy specimens

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    Nelson Gianni de Lima

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the concordance between the Gleason scores of prostate biopsies and radical prostatectomy specimens, thereby highlighting the importance of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA level as a predictive factor of concordance. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 253 radical prostatectomy cases performed between 2006 and 2011. The patients were divided into 4 groups for the data analysis and dichotomized according to the preoperative PSA, <10 ng/mL and ≥10 ng/mL. A p-score <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: The average patient age was 63.3±7.8 years. The median PSA level was 9.3±4.9 ng/mL. The overall concordance between the Gleason scores was 52%. Patients presented preoperative PSA levels <10 ng/mL in 153 of 235 cases (65% and ≥10 ng/mL in 82 of 235 cases (35%. The Gleason scores were identical in 86 of 153 cases (56% in the <10 ng/mL group and 36 of 82 (44% cases in the ≥10 ng/mL group (p = 0.017. The biopsy underestimated the Gleason score in 45 (30% patients in the <10 ng/mL group and 38 (46% patients in the ≥10 ng/mL (p = 0.243. Specifically, the patients with Gleason 3 + 3 scores according to the biopsies demonstrated global concordance in 56 of 110 cases (51%. In this group, the patients with preoperative PSA levels <10 ng/dL had higher concordance than those with preoperative PSA levels ≥10 ng/dL (61% x 23%, p = 0.023, which resulted in 77% upgrading after surgery in those patients with PSA levels ≥10 ng/dl. CONCLUSION: The Gleason scores of needle prostate biopsies and those of the surgical specimens were concordant in approximately half of the global sample. The preoperative PSA level was a strong predictor of discrepancy and might improve the identification of those patients who tended to be upgraded after surgery, particularly in patients with Gleason scores of 3 + 3 in the prostate biopsy and preoperative PSA levels ≥10 ng/mL.

  2. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor administered immediately after radical prostatectomy temporarily increases the need for incontinence pads, but improves final continence status

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    Yasuhiro Kaiho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effects of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i on urinary continence recovery after bilateral nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (BNSRP. Materials and Methods: Between 2002 and 2012, 137 of 154 consecutive patients who underwent BNSRP in our institution retrospectively divided into 3 groups that included patients taking PDE5i immediately after surgery (immediate PDE5i group, n=41, patients starting PDE5i at an outpatient clinic after discharge (PDE5i group, n=56, and patients taking no medication (non-PDE5i group, n=40. Using self-administered questionnaires, the proportion of patients who did not require incontinence pads (pad-free patients was calculated preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after BNSRP. Severity of incontinence was determined based on the pad numbers and then compared among the 3 groups. Results: Proportions of pad-free patients and severity of incontinence initially deteriorated in all of the groups to the lowest values soon after undergoing BNSRP, with gradual improvement noted thereafter. The deterioration was most prominent in the immediate PDE5i group. As compared to the non-PDE5i group, both the PDE5i and immediate PDE5i groups exhibited a better final continence status. Conclusions: PDE5i improves final continence status. However, administration of PDE5i immediately after surgery causes a distinct temporary deterioration in urinary incontinence.

  3. Reduction in PSA messenger-RNA expression and clinical recurrence in patients with prostatic cancer undergoing neoadjuvant therapy before radical prostatectomy

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    Baruffi Marco

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We assessed the incidence of micro-metastases at surgical margins (SM and pelvic lymph nodes (LN in patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy (RP after neoadjuvant therapy (NT or to RP alone. We compared traditional staging to molecular detection of PSA using Taqman-based quantitative real-time PCR (qrt-PCR never used before for this purpose. Methods 29 patients were assigned to NT plus RP (arm A or RP alone (arm B. Pelvic LN were dissected for qrt-PCR analysis, together with right and left lateral SM. Results 64,3% patients of arm B and 26.6% of arm A had evidence of PSA mRNA expression in LN and/or SM. 17,2% patients, all of arm B, had biochemical recurrence. Conclusions Qrt-PCR may be more sensitive, compared to conventional histology, in identifying presence of viable prostate carcinoma cells in SM and LN. Gene expression of PSA in surgical periprostatic samples might be considered as a novel and reliable indicator of minimal residual disease after NT.

  4. Reduction in PSA messenger-RNA expression and clinical recurrence in patients with prostatic cancer undergoing neoadjuvant therapy before radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Marco; Lania, Caterina; Blanco, Salvatore; Baruffi, Marco; Mocellin, Simone

    2004-01-01

    Background We assessed the incidence of micro-metastases at surgical margins (SM) and pelvic lymph nodes (LN) in patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy (RP) after neoadjuvant therapy (NT) or to RP alone. We compared traditional staging to molecular detection of PSA using Taqman-based quantitative real-time PCR (qrt-PCR) never used before for this purpose. Methods 29 patients were assigned to NT plus RP (arm A) or RP alone (arm B). Pelvic LN were dissected for qrt-PCR analysis, together with right and left lateral SM. Results 64,3% patients of arm B and 26.6% of arm A had evidence of PSA mRNA expression in LN and/or SM. 17,2% patients, all of arm B, had biochemical recurrence. Conclusions Qrt-PCR may be more sensitive, compared to conventional histology, in identifying presence of viable prostate carcinoma cells in SM and LN. Gene expression of PSA in surgical periprostatic samples might be considered as a novel and reliable indicator of minimal residual disease after NT. PMID:15104791

  5. Health-related quality of life using SF-8 and EPIC questionnaires after treatment with radical retropubic prostatectomy and permanent prostate brachytherapy

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    Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Kusuhara, Yoshito; Miura, Noriyoshi; Shirato, Akitomi; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru; Kataoka, Masaaki

    2009-01-01

    The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after treatment of prostate cancer is examined using a new HRQOL tool. HRQOL, based on the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC) and SF-8 questionnaires, was prospectively compared after either a radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) or a permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) at a single institute. Between October 2005 and June 2007, 96 patients were treated by an RRP and 88 patients were treated by a PPB. A HRQOL survey was completed at baseline, and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment, prospectively. The general HRQOL in the RRP and PPB groups was not different after 3 months. However, at baseline and 1 month after treatment, the mental component summary was significantly better in the PPB group than in the RRP group. Moreover, the disease-specific HRQOL was worse regarding urinary and sexual functions in the RRP group. Urinary irritative/obstructive was worse in the PPB group, but urinary incontinence was worse in the RRP group and had not recovered to baseline after 12 months. The bowel function and bother were worse in the PPB group than in the RRP group after 3 months. In the RRP group, the patients with nerve sparing demonstrated the same scores in sexual function as the PPB group. This prospective study revealed the differences in the HRQOL after an RRP and PPB. Disease-specific HRQOL is clarified by using EPIC survey. These results will be helpful for making treatment decisions. (author)

  6. Exploring Prostate Cancer Genome Reveals Simultaneous Losses of PTEN, FAS and PAPSS2 in Patients with PSA Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy

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    Chinyere Ibeawuchi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The multifocal nature of prostate cancer (PCa creates a challenge to patients’ outcome prediction and their clinical management. An approach that scrutinizes every cancer focus is needed in order to generate a comprehensive evaluation of the disease, and by correlating to patients’ clinico-pathological information, specific prognostic biomarker can be identified. Our study utilized the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 Genome-wide assay to investigate forty-three fresh frozen PCa tissue foci from twenty-three patients. With a long clinical follow-up period that ranged from 2.0–9.7 (mean 5.4 years, copy number variation (CNV data was evaluated for association with patients’ PSA status during follow-up. From our results, the loss of unique genes on 10q23.31 and 10q23.2–10q23.31 were identified to be significantly associated to PSA recurrence (p < 0.05. The implication of PTEN and FAS loss (10q23.31 support previous reports due to their critical roles in prostate carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the PAPSS2 gene (10q23.2–10q23.31 may be functionally relevant in post-operative PSA recurrence because of its reported role in androgen biosynthesis. It is suggestive that the loss of the susceptible region on chromosome 10q, which implicates PTEN, FAS and PAPSS2 may serve as genetic predictors of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

  7. Prospective longitudinal comparative study of health-related quality of life in patients treated with radical prostatectomy or permanent brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobuke, Makoto; Saika, Takashi; Nakanishi, Yoshiko

    2009-01-01

    To determine health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) or permanent prostate brachytherapy (BT), third party-conducted QOL surveys were prospectively compared. Between 2004 and 2005, 37 patients underwent RRP and 36 were treated with BT. A QOL survey consisting of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form (SF-36), the University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) and the International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) was completed prospectively by a research coordinator at baseline, and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment. The RRP patients scored well in general QOL except at 1 month after surgery, with their mental health better than at baseline by 6 months after surgery. Disease-specific QOL in RRP patients received a low score at 1 month for both urinary and sexual function, though urinary function rapidly recovered to baseline levels. BT patient QOL was not affected by the therapy except in the IPSS score. However, general and mental health scores in BT patients were inferior to those in RRP patients. This prospective study revealed differences in QOL after RRP and BT. These results will be helpful in making treatment decisions. (author)

  8. Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a step–by-step technique description of this first brazilian experience

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    Marcos Tobias-Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy(RARP is a newly approach that preserve the Retzus structures and provide better recovery of continence and erectile function. In Brazil, this approach has not yet been previously reported. Objective: Our goal is to describe Step-by-Step the Retzus-sparing RARP surgical technique and report our first Brazilian experience. Methods: We present a case of a 60-year-old white man with low risk prostate cancer. Surgical materials were four arms Da Vinci robotic platform system, six transperitoneal portals, two prolene wires and Polymer Clips. This surgical technique was step-by-step described according to Galfano et al. One additional step was added as a modification of Galfano et al. Primary technique description: The closure of the Denovellier fascia. Results: We have operated one patient with this technique. The operative time was 180minutes, console time was135 min, the blood loss was 150ml, none perioperative or postoperative complications was found, hospital stay of 01 day. The anatomopathological classification revealed a pT2aN0M0 specimen with free surgical margins. The patient achieved continence immediately after bladder stent retrieval. Full erection reported after 30 days of surgery. Conclusion: Retzus-sparing RARP approach is feasible and reproducible. However, further comparative studies are necessary to demonstrate potential benefits in continence and sexual outcomes over the standard approaches.

  9. Exploring Prostate Cancer Genome Reveals Simultaneous Losses of PTEN, FAS and PAPSS2 in Patients with PSA Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibeawuchi, Chinyere; Schmidt, Hartmut; Voss, Reinhard; Titze, Ulf; Abbas, Mahmoud; Neumann, Joerg; Eltze, Elke; Hoogland, Agnes Marije; Jenster, Guido; Brandt, Burkhard; Semjonow, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The multifocal nature of prostate cancer (PCa) creates a challenge to patients’ outcome prediction and their clinical management. An approach that scrutinizes every cancer focus is needed in order to generate a comprehensive evaluation of the disease, and by correlating to patients’ clinico-pathological information, specific prognostic biomarker can be identified. Our study utilized the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 Genome-wide assay to investigate forty-three fresh frozen PCa tissue foci from twenty-three patients. With a long clinical follow-up period that ranged from 2.0–9.7 (mean 5.4) years, copy number variation (CNV) data was evaluated for association with patients’ PSA status during follow-up. From our results, the loss of unique genes on 10q23.31 and 10q23.2–10q23.31 were identified to be significantly associated to PSA recurrence (p < 0.05). The implication of PTEN and FAS loss (10q23.31) support previous reports due to their critical roles in prostate carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the PAPSS2 gene (10q23.2–10q23.31) may be functionally relevant in post-operative PSA recurrence because of its reported role in androgen biosynthesis. It is suggestive that the loss of the susceptible region on chromosome 10q, which implicates PTEN, FAS and PAPSS2 may serve as genetic predictors of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. PMID:25679447

  10. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS OF POSITIVE RESULTS OF MULTIFOCAL TRUS-GUIDED VESICOURETHRAL ANASTOMOSIS BIOPSY IN PATIENTS WITH BIOCHEMICAL RECURRENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    P. D. Demeshko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate influence of clinical, biochemical and histological factors to detection rate of local recurrence following radical prostatectomy (RPE using multifocal TRUS-guided vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA biopsy.Material and methods. 59 patients with newly diagnosed biochemical recurrence (BR after RPE were included into prospective study. All of them underwent multifocal TRUS-guided VUA biopsy. Сlinical variables (serum prostate-specifi c antigen [PSA] level and PSA kinetics, time RPE-BR, Gleason grade, stage after RPE and clinical findings were evaluated. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analyses were performed.Results. The detection rate of local prostate recurrence with TRUS-guided VUA biopsy was 45,8 % (95 % CI 33,7–58,3. At multivariate analysis only PSA level at the moment of biopsy (≤ 1,5 ng/ml vs > 1,5 ng/ml and time RPE-BR (≤ 15 months vs > 15 months were significantly associated with positive results of multifocal TRUS-guided VUA biopsy (p < 0,05.Conclusion The detection rate of local prostate recurrence with TRUS-guided VUA biopsy depends on combination of independent predictors (PSA level at the moment of biopsy and time RPE—BR.

  11. Predictive value of PSA velocity over early clinical and pathological parameters in patients with localized prostate cancer who undergo radical retropubic prostatectomy

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    Martinez Carlos A.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To analyze the behavior of the prostate specific antigen velocity (PSAV in localized prostate adenocarcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of 500 men who had localized prostate adenocarcinoma, who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy between January 1986 and December 1999. The PSAV was calculated for each patient and subsequently, the values were correlated with 5 groups: age, initial PSA value, clinical stage, tumor volume and Gleason score. RESULTS: The behavior of PSAV presented statistic significance with an increment between 1.3 ng/mL and 9.6 ng/mL, ranging from 38.6% and 59.8% when compared with the initial PSA value (p < 0.0001, clinical stage (p = 0.0002, tumor volume (p < 0.0001 and Gleason score (p = 0.0009. CONCLUSION: PSAV up to 2.5 ng/mL/year is associated with factors of good prognosis, such as initial PSA below 10 mg/mL, clinical stage T1, tumor volume below 20% and Gleason score lower than 7.

  12. National Trends in Prostate Biopsy and Radical Prostatectomy Volumes Following the US Preventive Services Task Force Guidelines Against Prostate-Specific Antigen Screening.

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    Halpern, Joshua A; Shoag, Jonathan E; Artis, Amanda S; Ballman, Karla V; Sedrakyan, Art; Hershman, Dawn L; Wright, Jason D; Shih, Ya Chen Tina; Hu, Jim C

    2017-02-01

    Studies demonstrate that use of prostate-specific antigen screening decreased significantly following the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation against prostate-specific antigen screening in 2012. To determine downstream effects on practice patterns in prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment following the 2012 USPSTF recommendation. Procedural volumes of certifying and recertifying urologists from 2009 through 2016 were evaluated for variation in prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy (RP) volume. Trends were confirmed using the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System and Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The study included a representative sample of urologists across practice settings and nationally representative sample of all RP discharges. We obtained operative case logs from the American Board of Urology and identified urologists performing at least 1 prostate biopsy (n = 5173) or RP (n = 3748), respectively. The 2012 USPSTF recommendation against routine population-wide prostate-specific antigen screening. Change in median biopsy and RP volume per urologist and national procedural volume. Following the USPSTF recommendation, median biopsy volume per urologist decreased from 29 to 21 (interquartile range [IQR}, 12-34; P prostate biopsy and RP volumes decreased significantly. A panoramic vantage point is needed to evaluate the long-term consequences of the 2012 USPSTF recommendation.

  13. Is active surveillance a safe alternative in the management of localized prostate cancer? Pathological features of radical prostatectomy specimens in potential candidates for active surveillance

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    Zambrano Norman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectiveActive surveillance (AS has become an accepted alternative for patients with low risk prostate cancer. The purpose of AS is to defer definitive therapy in these patients to avoid treatment-related complications. Our aim was to determine the pathological features of the surgical specimen from potential AS candidates that underwent radical prostatectomy (RP.Materials and MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed a group of patients submitted to RP who met criteria for AS: Gleason score (GS ≤ 3+3 = 6, PSA ≤ 10ng/mL, T1c - T2a, 6 in the RPS (GS 7 n = 49; GS 8 n = 3. Extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle and lymph node involvement was found in 6.1%, 3.1% and 1.2% of the specimens, respectively.ConclusionIn this study a significant proportion of potential candidates for AS showed features of aggressive and/or high-risk tumors in the RPS. Therefore, before considering a patient for an AS protocol, a proper and strict selection must be performed, and informed consent is crucial for these patients.

  14. Transrectal contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, transrectal ultrasonography and retrograde cystography for the detection of vesicourethral anastomosis leakage after radical retropubic prostatectomy: a prospective comparative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantiello, Francesco; Cicione, Antonio; Autorino, Riccardo; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Tubaro, Andrea; Damiano, Rocco

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cystography (CG), transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) and transrectal contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) for the detection of vesicourethral extravasation (VE) after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). In 80 consecutive patients who underwent RRP, the strength of the vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA) was assessed by CG, TRUS and transrectal CEUS. The investigation started with a conventional CG evaluated by an experienced uroradiologist. Following this, patients underwent TRUS which was performed by an experienced urologist who was blinded to the CG findings. The examination started with a conventional B-scan and, subsequently, a CEUS was performed by emptying and refilling the bladder with 90 ml of NaCl 0.9% + 10 ml suspension of 1:10 SonoVue and NaCl 0.9%. 26 patients (32.5%) presented urinary VE and 54 (67.5%) a watertight VUA. In 16 patients (61%) we observed a small leakage, 9 patients (35%) presented a moderate VE, and a large VE was detected in 1 patient (4%). No statistically significant difference in detection of VE was found among the three tests (p = 0.472). TRUS and CEUS are able to provide information about the integrity of the VUA that is comparable with that of CG. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Development of a Three-dimensional Surgical Navigation System with Magnetic Resonance Angiography and a Three-dimensional Printer for Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

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    Jomoto, Wataru; Tanooka, Masao; Doi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Mitsuie, Chiemi; Yamada, Yusuke; Suzuki, Toru; Yamano, Toshiko; Ishikura, Reiichi; Kotoura, Noriko; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2018-01-02

    We sought to develop a surgical navigation system using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and a three-dimensional (3D) printer for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Six patients with pathologically proven localized prostate cancer were prospectively enrolled in this study. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), consisting of T2-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) and true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true FISP), reconstructed by volume rendering, was followed by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA performed with a volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) during intravenous bolus injection of gadobutrol. Images of arterial and venous phases were acquired over approximately 210 seconds. Selected images were sent to a workstation for generation of 3D volume-rendered images and standard triangulated language (STL) files for 3D print construction. The neurovascular bundles (NVBs) were found in sequence on non-contrast images. Accessory pudendal arteries (APAs) were found in all cases in the arterial phase of contrast enhancement but were ill-defined on non-contrast enhanced MRA. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA helped to detect APAs, suggesting that this 3D system using MRI will be useful in RARP.

  16. Longitudinal comparison of quality of life after real-time tumor-tracking intensity-modulated radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy in patients with localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Nobuo; Maruyama, Satoru; Abe, Takashige; Nonomura, Katsuya; Shimizu, Shinichi; Nishioka, Kentaro; Shirato, Hiroki; C-Hatanaka, Kanako; Oba, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the quality of life (QOL) in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC) after intensity-modulated radiation therapy assisted with a fluoroscopic real-time intensity-modulated radiation therapy (RT-IMRT) tumor-tracking system versus the QOL after radical prostatectomy (RP). Between 2003 and 2006, 71 patients were enrolled in this longitudinal prospective study. Each patient was allowed to decide which treatment modality they would receive. Of the 71 patients, 23 patients underwent RT-IMRT, while 48 opted for RP. No patient received neo-adjuvant or adjuvant hormone therapy. The global QOL and disease-specific-QOL were evaluated before treatment and again at 1, 3 and 5 years after treatment. There was no significant difference in the background characteristics between the two groups. The 5-year biochemical progression-free survival was 90% in the RT-IMRT and 79% in the RP group. In the RT-IMRT group, there was no significant deterioration of the global QOL or disease-specific QOL through 5 years post-treatment. In the RP group, the urinary function, sexual function, and sexual bother indicators significantly deteriorated after treatment. Urinary and sexual function was significantly better in the RT-IMRT group at 1, 3 and 5 years post-treatment compared to the RP group. RT-IMRT may be a preferable treatment for localized PC because of similar efficacy to RP but better post-treatment QOL. (author)

  17. Effect of combined treatment with salvage radiotherapy plus androgen suppression on quality of life in patients with recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, Andrew; Choo, Richard; Danjoux, Cyril; Morton, Gerard; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Szumacher, Ewa; Cheung, Patrick; Deboer, Gerrit; Chander, Sarat

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of salvage radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) on quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: A total of 74 patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence or PSA relapse after radical prostatectomy were treated with salvage RT plus 2-year AS, as per a phase II study. Quality of life was prospectively assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-Item Version 3.0 with the added prostate cancer-specific module at baseline and predefined follow-up visits. Results: Patients experienced a significant increase in bowel dysfunction (23%) by the end of RT (p < 0.0001). This bowel dysfunction improved after RT but remained slightly elevated (5-10%) throughout the 2-year AS period. This extent of residual bowel dysfunction would be considered of minimal clinical importance. A similar, but less pronounced, pattern of change did occur for urinary dysfunction. Erectile function showed no change during RT, but had an abrupt decline (10%) with initiation of AS that was of moderate clinical significance (p < 0.01). None of the other QOL domains demonstrated a persistent, significant change from baseline that would be considered of major clinical significance. Conclusion: The combined treatment with salvage RT plus 2-year AS had relatively minor long-term effects on QOL

  18. The effect of marital status on stage and survival of prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollah, Firas; Sun, Maxine; Thuret, Rodolphe; Abdo, Al'a; Morgan, Monica; Jeldres, Claudio; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Perrotte, Paul; Montorsi, Francesco; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2011-08-01

    The detrimental effect of unmarried marital status on stage and survival has been confirmed in several malignancies. We set to test whether this applied to patients diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) treated with radical prostatectomy (RP). We identified 163,697 non-metastatic PCa patients treated with RP, within 17 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries. Logistic regression analyses focused on the rate of locally advanced stage (pT3-4/pN1) at RP. Cox regression analyses tested the relationship between marital status and cancer-specific (CSM), as well as all-cause mortality (ACM). Respectively, 9.1 and 7.8% of individuals were separated/divorced/widowed (SDW) and never married. SDW men had more advanced stage at surgery (odds ratio: 1.1; p married men. Similarly, never married marital status portended to a higher ACM rate (HR:1.2, p = 0.001). These findings were consistent when analyses were stratified according to organ confined vs. locally advanced stages. Being SDW significantly increased the risk of more advanced stage at RP. Following surgery, SDW men portended to a higher CSM and ACM rate than married men. Consequently, these individuals may benefit from a more focused health care throughout the natural history of their disease.

  19. Detection of local recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy: Is there a role for early ¹⁸F-FCH PET/CT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Biagio, Daniele; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Tavolozza, Mario; Abbatiello, Paolo; Schillaci, Orazio

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of early acquisition compared to late imaging for the detection of local recurrence of prostate cancer by means of ¹⁸F-FCH PET/CT. 99 patients with radical prostatectomy (mean PSA 3.9 ± 5.03) were subjected to early dynamic PET/CT acquisition of the pelvis and a whole body PET/CT in the same exam session. None of the patients examined was subjected to radiotherapy for local or distant recurrence. All the subjects were taken off hormonal therapy. 58 subjects did not show local recurrence in both early and late acquisition, 22 were positive in both modalities, 10 showed a positive early and a negative late acquisition while 9 showed a negative early and a positive late acquisition (Cohen's k = 0.558). When the results of imaging modalities were considered separately, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value resulted: 78.9, 96.7, 93.8 and 88.1 % for early acquisition and 73.7, 95.1, 90.3 and 85.3 % for late acquisition, respectively. When the results of early and late acquisition were considered together, results were 97.4, 93.4, 90.2 and 98.3 %, respectively. The combination of early acquisition with late acquisition lead to an increase of the diagnostic accuracy of ¹⁸F-FCH PET/CT for the diagnosis of local recurrence in prostate cancer.

  20. The Efficacy and Utilisation of Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Does it Change the Surgical Dissection Plan? A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin Tavukçu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We investigated the effect of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI on the dissection plan of the neurovascular bundle and the oncological results of our patients who underwent robotic radical prostatectomy operation. Materials and Methods: We prospectively evaluated 30 consecutive patients, 15 of whom had prostate MRI before the operation, and 15 of whom did not. With the findings of MRI, the dissection plan was changed as intrafascial, interfascial, and extrafascial technique in the MRI group. Two groups were compared in terms of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA, and Gleason scores (GSs. Surgical margin status was also checked with the final pathology. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, PSA, biopsy GS, and final pathological GS. MRI changed the initial surgical plan to a nerve-sparing technique in 7 of the 15 patients. Only one patient in the MRI group had a positive surgical margin on bladder neck. MRI was confirmed as the primary tumour localisation in the final pathology in 93.3% of patients. Conclusion: Preoperative prostate MRI influenced the decision to carry out a nerve-sparing technique in 46% of the patients in our study; however, the change to a nerve-sparing technique did not seem to compromise the surgical margin positivity.

  1. [11C]Choline PET/CT predicts survival in hormone-naive prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovacchini, Giampiero; Incerti, Elena; Mapelli, Paola; Gianolli, Luigi; Picchio, Maria; Kirienko, Margarita; Briganti, Alberto; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Montorsi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, PET/CT with radiolabelled choline has been shown to be useful for restaging patients with prostate cancer (PCa) who develop biochemical failure. The limitations of most clinical studies have been poor validation of [ 11 C]choline PET/CT-positive findings and lack of survival analysis. The aim of this study was to assess whether [ 11 C]choline PET/CT can predict survival in hormone-naive PCa patients with biochemical failure. This retrospective study included 302 hormone-naive PCa patients treated with radical prostatectomy who underwent [ 11 C]choline PET/CT from 1 December 2004 to 31 July 2007 because of biochemical failure (prostate-specific antigen, PSA, >0.2 ng/mL). Median PSA was 1.02 ng/mL. PCa-specific survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between clinicopathological variables and PCa-specific survival. The coefficients of the covariates included in the Cox regression analysis were used to develop a novel nomogram. Median follow-up was 7.2 years (1.4 - 18.9 years). [ 11 C]Choline PET/CT was positive in 101 of 302 patients (33 %). Median PCa-specific survival after prostatectomy was 14.9 years (95 % CI 9.7 - 20.1 years) in patients with positive [ 11 C]choline PET/CT. Median survival was not achieved in patients with negative [ 11 C]choline PET/CT. The 15-year PCa-specific survival probability was 42.4 % (95 % CI 31.7 - 53.1 %) in patients with positive [ 11 C]choline PET/CT and 95.5 % (95 % CI 93.5 - 97.5 %) in patients with negative [ 11 C]choline PET/CT. In multivariate analysis, [ 11 C]choline PET/CT (hazard ratio 6.36, 95 % CI 2.14 - 18.94, P < 0.001) and Gleason score >7 (hazard ratio 3.11, 95 % CI 1.11 - 8.66, P = 0.030) predicted PCa-specific survival. An internally validated nomogram predicted 15-year PCa-specific survival probability with an accuracy of 80 %. Positive [ 11 C]choline PET/CT after biochemical failure predicts PCa-specific survival in hormone

  2. Simple prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Han M, Partin AW. Simple prostatectomy: open and robot-assisted laparoscopic approaches. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  3. Quality of Life, Psychological Functioning, and Treatment Satisfaction of Men Who Have Undergone Penile Prosthesis Surgery Following Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Brindha; Moon, Daniel; Love, Christopher; Meyer, Denny; Ferguson, Emma; Crowe, Helen; Howard, Nicholas; Mann, Sarah; Wootten, Addie

    2017-12-01

    Penile prosthesis surgery is last-line treatment to regaining erectile function after radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer. To assess quality of life, psychological functioning, and treatment satisfaction of men who underwent penile implantation after RP; the psychosocial correlates of treatment satisfaction and sexual function after surgery; and the relation between patients' and partners' ratings of treatment satisfaction. 98 consecutive patients who underwent penile implantation after RP from 2010 and 2015 and their partners were invited to complete a series of measures at a single time point. Of these, 71 patients and 43 partners completed measures assessing sexual function, psychological functioning, and treatment satisfaction. Proportions of patients who demonstrated good sexual function and satisfaction with treatment and clinical levels of anxiety and depression were calculated. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to determine psychosocial factors associated with patient treatment satisfaction and sexual function and patient-partner differences in treatment satisfaction. Patients completed the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite Short Form (EPIC-26), Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS), Prostate Cancer-Related Quality of Life Scale, Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire (SEAR), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Partners completed the GAD-7, PHQ-9, EDITS (partner version), and SEAR. 94% of men reported satisfaction with treatment (EDITS score > 50). 77% of men reported good sexual function (EPIC-26 score > 60). Lower depression scores were associated with higher sexual confidence and sexual intimacy, and these were correlated with better treatment satisfaction and sexual function. Patients experienced higher sexual relationship satisfaction (median score = 90.6) than their partners (median score = 81.2), but there was no difference in

  4. The Effect of Ureteral Stent Placement Before Radical Prostatectomy on the Safety of Ureteral Dissection and the Surgeon’s Comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Akdemir

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigated the role of preoperative ureteral stent placement in reducing the risk of ureteral injury, an intraoperative complication of radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP, and its contribution to the surgeon’s comfort. Materials and Methods: Open RRP was performed in 66 patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer in our clinic between 2010 and 2015. The patients were divided into two groups; group 1 (n=34 underwent surgery without ureteral stent placement and group 2 (n=32 had surgery following the placement of a ureteral stent. The cases were preoperatively evaluated by suprapubic and transrectal ultrasonography. Perioperative and postoperative complications of all cases were determined. Both groups were assessed in terms of ureteral injury, operative time, and surgeon’s comfort. Results: The mean age of the patients in group 1 and group 2 was 61.12±5.92 (50-72 years and 63.58±6.2 (51-75 years, respectively. The mean prostate volume was 76.8±2.41 and 72.4±3.53 cc in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The mean operative time was 143.9±3.06 minutes in group 1 and 136.8±2.83 minutes in group 2. Partial ureteral injury occurred in three patients in group 1 and was repaired intraoperatively. Of these patients, two had previously undergone radiotherapy for prostate cancer and it was difficult to perform prostate dissection intraoperatively. The remaining patient had a history of transurethral resection of the prostate. No ureteral injury was observed in any of the patients in group 2. Conclusion: Preoperative ureteral stent placement in selected patients can facilitate ureteral dissection and reduce ureteral injury risk.

  5. Health-related quality of life after radical retropubic prostatectomy and permanent prostate brachytherapy. A 3-year follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Yuasa, Akihito; Shinomori, Kensuke; Ninomiya, Iku; Kataoka, Masaaki; Yamashita, Natsumi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine quality of life (QOL) for 3 years after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) or permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) and to determine differences between the two procedures. In all 107 patients who underwent RRP and 91 who received PPB between October 2005 and July 2007 were included in this study. QOL surveys were performed using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS), the Medical Outcome Study 8-items short form health survey and the expanded prostate cancer index composite at baseline and 1, 3, 6, 12 and 36 months after treatment. At 3 years, all parameters for general QOL and almost all for disease-specific QOL were similar to those at 12 months. Urinary continence after RRP slightly improved from 12 months to 3 years, but it was still significantly worse than that after PPB. Scores for urinary irritation or obstruction and for bowel function and bother at 3 years were similar between the two groups. Sexual function and bother did not change between 12 months and 3 years in either group. Sexual function at 3 years after RRP was worse than that after PPB. Recovery from urinary incontinence and sexual function after RRP with nerve sparing were similar to those after PPB. Urinary incontinence at 3 years correlated with the treatment method and patients' age, whereas urinary irritation/obstruction and urinary bother correlated with the pre-treatment IPSS. QOL assessment represents an important issue in prostate cancer management. Our findings are likely to be of aid in the development of a treatment plan for prostate cancer patients. (author)

  6. Surgery confounds biology: the predictive value of stage-, grade- and prostate-specific antigen for recurrence after radical prostatectomy as a function of surgeon experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J; Savage, Caroline J; Bianco, Fernando J; Klein, Eric A; Kattan, Michael W; Secin, Fernando P; Guilloneau, Bertrand D; Scardino, Peter T

    2011-04-01

    Statistical models predicting cancer recurrence after surgery are based on biologic variables. We have shown previously that prostate cancer recurrence is related to both tumor biology and to surgical technique. Here, we evaluate the association between several biological predictors and biochemical recurrence across varying surgical experience. The study included two separate cohorts: 6,091 patients treated by open radical prostatectomy and an independent replication set of 2,298 patients treated laparoscopically. We calculated the odds ratios for biological predictors of biochemical recurrence-stage, Gleason grade and prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-and also the predictive accuracy (area under the curve, AUC) of a multivariable model, for subgroups of patients defined by the experience of their surgeon. In the open cohort, the odds ratio for Gleason score 8+ and advanced pathologic stage, though not PSA or Gleason score 7, increased dramatically when patients treated by surgeons with lower levels of experience were excluded (Gleason 8+: odds ratios 5.6 overall vs. 13.0 for patients treated by surgeons with 1,000+ prior cases; locally advanced disease: odds ratios of 6.6 vs. 12.2, respectively). The AUC of the multivariable model was 0.750 for patients treated by surgeons with 50 or fewer cases compared to 0.849 for patients treated by surgeons with 500 or more. Although predictiveness was lower overall for the independent replication set cohort, the main findings were replicated. Surgery confounds biology. Although our findings have no direct clinical implications, studies investigating biological variables as predictors of outcome after curative resection of cancer should consider the impact of surgeon-specific factors. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  7. Improving the prediction of pathologic outcomes in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy: the value of prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3), prostate health index (phi) and sarcosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Matteo; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Bruzzese, Dario; Perdonà, Sisto; Mazzarella, Claudia; Perruolo, Giuseppe; Marino, Ada; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Giorgio, Emilia; Tagliamonte, Virginia; Bottero, Danilo; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Terracciano, Daniela

    2015-02-01

    Several efforts have been made to find biomarkers that could help clinicians to preoperatively determine prostate cancer (PCa) pathological characteristics and choose the best therapeutic approach, avoiding over-treatment. On this effort, prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3), prostate health index (phi) and sarcosine have been presented as promising tools. We evaluated the ability of these biomarkers to predict the pathologic PCa characteristics within a prospectively collected contemporary cohort of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) for clinically localized PCa at a single high-volume Institution. The prognostic performance of PCA3, phi and sarcosine were evaluated in 78 patients undergoing RP for biopsy-proven PCa. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses tested the accuracy (area under the curve (AUC)) in predicting PCa pathological characteristics. Decision curve analyses (DCA) were used to assess the clinical benefit of the three biomarkers. We found that PCA3, phi and sarcosine levels were significantly higher in patients with tumor volume (TV)≥0.5 ml, pathologic Gleason sum (GS)≥7 and pT3 disease (all p-values≤0.01). ROC curve analysis showed that phi is an accurate predictor of high-stage (AUC 0.85 [0.77-0.93]), high-grade (AUC 0.83 [0.73-0.93]) and high-volume disease (AUC 0.94 [0.88-0.99]). Sarcosine showed a comparable AUC (0.85 [0.76-0.94]) only for T3 stage prediction, whereas PCA3 score showed lower AUCs, ranging from 0.74 (for GS) to 0.86 (for TV). PCA3, phi and sarcosine are predictors of PCa characteristics at final pathology. Successful clinical translation of these findings would reduce the frequency of surveillance biopsies and may enhance acceptance of active surveillance (AS). Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. A Case Series of Patients Who Underwent Laparoscopic Extraperitoneal Radical Prostatectomy with the Simultaneous Implant of a Penile Prosthesis: Focus on Penile Length Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Purpose There are many grey areas in the field of penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy (RP). The preservation of the full dimensions of the penis is an important consideration for improving patients' compliance for the treatment. We present the first case series of patients treated by laparoscopic extraperitoneal RP and simultaneous penile prosthesis implantation (PPI) in order to preserve the full length of the penis and to improve patients' satisfaction. Materials and Methods From June 2013 to June 2014, 10 patients underwent simultaneous PPI (with an AMS InhibiZone prosthesis) and RP. Patients were evaluated by means of urological visits, questionnaires, and objective measurements before surgery, at discharge from the hospital, on postoperative days 21 to 28, each 3 months for the first year, and each 6 months thereafter. The main outcome measures were biochemical recurrence-free rate, penile length, and quality of life. Results Ten patients (mean age of 61 years; completed the study follow-up period (median, 32.2 months). No difference was found between the time of surgery and the 2-year follow-up evaluation in terms of penile length. The pre-surgery 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) median score was 97. Patients were satisfied with their penile implants, and couples' level of sexual satisfaction was rated median 8. The median postoperative SF-36 score was 99 at 3 months follow-up. Conclusions Laparoscopic extraperitoneal RP surgery with simultaneous PPI placement seems to be an interesting possibility to propose to motivated patients for preserving the length of the penis and improving their satisfaction. PMID:29623695

  9. Clinical Validation of the 2005 ISUP Gleason Grading System in a Cohort of Intermediate and High Risk Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila F Faraj

    Full Text Available In 2005, the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP introduced several modifications to the original Gleason system that were intended to enhance the prognostic power of Gleason score (GS. The objective of this study was to clinically validate the 2005 ISUP Gleason grading system for its ability to detect metastasis. We queried our institutional RP database for men with NCCN clinically localized intermediate to high-risk disease undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP between 1992 and 2010 with no additional treatment until the time of metastatic progression. A case-cohort design was utilized. A total of 333 available RP samples were re-reviewed and GS was reassigned per the 2005 ISUP Gleason system. Cumulative incidence of metastasis was 0%, 8.4%, 24.5% and 44.4% among specimens that were downgraded, unchanged, had one point GS increase and two point GS increase, respectively. The hazard ratio for metastasis raised in GS 8 and 9 compared to GS 7 from 2.77 and 5.91 to 3.49 and 9.31, respectively. The survival c-index of GS increased from 0.70 to 0.80 when samples were re-graded at 5 years post RP. The c-index of the reassigned GS was higher than the original GS (0.77 vs 0.64 for predicting PCSM at 10 years post RP. The regraded GS improved the prediction of metastasis and PCSM. This validates the updated Gleason grading system using an unambiguous clinical endpoint and highlights the need for reassignment of Gleason grading according to 2005 ISUP system when considering comparisons of novel biomarkers to clinicopathological variables in archival cohorts.

  10. Incidence of positive surgical margins after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: Does the surgeon's experience have an influence on all pathological stages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamil, A W; Costabel, J I; Billordo Peres, N; Martínez, P F; Giudice, C R; Damia, O H

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the clinical and surgical features of patients who underwent robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) at our institution, and the impact of the surgeon's experience in the oncological results related to pathological stage. An analysis of 300 RARP consecutively performed by the same urologist was conducted. Patients were divided into 3 groups of 100 patients in chronological order, according to surgery date. All patients had organ-confined clinical stage. Variables which could impact in positive margins rates were analyzed. Finally, positive surgical margins (PSM) in regard to pathological stage and surgeon's experience were compared and analyzed. No significant differences were found in variables which could impact in PSM rates. The overall PSM rate was 21%, with 28% in the first group, 20% in the second, and 16% in the third (P = .108). Significant lineal decreasing tendency was observed (P = .024). In pT2 patients, the overall PSM rate was 16.6%, with 27%, 13.8%, and 7.3% in each group respectively (P = .009). A significant difference was found between group 1 and group 3 (P = .004). In pT3 patients, the surgeon's experience was not significantly associated with margin reductions with an overall PSM rate of 27.7% (28.2%, 28.6%, and 26.7% in each group respectively). Clinical and surgical features in our patients did not vary over time. We found a significant reduction of PSM related to surgeon's experience in pT2 patients. Contrariwise, the margin status remained stable despite increasing experience in pT3 patients. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Multiparametric 3T MRI for the prediction of pathological downgrading after radical prostatectomy in patients with biopsy-proven Gleason score 3 + 4 prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondo, Tatsuo; Hricak, Hedvig; Sala, Evis; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Bernstein, Melanie; Eastham, James A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of pre-treatment 3-Tesla (3T) multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) for predicting Gleason score (GS) downgrading after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with GS 3 + 4 prostate cancer (PCa) on biopsy. We retrospectively reviewed 304 patients with biopsy-proven GS 3 + 4 PCa who underwent mpMRI before RP. On T2-weighted imaging and three mpMRI combinations (T2-weighted imaging + diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI], T2-weighted imaging + dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI [DCE-MRI], and T2-weighted imaging + DWI + DCE-MRI), two radiologists (R1/R2) scored the presence of a dominant tumour using a 5-point Likert scale (1 = definitely absent to 5 = definitely present). Diagnostic performance in identifying downgrading was evaluated via areas under the curves (AUCs). Predictive accuracies of multivariate models were calculated. In predicting downgrading, T2-weighted imaging + DWI (AUC = 0.89/0.85 for R1/R2) performed significantly better than T2-weighted imaging alone (AUC = 0.72/0.73; p 0.99 for R1/R2). On multivariate analysis, the clinical + mpMRI model incorporating T2-weighted imaging + DWI (AUC = 0.92/0.88 for R1/R2) predicted downgrading significantly better than the clinical model (AUC = 0.73; p < 0.001 for R1/R2). mpMRI improves the ability to identify a subgroup of patients with Gleason 3 + 4 PCa on biopsy who are candidates for active surveillance. DCE-MRI (compared to T2 + DWI) offered no additional benefit to the prediction of downgrading. (orig.)

  12. Long-term oncological outcomes of a phase II trial of neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapy followed by radical prostatectomy for patients with clinically localised, high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Jonathan L; Poon, Stephen A; Sjoberg, Daniel D; Maschino, Alexandra C; Vickers, Andrew J; Bernie, Aaron; Konety, Badrinath R; Kelly, W Kevin; Eastham, James A

    2015-07-01

    To determine long-term oncological outcomes of radical prostatectomy (RP) after neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapy (CHT) for clinically localised, high-risk prostate cancer. In this phase II multicentre trial of patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PSA level >20 ng/mL, Gleason ≥8, or clinical stage ≥T3), androgen-deprivation therapy (goserelin acetate depot) and paclitaxel, carboplatin and estramustine were administered before RP. We report the long-term oncological outcomes of these patients and compared them to a contemporary cohort who met oncological inclusion criteria but received RP only. In all, 34 patients were enrolled and followed for a median of 13.1 years. Within 10 years most patients had biochemical recurrence (BCR-free probability 22%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 10-37%). However, the probability of disease-specific survival at 10 years was 84% (95% CI 66-93%) and overall survival was 78% (95% CI 60-89%). The CHT group had higher-risk features than the comparison group (123 patients), with an almost doubled risk of calculated preoperative 5-year BCR (69% vs 36%, P < 0.01). After adjusting for these imbalances the CHT group had trends toward improvement in BCR (hazard ratio [HR] 0.76, 95% CI 0.43-1.34; P = 0.3) and metastasis-free survival (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.24-1.29; P = 0.2) although these were not statistically significant. Neoadjuvant CHT followed by RP was associated with lower rates of BCR and metastasis compared with the RP-only group; however, these results were not statistically significant. Because this treatment strategy has known harms and unproven benefit, this strategy should only be instituted in the setting of a clinical trial. © 2014 The Authors BJU International © 2014 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Pattern of Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Failure Dictates the Probability of a Positive Bone Scan in Patients With an Increasing PSA After Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotan, Zohar A.; Bianco, Fernando J.; Rabbani, Farhang; Eastham, James A.; Fearn, Paul; Scher, Howard I.; Kelly, Kevin W.; Chen, Hui-Ni; Schöder, Heiko; Hricak, Hedvig; Scardino, Peter T.; Kattan, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Physicians often order periodic bone scans (BS) to check for metastases in patients with an increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA; biochemical recurrence [BCR]) after radical prostatectomy (RP), but most scans are negative. We studied patient characteristics to build a predictive model for a positive scan. Patients and Methods From our prostate cancer database we identified all patients with detectable PSA after RP. We analyzed the following features at the time of each bone scan for association with a positive BS: preoperative PSA, time to BCR, pathologic findings of the RP, PSA before the BS (trigger PSA), PSA kinetics (PSA doubling time, PSA slope, and PSA velocity), and time from BCR to BS. The results were incorporated into a predictive model. Results There were 414 BS performed in 239 patients with BCR and no history of androgen deprivation therapy. Only 60 (14.5%) were positive for metastases. In univariate analysis, preoperative PSA (P = .04), seminal vesicle invasion (P = .02), PSA velocity (P < .001), and trigger PSA (P < .001) predicted a positive BS. In multivariate analysis, only PSA slope (odds ratio [OR], 2.71; P = .03), PSA velocity (OR, 0.93; P = .003), and trigger PSA (OR, 1.022; P < .001) predicted a positive BS. A nomogram for predicting the bone scan result was constructed with an overfit-corrected concordance index of 0.93. Conclusion Trigger PSA, PSA velocity, and slope were associated with a positive BS. A highly discriminating nomogram can be used to select patients according to their risk for a positive scan. Omitting scans in low-risk patients could reduce substantially the number of scans ordered. PMID:15774789

  14. A Double Blind, Randomized, Neoadjuvant Study of the Tissue effects of POMx Pills in Men with Prostate Cancer Prior to Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Stephen J.; Carducci, Michael; Kroeger, Nils; Partin, Alan; Rao, Jian-yu; Jin, Yusheng; Kerkoutian, Susan; Wu, Hong; Li, Yunfeng; Creel, Patricia; Mundy, Kelly; Gurganus, Robin; Fedor, Helen; King, Serina A.; Zhang, Yanjun; Heber, David; Pantuck, Allan J.

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranates slow prostate cancer xenograft growth and prolong PSA doubling times in single-arm human studies. Pomegranates’ effects on human prostate tissue are understudied. We hypothesized orally administered pomegranate extract (POMx; PomWonderful, Los Angeles, CA) would lower tissue 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an oxidative stress biomarker. 70 men were randomized to 2 tablets POMx or placebo daily up to 4 weeks prior to radical prostatectomy. Tissue was analyzed for intra-prostatic Urolithin A, a pomegranate metabolite, benign and malignant 8-OHdG, and cancer pS6 kinase, NFκB, and Ki67. Primary end-point was differences in 8-OHdG powered to detect 30% reduction. POMx was associated with 16% lower benign tissue 8-OHdG (p=0.095), which was not statistically significant. POMx was well-tolerated with no treatment-related withdrawals. There were no differences in baseline clinicopathological features between arms. Urolithin A was detected in 21/33 patient in the POMx group vs. 12/35 in the placebo group (p=0.031). Cancer pS6 kinase, NFκB, Ki67, and serum PSA changes were similar between arms. POMx prior to surgery results in pomegranate metabolite accumulation in prostate tissues. Our primary end-point in this modest-sized short-term trial was negative. Future larger longer studies are needed to more definitely test whether POMx reduces prostate oxidative stress as well as further animal testing to better understand the multiple mechanisms through which POMx may alter prostate cancer biology. PMID:23985577

  15. Overcoming difficulties with equipoise to enable recruitment to a randomised controlled trial of partial ablation versus radical prostatectomy for unilateral localised prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Daisy; Hamdy, Freddie C; Leslie, Tom A; Rosario, Derek; Dudderidge, Tim; Hindley, Richard; Emberton, Mark; Brewster, Simon; Sooriakumaran, Prasanna; Catto, James W F; Emara, Amr; Ahmed, Hashim; Whybrow, Paul; le Conte, Steffi; Donovan, Jenny L

    2018-06-11

    To describe how clinicians conceptualised equipoise in the PART (Partial prostate Ablation versus Radical prosTatectomy in intermediate risk, unilateral clinically localised prostate cancer) feasibility study and how this affected recruitment. PART included a QuinteT Recruitment Intervention (QRI) to optimise recruitment. Phase I aimed to understand recruitment, and included scrutinising recruitment data, interviewing the Trial Management Group and recruiters (n=13), and audio-recording recruitment consultations (n=64). Data were analysed using qualitative content and thematic analysis methods. In Phase II, strategies to improve recruitment were developed and delivered. Initially many recruiters found it difficult to maintain a position of equipoise and held preconceptions about which treatment was best for particular patients. They did not feel comfortable about approaching all eligible patients, and when the study was discussed, biases were conveyed through the use of terminology, poorly balanced information and direct treatment recommendations. Individual and group feedback led to presentations to patients becoming clearer and enabled recruiters to reconsider their sense of equipoise. Although the precise impact of the QRI alone cannot be determined, recruitment increased (from mean 1.4 (range=0-4) to 4.5 (range=0-12) patients per month) and the feasibility study reached its recruitment target. Although clinicians find it challenging to recruit participants to a trial comparing different contemporary treatments for prostate cancer, training and support can enable recruiters to become more comfortable with conveying equipoise and providing clearer information to patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Pathological Outcome following Radical Prostatectomy in Men with Prostate Specific Antigen Greater than 10 ng/ml and Histologically Favorable Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiwoong; Kwon, Young Suk; Kim, Sinae; Han, Christopher Sejong; Farber, Nicholas; Kim, Jongmyung; Byun, Seok Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Jeon, Seong Soo; Kim, Isaac Yi

    2016-05-01

    Active surveillance is now the treatment of choice in men with low risk prostate cancer. Although there is no consensus on which patients are eligible for active surveillance, prostate specific antigen above 10 ng/ml is generally excluded. In an attempt to determine the validity of using a prostate specific antigen cutoff of 10 ng/ml to counsel men considering active surveillance we analyzed a multi-institution database to determine the pathological outcome in men with prostate specific antigen greater than 10 ng/ml but histologically favorable risk prostate cancer. We queried a prospectively maintained database of men with histologically favorable risk prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy between 2003 and 2015. The cohort was categorized into 3 groups based on prostate specific antigen level, including low-less than 10 ng/ml, intermediate-10 or greater to less than 20 and high-20 or greater. Associations of prostate specific antigen group with adverse pathological and oncologic outcomes were analyzed. Of 2,125 patients 1,327 were categorized with histologically favorable risk disease. However on multivariate analyses the rates of up staging and upgrading were similar between the intermediate and low prostate specific antigen groups. In contrast compared to the intermediate prostate specific antigen group the high group had higher incidences of up staging (p = 0.02) and upgrading to 4 + 3 or greater disease (p = 0.046). Biochemical recurrence-free survival rates revealed no pairwise intergroup differences except between the low and high groups. Patients with preoperatively elevated prostate specific antigen between 10 and less than 20 ng/ml who otherwise had histologically favorable risk prostate cancer were not at higher risk for adverse pathological outcomes than men with prostate specific antigen less than 10 ng/ml. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Income and health-related quality of life among prostate cancer patients over a one-year period after radical prostatectomy: a linear mixed model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jens; Lüdecke, Daniel; Hofreuter-Gätgens, Kerstin; Fisch, Margit; Graefen, Markus; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf

    2017-09-01

    To examine income-related disparities in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) over a one-year period after surgery (radical prostatectomy) and its contributory factors in a longitudinal perspective. Evidence of associations between income and HRQOL among patients with prostate cancer (PCa) is sparse and their explanations still remain unclear. 246 males of two German hospitals filled out a questionnaire at the time of acute treatment, 6 and 12 months later. Age, partnership status, baseline disease and treatment factors, physical and psychological comorbidities, as well as treatment factors and adverse effects at follow-up were additionally included in the analyses to explain potential disparities. HRQOL was assessed with the EORTC (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer) QLQ-C30 core questionnaire and the prostate-specific QLQ-PR25. A linear mixed model for repeated measures was calculated. The fixed effects showed highly significant income-related inequalities regarding the majority of HRQOL scales. Less affluent PCa patients reported lower HRQOL in terms of global quality of life, all functional scales and urinary symptoms. After introducing relevant covariates, some associations became insignificant (physical, cognitive and sexual function), while others only showed reduced estimates (global quality of life, urinary symptoms, role, emotional and social function). In particular, mental disorders/psychological comorbidity played a relevant role in the explanation of income-related disparities. One year after surgery, income-related disparities in various dimensions of HRQOL persist. With respect to economically disadvantaged PCa patients, the findings emphasize the importance of continuous psychosocial screening and tailored interventions, of patients' empowerment and improved access to supportive care.

  18. High-definition resolution three-dimensional imaging systems in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: randomized comparative study with high-definition resolution two-dimensional systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Nakagawa, Ken; Usui, Yukio; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Ito, Akihiro; Miyajima, Akira; Hoshi, Akio; Arai, Yoichi; Baba, Shiro; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging systems have been introduced worldwide for surgical instrumentation. A difficulty of laparoscopic surgery involves converting two-dimensional (2D) images into 3D images and depth perception rearrangement. 3D imaging may remove the need for depth perception rearrangement and therefore have clinical benefits. We conducted a multicenter, open-label, randomized trial to compare the surgical outcome of 3D-high-definition (HD) resolution and 2D-HD imaging in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP), in order to determine whether an LRP under HD resolution 3D imaging is superior to that under HD resolution 2D imaging in perioperative outcome, feasibility, and fatigue. One-hundred twenty-two patients were randomly assigned to a 2D or 3D group. The primary outcome was time to perform vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA), which is technically demanding and may include a number of technical difficulties considered in laparoscopic surgeries. VUA time was not significantly shorter in the 3D group (26.7 min, mean) compared with the 2D group (30.1 min, mean) (p = 0.11, Student's t test). However, experienced surgeons and 3D-HD imaging were independent predictors for shorter VUA times (p = 0.000, p = 0.014, multivariate logistic regression analysis). Total pneumoperitoneum time was not different. No conversion case from 3D to 2D or LRP to open RP was observed. Fatigue was evaluated by a simulation sickness questionnaire and critical flicker frequency. Results were not different between the two groups. Subjective feasibility and satisfaction scores were significantly higher in the 3D group. Using a 3D imaging system in LRP may have only limited advantages in decreasing operation times over 2D imaging systems. However, the 3D system increased surgical feasibility and decreased surgeons' effort levels without inducing significant fatigue.

  19. Race and time from diagnosis to radical prostatectomy: does equal access mean equal timely access to the operating room?--Results from the SEARCH database.

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    Bañez, Lionel L; Terris, Martha K; Aronson, William J; Presti, Joseph C; Kane, Christopher J; Amling, Christopher L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2009-04-01

    African American men with prostate cancer are at higher risk for cancer-specific death than Caucasian men. We determine whether significant delays in management contribute to this disparity. We hypothesize that in an equal-access health care system, time interval from diagnosis to treatment would not differ by race. We identified 1,532 African American and Caucasian men who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) from 1988 to 2007 at one of four Veterans Affairs Medical Centers that comprise the Shared Equal-Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database with known biopsy date. We compared time from biopsy to RP between racial groups using linear regression adjusting for demographic and clinical variables. We analyzed risk of potential clinically relevant delays by determining odds of delays >90 and >180 days. Median time interval from diagnosis to RP was 76 and 68 days for African Americans and Caucasian men, respectively (P = 0.004). After controlling for demographic and clinical variables, race was not associated with the time interval between diagnosis and RP (P = 0.09). Furthermore, race was not associated with increased risk of delays >90 (P = 0.45) or >180 days (P = 0.31). In a cohort of men undergoing RP in an equal-access setting, there was no significant difference between racial groups with regard to time interval from diagnosis to RP. Thus, equal-access includes equal timely access to the operating room. Given our previous finding of poorer outcomes among African Americans, treatment delays do not seem to explain these observations. Our findings need to be confirmed in patients electing other treatment modalities and in other practice settings.

  20. Assessing the Impact of Surgeon Experience on Urinary Continence Recovery After Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Results of Four High-Volume Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Nicola; Di Trapani, Ettore; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Umari, Paolo; Buffi, Nicolò Maria; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Mottrie, Alexander; Gaboardi, Franco; Montorsi, Francesco; Briganti, Alberto; Suardi, Nazareno

    2017-09-01

    To test the impact of surgeon experience on urinary continence (UC) recovery after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). The study included 1477 consecutive patients treated with RARP by four surgeons between 2006 and 2014. UC recovery was defined as being completely dry over a 24-hour period at follow-up. Surgeon experience was coded as the total number of RARP performed by the surgeon before the patient's operation. Multivariable analysis tested the association between surgeon experience and UC recovery. Covariates consisted of patient age, Charlson comorbidity index, preoperative International Index of Erectile Function-Erectile Function domain (IIEF-EF), nerve-sparing surgery (none vs unilateral vs bilateral), and preoperative risk groups (low- vs intermediate- vs high risk). The number of cases performed by each surgeon was 541, 413, 411, and 112, respectively. Median follow-up was 24 months (inter-quartile range: 18, 40). The UC recovery rate at 1 year after surgery was 82%. At multivariable analyses, surgeon experience represented an independent predictor of UC recovery (hazard ratio: 1.02, p < 0.001). The surgical learning curve was similar among surgeons, moving linearly from ∼60% of UC rate at the initial cases to almost 90% after more than 400 procedures. In patients undergoing RARP, surgeon experience is a significant predictor of UC recovery. The surgical learning curve of UC recovery does not reach a plateau even after more than 100 cases, suggesting a continuous improvement of the surgical technique. These findings deserve attention for patient counseling and future comparative studies evaluating functional outcomes after RARP.

  1. Low Pressure Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy With the AirSeal System at OLV Hospital: Results From a Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Falce, Sabrina; Novara, Giacomo; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Umari, Paolo; De Naeyer, Geert; D'Hondt, Frederiek; Beresian, Jean; Carette, Rik; Penicka, Martin; Mo, Yujiing; Vandenbroucke, Geert; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2017-12-01

    Limited studies examined effects of pneumoperiotneum during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and with AirSeal. The aim of this study was to assess the effect on hemodynamics of a lower pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg) with AirSeal, during RARP in steep Trendelenburg 45° (ST). This is an institutional review board-approved, prospective, interventional, single-center study including patients treated with RARP at OLV Hospital by one extremely experienced surgeon (July 2015-February 2016). Intraoperative monitoring included: arterial pressure, central venous pressure, cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, systemic vascular resistance, intrathoracic pressure, airways pressures, left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic areas/volumes and ejection fraction, by transesophageal echocardiography, an esophageal catheter, and FloTrac/Vigileo system. Measurements were performed after induction of anesthesia with patient in horizontal (T0), 5 minutes after 8 mmHg pneumoperitoneum (TP), 5 minutes after ST (TT1) and every 30 minutes thereafter until the end of surgery (TH). Parameters modification at the prespecified times was assessed by Wilcoxon and Friedman tests, as appropriate. All analyses were performed by SPSS v. 23.0. A total of 53 consecutive patients were enrolled. The mean patients age was 62.6 ± 6.9 years. Comorbidity was relatively limited (51% with Charlson Comorbidity Index as low as 0). Despite the ST, working always at 8 mmHg with AirSeal, only central venous pressure and mean airways pressure showed a statistically significant variation during the operative time. Although other significant hemodynamic/respiratory changes were observed adding pneumoperitoneum and then ST, all variables remained always within limits safely manageable by anesthesiologists. The combination of ST, lower pressure pneumoperitoneum and extreme surgeon's experience enables to safely perform RARP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of penile rehabilitation with low-dose vardenafil on recovery of erectile function in Japanese men following nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzo Nakano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction (ED is a major complication after radical prostatectomy (RP; however, debate continues regarding the efficacy of penile rehabilitation in the recovery of the postoperative erectile function (EF. This study included a total of 103 consecutive sexually active Japanese men with localized prostate cancer undergoing nerve-sparing RP, and analyzed the postoperative EF, focusing on the significance of penile rehabilitation. In this series, 24 and 79 patients underwent bilateral and unilateral nerve-sparing RPs, respectively, and 10 or 20 mg of vardenafil was administered to 35 patients at least once weekly, who agreed to undergo penile rehabilitation. Twelve months after RP, 48 (46.6% of the 103 patients were judged to have recovered EF sufficient for sexual intercourse without any assistance. The proportion of patients who recovered EF in those undergoing penile rehabilitation (60.0% was significantly greater than that in those without penile rehabilitation (38.2%. Of several parameters examined, the preoperative International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5 score and nerve-sparing procedure were significantly associated with the postoperative EF recovery rates in patients with and without management by penile rehabilitation, respectively. Furthermore, univariate analysis identified the preoperative IIEF-5 score, nerve-sparing procedure and penile rehabilitation as significant predictors of EF recovery, among which the preoperative IIEF-5 score and nerve-sparing procedure appeared to be independently associated with EF recovery. Considering these findings, despite the lack of independent significance, penile rehabilitation with low-dose vardenafil could exert a beneficial effect on EF recovery in Japanese men following nerve-sparing RP.

  3. Return to work following robot-assisted laparoscopic and open retropubic radical prostatectomy: A single-center cohort study to compare duration of sick leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mechow, Stefanie; Graefen, Markus; Haese, Alexander; Tennstedt, Pierre; Pehrke, Dirk; Friedersdorff, Frank; Beyer, Burkhard

    2018-06-01

    To compare the duration of sick leave in patients with localized prostate cancer after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and open retropubic RP (ORP) at a German high-volume prostate cancer center. The data of 1,415 patients treated with RP at Martini Klinik, Prostate Cancer Center between 2012 and 2016 were, retrospectively, analyzed. Information on employment status, monthly revenues and days of work missed due to sickness were assessed via online questionnaire. Additional data were retrieved from our institutional database. Medians and interquartile ranges (IQR) were reported for continuous data. Cox proportional hazard analysis was performed to compare both surgical techniques for return to work time after RP. Median time elapsed between surgery and return to work comprised 42 days in patients undergoing RARP (IQR: 21-70) and ORP (IQR: 28-84, P = 0.05). In Cox regression analysis, surgical approach showed no impact on return to work time (RARP vs. ORP hazard ratio = 1, 95% CI: 0.91-1.16, P = 0.69). Return to work time was significantly associated with employment status, physical workload and monthly income (all PLimitation of this study is the nonrandomized design in a single-center. As the surgical approach did not show any influence on the number of days missed from work in patients undergoing RP, no superiority of either RARP or ORP could be identified for return to work time in a German cohort. Both surgical approaches are safe options usually allowing the patients to resume normal activities including work after an appropriate convalescence period. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Upgrading and downgrading of prostate cancer from biopsy to radical prostatectomy: incidence and predictive factors using the modified Gleason grading system and factoring in tertiary grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jonathan I; Feng, Zhaoyong; Trock, Bruce J; Pierorazio, Phillip M

    2012-05-01

    Prior studies assessing the correlation of Gleason score (GS) at needle biopsy and corresponding radical prostatectomy (RP) predated the use of the modified Gleason scoring system and did not factor in tertiary grade patterns. To assess the relation of biopsy and RP grade in the largest study to date. A total of 7643 totally embedded RP and corresponding needle biopsies (2004-2010) were analyzed according to the updated Gleason system. All patients underwent prostate biopsy prior to RP. The relation of upgrading or downgrading to patient and cancer characteristics was compared using the chi-square test, Student t test, and multivariable logistic regression. A total of 36.3% of cases were upgraded from a needle biopsy GS 5-6 to a higher grade at RP (11.2% with GS 6 plus tertiary). Half of the cases had matching GS 3+4=7 at biopsy and RP with an approximately equal number of cases downgraded and upgraded at RP. With biopsy GS 4+3=7, RP GS was almost equally 3+4=7 and 4+3=7. Biopsy GS 8 led to an almost equal distribution between RP GS 4+3=7, 8, and 9-10. A total of 58% of the cases had matching GS 9-10 at biopsy and RP. In multivariable analysis, increasing age (pfactoring in multiple variables including the number of positive cores and the maximum percentage of cancer per core, the concordance indexes were not sufficiently high to justify the use of nomograms for predicting upgrading and downgrading for the individual patient. Almost 20% of RP cases have tertiary patterns. A needle biopsy can sample a tertiary higher Gleason pattern in the RP, which is then not recorded in the standard GS reporting, resulting in an apparent overgrading on the needle biopsy. Copyright © 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Superior metastasis-free survival for patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy compared to radical prostatectomy: A propensity score-matched analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Markovina, MD, PhD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: For high-risk prostate cancer (HR-PCa in men with a life expectancy of at least 10 years, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends radiation therapy (RT plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with category 1 evidence or radical prostatectomy (RP as an acceptable initial therapy. Randomized evidence regarding which therapy is optimal for disease control is lacking for men with HR-PCa. We performed a propensity-score-matched comparison of outcomes for men with localized HR-PCa treated with primary RT or RP. Methods and materials: The medical records of patients with localized HR-PCa who were treated at our institution between 2002 and 2011 were reviewed. Patient and disease characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were collected. A combination of nearest-neighbor propensity score matching on age, Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27 comorbidity index, prostate-specific antigen, biopsy Gleason scores, and clinical T-stage as well as exact matching on prostate-specific antigen, biopsy Gleason scores, and clinical T-stage was performed. Outcomes were measured from diagnosis. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare metastasis-free and overall survival. Results: A total of 246 patients were identified with 62 propensity-score-matched pairs. ADT was administered to 6.5% and 80.6% of patients receiving RP and RT, respectively. Five-year rates of metastasis for RP and RT were 33% and 8.9%, respectively (P = .003. Overall survival was not different. Delay of salvage therapy was longer for patients undergoing primary RT (P < .001. Findings were similar when only those patients who did not receive ADT were compared. Conclusions: At our institution, treatment with primary RT resulted in superior metastasis-free survival over RP. This was not accompanied by an improvement in OS.

  6. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Diagnosis of Local Recurrences of Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy: Preliminary Evaluation on Twenty-Seven Cases

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    Salvatore Francesco Carbone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI in patients affected by prostatic fossa (PF relapse after radical prostatectomy (RP for prostatic carcinoma (PC. Methods. Twenty-seven patients showing a nodular lesion in the PF at T2-weighted MR imaging after RP, with diagnosis of PC relapse established by biopsy or PSA determinations, were investigated by DWI. Two readers evaluated the DWI results in consensus and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC of the nodules, separately; a mean value was obtained (ADCm. Results. Relapses did not significantly differ in size in respect of postsurgical benign nodules. The DWI qualitative evaluation showed sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, ppv, and npv values, respectively, of 83.3%, 88.9%, 85.2%, 93.7%, and 72.7% (100%, 87.5%, 95.6%, 93.7%, and 100%, for nodules >6 mm. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC for ADC evaluation between the two readers was 0.852 (95% CI 0.661–0.935; P=0.0001. The ADCm values for relapses and benign nodules were, respectively, 0.98±0.21×10−3 mm2/sec and 1.24±0.32×10−3 mm2/sec (P=0.006. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, ppv and npv of ADCm were, respectively, 77.8%, 88.9%, 81.8%, 93.3%, and 66.7% (93.3%, 87.5%, 85.4%, 93.3%, and 87.5% for nodules >6 mm. Conclusions. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is a promising tool in the management of a hyperintense nodule detected by T2-weighted sequences. This might have a relevant importance in contouring radiotherapy treatment volumes.

  7. Urodynamic assessment of bladder and urethral function among men with lower urinary tract symptoms after radical prostatectomy: A comparison between men with and without urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hansol; Kim, Ki Bom; Lee, Sangchul; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Myong; Cho, Sung Yong; Oh, Seung-June; Jeong, Seong Jin

    2015-12-01

    We compared bladder and urethral functions following radical prostatectomy (RP) between men with and without urinary incontinence (UI), using a large-scale database from SNU-experts-of-urodynamics-leading (SEOUL) Study Group. Since July 2004, we have prospectively collected data on urodynamics from 303 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) following RP at three affiliated hospitals