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Sample records for radical palliative surgery

  1. Palliative surgery for pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.M.; Aurangzeb, M.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the role of palliative surgical treatment in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Ward of Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar, from January 2005 to January 2009. Methodology: The study included patients with pancreatic carcinoma admitted with advanced, unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas. Patients with resectable tumours and with previous history of gastric or biliary surgery were excluded. Palliative procedures were performed after assessment of the tumour and its confirmation as unresectable on ultrasound and CT scan + ERCP. Postoperatively all patients were referred to oncologist. Complications and mortality were noted. Results: There were 40 patients, including 24 males and 16 females with mean age 58.72 +- 6.42 years. The most common procedure performed was triple bypass in 21 (52.50%) patients followed by choledocho-, cholecysto-, hepaticoand gastro-jejunostomy in various combinations. Wound infection occurred in 7 patients and was more common in patients with co-morbidities. Biliary leakage occurred in 03 patients. Postoperative cholangitis occurred in 3 patients while 7 patients had minor leak from the drain site. Four patients developed UTI, while 5 patients had signs of delayed gastric emptying. Two patients had upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Three patients died due to septicemia and multiple organs failure. Rest of the patients were discharged in stable state. The mean hospital stay was 8.40 +- 3.48 days and median survival was 7.72 +- 2.39 months. Conclusion: Surgical palliation for the advanced carcinoma pancreas can improve the quality of life of patients and is associated with minimum morbidity and mortality. (author)

  2. Repetitive endoscopic sinus surgery failure: a role for radical surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, Ward J. M.; Wreesmann, Volkert B.; van der Meulen, Freerk W.; Knegt, Paul P.; Fokkens, Wytske J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is considered to be the golden standard for surgery in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. However, there is still a small group of patients unresponsive despite repetitive surgery. Radical surgery aimed at reduction of the

  3. Radical surgery compared with intracavitary cesium followed by radical surgery in cervical carcinoma stage IB

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    Tinga, D.J.; Bouma, J.; Aalders, J.G. (Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, State Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands)); Hollema, H. (Dept. of Pathology, State Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    Forty-nine patients aged {le} 45 years, with cervical carcinoma stage IB ({le} 3 cm) were treated with either primary radical surgery (n = 26), or intracavitary irradiation followed by radical surgery (n = 23). With primary surgery, ovarian function had been preserved in 15 of the 25 patients, who were alive and well. Seven of the primary surgery patients were irradiated postoperatively and 2 others with a central recurrence were cured by irradiation. One other patient, who was not irradiated postoperatively, had an intestinal metastasis and died of the disease. If any of the adverse prognostic factors (as reported in the literature) had been considered as an indication for postoperative irradiation, 17 patients instead of 7 would have been irradiated after primary radical surgery. In the comparable group of 23 patients treated by intracavitary irradiation and radical surgery (and in 4 cases postoperative irradiation as well) there was no recurrence. There was no significant statistical difference between the treatment results in the cesium + surgery group and those who underwent primary radical surgery. Young patients with early cervical carcinoma without prognostic indicators for postoperative irradiation can benefit from primary radical surgery, because their ovarian function can be preserved. (authors).

  4. Radical surgery compared with intracavitary cesium followed by radical surgery in cervical carcinoma stage IB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinga, D.J.; Bouma, J.; Aalders, J.G.; Hollema, H.

    1990-01-01

    Forty-nine patients aged ≤ 45 years, with cervical carcinoma stage IB (≤ 3 cm) were treated with either primary radical surgery (n = 26), or intracavitary irradiation followed by radical surgery (n = 23). With primary surgery, ovarian function had been preserved in 15 of the 25 patients, who were alive and well. Seven of the primary surgery patients were irradiated postoperatively and 2 others with a central recurrence were cured by irradiation. One other patient, who was not irradiated postoperatively, had an intestinal metastasis and died of the disease. If any of the adverse prognostic factors (as reported in the literature) had been considered as an indication for postoperative irradiation, 17 patients instead of 7 would have been irradiated after primary radical surgery. In the comparable group of 23 patients treated by intracavitary irradiation and radical surgery (and in 4 cases postoperative irradiation as well) there was no recurrence. There was no significant statistical difference between the treatment results in the cesium + surgery group and those who underwent primary radical surgery. Young patients with early cervical carcinoma without prognostic indicators for postoperative irradiation can benefit from primary radical surgery, because their ovarian function can be preserved. (authors)

  5. Preoperative radiochemotherapy and radical surgery in comparison with radical surgery alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, C.; Schettler, D.; Bohndorf, W.

    1994-01-01

    A multicentric, randomized study of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and the oropharynx has been undertaken by DOeSAK. The results after radical surgery alone have been compared with the results of combined preoperative radiochemotherapy followed by radical surgery. Patients with primary (biopsy proven) SCC of the oral cavity or the oropharynx with tumor nodes metastasis (TNM) stages T2-4, N0-3, M0 were included in the study. A total of 141 patients were treated by radical surgery alone, whereas 127 patients were treated by radical surgery preceded by preoperative radiochemotherapy. The pre-operative treatment consisted of conventionally fractioned irradiation on the primary and the regional lymph nodes with a total dose of 36 Gy (5 x 2 Gy per week) and low-dose cisplatin chemotherapy with 5 x 12.5 mg cisplatin per m 2 of body surface during the first week of treatment. Radical surgery according to be DOeSAK definitions (DOeSAK, 1982) was performed after a delay of 10-14 days. During the follow-up period, 28.2% of all patients suffered from locoregional recurrence, and 27.2% of the patients died. The percentages were higher after radical surgery alone for locoregional recurrence (31% and 15.6%) and for death (28% and 18.6%). The life-table analysis showed improved survival rates of 4.5% after 1 year and 8.3% after 2 years in the group of patients treated with combined therapy. The demonstrated improvement appeared to be significant with the Gehan-Wilcoxon test as well as with the log rank test below a P value of 5%. (au) (29 refs.)

  6. Optimal pain management for radical prostatectomy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Grish P; Jaschinski, Thomas; Bonnet, Francis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increase in the diagnosis of prostate cancer has increased the incidence of radical prostatectomy. However, the literature assessing pain therapy for this procedure has not been systematically evaluated. Thus, optimal pain therapy for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy remains...... controversial. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for studies assessing the effects of analgesic and anesthetic interventions on pain after radical prostatectomy. All searches were conducted in October 2012 and updated in June 2015. RESULTS: Most...... treatments studied improved pain relief and/or reduced opioid requirements. However, there were significant differences in the study designs and the variables evaluated, precluding quantitative analysis and consensus recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review reveals that there is a lack...

  7. Aggressive palliative surgery in metastatic phyllodes tumor: Impact on quality of life

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    A S Kapali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic phyllodes tumor has very few treatment options. Phyllodes tumor in metastatic setting has limited role of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy or combined treatment. Most of the patients receive symptomatic management only. We present a case of metastatic phyllodes tumor managed with aggressive margin negative resection of primary tumor leading to palliation of almost all the symptoms, which eventually led to improved quality of life and probably to improved survival. The improved quality of life was objectively assessed with Hamilton depression rating scale. Surgery may be the only mode of palliation in selected patients that provides a better quality of life and directly or indirectly may lead to improved survival.

  8. Communication skills in palliative surgery: skill and effort are key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Thomas J

    2011-04-01

    Excellence as a surgeon requires not only the technical and intellectual ability to effectively take care of surgical disease but also an ability to respond to the needs and questions of patients. This article provides an overview of the importance of communication skills in optimal surgical palliation and offers suggestions for a multidisciplinary team approach, using the palliative triangle as the ideal model of communication and interpersonal skills. This article also discusses guidelines for advanced surgical decision making and outlines methods to improve communication skills. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Excimer laser corneal surgery and free oxygen radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, K; Bilgihan, A; Akata, F; Hasanreisoğlu, B; Türközkan, N

    1996-01-01

    Corneal photoablation with 193 nm argon fluoride excimer laser is a new technique for the treatment of refractive errors and for removing corneal opacities and irregularities. Ultraviolet radiation and thermal injury induce free radical formation in the tissues. The aim of this study was to confirm the production of free radicals by excimer laser photoablation in rabbits. The thermal changes of the posterior corneal surface were recorded during excimer laser photoablation. The lipid peroxide (LPO) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities of aqueous humour were measured after excimer laser keratectomy. The aqueous LPO levels were not changed after excimer laser ablation, but both the thermal increase in the cornea during the photoablation and the decreased aqueous SOD activities suggest that free radicals are formed in the cornea during excimer laser keratectomy, and that they may be responsible for some of the complications of excimer laser corneal surgery.

  10. Guidelines for the application of surgery and endoprostheses in the palliation of obstructive jaundice in advanced cancer of the pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, R. P.; van der Schelling, G. P.; Klinkenbijl, J. H.; Mulder, P. G.; van Blankenstein, M.; Jeekel, J.

    1994-01-01

    This study was set up to identify patient-related factors favoring the application of either surgery or endoprostheses in the palliation of obstructive jaundice in subsets of patients with cancer of the head of the pancreas or periampullary region. In the palliation of obstructive jaundice, surgical

  11. [Erectile complications after radical surgery for penile plastic induration].

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    Austoni, E; Mantovani, F; Colombo, F; Canclini, L; Mastromarino, G; Vecchio, D; Fenice, O

    1994-02-01

    The radical surgical option we propose for Peyronie's disease consists in removing the sclero-hyalinotic focus of disease and replacing it by an autologous dermal graft taken from the upper outer thigh area. Between 1981 and 1991, we operated 335 patients with IPP, 152 of whom underwent plaque excision and dermal graft. All could be assessed at two-year follow-up. Two main complications were observed: mild penile flexure due to scar retraction of the graft (35% of cases), and partial erectile deficit with decreased corporal rigidity (17% of cases). The degree of the graft retraction is linked to the individual's histologic response. A mild deviation of the penis can occur some months after surgery and is not a relapse flexure due to disease progression (as it should have evolutive characteristics) but is mere scar retraction and will spontaneously regress. As the patient will date the onset of a postoperative erectile deficit from the time of the operation, it is advisable to assess preoperatively the erectile ability of all patients. Furthermore, an impaired erectile response could result from hypoaesthesia of the glans, post-surgical stress, and fibrosis of the erectile tissue. A retrospective assessment of radical surgery cases involving plaque excision and dermal graft lead us to propose this option where precise indications apply, providing the presence of other alterations of the erectile function are pre-operatively assessed.

  12. Palliative surgery for acetabular metastasis with pathological central dislocation of the hip joint after radiation therapy. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Manabu; Takada, Jun; Oebisu, Naoto; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Taguchi, Susumu; Takami, Masatsugu

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery for bone metastases is mainly a palliative treatment. Pathological central dislocation of the hip joint secondary to osteonecrosis of acetabular metastasis after radiation therapy brings severe suffering to cancer patients. We performed minimally invasive palliative surgery for an elderly woman, and excellent pain relief was achieved. An 80-year-old female suffering from right hip pain was referred to our hospital. She had undergone surgery for lung cancer 5 years previously and her right acetabulum was subsequently affected by metastasis. With the aim of controlling the metastasis, radiation therapy was performed. Two years later, pathological central dislocation of the hip joint occurred with sudden onset of severe pain, and she was unable to maintain a sitting position and became bedridden. After she was referred to our hospital, we created an intentional pseudarthrosis in the femoral neck for palliation. After the surgery, excellent pain relief and remarkably improved mobility were achieved during her limited remaining lifetime. In this report, we introduce a novel method of producing a pseudarthrosis in the femoral neck for pathological dislocation. This procedure is a minimally invasive treatment and an alternative option for palliative surgery for pathological dislocation of the hip joint due to osteonecrosis after radiation therapy. (author)

  13. Outcomes of secondary self-expandable metal stents versus surgery after delayed initial palliative stent failure in malignant colorectal obstruction.

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    Yoon, Jin Young; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2013-01-01

    When re-intervention is required due to an occluded first colorectal self-expanding metal stent for malignant colorectal obstruction, serious controversies exist regarding whether to use endoscopic re-stenting or surgery. To compare the clinical outcomes in patients who underwent stent re-insertion versus palliative surgery as a second intervention. A total of 115 patients who received either self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) insertion or palliative surgery for treatment of a second occurrence of malignant colorectal obstruction after the first SEMS placement were retrospectively studied between July 2005 and December 2009. The median overall survival (8.2 vs. 15.5 months) and progression-free survival (4.0 vs. 2.7 months) were not significantly different between the stent and surgery groups (p = 0.895 and 0.650, respectively). The median lumen patency in the stent group was 3.4 months and that in the surgery group was 7.9 months (p = 0.003). The immediate complication rate after second stent insertion was 13.9% and late complication rate was observed in 12 of 79 (15.2%) patients. There was no mortality related to the SEMS procedure. The complication and mortality rates associated with palliative surgery were 3.5% (2/57) and 12.3% (7/57), respectively. Although there is no significant difference in the overall survival between stenting and surgery, a secondary stent insertion had a lower mortality rate despite a shorter duration of temporary colorectal decompression compared to that of palliative surgery.

  14. Orgasm associated incontinence (climacturia) following radical pelvic surgery: rates of occurrence and predictors.

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    Choi, Judy M; Nelson, Christian J; Stasi, Jason; Mulhall, John P

    2007-06-01

    Orgasm associated incontinence, that is the inadvertent leakage of urine at orgasm, has received little attention in the literature. We evaluated the rate of occurrence of orgasm associated incontinence following radical pelvic surgery as well as its associated factors and predictors. From January 2005 to March 2006, 696 patients were evaluated for post-radical pelvic surgery sexual dysfunction. A database was created, and descriptive statistics, chi-square analysis and logistic regression analysis were used to evaluate associated factors and predictors. Of 475 patients 96 (20%) reported orgasm associated incontinence following radical pelvic surgery. The incidence was significantly less in the cystoprostatectomy group than in the open and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy groups (p Orgasm associated incontinence was more commonly found within 12 months following surgery vs greater than 12 months (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.72-0.92, p orgasm associated pain (RR 1.09, 95% CI 1.01-1.16, p Orgasm associated incontinence was not associated with patient age, the degree of nerve sparing, surgical margin status, seminal vesicle or lymph node involvement, preoperative erectile function, nocturnal erections, libido level or daytime continence. Orgasm associated incontinence occurs in a fifth of men (96 of 475) following radical pelvic surgery. The incidence of orgasm associated incontinence is greater with radical prostatectomy than with radical cystectomy and it is unrelated to the type of prostatectomy performed (open vs laparoscopic). Orgasm associated incontinence is more likely to be reported within year 1 following surgery and in men who complain of orgasmic pain and/or penile shortening.

  15. Young infants with severe tetralogy of Fallot: Early primary surgery versus transcatheter palliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Travis J; Van Arsdell, Glen S; Benson, Lee; Pham-Hung, Eric; Gritti, Michael; Page, Alexandra; Caldarone, Christopher A; Hickey, Edward J

    2017-11-01

    Infants with severe tetralogy of Fallot may undergo (1) early primary surgical repair (EARLY) or (2) early transcatheter palliation (CATH) before delayed surgical repair. We compared these strategies with (3) elective single-stage tetralogy of Fallot repair (IDEAL). From 2000 to 2012, 453 children underwent tetralogy of Fallot repair (excluding systemic-pulmonary shunts), including 383 in the IDEAL (75%), 42 in the EARLY (9%), and 28 in the CATH (6%) groups. IDEAL repair at The Hospital for Sick Children occurs after 3 months. Risk-adjusted hazard analysis compared freedom from surgical or catheter reintervention. Somatic size, branch pulmonary artery size, and right ventricle systolic pressure were modeled using 2780 echocardiogram reports via mixed-model regression. CATH involved right ventricular outflow tract stent in 18 patients, right ventricular outflow tract balloon in 9 patients, and ductal-stent in 1 patient. Three patients died (1 per group). Risk-adjusted freedom from surgical reoperation was 89% ± 4%, 88% ± 5%, and 85% ± 6% for the IDEAL, EARLY, and CATH groups, respectively, at 10 years. Patients in the EARLY and CATH groups had similar reoperation rates, except for neonates (tetralogy of Fallot. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. OUTCOMES OF PALLIATIVE ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY FOR HIP DISLOCATION IN PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

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    R. R. Bidyamshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hip dislocation is the key problem in patients with severe cerebral palsy (GMFCS IV, V older than 10 years that affects life quality and limits functional capabilities. In the present study the authors evaluated the efficiency of the proximal femoral resection arthroplasty (pfra and valgus proximal osteotomy of the femur (VPOF associated with femoral head resection for pain control, improvement of postural management, hygiene and verticalization with total weight-bearing and correction of accompanying orthopaedic deformities. Material and мethods. A retrospective study compared two groups of patients where PFRA (7 cases, 13 hips or VPOF (14 patients, 23 hips were performed. Level V of GMFCS was reported in 10 patients, and level IV of GMFCS – in 11 patients. The mean age at time of surgery was 15.3±3.9 y.o. PFRA was performed in 7 cases (13 joints and VPOF – in 14 patients (23 joints. Results. The authors did not observe any difference between the methods in respect of pain control, postural management, comfortable sitting position and hygiene. The verticalization with total weight-bearing and life quality improvement was achieved only after PVOF with femoral head resection associated with simultaneous knee and foot deformity correction performed according to the principles of Single-Event Multilevel Orthopedic Surgery. Conclusion. Both palliative methods allow to control pain syndrome, to achieve satisfactory postural management, comfortable sitting position and hygiene. But only VPOF with simultaneous knee and foot deformity correction provides possibility to verticalize the patient with weight-bearing using different orthopedic devices.

  17. Progress in surgical palliative treatment for malignant obstructive jaundice

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    LIANG Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive jaundice, also known as surgical jaundice, is divided into benign and malignant types. Most of the patients newly diagnosed with malignant obstructive jaundice have lost the opportunity of receiving radical surgery due to its insidious onset, so surgical palliative treatment is very important for patients with advanced malignant obstructive jaundice. This paper elaborates on various current modalities of surgical palliative treatment for malignant obstructive jaundice. Appropriate modality of surgical palliative treatment is of great significance for patients with advanced malignant obstructive jaundice.

  18. Efficacy of Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery for Bone Metastases Pain Palliation

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    Kawasaki, Motohiro; Nanba, Hirofumi; Kato, Tomonari; Tani, Toshikazu; Ushida, Takahiro

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is a novel treatment method that achieves non-invasive thermal ablation by focusing many ultrasound waves on a target tissue with real-time monitoring of the location and temperature of the target during the procedure. We investigated the palliative effect on pain and safety of MRgFUS in painful bone metastases. Six patients (mean age, 65.8 years) who met eligibility criteria for the clinical study approved by our Institutional Ethics Committee based on the cooperative protocol were treated with MRgFUS. Targeted sites included the sacrum (n = 1), ilium (n = 2), scapula (n = 2), and femur (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 9.2 months. All procedures were performed as a single-session treatment using the treatment system that is integrated into the patient table of a magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanner. Endpoints were change in the intensity of pain due to bone metastases from before to after the treatment, as measured on a numerical rating scale, pain interference with daily activities as determined by the Brief pain inventory (BPI), change in images, and safety. Pain relief was obtained in all patients early after treatment, with a reduction in the mean pain score from 6.0±1.3 at baseline to 1.2±1.0 at the end of follow-up as well as in pain interference with daily activities. The mean time required for a single-session treatment was 83.7±37.0 min, with a mean number of sonications required of 13.3±3.7 and mean energy applied of 846.4±273.5 J. No significant growth of tumors was observed, nor were there treatment-related adverse events. These results suggest that MRgFUS has a non-invasive palliative effect on the localized pain in patients with bone metastasis. MRgFUS could become an option in treatment strategies for painful bone metastases in the future.

  19. Propofol Effect on Stress Response and Free Radicals in Patient during Surgery and Sedation Procedure

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    Theresia Monica Rahardjo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Propofol is an intravenous anesthetic used worldwide as an anesthesia induction and maintenance agent. Propofol also used as sedation agent in Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Despite it’s usual anesthesia properties, propofol has an unique pharmacologic characteristic, especially as antioxidant and stress response reduction. These advantages suggested propofol has positive effects when used as an anesthesia agent in surgery or sedation in ICU in conditions when high stress and free radical level are released. CONTENT: Stress response and free radical can be elevated in various conditions including surgery or during care in ICU, especially critical ill patient. Cortisol is a major stress hormone that influences metabolism, cardiovascular and central nervous system, either in acute or chronic phase. Oxidative stress was marked by free radical elevation called Radical Oxygen Species (ROS. Combination of both elements (cortisol and ROS can worsen patient condition. Propofol with anti-stress and antioxidant properties could be used to reduce stress response and attenuate free radical level in order to improve patient condition. SUMMARY: The anti-stress and antioxidant properties of Propofol are interesting, because these benefits can be added as adjunctive therapy when propofol was used as an anesthetic agent in surgery and a sedation in ICU. KEYWORDS: propofol, stress response, antioxidant.

  20. Treatment of early stage breast cancer by limited surgery and radical irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, A.M.; Cope, O.; Russo, R.; Wang, C.C.; Schulz, M.D.; Wang, C.; Rodkey, G.

    1980-01-01

    Eighty-five female patients with early stage breast cancer, i.e., Stage I and II were treated by limited surgery followed by radical radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between January, 1956 and December, 1974. Patients included those who were medically inoperable or who refused mastectomy. The 5-year survival rate was 83% and 76% for Stage I and II, respectively. The corresponding disease free survival (absolute) was 67% and 42%. Although the number of patients so treated is small, there was no significant difference in survival from the results of the radical mastectomy series at the same institution. No major complications were encountered. Seventeen of eighty-five patients developed minor problems; mostly fibrosis and minimal arm lymphedema stemmming from older orthovoltage equipment and treatment techniques. With the current availability of megavoltage equipment, improvements in techniques and dosimetry, complications should decrease. Combined limited surgery and radical radiation therapy should be considered in those patients where a radical mastectomy is not feasible because of psychological or medical problems. Since this procedure results in a cosmetically acceptable breast, radical radiation in early stage breast cancer seems a reasonable alternative to radical mastectomy

  1. Radical surgery in patients with residual disease after (chemo)radiation for cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, Aniek; Arts, Henriette J. G.; Klip, Harry; Nijhuis, Esther R.; Pras, Elisabeth; Hollema, Harry; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Nijman, Hans W.; Mourits, Marian J. E.; Reyners, Anna K. L.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Thomas, Gillian; van der Zee, Ate G. J.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine possible impact of routinely scheduled biopsies and more radical surgery for residual central disease in locally advanced cervical cancer after (chemo) radiation. Methods/Materials: Data were analyzed of a consecutive series of cervical cancer

  2. FDG-PET-Detected Extracranial Metastasis in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Staging for Surgery or Radical Radiotherapy

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    Macmanus, Michael P.; Hicks, Rodney; Fisher, Richard; Rischin, Danny; Michael, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Ball, David L. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Inst., Melbourne (Australia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2003-03-01

    The prognostic significance of extracranial distant metastasis detected by positron emission tomography (PET) was investigated in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Forty-two patients staged with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET-detected distant metastasis before planned surgery (n=7) or radical radiotherapy (RT)/chemoradiotherapy (n=35) for NSCLC were identified from a prospective database. The influence of metastasis number and other prognostic factors was investigated using Cox's regression analysis. Treatment after PET included surgery (n=2), radical RT (n =5), palliative RT (n=25), chemotherapy (n=8) or supportive care (n=2). All but 4 patients had died by the last follow-up. Median survival was 9 months overall, 12 months for 27 patients with single PET-detected metastasis and 5 months for 15 patients with >1 metastasis (p=0.009). It was found that the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (p=0.027) but not pre-PET stage, weight loss or metastasis site correlated with survival. PET-detected metastatic tumor burden appeared to influence survival and should be evaluated as a prognostic factor in NSCLC.

  3. Radical surgery after chemotherapy: a new therapeutic strategy to envision in grade II glioma.

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    Duffau, Hugues; Taillandier, Luc; Capelle, Laurent

    2006-11-01

    While surgery is proned in low-grade glioma (LGG), the invasion of functional areas frequently prevents a complete resection. We report the first case of a patient operated on for a left frontal LGG, diagnosed because of seizures, with partial resection due to an invasion of the controlateral hemisphere. Chemotherapy enabled a regression of this controlateral extension. Postchemotherapy surgery performed with intraoperative functional mapping then allowed a complete resection, without sequelae. The patient has a normal socio-professional life, with no seizure. No other treatment was given. There was no recurrence, with a follow-up of 2 years since the second surgery (3.5 years since the first symptom). We propose a new therapeutic strategy in unresectable LGG, with preoperative chemotherapy, to make a radical surgery possible in a second step, while preserving the quality of life.

  4. Gastrointestinal Surgery of Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carsten Palnæs; Olsen, Ingrid Marie Holst; Knigge, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Surgery is the only treatment that may cure the patient with gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) and should always be considered as the first-line treatment if radical resection can be achieved. Even in cases where radical surgery is not possible, palliative resection may...... be performed to reduce local or hormone-induced symptoms and to improve quality of life. The surgical procedures for GEP-NENs are accordingly described below. In most patients life-long follow-up is required, even following radical surgery, as recurrence may occur several years later....

  5. Congenital craniopharyngioma treated by radical surgery: case report and review of the literature.

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    Kageji, Teruyoshi; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Kotani, Yumiko; Kaji, Tsuyoshi; Bando, Yoshimi; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Nakajima, Kohei; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2017-02-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are 5-10 % of all pediatric tumors, but are seldomly encountered in the perinatal period. Only seven instances of a truly antenatal diagnosis of a congenital craniopharyngioma that subsequently underwent radical surgery have been reported. We present the case of a patient who received the diagnosis of a suprasellar tumor during the prenatal period and received radical surgery. We report a case of a neonatal craniopharyngioma treated surgically. The pregnancy progressed uneventfully until a routine ultrasound at 37 weeks of gestation showed a 15 × 15 mm high echoic mass in the center of the fetal head. Neonatal Gd-enhanced T1-weighted MRI at 5 days of life showed a homogenously enhanced mass (16×22×15 mm) in the sellar and suprasellar lesion. As the tumor showed rapid growth at the 3rd month of life, the patient underwent a surgical treatment and the mass was totally removed. Three years later, the physical and mental development of the patient was normal, and Gd-MRI studies showed no tumor recurrence. The present case is the eighth case of a truly antenatal diagnosis of a craniopharyngioma that underwent successful radical surgery. Craniopharyngioma is a benign tumor and thought to be a slow growing tumor in childhood. The results of radical surgery were very poor, and the mortality and morbidity rates were high in the previous reports due to the huge size of tumor at operation. The present case demonstrated the rapid growth in short interval of Gd-MRI. This is the first report of tumor kinetics of congenital craniopharyngioma with previous reports. The calculated tumor doubling time in our case was 37 days.

  6. Hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy followed by radical surgery in locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeller, U.; Biertz, I.; Tribius, S.; Alberti, W.; Flinzberg, S.; Schmelzle, R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the outcome of hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy and subsequent planned primary tumor resection and radical neck dissection in locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity. Patients and Methods: this retrospective analysis evaluates 126 subsequent patients who were treated between 1988 and 1997 for locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity (with extension into the oropharynx in 17 patients), 34 (27%) AJCC stage III and 92 (73%) stage IV. Primary tumor and nodal metastases were irradiated with 1.4 Gy bid to a median total dose of 72.8 Gy (range 58.8-75.6 Gy). Then, planned radical surgery of the primary site according to the initial tumor extent and cervical nodes was performed. Median follow-up of living patients was 6 years (range 1-11 years). Results: 4 weeks after radiotherapy, 14 patients (11%) had complete tumor remission, 92 (73%) partial remission, 15 (12%) no change, and five (4%) progressive disease. Complete resection was achieved in 117 (93%) patients (nine incomplete resections). 5-year locoregional control rate was 62 ± 9%, overall survival 36 ± 9%. Surgery-related morbidity occurred in 42 patients (33%; mainly delayed wound healing and fistulae), overall severe treatment-related morbidity in 46 patients (36%). 24/84 relapse-free patients (29%) required a percutaneous gastrostomy or nasal tube ≥ 1 year after therapy. Conclusion: in this study, the outcome of combined curative radiotherapy and planned surgery of the primary tumor and neck nodes was comparable to reported results of hyperfractionated radiotherapy with or without salvage surgery of the neck nodes with respect to locoregional control and overall survival. Planned surgery carries a substantial risk of morbidity and seems to offer no benefit in comparison to salvage surgery of the neck nodes only. Therefore, salvage surgery is preferred. (orig.)

  7. Successful Use of Magnetic Resonance-Guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery for Long-Term Pain Palliation in a Patient Suffering from Metastatic Bone Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Yoon, Sang Wook; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Jong Tae [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Shay, Lilach [InSightec. Ltd, Hifa, (Israel); Lee, Kyong Sik [Dept. of General Surgery, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery (MRgFUS) is a clinically effective, non-invasive treatment for thermal ablation of various soft tissue tumors, and is effective in pain palliation following radiation therapy, as has been demonstrated in the initial studies of bone metastases. The current study evaluated the safety and clinical efficacy of MRgFUS for pain palliation prior to radiation therapy, in a patient with a solitary metastatic bone lesion. This is the first case report of MRgFUS treatment with a 1-year follow-up in a patient.

  8. Successful Use of Magnetic Resonance-Guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery for Long-Term Pain Palliation in a Patient Suffering from Metastatic Bone Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Yoon, Sang Wook; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Jong Tae; Shay, Lilach; Lee, Kyong Sik

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery (MRgFUS) is a clinically effective, non-invasive treatment for thermal ablation of various soft tissue tumors, and is effective in pain palliation following radiation therapy, as has been demonstrated in the initial studies of bone metastases. The current study evaluated the safety and clinical efficacy of MRgFUS for pain palliation prior to radiation therapy, in a patient with a solitary metastatic bone lesion. This is the first case report of MRgFUS treatment with a 1-year follow-up in a patient.

  9. Psychological distress in women with breast and gynecological cancer treated with radical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Campelo, Paloma; Bragado-Álvarez, Carmen; Hernández-Lloreda, Maria José

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to compare psychological distress (body image disturbance,self-esteem, depression, and anxiety) in women with breast or gynecological cancer treated by radical surgery. Additionally, another objective is to analyze the association between psychological distress and sociodemographic characteristics, medical history, and social support to produce a prediction model for the outcome measures. A cross-sectional study was carried out with 100 women who had undergone radical surgery for breast or gynecological cancer. Both groups were divided into the following: younger than 50 years old and 50 years old or older. Body Image Scale, Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Beck Anxiety Inventory were used. Age had a significant main effect on psychological distress but the type of cancer did not.Younger women showed significantly greater distress than older women (p-valuesself-esteem, the variables were: being younger, post-adjuvant therapy side effects,and dissatisfaction with social support. And for higher anxiety, the sole variable included was post-adjuvant therapy side effects. Both mastectomy and hysterectomy/oophorectomy cause similar psychological distress in younger women, but mastectomy causes greater distress in older women than hysterectomy/oophorectomy.

  10. Prognostic role of mesenteric lymph nodes involvement in patients undergoing posterior pelvic exenteration during radical or supra-radical surgery for advanced ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Roberto; Capozzi, Vito Andrea; Sozzi, Giulio; Volpi, Lavinia; Ceni, Valentina; Melpignano, Mauro; Giordano, Giovanna; Marchesi, Federico; Monica, Michela; Di Serio, Maurizio; Riccò, Matteo; Ceccaroni, Marcello

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to analyze the prognostic role and the practical implication of mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) involvements in advanced ovarian cancer (AOC). A total of 429 patients with AOC underwent surgery between December 2007 and May 2017. We included in the study 83 patients who had primary (PDS) or interval debulking surgery (IDS) for AOC with bowel resection. Numbers, characteristics and surgical implication of MLN involvement were considered. Eighty-three patients were submitted to bowel resection during cytoreduction for AOC. Sixty-seven patients (80.7%) underwent primary debulking surgery (PDS). Sixteen patients (19.3%) experienced interval debulking surgery (IDS). 43 cases (51.8%) showed MLN involvement. A statistic correlation between positive MLN and pelvic lymph nodes (PLN) (p = 0.084), aortic lymph nodes (ALN) (p = 0.008) and bowel infiltration deeper than serosa (p = 0.043) was found. A longer overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival was observed in case of negative MLN in the first 20 months of follow-up. No statistical differences between positive and negative MLN in terms of operative complication, morbidity, Ca-125, type of surgery (radical vs supra-radical), length and site of bowel resection, residual disease and site of recurrence were observed. An important correlation between positive MLN, ALN and PLN was detected; these results suggest a lymphatic spread of epithelial AOC similar to that of primary bowel cancer. The absence of residual disease after surgery is an independent prognostic factor; to achieve this result should be recommended a radical bowel resection during debulking surgery for AOC with bowel involvement.

  11. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and radical surgery. Early results and toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leibl, Bernhard J. [Klinikum Coburg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Coburg Cancer Center, Coburg (Germany); Vitz, Stephanie; Schaefer, Wolfgang; Alfrink, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G. [DiCura Coburg, Coburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Coburg Cancer Center, Coburg (Germany); Geschwendtner, Andreas [Klinikum Coburg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Coburg Cancer Center, Coburg (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate treatment results and toxicity following a combined approach consisting of neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and radical surgery in advanced adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. Patients and Methods: Between 2005 and 2009, a total of 41 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and the esophagogastric junction were evaluated, of whom 23 received neoadjuvant radiochemo-therapy (RCT). A total dose of 50.4 Gy with 2 cycles of simultaneous cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (FU) or Taxol/FU-chemotherapy were applied. A radical transthoracic subtotal esophageal and proximal gastric resection through a right thoracoabdominal laparotomy with intrathoracic anastomosis was performed 6-8 weeks following RCT. This was combined with a two-field lymphadenectomy of mediastinal and abdominal lymph nodes. Standard histopathological evaluation included the application of regression grading according to Werner and Hoefler. Toxicity was recorded on the basis of CTC criteria; survival curves were calculated according to Kaplan-Meier. V10, V15, and V20 data were correlated with pulmonary toxicity. Results: Overall survival for all 23 patients was 61% at 3 years. Of the original 23 patients, 18 (78%) patients proceeded to radical surgery. Reasons for no surgery included advanced age of 79, 82, and 86 years (n = 3), severe comorbidity (n = 1), and progression during radiochemotherapy (n = 1). Surgical morbidity (grade 3-4) and mortality rates were 35% and 6%, respectively. Resurgery was necessary in 3 cases (18%). Clear resection margins were achieved in 17 of 18 patients (94%). Twelve of 18 (67%) patients initially diagnosed with T3 tumors and 3 of 3 patients with T4 tumors experienced downstaging. The ypN0 rate was 12 of 18 patients (67%). Out of a total of 18 patients, regression grading revealed < 10% viable cells in 8 (44%) including 3 cases (17%) with complete regression, 10-50% viable

  12. [Magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery for pain palliation of bone metastases: early experience of clinical application in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianjun; Wang, Han; Tang, Na; Hua, Yingqi; Yang, Haiyan; Qiu, Yimin; Ge, Renbin; Zhou, Ying; Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Guixiang

    2015-11-03

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) in treatment for pain palliation of bone metastases. Eighty-one patients of painful bone metastases were volunteered to screen for this study in Shanghai General Hospital from June 2014 to February 2015. Twenty-three patients among them were treated by MRgFUS, who was more than 18-years old, having the ability to fully understand the informed consent of the research, suffering with pain of numeric rating scale (NRS) ≥ 4, non-received radiotherapy or chemotherapy for pain palliation of bone metastases in the past two weeks. The NRS, the standard question of Brief Pain Inventory (BPI-QoL), and the standard question of Europe Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire- Bone Metastases 22 (EORTC QLQ-BM22) were respectively recorded before and 1-week, 1-month, 3-month after the treatment. The related adverse events of MRgFUS were observed and recorded in 3 months after the treatment as well. (1)Twenty-three metastatic bone tumor lesions of 23 patients were treated by MRgFUS, the treatment data was as follows: the mean treatment time was (88 ± 33) minutes, the mean sonication number was 13 ± 8. (2) Adverse events included: pain in therapy area 3/23, which spontaneous relieving within one week; numbness in lower limb (1/23), which relieved after physiotherapy. (3) The NRS of before treatment and at 1-week, 1-month, and 3-month after treatment respectively was 6.0 ± 1.5, 3.7 ± 1.7,3.1 ± 2.0, and 2.2 ± 1.0,which significantly decreased after the treatment (P<0.01). (4) The BPI-QoL score of before treatment and at 1-week, 1-month, and 3-month after treatment respectively was 39 ± 16, 27 ± 18, 26 ± 18, and 21 ± 18, which significantly decreased after the treatment (P<0.01). (5) The EORTC QLQ-BM22 score of before treatment and at 1-week, 1-month, and 3-month after treatment respectively was 52 ± 13, 44 ± 12, 42 ± 12, and 39

  13. Locally Advanced Cheek Carcinoma; Radical Surgery and Reconstruction of Though and Through Defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denewer, A.T.; Steet, A.E.; Mohamed, O.H.; Aly, O.F.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Squamous cell carcinoma of the cheek is a locoregionally aggressive tumor. Radical resection may be curative in cases of large tumor without distant metastases. We reviewed forty eight consecutive cases of Sq.c.c. of the oral cavity to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the reconstructive method. Patients and Methods: Forty eight cases of invasive Sq.c.c. affecting the cheek performed in Mansoura University, Surgical Oncology Department. From November 2001 to October 2004 were included. Twenty cafes presented primarily, and 28 were relapsing after previous surgery or radiotherapy. Tumors of T 3 and T 4 size were included. Radical excision with adequate safety margin followed by reconstruction was done in the same setting using: A- Double layered pectorals major flap (n=30). B- Pectorals major flap for external surface and tongue flap for mucosal lining (n=10). C- Pectorals major flap plus free Latissmus dorsi flap (n=3). D- Latissmus dorsi flap plus tongue flap (n=5). Results: Nine cases (18.7%) had local and distant relapse after a median follow up period of 36 months. However, total flap loss was not encountered. There were partial loss of three tongue flaps, seven pectorals flaps corrected with debridement and re approximation. Two patients had oral incompetence. Orocutaneous salivary fistula persistent more than three weeks occurred in eight patients. Functional outcome in terms of oral competence, sensibility, chewing movements was satisfactory in all but three cases. In Conclusion: Radical resection of extensive cheek carcinoma and reconstruction using pedicled flaps is an effective, economic and reliable method for oncologic and functional purposes

  14. Shape Optimization of the Assisted Bi-directional Glenn surgery for stage-1 single ventricle palliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Aekaansh; Shang, Jessica; Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi; Wong, Kwai; Marsden, Alison

    2016-11-01

    Babies born with a single functional ventricle typically undergo three open-heart surgeries starting as neonates. The first of these stages (BT shunt or Norwood) has the highest mortality rates of the three, approaching 30%. Proceeding directly to a stage-2 Glenn surgery has historically demonstrated inadequate pulmonary flow (PF) & high mortality. Recently, the Assisted Bi-directional Glenn (ABG) was proposed as a promising means to achieve a stable physiology by assisting the PF via an 'ejector pump' from the systemic circulation. We present preliminary parametrization and optimization results for the ABG geometry, with the goal of increasing PF. To limit excessive pressure increases in the Superior Vena Cava (SVC), the SVC pressure is included as a constraint. We use 3-D finite element flow simulations coupled with a single ventricle lumped parameter network to evaluate PF & the pressure constraint. We employ a derivative free optimization method- the Surrogate Management Framework, in conjunction with the OpenDIEL framework to simulate multiple simultaneous evaluations. Results show that nozzle diameter is the most important design parameter affecting ABG performance. The application of these results to patient specific situations will be discussed. This work was supported by an NSF CAREER award (OCI1150184) and by the XSEDE National Computing Resource.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging compared with echocardiography in the evaluation of pulmonary artery abnormalities in children with tetralogy of Fallot following palliative and corrective surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, S.B.; Crisci, K.L.; Koenig, P.; Robinson, B.; Anisman, P.; Russo, P. [St. Christopher`s Hospital for Children, Front Street at Erie Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19134 (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Background. Abnormalities of the pulmonary arteries following palliative or corrective surgery for tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) are common. Our purpose was to compare the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiography in the post- operative evaluation of the pulmonary arteries in children with TOF. Objective. Our hypothesis was that MRI is more sensitive than echocardiography in the detection of branch pulmonary artery abnormalities in children with TOF. Materials and methods. Pulmonary artery MRI and echocardiography were performed in 20 children following palliative and/or corrective surgery for TOF. MRI and echocardiography were compared in their ability to detect abnormalities of the pulmonary arteries. Angiographic or surgical correlation was available in 15 children. A perfusion scan for confirmation of pulmonary artery patency was available in one additional child. Results. Abnormalities of the branch pulmonary arteries identified by MRI included: absence or occlusion (2), focal stenosis (15), hypoplasia (2), aneurysm (1), and non-confluence (1). Echocardiography could not adequately visualize the right and left branch pulmonary arteries in eight and ten children, respectively. Echocardiography missed stenosis in 13 branch pulmonary arteries, patency of hypoplastic pulmonary arteries in two children, non-confluence of the pulmonary arteries in one child, and a left pulmonary artery aneurysm in one child. Abnormalities identified by MRI were confirmed in 16 children by angiography, surgery or perfusion scan. Conclusion. MRI is more sensitive than echocardiography for the evaluation of branch pulmonary artery abnormalities in children following surgery for TOF. (orig.) With 2 figs., 3 tabs., 11 refs.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging compared with echocardiography in the evaluation of pulmonary artery abnormalities in children with tetralogy of Fallot following palliative and corrective surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, S.B.; Crisci, K.L.; Koenig, P.; Robinson, B.; Anisman, P.; Russo, P.

    1997-01-01

    Background. Abnormalities of the pulmonary arteries following palliative or corrective surgery for tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) are common. Our purpose was to compare the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiography in the post- operative evaluation of the pulmonary arteries in children with TOF. Objective. Our hypothesis was that MRI is more sensitive than echocardiography in the detection of branch pulmonary artery abnormalities in children with TOF. Materials and methods. Pulmonary artery MRI and echocardiography were performed in 20 children following palliative and/or corrective surgery for TOF. MRI and echocardiography were compared in their ability to detect abnormalities of the pulmonary arteries. Angiographic or surgical correlation was available in 15 children. A perfusion scan for confirmation of pulmonary artery patency was available in one additional child. Results. Abnormalities of the branch pulmonary arteries identified by MRI included: absence or occlusion (2), focal stenosis (15), hypoplasia (2), aneurysm (1), and non-confluence (1). Echocardiography could not adequately visualize the right and left branch pulmonary arteries in eight and ten children, respectively. Echocardiography missed stenosis in 13 branch pulmonary arteries, patency of hypoplastic pulmonary arteries in two children, non-confluence of the pulmonary arteries in one child, and a left pulmonary artery aneurysm in one child. Abnormalities identified by MRI were confirmed in 16 children by angiography, surgery or perfusion scan. Conclusion. MRI is more sensitive than echocardiography for the evaluation of branch pulmonary artery abnormalities in children following surgery for TOF. (orig.)

  17. Outcomes after curative or palliative surgery for locoregional recurrent breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Alexander Andersen; Mele, Marco; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2014-01-01

    Background Locoregional recurrence (LRR) after breast cancer is an independent predictor for later systemic disease and poor long-term outcome. As the surgical treatment is complex and often leaves the patient with extensive defects, reconstructive procedures involving flaps, and thus plastic...... surgical assistance, are often required. The aim of the present study was to evaluate our institution’s approach to surgical treatment for locoregional recurrence of a breast cancer. Methods In the present retrospective, single-centre study, we evaluate our experience with 12 patients who underwent surgery...... for locally recurrent breast cancer at Aarhus University Hospital between 2006 and 2010. Nine patients underwent wide local excision. The remaining three patients underwent full thickness chest wall resection. Results There was no perioperative mortality and no major complications. Minor complications...

  18. Extent of postoperative prophylactic radiotherapy after radical surgery of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jincheng; Tao Hua; Zha Wenwu; Xu Kangxiong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the extent of postoperative prophylactic radiotherapy after radical surgery of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Should the entire mediastinum (M), bilateral supraclavicular areas(S) and the left gastric area(L) be all included in the irradiation field. Methods The clinical data of 204 such patients treated from 1996 through 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. They were classified into four groups: group A, 26 patients given irradiation to the mediastinum M alone; group B, 139 patients given irradiation to the mediastinum and bilateral supraclavicular areas M + S; group C, 10 patients irradiation to the mediastinum plus left gastric area M + L; and group D, 29 patients irradiation to all these three areas ( M + S + L). The overall and disease-free survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan- Meier method and comparison of these groups was done with the Logrank test. Prognostic variables were entered into a Cox regression model controlling the age, gender, length, site, pT, pN, and treatment received. Results: The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates of all 204 patients were 83.8%, 53.2%, 34.1% and 77.8%, 51.6%, 33.8% , respectively. The 5-year disease-free survival rates for patients in group A, group B, group C, and group D were 36.3%, 30.7%, 40.0% and 43.6% (χ 2 = 3.05, P=0.385), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the pT and pN were independent risk factors for disease-free survival rate, whereas treatment arm gave no significant difference (χ 2 =2.77, P=0.096). None of the 43 patents without irradiation to the L had abdominal lymph node metastasis from lesions in the upper and upper-middle third (located middle third but invasion to the upper third) thoracic esophagus. The data of supraclavicular lymph node metastasis between patients with and without irradiation showed that S in lesion in the lower and middle-lower third (located middle third but invasion to the lower third) thoracic

  19. A multi-centred randomised trial of radical surgery versus adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after local excision for early rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borstlap, W. A. A.; Tanis, P. J.; Koedam, T. W. A.; Marijnen, C. A. M.; Cunningham, C.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer surgery is accompanied with high morbidity and poor long term functional outcome. Screening programs have shown a shift towards more early staged cancers. Patients with early rectal cancer can potentially benefit significantly from rectal preserving therapy. For the earliest stage cancers, local excision is sufficient when the risk of lymph node disease and subsequent recurrence is below 5 %. However, the majority of early cancers are associated with an intermediate risk of lymph node involvement (5–20 %) suggesting that local excision alone is not sufficient, while completion radical surgery, which is currently standard of care, could be a substantial overtreatment for this group of patients. In this multicentre randomised trial, patients with an intermediate risk T1-2 rectal cancer, that has been locally excised using an endoluminal technique, will be randomized between adjuvant chemo-radiotherapylimited to the mesorectum and standard completion total mesorectal excision (TME). To strictly monitor the risk of locoregional recurrence in the experimental arm and enable early salvage surgery, there will be additional follow up with frequent MRI and endoscopy. The primary outcome of the study is three-year local recurrence rate. Secondary outcomes are morbidity, disease free and overall survival, stoma rate, functional outcomes, health related quality of life and costs. The design is a non inferiority study with a total sample size of 302 patients. The results of the TESAR trial will potentially demonstrate that adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is an oncological safe treatment option in patients who are confronted with the difficult clinical dilemma of a radically removed intermediate risk early rectal cancer by polypectomy or transanal surgery that is conventionally treated with subsequent radical surgery. Preserving the rectum using adjuvant radiotherapy is expected to significantly improve morbidity, function and quality of life if compared to completion

  20. Bulky mesonephric adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical surgery: report of the first case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Bogani, Giorgio; Gasparri, Maria L; Donato, Violante Di; Paolini, Biagio; Carcangiu, Maria L; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2016-11-11

    Malignant mesonephric adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix is a rare occurrence with few cases described in the literature. Although surgery seems to be effective in the treatment of early-stage tumor, no cases describing outcomes of locally advanced stage are available. We report the first case of a patient with International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecologists stage IIB mesonephric adenocarcinoma undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical surgery. Despite the inherent limitation of a single description of a case, our experience supports the utilization of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with malignant mesonephric adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. Further prospective multi-institutional studies are needed.

  1. Ovarian preservation in locally advanced cervical cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical surgery: our experience and analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Mauro; Bogani, Giorgio; Chiappa, Valentina; Ditto, Antonino; Scaffa, Cono; Martinelli, Fabio; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2018-03-30

    The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of ovarian metastases and recurrences among patients affected by locally advanced stage cancer patients (LACC), undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and radical surgery with conservation of ovaries. Retrospective evaluation of consecutive patients affected by LACC (stage IB2- IIB), treated by NACT followed by radical surgery at National Cancer Institute, Milan, Italy, between 1990-2015. Overall, 331 patients were included. Stage at presentation included stage IB2, IIA and IIB in 120 (36.3%), 63 (19%) and 148 (44.7%) patients, respectively. Main histotype was squamous cell carcinoma (n=265, 80.1%) followed by adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous (n=51, 15.4%), and more than half of patients had a grade 3 carcinoma . Overall, 102 (30.8%) women had at least one ovary preserved during surgery, while 229 (69.2%) had bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Comparing patients who had ovarian preservation with patients who had not, we observed that the two groups were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics. Survival outcomes were not influenced by ovarian preservation (disease-free (p=0.93) and overall (p=0.65) survivals). One (1%) woman had a localized ovarian recurrence. Our data suggest that ovarian preservation at the time of surgery is a safe option among women with LACC after NACT with no detrimental impact on oncologic outcome. Further prospective studies are warranted.

  2. Is radical surgery of an inverted papilloma of the maxillary sinus obsolete? a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Yildirim

    2016-12-01

    patient regained a well-formed maxilla without any restrictions. He has remained disease-free for 25 months following the surgery and surveillance was continued in our tumor clinic. Conclusions Endoscopic resection of an inverted papilloma continues to be the gold standard. However, some cases require a radical approach. This does not necessarily increase patient morbidity.

  3. Neuro-urological consequences of gynaecological surgery (endometriosis, simple hysterectomy, radical colpohysterectomy), colorectal surgery and pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidait, A.; Mozer, P.; Chartier-Kastler, E.; Ruffion, A.

    2007-01-01

    Apart from damage to bladder innervation, a number of local diseases and treatments such as radiotherapy can induce lower urinary tract functional disorders. Some of these disorders can be treated according to the principles used in the management of neurogenic bladder. The purpose of this review is to report the functional consequences of pelvic endometriosis, radiotherapy, colorectal surgery and urinary incontinence surgery with particular emphasis on situations in which a neurogenic mechanism is suspected. (authors)

  4. Preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy and radical surgery in advanced head and neck cancer: A prospective phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, Paula; Valavaara, Ritva; Aitasalo, Kalle; Kulmala, Jarmo; Laine, Juhani; Elomaa, Liisa; Sillanmaeki, Lauri; Minn, Heikki; Grenman, Reidar

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate whether preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) combined with major radical surgery is feasible and successful in the treatment of advanced primary head and neck cancer. Patients and methods: Ninety four patients with histologically confirmed head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) in the oral cavity (41/96; 43%), supraglottis (14/96; 15%), glottis (5/96; 5%), oropharynx (16/96; 17%), nasal cavity/paranasal sinuses (8/96; 8%), nasopharynx (3/96; 3%), hypopharynx (7/96; 7%) and two (2%) with unknown primary tumour and large cervical lymph nodes entered into the study. 21/96 patients (22%) had stage II, 17/96 (18%) stage III and 58/96 patients (60%) stage IV disease. The patients received preoperative hyperfractionated RT 1.6 Gy twice a day, 5 days a week to a median tumour dose of 63 Gy with a planned break for 11 days (median) after the median dose of 37 Gy. Then, after a median of 27 days the patients underwent major radical surgery of the primary tumour and metastatic lymph nodes including reconstructions with pedicled or microvascular free flaps when indicated as a part of the scheduled therapy. 12/96 patients had only ipsilateral or bilateral neck dissections. Results: After a median follow-up time of 37.2 mos 77/96 (80.2%) patients had complete locoregional control. All but 2 patients had complete histological remission after surgery. 40/96 pts were alive without disease, two of them after salvage surgery. 32/96 patients had relapsed; 15 had locoregional and 13 distant relapses, 4 patients relapsed both locoregionally and distantly. Fifty patients have died; 29 with locoregional and/or distant relapse, eight patients died of second malignancy, and 19 had intercurrent diseases. Disease-specific and overall survival at 3 years was 67.7 and 51%, respectively. Acute grade three mucosal reactions were common, but transient and tolerable. Late grade 3-4 adverse effects were few. Conclusions: Preoperative

  5. Radical Surgery of Only the Anterior Elements of the Spine at the Posterior Element Fusion Level due to Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuto Tsuchiya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer can have a favorable prognosis if radical surgery is performed. We encountered a case of spinal metastasis involving three anterior vertebral bodies at the posterior element fusion level and successfully achieved adequate stability by radical surgery involving only the anterior elements. A 67-year-old woman who had numbness and muscle weakness in the lower limbs caused by metastatic spinal tumor at the posterior element fusion level of L1–L3 vertebrae was treated with radical surgery of only the anterior element to gain stability. Similar situations may occur in cases involving other malignant tumor metastases or spinal primary tumors. If such a case occurs, this method could be useful in preventing metastasis to the posterior element.

  6. Fast-track surgery protocol in elderly patients undergoing laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu G

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Guozheng Liu,1 Fengguo Jian,2 Xiuqin Wang,2 Lin Chen1 1Department of General Surgery, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Second Department of General Surgery, Changyi People’s Hospital, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Aim: To study the efficacy of the fast-track surgery (FTS program combined with laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for elderly gastric cancer (GC patients.Methods: Eighty-four elderly patients diagnosed with GC between September 2014 and August 2015 were recruited to participate in this study and were divided into four groups randomly based on the random number table as follows: FTS + laparoscopic group (Group A, n=21, FTS + laparotomy group (Group B, n=21, conventional perioperative care (CC + laparoscopic group (Group C, n=21, and CC + laparotomy group (Group D, n=21. Observation indicators include intrasurgery indicators, postoperative recovery indicators, nutritional status indicators, and systemic stress response indicators.Results: Preoperative and intraoperative baseline characteristics showed no significant differences between patients in each group (P>0.05. There were no significant differences between each group in nausea and vomiting, intestinal obstruction, urinary retention, incision infection, pulmonary infection, and urinary tract infection after operation (P>0.05. Time of first flatus and postoperative hospital stay time of FTS Group A were the shortest, and total medical cost of this group was the lowest. For all groups, serum albumin, prealbumin, and transferrin significantly decreased, while CRP and interleukin 6 were significantly increased postoperative day 1. From postoperative day 4–7, all indicators of the four groups gradually recovered, but compared with other three groups, those of Group A recovered fastest.Conclusion: FTS combined with laparoscopic surgery can promote faster postoperative recovery, improve early postoperative nutritional status, and more

  7. Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Patients and Families What Is Palliative Care? Definition Palliative care (pronounced pal-lee-uh-tiv) is specialized medical care for people with serious illness. This type of care is focused on providing relief from the symptoms and stress of a serious illness. The goal is to ...

  8. Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Keith M; Kamal, Arif H

    2018-03-06

    Palliative care prioritizes symptom management and quality of life throughout the course of serious illness. Regardless of whether care is inpatient or outpatient, primary or subspecialty, a solid understanding of the basics of effective communication, symptom management, and end-of-life care is crucial. This article reviews these essentials and provides an overview of current evidence to support patient-centered palliative care.

  9. Cosmetics or Radical Surgery? What’s Right For the Top Levels of the U.S Defense Establishment as it Downsizes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-15

    1992. Thompson, W. Scott, and Donaldson D. Frizzell, ed. The Lessons of Viet Nam . New York: Crane, Russak & Company, 1977. Thurman, General Maxwell R...Depuftt .f Deawss. w SOY Or qifMade Thk 4amest may wt be IS-ýi ft 1W 0Mp•"s u ftbwsbee.demadby lbs appespdAdks Of enls COSMETICS OR RADICAL SURGERY...Classification) Cosmetics or Radical Surgery? What’s Right for the Top Levels of the U.S. Defense Establishment as It Downsizes? 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) LTC

  10. Magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) of bone metastases: From primary pain palliation to local tumor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, A.; Leonardi, A.; Andrani, F.; Boni, F.; Anzidei, M.; Catalano, C.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical performance of MRgFUS in primary pain palliation of painful bone metastases and in local tumor control. Materials and Methods: We enrolled 26 consecutive patients (female/male 12/14; age: 64.7±7.5yrs) with painful bone metastases. Before and 3 months after MRgFUS treatment pain severity and pain interference scores were assessed according to Brief Pain Inventory-Quality of Life (BPI-QoL) criteria and patients underwent both CT and MRI. Local tumor control was evaluated according to lesion size, density and perfusion at CT, dynamic contrast enhancement at MRI (Discovery 750HD, GE; Gd-Bopta, Bracco) and metabolic activity at PET or scintigraphy. Patients were classified as responders or non-responders. Results: No treatment-related adverse events were recorded during the study. As statistically significant difference between baseline and follow-up values for both pain severity and pain interference scores was observed (p<0.05). Increased bone density was observed in 9/26 (34.6%) patients. Non-Perfused Volume values ranged between 20% and 92%. There was no difference in NPV values between responders and non-responders (46.7±24.2% [25 - 90 %] vs. 45±24.9% [20 - 93 %]; p=0.7). In 6 patients (5 prostate and 1 breast primary cancer) there was nearly absence of metabolic activity after treatment (mean SUV=1.2). Conclusion: MRgFUS can be safely and effectively used as the primary treatment for pain palliation in patients with painful bone metastases; moreover our experience demonstrated also a potential role for the MRgFUS in local tumor control.

  11. Palliative radiation in primary squamous cell carcinoma of thyroid: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Ghoshal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid is an extremely rare neoplasm with aggressive behavior. Until date, only around 60 cases have been reported in the literature. Primary treatment of the patient is radical surgery. With optimum treatment survival is not more than 6 months in this aggressive malignancy. However in our patient surgery it was not possible because of unresectability of the mass due to encroachment of major vessels. Hence, we have delivered radiotherapy alone, with which effective palliation could be achieved and patient is leading a good quality-of-life for last 1 year.

  12. Impact of Blood Transfusions on Survival of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Plus Radical Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Signorelli, Mauro; Chiappa, Valentina; Lopez, Carlos; Indini, Alice; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Sabatucci, Ilaria; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Transfusions represent one of the main progresses of modern medicine. However, accumulating evidence supports that transfusions correlate with worse survival outcomes in patients affected by solid cancers. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of perioperative blood transfusion in locally advanced cervical cancer. Data of consecutive patients affected by locally advanced cervical cancer scheduled to undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radical surgery were retrospectively searched to test the impact of perioperative transfusions on survival outcomes. Five-year survival outcomes were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier and Cox models. The study included 275 patients. Overall, 170 (62%) patients had blood transfusion. Via univariate analysis, we observed that transfusion correlated with an increased risk of developing recurrence (hazard ratio [HR], 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-4.40; P = 0.02). Other factors associated with 5-year disease-free survival were noncomplete clinical response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (HR, 2.99; 95% CI, 0.92-9.63; P = 0.06) and pathological (P = 0.03) response at neoadjuvant chemotherapy as well as parametrial (P = 0.004), vaginal (P < 0.001), and lymph node (P = 0.002) involvements. However, via multivariate analysis, only vaginal (HR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.20-7.85; P = 0.01) and lymph node involvements (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.00-6.06; P = 0.05) correlate with worse disease-free survival. No association with worse outcomes was observed for patients undergoing blood transfusion (HR, 2.71; 95% CI, 0.91-8.03; P = 0.07). Looking at factors influencing overall survival, we observed that lymph node status (P = 0.01) and vaginal involvement (P = 0.06) were independently associated with survival. The role of blood transfusions in increasing the risk of developing recurrence in LAAC patients treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radical surgery remains unclear; further prospective studies are warranted.

  13. Palliation of Dysphagia in Carcinoma Esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala; Malage, Somanath; Sreenath, G.S.; Kotlapati, Sudhakar; Cyriac, Sunu

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma has a special place in gastrointestinal carcinomas because it contains two main types, namely, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Carcinoma esophagus patients require some form of palliation because of locally advanced stage or distant metastasis, where it cannot be subjected to curable treatment with surgery and chemoradiation. Many modalities of palliation of dysphagia are available, but the procedure with least morbidity, mortality, and long-term palliation of...

  14. Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palliative care is treatment of the discomfort, symptoms, and stress of serious illness. It provides relief from distressing symptoms ... of the medical treatments you're receiving. Hospice care, care at the end of life, always includes ...

  15. Safety and Palliative Efficacy of Single-Dose 8-Gy Reirradiation for Painful Local Failure in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Radical Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topkan, Erkan, E-mail: docdretopkan@gmail.com [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Guler, Ozan Cem; Parlak, Cem [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Pehlivan, Berrin [Koc University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul, and American Hospital, University of Texas MD Anderson Radiation Treatment Center, Istanbul (Turkey); Selek, Ugur [Medstar Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Antalya (Turkey)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of single-dose 8-Gy palliative chest reirradiation (CRI) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (M-NSCLC) patients with painful thoracic failures (TF) within the previous radiation portal. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 78 M-NSCLC patients who received single-dose 8-Gy CRI for painful TF after concurrent chemoradiation therapy to a total radiation dose of 52 to 66 Gy between 2007 and 2012. Primary endpoints included significant pain relief (SPR) defined as a ≥2 point decrement in the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain inventory (VAS-P), time to pain relief, and duration of pain control. Secondary objectives were survival and prognostic factors. Results: Treatment was well tolerated, with only 5.1% grade 3 pneumonitis and 1.3% grade 2 esophagitis. Pre-CRI median and post-CRI minimum VAS-P were 7 and 3 (P<.001), respectively. SPR was noted in 67 (85.9%) patients, and only 3 (3.9%) scored progressive pain. Median time to lowest VAS-P and duration of pain control were 27 days and 6.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 26.5%. On multivariate analyses, lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology group score (1-2; P<.001), absence of anemia (P=.001), and fewer metastatic sites (1-2; P<.001) were found to be associated with longer OS. Conclusions: Single-dose 8-Gy CRI provides safe, effective, and durable pain palliation for TF in radically irradiated M-NSCLC patients. Because of its convenience, lower cost, and higher comfort, the present protocol can be considered an appropriate option for patients with limited life spans.

  16. Palliative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, J.

    2003-01-01

    Palliative care does not attempt to prolong survival but to the achieve the highest quality of life both for the patient and their family covering their physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Radiotherapy (RT), one of the most important therapeutic modalities, has a great significance in palliative medicine for cancer since it attempts to reduce as much as possible the acute reaction associated with the treatment for the patient. (Author)

  17. Influence of radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer on work status and working life 3 years after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Sigrun; Loge, Jon Håvard; Berge, Viktor; Dahl, Alv Andreas; Cvancarova, Milada; Fosså, Sophie Dorothea

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to study the influence of radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer on work status and working life in men 3 years after surgery. In a prospective, questionnaire-based study on adverse effects after RP, 330 prostate cancer (PCa) patients who had been active in the workforce before RP described their work status 3 years after having surgery. We dichotomized their postoperative work status into "unchanged or increased" versus "reduced." The participants also reported whether their working life was influenced by the PCa trajectory to no, some, or a great extent. Univariate and multiple logistic regression models were established with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics as independent variables and "work status" or "influence of PCa trajectory on working life" as dependent variables. Twenty-five percent of the participants had retired. Of the remaining participants, approximately 20 % had a reduced work status, which in the multivariate analyses was significantly associated with increasing age. One third of the men still active in the workforce considered the PCa to negatively influence their working life. This was independently associated with bother related to urinary leakage, fatigue, and having undergone additional oncological therapy (pelvic radiotherapy and/or hormone treatment). Though RP does not affect work status in most men, approximately one third of them experience problems in their working life due to adverse effects related to RP and/or additional post-RP anti-cancer therapy. Most PCa survivors can expect to remain in the workforce for at least 3 years after RP, but for some, persistent adverse effects after RP and /or additional anti-cancer treatment negatively affect their working life. Pre-RP counseling of men within the workforce should cover possible post-RP changes concerning work status and working life.

  18. Radical Radiation Therapy After Lung-Sparing Surgery for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: Survival, Pattern of Failure, and Prognostic Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minatel, Emilio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Trovo, Marco, E-mail: marcotrovo33@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Bearz, Alessandra [Department of Medical Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Di Maso, Matteo [Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Baresic, Tania [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Drigo, Annalisa; Barresi, Loredana [Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Furlan, Carlo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Del Conte, Alessandro [Department of Medical Oncology, Pordenone General Hospital, Pordenone (Italy); Bruschi, Gioia [Department of Pneumology, Pordenone General Hospital, Pordenone (Italy); Fontana, Paolo [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Mestre General Hospital, Mestre (Italy); Pagan, Vittore [Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Franchin, Giovanni [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the survival, patterns of failure, and prognostic factors in a large cohort of patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who had undergone a novel trimodal therapeutic approach, including lung-sparing surgery, chemotherapy, and subsequent treatment with high doses of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the whole hemithorax. Methods and Materials: The analysis was conducted on the data from 69 patients. Of the 69 patients, 35 underwent extended pleurectomy/decortication (P/D), with resection of the entire pleura, along with portions of the pericardium and diaphragm and 34, partial pleurectomy, defined as partial removal of parietal or visceral pleura for diagnostic purposes, leaving gross tumor behind in all cases. All patients received cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy. Postoperative IMRT was delivered to the entire hemithorax, excluding the intact lung. The IMRT dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Any fluorodeoxyglucose-avid areas or regions of particular concern for residual disease were given a simultaneous boost to 60 Gy. Results: The median follow-up duration was 19 months. No difference was seen in overall survival and locoregional control between the extended P/D group and the partial pleurectomy group. The 2-year overall survival was 65% and 58% in the extended P/D and partial pleurectomy groups, respectively (P=.94). Locoregional control at 2 years was 65% and 64% in the extended P/D and partial pleurectomy groups, respectively (P=.75). The predominant pattern of failure was distant: 19 patients (27.5%) developed distant metastases as the first site of relapse. Gross residual disease after surgery was significantly associated with overall survival (hazard ratio 3.45). One fatal pneumonitis was reported; 14 cases (20%) of grade 2 to 3 pneumonitis were documented. Conclusions: Radical IMRT after lung-sparing surgery and chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma leads to promising survival results and

  19. Palliative management of hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singhal, D.; van Gulik, T. M.; Gouma, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    Around 80% of the patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma are candidates for palliative management due to extensive co-morbidity for major surgery, metastases or advanced loco-regional disease. The primary aim of treatment is to provide biliary drainage with long-term relief from pruritis,

  20. Management of low-risk early-stage cervical cancer: Should conization, simple trachelectomy, or simple hysterectomy replace radical surgery as the new standard of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pedro T.; Pareja, Rene; Rendón, Gabriel J.; Millan, Carlos; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    The standard treatment for women with early-stage cervical cancer (IA2-IB1) remains radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy. In select patients interested in future fertility, the option of radical trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy is also considered a viable option. The possibility of less radical surgery may be appropriate not only for patients desiring to preserve fertility but also for all patients with low-risk early-stage cervical cancer. Recently, a number of studies have explored less radical surgical options for early-stage cervical cancer, including simple hysterectomy, simple trachelectomy, and cervical conization with or without sentinel lymph node biopsy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Such options may be available for patients with low-risk early-stage cervical cancer. Criteria that define this low-risk group include: squamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, or adenosquamous carcinoma, tumor size <2 cm, stromal invasion <10mm, and no lymph-vascular space invasion. In this report, we provide a review of the existing literature on the conservative management of cervical cancer and describe ongoing multi-institutional trials evaluating the role of conservative surgery in selected patients with early-stage cervical cancer. PMID:24041877

  1. The European Respiratory Society and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons clinical guidelines for evaluating fitness for radical treatment (surgery and chemoradiotherapy) in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Charloux, Anne; Bolliger, Chris T; Rocco, Gaetano; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Varela, Gonzalo; Licker, Marc; Ferguson, Mark K; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Clini, Enrico M; Win, Thida; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Goldman, Lee

    2009-07-01

    The European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) established a joint task force with the purpose to develop clinical evidence-based guidelines on evaluation of fitness for radical therapy in patients with lung cancer. The following topics were discussed, and are summarized in the final report along with graded recommendations: Cardiologic evaluation before lung resection; lung function tests and exercise tests (limitations of ppoFEV1; DLCO: systematic or selective?; split function studies; exercise tests: systematic; low-tech exercise tests; cardiopulmonary (high tech) exercise tests); future trends in preoperative work-up; physiotherapy/rehabilitation and smoking cessation; scoring systems; advanced care management (ICU/HDU); quality of life in patients submitted to radical treatment; combined cancer surgery and lung volume reduction surgery; compromised parenchymal sparing resections and minimally invasive techniques: the balance between oncological radicality and functional reserve; neoadjuvant chemotherapy and complications; definitive chemo and radiotherapy: functional selection criteria and definition of risk; should surgical criteria be re-calibrated for radiotherapy?; the patient at prohibitive surgical risk: alternatives to surgery; who should treat thoracic patients and where these patients should be treated?

  2. Is aortic lymphadenectomy indicated in locally advanced cervical cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical surgery? A retrospective study on 261 women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, F; Signorelli, M; Bogani, G; Ditto, A; Chiappa, V; Perotto, S; Scaffa, C; Lorusso, D; Raspagliesi, F

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of aortic lymph nodes (LN) metastases/recurrences among patients affected by locally advanced stage cancer patients (LACC), treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and radical surgery. Retrospective evaluation of consecutive 261 patients affected by LACC (stage IB2-IIB), treated with NACT followed by radical surgery at National Cancer Institute, Milan, Italy, between 1990 and 2011. Stage at presentation included stage IB2, IIA and IIB in 100 (38.3%), 50 (19.2%) and 111 (42.5%) patients, respectively. Squamous cell carcinoma accounted for more than 80%, followed by adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous cancers (20%). Overall, 56 women (21.5%) had LN metastases. Four out of 83 women (5%) who underwent both pelvic and aortic LN dissection had aortic LN metastases, and all women had concomitant pelvic and aortic LN metastases. Only one woman out of 178 (0.5%) who underwent pelvic lymphadenectomy only, had an aortic LN recurrence. Overall 2% of women (5/261) had aortic LN metastases/recurrence. Our data suggest that aortic lymphadenectomy at the time of surgery is not routinely indicated in LACC after NACT, but should reserved in case of bulky LN in both pelvic and/or aortic area. The risk of isolated aortic LN relapse is negligible. Further prospective studies are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ the Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  3. Is there a role for pre-operative contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for radical surgery in malignant pleural mesothelioma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Duncan; Waller, David; Edwards, John; Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam; Entwisle, James

    2003-12-01

    To assess the use of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CEMRI) in addition to computed tomography in the pre-operative assessment of patients for radical surgery in malignant pleural mesothelioma. Over a 45-month period, 51 of 76 patients assessed (69 men and seven women), underwent extra-pleural pneumonectomy or radical pleurectomy/decortication. Post-operative pathological stage was correlated with radiological staging, with particular emphasis on tumour resectability. Seventeen (22%) patients were found on CEMRI to have unresectable, but histologically unconfirmed disease, not previously seen on CT. Fifty-one (67%) patients proceeded to radical surgery, but pathological nodal data were incomplete in three, so excluding these patients from further analyses. The median pre-operative interval after CEMRI was 17 days. Two patients were found to have unexpectedly extensive disease at thoracotomy, thus the sensitivity of CEMRI for prediction of resectability was 97%. Using the International Mesothelioma Interest Group system, tumour stage was correctly predicted by CEMRI in 48% of patients, but understaged in 50% of cases, largely due to the underestimation of pericardial involvement, but this did not affect resectability and had no significant effect on prognosis. Nodal stage was correctly identified in 60% of patients. CEMRI was successful in predicting pathological tumour stage T3 or less (sensitivity of 85%; specificity of 100%), but less so in identifying tumour stage T2 or less (sensitivity of 23%; specificity of 96%) or N2 nodal disease (sensitivity 66%; specificity 73%). CEMRI is most useful in the differentiation of T3 and T4 disease and may be unnecessary at earlier stages. Its multiplanar tumour localisation abilities are of value in the assessment of resectability. It is unlikely to contribute significantly to nodal staging, but it remains a valuable adjunct in the selection of patients for radical surgery.

  4. Surgery-related complications in 1253 robot-assisted and 485 open retropubic radical prostatectomies at the Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Stefan; Nilsson, Andreas E; Schumacher, Martin C; Jonsson, Martin N; Volz, Daniela S; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, Peter N

    2010-05-01

    To quantify complications to surgery in patients treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and open retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) at our institution. Radical prostatectomy is associated with specific complications that can affect outcome results in patients. Between January 2002 and August 2007, a series of 1738 consecutive patients underwent RARP (n = 1253) or RRP (n = 485) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Surgery-related complications were assessed using a prospective hospital-based complication registry. The baseline characteristics of all patients were documented preoperatively. Overall, 170 patients required blood transfusions (9.7%), 112 patients (23%) in the RRP group compared with 58 patients (4.8%) in the RARP group. Infectious complications occurred in 44 RRP patients (9%) compared with 18 (1%) in the RARP group. Bladder neck contracture was treated in 22 (4.5%) patients who had undergone RRP compared with 3 (0.2%) in the RARP group. Clavien grade IIIb-V complications were more common in RRP patients (n = 63; 12.9%) than in RARP patients (n = 46; 3.7%). The introduction of RARP at our institution has resulted in decreased number of patients with Clavien grade IIIb-V complications, such as bladder neck contractures, a decrease in the number of patients who require blood transfusions, and decreased numbers of patients with postoperative wound infections. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of peri- and postoperative complications and Karnofsky-performance status in head and neck cancer patients after radiation or chemoradiation that underwent surgery with regional or free-flap reconstruction for salvage, palliation, or to improve function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertel Serkan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgery after (chemoradiation (RCTX/RTX is felt to be plagued with a high incidence of wound healing complications reported to be as high as 70%. The additional use of vascularized flaps may help to decrease this high rate of complications. Therefore, we examined within a retrospective single-institutional study the peri--and postoperative complications in patients who underwent surgery for salvage, palliation or functional rehabilitation after (chemoradiation with regional and free flaps. As a second study end point the Karnofsky performance status (KPS was determined preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively to assess the impact of such extensive procedures on the overall performance status of this heavily pretreated patient population. Findings 21 patients were treated between 2005 and 2010 in a single institution (17 male, 4 female for salvage (10/21, palliation (4/21, or functional rehabilitation (7/21. Overall 23 flaps were performed of which 8 were free flaps. Major recipient site complications were observed in only 4 pts. (19% (1 postoperative haemorrhage, 1 partial flap loss, 2 fistulas and major donor site complications in 1 pt (wound dehiscence. Also 2 minor donor site complications were observed. The overall complication rate was 33%. There was no free flap loss. Assessment of pre- and postoperative KPS revealed improvement in 13 out of 21 patients (62%. A decline of KPS was noted in only one patient. Conclusions We conclude that within this (chemoradiated patient population surgical interventions for salvage, palliation or improve function can be safely performed once vascularised grafts are used.

  6. Palliative Care in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosoiu, Daniela; Mitrea, Nicoleta; Dumitrescu, Malina

    2018-02-01

    HOSPICE Casa Sperantei has been pioneering palliative care development in Romania since 1992. The have developed specialist palliative care services in home-based settings, inpatient units, day care centers, and as hospital support teams. They have provided national and international education programs for professionals in the palliative care field, as well as promoting palliative care integration in the health care system. Legislative improvements were adopted, including funding mechanisms for the reimbursement of palliative care services through the health insurance funds, review of opioid policy, and quality standards of care. By the end of 2015, Romania had 115 specialist palliative care services (78 palliative care inpatient units, 24 home-based palliative care services, five outpatient palliative care clinics, four day care centers, and four hospital support teams). A palliative care subspecialty for doctors was recognized as early as 2000, and a multidisciplinary master's degree program has been available at Transilvania University since 2010, when the first palliative care academic position was established. Nursing education includes mandatory palliative care modules in nursing schools. For coordinated development of palliative care at the national level, a national strategy was proposed defining three levels of palliative care provision, local, district, and national. The implementation of the palliative care strategy is partially funded through a World Bank loan. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of the 7(th) and proposed 8(th) editions of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for non-small cell lung cancer undergoing radical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ying; Chen, Ming; Yu, Xinmin

    2016-09-19

    The present study aims to compare the 7(th) and the proposed 8(th) edition of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for NSCLC in a cohort of patients from a single institution. A total of 408 patients with NSCLC who underwent radical surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Survivals were analyzed using the Kaplan -Meier method and were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed by the Cox proportional hazard model. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) and C-index were applied to compare the two prognostic systems with different numbers of stages. The 7(th) AJCC T categories, the proposed 8(th) AJCC T categories, N categories, visceral pleural invasion, and vessel invasion were found to have statistically significant associations with disease-free survival (DFS) on univariate analysis. In the 7(th) edition staging system as well as in the proposed 8(th) edition, T categories, N categories, and pleural invasion were independent factors for DFS on multivariate analysis. The AIC value was smaller for the 8(th) edition compared to the 7(th) edition staging system. The C-index value was larger for the 8(th) edition compared to the 7(th) edition staging system. Based on the data from our single center, the proposed 8(th) AJCC T classification seems to be superior to the 7(th) AJCC T classification in terms of DFS for patients with NSCLC underwent radical surgery.

  8. Chylous ascites following radical nephrectomy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Shahzad S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chylous ascites may result from diverse pathologies. Ascites results either due to blockage of the lymphatics or leak secondary to inadvertent trauma during surgery. Case presentation We report the first case of chylous ascites following radical nephrectomy for a renal cell carcinoma involving the right half of a crossed fused renal ectopia. The patient was managed conservatively. Conclusion Post-operative chylous ascites is a rare complication of retroperitoneal and mediastinal surgery. Most cases resolve with conservative treatment which aims at decreasing lymph production and optimizing nutritional requirements along with palliative measures. Refractory cases need either open or laparoscopic ligation of the leaking lymphatic channels. A review of the current literature on the management of post-operative chylous ascites is presented.

  9. Mobile Technology Applications in Cancer Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire de Castro Silva, Sandro Luís; Gonçalves, Antônio Augusto; Cheng, Cezar; Fernandes Martins, Carlos Henrique

    2018-01-01

    Mobile devices frequently used in other specialties can find great utility in palliative care. For healthcare professionals, the use of mobile technology not only can bring additional resources to the care, but it can actually radically change the cancer remote care practices. The Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) has developed the largest cancer home care program in Latin America, which currently benefits more than 500 patients. The purpose of this paper is to show the development of an ICT environment of mobile applications developed to support the palliative cancer care program at INCA.

  10. Palliative Care in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care is usually provided by palliative care specialists, health care practitioners who have received special training and/or certification in palliative care. They provide holistic care to the patient and family or caregiver ...

  11. Palliative or Comfort Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is not under control Need help understanding your situation and coordinating care PALLIATIVE CARE Often a team of specialists provides palliative care. The team usually includes: Palliative care doctors and nurses Social workers and chaplains Pharmacists and nutritionists Counselors and others ...

  12. Bypass laparoscopic procedure for palliation of esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siosaki, Marcos Duarte; Lacerda, Croider Franco; Bertulucci, Paulo Anderson; da Costa Filho, José Orlando; de Oliveira, Antônio Talvane Torres

    2013-03-26

    Esophageal cancer is a devastating disease with rapidly increasing incidence in Western countries. Dysphagia is the most common complication, causing severe malnutrition and reduced quality of life. A 69-year-old male with persistent esophageal cancer after radiation therapy was subjected to palliative by-pass surgery using a laparoscopic approach. Due to the advanced stage at diagnosis, palliative treatment was a more realistic option. Dysphagia is a most distressing symptom of this disease, causing malnutrition and reducing quality of life. The goal of palliation is to improve swallowing. The most common methods applied are endoscopic stenting, radiation therapy (external or brachytherapy), chemotherapy, yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser rechanneling or endoscopic dilatation. Palliative surgery is rarely proposed due to morbidity and complications. This paper demonstrates an update in the technique proposed by Postlethwait in 1979 for palliation of esophageal cancer. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2013.

  13. What to choose as radical local treatment for lung metastases from colo-rectal cancer: surgery or radiofrequency ablation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlijper, R.C.; Grutters, J.P.C.; Houben, R.; Dingemans, A.M.; Wildberger, J.E.; Raemdonck, D. Van; Cutsem, E. van; Haustermans, K.; Lammering, G.; Lambin, P.; Ruysscher, D. de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term survival can be obtained with local treatment of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. However, it is unclear as to what the optimal local therapy is: surgery, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT). METHODS: A systematic review included 27 studies

  14. Intention, procedure, outcome and personhood in palliative sedation and euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materstvedt, Lars Johan

    2012-03-01

    Palliative sedation at the end of life has become an important last-resort treatment strategy for managing refractory symptoms as well as a topic of controversy within palliative care. Furthermore, palliative sedation is prominent in the public debate about the possible legalisation of voluntary assisted dying (physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia). This article attempts to demonstrate that palliative sedation is fundamentally different from euthanasia when it comes to intention, procedure, outcome and the status of the person. Nonetheless, palliative sedation in its most radical form of terminal deep sedation parallels euthanasia in one respect: both end the experience of suffering. However, only the latter intentionally ends life and also has this as its goal. There is the danger that deep sedation could bring death forward in time due to particular side effects of the treatment. Still that would, if it happens, not be intended, and accordingly is defensible in view of the doctrine of double effect.

  15. Real-time simulation of soft tissue deformation and electrocautery procedures in laparoscopic rectal cancer radical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Yuan; Pan, Jun J; Qin, Hong; Liu, Hao; Lu, Yun

    2017-12-01

    Laparoscopic surgery (LS), also referred to as minimally invasive surgery, is a modern surgical technique which is widely applied. The fulcrum effect makes LS a non-intuitive motor skill with a steep learning curve. A hybrid model of tetrahedrons and a multi-layer triangular mesh are constructed to simulate the deformable behavior of the rectum and surrounding tissues in the Position-Based Dynamics (PBD) framework. A heat-conduction based electric-burn technique is employed to simulate the electrocautery procedure. The simulator has been applied for laparoscopic rectum cancer surgery training. From the experimental results, trainees can operate in real time with high degrees of stability and fidelity. A preliminary study was performed to evaluate the realism and usefulness. This prototype simulator has been tested and verified by colorectal surgeons through a pilot study. They believed both the visual and the haptic performance of the simulation are realistic and helpful to enhance laparoscopic skills. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Does pathologic node status affect local control in patients with carcinoma of the head and neck treated with radical surgery and postoperative radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudoltz, Marc S.; Benammar, Alia; Mohiuddin, Mohammed

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of pathologic lymph node status and nodal stage on local control at the primary site in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, treated with radical surgery and postoperative irradiation. Methods and Materials: Fifty-seven patients with advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and supraglottic larynx were analyzed. All patients underwent resection of the primary lesion, neck dissection, and postoperative radiotherapy. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. The median dose to the primary tumor bed was 60.4 Gray (range 39.7-72.0). Besides pathologic nodal status (pN0 vs. pN+) and nodal stage, the following factors were analyzed for their impact on local control: age, gender, T stage, tumor grade, resection margins, interval from surgery to irradiation, dose to the primary site, and overall treatment time. Results: The 3-year actuarial local control rate was 78%. When all patients were analyzed, nodal status (pN0 vs. pN+) did not affect control at the primary site (71% vs. 82%, p = 0.42). Nodal stage (pN0-N2a va. pN2b-N2c) was also not a significant factor for local control (74% vs. 82%, p = 0.57). When only patients with negative margins were analyzed, nodal status again did not impact on local control (79% vs. 90% for pN0 vs. pN+, p = 0.39). On univariate analysis, only tumor grade, margin status, and elapsed days were significant factors for local control. Local control was 85% for patients with negative margins vs. 60% for those with positive margins (p = 0.016). For patients with moderately and poorly differentiated tumors, local control was 86% as compared to 50% for patients with well-differentiated tumors (p = 0.007). When radiotherapy was completed within 50 days, local control was 93% as opposed to 63% for >50 days (p 0.016). On multivariate analysis, only margin status (p = 0.002) and tumor grade (p = 0.007) remained significant. Conclusion: We conclude that

  17. Does pathologic node status affect local control in patients with carcinoma of the head and neck treated with radical surgery and postoperative radiotherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudoltz, Marc S; Benammar, Alia; Mohiuddin, Mohammed

    1995-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of pathologic lymph node status and nodal stage on local control at the primary site in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, treated with radical surgery and postoperative irradiation. Methods and Materials: Fifty-seven patients with advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and supraglottic larynx were analyzed. All patients underwent resection of the primary lesion, neck dissection, and postoperative radiotherapy. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. The median dose to the primary tumor bed was 60.4 Gray (range 39.7-72.0). Besides pathologic nodal status (pN0 vs. pN+) and nodal stage, the following factors were analyzed for their impact on local control: age, gender, T stage, tumor grade, resection margins, interval from surgery to irradiation, dose to the primary site, and overall treatment time. Results: The 3-year actuarial local control rate was 78%. When all patients were analyzed, nodal status (pN0 vs. pN+) did not affect control at the primary site (71% vs. 82%, p = 0.42). Nodal stage (pN0-N2a va. pN2b-N2c) was also not a significant factor for local control (74% vs. 82%, p = 0.57). When only patients with negative margins were analyzed, nodal status again did not impact on local control (79% vs. 90% for pN0 vs. pN+, p = 0.39). On univariate analysis, only tumor grade, margin status, and elapsed days were significant factors for local control. Local control was 85% for patients with negative margins vs. 60% for those with positive margins (p = 0.016). For patients with moderately and poorly differentiated tumors, local control was 86% as compared to 50% for patients with well-differentiated tumors (p = 0.007). When radiotherapy was completed within 50 days, local control was 93% as opposed to 63% for >50 days (p 0.016). On multivariate analysis, only margin status (p = 0.002) and tumor grade (p = 0.007) remained significant. Conclusion: We conclude that

  18. Immediate radical trachelectomy versus neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by conservative surgery for patients with stage IB1 cervical cancer with tumors 2cm or larger: A literature review and analysis of oncological and obstetrical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Rene; Rendón, Gabriel J; Vasquez, Monica; Echeverri, Lina; Sanz-Lomana, Carlos Millán; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2015-06-01

    Radical trachelectomy is the treatment of choice in women with early-stage cervical cancer wishing to preserve fertility. Radical trachelectomy can be performed with a vaginal, abdominal, or laparoscopic/robotic approach. Vaginal radical trachelectomy (VRT) is generally not offered to patients with tumors 2cm or larger because of a high recurrence rate. There are no conclusive recommendations regarding the safety of abdominal radical trachelectomy (ART) or laparoscopic radical trachelectomy (LRT) in such patients. Several investigators have used neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with tumors 2 to 4cm to reduce tumor size so that fertility preservation may be offered. However, to our knowledge, no published study has compared outcomes between patients with cervical tumors 2cm or larger who underwent immediate radical trachelectomy and those who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical trachelectomy. We conducted a literature review to compare outcomes with these 2 approaches. Our main endpoints for evaluation were oncological and obstetrical outcomes. The fertility preservation rate was 82.7%, 85.1%, 89%; and 91.1% for ART (tumors larger than >2cm), ART (all sizes), NACT followed by surgery and VRT (all sizes); respectively. The global pregnancy rate was 16.2%, 24% and 30.7% for ART, VRT, and NACT followed by surgery; respectively. The recurrence rate was 3.8%, 4.2%, 6%, 7.6% and 17% for ART (all sizes), VRT (all sizes), ART (tumors>2cm), NACT followed by surgery, and VRT (tumors>2cm). These outcomes must be considered when offering a fertility sparing technique to patients with a tumor larger than 2cm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Significance of lymphadenectomy with splenectomy in radical surgery for advanced (pT3/pT4) remnant gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Hiroki; Oda, Eri; Hirota, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Shinji; Tomiyasu, Shinjiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Arita, Tetsumasa; Yagi, Yasushi; Baba, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    To date, the optimal surgical strategy for remnant gastric cancer has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to clarify the significance of lymphadenectomy with splenectomy in remnant gastric cancer surgery. This retrospective cohort study was conducted at the Kumamoto Regional Medical Center. The primary endpoint was overall survival after surgery. We retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathologic features, surgical treatments, and long-term prognosis of remnant gastric cancer patients treated with total gastrectomy. A total of 80 patients with gastric cancer in the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy and who underwent total gastrectomy were enrolled in the study. Splenectomy was performed in 38 patients. Lymph node metastasis in the splenic hilum was not observed in the patients with pT1/pT2 tumors, whereas nodal metastasis at the splenic hilum was detected in 30.4% of the patients with pT3/pT4 tumors. The survival rate of the patients with pT3/pT4 tumors who underwent splenectomy was significantly higher than that of the patients who did not undergo splenectomy, although there was no difference in the patients with pT1/pT2 tumors. Among the patients classified as R0, the survival rate of the patients with pT3/pT4 tumors who underwent splenectomy was significantly higher than that of the patients who did not undergo splenectomy. Lymphadenectomy with splenectomy in radical surgery is beneficial for patients with advanced (pT3/pT4) remnant gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. East and Central African Journal of Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    health institutions. Thus many patients present with advanced malignancies when surgery for cure is impossible and only palliative care can be offered. Unfortunately many African countries lack both facilities and specialists in palliative care. Until recently palliative care was not even included in the curriculum for medical.

  1. Leaving the placenta in situ versus conservative and radical surgery in the treatment of placenta accreta spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutuk, Mehmet S; Ak, Mehmet; Ozgun, Mahmut T

    2018-03-01

    To compare different treatment methods in the management of placenta accreta spectrum (PAS) disorders. In a retrospective cohort study, medical records were retrieved for patients who underwent elective surgery at 24 weeks of pregnancy or more after a diagnosis of PAS disorder (creta, increta, or percreta) at a center in Turkey between May 2, 2010, and August 10, 2016. The final analysis included patients whose diagnosis was confirmed intraoperatively and for whom complete data were available. Patients were divided into three groups: group 1 included those who underwent hysterectomy without placental removal, group 2 included patients whose placenta was left in situ, and group 3 included those who underwent placental removal and conservative surgery. Among 79 included patients (33 creta, 18 increta, 28 percreta), 27 (34%) were in group 1, 15 (19%) in group 2, and 37 (47%) in group 3. Total blood loss and the amounts of blood products transfused were lowest in group 2; significant differences between groups were noted (all P ≤ 0.001). Surgical complication rates were similar between groups (4/27 [15%], 1/15 [7%], and 11/37 [30%], respectively; P=0.119). Overall uterine preservation rates were not significantly different between groups 2 and 3 (14/15 [93%] vs 33/37 [89%]; P>0.99). Leaving the placenta in situ could become the treatment of choice for PAS disorders. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  2. Quality of Life, Psychological Functioning, and Treatment Satisfaction of Men Who Have Undergone Penile Prosthesis Surgery Following Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Brindha; Moon, Daniel; Love, Christopher; Meyer, Denny; Ferguson, Emma; Crowe, Helen; Howard, Nicholas; Mann, Sarah; Wootten, Addie

    2017-12-01

    Penile prosthesis surgery is last-line treatment to regaining erectile function after radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer. To assess quality of life, psychological functioning, and treatment satisfaction of men who underwent penile implantation after RP; the psychosocial correlates of treatment satisfaction and sexual function after surgery; and the relation between patients' and partners' ratings of treatment satisfaction. 98 consecutive patients who underwent penile implantation after RP from 2010 and 2015 and their partners were invited to complete a series of measures at a single time point. Of these, 71 patients and 43 partners completed measures assessing sexual function, psychological functioning, and treatment satisfaction. Proportions of patients who demonstrated good sexual function and satisfaction with treatment and clinical levels of anxiety and depression were calculated. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to determine psychosocial factors associated with patient treatment satisfaction and sexual function and patient-partner differences in treatment satisfaction. Patients completed the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite Short Form (EPIC-26), Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS), Prostate Cancer-Related Quality of Life Scale, Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire (SEAR), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Partners completed the GAD-7, PHQ-9, EDITS (partner version), and SEAR. 94% of men reported satisfaction with treatment (EDITS score > 50). 77% of men reported good sexual function (EPIC-26 score > 60). Lower depression scores were associated with higher sexual confidence and sexual intimacy, and these were correlated with better treatment satisfaction and sexual function. Patients experienced higher sexual relationship satisfaction (median score = 90.6) than their partners (median score = 81.2), but there was no difference in

  3. What is Pediatric Palliative Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQ Handout for Patients and Families What Is Pediatric Palliative Care? Pediatric Palliative care (pronounced pal-lee-uh-tiv) is ... life for both the child and the family. Pediatric palliative care is provided by a team of ...

  4. Adenocarcinoma of the rectum treated by radical external radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catton, Charles N; Brierley, James D; Cummings, Bernard J; Wong, C Shun; Keane, Thomas J; O' Sullivan, Brian; Goodman, Phyllis

    1995-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the long-term survival and response rates of patients with primary rectal cancer to radical radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1978 and 1987, 229 patients were treated at the Princess Margaret Hospital with radical external radiation therapy for adenocarcinoma of the rectum. Patients were treated with radiation either because they were considered to have unresectable tumors, were medically unfit, or refused surgery, or for a combination of these factors. Doses ranged from 40 Gy in 10 fractions by a split course over 6 weeks to 60 Gy in 30 fractions in 6 weeks. The most commonly prescribed treatment was 52 Gy target absorbed dose in 20 daily fractions over 4 weeks. Results: The overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 27%; for patients with mobile tumors, it was 48%, partially fixed 27%, and fixed tumor 4%. Forty-eight of the 97 patients (50%) with mobile tumors, 11 of the 37 patients (30%) with partially fixed tumors, and 7 of the 77 patients (9%) with fixed tumors had clinically complete tumor regression following radiation. Of these, 18 of the mobile, 6 of the partially fixed, and 5 of the fixed tumors later relapsed locally. Fifty patients had salvage surgery after failing to achieve complete remission or for local relapse, with a 5-year actuarial survival rate of 42% from the time of surgery. Conclusion: Although radiation therapy can cure some patients with mobile or partially fixed rectal adenocarcinomas who refuse or are unsuitable for surgery, local control remains a problem; salvage surgery should be considered in patients who relapse or fail to go into complete remission and who are fit to undergo surgery. For patients with fixed rectal cancers, high-dose external-beam radiation should be part of a planned preoperative regimen or be palliative in intent.

  5. Lack of evidence of HPV etiology of prostate cancer following radical surgery and higher frequency of the Arg/Pro genotype in turkish men with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Aydin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the possible role of HPV in the development of prostate cancer (PCa and investigate the distribution of the p53 codon 72 polymorphism in PCa in a Turkish population. Materials and methods A total of 96 tissues, which had been obtained using a radical surgery method, formalin-fixed and parafin-embedded, were used in this study. The study group consisted of 60 PCa tissues (open radical prostatectomy and the control group contained 36 benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues (BPH (transvesical open prostatectomy. The presence of HPV and the p53 codon 72 polymorphism was investigated in both groups using real-time PCR and pyrosequencing. Results The results of the real-time PCR showed no HPV DNA in any of the 36 BPH tissue samples. HPV-DNA was positive in only 1 of the 60 PCa samples (1.7%. The HPV type of this sample was identified as HPV-57. The distribution of the three genotypes, Arg/Arg, Arg/Pro and Pro/Pro was found to be 45.6, 45.6, and 8.8% in the PCa group and 57.1%, 34.3% and 8.6% in the control group, respectively. Compared with the control group, patients with PCa had a higher frequency of the Arg/Pro genotype and Proline allele (odds ratio (OR=1.67, 95% confidence interval (CI=0.68-4.09, p=0.044; OR=1.13, 95% CI=0.76-1.68, p=0.021, respectively. Conclusions The results of the study do not support the hyphothesis that prostate cancer is associated with HPV infection but indicated that Proline allele can be a risk factor in the development of PCa in the Turkish population.

  6. Palliative care and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  7. Radiotherapy in addition to radical surgery in rectal cancer: evidence for a dose-response effect favoring preoperative treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glimelius, Bengt; Isacsson, Ulf; Jung, Bo; Paahlman, Lars

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the relationship between radiation dose and reduction in local recurrence rate after preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: All randomized trials initiated prior to 1988 comparing preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy with surgery alone or with each other were included. Local failure rates were available in 5626 randomized patients. The linear quadratic formula was used to compensate for different radiotherapy schedules. Results: For preoperative radiotherapy, a clear dose-response relationship could be established. For postoperative radiotherapy, the range of doses was narrow, and a dose-response relationship could not be demonstrated. At similar doses, preoperative radiotherapy appeared to be more efficient in reducing local failure rate than postoperative. The only trial comparing preoperative with postoperative radiotherapy confirms this notion. A 15-20 Gy higher dose may be required postoperatively than preoperatively to reach similar efficacy. Neither approach alone significantly influences survival, although it is likely that a small survival benefit may be seen after preoperative radiotherapy. Conclusions: The information from the entire randomized experience suggests that preoperative radiotherapy may be more dose efficient than postoperative radiotherapy

  8. Effect of hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with ropivacaine for PCEA after orthopedic surgery on the synthesis of pain mediators, inflammatory mediator and oxygen free radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Ying Luo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with ropivacaine for PCEA after orthopedic surgery on the synthesis of pain mediators, inflammatory mediator and oxygen free radicals. Methods: A total of 120 patients with fracture who underwent operation in the hospital between July 2014 and December 2016 were collected and divided into control group and observation group according to the random number table method, 60 cases in each group. Control group received morphine hydrochloride combined with ropivacaine for analgesia, observation group received hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with ropivacaine for analgesia, and the postoperative analgesia lasted for 48 h. The differences in serum levels of pain mediators, inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress indexes were compared between the two groups. Results: Immediately after operation, the differences in serum levels of pain mediators, inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress indexes were not statistically significant between the two groups. 48 h after operation, serum PGE2, SP, β-EP, IL-6, MCP-1, HMGB-1 and MDA levels of both groups of patients were significantly lower than those immediately after operation while Cu-Zn SOD and GSH-Px levels were significantly higher than those immediately after operation, and serum PGE2, SP, β-EP, IL-6, MCP-1, HMGB-1 and MDA levels of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group while Cu-Zn SOD and GSH-Px levels were significantly higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Hydromorphone hydrochloride combined with ropivacaine for PCEA after orthopedic surgery is effective in alleviating pain and inhibiting systemic inflammatory response.

  9. Laparo-Endoscopic Single-Site Surgery for Radical and Cytoreductive Nephrectomy, Renal Vein Thrombectomy, and Partial Nephrectomy: A Prospective Pilot Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ithaar H. Derweesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery (LESS may diminish morbidity of laparoscopic surgery. We prospectively evaluated feasibility and outcomes of LESS-Radical Nephrectomy (LESS-RN and Partial Nephrectomy (LESS-PN. Methods. 10 patients underwent LESS-RN (6 and LESS-PN (4 between 2/2009-5/2009. LESS-RN included 2 with renal vein thrombectomy, one of which was also cytoreductive. Transperitoneal LESS access was obtained by periumbilical incision. Patient/tumor characteristics, oncologic, and quality of life (QoL outcomes were analyzed. Results. 3 Men/7 Women (mean age 58.7 years, median follow-up 9.8 months underwent LESS. 9/10 cases were completed successfully. All had negative margins. Mean operative time was 161 minutes, estimated blood loss was 125 mL, and incision size was 4.4 cm. Median tumor size for LESS-RN and -PN was 5.0 and 1.7 cm (=.045. Median LESS-PN ischemia time was 24 minutes; mean preoperative/postoperative creatinine were 0.7/0.8 mg/dL (=.19. Mean pain score at discharge was 1.3. Mean preoperative, 3-, and 6-month postoperative SF-36 QoL Score was 73.8, 74.4 and 77.1 (=.222. All patients are currently alive. Conclusions. LESS-RN, renal vein thrombectomy, and PN are technically feasible and safe while maintaining adherence to oncologic principles, with excellent QoL preservation and low discharge pain scores. Further study is requisite.

  10. Surgery confounds biology: the predictive value of stage-, grade- and prostate-specific antigen for recurrence after radical prostatectomy as a function of surgeon experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J; Savage, Caroline J; Bianco, Fernando J; Klein, Eric A; Kattan, Michael W; Secin, Fernando P; Guilloneau, Bertrand D; Scardino, Peter T

    2011-04-01

    Statistical models predicting cancer recurrence after surgery are based on biologic variables. We have shown previously that prostate cancer recurrence is related to both tumor biology and to surgical technique. Here, we evaluate the association between several biological predictors and biochemical recurrence across varying surgical experience. The study included two separate cohorts: 6,091 patients treated by open radical prostatectomy and an independent replication set of 2,298 patients treated laparoscopically. We calculated the odds ratios for biological predictors of biochemical recurrence-stage, Gleason grade and prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-and also the predictive accuracy (area under the curve, AUC) of a multivariable model, for subgroups of patients defined by the experience of their surgeon. In the open cohort, the odds ratio for Gleason score 8+ and advanced pathologic stage, though not PSA or Gleason score 7, increased dramatically when patients treated by surgeons with lower levels of experience were excluded (Gleason 8+: odds ratios 5.6 overall vs. 13.0 for patients treated by surgeons with 1,000+ prior cases; locally advanced disease: odds ratios of 6.6 vs. 12.2, respectively). The AUC of the multivariable model was 0.750 for patients treated by surgeons with 50 or fewer cases compared to 0.849 for patients treated by surgeons with 500 or more. Although predictiveness was lower overall for the independent replication set cohort, the main findings were replicated. Surgery confounds biology. Although our findings have no direct clinical implications, studies investigating biological variables as predictors of outcome after curative resection of cancer should consider the impact of surgeon-specific factors. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  11. Benign Tumors of the Pancreas-Radical Surgery Versus Parenchyma-Sparing Local Resection-the Challenge Facing Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, Hans G

    2018-03-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy and left-sided pancreatectomy are the surgical treatment standards for tumors of the pancreas. Surgeons, who are requested to treat patients with benign tumors, using standard oncological resections, face the challenge of sacrificing pancreatic and extra-pancreatic tissue. Tumor enucleation, pancreatic middle segment resection and local, duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resections are surgical procedures increasingly used as alternative treatment modalities compared to classical pancreatic resections. Use of local resection procedures for cystic neoplasms and neuro-endocrine tumors of the pancreas (panNETs) is associated with an improvement of procedure-related morbidity, when compared to classical Whipple OP (PD) and left-sided pancreatectomy (LP). The procedure-related advantages are a 90-day mortality below 1% and a low level of POPF B+C rates. Most importantly, the long-term benefits of the use of local surgical procedures are the preservation of the endocrine and exocrine pancreatic functions. PD performed for benign tumors on preoperative normo-glycemic patients is followed by the postoperative development of new onset of diabetes mellitus (NODM) in 4 to 24% of patients, measured by fasting blood glucose and/or oral/intravenous glucose tolerance test, according to the criteria of the international consensus guidelines. Persistence of new diabetes mellitus during the long-term follow-up after PD for benign tumors is observed in 14.5% of cases and after surgery for malignant tumors in 15.5%. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after PD is found in the long-term follow-up for benign tumors in 25% and for malignant tumors in 49%. Following LP, 14-31% of patients experience postoperatively NODM; many of the patients subsequently change to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). The decision-making for cystic neoplasms and panNETs of the pancreas should be guided by the low surgical risk and the preservation of pancreatic metabolic

  12. Litteraturstudie: akupunktur og palliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Bolt

    2013-01-01

    af systematiske søgninger fra 2002-2012 i Pubmed, Cochrane, Cinahl og PsykInfo med søgeordene acupuncture and palliation, acupuncture and cancer, acupuncture and placebo, acupuncture and neurophysiology, acupuncture and palliation and nursing. RCT-forskning viser ikke overbevisende effekt af...

  13. Palliative care in Romania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumitrescu, Luminita

    2006-01-01

    Palliative care concentrates on supporting and helping people with an incurable disease and aims to improve patient’s quality of life by reducing or eliminating pain and other physical symptoms. Palliative care is a new phenomenon in Romania . PhD student Luminita Dumitrescu describes the

  14. Palliative Percutaneous Jejunal Stent for Patients with Short Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Takayama

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal obstruction is a common preterminal event in patients with gastric and pancreatic cancer who often undergo palliative bypass surgery. Although endoscopic palliation with self-expandable metallic stents has emerged as a safe and effective alternative to surgery, experience with this technique remains limited. In particular, a proximal jejunal obstruction requires more technical expertise than a duodenal obstruction. Palliative treatment modalities include both surgical and nonsurgical approaches. In this report, we describe the successful placement of self-expandable metallic stents at the proximal jejunum using a combination of percutaneous endoscopic, intraoperative, and transstomal stenting. Usually endoscopy is not indicated in cases of proximal jejunal obstruction, but some cases may require palliative endoscopy instead of bypass operation.

  15. Chemoradiation With Concomitant Boosts Followed by Radical Surgery in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results of the ROMA-2 Prospective Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrandina, Gabriella, E-mail: gabriella.ferrandina@libero.it [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Antonietta [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Gallotta, Valerio [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Smaniotto, Daniela [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Fagotti, Anna [Gynecologic Surgery, University of Perugia, Terni (Italy); Tagliaferri, Luca [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Foti, Elvira; Fanfani, Francesco [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Autorino, Rosa [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Scambia, Giovanni [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Valentini, Vincenzo [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: This prospective, phase 2 study aimed at assessing the efficacy of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy by concomitant boosts (CBs) associated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of the whole pelvis, in improving the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment in patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IVA locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Neoadjuvant CRT included conformal irradiation of the whole pelvis with a total dose of 39.6 Gy (1.8 cGy/fraction, 22 fractions), plus additional irradiation of primary tumor and parametria with 10.8 Gy administered with CBs (0.9 cGy/fraction, 12 fractions, every other day). Concomitant chemotherapy included cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-4 and 26-30 of treatment), and capecitabine (1300 mg/m{sup 2}/daily, orally) during the first 2 and the last 2 weeks of treatment. Radical hysterectomy plus pelvic with or without aortic lymphadenectomy was performed within 6 to 8 weeks from CRT. Toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria and Chassagne grading system. Based on the Simon design, 103 cases were required, and the regimen would be considered active if >45 pCR were registered (α error = 0.05; β error = 0.1). Results: pCR was documented in 51 cases (50.5%), and the regimen was considered active, according to the planned statistical assumptions. At median follow-up of 36 months (range: 7-85 months), the 3-year local failure rate was 7%, whereas the 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 73.0% and 86.1%, respectively. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were reported in only 1 and 2 cases, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was always grade 1 or 2. Conclusions: Addition of CBs in the accelerated fractionation modality to the whole pelvis chemoradiation followed by radical surgery results in a high rate of pathologically assessed complete response to CRT and a very

  16. Sexuality Following Radical Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Serefoglu, Ege C; Albersen, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    incontinence in relation to sexual activity after surgery. This can present at the time of orgasm (ie, climacturia) or arise during arousal. In general, the problem subsides with time and pelvic floor training and tension penile loops can be used as treatments. Orgasmic disturbances after radical prostatectomy...

  17. Danish Palliative Care Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønvold, Mogens; Adsersen, Mathilde; Hansen, Maiken Bang

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the Danish Palliative Care Database (DPD) is to monitor, evaluate, and improve the clinical quality of specialized palliative care (SPC) (ie, the activity of hospital-based palliative care teams/departments and hospices) in Denmark. Study population: The study population is all...... patients were registered in DPD during the 5 years 2010–2014. Of those registered, 96% had cancer. Conclusion: DPD is a national clinical quality database for SPC having clinically relevant variables and high data and patient completeness....

  18. Salvage robotic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Kaffenberger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of non-surgical primary treatment for localized prostate cancer is a common occurrence, with rates of disease recurrence ranging from 20% to 60%. In a large proportion of patients, disease recurrence is clinically localized and therefore potentially curable. Unfortunately, due to the complex and potentially morbid nature of salvage treatment, radical salvage surgery is uncommonly performed. In an attempt to decrease the morbidity of salvage therapy without sacrificing oncologic efficacy, a number of experienced centers have utilized robotic assistance to perform minimally invasive salvage radical prostatectomy. Herein, we critically evaluate the existing literature on salvage robotic radical prostatectomy with a focus on patient selection, perioperative complications and functional and early oncologic outcomes. These results are compared with contemporary and historical open salvage radical prostatectomy series and supplemented with insights we have gained from our experience with salvage robotic radical prostatectomy. The body of evidence by which conclusions regarding the efficacy and safety of robotic salvage radical prostatectomy can be drawn comprises fewer than 200 patients with limited follow-up. Preliminary results are promising and some outcomes have been favorable when compared with contemporary open salvage prostatectomy series. Advantages of the robotic platform in the performance of salvage radical prostatectomy include decreased blood loss, short length of stay and improved visualization. Greater experience is required to confirm the long-term oncologic efficacy and functional outcomes as well as the generalizability of results achieved at experienced centers.

  19. Paediatric palliative medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of health workers to prescribe and/or administer morphine despite the availability of essential ... doses are complex, largely weight related, and side-effect profiles can differ from those of ... psychological, and social distress. • Effective palliative ...

  20. What is palliative care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Guide to Advance Directives, the Health Care Power of Attorney, and Other Key Documents . Cambridge, MA: Harvard Health Publications. 2013. Oxenham D. Palliative care and pain. In: Walker BR, Colledge NR, Ralston SH, Penman ...

  1. Palliative care - managing pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Palliative care is a holistic approach to care that focuses on treating pain ... stressful for you and your family. But with treatment, pain can be managed. How Pain is Measured ...

  2. Future of palliative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Bhatnagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A ′need-supply′ and ′requirement-distribution mismatch′ along with a continuingneed explosion are the biggest hurdles faced by palliative medicine today. It is the need of the hour to provide an unbiased, equitable and evidence-based palliative care to those in need irrespective of the diagnosis, prognosis, social and economic status or geographical location. Palliative care as a fundamental human right, ensuring provision throughout the illness spectrum, global as well as region-specific capacity building, uniform availability of essential drugs at an affordable price, a multidisciplinary team approachand caregiver-support are some of the achievable goals for the future. This supplanted with a strong political commitment, professional dedication and ′public-private partnerships′ are necessaryto tackle the existing hurdles and the exponentially increasing future need. For effectively going ahead it is of utmost importance to integrate palliative medicine into medical education, healthcare system and societal framework.

  3. Palliative Care Development in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davaasuren, Odontuya; Ferris, Frank D

    2018-02-01

    Since the year 2000, Mongolia has established the foundation measures for a national palliative care program and has made several significant achievements. Systematic reviews and observational studies on palliative care development in Mongolia have taken place over the past 16 years. Mongolia began palliative care development in 2000 with the creation of the Mongolian Palliative Care Society and the Palliative Care Department. Palliative care is included in the Mongolia's Health Law, Health Insurance Law, Social Welfare Law, National Cancer Control Program, and the National Program for Non-Communicable Diseases, and has approved Palliative Care Standards and Pain Management Guidelines. Palliative care education is included in the undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum in all medical universities. Six hospice units in Ulaanbaatar have 50 beds; each of the nine districts and all 21 provinces have up to four to five palliative beds, and there are 36 palliative care units, for a total 190 beds for three million people. In 2014, a pediatric palliative care inpatient unit was established with five beds. Essential drugs for palliative care have been available in Mongolia since 2015. The pharmaceutical company IVCO produces morphine, codeine, pethidine, and oxycodone in Ulaanbaatar. Mongolia has made real progress in integrating palliative care into the health system. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. [General practitioner and palliative sedation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Recent publications in Dutch national newspapers on palliative sedation have raised concerns about its use in general practice. There is now evidence that there is no significant increase in the incidence of palliative sedation. Euthanasia requests were pending in 20.8% of the cases in which palliative sedation was performed, but the general practitioners could clearly justify why they made this choice. This is important because it indicates that they are aware of a sharp distinction between euthanasia and palliative sedation. Although the decision to perform palliative sedation was discussed with almost all cancer patients, patient involvement was less present in non-cancer conditions. This may be related to different disease trajectories, but it also indicates that attention should be devoted to earlier identification of patients in need of palliative care. The findings confirm that the practice of palliative sedation by general practitioners largely reflects the recommendations of the Dutch National Guideline on Palliative Sedation.

  5. Palliative care and pediatric surgical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserra, Alessandro; Narciso, Alessandra; Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Messina, Raffaella; Crocoli, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Survival rate for childhood cancer has increased in recent years, reaching as high as 70% in developed countries compared with 54% for all cancers diagnosed in the 1980s. In the remaining 30%, progression or metastatic disease leads to death and in this framework palliative care has an outstanding role though not well settled in all its facets. In this landscape, surgery has a supportive actor role integrated with other welfare aspects from which are not severable. The definition of surgical palliation has moved from the ancient definition of noncurative surgery to a group of practices performed not to cure but to alleviate an organ dysfunction offering the best quality of life possible in all the aspects of life (pain, dysfunctions, caregivers, psychosocial, etc.). To emphasize this aspect a more modern definition has been introduced: palliative therapy in whose context is comprised not only the care assistance but also the plans of care since the onset of illness, teaching the matter to surgeons in training and share paths. Literature is very poor regarding surgical aspects specifically dedicated and all researches (PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane) with various meshing terms result in a more oncologic and psychosocial effort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychosocial issues in palliative care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    work of all involved in palliative care and understanding this will ... palliative care. The quality of life for patients and the manner of ... In palliative care, the creation of a safe space for families to talk is important. Communication ... family finds balance only with, and in your ... those relationships that are signifi- cant for the ...

  7. Inter-Professional Palliative Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten Halskov; Henriksen, Jette; Meldgaard, Anette

    2013-01-01

    Chapter 11 by Kirsten Halskov Madsen, Anette Meldgaard and Jette Henriksen deals with the development of palliative care programmes aimed at the basic level of palliative care practice. The need to develop educational opportunities at particularly this level – described as ‘the basic inter......-professional level of palliative care’ – has been increasing for many years where palliative care has conventionally and primarily been associated with specialist training. As the authors show – based on a mapping out of existing educational initiatives in a region of Denmark, a reading of the curriculum...... and a description of the organization of palliative care – there is a need for such inter-professional palliative care that raises the level of competences at the basic level and the sharing of knowledge as well as securing the continuous qualifying of healthcare staff working with palliative care....

  8. Palliative care in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Robyna Irshad

    2017-01-01

    Pakistan is a developing country of South East Asia, with all the incumbent difficulties currently being faced by the region. Insufficient public healthcare facilities, poorly regulated private health sector, low budgetary allocation for health, improper priority setting while allocating limited resources, have resulted essentially in an absence of palliative care from the healthcare scene. Almost 90% of healthcare expenditure is out of the patient's pocket with more than 45% of population living below the poverty line. All these factors have a collective potential to translate into an end-of-life care disaster as a large percentage of population is suffering from chronic debilitating/terminal diseases. So far, such a disaster has not materialised, the reason being a family based culture emphasising the care of the sick and old at home, supported by religious teachings. This culture is not limited to Pakistan but subsists in the entire sub-continent, where looking after the sick/elderly at home is considered to be the duty of the younger generation. With effects of globalisation, more and more older people are living alone and an increasing need for palliative care is being realised. However, there does not seem to be any plan on the part of the public or private sectors to initiate palliative care services. This paper seeks to trace the social and cultural perspectives in Pakistan with regards to accessing palliative care in the context of healthcare facilities available.

  9. Palliative care and spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanasamy Aru

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical junctures in patients′ lives such as chronic illnesses and advanced diseases may leave the persons in a state of imbalance or disharmony of body, mind and spirit. With regard to spirituality and healing, there is a consensus in literature about the influence of spirituality on recovery and the ability to cope with and adjust to the varying and demanding states of health and illness. Empirical evidence suggests that spiritual support may act as an adjunct to the palliative care of those facing advanced diseases and end of life. In this article, the author draws from his empirical work on spirituality and culture to develop a discourse on palliative care and spirituality in both secular and non-secular settings. In doing so, this paper offers some understanding into the concept of spirituality, spiritual needs and spiritual care interventions in palliative care in terms of empirical evidence. Responding to spiritual needs could be challenging, but at the same time it could be rewarding to both healthcare practitioner (HCP and patient in that they may experience spiritual growth and development. Patients may derive great health benefits with improvements in their quality of life, resolutions and meaning and purpose in life. It is hoped that the strategies for spiritual support outlined in this paper serve as practical guidelines to HCPs for development of palliative care in South Asia.

  10. Radical treatment of stage Ⅳ pancreatic cancer by the combination of cryosurgery and iodine-125 seed implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Bing Chen; Jia-Liang Li; Li-Hua He; Wei-Qun Liu; Fei Yao; Jian-Ying Zeng; Yi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the therapeutic effect of radical treatment and palliative treatment in stage Ⅳ pancreatic cancer patients.METHODS:81 patients were enrolled in the study.Radical treatment was performed on 51 patients,while 30 patients were put under palliative treatment.The procedural safety and interval survival for stage Ⅳ pancreatic cancer (IS-Ⅳ) was assessed by almost 2.5 years of follow-ups.The IS-Ⅳ of patients under the two kinds of treatment,and the effects of treatment timing and frequency on IS-Ⅳ,were compared.RESULTS:The IS-Ⅳ of patients who received radical treatment was significantly longer than those who received palliative treatment (P < 0.001).The IS-Ⅳ of patients who received delayed radical or palliative treatment was longer than those who received accordingly timely treatment (P =0.0034 and 0.0415,respectively).Multiple treatments can play an important role in improving the IS-Ⅳ of patients who received radical treatment (P =0.0389),but not for those who received palliative treatment (P =0.99).CONCLUSION:The effect of radical treatment was significantly more obvious than that of palliative treatment,and multiple radical treatments may contribute more to patients than a single radical treatment.

  11. Palliation: Hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenka, Mahesh Kr; Goenka, Usha

    2014-01-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinomas are common tumors of the bile duct that are often unresectable at presentation. Palliation, therefore, remains the goal in the majority of these patients. Palliative treatment is particularly indicated in the presence of cholangitis and pruritus but is often also offered for high-grade jaundice and abdominal pain. Endoscopic drainage by placing stents at endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) is usually the preferred modality of palliation. However, for advanced disease, percutaneous stenting has been shown to be superior to endoscopic stenting. Endosonography-guided biliary drainage is emerging as an alternative technique, particularly when ERCP is not possible or fails. Metal stents are usually preferred over plastic stents, both for ERCP and for percutaneous biliary drainage. There is no consensus as to whether it is necessary to place multiple stents within advanced hilar blocks or whether unilateral stenting would suffice. However, recent data have suggested that, contrary to previous belief, it is useful to drain more than 50% of the liver volume for favorable long-term results. In the presence of cholangitis, it is beneficial to drain all of the obstructed biliary segments. Surgical bypass plays a limited role in palliation and is offered primarily as a segment III bypass if, during a laparotomy for resection, the tumor is found to be unresectable. Photodynamic therapy and, more recently, radiofrequency ablation have been used as adjuvant therapies to improve the results of biliary stenting. The exact technique to be used for palliation is guided by the extent of the biliary involvement (Bismuth class) and the availability of local expertise. PMID:25232449

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ® ™ ® Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance A child’s serious illness affects the entire family. Pediatric palliative (pal-lee-uh-tiv) care can support ... extra support, palliative care can help. What is pediatric palliative care? Pediatric palliative care is supportive care ...

  13. Palliative sedation for intolerable suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltoni, Marco; Scarpi, Emanuela; Nanni, Oriana

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an update on palliative sedation in palliative and end-of-life care. Palliative sedation is the medical procedure used to deal with refractory symptoms in advanced cancer patients when all other specific approaches have failed. Palliative sedation, in the strictest sense of the term, is a proportionate (proportionate palliative sedation, PPS) and intrinsically variable procedure used on an individual basis to relieve refractory symptoms in terminally ill patients, without the intention of hastening death. Completely separate from any other end-of-life decision and not intended to hasten death, palliative sedation has been shown not to have a detrimental impact on survival. To maintain palliative sedation as a legitimate clinical procedure from any ethical or clinical point of view, it must be limited to the restricted area for which it was conceived, that is, relief from refractory suffering as deemed necessary by a patient and by an experienced palliative care team. In this way, there is no risk of associating palliative sedation with other end-of-life decisions. Close collaboration is needed between oncologists and palliative care physicians for this clinical procedure.

  14. Palliative sedation in nursing anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Palliative sedation is a technique of providing a sedative for end-of-life care to patients with intractable pain. The literature discusses the techniques and use of palliative sedation. Numerous articles have been written regarding the issues surrounding its use, but no literature has discussed the prescription or administration of palliative sedation by a nurse anesthetist. By understanding the concept and ethics involved in its use and providing nursing care that is theory based, the author argues that the involvement of nursing anesthesia is appropriate and within the scope of practice. Few other healthcare disciplines can provide the patient care and empirical knowledge that is imperative in the care of the dying patient. This article discusses the concept and ethics of palliative sedation and presents a case of providing palliative sedation to a terminally ill patient by an experienced nurse anesthetist. Palliative sedation should be understood, embraced, and utilized as an area of expertise suited for nursing anesthesia.

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category ... Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,364 views 3:29 Perinatal Palliative Care - ...

  16. Have Case Loads of Radical Surgery for Prostate Cancer Been Concentrated in Hospitals with Robotic Equipment ?―Analyses with Questionnaire Survey and Diagnostic Procedure Combination (DPC) Data―

    OpenAIRE

    塚本, 泰司; 田中, 滋

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether installation of robot-assisted surgical equipment in hospitals resulted in concentration of the case loads of radical prostatectomy. We selected 11 areas with populations of around 1 million or more where there were one or more hospitals with robotic equipment and 4 or more without it. In addition, annual changes of case loads for prostatectomy over 4 years from 2010 to 2013 were clearly determined in these areas. The case loads were determined based on the results of ...

  17. Hepatic Radioembolization as a Bridge to Liver Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur J.A.T. Braat

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of oncologic disease has improved significantly in the last decades and in the future a vast majority of cancer types will continue to increase worldwide. As a result many patients are confronted with primary liver cancers or metastatic liver disease. Surgery in liver malignancies has steeply improved and curative resections are applicable in wider settings, leading to a prolonged survival. Simultaneously, radiofrequency ablation (RFA and liver transplantation (LTx have been applied more commonly in oncologic settings with improving results. To minimize adverse events in treatments of liver malignancies, locoregional minimal invasive treatments have made their appearance in this field, in which radioembolization (RE has shown promising results in recent years with few adverse events and high response rates. We discuss several other applications of radioembolization for oncologic patients, other than its use in the palliative setting, whether or not combined with other treatments. This review is focused on the role of RE in acquiring patient eligibility for radical treatments, like surgery, RFA and LTx. Inducing significant tumor reduction can downstage patients for resection or, through attaining stable disease, patients can stay on the LTx waiting list. Hereby, RE could make a difference between curative of palliative intent in oncologic patient management. Prior to surgery, the future remnant liver volume might be inadequate in some patients. In these patients, forming an adequate liver reserve through RE leads to prolonged survival without risking postoperative liver failure and minimizing tumor progression while inducing hypertrophy. In order to optimize results, developments in procedures surrounding RE are equally important. Predicting the remaining liver function after radical treatment and finding the right balance between maximum tumor irradiation and minimizing the chance of inducing radiation-related complications are still

  18. A Review of Palliative Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobb, Barton

    2016-09-01

    Palliative sedation has become a standard practice to treat refractory symptoms at end-of-life. Dyspnea and delirium are the two most commonly treated symptoms. The medications used in palliative sedation are usually benzodiazepines, barbiturates, antipsychotics, and/or anesthetics. Some ethical considerations remain, especially surrounding the use of palliative sedation in psychological distress and existential suffering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Palliative Sedation at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barathi, B

    2012-01-01

    Patients with advanced cancer often suffer from multiple intractable physical symptoms. Though majority of the symptoms can be controlled, in some of the patients these symptoms remain refractory and uncontrolled till the end. Palliative sedation (PS) is one of the ways to relieve intractable suffering of the dying cancer patients. The main concern while using PS is its life-shortening effect. This case report describes the feasibility of administering PS in Indian home settings. PMID:22837615

  20. Palliative sedation at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Barathi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients with advanced cancer often suffer from multiple intractable physical symptoms. Though majority of the symptoms can be controlled, in some of the patients these symptoms remain refractory and uncontrolled till the end. Palliative sedation (PS is one of the ways to relieve intractable suffering of the dying cancer patients. The main concern while using PS is its life-shortening effect. This case report describes the feasibility of administering PS in Indian home settings.

  1. Radical Evil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Manrique

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an aporia in Kant’s analysis of evil: he defines radical evilas an invisible disposition of the will, but he also demands an inferential connection between visible evil actions and this invisible disposition. This inference,however, undermines the radical invisibility of radical evil according to Kant’s own definition of the latter. Noting how this invisibility of moral worth is a distinctive feature of Kant’s approach to the moral problem, the paper then asks why, in the Groundwork, he nonetheless forecloses a question about evil that seems to be consistent with this approach. It is argued that to account for this aporia and this foreclosure, one has to interrogate the way in which the category of religion orients Kant’s incipient philosophy of history in Die Religion.

  2. [Bladder neck sclerosis following prostate surgery : Which therapy when?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassweiler, J J; Weiss, H; Heinze, A; Elmussareh, M; Fiedler, M; Goezen, A S

    2017-09-01

    Secondary bladder neck sclerosis represents one of the more frequent complications following endoscopic, open, and other forms of minimally invasive prostate surgery. Therapeutic decisions depend on the type of previous intervention (e.g., radical prostatectomy, TURP, HoLEP, radiotherapy, HIFU) and on associated complications (e.g., incontinence, fistula). Primary treatment in most cases represents an endoscopic bilateral incision. No specific advantages of any type of the applied energy (i.e., mono-/bipolar HF current, cold incision, holmium/thulium YAG laser) could be documented. Adjuvant measures such as injection of corticosteroids or mitomycin C have not been helpful in clinical routine. In case of first recurrence, a transurethral monopolar or bipolar resection can usually be performed. Recently, the ablation of the scared tissue using bipolar vaporization has been recommended providing slightly better long-term results. Thereafter, surgical reconstruction is strongly recommended using an open, laparoscopic, or robot-assisted approach. Depending on the extent of the bladder neck sclerosis and the underlying prostate surgery, a Y-V/T-plasty, urethral reanastomosis, or even a radical prostatectomy with new urethravesical anastomosis should be performed. Stent implantation should be reserved for patients who are not suitable for surgery. The final palliative measure is a cystectomy with urinary diversion or a (continent) cystostomy.

  3. Tumor suppressor function of PGP9.5 is associated with epigenetic regulation in prostate cancer--novel predictor of biochemical recurrence after radical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Yozo; Shiina, Hiroaki; Hiraki, Miho; Arichi, Naoko; Hiraoka, Takeo; Sumura, Masahiro; Honda, Satoshi; Yasumoto, Hiroaki; Igawa, Mikio

    2012-03-01

    The expression level of protein G product 9.5 (PGP9.5) is downregulated because of promoter CpG hypermethylation in several tumors. We speculated that impaired regulation of PGP9.5 through epigenetic pathways is associated with the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. CpG methylation of the PGP9.5 gene was analyzed in cultured prostate cancer cell lines, 226 localized prostate cancer samples from radical prostatectomy cases, and 80 benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) tissues. Following 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidune treatment, increased PGP9.5 mRNA transcript expression was found in the LNCaP and PC3 cell lines. With bisulfite DNA sequencing, partial methylation of the PGP9.5 promoter was shown in LNCaP whereas complete methylation was found in PC3 cells. After transfection of PGP9.5 siRNA, cell viability was significantly accelerated in LNCaP but not in PC3 cells as compared with control siRNA transfection. Promoter methylation of PGP9.5 was extremely low in only one of 80 BPH tissues, whereas it was found in 37 of 226 prostate cancer tissues. Expression of the mRNA transcript of PGP9.5 was significantly lower in methylation (+) than methylation (-) prostate cancer tissues. Multivariate analysis of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after an radical prostatectomy revealed pT category and PGP9.5 methylation as prognostically relevant. Further stratification with the pT category in addition to methylation status identified a stepwise reduction of BCR-free probability. This is the first clinical and comprehensive study of inactivation of the PGP9.5 gene via epigenetic pathways in primary prostate cancer. CpG methylation of PGP9.5 in primary prostate cancer might become useful as a molecular marker for early clinical prediction of BCR after radical prostatectomy. ©2012 AACR.

  4. Erectile function after radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Frey, Anders; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    collected database and a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study in patients following radical prostatectomy. Erectile function was assessed with the IIEF-5 and the question "Is your erectile function as good as before the surgery (yes/no)". Patients were included if they were sexually active before...

  5. Robotic radical hysterectomy in the management of gynecologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Rene; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2008-01-01

    Robotic surgery is being used with increasing frequency in gynecologic oncology. To date, 44 cases were reported in the literature of radical hysterectomy performed with robotic surgery. When comparing robotic surgery with laparoscopy or laparotomy in performing a radical hysterectomy, the literature shows that robotic surgery offers an advantage over the other 2 surgical approaches with regard to operative time, blood loss, and length of hospitalization. Future studies are needed to further elucidate the equivalence or superiority of robotic surgery to laparoscopy or laparotomy in performing a radical hysterectomy.

  6. Robotic assisted radical prostatectomy accelerates postoperative stress recovery: Final results of a contemporary prospective study assessing pathophysiology of cortisol peri-operative kinetics in prostate cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio B. Porcaro

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Our study shows that PCa surgery immediately (POD 0 triggers the stress system which respond by overproduction of cortisol which induces the negative feedback mechanism that starts on POD 1, is still ongoing on POD 5, but is completely settled on POD 45. Moreover, after surgical trauma, our study gives evidence that the RARP procedure associates with stress recovery faster than RRP. Further confirmatory studies are required.

  7. Consultation with specialist palliative care services in palliative sedation: considerations of Dutch physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, I.; Heide, A.; Janssens, M.J.P.A.; Swart, S.; Perez, R.S.G.M.; Rietjens, J.A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Palliative sedation is considered a normal medical practice by the Royal Dutch Medical Association. Therefore, consultation of an expert is not considered mandatory. The European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) framework for palliative sedation, however, is more stringent: it

  8. Laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielik, T.; Karovic, M.; Trska, R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radical trachelectomy is a fertility-sparing procedure with the aim to provide adequate oncological safety to patients with cervical cancer while preserving their fertility. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate, in a series of 3 patients, the feasibility, morbidity, and safety of laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy for early cervical cancer. Patients and Methods: Three non consecutive patients with FIGO stage IA1 and IB1 cervical cancer was evaluated in a period of years 2008 - 2011. The patients underwent a laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy and radical parametrectomy class II procedure according to the Piver classification. The section of vaginal cuff, trachelectomy, permanent cerclage and isthmo-vaginal anastomosis ware realised by vaginal approach. Results: The median operative time, the median blood loss and the mean number of resected pelvic nodes was comparable with published data. Major intraoperative complications did not occur and no patient required a blood transfusion. The median follow-up time was 33 (38-59) months. One vaginal recurrence occurred in 7 months after primary surgery. The patient was underwent a radicalisation procedure and adjuvant oncologic therapy and now is free of disease. Conclusions: Laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy (LAVRT)may be an alternative in fertility-preserving surgery for early cervical cancer. The procedure offers patients potential benefits of minimally invasive surgery with adequate oncological safety, but it should be reserved for oncologic surgeons trained in advanced laparoscopic procedures. (author)

  9. Team networking in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odette Spruyt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available "If you want to travel quickly, go alone. But if you want to travel far, you must go together". African proverb. The delivery of palliative care is often complex and always involves a group of people, the team, gathered around the patient and those who are close to them. Effective communication and functional responsive systems of care are essential if palliative care is to be delivered in a timely and competent way. Creating and fostering an effective team is one of the greatest challenges for providers of palliative care. Teams are organic and can be life giving or life sapping for their members.

  10. Team Networking in Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruyt, Odette

    2011-01-01

    “If you want to travel quickly, go alone. But if you want to travel far, you must go together”. African proverb. The delivery of palliative care is often complex and always involves a group of people, the team, gathered around the patient and those who are close to them. Effective communication and functional responsive systems of care are essential if palliative care is to be delivered in a timely and competent way. Creating and fostering an effective team is one of the greatest challenges for providers of palliative care. Teams are organic and can be life giving or life sapping for their members. PMID:21811361

  11. Radical fashion and radical fashion innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, D.; Benedetto, Di A.C.

    2010-01-01

    This is a study of the related concepts of radical fashion and radical fashion innovation. Radical fashions are defined here as those that may never enter the market at all, and exist primarily on runway shows, in exhibitions and in publicity; by contrast, radical fashion innovations may be very

  12. Radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    surgery and at follow-up and they were asked to report their use of pads/diapers. Potency was defined as an IIEF-5 score of at least 17 with or without phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. Patients using up to one pad daily for security reasons only were considered continent. Positive surgical margins, blood...

  13. Quimioterapia neoadjuvante seguida de cirurgia radical em paciente grávida com câncer de colo de útero: relato de caso e revisão de literatura Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical surgery in pregnant patient with invasive cervical cancer: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allex Jardim da Fonseca

    2011-01-01

    gestational age, clinical stage and the patient's wishes. Some authors have reported cases of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical surgery in these patients. The aim of this paper was to revisit this subject and to add a new case and review the literature. We report the case of a 30 year-old woman in the 24th week of gestation. She was diagnosed with ICC (squamous cell carcinoma grade 2, stage IIB (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics - FIGO. Nulliparous, the patient refused to interrupt the pregnancy. After meticulous counseling, the patient accepted treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (cisplatin 75 mg/m² and vincristine 1 mg/m² and subsequent evaluation of radical surgery concomitant to a cesarean section. Four complete cycles of chemotherapy were administered without delays or significant adverse effects. A few days before the date scheduled for surgery, the patient was admitted in advanced labor (37th week of gestation. Due to tumor clinical response, the obstetric team decided to monitor the labor, and the patient gave birth to a male newborn (2,450 g uneventfully. Radical surgery was performed three days after birth, and histopathology analysis revealed carcinoma confined to the cervix without lymphatic involvement. Mother and son are in good general condition 12 months after delivery. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy during the second or third trimester of pregnancy appears to be a safe option for patients who do not wish to interrupt a pregnancy while awaiting fetal maturity. However, additional studies are needed to confirm the prognosis and assure the safety of newborns and patients.

  14. Palliative care - shortness of breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Palliative care is a holistic approach to care that focuses on treating pain ... the cause will help the team decide the treatment. The nurse may check how much oxygen is ...

  15. Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Press Release Patients & Families About Serious Illness Certified Nurses are Everywhere Advocacy Palliative Nursing Summit Recent Activity ... Principles State Ambassadors Advocacy Resources Healthcare Resources Certified Nurses Day Certified Nurses are Everywhere Certification is Transformational ...

  16. Palliative care in advanced HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    FEATURES OF PALLIATIVE CARE. IN AIDS ... rent infection e.g. IV ampho- tericin B on an in-patient ... nurses for case management, to communicate ... evaluation — an ongoing process of assessment, to .... Rectal, subcutaneous, intravenous.

  17. Laparoscopic radical cystectomy: key points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Perlin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radical cystectomy remains the golden standard for treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer. Objective: to duplicate with highest accuracy the open radical cystectomy procedure, which we successfully utilized earlier in our clinic, in the of laparoscopic conditions in order to preserve the advantages of minimally invasive procedures and retain the reliability of the tried and tested open surgery.Materials and methods. In the report were included 35 patients (27 men and 8 women with bladder cancer, who underwent laparoscopic radical cystectomy in Volgograd Regional Center of Urology and Nephrology between April 2013 and March 2016. Only the patients who had been submitted to full intracorporal ileal conduits were included.Results. The mean operative time was 378 minutes, the mean blood loss was 285 millilitres, the mean length of hospital stay was 12.4 days, only 20 % of patients required the narcotic anesthetics. The postoperative complication rate was 11.4 %. However, the majority of the patients were successfully treated with minimally invasive procedures. Generally, our results were similar to other reported studies.Conclusion. Laparoscopic radical cystectomy is a safe and efficient modality of treatment of bladder cancer. However, it needs more procedures and longer observation period to establish laparoscopic radical cystectomy as an alternative to open radical cystectomy.

  18. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires for men who have radical surgery for prostate cancer: a conceptual review of existing instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopapa, Evangelia; van der Meulen, Jan; Moore, Caroline M; Smith, Sarah C

    2017-10-01

    To critically review conceptual frameworks for available patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires in men having radical prostatectomy (RP), psychometrically evaluate each questionnaire, and identify whether each is appropriate for use at the level of the individual patient. We searched PubMed, the Reports and Publications database of the University of Oxford Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Group and the website of the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) for psychometric reviews of prostate cancer-specific PRO questionnaires. From these we identified relevant questionnaires and critically appraised the conceptual content, guided by the Wilson and Cleary framework and psychometric properties, using well established criteria. The searches found four reviews and one recommendation paper. We identified seven prostate cancer-specific PROs: the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite-26 (EPIC-26), Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite-50 (EPIC-50), University of California-Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Prostate Cancer Subscale (FACT-P PCS), European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire - prostate specific 25-item (EORTC QLQ-PR25), Prostate Cancer - Quality of Life (PC-QoL), and Symptom Tracking and Reporting (STAR). Six out of seven measures purported to measure health-related quality of life (HRQL), but items focused strongly on urinary and sexual symptoms/functioning. The remaining questionnaire (STAR) claimed to assess functional recovery after RP. The psychometric evidence for these questionnaires was incomplete and variable in quality; none had evidence that they were appropriate for use with individual patients. Several questionnaires provide the basis of measures of urinary and/or sexual symptoms/functioning. Further work should explore other aspects of HRQL that are important for men having RP. Further psychometric work

  19. [Have Case Loads of Radical Surgery for Prostate Cancer Been Concentrated in Hospitals with Robotic Equipment ?--Analyses with Questionnaire Survey and Diagnostic Procedure Combination (DPC) Data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Taiji; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether installation of robot-assisted surgical equipment in hospitals resulted in concentration of the case loads of radical prostatectomy. We selected 11 areas with populations of around 1 million or more where there were one or more hospitals with robotic equipment and 4 or more without it. In addition, annual changes of case loads for prostatectomy over 4 years from 2010 to 2013 were clearly determined in these areas. The case loads were determined based on the results of a questionnaire survey for the hospitals with robots and on the Diagnostic Procedures Combination data provided by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Wealth for those without such equipment. The concentration of the case loads was principally defined as when hospitals with robots had more predominant proportion of cases than those without them in the comparison between case loads prior to instillation of robots (or in the initial year of the study) and those in the final years. The 11 selected areas included 44 hospitals with robots and 156 without them. Concentration of case loads was found in 5 areas. In 4 areas, installation of robots did not have a specific relation to the distribution pattern s of case loads in hospitals with or without the equipment. The remaining 2 areas tended to have a weak but not definite concentration of case loads. In the areas in which installation did not influence case loads the further analysis revealed that their case loads had already been concentrated in the initial year (2010) of the study. Although the current results were found in a single department of the hospital, robotic installation may result in concentration of prostatectomy case loads for such hospitals in some areas. The current results are intriguing when we consider the future roles of acute care hospitals and beds in our country where the number of aged patients having chronic diseases will increase. In conclusion, installation of robotic equipment may result in concentration

  20. Palliative care guidelines in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krizanova, K.

    2006-01-01

    Palliative care has its roots in hospice movement arising in the 1970s in Europe and later also in America. From its beginning it has had connection with patients in terminal phase of cancer disease who suffered from many serious symptoms. Nowadays palliative care is also being provided to patients in terminal phase of certain neurological disorders, AIDS, exceptionally for patients with heart, lung or kidney failure. It has become part of modern medicine and of good clinical practice. (author)

  1. Palliative care content on cancer center websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B; Rebesco, Gina; Schenker, Yael; Torke, Alexia M; Gramelspacher, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    Professional guidelines recommend that palliative care begin early in advanced cancer management, yet integration of palliative and cancer care remains suboptimal. Cancer centers may miss opportunities to provide palliative care information online. In this study, we described the palliative care content on cancer center websites. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 62 National Cancer Institute- (NCI) designated cancer center websites. We assessed the content of center homepages and analyzed search results using the terms palliative care, supportive care, and hospice. For palliative and supportive care webpages, we assessed services offered and language used to describe care. Two researchers analyzed all websites using a standardized coding manual. Kappa values ranged from 0.78 to 1. NCI-designated cancer center homepages presented information about cancer-directed therapy (61%) more frequently than palliative care (5%). Ten percent of cancer centers had no webpage with palliative care information for patients. Among centers with information for patients, the majority (96%) defined palliative or supportive care, but 30% did not discuss delivery of palliative care alongside curative treatment, and 14% did not mention provision of care early in the disease process. Cancer center homepages rarely mention palliative care services. While the majority of centers have webpages with palliative care content, they sometimes omit information about early use of care. Improving accessibility of palliative care information and increasing emphasis on early provision of services may improve integration of palliative and cancer care.

  2. Palliative radiotherapy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicts that cancer incidence in developing countries will increase dramatically in the first two decades of this millennium. Already some 80% of cancer patients in developing countries present with incurable disease. [n many cases pain is a severe problem and palliation is needed to improve quality of life as well as extending survival. This paper will consider the physical and clinical aspects of palliative radiotherapy (PRT), choice of radiation modality, alternative approaches to imaging and therapy and cost-benefit considerations. The potential benefits of a dedicated palliative centre include lower cost and therefore more centres, enabling more patients access to regional palliative care. Whilst there is an obvious need for palliative radiotherapy, simple curative treatments could also be managed. C060 radiotherapy has important advantages in developing countries, because of the higher initial cost of a linear accelerator, as well as the need for reliable power supply and the level of skill required by linac technicians and physicists. The beam characteristics of both C060 units and low energy linacs are compared and both are found to be acceptable for palliation. The concept of telemedicine is also discussed, using mobile phones and internet communication to allow rural clinics to receive support from specialists based in the cities, to send images for remote diagnosis and remote dose planning for radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Primary radical ablative surgery and fibula free-flap reconstruction for T4 oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma with mandibular invasion: oncologic and functional results and their predictive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camuzard, Olivier; Dassonville, Olivier; Ettaiche, Marc; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Poissonnet, Gilles; Berguiga, Riadh; Leysalle, Axel; Benezery, Karen; Peyrade, Frédéric; Saada, Esma; Hechema, Raphael; Sudaka, Anne; Haudebourg, Juliette; Demard, François; Santini, José; Bozec, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate clinical outcomes and to determine their predictive factors in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) invading the mandibular bone (T4) who underwent primary radical surgery and fibula free-flap reconstruction. Between 2001 and 2013, all patients who underwent primary surgery and mandibular fibula free-flap reconstruction for OCSCC were enrolled in this retrospective study. Predictive factors of oncologic and functional outcomes were assessed in univariate and multivariate analysis. 77 patients (55 men and 22 women, mean age 62 ± 10.6 years) were enrolled in this study. Free-flap failure and local and general complication rates were 9, 31, and 22 %, respectively. In multivariate analysis, ASA score (p = 0.002), pathologic N-stage (p = 0.01), and close surgical margins (p = 0.03) were independent predictors of overall survival. Six months after therapy, oral diet, speech intelligibility, and mouth opening functions were normal or slightly impaired in, respectively, 79, 88, and 83 % of patients. 6.5 % of patients remaining dependent on enteral nutrition 6 months after therapy. With acceptable postoperative outcomes and satisfactory oncologic and functional results, segmental mandibulectomy with fibula free-flap reconstruction should be considered the gold standard primary treatment for patients with OCSCC invading mandible bone. Oncologic outcomes are dependent on three main factors: ASA score, pathologic N-stage, and surgical margin status.

  4. When palliative treatment achieves more than palliation: Instances of long-term survival after palliative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhup Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Palliative radiotherapy aims at symptom alleviation and improvement of quality of life. It may be effective in conferring a reasonable quantum of local control, as well as possibly prolonging survival on the short term. However, there can be rare instances where long-term survival, or even cure, results from palliative radiotherapy, which mostly uses sub-therapeutic doses. Aim: To categorize and characterize the patients with long-term survival and/or cure after palliative radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of hospital records of patients treated with palliative radiotherapy from 2001 to 2006 at the Regional Cancer Centre, Shimla. Results: Of the analyzed 963 patients who received palliative radiotherapy, 2.4% (n = 23 survived at least 5 years, with a large majority of these surviving patients (73.9%, n = 17 being free of disease. Conclusions: In addition to providing valuable symptom relief, palliative radiotherapy utilizing sub-therapeutic doses may, in a small proportion of patients, bestow long-term survival, and possibly cure. Rationally, such a favorable, but rare outcome cannot be expected with supportive care alone.

  5. Comparison and evaluation between 3D-bolus and step-bolus, the assistive radiotherapy devices for the patients who had undergone modified radical mastectomy surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Won Seok; Park, Kwang Woo; Shin, Dong Bong; Kim, Jong Dae; Kim, Sei Joon; Ha, Jin Sook; Jeon, Mi Jin; Cho, Yoojin; Jung, Inho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul, (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    This study aimed to compare and evaluate between the efficiency of two respective devices, 3D-bolus and step-bolus when the devices were used for the treatment of patients whose chest walls were required to undergo the electron beam therapy after the surgical procedure of modified radical mastectomy, MRM. The treatment plan of reverse hockey stick method, using the photon beam and electron beam, had been set for six breast cancer patients and these 6 breast cancer patients were selected to be the subjects for this study. The prescribed dose of electron beam for anterior chest wall was set to be 180 cGy per treatment and both the 3D-bolus, produced using 3D printer(CubeX, 3D systems, USA) and the self-made conventional step-bolus were used respectively. The surface dose under 3D-bolus and step-bolus was measured at 5 measurement spots of iso-center, lateral, medial, superior and inferior point, using GAFCHROMIC EBT3 film (International specialty products, USA) and the measured value of dose at 5 spots was compared and analyzed. Also the respective treatment plan was devised, considering the adoption of 3D-bolus and stepbolus and the separate treatment results were compared to each other. The average surface dose was 179.17 cGy when the device of 3D-bolus was adopted and 172.02 cGy when step-bolus was adopted. The average error rate against the prescribed dose of 180 cGy was -(minus) 0.47% when the device of 3D-bolus was adopted and it was -(minus) 4.43% when step-bolus was adopted. It was turned out that the maximum error rate at the point of iso-center was 2.69%, in case of 3D-bolus adoption and it was 5,54% in case of step-bolus adoption. The maximum discrepancy in terms of treatment accuracy was revealed to be about 6% when step-bolus was adopted and to be about 3% when 3D-bolus was adopted. The difference in average target dose on chest wall between 3D-bolus treatment plan and step-bolus treatment plan was shown to be insignificant as the difference was only 0

  6. Comparison and evaluation between 3D-bolus and step-bolus, the assistive radiotherapy devices for the patients who had undergone modified radical mastectomy surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Won Seok; Park, Kwang Woo; Shin, Dong Bong; Kim, Jong Dae; Kim, Sei Joon; Ha, Jin Sook; Jeon, Mi Jin; Cho, Yoojin; Jung, Inho

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare and evaluate between the efficiency of two respective devices, 3D-bolus and step-bolus when the devices were used for the treatment of patients whose chest walls were required to undergo the electron beam therapy after the surgical procedure of modified radical mastectomy, MRM. The treatment plan of reverse hockey stick method, using the photon beam and electron beam, had been set for six breast cancer patients and these 6 breast cancer patients were selected to be the subjects for this study. The prescribed dose of electron beam for anterior chest wall was set to be 180 cGy per treatment and both the 3D-bolus, produced using 3D printer(CubeX, 3D systems, USA) and the self-made conventional step-bolus were used respectively. The surface dose under 3D-bolus and step-bolus was measured at 5 measurement spots of iso-center, lateral, medial, superior and inferior point, using GAFCHROMIC EBT3 film (International specialty products, USA) and the measured value of dose at 5 spots was compared and analyzed. Also the respective treatment plan was devised, considering the adoption of 3D-bolus and stepbolus and the separate treatment results were compared to each other. The average surface dose was 179.17 cGy when the device of 3D-bolus was adopted and 172.02 cGy when step-bolus was adopted. The average error rate against the prescribed dose of 180 cGy was -(minus) 0.47% when the device of 3D-bolus was adopted and it was -(minus) 4.43% when step-bolus was adopted. It was turned out that the maximum error rate at the point of iso-center was 2.69%, in case of 3D-bolus adoption and it was 5,54% in case of step-bolus adoption. The maximum discrepancy in terms of treatment accuracy was revealed to be about 6% when step-bolus was adopted and to be about 3% when 3D-bolus was adopted. The difference in average target dose on chest wall between 3D-bolus treatment plan and step-bolus treatment plan was shown to be insignificant as the difference was only 0

  7. Primary management of esophageal carcinoma with radiation therapy and surgery and correlation of failure pattern based on autopsy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.M.; Goertz, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports a study of forty-seven patients with esophageal carcinoma who were treated definitively with radiation therapy (n = 18) and radical surgery (n = 18) or received palliative treatment (n = 11) at the Medical College of Virginia between 1967 and 1982. The average intervals between diagnosis and death were 5, 7, and 4 months, respectively. Autopsy revealed that 80% with radiation therapy and 50% in the surgery group had persistent local-regional disease. Eleven of 36 had adrenal metastasis and eight of 36 had a second primary in the head, neck, lung or prostate. The data show a significant incidence of persistent disease in spite of negative surgical margins. Additional treatment with chemotherapy or postoperative radiation therapy should be considered

  8. Quantification of hydroxyl radical produced during phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jonathan M; Aust, Steven D

    2009-12-01

    To quantitate hydroxyl radicals produced during phacoemulsification with various irrigating solutions and conditions used in cataract surgery. Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, USA. All experiments were performed using an Infiniti Vision System phacoemulsifier with irrigation and aspiration. Hydroxyl radicals were quantitated using electron spin resonance spectroscopy and a spectrophotometric assay for malondialdehyde, which is formed by the oxidation of deoxyribose by the hydroxyl radical. Hydroxyl radical production increased during longitudinal-stroking phacoemulsification as power levels were increased in a nonlinear, nonexponential fashion. The detection of hydroxyl radical was reduced in irrigating solutions containing organic molecules (eg, citrate, acetate, glutathione, dextrose) and further reduced in Navstel, an irrigating solution containing a viscosity-modifying agent, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose. Hydroxyl radicals produced in settings representative of those used in phacoemulsification cataract surgery were quantitated using the deoxyribose method. Hydroxyl radical production was dependent on the level of ultrasound power applied and the irrigating solution used. Oxidative stress on the eye during phacoemulsification may be minimized by using irrigating solutions that contain organic molecules, including the viscosity-modifying agent hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, that can compete for reaction with hydroxyl radicals.

  9. Phase II study of a trimodal preoperative treatment followed by radical surgery or radiotherapy in non-resectable cervical cancer ≥ Figo IIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, C.; Gellermann, J.; Jungnickel, K.; Kuemmel, S.; Hildebrandt, B.; Wust, P

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Regional hyperthermia is combined with radiochemotherapy to achieve resectability in non-resectable cervical carcinoma. In a phase II study at the Charite Medical School approved by the institutionals ethical committee non-resectable cervical carcinoma of at least FIGO IIB were treated with radiochemotherapy combined with regional hyperthermia. The treatment concept comprises cisplatinum therapy of 40 mg/sqm body surface once weekly during regional hyperthermia supplementing radiation therapy of 5 x 1.8 Gy to a total dose of 45 - 50.4 Gy. A gynecological status and imaging is performed for evaluation of resectability of the tumor. If a tumor resection was not feasable radiation was completed to 59.4 - 63 Gy supplemented by 4 - 5 afterloading sessions. Regional hyperthermia was conducted with SIGMA 60 or SIGMA Eye applicator of the system BSD-2000, on average steady state temperatures between 40-41 o C were achieved over the therapeutic time. From 2000 to 2003 we recruited 30 patients. Acute toxicity was in the usual range (10-15 % grade ≥ 3). Two thirds were FIGO stage III/IV with tumor diameters > 6 cm. After treatment 20/30 (67 %) of the former inoperable cases were evaluated as resectable, 3 of these patients refused surgery. Of the remaining 17 cases 14 patients were R0-resected, 2 patients were R1-resected, and 1 patient had a positive paraaortal lymphnode. In 13/30 patients nonsurgical treatment was continued. Response was achieved in 23/30 patients (77 %), i.e. 14 resectable cases with downstaging and 9 partial remissions (PR) after hyperthermic radiochemotherapy with 45 - 50.4 Gy. Response correlated well with thermal parameters, in particular the mean temperature in the vaginal reference point. For the whole group a three year overall survival of 60 % was achieved together with a moderate late toxicity ≥ 3 in 4/30 patients (13 %). R0-resected patients have an excellent prognosis with a 3-year survival of 95 % and a late toxicity ≥ 3 below

  10. Palliative social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, Mark; Watts, Gareth; Boland, Jason; Radbruch, Lukas

    2014-03-01

    The uses of social media have become ubiquitous in contemporary society at an astonishingly fast-paced rate. The internet and in particular platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are now part of most people's vocabulary and are starting to replace many face-to-face interactions. The online world, in particular, is alive with discussions, comments and anecdotes about the topics of illness, disease, hospitals, death and dying. The topic of death and dying had in the not too distant past been seen as taboo, but willingness and need to talk openly about it appears to be on the increase. In parallel to this, many public awareness campaigns are highlighting society's need to be more prepared for dying and death. This will have a significant impact on the way terminally ill patients and their families approach the last years, months and weeks of their lives and how they might expect palliative health and social care professionals working with them through these difficult periods to interact with them. We pay particular attention to the areas of digital posterity creation and memorialisation within the wider holistic context of end-of-life care.

  11. Palliative Care Scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelson, Sheri; Pierce, Read; Youngwerth, Jeanie

    2017-05-01

    In response to poor healthcare quality outcomes and rising costs, healthcare reform triple aim has increased requirements for providers to demonstrate value to payers, partners, and the public. Electronically automating measurement of the meaningful impact of palliative care (PC) programs on clinical, operational, and financial systems over time is imperative to the success of the field and the goal of development of this automated PC scorecard. The scorecard was organized into a format of quality measures identified by the Measuring What Matters (MWM) project that are defined as important to the team, automatically extracted from the electronic health record, valid, and can be impacted over time. The scorecard was initially created using University of Florida Health (UF) data, a new PC program, and successfully applied and implemented at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus (CU), a second institution with a mature PC program. Clinical metrics are organized in the scorecard based on MWM and described in terms of the metric definition, rationale for selection, measure type (structure, process, or outcome), and whether this represents a direct or proxy measure. The process of constructing the scorecard helped identify areas within both systems for potential improvement in team structure, clinical processes, and outcomes. In addition, by automating data extraction, the scorecard decreases costs associated with manual data entry and extraction, freeing clinical staff to care for patients and increasing the value of PC delivered to patients.

  12. American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Getting Involved Communities Advanced Lung Disease Forum Psychiatry, Psychology, Mental Health Forum Social Work Forum SIG Instructions ... MOC/OCC Workforce Study Global Palliative Care About History Position Statements Access to Palliative Care and Hospice ...

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) 26,045 views 5:39 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: ...

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Keeney Family discuss pediatric palliative care - Duration: 12:07. Hospice of the Western Reserve 12,073 views 12:07 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - ...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  16. Prevalence of hyponatremia in palliative care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Nair

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Prevalence of hyponatremia is significant in palliative care patients. A prospective study looking at the causes and clinical outcomes associated with hyponatremia in palliative care patients is needed.

  17. Endoscopic palliation of malignant dysphagia: a challenging task in inoperable oesophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mylvaganam S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main goal when managing patients with inoperable oesophageal cancer is to restore and maintain their oral nutrition. The aim of the present study was to assess the value of endoscopic palliation of dysphagia in patients with oesophageal cancer, who either due to advanced stage of the disease or co-morbidity are not suitable for surgery. Patients and methods All the endoscopic palliative procedures performed over a 5-year period in our unit were retrospectively reviewed. Dilatation and insertion of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS were mainly used for tight circumferential strictures whilst ablation with Nd-YAG laser was used for exophytic lesions. All procedures were performed under sedation. Results Overall 249 palliative procedures were performed in 59 men and 40 women, with a median age of 73 years (range 35 – 93. The median number of sessions per patient was 2 (range 1 – 13 sessions. Palliation involved laser ablation alone in 24%, stent insertion alone in 22% and dilatation alone in 13% of the patients. In 41% of the patients, a combination of the above palliative techniques was applied. A total of 45 SEMS were inserted. One third of the patients did not receive any other palliative treatment, whilst the rest received chemotherapy, radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Swallowing was maintained in all patients up to death. Four oesophageal perforations were encountered; two were fatal whilst the other two were successfully treated with covered stent insertion and conservative treatment. The median survival from diagnosis was 10.5 months (range 0.5–83 months and the median survival from 1st palliation was 5 months (range 0.5–68.5 months. Conclusion Endoscopic interventions are effective and relatively safe palliative modalities for patients with oesophageal cancer. It is possible to adequately palliate almost all cases of malignant dysphagia. This is achieved by expertise in combination treatment.

  18. Rawlsian Justice and Palliative Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knight, Carl; Albertsen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Palliative care serves both as an integrated part of treatment and as a last effort to care for those we cannot cure. The extent to which palliative care should be provided and our reasons for doing so have been curiously overlooked in the debate about distributive justice in health and healthcar...... to provide pain relief to those who need it as a supplement to treatment and, without justice-based reasons to provide palliative care to those whose opportunities cannot be restored. We conclude that this makes Daniels' framework much less attractive.......Palliative care serves both as an integrated part of treatment and as a last effort to care for those we cannot cure. The extent to which palliative care should be provided and our reasons for doing so have been curiously overlooked in the debate about distributive justice in health and healthcare....... We argue that one prominent approach, the Rawlsian approach developed by Norman Daniels, is unable to provide such reasons and such care. This is because of a central feature in Daniels' account, namely that care should be provided to restore people's opportunities. Daniels' view is both unable...

  19. Flemish Palliative-Care Nurses’ Attitudes to Palliative Sedation: Results of a Quantitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gielen, Joris; Van den Branden, Stef; van Iersel, Trudie; Broeckaert, Bert

    2012-01-01

    Palliative sedation is an option of last resort to control refractory suffering. In order to better understand palliative-care nurses’ attitudes to palliative sedation, an anonymous questionnaire was sent to all nurses (589) employed in palliative care in Flanders (Belgium). In all, 70.5% of the nurses (n=415) responded. A large majority did not agree that euthanasia is preferable to palliative sedation, were against non-voluntary euthanasia in the case of a deeply and continuously sedated pa...

  20. Endoscopic Palliation for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Bakhru

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is devastating due to its poor prognosis. Patients require a multidisciplinary approach to guide available options, mostly palliative because of advanced disease at presentation. Palliation including relief of biliary obstruction, gastric outlet obstruction, and cancer-related pain has become the focus in patients whose cancer is determined to be unresectable. Endoscopic stenting for biliary obstruction is an option for drainage to avoid the complications including jaundice, pruritus, infection, liver dysfunction and eventually failure. Enteral stents can relieve gastric obstruction and allow patients to resume oral intake. Pain is difficult to treat in cancer patients and endoscopic procedures such as pancreatic stenting and celiac plexus neurolysis can provide relief. The objective of endoscopic palliation is to primarily address symptoms as well improve quality of life.

  1. Palliative radiotherapy for multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Mitsuhiro; Baba, Yuji; Murakami, Ryuji; Yokoyama, Toshimi; Nishimura, Ryuichi; Uozumi, Hideaki; Takada, Chitose; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    1995-01-01

    This study reviews the experience of palliative radiotherapy to patients with multiple myeloma to define the optimal dose for pain relief. The records of 31 patients (66 sites) with multiple myeloma irradiated for palliation at Kumamoto University hospital between 1985 and 1994 were reviewed. Total dose ranged from 8 to 50 Gy, with a mean of 32.2 Gy. Symptoms included pain (78.1%), neurological abnormalities (28.1%), and palpable masses (34.3%). Symptomatic remission was obtained in 45 of 46 evaluable sites (97.8%). Complete remission of symptoms were obtained in 28.3%, and partial remission in 69.6%. According to fraction size, there was no significant difference between 3-5 Gy and 1.8-2 Gy. The incidence of complete remission increased when a total dose of more than 20 Gy was given. When the quality of life is considered, hypofractionation was recommended for the palliative radiation therapy of multiple myeloma. (author)

  2. Palliative Care in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Mert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is an important health problem since its incidence and prevalence is increasing year by year. Since symptom burden and mortality are high in heart failure, supportive and palliative care should be provided. However, very few patients are referred to palliative care services. In comparison with cancer patients, it is difficult to identify end of life care for patients with heart failure, because these patients are hospitalized when the signs of acute decompensation appear, and their symptoms decrease and functional status improve before they are discharged. Therefore, palliative care, which is a holistic approach aiming to improve patients’ quality of life, to detect and treat the attacks of the disease before they become severe, and to deal with patients’ physical, psychological, social, and mental health altogether during their care, should be integrated into heart failure patients’ care. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 217-222

  3. Endoscopic palliation in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivieso, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The integral search for improved living conditions for those patients with gastric cancer who have not received curative surgical treatment continues to challenge the knowledge, dexterity and ethical foundations of medical teams. The justification for palliative treatment must be based on a thorough consideration of the available options and the particular situation in each case. This article reviews endoscopic therapy with auto expandable prosthetics for palliative treatment of gastric cancer, as well as the scientific evidence that supports its use and the factors that determine its indication.

  4. Value of palliation and improvement in quality of life in oesophageal cancer patients treated with iridium - 192 HDR fractionated brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaias, B.; Kaleta, R.; Fijaikowski, M.

    1996-01-01

    During December 1992 - November 1995 twenty-two patients with oesophageal cancer were treated with palliative HDR brachytherapy. Sixteen patients had local recurrence or progression after external radiotherapy and the remaining six patients were treated with brachytherapy alone. All patients received fractions of 7.5 Gy at the reference point 2 - 4 time weekly. Reference point was calculated at 0.5 cm distance from applicator surface. Microselectron HDR device with Iridium-192 source were used. Criteria for palliative effect were as follow: relive of symptoms time of occurrence and duration of palliative effect. Quality of life during and after treatment were evaluated by patients and staff independently. In majority of patients both palliative effect and significant improvement of quality of life were noted. Detail results include: - improvement in swallowing in 63,6% ((14(22))); - increase in body weight in 45% ((10(22))); - pain relive 70% ((12(17))); - appearance of palliation 1 hour - 8 days; - duration of palliation - 3-12 mo. (median 5 mo.); Quality of live - improvement - 59% ((13(22))); - no improvement - 27.3% ((6(22))); - worsening - 13.7% ((3(22))); No improvement or worsening in quality of life were observed only in patients who obtained radical radiotherapy previously. Brachytherapy is an effective method of palliative treatment for as well primary and recurrent oesophageal cancer

  5. Branding Palliative Care Units by Avoiding the Terms "Palliative" and "Hospice".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying-Xiu; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lin, Ming-Hwai

    2017-01-01

    The term "palliative care" has a negative connotation and may act as a barrier to early patient referrals. Rebranding has thus been proposed as a strategy to reduce the negative perceptions associated with palliative care. For example, using the term "supportive care" instead of "palliative care" in naming palliative care units has been proposed in several studies. In Taiwan, terms other than "palliative" and "hospice" are already widely used in the names of palliative care units. With this in mind, this study investigated the characteristics of palliative care unit names in order to better understand the role of naming in palliative care. Relevant data were collected from the Taiwan Academy of Hospice Palliative Medicine, the National Health Insurance Administration of the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the open database maintained by the government of Taiwan. We found a clear phenomenon of avoiding use of the terms "palliative" and "hospice" in the naming of palliative care units, a phenomenon that reflects the stigma attached to the terms "palliative" and "hospice" in Taiwan. At the time of the study (September, 2016), there were 55 palliative care units in Taiwan. Only 20.0% (n = 11) of the palliative care unit names included the term "palliative," while 25.2% (n = 14) included the term "hospice." Religiously affiliated hospitals were less likely to use the terms "palliative" and "hospice" (χ 2 = 11.461, P = .001). There was also a lower prevalence of use of the terms "palliative" and "hospice" for naming palliative care units in private hospitals than in public hospitals (χ 2 = 4.61, P = .032). This finding highlights the strong stigma attached to the terms "palliative" and "hospice" in Taiwan. It is hypothesized that sociocultural and religious factors may partially account for this phenomenon.

  6. Modern Palliative Radiation Treatment: Do Complexity and Workload Contribute to Medical Errors?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, Neil, E-mail: neil.dsouza@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Holden, Lori [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Robson, Sheila [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mah, Kathy; Di Prospero, Lisa; Wong, C. Shun; Chow, Edward; Spayne, Jacqueline [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To examine whether treatment workload and complexity associated with palliative radiation therapy contribute to medical errors. Methods and Materials: In the setting of a large academic health sciences center, patient scheduling and record and verification systems were used to identify patients starting radiation therapy. All records of radiation treatment courses delivered during a 3-month period were retrieved and divided into radical and palliative intent. 'Same day consultation, planning and treatment' was used as a proxy for workload and 'previous treatment' and 'multiple sites' as surrogates for complexity. In addition, all planning and treatment discrepancies (errors and 'near-misses') recorded during the same time frame were reviewed and analyzed. Results: There were 365 new patients treated with 485 courses of palliative radiation therapy. Of those patients, 128 (35%) were same-day consultation, simulation, and treatment patients; 166 (45%) patients had previous treatment; and 94 (26%) patients had treatment to multiple sites. Four near-misses and 4 errors occurred during the audit period, giving an error per course rate of 0.82%. In comparison, there were 10 near-misses and 5 errors associated with 1100 courses of radical treatment during the audit period. This translated into an error rate of 0.45% per course. An association was found between workload and complexity and increased palliative therapy error rates. Conclusions: Increased complexity and workload may have an impact on palliative radiation treatment discrepancies. This information may help guide the necessary recommendations for process improvement for patients who require palliative radiation therapy.

  7. Palliative Care: Delivering Comprehensive Oncology Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Constance

    2015-11-01

    To describe palliative care as part of comprehensive oncology nursing care. A review of the palliative care, oncology, and nursing literature over the past 10 years. Palliative care is mandated as part of comprehensive cancer care. A cancer diagnosis often results in distress in the physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and emotional domains of care. Oncology nurses are essential in providing palliative care from diagnosis to death to patients with cancer. They address the myriad aspects of cancer. With palliative care skills and knowledge, oncology nurses can provide quality cancer care. There are many opportunities in which oncology nurses can promote palliative care. Oncology nurses must obtain knowledge and skills in primary palliative care to provide comprehensive cancer care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Consultation with specialist palliative care services in palliative sedation: considerations of Dutch physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, Ian; van der Heide, Agnes; Janssens, Rien; Swart, Siebe; Perez, Roberto; Rietjens, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Palliative sedation is considered a normal medical practice by the Royal Dutch Medical Association. Therefore, consultation of an expert is not considered mandatory. The European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) framework for palliative sedation, however, is more stringent: it considers the use of palliative sedation without consulting an expert as injudicious and insists on input from a multi-professional palliative care team. This study investigates the considerations of Dutch physicians concerning consultation about palliative sedation with specialist palliative care services. Fifty-four physicians were interviewed on their most recent case of palliative sedation. Reasons to consult were a lack of expertise and the view that consultation was generally supportive. Reasons not to consult were sufficient expertise, the view that palliative sedation is a normal medical procedure, time pressure, fear of disagreement with the service and regarding consultation as having little added value. Arguments in favour of mandatory consultation were that many physicians lack expertise and that palliative sedation is an exceptional intervention. Arguments against mandatory consultation were practical obstacles that may preclude fulfilling such an obligation (i.e. lack of time), palliative sedation being a standard medical procedure, corroding a physician's responsibility and deterring physicians from applying palliative sedation. Consultation about palliative sedation with specialist palliative care services is regarded as supportive and helpful when physicians lack expertise. However, Dutch physicians have both practical and theoretical objections against mandatory consultation. Based on the findings in this study, there seems to be little support among Dutch physicians for the EAPC recommendations on obligatory consultation.

  9. [Palliative Medicine as a New Career Path for Anesthesiologists: Preface and Comments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamata, Mikito

    2016-03-01

    The aim of Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists is to provide safe and comfortable medical care through biological management in emergency and intensive care using pain management and palliative medical care to deal with disease and surgery. Thus, in addition to the fields of intensive care medicine and emergency medicine, anesthesiologists have been expected to play an important role in the field of palliative medicine. Recently, anesthesiologists have been becoming professors and heads in the field of palliative medicine at many university hospitals in Japan. This is because anesthesiologists can provide care for the patient to prevent pain and various distress symptoms they would experience. Palliative care is provided by a team of physicians, nurses, and other health professionals who work together with the primary care physician and referred specialists to provide an extra layer of support. It is appropriate at any age and at any stage of a serious illness and can be provided along with curative treatment. Palliative care is also appropriate for patients from the point of diagnosing a serious illness--not just for the end of life. Anesthesiologists should show more leadership in the field of such palliative medicine in Japan.

  10. Local excision of early rectal cancer: is transanal endoscopic microsurgery an alternative to radical surgery? Escisión local del cáncer de recto en estadio precoz: ¿representa la microcirugía transanal endoscópica una alternativa a la cirugía radical?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Palma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM allows locally complete excision of rectal neoplasms and provides an alternative to conventional surgery for benign tumours. However, its role in the curative treatment of invasive carcinoma is controversial. This paper examines the results of TEM compared with radical surgery (RS for T1 rectal cancer. Methods: 51 patients with T1 rectal tumours treated by RS, or local excision by means of TEM were included. The following parameters were evaluated: operating time, blood loss, hospital stay and complications, as well as local recurrence rate and survival. Results: 17 patients were treated by RS and 34 by TEM. Operative time, blood loss, and duration of hospitalization were significantly lower in the TEM group compared with the RS group. In the RS group there were 4 patients with complications which required an operative revision (23.5%, compared to 1 reintervention (2.9% in the TEM group. Local recurrence was 5.88% (n = 2 in the TEM group compared with none after RS (p = 0.547. The overall survival and disease-free survival showed not significant statistical differences between both groups (p = 0.59; p = 1.000, resp.. Conclusions: although local recurrence was only observed after local excision, patients treated with TEM showed no significant differences in terms of overall survival and disease-free survival compared with patients who underwent RS. Inasmuch as local excision represents a minimally invasive technique in terms of morbidity, mortality and functional outcome, TEM should be offered as a valid option for well selected patients with early rectal cancer.Objetivo: la cirugía transanal endoscópica (TEM permite la resección completa de neoplasias de recto siendo una alternativa a la cirugía convencional para tumores benignos. Existe controversia sobre su papel en el tratamiento curativo del cáncer de recto. Esta publicación compara los resultados entre la resección radical (RS y la ex

  11. Radical Change by Entrepreneurial Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Nancy C

    1998-01-01

    .... How radical change in public policy has occurred in the past is then documented. We find examples of radical change by chance, radical change by consensus, radical change by learning, and radical change by entrepreneurial design...

  12. Palliative care in Salima district

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On 27th June 2007, Malawi's first dedicated palliative care centre, Ndi Moyo, was officially opened by the Honourable. Marjorie Ngaunje, the then Minister of Health. Over 260 patients have registered since August 2006 when they first started to receive treatment for relief of severe and chronic pain which is frequently related ...

  13. Opioid use in palliative care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    care. The confident and safe use of opioids in palliative care is an essential skill required by all. d o c t o r s . ... patient for ongoing clinical review. Start the elderly and frail .... (24 hour subcutaneous infusion ... (nursing or medical), pain special-.

  14. Palliative care in neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, Marianne; Oliver, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness. Neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) are characterized by progressive muscle weakness, leading to pronounced and incapacitating

  15. Radical surgery for early stage cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, M.

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women worldwide. Due to an effective screening programme, in the Netherlands cervical cancer is often detected in early stages of disease. For early stage (International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB/IIA) cervical

  16. The Attitudes of Indian Palliative-care Nurses and Physicians to Pain Control and Palliative Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Joris; Gupta, Harmala; Rajvanshi, Ambika; Bhatnagar, Sushma; Mishra, Seema; Chaturvedi, Arvind K; den Branden, Stef Van; Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to assess Indian palliative-care nurses and physicians' attitudes toward pain control and palliative sedation. From May to September 2008, we interviewed 14 physicians and 13 nurses working in different palliative-care programs in New Delhi, using a semi-structured questionnaire, and following grounded-theory methodology (Glaser and Strauss). The interviewees did not consider administration of painkillers in large doses an ethical problem, provided the pain killers are properly titrated. Mild palliative sedation was considered acceptable. The interviewees disagreed whether palliative sedation can also be deep and continuous. Arguments mentioned against deep continuous palliative sedation were the conviction that it may cause unacceptable side effects, and impedes basic daily activities and social contacts. A few interviewees said that palliative sedation may hasten death. Due to fears and doubts regarding deep continuous palliative sedation, it may sometimes be too easily discarded as a treatment option for refractory symptoms.

  17. The African Palliative Care Association (APCA Atlas of Palliative Care Development in Africa: a comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Y Rhee

    2018-03-01

    Funding: Arnhold Institute of Global Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the African Palliative Care Association, the International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care, and the Institute for Culture and Society at the University of Navarra.

  18. The Attitudes of Indian Palliative-care Nurses and Physicians to Pain Control and Palliative Sedation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Joris; Gupta, Harmala; Rajvanshi, Ambika; Bhatnagar, Sushma; Mishra, Seema; Chaturvedi, Arvind K; den Branden, Stef Van; Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Aim: We wanted to assess Indian palliative-care nurses and physicians’ attitudes toward pain control and palliative sedation. Materials and Methods: From May to September 2008, we interviewed 14 physicians and 13 nurses working in different palliative-care programs in New Delhi, using a semi-structured questionnaire, and following grounded-theory methodology (Glaser and Strauss). Results: The interviewees did not consider administration of painkillers in large doses an ethical problem, provided the pain killers are properly titrated. Mild palliative sedation was considered acceptable. The interviewees disagreed whether palliative sedation can also be deep and continuous. Arguments mentioned against deep continuous palliative sedation were the conviction that it may cause unacceptable side effects, and impedes basic daily activities and social contacts. A few interviewees said that palliative sedation may hasten death. Conclusion: Due to fears and doubts regarding deep continuous palliative sedation, it may sometimes be too easily discarded as a treatment option for refractory symptoms. PMID:21633619

  19. Undergraduate curricula in palliative medicine: a systematic analysis based on the palliative education assessment tool.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Schiessi, C

    2013-01-01

    By law in 2013, palliative medicine will be integrated into the undergraduate curriculum as part of a mandatory training program and examinations at German medical schools. For this reason a national curriculum in palliative medicine has to be developed.

  20. Specialist palliative care nursing and the philosophy of palliative care: a critical discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn; Gardiner, Clare; Ingleton, Christine

    2017-07-02

    Nursing is the largest regulated health professional workforce providing palliative care across a range of clinical settings. Historically, palliative care nursing has been informed by a strong philosophy of care which is soundly articulated in palliative care policy, research and practice. Indeed, palliative care is now considered to be an integral component of nursing practice regardless of the specialty or clinical setting. However, there has been a change in the way palliative care is provided. Upstreaming and mainstreaming of palliative care and the dominance of a biomedical model with increasing medicalisation and specialisation are key factors in the evolution of contemporary palliative care and are likely to impact on nursing practice. Using a critical reflection of the authors own experiences and supported by literature and theory from seminal texts and contemporary academic, policy and clinical literature, this discussion paper will explore the influence of philosophy on nursing knowledge and theory in the context of an evolving model of palliative care.

  1. A radical approach to radical innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Deichmann (Dirk); J.C.M. van den Ende (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInnovation pays. Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google – nearly every one of today’s most successful companies has a talent for developing radical new ideas. But how best to encourage radical initiative taking from employees, and does their previous success or failure at it play a role?

  2. EFFICIENT MEASURES FOR BURNOUT PREVENTION IN PALLIATIVE CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina DOBRE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The term burnout, meaning ”professional exhaustion”, was introduced by Herbert Freudenberger in 1974. On May 21, 2014 , the World Health Assembly, the decisional organ of the World Health Organization, voted the resolution for the integration and development of the capacity of palliative care services as a constituent part of the health systems. The resolution represents a major pace in the development of palliative care at world level, once the ministers responsible for the field took upon themselves - by means of information and training programs - the task of services’ development, mainly at community level, the support from the part of the next of kins, the elaboration of educational programs, of guides and clinical protocols for specialists, of instruments for the monitorization of the quality of services provided, an easier access of patients to medication, as well as partnerships with the civil society. Burnout is a state of emotional, mental and physical overfatigue caused by excessive and prolongued stress. It is installed mainly when the person affected with it feels care-worn and uncapable of fulfilling his/her usual duties. As the stress continues, he/she will come to lose the interest or motivation which made him/her assume a certain position in the organizational hierarchy. The burnout phenomenon includes three components: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and lack of professional accomplishment. The main observations on the phenomenon indicate that, apparently, the burnout level in palliative care is not higher than in other services, such as intensive therapy or surgery. Nevertheless, mention should be made of a characteristic of the palliative care services which influences the burnout level, namely the emotional relation created between the patient and the medical team, as a result of the prolongued duration of the care services

  3. PALLIATIVE CARE AND MEDICAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Anca COLIBABA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines learners’ difficulty in acquiring and practicing palliative medical skills necessary in medical procedures due to limited technologically state-of-the art language learning support to facilitate optimum access for medical students to the European medicine sector and offers as a potential solution the Palliative Care MOOC project (2014-1-RO01-KA203-002940. The project is co-financed by the European Union under the Erasmus+ program and coordinated by the Gr.T.Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi, Romania. The article describes the project idea and main objectives, highlighting its focus and activities on developing innovative guidelines on standardized fundamental medical procedures, as well as clinical language and communication skills. The project thus helps not only medical lecturers and language teachers who teach medical students, but also the medical students themselves and the lay people involved in causalities.

  4. Palliative Care and Death Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Inci

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diminishing treatment alternatives, losing hope for a possible recovery, insufficient control of pain and inability to provide the necessary technical support lead palliative care to bring multiple problems with itself. Along with technical and professional challenges, palliative care can put a humanitarian strain on the nurse. Caring for a dying patient is a worrisome experience which causes spiritual pain. An increase in nurses’ death anxiety may cause unwillingness to be together with a dying patient. In terms of the end of life, it is expected that the nurse stands by patient’s family to help them in sustaining their psychosocial wellness. In order to meet this expectation, nurses should get a qualitative training for end of life care along with good interpersonal communication skills and coping strategies.

  5. Smartphone applications in palliative homecare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil R Dhiliwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphone applications in healthcare delivery are a novel concept and is rapidly gaining ground in all fields of medicine. The modes of e-communications such as e-mail, short message service (SMS, multimedia messaging service (MMS and WhatsApp in palliative care provides a means for quick tele-consultation, information sharing, cuts the waiting time and facilitates initiation of the treatment at the earliest. It also forms a means of communication with local general practitioner and local health care provider such that continuity of the care is maintained. It also minimizes needless transport of the patient to hospital, prevents needless hospitalization and investigations and minimizes cost and logistics involved in the care process. The two case studies provided highlights the use of smartphone application like WhatsApp in palliative care practice and demonstrates its utility.

  6. Smartphone Applications in Palliative Homecare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiliwal, Sunil R; Salins, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone applications in healthcare delivery are a novel concept and is rapidly gaining ground in all fields of medicine. The modes of e-communications such as e-mail, short message service (SMS), multimedia messaging service (MMS) and WhatsApp in palliative care provides a means for quick tele-consultation, information sharing, cuts the waiting time and facilitates initiation of the treatment at the earliest. It also forms a means of communication with local general practitioner and local health care provider such that continuity of the care is maintained. It also minimizes needless transport of the patient to hospital, prevents needless hospitalization and investigations and minimizes cost and logistics involved in the care process. The two case studies provided highlights the use of smartphone application like WhatsApp in palliative care practice and demonstrates its utility. PMID:25709195

  7. Pain palliation therapy of bone metastases: palliative or curative?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.

    2007-01-01

    In Germany the incidence of breast cancer is about 85 and of prostate cancer about 50 new patients per 100.000 inhabitants/year. In about 80% of prostate cancer patients and 75% of breast cancer patients bone metastases are observed in autopsy. Most of these patients develop severe pain syndrome from bone metastases reducing quality of life during life time. Therapy of these patients should aim at adding life to the years not years to their life. The knowledge of metastatic cell biology, of cell-cell interaction and of tumor-cell, tumor cell-skeleton interaction may modify the therapeutic procedure. Already in 1940/41, Pecher treated a patient suffering from painful prostate cancer bone metastases administering 296 MBq 89 Strontium chloride. About 10 years later, Friedell introduced 32 Phosphorus for treatment of bone metastases from breast cancer. Today in Europe 3 radionuclides are approved for pain palliation therapy as shown in Table.1. Indication: - pain palliation therapy of bone metastases from prostate cancer ( 89 Sr and 186 Re); - pain palliation of all osteoblastic metastases independent from primary tumors ( 153 Sm). Contraindications: - pregnant and lactating females - myelosuppression ( 3 granulocytes; 3 platelets); - impaired renal function (urea >12 mmol/l; creatinine > 150 mmol/l) - incontinence; - acute or chronic spinal cord compression and/or brain metastases causing neurological symptoms; - disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. The recommended activities per treatment are: 89 Sr 150 MBq, 186 Re 1.295 MBq, and 153 Sm 37 MBq/kg BW. Shortly (6-8 weeks) prior to radionuclide therapy for pain palliation no high dose chemotherapy or large field radiation therapy should be performed. Stopping unlabelled bisphosphonate therapy prior to pain palliation therapy is not necessary. This radionuclide therapy may be repeated several time, the interval between tracer administration depends on blood cell count rate. The recommended intervals are for 89 Sr

  8. Who to include in palliative care research? Consequences of different population definitions in palliative care epidemiology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgsteede, S.D.; Deliens, L.; Francke, A.L.; Stalman, W.A.B.; Willems, D.L.; Eijk, T.T.M. van; Wal, G. van der

    2003-01-01

    Object of the study: Epidemiological research into palliative care faces the problem of defining an adequate research population. Subjects in studies are alternately defined as patients receiving 'palliative care' , 'palliative treatment' or 'end of life care'. So far, it is not known how

  9. Palliative sedation and ethical dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juri Salamah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative sedation is a unique concern for the patient as well as the family. It is a difficult serious ethical dilemma for the physicians to handle. The conflicting ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence and nonmaleficence in continuing versus discontinuing all supportive devices raise concerns among health professionals whether this is euthanasia (physician-assisted suicide or is just prolonging the patient's unnecessary suffering.

  10. Music Therapy in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Marco; Keßler, Jens; Hillecke, Thomas K; Bardenheuer, Hubert J

    2015-11-13

    Music therapy has been used successfully for over 30 years as part of palliative care programs for severely ill patients. There is nonetheless a lack of high-quality studies that would enable an evidence-based evaluation of its psychological and physiological effects. In a randomized controlled trial, 84 hospitalized patients in palliative care were assigned to one of two treatment arms--music therapy and control. The music therapy intervention consisted of two sessions of live music-based relaxation exercises; the patients in the control group listened to a verbal relaxation exercise. The primary endpoints were self-ratings of relaxation, well-being, and acute pain, assessed using visual analog scales. Heart rate variability and health-related quality of life were considered as secondary outcomes. The primary data analysis was performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Analyses of covariance revealed that music therapy was more effective than the control treatment at promoting relaxation (F = 13.7; p Music therapy did not differ from control treatment with respect to pain reduction (F = 0.4; p = 0.53), but it led to a significantly greater reduction in the fatigue score on the quality-of-life scale (F = 4.74; p = 0.03). Music therapy is an effective treatment with a low dropout rate for the promotion of relaxation and well-being in terminally ill persons undergoing palliative care.

  11. PALLIATIVE CARE IN SLOVENIA AND FUTURE CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Lunder

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Palliative care in Slovene health care system isn’t developed. Comparison with other countries is not possible in many aspects. There is no complete or appropriately educated palliative care team in hospitals or in primary care. Palliative care departments in hospitals and nursing homes do not exist. Holistic palliative home care is offered only by Slovene association of hospice. The pressure on nursing homes and nursing service departments is getting stronger. Standards and norms for staff, for living conditions and medical equipment do not allow any more admittances of patients with the needs of high category of care in these institutions.Conclusions. Indirect indicators of level of palliative care (e.g. morphine consumption, palliative care departments, home care network, undergraduate education, specialisation and research put Slovenia at the bade of the Europe. Statistics predict aging of population and more patients are also living with consequences of progressive chronic diseases and cancer.In the new healthcare reform there is an opportunity for palliative care to get an equal place in healthcare system. With coordinated implementation of palliative care departments, consultant teams and mobile specialistic teams, palliative care could reach a better level of quality. At the same time, quality permanent education is essential.

  12. Free radical inactivation of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudina, Ivana; Jovanovic, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    Reactivities of free radical oxidants, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and Cl 3 COO radical and a reductant, CO2-anion radical, with trypsin and reactive protein components were determined by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions at pH 7, 20 0 C. Highly reactive free radicals, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical, react with trypsin at diffusion controlled rates. Moderately reactive trichloroperoxy radical, k(Cl 3 COO radical + trypsin) preferentially oxidizes histidine residues. The efficiency of inactivation of trypsin by free radicals is inversely proportional to their reactivity. The yields of inactivation of trypsin by radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical are low, G(inactivation) = 0.6-0.8, which corresponds to ∼ 10% of the initially produced radicals. In contrast, Cl 3 COO radical inactivates trypsin with ∼ 50% efficiency, i.e. G(inactivation) = 3.2. (author)

  13. Self-Expanding Metal Stenting for Palliation of Patients with Malignant Colonic Obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisner, Søren; González-Huix, Ferran; Vandervoort, Jo G

    2012-01-01

    Background. Self-expanding metal stents can alleviate malignant colonic obstruction in incurable patients and avoid palliative stoma surgery. Objective. Evaluate stent effectiveness and safety on palliation of patients with malignant colorectal strictures. Design. Two prospective, one Spanish....... Interventions(s). Self-expanding metal stent placement. Main Outcome Measures. Procedural success, clinical success, and safety. Results. Procedural success was 98.4% (251). Clinical success rates were 87.8% at 30 days, 89.7% at 3 months, 92.8% at 6 months, and 96% at 12 months. Overall perforation rate was 5...... for patients with malignant colonic obstruction should be self-expanding metal stent placement due to high rates of technical success and efficacy in symptom palliation and few complications....

  14. Palliative sedation versus euthanasia: an ethical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Have, Henk; Welie, Jos V M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the ethical debate concerning palliative sedation. Although recent guidelines articulate the differences between palliative sedation and euthanasia, the ethical controversies remain. The dominant view is that euthanasia and palliative sedation are morally distinct practices. However, ambiguous moral experiences and considerable practice variation call this view into question. When heterogeneous sedative practices are all labeled as palliative sedation, there is the risk that palliative sedation is expanded to include practices that are actually intended to bring about the patients' death. This troublesome expansion is fostered by an expansive use of the concept of intention such that this decisive ethical concept is no longer restricted to signify the aim in guiding the action. In this article, it is argued that intention should be used in a restricted way. The significance of intention is related to other ethical parameters to demarcate the practice of palliative sedation: terminality, refractory symptoms, proportionality, and separation from other end-of-life decisions. These additional parameters, although not without ethical and practical problems, together formulate a framework to ethically distinguish a more narrowly defined practice of palliative sedation from practices that are tantamount to euthanasia. Finally, the article raises the question as to what impact palliative sedation might have on the practice of palliative care itself. The increasing interest in palliative sedation may reemphasize characteristics of health care that initially encouraged the emergence of palliative care in the first place: the focus on therapy rather than care, the physical dimension rather than the whole person, the individual rather than the community, and the primacy of intervention rather than receptiveness and presence. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Palliative radiotherapy in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Hee Cheol; Park, Won; Choi, Doo Ho; Nam, Heerim; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Young Suk; Park, Joon Oh; Chun, Ho Kyung; Lee, Woo Yong

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the palliative role of radiotherapy (RT) and define the effectiveness of chemotherapy combined with palliative RT (CCRT) in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer. From August 1995 to December 2007, 80 patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer were treated with palliative RT at Samsung Medical Center. Initial presenting symptoms were pain (68 cases), bleeding (18 cases), and obstruction (nine cases). The pelvic mass originated from rectal cancer in 58 patients (73%) and from colon cancer in 22 patients (27%). Initially 72 patients (90%) were treated with surgery, including 64 complete local excisions; 77% in colon cancer and 81% in rectal cancer. The total RT dose ranged 8-60 Gy (median: 36 Gy) with 1.8-8 Gy per fraction. When the α/β for the tumor was assumed to be 10 Gy for the biologically equivalent dose (BED), the median RT dose was 46.8 Gy 10 (14.4-78). Twenty one patients (26%) were treated with CCRT. Symptom palliation was assessed one month after the completion of RT. Symptom palliation was achieved in 80% of the cases. During the median follow-up period of five months (1-44 months), 45% of the cases experienced reappearance of symptoms; the median symptom control duration was five months. Median survival after RT was six months. On univariate analysis, the only significant prognostic factor for symptom control duration was BED ≥40 Gy 10 (p < 0.05), and CCRT was a marginally significant factor (p = 0.0644). On multivariate analysis, BED and CCRT were significant prognostic factors for symptom control duration (p < 0.05). RT was an effective palliation method in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer. For improvement of symptom control rate and duration, a BED ≥ 40 Gy 10 is recommended when possible. Considering the low morbidity and improved symptom palliation, CCRT might be considered in patients with good performance status

  16. Palliative radiotherapy in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Ho Kyung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the palliative role of radiotherapy (RT and define the effectiveness of chemotherapy combined with palliative RT (CCRT in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods From August 1995 to December 2007, 80 patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer were treated with palliative RT at Samsung Medical Center. Initial presenting symptoms were pain (68 cases, bleeding (18 cases, and obstruction (nine cases. The pelvic mass originated from rectal cancer in 58 patients (73% and from colon cancer in 22 patients (27%. Initially 72 patients (90% were treated with surgery, including 64 complete local excisions; 77% in colon cancer and 81% in rectal cancer. The total RT dose ranged 8-60 Gy (median: 36 Gy with 1.8-8 Gy per fraction. When the α/β for the tumor was assumed to be 10 Gy for the biologically equivalent dose (BED, the median RT dose was 46.8 Gy10 (14.4-78. Twenty one patients (26% were treated with CCRT. Symptom palliation was assessed one month after the completion of RT. Results Symptom palliation was achieved in 80% of the cases. During the median follow-up period of five months (1-44 months, 45% of the cases experienced reappearance of symptoms; the median symptom control duration was five months. Median survival after RT was six months. On univariate analysis, the only significant prognostic factor for symptom control duration was BED ≥40 Gy10 (p Conclusions RT was an effective palliation method in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer. For improvement of symptom control rate and duration, a BED ≥ 40 Gy10 is recommended when possible. Considering the low morbidity and improved symptom palliation, CCRT might be considered in patients with good performance status.

  17. Factors predicting early return of continence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Jaspreet S; Eastham, James A

    2010-05-01

    Success of radical prostatectomy is measured by control of cancer and return of urinary and sexual function. Urinary incontinence is generally considered the greatest impairment in immediate postoperative urinary function. Multiple factors are associated with earlier return of urinary continence after radical prostatectomy. These factors can be divided into those known prior to surgery, and therefore possibly not modifiable, and factors that can be controlled during surgery or surgical planning. In addition, various postoperative maneuvers can help hasten urinary continence. This article examines the effect of known factors related to early return of urinary continence after radical prostatectomy.

  18. Flemish palliative-care nurses' attitudes to palliative sedation: a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Joris; Van den Branden, Stef; Van Iersel, Trudie; Broeckaert, Bert

    2012-09-01

    Palliative sedation is an option of last resort to control refractory suffering. In order to better understand palliative-care nurses' attitudes to palliative sedation, an anonymous questionnaire was sent to all nurses (589) employed in palliative care in Flanders (Belgium). In all, 70.5% of the nurses (n = 415) responded. A large majority did not agree that euthanasia is preferable to palliative sedation, were against non-voluntary euthanasia in the case of a deeply and continuously sedated patient and considered it generally better not to administer artificial floods or fluids to such a patient. Two clusters were found: 58.5% belonged to the cluster of advocates of deep and continuous sedation and 41.5% belonged to the cluster of nurses restricting the application of deep and continuous sedation. These differences notwithstanding, overall the attitudes of the nurses are in accordance with the practice and policy of palliative sedation in Flemish palliative-care units.

  19. Radiotherapy Is Associated With Improved Survival in Adjuvant and Palliative Treatment of Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Mitra, Nandita; Guo Mengye; Metz, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (EHC) are rare tumors of the biliary tree because of their low incidence, large randomized studies examining radiotherapy (RT) for EHC have not been performed. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of adjuvant and palliative RT in the treatment of EHC in a large patient population. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 4,758 patients with EHC collected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: Patients underwent surgery (28.8%), RT (10.0%), surgery and RT (14.7%), or no RT or surgery (46.4%). The median age of the patient population was 73 years (range, 23-104), 52.5% were men, and 80.7% were white. The median overall survival time was 16 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-17), 9 months (95% CI 9-11), 9 months (95% CI 9-10), and 4 months (95% CI 3-4) for surgery and RT, surgery, RT, and no RT or surgery, respectively. The overall survival was significantly different between the surgery and surgery and RT groups (p < .0001) and RT and no RT or surgery groups (p < .0001) on the log-rank test. The propensity score-adjusted analyses of surgery and RT vs. surgery (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.84-1.05) were not significantly different, but that for RT vs. no RT or surgery (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.54-0.70) was significantly different. Conclusion: These results suggest that palliative RT prolongs survival in patients with EHC. The benefit associated with surgery and RT was significant on univariate analysis but not after controlling for potential confounders using the propensity score. Future studies should evaluate the addition of chemotherapy and biologic agents for the treatment of EHC.

  20. Need for palliative care for neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provinciali, Leandro; Carlini, Giulia; Tarquini, Daniela; Defanti, Carlo Alberto; Veronese, Simone; Pucci, Eugenio

    2016-10-01

    The new concept of palliative care supports the idea of palliation as an early approach to patients affected by disabling and life-limiting disease which focuses on the patient's quality of life along the entire course of disease. This model moves beyond the traditional concept of palliation as an approach restricted to the final stage of disease and widens the fields of intervention. There is a growing awareness of the importance of palliative care not only in oncological diseases but also in many other branches of medicine, and it appears particularly evident in the approach to many of the most frequent neurological diseases that are chronic, incurable and autonomy-impairing illnesses. The definition and implementation of palliative goals and procedures in neurology must take into account the specific features of these conditions in terms of the complexity and variability of symptoms, clinical course, disability and prognosis. The realization of an effective palliative approach to neurological diseases requires specific skills and expertise to adapt the concept of palliation to the peculiarities of these diseases; this approach should be realized through the cooperation of different services and the action of a multidisciplinary team in which the neurologist should play a central role to identify and face the patient's needs. In this view, it is paramount for the neurologist to be trained in these issues to promote the integration of palliative care in the care of neurological patients.

  1. Improving aspects of palliative care for children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagt, C.T.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis is about improving aspects of palliative care for children, and covers three different areas of quality of care. First of all, palliative care should be anticipating. To be able to deliver this anticipating care, caregivers should know what to expect. The first two chapters of the thesis

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... report inappropriate content. Sign in Transcript Add translations 4,609 views Like this video? Sign in to ... Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,363 views 3:29 Pediatric Palliative Care and ...

  3. PALLIATIVE CARE IN ROMANIA : NEEDS AND RIGHTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.; Olaroiu, Marinela

    2008-01-01

    Palliative care is directed to maintenance of quality of life and to prevent and to relief suffering of those with a life-threatening disease. Palliative care does not only concern the patient, but also the quality of life of family members and it deals with physical symptoms as well as with

  4. Is Palliative Care Right for You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to you, need help with: Coping with the stress of a serious illness Emotional support Spiritual or religious support Talking with your family about your illness and what is important to ... What Is Palliative Care Definition Pediatric Palliative Care Disease Types FAQ Handout for ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 014 views 6:28 Seasons Hospice & Palliative Care Music Therapy & Alzheimer's - Duration: 6:24. Seasons Hospice & Palliative ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 010 views 1:55 Seasons Hospice & Palliative Care Music Therapy & Alzheimer's - Duration: 6:24. Seasons Hospice & Palliative ...

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care Initiative in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Yaşar Çeliker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer care with curative intent remains difficult to manage in many resource-limited settings such as Cambodia. Cambodia has a small workforce with limited financial and health-care resources resulting in delayed diagnoses and availability of limited therapeutic tools. Thus, palliative care becomes the primary form of care in most cases. Although palliative care is becoming an integral part of medical care in developed countries, this concept remains poorly understood and utilized in developing countries. Angkor Hospital for Children serves a relatively large pediatric population in northern Cambodia. According to the modern definition of palliative care, approximately two-thirds of the patients admitted to the hospital were deemed candidates to receive palliative care. In an effort to develop a pediatric palliative care team utilizing existing resources and intensive training, our focus group recruited already existing teams with different health-care expertise and other motivated members of the hospital. During this process, we have also formed a palliative care training team of local experts to maintain ongoing palliative care education. Feedback from patients and health-care providers confirmed the effectiveness of these efforts. In conclusion, palliative and sustainable care was offered effectively in a resource-limited setting with adequately trained and motivated local providers. In this article, the steps and systems used to overcome challenges in Cambodia are summarized in the hope that our experience urges governmental and non-governmental agencies to support similar initiatives.

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care Initiative in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çeliker, Mahmut Yaşar; Pagnarith, Yos; Akao, Kazumi; Sophearin, Dim; Sorn, Sokchea

    2017-01-01

    Cancer care with curative intent remains difficult to manage in many resource-limited settings such as Cambodia. Cambodia has a small workforce with limited financial and health-care resources resulting in delayed diagnoses and availability of limited therapeutic tools. Thus, palliative care becomes the primary form of care in most cases. Although palliative care is becoming an integral part of medical care in developed countries, this concept remains poorly understood and utilized in developing countries. Angkor Hospital for Children serves a relatively large pediatric population in northern Cambodia. According to the modern definition of palliative care, approximately two-thirds of the patients admitted to the hospital were deemed candidates to receive palliative care. In an effort to develop a pediatric palliative care team utilizing existing resources and intensive training, our focus group recruited already existing teams with different health-care expertise and other motivated members of the hospital. During this process, we have also formed a palliative care training team of local experts to maintain ongoing palliative care education. Feedback from patients and health-care providers confirmed the effectiveness of these efforts. In conclusion, palliative and sustainable care was offered effectively in a resource-limited setting with adequately trained and motivated local providers. In this article, the steps and systems used to overcome challenges in Cambodia are summarized in the hope that our experience urges governmental and non-governmental agencies to support similar initiatives. PMID:28804708

  9. Diagnostic radiology in paediatric palliative care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Preena; Koh, Michelle; Carr, Lucinda; McHugh, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an expanding specialty within paediatrics, which has attracted little attention in the paediatric radiological literature. Paediatric patients under a palliative care team will have numerous radiological tests which we traditionally categorise under organ systems rather than under the umbrella of palliative medicine. The prevalence of children with life-limiting illness is significant. It has been estimated to be one per thousand, and this may be an underestimate. In this review, we will focus on our experience at one institution, where radiology has proven to be an invaluable partner to palliative care. We will discuss examples of conditions commonly referred to our palliative care team and delineate the crucial role of diagnostic radiology in determining treatment options. (orig.)

  10. Diagnostic radiology in paediatric palliative care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Preena; Koh, Michelle; Carr, Lucinda; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Palliative care is an expanding specialty within paediatrics, which has attracted little attention in the paediatric radiological literature. Paediatric patients under a palliative care team will have numerous radiological tests which we traditionally categorise under organ systems rather than under the umbrella of palliative medicine. The prevalence of children with life-limiting illness is significant. It has been estimated to be one per thousand, and this may be an underestimate. In this review, we will focus on our experience at one institution, where radiology has proven to be an invaluable partner to palliative care. We will discuss examples of conditions commonly referred to our palliative care team and delineate the crucial role of diagnostic radiology in determining treatment options. (orig.)

  11. [Multiprofessional team working in palliative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Iwao

    2013-04-01

    Now, more than ever, palliative medicine has been gaining recognition for its essential role in cancer treatment. Since its beginning, it has emphasized the importance of collaboration among multidisciplinary professionals, valuing a comprehensive and holistic philosophy, addressing a wide range of hopes and suffering that patients and families experience. There are three models (approaches) for the medical teams: multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary. Palliative care teams often choose the interdisciplinary team model, and the teams in the palliative care units may often choose the transdisciplinary team model. Recently, accumulating research has shown the clinical benefits of the interdisciplinary/transdisciplinary approach in palliative care settings. Clarifying appropriate functions and ideal features of physicians in the health care team, and enforcing the suitable team approach will contribute to improve the quality of whole medical practice beyond the framework of "palliative medicine".

  12. [Palliativer medicine in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Samperio, César; Ruiz Canizales, Raúl; Arellano Rodríguez, Salvador; Romero Zepeda, Hilda; Hall, Robert T; García Camino, Bernardo

    The concepts and background of palliative medicine, the patient-health team relationship and the right of the patients to receive palliative care, its application in surgery, the criterion defining the terminally ill, proportionate and disproportionate measures, where it is applied and what this consists of, drugs and procedures used, who should administrate them and for how long, the requirements for advanc directives and avoidance of therapeutic obstinacy, were reviewed. It describes and reflects their ethical and legal bases. It describes the main changes to the law in México in 2009 and 2012. It concludes that palliative medicine is not against scientific and technological progress, but promotes its appropriate use with respect to the will and dignity of the patient. It should be applied by a multidisciplinary team, who accompany the patient throughout the progression of their condition, strengthening the doctor's and health team's relationship with the patients and their families. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Palliative radiotherapy of bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koswig, S.; Buchali, A.; Boehmer, D.; Schlenger, L.; Budach, V.

    1999-01-01

    Background: The effect of the palliative irradiation of bone metastases was explored in this retrospective analysis. The spectrum of primary tumor sites, the localization of the bone metastases and the fractionation schedules were analyzed with regard to palliation discriminating total, partial and complete pain response. Patients and Methods: One hundred seventy-six patients are included in this retrospective quantitative study from April 1992 to November 1993. Two hundred fifty-eight localizations of painful bone metastases were irradiated. The percentage of bone metastases of the total irradiated localizations in our department of radiotherapy in the Carite-Hospital, the primary tumor sites, the localizations and the different fractionation schedules were explored. The total, partial and complete pain response was analyzed in the most often used fractionation schedules and by primary tumor sites. Results: Eight per cent of all irradiated localizations in the observation period were bone metastases. There were irradiated bone metastases of 21 different tumor sites. Most of the primary tumor sites were breast cancer (49%), lung cancer (6%) and kidney cancer (6%). The most frequent site of metastases was the vertebral column (52%). The most often used fractionation schedules were: 4x5 Gy (32%), 10x3 Gy (18%), 6x5 Gy (9%), 7x3 Gy (7%), 10x2 Gy (5%) and 2x8 Gy. The total response rates in this fractionation schedules were 72%, 79%, 74%, 76%, 75% and 72%, the complete response rates were 35%, 32%, 30%, 35%, 33% and 33%. There were no significant differences between the most often irradiated primary tumor sites, the most frequent localizations and the palliation with regard to total, partial and complete pain response. (orig.) [de

  14. Free Radical Oxidation in Rat Myocardium after Maximum Permissible Hepatic Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolaev, P A; Khramykh, T P; Barskaya, L O

    2016-03-01

    Free radical oxidation in rat myocardial homogenate was studied by chemiluminescent assay during the early terms after maximum permissible liver resection. During this period, activation of free radical oxidation was biphasic. The critical terms characterized by dramatic intensification of free radical oxidation in the myocardium are the first hour and the first day after surgery. The period from 3 to 12 h after surgery, in which the indices of chemiluminescence decrease, can be tentatively termed as the period of "putative wellbeing". Normalization of the free radical oxidation processes in the myocardium occurred by day 7 after surgery.

  15. Palliative Care: The Oldest Profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffin, Jacalyn

    2014-01-01

    By the 1960s, the forces that had slowly turned medicine away from comfort toward a greater emphasis on cure had generated a need for better care of the dying and the chronically ill. With reference to the growth of peer-reviewed literature on palliative care, the history of this seemingly new specialty is traced through the hallmarks of professionalization to outline and document the changes in the leaders, the issues, the publications, and the treatment modalities over the last five decades. The focus is on Canada within an international context.

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals for palliative therapy pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudiano, Javier

    1994-01-01

    Dissemination to bone of various neoplasms is cause of pain with poor response by major analgesics.Indications. Radiopharmaceuticals,description of main characteristics of various β emitter radionuclides.Choose of patients for worm indication of pain palliative therapy with β emitter radiopharmaceuticals is adequate must be careful . Contraindications are recognized.Pre and post treatment controls as clinical examination and complete serology are described.It is essential to subscribe protocols,keep patient well informed,included the physician in charge of the patient as part of the team.Bibliography

  17. Anatomical landmarks of radical prostatecomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Horn, Lars-Christian; Neuhaus, Jochen; Constantinides, Costantinos; Liatsikos, Evangelos N

    2007-03-01

    In the present study, we review current literature and based on our experience, we present the anatomical landmarks of open and laparoscopic/endoscopic radical prostatectomy. A thorough literature search was performed with the Medline database on the anatomy and the nomenclature of the structures surrounding the prostate gland. The correct handling of puboprostatic ligaments, external urethral sphincter, prostatic fascias and neurovascular bundle is necessary for avoiding malfunction of the urogenital system after radical prostatectomy. When evaluating new prostatectomy techniques, we should always take into account both clinical and final oncological outcomes. The present review adds further knowledge to the existing "postprostatectomy anatomical hazard" debate. It emphasizes upon the role of the puboprostatic ligaments and the course of the external urethral sphincter for urinary continence. When performing an intrafascial nerve sparing prostatectomy most urologists tend to approach as close to the prostatic capsula as possible, even though there is no concurrence regarding the nomenclature of the surrounding fascias and the course of the actual neurovascular bundles. After completion of an intrafascial technique the specimen does not contain any periprostatic tissue and thus the detection of pT3a disease is not feasible. This especially becomes problematic if the tumour reaches the resection margin. Nerve sparing open and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy should aim in maintaining sexual function, recuperating early continence after surgery, without hindering the final oncological outcome to the procedure. Despite the different approaches for radical prostatectomy the key for better results is the understanding of the anatomy of the bladder neck and the urethra.

  18. Palliative and Supportive Care in Acrometastasis to the Hand: Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acrometastasis to the hand is an unusual presentation which might mimic an infectious, inflammatory, or a metabolic pathology. We herein describe a case series of three patients of acrometastasis to the hand. We encountered three cases of acrometastasis to the hand attending the departmental clinics from 2007 to 2010. The median age at presentation was noted to be 55 years. All were males. The primaries included squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, larynx, and esophagus. In two patients, acrometastasis was detected at presentation and in one it was detected 2 years postcompletion of radical therapy. Two patients were offered palliative radiation to acrometastasis, and best supportive care was given to one. Palliation achieved after radiation was noted to be modest to good. The brief report highlights the importance of the clinical awareness of metastatic dissemination to unusual sites in the face of increasing cancer survivorship. Acrometastasis portends a poor prognosis with limited survival, and optimal integration of the best supportive care is mandatory. A short course of hypofractionated palliative radiation therapy results in modest to good palliation.

  19. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  20. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  1. Symptomatic splenomegaly and palliative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaneva, M.; Vlaikova, M.

    2005-01-01

    We analysed the effect of irradiation of an enlarged spleen in some hematologic diseases: chronic myelaemia, osteomyelophybrosis and chronic lymphadenosis, where splenectomy had been contraindicated and where pain has been a leading symptom and also the discomfort because of an enlarged spleen. For 20 years in the Clinic of Radiotherapy have been treated 23 patients with the above mentioned diseases. We have irradiated all patients using X-ray and later- Co-60. To reach a palliative effect we have irradiated patients with single doses from 50 cGy to 100 cGy with an interval of 2-3 days between each fraction, but the total doses have been different- from 400 cGy to 1500 cGy. The enlarged spleen has reached the pelvis in 3 cm to 17 cm below the costal margin, and in some patients has crossed the median line of the body going in some centimetres on the other side. The reduction of splenic size and volume is as follows: full reduction in 6 patients (26.1%) and partial in 17 (73.9%). All patients resulted in decreases in pain and tension in abdomen and the total discomfort. No serious side haematologic effects were encountered. Our experience indicates that cautious splenic irradiation can be a safe and useful therapeutic alternative. The symptomatic palliation in patients, where splenectomy is not an option, is effective and is an additional alternative for an improvement of their general condition

  2. Palliative radiotherapy for liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eble, M.J.; Gademann, G.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1993-01-01

    The role of palliative irradiation was analysed in 55 patients with liver metastases from colorectal, breast and lung cancer, treated with irradiation doses more than 10 Gy. In 47 patients irradiation alone was done. In 29 patients the disease involved not only the liver, but was disseminated. A mean dose of 23.8 Gy was delivered, with daily fractions of 1.5, 1.8 or 2 Gy. Complete and near complete pain relief was obtained in six and nine patients. Normalized and near normalized values of bilirubin serum levels were obtained in five and seven patients. Relief of pain as well as normalisation of cholestasis were significantly correlated with the irradiation doses applied. Median survival was 36.5 days for patients with lung cancer, 70.5 and 73 days for patients with breast and colorectal cancer. Irradiation doses given and the status of disease were significantly correlated to prognosis. In the majority of our patients with clinical symptoms, i.e. pain or cholestase, irradiation alone was sufficient for palliation of these symptoms. Prognosis is limited because of the disseminated state of disease in 62% of the patients. In a group of patients, suffering from colorectal cancer with good prognostic criteria, the simultaneous application of radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy was able to increase significantly the survival with minor toxicity. The use of a three-dimensional treatment planning could optimize the radiotherapy, due to the dose-volume histogram analysis. (orig./MG) [de

  3. A Controlled Study on Vaginal Blood Flow During Sexual Arousal Among Early-Stage Cervical Cancer Survivors Treated With Conventional Radical or Nerve-Sparing Surgery With or Without Radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Rinske Maria; Pieterse, Quirine D.; van Lonkhuijzen, Luc R. C. W.; Trimbos, Baptist J. B. M. Z.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Kenter, Gemma G.; de Kroon, Cor D.; ter Kuile, Moniek M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sexual problems among cervical cancer survivors may in part be caused by reduced vaginal blood flow due to damaged hypogastric nerves during radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy and/or by radiation-induced vaginal changes after pelvic radiotherapy. A nerve-sparing modification

  4. Palliative Sedation in Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltoni, Marco; Setola, Elisabetta

    2015-10-01

    Palliative sedation involves the use of sedative medication to relieve refractory symptoms in patients by reducing their level of consciousness. Although it is considered an acceptable clinical practice from most ethical points of view, palliative sedation is still a widely debated procedure and merits better understanding. The relevant medical literature pertaining to palliative sedation was analyzed and reviewed from various technical, relational, and bioethical perspectives. Proportionate palliative sedation is considered to be the most clinically appropriate modality for performing palliative sedation. However, guidelines must be followed to ensure that it is performed correctly. Benzodiazepines represent the first therapeutic option and careful monitoring of dosages is essential to avoid oversedation or undersedation. Proportionate palliative sedation is used to manage and relieve refractory symptoms in patients with cancer during their last days or hours of life. Evidence suggests that its use has no detrimental effect on survival. A different decision-making process is used to manage the withdrawal of hydration than the process used to determine whether proportionate palliative sedation is appropriate. Communication between patients, their relatives, and the health care staff is important during this medical intervention.

  5. The Attitudes of Indian Palliative-Care Nurses and Physicians toward Pain Control and Palliative Sedation

    OpenAIRE

    Gielen, Joris; Gupta, Harmala; Rajvanshi, Ambika; Bhatnagar, Sushma; Mishra, Seema; Chaturvedi, Arvind K.; Van den Branden, Stef; Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Aim: We wanted to assess Indian palliative-care nurses and physicians’ attitudes toward pain control and palliative sedation. Materials and Methods: From May to September 2008, we interviewed 14 physicians and 13 nurses working in different palliative-care programs in New Delhi, using a semi-structured questionnaire, and following grounded-theory methodology (Glaser and Strauss). Results: The interviewees did not consider administration of painkillers in large doses an ethical problem, ...

  6. The attitudes of Indian palliative-care nurses and physicians to pain control and palliative sedation

    OpenAIRE

    Joris Gielen; Harmala Gupta; Ambika Rajvanshi; Sushma Bhatnagar; Seema Mishra; Arvind K Chaturvedi; Stef Van den Branden; Bert Broeckaert

    2011-01-01

    Aim: We wanted to assess Indian palliative-care nurses and physicians′ attitudes toward pain control and palliative sedation. Materials and Methods: From May to September 2008, we interviewed 14 physicians and 13 nurses working in different palliative-care programs in New Delhi, using a semi-structured questionnaire, and following grounded-theory methodology (Glaser and Strauss). Results: The interviewees did not consider administration of painkillers in large doses an ethical problem...

  7. Orgasm after radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeman, M; VanDriel, MF; Schultz, WCMW; Mensink, HJA

    Objective To evaluate the ability to obtain and the quality of orgasm after radical prostatectomy, Patients and methods The orgasms experienced after undergoing radical prostatectomy were evaluated in 20 men (median age 65 years, range 56-76) using a semi-structured interview and a self-administered

  8. Physiology of free radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals imply that every atom, molecule, ion, group of atoms, or molecules with one or several non-paired electrons in outer orbital. Among these are: nitrogenoxide (NO•, superoxide-anion-radical (O2•-, hydroxyl radical (OH•, peroxyl radical (ROO•, alcoxyl radical (RO• and hydroperoxyl radical (HO2•. However, reactive oxygen species also include components without non-paired electrons in outer orbital (so-called reactive non-radical agents, such as: singlet oxygen (1O2, peroxynitrite (ONOO-, hydrogen-peroxide (H2O2, hypochloric acid (eg. HOCl and ozone (O3. High concentrations of free radicals lead to the development of oxidative stress which is a precondition for numerous pathological effects. However, low and moderate concentrations of these matter, which occur quite normally during cell metabolic activity, play multiple significant roles in many reactions. Some of these are: regulation of signal pathways within the cell and between cells, the role of chemoattractors and leukocyte activators, the role in phagocytosis, participation in maintaining, changes in the position and shape of the cell, assisting the cell during adaption and recovery from damage (e.g.caused by physical effort, the role in normal cell growth, programmed cell death (apoptosis and cell ageing, in the synthesis of essential biological compounds and energy production, as well as the contribution to the regulation of the vascular tone, actually, tissue vascularization.

  9. Radicals in arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Palenstijn (Willem Jan)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractLet K be a field. A radical is an element of the algebraic closure of K of which a power is contained in K. In this thesis we develop a method for determining what we call entanglement. This describes unexpected additive relations between radicals, and is encoded in an entanglement

  10. Radicals in arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palenstijn, Willem Jan

    2014-01-01

    Let K be a field. A radical is an element of the algebraic closure of K of which a power is contained in K. In this thesis we develop a method for determining what we call entanglement. This describes unexpected additive relations between radicals, and is encoded in an entanglement group. We give

  11. Muslim physicians and palliative care: attitudes towards the use of palliative sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muishout, George; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Wiegers, Gerard; Popp-Baier, Ulrike

    2018-05-08

    Muslim norms concerning palliative sedation can differ from secular and non-Muslim perceptions. Muslim physicians working in a Western environment are expected to administer palliative sedation when medically indicated. Therefore, they can experience tension between religious and medical norms. To gain insight into the professional experiences of Muslim physicians with palliative sedation in terms of religious and professional norms. Interpretative phenomenological study using semi-structured interviews to take a closer look at the experiences of Muslim physicians with palliative sedation. Data were recorded, transcribed and analysed by means of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Ten Muslim physicians, working in the Netherlands, with professional experience of palliative sedation. Two main themes were identified: professional self-concept and attitudes towards death and dying. Participants emphasized their professional responsibility when making treatment decisions, even when these contravened the prevalent views of Islamic scholars. Almost all of them expressed the moral obligation to fight their patients' pain in the final stage of life. Absence of acceleration of death was considered a prerequisite for using palliative sedation by most participants. Although the application of palliative sedation caused friction with their personal religious conceptions on a good death, participants followed a comfort-oriented care approach corresponding to professional medical standards. All of them adopted efficient strategies for handling of palliative sedation morally and professionally. The results of this research can contribute to and provide a basis for the emergence of new, applied Islamic ethics regarding palliative sedation.

  12. Palliative reirradiation of recurrent rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingareddy, Vasudha; Ahmad, Neelofur; Mohiuddin, Mohammed

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: This report will summarize symptom palliation, complication rate, and survival outcome of an aggressive reirradiation policy for patients with recurrent rectal cancer. MATERIALS and METHODS: From 1987 - 1993, 83 patients with recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma following previous pelvic irradiation (RT) underwent reirradiation. Thirty-one patients were treated with radical intent, and underwent reirradiation followed by planned surgical resection. The remaining fifty-two patients underwent reirradiation alone and are the basis of this study. Median initial RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range 40.0 - 70.2 Gy), and median time to recurrence was 24 months. Reirradiation was delivered with two lateral fields (7x7 - 12x10 cm) encompassing recurrent tumor with a minimum of 2 cm margin and excluding all small bowel. Thirty patients received 1.8 - 2.0 Gy daily fractions, and 22 patients received 1.2 Gy BID fractions. Median reirradiation dose was 30.6 Gy (range 19.8 - 40.8 Gy). Median total cumulative dose was 84.6 Gy (range 66.6 - 104.9 Gy). Forty-seven of the 52 patients received concurrent 5-FU based chemotherapy. Median follow up for the entire group was 16 months (range 2 - 53 months). Eight patients who remain alive at the time of this study had a median follow up of 22 months (range 13 - 48 months). RESULTS: Patients' presenting symptoms included bleeding, pain and mass effect. Results of treatment are shown in Table 1. Treatment was well tolerated. Using the RTOG toxicity scale, 16 patients required a treatment break for grade 3 toxicity including severe diarrhea, moist desquamation, and mucositis. No patient developed grade 4 acute toxicity. Eighteen patients (35%) developed late grade 3 or 4 morbidity, including bowel obstruction in 9 patients, cystitis in 3 patients, fistula in 4 patients and skin ulceration in 1 patient. There was no difference in incidence of late complications by time to recurrence, reirradiation dose, or total cumulative dose. However, there was

  13. Muonium and muonic radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhard, P.; Fischer, H.; Roduner, E.; Strub, W.; Geeson, D.; Symons, M.C.R.

    1985-01-01

    An energetic positive muon which is injected in a liquid sample of substrate molecules (S) creates an ionization track consisting of substrate cations (S + ) and electrons. Near the end of this track the muon may combine with an electron to form muonium (Mu) which is observable in inert liquids, but which reacts by addition to form a radical. Alternatively, the electron can add to S to form S - , which then combines with the muon to form the radical. Furthermore, instead of ending up in Mu or in a radical the muon may stay in a diamagnetic environment as a solvated muon, or as a muon substituting a proton in a molecule. Of interest in these schemes are the mechanisms and rates of formation of muonated radicals and in particular the rate constants for their reactions to products. Investigations are based on the observation of Mu and the radical by means of the μSR technique in transverse magnetic fields. (Auth.)

  14. Hearing Status after Radical Mastoidectomy without Tympanoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shamaila Nawaz; Udaipurwala, Iqbal Hussain; Mehmood, Talat; Rahat, Zahid Mehmood

    2017-12-01

    To find out the impairment of hearing associated with radical mastoidectomy by measuring the quantitative difference in the functional hearing level before and after radical mastoidectomy operation without tympanoplasty. Cross-sectional comparative study. Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head Neck Surgery, Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur and PNS Shifa Hospital, Karachi, from November 2009 to January 2013. Eighty-five patients, diagnosed clinically as chronic suppurative otitis media with extensive cholesteatoma having history of ear discharge and hearing impairment for more than 6 weeks duration and requiring radical mastoidectomy for treatment, were included in this study. Pure tone audiogram was done before and after radical mastoidectomy. Hearing impairment was compared in each patient before and after the operation. Among the 85 patients, 54 (63.5%) were males and 31 (36.5%) were females, with the age ranged between 18 to 63 years, mean age being 42.31 4.8 years. The mean increase in hearing loss after radical mastoidectomy in air conduction was 7.19 dB, bone conduction was 4.16 dB, and air-bone gap was 3.75 dB (0.001). The ear became dry and safe in 82 patients (96.5%) out of a total of 85, and only 3 patients required revision surgery at a second stage. Radical mastoidectomy has a least negligible effect on hearing status and one should not limit this technique due to the concern of aggravated hearing in patients with extensive cholesteatoma at the cost of dry and safe ears, which should be of prime importance.

  15. Computed tomography after radical pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple's procedure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.L.; Hampson, F.; Duxbury, M.; Rae, D.M.; Sinclair, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Whipple's procedure (radical pancreaticoduodenectomy) is currently the only curative option for patients with periampullary malignancy. The surgery is highly complex and involves multiple anastomoses. Complications are common and can lead to significant postoperative morbidity. Early detection and treatment of complications is vital, and high-quality multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is currently the best method of investigation. This review outlines the surgical technique and illustrates the range of normal postoperative appearances together with the common complications

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 13:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 64,186 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  17. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NEOMED) 26,193 views 5:39 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: 10:35. Little Stars 12,759 ... in to add this to Watch Later Add to Loading playlists...

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,893 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 21. KidsCancerChannel 64,265 views 5:21 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: 10:35. Little Stars 12,980 views 10:35 LIFE Before Death ...

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 64,001 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  1. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,752 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... thanks 3-months free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... University (NEOMED) 26,193 views 5:39 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: 10:35. Little Stars 12,759 views 10:35 Teen Cancer Stories | ...

  4. Frequently Asked Questions (Palliative Care: Conversations Matter)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicine at NINR Research Highlights Data Science and Nursing Research Spotlight on End-of-Life and Palliative Care Research Spotlight on Symptom Management Research Spotlight on Pain Research The Science of Compassion: Future Directions in ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,826 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,864 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License ... 4:24 LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. ...

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License ... 5:21 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: ...

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,850 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology ...

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 13:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 64,137 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 12:07 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,703 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  17. Advancing palliative care as a human right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwyther, Liz; Brennan, Frank; Harding, Richard

    2009-11-01

    The international palliative care community has articulated a simple but challenging proposition that palliative care is an international human right. International human rights covenants and the discipline of palliative care have, as common themes, the inherent dignity of the individual and the principles of universality and nondiscrimination. However, when we consider the evidence for the effectiveness of palliative care, the lack of palliative care provision for those who may benefit from it is of grave concern. Three disciplines (palliative care, public health, and human rights) are now interacting with a growing resonance. The maturing of palliative care as a clinical specialty and academic discipline has coincided with the development of a public health approach to global and community-wide health problems. The care of the dying is a public health issue. Given that death is both inevitable and universal, the care of people with life-limiting illness stands equal to all other public health issues. The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) includes the right to health care and General Comment 14 (paragraph 34) CESCR stipulates that "States are under the obligation to respect the right to health by, inter alia, refraining from denying or limiting equal access for all persons, ... to preventive, curative and palliative health services." However, these rights are seen to be aspirational-rights to be achieved progressively over time by each signatory nation to the maximum capacity of their available resources. Although a government may use insufficient resources as a justification for inadequacies of its response to palliative care and pain management, General Comment 14 set out "core obligations" and "obligations of comparable priority" in the provision of health care and placed the burden on governments to justify "that every effort has nevertheless been made to use all available resources at its disposal in order to satisfy, as

  18. Dental expression and role in palliative treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Saini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available World Health Organization defines palliative care as the active total care of patients whose disease is not responding to curative treatment. Palliative care for the terminally ill is based on a multidimensional approach to provide whole-person comfort care while maintaining optimal function; dental care plays an important role in this multidisciplinary approach. The aim of the present study is to review significance of dentist′s role to determine whether mouth care was effectively assessed and implemented in the palliative care setting. The oral problems experienced by the hospice head and neck patient clearly affect the quality of his or her remaining life. Dentist plays an essential role in palliative care by the maintenance of oral hygiene; dental examination may identify and cure opportunistic infections and dental disease like caries, periodontal disease, oral mucosal problems or prosthetic requirement. Oral care may reduce not only the microbial load of the mouth but the risk for pain and oral infection as well. This multidisciplinary approach to palliative care, including a dentist, may reduce the oral debilities that influence the patient′s ability to speak, eat or swallow. This review highlighted that without effective assessment of the mouth, the appropriate implementation of care will not be delivered. Palliative dental care has been fundamental in management of patients with active, progressive, far-advanced disease in which the oral cavity has been compromised either by the disease directly or by its treatment; the focus of care is quality of life.

  19. Palliative care in Africa: a global challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntizimira, Christian R; Nkurikiyimfura, Jean Luc; Mukeshimana, Olive; Ngizwenayo, Scholastique; Mukasahaha, Diane; Clancy, Clare

    2014-01-01

    We are often asked what challenges Rwanda has faced in the development of palliative care and its integration into the healthcare system. In the past, patients have been barred from accessing strong analgesics to treat moderate to severe pain, but thanks to health initiatives, this is slowly changing. Rwanda is an example of a country where only a few years ago, access to morphine was almost impossible. Albert Einsten said 'in the middle of difficulty lies opportunity' and this sentiment could not be more relevant to the development of palliative care programmes. Through advocacy, policy, and staunch commitment to compassion, Rwandan healthcare workers are proving how palliative care can be successfully integrated into a healthcare system. As a global healthcare community, we should be asking what opportunities exist to do this across the African continent. Champions of palliative care have a chance to forge lasting collaborations between international experts and African healthcare workers. This global network could not only advocate for palliative care programmes but it would also help to create a culture where palliative care is viewed as a necessary part of all healthcare systems.

  20. Healing ministry and palliative care in Christianity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayard, S Stephen; Irudayadason, Nishant A; Davis, J Charles

    2017-01-01

    Death is inevitable, but that does not mean it can be planned or imposed. It is an ethical imperative that we attend to the unbearable pain and suffering of patients with incurable and terminal illnesses. This is where palliative care plays a vital role. Palliative care has been growing faster in the world of medicine since its emergence as a specialty in the last decade. Palliative care helps to reduce physical pain while affirming the aspect of human suffering and dying as a normal process. The goal of palliative care is to improve the quality of life both of the patient and the family. Palliative care resonates with the healing ministry of Christianity that affirms the sanctity and dignity of human life from the moment of conception to natural death. Christianity is convinced that patients at the very end of their lives, with all their ailments and agonies, are still people who have been created in the image and likeness of God. The human person is always precious, even when marked by age and sickness. This is one of the basic convictions that motivate Christians to take care of the sick and the dying. Palliative care is a great opportunity for Christians to manifest God's unfailing love for the terminally ill and the dying.

  1. Gnosticism and Radical Feminism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cahana, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    and radical feminism would easily fall under this definition. There is, however, one major difference: since radical feminism is a relatively recent phenomenon which also benefited from modern modes of text production and preservation, almost all of the sources are still with us. This, in turn, may allow us...... to use radical feminism to make certain aspects of ancient Gnosticism re-emerge from their long submersion, provided that enough similarities can be independently drawn between the two phenomena to merit such a comparison. This paper therefore presents a comparison between concepts and positions...

  2. Homegrown religious radicalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram

    It has been reported that a growing number of youngsters from Western Europe are engaging in conflicts motivated by religious and political conflicts in the Middle East. This paper explores the reasons behind this seemingly religious radicalization from the point of view of the youngsters...... youngsters and parents of youngsters who have chosen a radicalized path in life. The paper will shed light on how the sense of and yearning for belonging and recognition have to be taken into account in our understanding of homegrown religious radicalization...

  3. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Evgenii T; Solodova, S L; Denisova, Taisa G [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-29

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  4. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, Evgenii T.; Solodova, S. L.; Denisova, Taisa G.

    2010-12-01

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  5. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, Evgenii T; Solodova, S L; Denisova, Taisa G

    2010-01-01

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  6. Radical's view of sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: General concept in radiation biology is that free radicals are highly reactive and they can damage vital cellular molecules leading to injurious effects. However, in this talk, evidence will be presented through the techniques of electron paramagnetic resonance ( EPR ) and pulse radiolysis that free radicals can be highly selective in their reaction with the target molecules. In addition, attempts will be made to present a brief account of emerging scenario of free radical generation, identification and their involvement in radiation damage mechanisms in chemical and biological systems

  7. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Evgenii T; Solodova, S L; Denisova, Taisa G [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-29

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  8. An Innovative Role for Faith Community Nursing: Palliative Care Ministry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Judy C

    Although the specialty of palliative nursing and palliative care continues to grow in hospital and outpatient settings, a paucity of home-based palliative services remains. This article discusses a new paradigm of faith-based palliative care ministry using faith community nurses (FCNs). Under the leadership of a palliative care doula (a nurse expert in palliative care), nurses in the faith community can offer critical support to those with serious illness. Models such as this provide stimulating content for FCN practice and opportunity to broaden health ministry within faith communities.

  9. Palliative percutaneous kidney embolization with enbucrilate in patients with renal cell carcinoma: safety and symptom control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Zbigniew; Karolkiewicz, Maciej; Strześniewski, Piotr; Lasek, Władysław; Bryczkowski, Michał; Wolski, Zbigniew

    2007-05-01

    Primarily palliative renal embolization is a relatively rare procedure which is indicated in patients with unresectable kidney malignancies and in patients in poor general condition. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the role of primarily palliative transarterial renal embolization for the treatment of inoperable patients with renal cell carcinoma, assessing the indications, safety, and efficacy of this procedure. Seventy-three patients scheduled for palliative embolization between 1998 and 2005 were retrospectively analyzed regarding their medical history, the procedure report, and data from the early postoperative period. Sixty-six of the 73 patients presented with renal cell carcinoma stage IV. The most common indication for embolization was hematuria (34%), followed by flank pain (32%), prophylaxis in stage IV (25%), lack of consent for surgery (7%), and poor general condition (3%). Embolizations were performed under local anesthesia with a mixture of enbucrilate and iodinated oil, with the use of additional embolizing materials in two cases. The procedure eliminated hematuria in 100% of cases and removed the loin pain completely in 72%. Migration of the embolizing material was observed in 10% of cases, and in 4% it resulted in symptomatic occlusion of the lower extremity distal arteries. Postembolic syndrome was noted in 92% of the patients Percutaneous palliative embolization with enbucrilate is a safe and effective method of treating patients with unresectable renal cell carcinoma. The potential effect of the embolization on cancer progression and improvement of survival in these patients still requires prospective investigation.

  10. Palliative Senning in the Treatment of Congenital Heart Disease with Severe Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Gomes da Penha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Transposition of the great arteries (TGA is the most common cyanotic cardiopathy, with an incidence ranging between 0.2 and 0.4 per 1000 live births. Many patients not treated in the first few months of life may progress with severe pulmonary vascular disease. Treatment of these patients may include palliative surgery to redirect the flow at the atrial level.Objective:Report our institutional experience with the palliative Senning procedure in children diagnosed with TGA and double outlet right ventricle with severe pulmonary vascular disease, and to evaluate the early and late clinical progression of the palliative Senning procedure.Methods:Retrospective study based on the evaluation of medical records in the period of 1991 to 2014. Only patients without an indication for definitive surgical treatment of the cardiopathy due to elevated pulmonary pressure were included.Results:After one year of follow-up there was a mean increase in arterial oxygen saturation from 62.1% to 92.5% and a mean decrease in hematocrit from 49.4% to 36.3%. Lung histological analysis was feasible in 16 patients. In 8 patients, pulmonary biopsy grades 3 and 4 were evidenced.Conclusion:The palliative Senning procedure improved arterial oxygen saturation, reduced polycythemia, and provided a better quality of life for patients with TGA with ventricular septal defect, severe pulmonary hypertension, and poor prognosis.

  11. Cystectomy with orthotopic reconstruction following radical retropubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Miotto Jr

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of infiltrative bladder carcinoma in patients previously treated with radical prostatectomy due to prostate adenocarcinoma represents a challenging perspective. Radical cystectomy remains the best option for invasive bladder cancer, however, there are few reports about the best approach to such individuals. Nevertheless, despite possible technical difficulties found during surgery, the orthotopic urinary shunt is a reasonable option in selected cases.

  12. Moderate and Radical Islam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rabasa, Angel

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the statement of Angel Rabasa, PhD, Senior Policy Analyst, The RAND Corporation, to the Committee on Armed Services, Defense Review Terrorism and Radical Islam Gap Panel, United...

  13. Violent Radicalization in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard-Nielsen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    When, why, and how do people living in a democracy become radicalized to the point of being willing to use or directly support the use of terrorist violence against fellow citizens? This question has been at the center of academic and public debate over the past years as terrorist attacks...... within this field and to answer the question: From an empirical point of view, what is known and what is not known about radicalization connected to militant Islamism in Europe?...

  14. A Survey of Hospice and Palliative Care Physicians Regarding Palliative Sedation Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Michael R; Protus, Bridget McCrate; Kimbrel, Jason; Grauer, Phyllis

    2017-04-01

    Patients nearing the end of life may experience symptoms that are refractory to standard therapeutic options. Physicians may consider palliative sedation to relieve intolerable suffering. There is limited clinical literature regarding preferred medications for palliative sedation. To determine the preferred medications physicians use when implementing palliative sedation. An Internet-based, cross-sectional survey of hospice and palliative care physicians in the United States. A link to the survey was e-mailed to 3130 physician members of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, of which 381 physicians completed the survey. Physicians were not required to answer all questions. Nearly all (n = 335, 99%) respondents indicated that palliative sedation may be used (acceptable by 73% [n = 248] for refractory symptoms and acceptable by 26% [n = 87] only for imminently dying patients). Seventy-nine percent (n = 252) believed that opioids should not be used to induce palliative sedation but should be continued to provide pain control. Midazolam was the most commonly selected first-line choice for palliative sedation (n = 155, 42%). The most commonly reported second-line agents for the induction of palliative sedation were lorazepam, midazolam (for those who did not select midazolam as first-line agent), and phenobarbital with a reported preference of 20% (n = 49), 19% (n = 46), and 17% (n = 40), respectively. Of the physicians surveyed, 99% (n = 335) felt that palliative sedation is a reasonable treatment modality. Midazolam was considered a drug of choice for inducing and maintaining sedation, and opioids were continued for pain control.

  15. Orgasmic Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Capogrosso

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In addition to urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, several other impairments of sexual function potentially occurring after radical prostatectomy (RP have been described; as a whole, these less frequently assessed disorders are referred to as neglected side effects. In particular, orgasmic dysfunctions (ODs have been reported in a non-negligible number of cases, with detrimental impacts on patients’ overall sexual life. This review aimed to comprehensively discuss the prevalence and physiopathology of post-RP ODs, as well as potential treatment options. Orgasm-associated incontinence (climacturia has been reported to occur in between 20% and 93% of patients after RP. Similarly, up to 19% of patients complain of postoperative orgasm-associated pain, mainly referred pain at the level of the penis. Moreover, impairment in the sensation of orgasm or even complete anorgasmia has been reported in 33% to 77% of patients after surgery. Clinical and surgical factors including age, the use of a nerve-sparing technique, and robotic surgery have been variably associated with the risk of ODs after RP, although robust and reliable data allowing for a proper estimation of the risk of postoperative orgasmic function impairment are still lacking. Likewise, little evidence regarding the management of postoperative ODs is currently available. In general, physicians should be aware of the prevalence of ODs after RP, in order to properly counsel all patients both preoperatively and immediately post-RP about the potential occurrence of bothersome and distressful changes in their overall sexual function.

  16. Orgasmic Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventimiglia, Eugenio; Cazzaniga, Walter; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In addition to urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, several other impairments of sexual function potentially occurring after radical prostatectomy (RP) have been described; as a whole, these less frequently assessed disorders are referred to as neglected side effects. In particular, orgasmic dysfunctions (ODs) have been reported in a non-negligible number of cases, with detrimental impacts on patients' overall sexual life. This review aimed to comprehensively discuss the prevalence and physiopathology of post-RP ODs, as well as potential treatment options. Orgasm-associated incontinence (climacturia) has been reported to occur in between 20% and 93% of patients after RP. Similarly, up to 19% of patients complain of postoperative orgasm-associated pain, mainly referred pain at the level of the penis. Moreover, impairment in the sensation of orgasm or even complete anorgasmia has been reported in 33% to 77% of patients after surgery. Clinical and surgical factors including age, the use of a nerve-sparing technique, and robotic surgery have been variably associated with the risk of ODs after RP, although robust and reliable data allowing for a proper estimation of the risk of postoperative orgasmic function impairment are still lacking. Likewise, little evidence regarding the management of postoperative ODs is currently available. In general, physicians should be aware of the prevalence of ODs after RP, in order to properly counsel all patients both preoperatively and immediately post-RP about the potential occurrence of bothersome and distressful changes in their overall sexual function. PMID:28459142

  17. [Neonatal palliative care and culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bétrémieux, P; Mannoni, C

    2013-09-01

    The period of palliative care is a difficult time for parents and caregivers because they are all weakened by the proximity of death. First of all, because of religious and cultural differences, parents and families cannot easily express their beliefs or the rituals they are required to develop; second, this impossibility results in conflicts between the caregiver team and the family with consequences for both. Caregivers are concerned to allow the expression of religious beliefs and cultural demands because it is assumed that they may promote the work of mourning by relating the dead child to its family and roots. However, caregivers' fear not knowing the cultural context to which the family belongs and having inappropriate words or gestures, as sometimes families dare not, cannot, or do not wish to describe their cultural background. We attempt to differentiate what relates to culture and to religion and attempt to identify areas of potential disagreement between doctors, staff, and family. Everyone has to work with the parents to open a space of freedom that is not limited by cultural and religious assumptions. The appropriation of medical anthropology concepts allows caregivers to understand simply the obligations imposed on parents by their culture and/or their religion and open access to their wishes. Sometimes help from interpreters, mediators, ethnopsychologists, and religious representatives is needed to understand this reality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Hope, Symptoms, and Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mellar P; Lagman, Ruth; Parala, Armida; Patel, Chirag; Sanford, Tanya; Fielding, Flannery; Brumbaugh, Anita; Gross, James; Rao, Archana; Majeed, Sumreen; Shinde, Shivani; Rybicki, Lisa A

    2017-04-01

    Hope is important to patients with cancer. Identifying factors that influence hope is important. Anxiety, depression, fatigue, and pain are reported to impair hope. The objective of this study was to determine whether age, gender, marital status, duration of cancer, symptoms, or symptom burden measured by the sum of severity scores on the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) correlated with hope measured by the Herth Hope Index (HHI). Patients with advanced cancer in a palliative care unit participated. Demographics including age, gender, marital status, cancer site, and duration of cancer were collected. Individuals completed the ESAS and HHI. Spearman correlation and linear regression were used to assess associations adjusting for gender (male vs female), age ( 12 months). One hundred and ninety-seven were participated in the study, of which 55% were female with a mean age of 61 years (standard deviation 11). Hope was not associated with gender, age, marital status, or duration of cancer. In univariable analysis, hope inversely correlated with ESAS score (-0.28), lack of appetite (-0.22), shortness of breath (-0.17), depression (-0.39), anxiety (-0.32), and lack of well-being (-0.33); only depression was clinically relevant. In multivariable analysis, total symptom burden weakly correlated with hope; only depression remained clinically significant. This study found correlation between symptom burden and hope was not clinically relevant but was so for depression. Among 9 ESAS symptoms, only depression had a clinically relevant correlation with hope.

  19. Teleconsultation for integrated palliative care at home: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gurp, J.; van Selm, M.; van Leeuwen, E.; Vissers, K.; Hasselaar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interprofessional consultation contributes to symptom control for home-based palliative care patients and improves advance care planning. Distance and travel time, however, complicate the integration of primary care and specialist palliative care. Expert online audiovisual

  20. Epilepsy surgery: Recommendations for India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The following article recommends guidelines for epilepsy surgery for India. This article reviews the indications, the various surgical options available and the outcome of surgery for drug resistant epilepsy based on current evidence. Epilepsy surgery is a well-established option for patients who have been diagnosed to have drug resistant epilepsy (DRE (on at least two appropriate, adequate anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs (either in monotherapy or in combination with continuing seizures, where the presurgical work-up has shown concordance of structural imaging (magnetic resonance imaging and electrical mapping data (electroencephalography (EEG, video EEG. There may be a requirement of functional imaging techniques in a certain number of DRE like positron emission tomography (PET, single photon emission tomography, (SPECT. Invasive monitoring should be restricted to a few when all noninvasive investigations are inconclusive, there is a dual pathology or there is a discordance of noninvasive data. The types of surgery could be curative (resective surgeries: amygdalo hippocampectomy, lesionectomy and multilobar resections; functional surgeries: hemispherotomy and palliative (multiple subpial transaction, corpus callosotomy, vagal nerve stimulation. Epilepsy surgery in indicated cases has a success range from 50 to 86% in achieving seizure freedom as compared with < 5% success rate with AEDs only in persons with DRE. Centers performing surgery should be categorized into Level I and Level II.

  1. Policy analysis: palliative care in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Larkin, P

    2014-03-01

    Palliative care for patients with advanced illness is a subject of growing importance in health services, policy and research. In 2001 Ireland became one of the first nations to publish a dedicated national palliative care policy. This paper uses the \\'policy analysis triangle\\' as a framework to examine what the policy entailed, where the key ideas originated, why the policy process was activated, who were the key actors, and what were the main consequences. Although palliative care provision expanded following publication, priorities that were unaddressed or not fully embraced on the national policy agenda are identified. The factors underlying areas of non-fulfilment of policy are then discussed. In particular, the analysis highlights that policy initiatives in a relatively new field of healthcare face a trade-off between ambition and feasibility. Key policy goals could not be realised given the large resource commitments required; the competition for resources from other, better-established healthcare sectors; and challenges in expanding workforce and capacity. Additionally, the inherently cross-sectoral nature of palliative care complicated the co-ordination of support for the policy. Policy initiatives in emerging fields such as palliative care should address carefully feasibility and support in their conception and implementation.

  2. Self-assessment in cancer patients referred to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Annette S; Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    the symptomatology of participating patients and examines differences in symptomatology between patients in three palliative care functions: inpatient, outpatient, and palliative home care. RESULTS: Of 267 eligible patients who were referred to a department of palliative medicine, initial self......-based study of symptomatology in consecutive cancer patients in palliative care, achieving rather complete data from the participants. The symptomatology in these patients was very pronounced. The questionnaires were able to detect clinically important differences between places of service....

  3. Palliative self-expandable metal stents for acute malignant colorectal obstruction: clinical outcomes and risk factors for complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jae Pil; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Shin Hee; Choi, Jong Hyo; Jung, Hee Jae; Cho, Youn Hee; Ko, Bong Min; Lee, Moon Sung

    2014-08-01

    Self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) have been used as palliative treatment or bridge to surgery for obstructions caused by colorectal cancer (CRC). We assessed the long-term outcomes of palliative SEMSs and evaluated the risk factors influencing complications. One hundred and seventy-five patients underwent SEMS placement for acute malignant colorectal obstruction. Of the 72 patients who underwent palliative treatment for primary CRC, 30 patients received chemotherapy (CT) for primary cancer (CT group) and 42 underwent best supportive treatment (BST) without CT (BST group). There was a significant difference in late migration between the CT group and the BST group (20.0% in CT group, 2.4% in BST group, p = 0.018). Response to CT influenced the rate of late obstruction (0% in disease control, 35.7% in disease progression, p = 0.014). However, late obstruction was not associated with stent properties, such as diameter or type (≤22 mm vs. >22 mm, 13.5% vs. 14.3%, p = 1.00; uncovered stent vs. covered stent, 15.5% vs. 7.1%, p = 0.675) and migration (≤22 mm vs. >22 mm, 16.2% vs. 2.9%, p = 0.108; uncovered stent vs. covered stent, 8.6% vs. 14.3%, p = 0.615) in palliative SEMS. The administration of CT increases the rate of stent migration, and disease control by CT can reduce the risk of obstruction by maintaining the luminal patency of palliative SEMSs.

  4. A novel index for preoperative, non-invasive prediction of macro-radical primary surgery in patients with stage IIIC-IV ovarian cancer-a part of the Danish prospective pelvic mass study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Mona Aarenstrup; Fagö-Olsen, Carsten Lindberg; Høgdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel index for preoperative, non-invasive prediction of complete primary cytoreduction in patients with FIGO stage IIIC-IV epithelial ovarian cancer. Prospectively collected clinical data was registered in the Danish Gynecologic Cancer Database. Blood...... samples were collected within 14 days of surgery and stored by the Danish CancerBiobank. Serum human epididymis protein 4 (HE4), serum cancer antigen 125 (CA125), age, performance status, and presence/absence of ascites at ultrasonography were evaluated individually and combined to predict complete tumor...... removal. One hundred fifty patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer were treated with primary debulking surgery (PDS). Complete PDS was achieved in 41 cases (27 %). The receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.785 for HE4, 0.678 for CA125, and 0...

  5. European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) framework for palliative sedation: an ethical discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juth, Niklas; Lindblad, Anna; Lynöe, Niels; Sjöstrand, Manne; Helgesson, Gert

    2010-09-13

    The aim of this paper is to critically discuss some of the ethically controversial issues regarding continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life that are addressed in the EAPC recommended framework for the use of sedation in palliative care. We argue that the EAPC framework would have benefited from taking a clearer stand on the ethically controversial issues regarding intolerable suffering and refractory symptoms and regarding the relation between continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life and euthanasia. It is unclear what constitutes refractory symptoms and what the relationship is between refractory symptoms and intolerable suffering, which in turn makes it difficult to determine what are necessary and sufficient criteria for palliative sedation at the end of life, and why. As regards the difference between palliative sedation at the end of life and so-called slow euthanasia, the rationale behind stressing the difference is insufficiently demonstrated, e.g. due to an overlooked ambiguity in the concept of intention. It is therefore unclear when palliative sedation at the end of life amounts to abuse and why. The EAPC framework would have benefited from taking a clearer stand on some ethically controversial issues regarding intolerable suffering and refractory symptoms and regarding the relation between continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life and euthanasia. In this text, we identify and discuss these issues in the hope that an ensuing discussion will clarify the EAPC's standpoint.

  6. European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC framework for palliative sedation: an ethical discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juth Niklas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this paper is to critically discuss some of the ethically controversial issues regarding continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life that are addressed in the EAPC recommended framework for the use of sedation in palliative care. Discussion We argue that the EAPC framework would have benefited from taking a clearer stand on the ethically controversial issues regarding intolerable suffering and refractory symptoms and regarding the relation between continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life and euthanasia. It is unclear what constitutes refractory symptoms and what the relationship is between refractory symptoms and intolerable suffering, which in turn makes it difficult to determine what are necessary and sufficient criteria for palliative sedation at the end of life, and why. As regards the difference between palliative sedation at the end of life and so-called slow euthanasia, the rationale behind stressing the difference is insufficiently demonstrated, e.g. due to an overlooked ambiguity in the concept of intention. It is therefore unclear when palliative sedation at the end of life amounts to abuse and why. Conclusions The EAPC framework would have benefited from taking a clearer stand on some ethically controversial issues regarding intolerable suffering and refractory symptoms and regarding the relation between continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life and euthanasia. In this text, we identify and discuss these issues in the hope that an ensuing discussion will clarify the EAPC's standpoint.

  7. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón, Gabriel J; Ramirez, Pedro T; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Pareja, Rene

    2012-01-01

    The standard treatment for patients with early-stage cervical cancer has been radical hysterectomy. However, for women interested in future fertility, radical trachelectomy is now considered a safe and feasible option. The use of minimally invasive surgical techniques to perform this procedure has recently been reported. We report the first case of a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy performed in a developing country. The patient is a nulligravid, 30-y-old female with stage IB1 adenocarcinoma of the cervix who desired future fertility. She underwent a laparoscopic radical trachelectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection. The operative time was 340 min, and the estimated blood loss was 100mL. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The final pathology showed no evidence of residual disease, and all pelvic lymph nodes were negative. At 20 mo of follow-up, the patient is having regular menses but has not yet attempted to become pregnant. There is no evidence of recurrence. Laparoscopic radical trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in a young woman who desires future fertility may also be an alternative technique in the treatment of early cervical cancer in developing countries.

  8. Continuous Palliative Sedation for Cancer and Noncancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, S.J.; Rietjens, J.A.C.; van Zuylen, L.; Zuurmond, W.W.A.; Perez, R.S.G.M.; van der Maas, P.J.; van Delden, J.J.M.; van der Heide, A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Palliative care is often focused on cancer patients. Palliative sedation at the end of life is an intervention to address severe suffering in the last stage of life. Objectives: To study the practice of continuous palliative sedation for both cancer and noncancer patients. Methods: In 2008,

  9. Hope in palliative care: A longitudinal qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsman, E.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes hope in palliative care patients, their family members and their healthcare professionals. An interpretative synthesis of the literature (chapter 2) and a metaphor analysis of semi-structured interviews with palliative care professionals (chapter 3) highlight palliative care

  10. Complications of Radical Cystectomy and Orthotopic Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical cystectomy and orthotopic reconstruction significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in minimal invasive and robotic technology. In this review, we will discuss early and late complications, as well as describe efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality, with a focus on ileal orthotopic bladder substitute (OBS. We summarise efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality including enhanced recovery as well as early and late complications seen after radical cystectomy and OBS. Centralisation of complex cancer services in the UK has led to a fall in mortality and high volume institutions have a significantly lower rate of 30-day mortality compared to low volume institutions. Enhanced recovery pathways have resulted in shorter length of hospital stay and potentially a reduction in morbidity. Early complications of radical cystectomy occur as a direct result of the surgery itself while late complications, which can occur even after 10 years after surgery, are due to urinary diversion. OBS represents the ideal urinary diversion for patients without contraindications. However, all patients with OBS should have regular long term follow-up for oncological surveillance and to identify complications should they arise.

  11. Palliative Care Physicians' Attitudes Toward Patient Autonomy and a Good Death in East Asian Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tatsuya; Oyama, Yasuhiro; Cheng, Shao-Yi; Suh, Sang-Yeon; Koh, Su Jin; Kim, Hyun Sook; Chiu, Tai-Yuan; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Shirado, Akemi; Tsuneto, Satoru

    2015-08-01

    Clarification of the potential differences in end-of-life care among East Asian countries is necessary to provide palliative care that is individualized for each patient. The aim was to explore the differences in attitude toward patient autonomy and a good death among East Asian palliative care physicians. A cross-sectional survey was performed involving palliative care physicians in Japan, Taiwan, and Korea. Physicians' attitudes toward patient autonomy and physician-perceived good death were assessed. A total of 505, 207, and 211 responses were obtained from Japanese, Taiwanese, and Korean physicians, respectively. Japanese (82%) and Taiwanese (93%) physicians were significantly more likely to agree that the patient should be informed first of a serious medical condition than Korean physicians (74%). Moreover, 41% and 49% of Korean and Taiwanese physicians agreed that the family should be told first, respectively; whereas 7.4% of Japanese physicians agreed. Physicians' attitudes with respect to patient autonomy were significantly correlated with the country (Japan), male sex, physician specialties of surgery and oncology, longer clinical experience, and physicians having no religion but a specific philosophy. In all 12 components of a good death, there were significant differences by country. Japanese physicians regarded physical comfort and autonomy as significantly more important and regarded preparation, religion, not being a burden to others, receiving maximum treatment, and dying at home as less important. Taiwanese physicians regarded life completion and being free from tubes and machines as significantly more important. Korean physicians regarded being cognitively intact as significantly more important. There are considerable intercountry differences in physicians' attitudes toward autonomy and physician-perceived good death. East Asia is not culturally the same; thus, palliative care should be provided in a culturally acceptable manner for each country

  12. Palliative sedation: from the family perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayne-Bossert, Petra; Zulian, Gilbert B

    2013-12-01

    Palliative sedation (PS) is a treatment option in case of refractory symptoms at the end of life. The emotional impact on nurses and doctors has been widely studied. We explore the experience of family members during a PS procedure. An anonymous questionnaire was sent to the closest family members (n = 17) of patients who died while receiving palliative sedation. The response rate was 59% (10 of 17). Nine relatives were sufficiently informed about PS. In all, 70% evaluated the chosen moment for initiation of PS as adequate. All the relatives noticed a significant improvement in the refractory symptom with a mean reduction in the estimated suffering of 6.25 points on a visual analog scale. Palliative sedation should be performed in the best possible way for the patient and his family in order to efficiently reduce a refractory symptom.

  13. [For the betterment of home palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Yasuhiko; Iiduka, Masashi

    2010-12-01

    The problems we have identified to overcome for a betterment of home palliative care were as follows:(1) Staffs' low level of knowledge and a lack of interest in home care, (2) Lack of cooperation between hospital and clinic, (3) Hard to keep the medical and caregiver staffs employed in the home care settings and a technical training is behind, (4) Insufficient cooperative networks for elderly care and welfare in the region, and (5) Misunderstanding of home palliative care by patient, family and people in the region. It is important to solve these problems one by one for a betterment of home palliative care. In this paper, we reported these problems through actual activities of our hospital and Iwaki city, and we propose to deal with them.

  14. Cryospray ablation (CSA in the palliative treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Mark H

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal carcinoma is the ninth most prevalent cancer worldwide with squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA and adenocarcinoma accounting for the vast majority of new cases (13,900 in 2003. Cure rates in the U.S. are less than 10%, similar to lung cancer. More than 50% of patients with esophageal carcinoma present with unresectable or metastatic disease, are not surgical candidates, or display disease progression despite the addition of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy to surgery. Need for improved palliation exits. Case presentation This case describes a 73-year-old African American male who presented with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA of the esophagus who has a achieved complete remission for 24 months via endoscopic cryospray ablation. Conclusion Endoscopic cryo spray ablation warrants further investigation as a palliative treatment modality for esophageal cancer. This is the first reported case in the medical literature.

  15. Palliative care nurses' views on euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpoort, Charlotte; Gastmans, Chris; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette

    2004-09-01

    In debates on euthanasia legalization in Belgium, the voices of nurses were scarcely heard. Yet studies have shown that nurses are involved in the caring process surrounding euthanasia. Consequently, they are in a position to offer valuable ideas about this problem. For this reason, the views of these nurses are important because of their palliative expertise and their daily confrontation with dying patients. The aim of this paper is to report a study of the views of palliative care nurses about euthanasia. A grounded theory approach was chosen, and interviews were carried out with a convenience sample of 12 palliative care nurses in Flanders (Belgium). The data were collected between December 2001 and April 2002. The majority of the nurses were not a priori for or against euthanasia, and their views were largely dependent on the situation. What counted was the degree of suffering and available palliative options. Depending on the situation, we noted both resistance and acceptance towards euthanasia. The underlying arguments for resistance included respect for life and belief in the capabilities of palliative care; arguments underlying acceptance included the quality of life and respect for patient autonomy. The nurses commented that working in palliative care had a considerable influence on one's opinion about euthanasia. In light of the worldwide debate on euthanasia, it is essential to know how nurses, who are confronted with terminally ill patients every day, think about it. Knowledge of these views can also contribute to a realistic and qualified view on euthanasia itself. This can be enlightening to the personal views of caregivers working in a diverse range of care settings.

  16. Radical dematerialization and degrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallis, Giorgos

    2017-05-01

    The emission targets agreed in Paris require a radical reduction of material extraction, use and disposal. The core claim of this article is that a radical dematerialization can only be part and parcel of degrowth. Given that capitalist economies are designed to grow, this raises the question of whether, and under what circumstances, the inevitable `degrowth' can become socially sustainable. Three economic policies are discussed in this direction: work-sharing, green taxes and public money. This article is part of the themed issue 'Material demand reduction'.

  17. Muon substituted free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhard, P.; Fischer, H.; Roduner, E.; Strub, W.; Gygax, F.N.; Brinkman, G.A.; Louwrier, P.W.F.; McKenna, D.; Ramos, M.; Webster, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    Spin polarized energetic positive muons are injected as magnetic probes into unsaturated organic liquids. They are implemented via fast chemical processes ( -10 s) in various molecules. Of particular interest among these are muonium substituted free radicals. The technique allows determination of accurate rate coefficients for fast chemical reactions of radicals. Furthermore, radiochemical processes occuring in picoseconds after injection of the muon are studied. Of fundamental interest are also the structural and dynamical implications of substituting a proton by a muon, or in other terms, a hydrogen atom by a muonium atom. Selected examples for each of these three types of experiments are given. (Auth.)

  18. Reporting of pediatric palliative care: A systematic review and quantitative analysis of research publications in palliative care journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The overall reporting rate for pediatric palliative care articles in palliative care journals was very low and there were no randomized clinical trials and systematic reviews found. The study findings indicate a lack of adequate evidence base for pediatric palliative care.

  19. Gastric carcinoma: when is palliative gastrectomy justified?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Scheidbach

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastric carcinoma is frequently diagnosed with an advanced stage of non-curable tumor growth characterized by infiltration of the gastric serosa, peritoneal tumor spread and/or metastases within lymph nodes and liver. Currently, there is a controversy on the value of palliative resection with regard to the safety and benefit to the patient outcome. Based on the available literature, this overview summarizes the various aspects and interprets the limited data on the palliative resection of gastric carcinoma. It turns out that the available study results may indicate potential for an improved quality of life and a prolongation of survival if an acceptable morbidity and mortality are present.

  20. Palliative care in Argentina: perspectives from a country in crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Gustavo G

    2003-01-01

    Argentina is a large South American country with a high prevalence of chronic disease-related mortality and a clear need for implementation of palliative care. Primary concerns related to palliative care are cultural, socio-economic and educational. Increasing poverty, patients and families receiving inadequate information about their diagnosis or prognosis, drug availability and costs, and insufficient knowledge by health care providers are obstacles to palliative care. Palliative care programs are developing throughout the country and methods by which they are meeting their needs are described. Several Argentinean palliative care initiatives are described and the role of the Pallium Latinomérica training program is discussed.

  1. Radical radiotherapy for T3 laryngeal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, T.; Itami, J.; Kotaka, K.; Toriyama, M.

    1996-01-01

    From 1974 through 1992, 37 previously untreated patients with T3 laryngeal cancer (supraglottic 15, glottic 22) were treated with initial radical radiotherapy and surgery for salvage. Two-year local control rate with radiotherapy alone, ultimate voice preservation rate, and ultimate local control rate for T3 supraglottic cancer were 33%, 33%, and 60%, respectively. Corresponding figures for T3 glottic cancer were 32%, 23%, and 77%, respecitvely. Five-year cause-specific survival rate for T3 supraglottic cancer and glottic cancer were 47% and 77%, respectively. In T3 supraglottic cancer, none of the 4 patients with subglottic tumor extension attained local control by radiotherapy alone, and local-regional recurrence-free time were significantly shorter in patients with subglottic tumor extension or tracheostomy before radiotherapy. There were no serious late complications such as chondronecrosis, rupture of carotid artery attributed to radical radiotherapy, while 3 patients had severe laryngeal edema requiring total laryngectomy. (orig.) [de

  2. Radical pancreatectomy: postoperative evaluation by CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, J.P.; Balfe, D.M.; Picus, D.; Scharp, D.W.

    1984-10-01

    Twenty-four patients who had undergone radical pancreatic resection were evaluated by CT one week to 11 years after surgery. Eighteen patients had had the Whipple procedure; six had had total pancreatectomy. The region between the aorta and superior mesenteric artery, previously occupied by the uncinate process of the pancreas, is an important area to evaluate for tumor recurrence because periampullary tumors tend to metastasize to the lymph nodes in this region. Tumor recurrence here is readily detectable by CT since radical pancreatectomy leaves this area area free of soft tissue attenuation material. CT demonstrated postoperative complications or tumor recurrence in 16 of the 24 patients and was 100% accurate in patients who had follow-up.

  3. International Radical Cystectomy Consortium: A way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Johar Raza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC is an emerging operative alternative to open surgery for the management of invasive bladder cancer. Studies from single institutions provide limited data due to the small number of patients. In order to better understand the related outcomes, a world-wide consortium was established in 2006 of patients undergoing RARC, called the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC. Thus far, the IRCC has reported its findings on various areas of operative interest and continues to expand its capacity to include other operative modalities and transform it into the International Radical Cystectomy Consortium. This article summarizes the findings of the IRCC and highlights the future direction of the consortium.

  4. Radical pancreatectomy: postoperative evaluation by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiken, J.P.; Balfe, D.M.; Picus, D.; Scharp, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-four patients who had undergone radical pancreatic resection were evaluated by CT one week to 11 years after surgery. Eighteen patients had had the Whipple procedure; six had had total pancreatectomy. The region between the aorta and superior mesenteric artery, previously occupied by the uncinate process of the pancreas, is an important area to evaluate for tumor recurrence because periampullary tumors tend to metastasize to the lymph nodes in this region. Tumor recurrence here is readily detectable by CT since radical pancreatectomy leaves this area area free of soft tissue attenuation material. CT demonstrated postoperative complications or tumor recurrence in 16 of the 24 patients and was 100% accurate in patients who had follow-up

  5. Continuous Palliative Sedation for Existential Distress? A Survey of Canadian Palliative Care Physicians' Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voeuk, Anna; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl; Fainsinger, Robin; Huot, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Palliative sedation can be used for refractory symptoms during end-of-life care. However, continuous palliative sedation (CPS) for existential distress remains controversial due to difficulty determining when this distress is refractory. The aim was to determine the opinions and practices of Canadian palliative care physicians regarding CPS for existential distress. A survey focusing on experience and views regarding CPS for existential distress was sent to 322 members of the Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians. Eighty-one surveys returned (accessible target, 314), resulting in a response rate of 26%. One third (31%) of the respondents reported providing CPS for existential distress. On a 5-point Likert-type scale, 40% of participants disagreed, while 43% agreed that CPS could be used for existential distress alone. Differing opinions exist regarding this complex and potentially controversial issue, necessitating the education of health-care professionals and increased awareness within the general public.

  6. A clinical review of treatment outcomes in glioblastoma multiforme - the validation in a non-trial population of the results of a randomised Phase III clinical trial: has a more radical approach improved survival?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rock, K

    2012-01-03

    Objective: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for up to 60% of all malignant primary brain tumours in adults, occurring in 2-3 cases per 100 000 in Europe and North America. In 2005, a Phase III clinical trial demonstrated a significant improvement in survival over 2, and subsequently, 5 years with the addition of concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) to radical radiotherapy (RT) (Stupp R, Hegi M, van den Bent M, et al. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study: 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial. Lancet Oncol 2009:10:459-66). The aim of this study was to investigate if the demonstrated improved survival in the literature translated to clinical practice.Methods: This was a retrospective study including all patients with histologically proven GBM diagnosed from 1999 to 2008 and treated with adjuvant RT at our institution. A total of 273 patients were identified. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS v18.Results: The median survival for the whole group (n = 273) over the 10-year period was 7.6 months (95% confidence interval 6.7-8.4 months). Overall, the cumulative probability of survival at 1 and 2 years was 31.5 and 9.4%, respectively. In total, 146 patients received radical RT. 103 patients were treated with radical RT and TMZ and 43 patients received radical RT alone. The median survival for patients receiving radical RT with TMZ was 13.4 months (95% CI 10.9-15.8 months) vs 8.8 months for radical RT alone (95% CI 6.9 - 10.7 months, p = 0.006). 2-year survival figures were 21.2 vs 4.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, independent predictors of survival included KPS, RT dose, TMZ and extent of surgery. The strongest predictors of poorer outcome based on the hazard ratio were palliative RT, followed by not receiving TMZ chemotherapy, then KPS <90 and a biopsy only surgical approach.Conclusion: This paper demonstrates

  7. A clinical review of treatment outcomes in glioblastoma multiforme - the validation in a non-trial population of the results of a randomised Phase III clinical trial: has a more radical approach improved survival?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Objective: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for up to 60% of all malignant primary brain tumours in adults, occurring in 2-3 cases per 100 000 in Europe and North America. In 2005, a Phase III clinical trial demonstrated a significant improvement in survival over 2, and subsequently, 5 years with the addition of concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) to radical radiotherapy (RT) (Stupp R, Hegi M, van den Bent M, et al. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study: 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial. Lancet Oncol 2009:10:459-66). The aim of this study was to investigate if the demonstrated improved survival in the literature translated to clinical practice.Methods: This was a retrospective study including all patients with histologically proven GBM diagnosed from 1999 to 2008 and treated with adjuvant RT at our institution. A total of 273 patients were identified. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS v18.Results: The median survival for the whole group (n = 273) over the 10-year period was 7.6 months (95% confidence interval 6.7-8.4 months). Overall, the cumulative probability of survival at 1 and 2 years was 31.5 and 9.4%, respectively. In total, 146 patients received radical RT. 103 patients were treated with radical RT and TMZ and 43 patients received radical RT alone. The median survival for patients receiving radical RT with TMZ was 13.4 months (95% CI 10.9-15.8 months) vs 8.8 months for radical RT alone (95% CI 6.9 - 10.7 months, p = 0.006). 2-year survival figures were 21.2 vs 4.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, independent predictors of survival included KPS, RT dose, TMZ and extent of surgery. The strongest predictors of poorer outcome based on the hazard ratio were palliative RT, followed by not receiving TMZ chemotherapy, then KPS <90 and a biopsy only surgical approach.Conclusion: This paper demonstrates improved

  8. Counter radicalization development assistance

    OpenAIRE

    van Hippel, Karin

    2006-01-01

    The paper reviews current research and practice and recommends strategies for development agencies working in the Arab and Muslim world. It builds on the basic assumption that the realization of the Millennium Development Goals will be vital to reduce support for terrorism in the long term. Within this overall framework, emphasis is placed on particular programs that could be specifically applied to counter radicalization.

  9. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali; Khashab, Niveen M.; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Friedman, Douglas C.; Colvin, Michael T.; Coti, Karla K.; Bení tez, Diego S.; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Olsen, John Carl; Belowich, Matthew E.; Carmieli, Raanan; Khatib, Hussam A.; Goddard, William Andrew III; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stoddart, Fraser Fraser Raser

    2009-01-01

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali

    2009-12-17

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  11. Online Radicalization: Bangladesh Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    radicalization through cyberspace, Bangladesh mostly implements hard powers such as removing contents and restricting access to the internet. However, freedom...cyberspace, Bangladesh mostly implements hard powers such as removing contents and restricting access to the internet. However, freedom of speech...67 An Organizational Approach to Implement the Measures........................................ 69 Formation of

  12. Cation radicals of xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinato, Mary Grace I; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Deal, Cailin; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2007-10-01

    Carotenes and xanthophylls are well known to act as electron donors in redox processes. This ability is thought to be associated with the inhibition of oxidative reactions in reaction centers and light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, cation radicals of neoxanthin, violaxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, beta-carotene, and lycopene were generated in solution using ferric chloride as an oxidant and then studied by absorption spectroscopy. The investigation provides a view toward understanding the molecular features that determine the spectral properties of cation radicals of carotenoids. The absorption spectral data reveal a shift to longer wavelength with increasing pi-chain length. However, zeaxanthin and beta-cryptoxanthin exhibit cation radical spectra blue-shifted compared to that of beta-carotene, despite all of these molecules having 11 conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. CIS molecular orbital theory quantum computations interpret this effect as due to the hydroxyl groups in the terminal rings selectively stabilizing the highest occupied molecular orbitals of preferentially populated s-trans-isomers. The data are expected to be useful in the analysis of spectral results from PSII pigment-protein complexes seeking to understand the role of carotene and xanthophyll cation radicals in regulating excited state energy flow, in protecting PSII reaction centers against photoinhibition, and in dissipating excess light energy absorbed by photosynthetic organisms but not used for photosynthesis.

  13. Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association: integrating palliative care in public hospitals in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Zipporah

    2016-01-01

    In Kenya, cancers as a disease group rank third as a cause of death after infectious and cardiovascular diseases. It is estimated that the annual incidence of cancer is about 37,000 new cases with an annual mortality of 28,000 cases (Kenya National Cancer Control Strategy 2010). The incidence of non-communicable diseases accounts for more than 50% of total hospital admissions and over 55% of hospital deaths (Kenya National Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Non Communicable Diseases 2015-2020). The prevalence of HIV is 6.8 (KIAS 2014). Most of these patients will benefit from palliative care services, hence the need to integrate palliative care services in the public healthcare system. The process of integrating palliative care in public hospitals involved advocacy both at the national level and at the institutional level, training of healthcare professionals, and setting up services within the hospitals that we worked with. Technical support was provided to each individual institution as needed. Eleven provincial hospitals across the country have now integrated palliative care services (Palliative Care Units) and are now centres of excellence. Over 220 healthcare providers have been trained, and approximately, over 30,000 patients have benefited from these services. Oral morphine is now available in the hospital palliative care units. As a success of the pilot project, Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association (KEHPCA) is now working with the Ministry of Health Kenya to integrate palliative care services in 30 other county hospitals across the country, thus ensuring more availability and access to more patients. Other developing countries can learn from Kenya's successful experience.

  14. Qualitative Research in Palliative Care: Applications to Clinical Trials Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Christopher T; Tadmor, Avia; Fujisawa, Daisuke; MacDonald, James J; Gallagher, Emily R; Eusebio, Justin; Jackson, Vicki A; Temel, Jennifer S; Greer, Joseph A; Hagan, Teresa; Park, Elyse R

    2017-08-01

    While vast opportunities for using qualitative methods exist within palliative care research, few studies provide practical advice for researchers and clinicians as a roadmap to identify and utilize such opportunities. To provide palliative care clinicians and researchers descriptions of qualitative methodology applied to innovative research questions relative to palliative care research and define basic concepts in qualitative research. Body: We describe three qualitative projects as exemplars to describe major concepts in qualitative analysis of early palliative care: (1) a descriptive analysis of clinician documentation in the electronic health record, (2) a thematic content analysis of palliative care clinician focus groups, and (3) a framework analysis of audio-recorded encounters between patients and clinicians as part of a clinical trial. This study provides a foundation for undertaking qualitative research within palliative care and serves as a framework for use by other palliative care researchers interested in qualitative methodologies.

  15. Free radical transfer in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonntag, C. von; Bothe, E.; Ulanski, P.

    1998-01-01

    For the present study of free-radical transfer in polymers pulse radiolysis and product studies have been carried out in aqueous solutions using thus far only the water-soluble polymers polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid and polyvinyl alcohol. When OH radicals, generated in the radiolysis of N 2 O-saturated aqueous solutions, react with polymers the lifetime of the polymer radical thus created very much depends on the number of radicals per polymer chain. When there are a large number of radicals per chain their bimolecular decay may be faster than the corresponding (diffusion controlled) decay of monomeric radicals, but when the macromolecule contains only few or even just one radical their lifetime is considerably prolonged. Highly charged polymers such as polyacrylic acid at high pH attain a rod-like conformation which again favors a long lifetime of the radicals. Under such conditions, radical transfer reactions can occur. For example, in polyacrylic acid OH radicals generate two kinds of radicals side by side. The radical in β-position to the carboxylate group converts into the thermodynamically more stable α-radicals by an H-transfer reaction as can be followed by spectrophotometry. Besides radical transfer reactions β-fragmentation reactions occur causing chain scission. Such reactions can be followed in a pulse radiolysis experiment by conductometry, because counter ions are released upon chain scission. Such a process is especially effective in the case of polymethacrylic acid, where it results in a chain depolymerization. An intramolecular H-abstraction is also observed in the γ-radiolysis of polyacrylic acid with the corresponding peroxyl radicals. This causes a chain reaction to occur. The resulting hydroperoxides are unstable and decarboxylate given rise to acetylacetone-like products. In polyvinyl alcohol the peroxyl radicals in α-position to the alcohol function undergo HO 2 -elimination. This prevents a scission of the polymer chain in the

  16. Ethical issues in laryngology: tracheal stenting as palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Aasif A; Flowers, W Jeffrey; Barrett, Jeanna M; O'Rourke, Ashli K; Postma, Gregory N; Weinberger, Paul M

    2014-07-01

    To improve understanding of aspects of end-of-life care that may not be intuitive to the otolaryngology community. A comprehensive review of the literature was performed by searching Medline, Embase, and Google Scholar databases. Primary manuscripts' bibliographies were reviewed to identify any nonindexed references. Prospective consultation by means of one-on-one interviews was sought from nonotolaryngology key stakeholders in the areas of hospice nursing care and patient advocacy in order to identify pertinent issues. We identified over 1,000 articles published from 1965 to 2013 on the topic of tracheal stents, as well as over 40,000 on hospice/end-of-life care. Three articles focusing specifically on palliative care and airway stenting were identified, of which three were case reports and none were definitive reviews. There are a number of significant issues and concepts unique to hospice care. These are likely unfamiliar to all except for head and neck oncology-specialized otolaryngologists. An example is that hospice care focuses on quality of life rather than prolongation of life (such as curative surgery). Patients with nonoperable tracheal obstruction from malignancy face an unpleasant demise from suffocation. For those patients, stenting can relieve suffering by restoring airway patency. Airway stenting can be a valid palliative care option, even for terminal patients receiving hospice care, when performed to relieve airway obstruction and improve quality of life. End-of-life ethics is an underdeveloped area of otolaryngology that should be explored. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Palliative Care Leadership Centers Are Key To The Diffusion Of Palliative Care Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, J Brian; Bowman, Brynn; Rogers, Maggie; Spragens, Lynn H; Meier, Diane E

    2018-02-01

    Between 2000 and 2015 the proportion of US hospitals with more than fifty beds that had palliative care programs tripled, from 25 percent to 75 percent. The rapid adoption of this high-value program, which is voluntary and runs counter to the dominant culture in US hospitals, was catalyzed by tens of millions of dollars in philanthropic support for innovation, dissemination, and professionalization in the palliative care field. We describe the dissemination strategies of the Center to Advance Palliative Care in the context of the principles of social entrepreneurship, and we provide an in-depth look at its hallmark training initiative, Palliative Care Leadership Centers. Over 1,240 hospital palliative care teams have trained at the Leadership Centers to date, with 80 percent of them instituting palliative care services within two years. We conclude with lessons learned about the role of purposeful technical assistance in promoting the rapid diffusion of high-value health care innovation.

  18. Developing a costing framework for palliative care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosoiu, Daniela; Dumitrescu, Malina; Connor, Stephen R

    2014-10-01

    Palliative care services have been reported to be a less expensive alternative to traditional treatment; however, little is known about how to measure the cost of delivering quality palliative care. The purpose of this project was to develop a standardized method for measuring the cost of palliative care delivery that could potentially be replicated in multiple settings. The project was implemented in three stages. First, an interdisciplinary group of palliative care experts identified standards of quality palliative care delivery in the inpatient and home care services. Surveys were conducted of government agencies and palliative care providers to identify payment practices and budgets for palliative care services. In the second phase, unit costs were defined and a costing framework was designed to measure inpatient and home-based palliative care unit costs. The final phase was advocacy for inclusion of calculated costs into the national funding system. In this project, a reliable framework for determining the cost of inpatient and home-based palliative care services was developed. Inpatient palliative care cost in Romania was calculated at $96.58 per day. Home-based palliative care was calculated at $30.37 per visit, $723.60 per month, and $1367.71 per episode of care, which averaged 45 visits. A standardized methodology and framework for costing palliative care are presented. The framework allows a country or provider of care to substitute their own local costs to generate cost information relevant to the health-care system. In Romania, this allowed the palliative care provider community to advocate for a consistent payment system. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Strategies for Introducing Outpatient Specialty Palliative Care in Gynecologic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Casey M; Lefkowits, Carolyn; Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Bakitas, Marie A; Clark, Leslie H; Duska, Linda R; Urban, Renata R; Creasy, Stephanie L; Schenker, Yael

    2017-09-01

    Concern that patients will react negatively to the idea of palliative care is cited as a barrier to timely referral. Strategies to successfully introduce specialty palliative care to patients have not been well described. We sought to understand how gynecologic oncologists introduce outpatient specialty palliative care. We conducted a national qualitative interview study at six geographically diverse academic cancer centers with well-established palliative care clinics between September 2015 and March 2016. Thirty-four gynecologic oncologists participated in semistructured telephone interviews focusing on attitudes, experiences, and practices related to outpatient palliative care. A multidisciplinary team analyzed interview transcripts using constant comparative methods to inductively develop and refine a coding framework. This analysis focuses on practices for introducing palliative care. Mean participant age was 47 years (standard deviation, 10 years). Mean interview length was 25 minutes (standard deviation, 7 minutes). Gynecologic oncologists described the following three main strategies for introducing outpatient specialty palliative care: focus initial palliative care referral on symptom management to dissociate palliative care from end-of-life care and facilitate early relationship building with palliative care clinicians; use a strong physician-patient relationship and patient trust to increase acceptance of referral; and explain and normalize palliative care referral to address negative associations and decrease patient fear of abandonment. These strategies aim to decrease negative patient associations and encourage acceptance of early referral to palliative care specialists. Gynecologic oncologists have developed strategies for introducing palliative care services to alleviate patient concerns. These strategies provide groundwork for developing system-wide best practice approaches to the presentation of palliative care referral.

  20. Gamma surgery for hemangiopericytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, B.R.; Prasad, D.; Steiner, M.; Steiner, L.

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of 12 patients with 15 intracranial hemangiopericytomas treated at the University of Virginia using gamma surgery is presented. Clinical and radiographic follow up of 3 to 56 months is available for 10 patients with 12 tumors. There was one tumor present at the time of initial gamma surgery in each patient. Two new tumors occurred in patients previously treated. Nine of the tumors decreased in volume and three remained stable. Four of the nine tumors that shrank later progressed at an average of 22 months after treatment. Of the tumors that decreased in volume and have not progressed, the response has been for an average of 11 months. The follow-up for two tumors that remained unchanged was 10 and 34 months (average 22 months). A third tumor was unchanged at 42 months but the patient died of new disease adjacent to the treated area in the anterior skull base. There were no complications and the quality of life following the procedure was maintained or improved in every case. Gamma surgery is effective in palliating the patients by decreasing tumor volume and delaying recurrence. (author)

  1. Emotionality and teamwork in palliative nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian

    This paper discusses the performance of palliative support teams based in an empirical study in a hospice in Denmark. The analytic strategy is based in science and technology studies (STS). The study was carried out as a number of meetings among the researcher and five non-consolidated teams in s...

  2. Palliation of Dysphagia from Esophageal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.Y.V. Homs (Marjolein)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe prognosis of esophageal cancer is poor with a 5-year survival of 10-15%. In addition, over 50% of patients with esophageal cancer already have an inoperable disease at presentation. The majority of these patients require palliative treatment to relieve progressive dysphagia. Metal

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,535 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,587 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 13:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 64,137 views 5: ... 24. RileyKidsVideo 216,139 views 4:24 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  5. Distress, Stress and Solidarity in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deMontigny, Johanne

    1993-01-01

    Notes that role of psychologist on palliative care unit is to be there for terminally ill, their friends, and their families, both during the dying and the bereavement and for the caregiver team. Focuses on work of decoding ordinary words which for many patients hide painful past. Stresses necessity to remain open to unexpected. (Author/NB)

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,802 views 5: ... University (NEOMED) 26,193 views 5:39 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 64,345 views 5: ... Health - Meriter 255,416 views 13:34 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 12:07 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 64,186 views 5: ... 24. RileyKidsVideo 216,780 views 4:24 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  9. Palliative care teams: effective through moral reflection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, M.A.; Have, H.A.M.J. ten

    2005-01-01

    Working as a multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary team is an essential condition to provide good palliative care. This widespread assumption is based on the idea that teamwork makes it possible to address the various needs of the patient and family more effectively. This article is about teamwork

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,462 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,462 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,573 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,587 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  12. Advances in pain control in palliative care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-02

    Jul 2, 2011 ... pain evoked by light touch or pain evoked by change in temperature. This type of pain is .... the drugs; drug interactions; co-morbidities that can be alleviated by .... AIDS and cancer. • Because pain in palliative care is multi-.

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,559 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,587 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 13:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,605 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,587 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... starting stop Loading... Watch Queue Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with ... ads? Get YouTube Red. Working... Not now Try it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: ...

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,486 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,587 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  17. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... 1:09:38 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 64,056 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,980 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 13:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 64,056 views 5: ... Medway CCG 311,087 views 27:40 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 11:08 Mia Tatun - Albany Medical Center Children's Hospital - Journeys Palliative Care Story - Duration: 3:32. ... 4:01 Mitochondrial Disease Patient Story - Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital - Duration: 4:17. Cleveland Clinic 82,065 ...

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,836 views 5: ... University (NEOMED) 26,193 views 5:39 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  1. Managing stress in a palliative care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vineeta; Woodman, Clare

    2010-12-01

    This article describes a strategy to reduce the high levels of stress experienced by community nurses in a children's palliative care team. The development, use and effectiveness of a problem-solving team intervention are illustrated by direct quotations from the nurses themselves.

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ...

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ... Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) 27,094 views 5:39 Faces ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,792 views 5: ... University (NEOMED) 26,193 views 5:39 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,517 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,587 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,776 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,680 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is starting stop Loading... Watch Queue Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. Working... Not now Try it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,636 views 5: ... 27. HammondCare 29,011 views 22:27 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  9. Oesphageal Stenting for palliation of malignant mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahamim Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dyspahgia in patients with malignant mesothelioma is usually due to direct infiltration of the eosophagus by the tumour. It can be distressing for the patient and challenging for the physician to treat. We describe three cases in which this condition has been successfully palliated with self expanding esophageal stents.

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 24. RileyKidsVideo 217,733 views 4:24 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,455 views 3:29 Portraits of ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 64,265 views 5: ...

  11. Palliative sedation: not just normal medical practice. Ethical reflections on the Royal Dutch Medical Association's guideline on palliative sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Rien; van Delden, Johannes J M; Widdershoven, Guy A M

    2012-11-01

    The main premise of the Royal Dutch Medical Association's (RDMA) guideline on palliative sedation is that palliative sedation, contrary to euthanasia, is normal medical practice. Although we do not deny the ethical distinctions between euthanasia and palliative sedation, we will critically analyse the guideline's argumentation strategy with which euthanasia is demarcated from palliative sedation. First, we will analyse the guideline's main premise, which entails that palliative sedation is normal medical treatment. After this, we will critically discuss three crucial propositions of the guideline that are used to support this premise: (1) the patient's life expectancy should not exceed 2 weeks; (2) the aim of the physician should be to relieve suffering and (3) expert consultation is optional. We will conclude that, if inherent problematic aspects of palliative sedation are taken seriously, palliative sedation is less normal than it is now depicted in the guideline.

  12. Muonium-containing vinyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, C.J.; Symons, M.C.R.; Roduner, E.; Heming, M.

    1987-01-01

    Exposure of trimethylsilylacetylene and bis(trimethylsilyl)acetylene to positive muons gave radicals whose muon-electron hyperfine coupling constants establish that the corresponding vinyl radicals were formed. (author)

  13. Pertinent issues related to laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney C. Abreu

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We describe the critical steps of the laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP technique and discuss how they impact upon the pertinent issues regarding prostate cancer surgery: blood loss, potency and continence. RESULTS: A major advantage of LRP is the reduced operative blood loss. The precise placement of the dorsal vein complex stitch associated with the tamponading effect of the CO2 pneumoperitoneum significantly decrease venous bleeding, which is the main source of blood loss during radical prostatectomy. At the Cleveland Clinic, the average blood loss of our first 100 patients was 322.5 ml, resulting in low transfusion rates. The continuous venous bleeding narrowed pelvic surgical field and poor visibility can adversely impact on nerve preservation during open radical prostatectomy. Laparoscopy, with its enhanced and magnified vision in a relatively bloodless field allows for excellent identification and handling of the neurovascular bundles. During open retropubic radical prostatectomy, the pubic bone may impair visibility and access to the urethral stump, and the surgeon must tie the knots relying on tactile sensation alone. Consequently, open prostatectomy is associated with a prolonged catheterization period of 2 - 3 weeks. Comparatively, during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy all sutures are meticulously placed and each is tied under complete visual control, resulting in a precise mucosa-to-mucosa approximation. CONCLUSION: The laparoscopic approach may represent a reliable less invasive alternative to the conventional open approach. Despite the encouraging preliminary anatomical and functional outcomes, prospective randomized comparative trials are required to critically evaluate the role of laparoscopy for this sophisticated and delicate operation.

  14. The diverse landscape of palliative care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander K; Thai, Julie N; Bakitas, Marie A; Meier, Diane E; Spragens, Lynn H; Temel, Jennifer S; Weissman, David E; Rabow, Michael W

    2013-06-01

    Many health care organizations are interested in instituting a palliative care clinic. However, there are insufficient published data regarding existing practices to inform the development of new programs. Our objective was to obtain in-depth information about palliative care clinics. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 20 outpatient palliative care practices in diverse care settings. The survey included both closed- and open-ended questions regarding practice size, utilization of services, staffing, referrals, services offered, funding, impetus for starting, and challenges. Twenty of 21 (95%) practices responded. Practices self-identified as: hospital-based (n=7), within an oncology division/cancer center (n=5), part of an integrated health system (n=6), and hospice-based (n=2). The majority of referred patients had a cancer diagnosis. Additional common diagnoses included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, neurologic disorders, and congestive heart failure. All practices ranked "pain management" and "determining goals of care" as the most common reasons for referrals. Twelve practices staffed fewer than 5 half-days of clinic per week, with 7 operating only one half-day per week. Practices were staffed by a mixture of physicians, advanced practice nurses or nurse practitioners, nurses, or social workers. Eighteen practices expected their practice to grow within the next year. Eleven practices noted a staffing shortage and 8 had a wait time of a week or more for a new patient appointment. Only 12 practices provide 24/7 coverage. Billing and institutional support were the most common funding sources. Most practices described starting because inpatient palliative providers perceived poor quality outpatient care in the outpatient setting. The most common challenges included: funding for staffing (11) and being overwhelmed with referrals (8). Once established, outpatient palliative care practices anticipate rapid growth. In this context, outpatient practices

  15. Radiotherapy for brain metastases: defining palliative response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezjak, Andrea; Adam, Janice; Panzarella, Tony; Levin, Wilfred; Barton, Rachael; Kirkbride, Peter; McLean, Michael; Mason, Warren; Wong, Chong Shun; Laperriere, Normand

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Most patients with brain metastases are treated with palliative whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). There is no established definition of palliative response. The aim of this study was to develop and test clinically useful criteria for response following palliative WBRT. Materials and methods: A prospective study was conducted of patients with symptomatic brain metastases treated with WBRT (20 Gy/5 fractions) and standardised steroid tapering. Assessments included observer rating of neurological symptoms, patient-completed symptom checklist and performance status (PS). Response criteria were operationally defined based on a combination of neurological symptoms, PS and steroid dose. Results: Seventy-five patients were accrued. At 1 month, presenting neurological symptoms were improved in 14 patients, stable in 17, and worse in 21; 23 patients were not assessed, mainly due to death or frailty. Using response criteria defined a priori, 15% (95% CI 7-23%) of patients were classified as having a response to RT, 25% no response, and 29% progression; 27% were deceased at or soon after 1 month. A revised set of criteria was tested, with less emphasis on complete tapering of steroids: they increased the proportion of patients responding to 39% (95% CI 27-50%) but didn't change the large proportion who did not benefit (44%). Conclusions: Clinical response to RT of patients with brain metastases is multifactorial, comprising symptoms, PS and other factors. Assessment of degree of palliation depend on the exact definition used. More research is needed in this important area, to help validate criteria for assessing palliation after WBRT

  16. Palliation of dysphagia with radiotherapy for exophytic base tongue metastases in a case of renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabassum Wadasadawala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Base tongue involvement is a rare presentation of lingual metastases from renal cell carcinoma. A 48-year-old gentleman was treated with open radical nephrectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy for Stage II Furhman grade I clear cell carcinoma of the left kidney at an outside hospital. He presented metachronously 5 years later with progressive dysphagia and change of voice. Clinicoradiological evaluation revealed a large exophytic mass in the oropharynx with epicenter in the right base of tongue. Metastatic workup revealed widespread dissemination to multiple organs and bone. In view of predominant symptom of dysphagia, base tongue metastasis was treated with protracted course of palliative radiotherapy to a dose of 50 Gy in conventional fractionation over 5 weeks. This resulted in excellent and durable response at the base tongue lesion (till the time of last follow-up. Radiation therapy is an acceptable palliative strategy for advanced lingual metastasis as it produces prompt relief of pain, bleeding, and dysphagia.

  17. Trends in pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ritesh; Botre, Abhijit; Udani, Vrajesh

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy surgery has become an accepted treatment for drug resistant epilepsy in infants and children. It has gained ground in India over the last decade. Certain epilepsy surgically remediable syndromes have been delineated and should be offered surgery earlier rather than later, especially if cognitive/behavioral development is being compromised. Advances in imaging, particularly in MRI has helped identify surgical candidates. Pre-surgical evaluation includes clinical assessment, structural and functional imaging, inter-ictal EEG, simultaneous video -EEG, with analysis of seizure semiology and ictal EEG and other optional investigations like neuropsychology and other newer imaging techniques. If data are concordant resective surgery is offered, keeping in mind preservation of eloquent cortical areas subserving motor, language and visual functions. In case of discordant data or non-lesional MRI, invasive EEG maybe useful using a two-stage approach. With multi-focal / generalized disease, palliative surgery like corpus callosotomy and vagal nerve stimulation maybe useful. A good outcome is seen in about 2/3rd of patients undergoing resective surgery with a low morbidity and mortality. This review outlines important learning aspects of pediatric epilepsy surgery for the general pediatrician.

  18. Turbinate surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery; Nasal obstruction - turbinate surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or ... This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  19. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often. Each type of surgery has advantages and disadvantages. Bariatric Surgery Benefits Bariatric surgery can improve many ... Grants & Grant History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Workshops Health Information Diabetes Digestive ...

  20. Lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are thoracotomy and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Robotic surgery may also be used. Lung surgery using ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  1. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Plastic Surgery KidsHealth / For Teens / Plastic Surgery What's in ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  2. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plastic stents do have some advantages over SEMS. They are cheaper and are easily removable, as opposed to in particular non-covered. SEMS. The aim of this study was to determine the safety and clinical effectiveness of 10Fr plastic biliary stents compared to uncovered SEMS for palliative treatment of patients with.

  3. Indications and contraindications for surgery in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriquiry, G.

    2004-01-01

    In this story we will present the main problems that we have as a surgeons at the moment to decide the indication for surgery in patients with esophageal cancer. Undoubtedly, the patient that will be submitted to surgery must have strict criteria in order to obtain good results. The patient must be compensated from respiratory, cardiovascular, hepatic and renal point of view with a (IMC) above 20, with Karnofsky index above 80% (wanders well), that declares the acceptance of surgery as well as the conserved appetite. After deciding the surgery according to the general conditions, should be discuss the type of procedure, based primarily on tumor topography, because there are different results both morbidity and long-term survival. The indications for resection or palliative surgery depend on the tumor stage. The indications for resection surgery with conventional or eventual extended lymphadenectomy require a patient in good condition, good experience the surgical team and a good hospital support. In tumor stage I the indication is a supposedly curative surgery. The tumor stages II b, III and IV are the heritage of palliative surgery, with or without tumor resection. The age is not an absolute contraindication for surgery, but the hypertension, liver cirrhosis, respiratory diseases with severe functional impact, ischemic heart disease, dilated heart with lowered LVEF, severe psychological disorders and the loss of appetite are contraindication. The morbidity and mortality has declined markedly due to technological advances and specialization of surgical groups, so that surgery is still the best treatment for selected patients

  4. Free radical explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  5. Trends in radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, James; Tokuda, Yuji; Scardino, Peter

    2009-02-01

    The surgical treatment of prostate cancer ideally removes the entire cancer, avoids excessive blood loss or serious perioperative complications, and results in complete recovery of continence and potency. To achieve this, the surgeon must excise sufficient periprostatic tissue to cure the cancer while preserving the cavernosal nerves required for erectile function and the neuromusculature required for normal urinary and bowel function. Here we will examine recent trends in radical prostatectomy, focusing on surgical technique.

  6. Effects of Different Palliative Jaundice Reducing Methods on Immunologic Functions in Patients with Advanced Malignant Obstructive Jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kun; Sui, Lu-Lu; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Qiang; Liu, Xiao-Fang

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of three treatment methods on the immunological function of patients with advanced malignant obstructive jaundice (MOJ). Patients with advanced MOJ were randomly divided into three groups according to biliary drainage methods. Detection of levels of multi-indices were investigated in different time periods. After drainage, the levels of complement 3 (C3) and complement 4 (C4) were increased. Forteen days post-operation, the levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) in the group undergoing palliative surgery decreased significantly compared to those in both percutaneous transhepatic cholangio drainage (PTCD) and endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage (ERBD) groups. The level of serum endotoxin in the group undergoing palliative surgery decreased gradually. Palliative surgery for reducing jaundice is superior to PTCD and ERBD in improving immune function of patients with MOJ. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  7. Palliative Sedation: An Analysis of International Guidelines and Position Statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurschick, Lauren; Mayer, Deborah K; Hanson, Laura C

    2015-09-01

    To describe the suggested clinical practice of palliative sedation as it is presented in the literature and discuss available guidelines for its use. CINAHL, PubMed, and Web of Science were searched for publications since 1997 for recommended guidelines and position statements on palliative sedation as well as data on its provision. Keywords included palliative sedation, terminal sedation, guidelines, United States, and end of life. Inclusion criteria were palliative sedation policies, frameworks, guidelines, or discussion of its practice, general or oncology patient population, performance of the intervention in an inpatient unit, for humans, and in English. Exclusion criteria were palliative sedation in children, acute illness, procedural, or burns, and predominantly ethical discussions. Guidelines were published by American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine (2000), Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (2003), American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (2006), American Medical Association (2008), Royal Dutch Medical Association (2009), European Association for Palliative Care (2009), National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (2010), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (2012). Variances throughout guidelines include definitions of the practice, indications for its use, continuation of life-prolonging therapies, medications used, and timing/prognosis. The development and implementation of institutional-based guidelines with clear stance on the discussed variances is necessary for consistency in practice. Data on provision of palliative sedation after implementation of guidelines needs to be collected and disseminated for a better understanding of the current practice in the United States. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmer MJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrah L Foster,1,2 Cynthia J Bell,1 Carey F McDonald,2 Joy S Harris,3 Mary Jo Gilmer,1,21Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, 2Monroe Carell Jr Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, 3Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Pediatric palliative care aims to enhance life and decrease suffering of children and adolescents living with life-threatening conditions and their loved ones. Oncology nurses are instrumental in providing palliative care to pediatric oncology populations. This paper describes pediatric palliative care and provides an overview of literature related to the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual domains of palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer. Nurses can provide optimal palliative care by accounting for children's understanding of death, encouraging early initiation of palliative care services, and improving utilization of pediatric palliative care in cancer settings. Specific roles of registered nurses and advanced practice nurses in pediatric palliative care will be addressed. Recommendations for future research are made to further advance the science of pediatric palliative care and decrease suffering for children and teens with cancer.Keywords: pediatric palliative care, pediatric cancer, oncology, child, suffering

  9. Palliative sedation, not slow euthanasia: a prospective, longitudinal study of sedation in Flemish palliative care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Patricia; Menten, Johan; Schotsmans, Paul; Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Palliative sedation remains a much debated and controversial issue. The limited literature on the topic often fails to answer ethical questions concerning this practice. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of patients who are being sedated for refractory symptoms in palliative care units (PCUs) from the time of admission until the day of death. A prospective, longitudinal, descriptive design was used to assess data in eight PCUs. The total sample consisted of 266 patients. Information on demographics, medication, food and fluid intake, decision making, level of consciousness, and symptom experience were gathered by nurses and researchers three times a week. If patients received palliative sedation, extra information was gathered. Of all included patients (n=266), 7.5% received palliative sedation. Sedation started, on average, 2.5 days before death and for half of these patients, the form of sedation changed over time. At the start of sedation, patients were in the end stage of their illness and needed total care. Patients were fully conscious and had very limited oral food or fluid intake. Only three patients received artificial fluids at the start of sedation. Patients reported, on average, two refractory symptoms, the most important ones being pain, fatigue, depression, drowsiness, and loss of feeling of well-being. In all cases, the patient gave consent to start palliative sedation because of increased suffering. This study revealed that palliative sedation is only administered in exceptional cases where refractory suffering is evident and for those patients who are close to the ends of their lives. Moreover, this study supports the argument that palliative sedation has no life-shortening effect. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Management of ramsay hunt syndrome in an acute palliative care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrenik Ostwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by combination of herpes infection and lower motor neuron type of facial nerve palsy. The disease is caused by a reactivation of Varicella Zoster virus and can be unrepresentative since the herpetic lesions may not be always be present (zoster sine herpete and might mimic other severe neurological illnesses. Case Report: A 63-year-old man known case of carcinoma of gall bladder with liver metastases, post surgery and chemotherapy with no scope for further disease modifying treatment, was referred to palliative care unit for best supportive care. He was on regular analgesics and other supportive treatment. He presented to Palliative Medicine outpatient with 3 days history of ipsilateral facial pain of neuropathic character, otalgia, diffuse vesciculo-papular rash over ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of left trigeminal nerve distribution of face and ear, and was associated with secondary bacterial infection and unilateral facial edema. He was clinically diagnosed to have Herpes Zoster with superadded bacterial infection. He was treated with tablet Valacyclovir 500 mg four times a day, Acyclovir cream for local application, Acyclovir eye ointment for prophylactic treatment of Herpetic Keratitis, low dose of Prednisolone, oral Amoxicillin and Clindamycin for 7 days, and Pregabalin 150 mg per day. After 7 days of treatment, the rash and vesicles had completely resolved and good improvement of pain and other symptoms were noted. Conclusion: Management of acute infections and its associated complications in an acute palliative care setting improves both quality and length of life.

  11. Clinical outcomes of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS placement as palliative treatment for malignant colorectal obstruction: A single-center study from Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikatsu Nitta

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: SEMS placement as a palliative treatment is likely to fail within a year, leading to re-occlusion. It is very important to maintain vigilant monitoring using X-ray, CT, and colonoscopy after SEMS placement, with close cooperation between the endoscopist and surgeon. A logistic framework involving careful follow-up, even in the absence of symptoms, and a combined team involving endoscopists and surgeons should be established to support re-intervention and surgery. We recommend vigilant monitoring of patients who received SEMS placement for palliation of malignant colorectal obstruction.

  12. SU-E-P-33: Critical Role of T2-Weighted Imaging Combined with Diffusion-Weighted Imaging of MRI in Diagnosis of Loco-Regional Recurrent Esophageal Cancer After Radical Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, G; Qiao, L [Department of Oncology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liang, N; Xie, J; Zhang, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Qianfoshan Hospital Affiliated to Shandon, Jinan, Shandong (China); Luo, H; Zhang, J [Division of Oncology, Department of Graduate, Weifang Medical College, Weifang, Shandong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We perform this study to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of T2-weighted MRI (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) in confirming local relapses of esophageal cancer in patients highly suspected of recurrence after eradicating surgery. Methods: Forty-two postoperative esophageal cancer patients with clinical suspicions of cancer recurrence underwent 3.0T MRI applying axial, coronal, sagittal T2WI and axial DWI sequences. Two experienced radiologists (R1 and R2) both used two methods (T2WI, T2WI+DWI) to observe the images, and graded the patients ranging from 1 to 5 to represent severity of the disease based on visual signal intensity (patients equal to or more than grade 3 was confirmed as recurrent disease) Results: 27/42patients were verified of recurrent disease by pathologic findings and/or imaging findings during follow-up. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of R1 applying T2WI+DWI are 96%, 87% and 93% versus 81%, 80% and 77% on T2WI, these figures by R2 were 96%, 93% and 95% versus 89%, 93% and 90%. The receiver operating curve (ROC) analyses suggest that both of the two readers can obtain better accuracy when adding DWI to T2WI compared with T2WI alone. Kappa test between R1 and R2 indicates excellent inter-observer agreement on T2WI+DWI. Conclusion: Standard T2WI in combination DWI can achieve better accuracy than T2WI alone in diagnosing local recurrence of esophageal cancer, and improve consistency between different readers.

  13. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here.

  14. Community Palliative Care Nurses' Challenges and Coping Strategies on Delivering Home-Based Pediatric Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, LeeAi; Abdullah, Adina

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experience of community palliative care nurses providing home care to children. A qualitative study was conducted at the 3 community palliative care provider organizations in greater Kuala Lumpur from August to October 2014. Data were collected with semistructured interviews with 16 nurses who have provided care to children and was analyzed using thematic analysis. Two categories were identified: (1) challenges nurses faced and (2) coping strategies. The themes identified from the categories are (1) communication challenges, (2) inadequate training and knowledge, (3) personal suffering, (4) challenges of the system, (5) intrapersonal coping skills, (6) interpersonal coping strategies, and (7) systemic supports. These results reinforces the need for integration of pediatric palliative care teaching and communication skills training into all undergraduate health care programs. Provider organizational support to meet the specific needs of the nurses in the community can help retain them in their role. It will also be important to develop standards for current and new palliative care services to ensure delivery of quality pediatric palliative care.

  15. Palliative care in India: Current progress and future needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Khosla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its limited coverage, palliative care has been present in India for about 20 years. Obstacles in the growth of palliative care in India are too many and not only include factors like population density, poverty, geographical diversity, restrictive policies regarding opioid prescription, workforce development at base level, but also limited national palliative care policy and lack of institutional interest in palliative care. Nonetheless we have reasons to be proud in that we have overcome several hurdles and last two decades have seen palpable changes in the mindset of health care providers and policy makers with respect to need of palliative care in India. Systematic and continuous education for medical staff is mandatory, and a major break-through for achieving this purpose would be to increase the number of courses and faculties in palliative medicine at most universities.

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care Resources for You | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatric Palliative Care Resources for You Follow us Pediatric Palliative Care Resources for You Dealing with a ... The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) offers pediatric palliative care resources to help you, your family, ...

  17. Music therapy in palliative care: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Julian

    2002-03-01

    As the music therapy profession has developed internationally over the last 25 years, so has its role in palliative care. Music is a highly versatile and dynamic therapeutic modality, lending itself to a variety of music therapy techniques used to benefit both those living with life-threatening illnesses and their family members and caregivers. This article will give a broad overview of the historical roots of music therapy and introduce the techniques that are employed in current practice. By combining a review of mainstream music therapy practice involving musical improvisation, song-writing and receptive/recreational techniques with case material from my own experience, this article aims to highlight the potential music therapy holds as an effective holistic practice for palliative care, whatever the care setting.

  18. Faith healing and the palliative care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Denise

    2013-01-01

    As the spiritual care needs of patients and their loved ones have become an essential component of palliative care, clinicians are being challenged to develop new ways of addressing the spiritual issues that often arise in the palliative care setting. Recent research has given attention to the communication strategies that are effective with patients or their loved ones who report that they are seeking a miraculous physical healing. However, these strategies often assume a unilateral rather than collaborative view of divine intervention. Communication strategies that are effective with unilateral understandings of divine intervention may be contraindicated with those who hold to a collaborative view of divine intervention. Greater attention to language of human-divine interaction along with approaching faith healing as a third modality of treatment are explored as additional interventions.

  19. PALLIATIVE CARE ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH SLEEPING DISORDERS ARE POORLY TREATED

    OpenAIRE

    Bellido-Estevez, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders are frequent in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative-care, especially in elderly patients (1). Sleep disorders during palliative-care may be related with anxiety, opioids related central-sleep apnoea or corticoids therapy between others (2). Our aim was to quantify the effectiveness of hypnotic medication in the sleep quality in advanced cancer receiving palliative-care elderly patients. Material and methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was...

  20. Attitude to Euthanasia of Workers in Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Poštová, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    This bsachelor thesis is devided into two parts, theoretical and practical. The work focuses on opinions of workers in palliative care on euthanasia. The theoretical part deals with the definition of palliative care, its goals and principles. Futhermore, it also introduced quality of palliative care in Czech Republic. Second chapter explains the term euthanasia and its forms. It also contains opinions of citizens of the Czech Republic on euthanasia. Third chapter is dedicated to terms such as...

  1. Factors affecting rural volunteering in palliative care - an integrated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittall, Dawn; Lee, Susan; O'Connor, Margaret

    2016-12-01

    To review factors shaping volunteering in palliative care in Australian rural communities using Australian and International literature. Identify gaps in the palliative care literature and make recommendations for future research. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using Proquest, Scopus, Sage Premier, Wiley online, Ovid, Cochran, Google Scholar, CINAHL and Informit Health Collection. The literature was synthesised and presented in an integrated thematic narrative. Australian Rural communities. While Australia, Canada, the United States (US) and the United Kingdom (UK) are leaders in palliative care volunteer research, limited research specifically focuses on volunteers in rural communities with the least occurring in Australia. Several interrelated factors influence rural palliative care provision, in particular an increasingly ageing population which includes an ageing volunteer and health professional workforce. Also current and models of palliative care practice fail to recognise the innumerable variables between and within rural communities such as distance, isolation, lack of privacy, limited health care services and infrastructure, and workforce shortages. These issues impact palliative care provision and are significant for health professionals, volunteers, patients and caregivers. The three key themes of this integrated review include: (i) Geography, ageing rural populations in palliative care practice, (ii) Psychosocial impact of end-end-of life care in rural communities and (iii) Palliative care models of practice and volunteering in rural communities. The invisibility of volunteers in rural palliative care research is a concern in understanding the issues affecting the sustainability of quality palliative care provision in rural communities. Recommendations for future Australian research includes examination of the suitability of current models of palliative care practice in addressing the needs of rural communities; the recruitment

  2. Internship report on palliative care at St Catherine's hospice

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Andreia Marlene da Silva

    2016-01-01

    This report, performed in the context of the completion of the masters in Palliative Care, presents the activities and learning experiences that I have acquired during the months of training in the different settings of palliative care. This internship was performed at St Catherine’s Hospice (Inpatient unit, Day hospice and Community team) and with the National Health Service of East Surrey Hospital Specialist Palliative Care Team. Alongside the institutional involvement, internship activitie...

  3. Music therapy perspectives in palliative care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porchet-Munro, S

    1993-01-01

    Major strides have been made in expanding the content of professional education in palliative care to include a focus on attitudes which nurture compassionate care as well as on knowledge and skills. However, accessing the emotional spheres--for instance the fear and helplessness of caregivers--remains a challenge. The inclusion of music therapy techniques as a teaching modality, with an emphasis on emotional experience and nonverbal expression, is suggested to address the latter and to enhance affective growth and learning.

  4. Mindfulness for palliative care patients. Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorraca, Carolina de Oliveira Cruz; Martimbianco, Ana Luiza Cabrera; Pachito, Daniela Vianna; Pacheco, Rafael Leite; Riera, Rachel

    2017-12-01

    Nineteen million adults worldwide are in need of palliative care. Of those who have access to it, 80% fail to receive an efficient management of symptoms. To assess the effectiveness and safety of mindfulness meditation for palliative care patients. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, PEDro, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Opengrey, ClinicalTrials.gov and WHO-ICTRP. No restriction of language, status or date of publication was applied. We considered randomised clinical trials (RCTs) comparing any mindfulness meditation scheme vs any comparator for palliative care. Cochrane Risk of Bias (Rob) Table was used for assessing methodological quality of RCTs. Screening, data extraction and methodological assessments were performed by two reviewers. Mean differences (MD) (confidence intervals of 95% (CI 95%)) were considered for estimating effect size. Quality of evidence was appraised by GRADE. Four RCTs, 234 participants, were included. All studies presented high risk of bias in at least one RoB table criteria. We assessed 4 comparisons, but only 2 studies showed statistically significant difference for at least one outcome. 1. Mindfulness meditation (eight weeks, one session/week, daily individual practice) vs control: statistically significant difference in favour of control for quality of life - physical aspects. 2. Mindfulness meditation (single 5-minute session) vs control: benefit in favour of mindfulness for stress outcome in both time-points. None of the included studies analysed safety and harms outcomes. Although two studies have showed statistically significant difference, only one showed effectiveness of mindfulness meditation in improving perceived stress. This study focused on one single session of mindfulness of 5 minutes for adult cancer patients in palliative care, but it was considered as possessing high risk of bias. Other schemes of mindfulness meditation did not show benefit in any outcome evaluated (low and very low quality evidence). © 2017 John Wiley

  5. Palliative care in Africa: a global challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Ntizimira, Christian R; Nkurikiyimfura, Jean Luc; Mukeshimana, Olive; Ngizwenayo, Scholastique; Mukasahaha, Diane; Clancy, Clare

    2014-01-01

    We are often asked what challenges Rwanda has faced in the development of palliative care and its integration into the healthcare system. In the past, patients have been barred from accessing strong analgesics to treat moderate to severe pain, but thanks to health initiatives, this is slowly changing. Rwanda is an example of a country where only a few years ago, access to morphine was almost impossible. Albert Einsten said ?in the middle of difficulty lies opportunity? and this sentiment coul...

  6. Using Skype to support palliative care surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jacqueline

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate how a novel yet important tool can facilitate family involvement in person-centred care, despite geographical distance. The author presents a case study as an in-depth example of the use of Skype in the context of palliative care at home. Skype enhanced family surveillance and symptom management, augmented shared decision making, provided a space for virtual bedside vigil, and ultimately provided the rapport necessary for optimal end of life care.

  7. Role of palliative radiotherapy in brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh S Bilimagga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain metastases are a common manifestation of systemic cancer and exceed primary brain tumors in number and are a significant cause of neurologic problems. They affect 20-40% of all cancer patients. Aggressive management of brain metastases is effective in both symptom palliation and prolonging the life. Radiotherapy has a major role to play in the management of brain metastases. AIM: The aim of the study was to know the outcome of palliative radiotherapy in symptomatic brain metastases in terms of improvement in their performance status. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 63 patients diagnosed to have brain metastases and treated with palliative whole brain radiotherapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions over two weeks between June 1998 and June 2007. Diagnosis was done in most of the cases with computed tomography scan and in a few with magnetic resonance imaging. Improvement in presenting symptoms has been assessed in terms of improvement in their performance status by using the ECOG scale. Results: Fifty-four patients completed the planned treatment. Eight patients received concurrent Temozolamide; 88% of patients had symptom relief at one month follow-up; 39/54 patients had a follow-up of just one to three months. Hence survival could not be assessed in this study. Conclusion: External beam radiotherapy in the dose of 30 Gy over two weeks achieved good palliation in terms improvement in their performance status in 88% of patients. Addition of concurrent and adjuvant Timozolamide may improve the results.

  8. Family physicians' perspectives regarding palliative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samant, Rajiv S.; Fitzgibbon, Edward; Meng, Joanne; Graham, Ian D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess family physicians' views on common indications for palliative radiotherapy and to determine whether this influences patient referral. Methods and materials: A 30-item questionnaire evaluating radiotherapy knowledge and training developed at the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre (ORCC) was mailed to a random sample of 400 family physicians in eastern Ontario, Canada. The completed surveys were collected and analyzed, and form the basis of this study. Results: A total of 172 completed surveys were received for a net response rate of 50% among practicing family physicians. Almost all of the physicians (97%) had recently seen cancer patients in their offices, with 85% regularly caring for patient with advanced cancer. Fifty-four percent had referred patients in the past for radiotherapy and 53% had contacted a radiation oncologist for advice. Physicians who were more knowledgeable about the common indications for palliative radiotherapy were significantly more likely to refer patients for radiotherapy (P<0.01). Inability to contact a radiation oncologist was correlated with not having referred patients for radiotherapy (P<0.01). Only 10% of the physicians had received radiotherapy education during their formal medical training. Conclusions: Many of the family physicians surveyed were unaware of the effectiveness of radiotherapy in a variety of common palliative situations, and radiotherapy referral was correlated with knowledge about the indications for palliative radiotherapy. This was not surprising given the limited education they received in this area and the limited contact they have had with radiation oncologists. Strategies need to be developed to improve continuing medical education opportunities for family physicians and to facilitate more interaction between these physicians and radiation oncologists

  9. Providing pediatric palliative care: PACT in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Janet; Spengler, Emily; Wolfe, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    High-quality pediatric palliative care should be an expected standard in the United States, especially since the publication of the numerous position statements such as "Precepts of Palliative Care for Children and Adolescents and Their Families," a joint statement created by the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses, the National Association of Neonatal Nurses, and the Society of Pediatric Nurses. Although many barriers still exist, dedicated individuals and teams strive to promote models of excellence and improve care for children with life-threatening conditions and their families. The Pediatric Advanced Care Team, a joint project of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Children's Hospital, Boston, is one such interdisciplinary pediatric palliative care consultation service. Founded in 1997, we have grown and learned from formal study and our extensive clinical work with families, children, and our colleagues. This article describes our journey as an interdisciplinary team forging a new service within two renowned medical institutions in which historically the primary emphasis of care has been on cure and innovation. Although these values remain, our work has resulted in an increased acceptance of balancing treatment of the underlying disease or condition along with treatment of the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs of the child and family through life or death. One of our goals is to help promote a balance of hope for cure with hope for comfort, dignity, and integrity for every child and family.

  10. Palliative radiotherapy for symptomatic osseous metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Ito, Hisao; Toya, Kazuhito; Ko, Weijey; Kutsuki, Shouji; Tsukamoto, Nobuhiro; Kubo, Atsushi; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori.

    1995-01-01

    Bone matastases are one of the most common and serious conditions requiring radiotherapy, but there is still a considerable lack of agreement on optimal radiation schedule. We analyzed patients with symptomatic osseous matastases from lung (72 patients) and breast (63 patients) carcinoma treated by palliative radiotherapy between 1983 and 1992. In this series, the incidences of symptomatic bone metastases appearing within 2 years after the first diagnosis of the primary lesion were 96% and 36% for lung and breast carcinomas, respectively. Thirty percent of bone metastases from breast carcinoma were diagnosed more than 5 years after the first diagnosis. Thus careful follow-up must be carried out for a prolonged period. Pain relief was achieved at almost the same rate for bone metastases from lung and breast carcinomas (81% and 85%, respectively), an the rapid onset of pain relief (15 Gy or less) was obtained in about half the patients for both diseases. The rapid onset of pain relief and the lack of association between the onset of pain relief and primary tumor argued against the conventional theory that tumor shrinkage is a component of the initial response. In contrast to the fact that almost all lung carcinoma patients had very poor prognoses, one third of the breast carcinoma patients were alive more than 2 years after palliative radiotherapy. Thust, the late effects of radiation, such as radiation myelopathy, must be always considered especially in breast carcinoma patients even when it is 'just' palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases. (author)

  11. Palliative radiotherapy in plasma cell myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamietz, I.A.; Schoeber, C.; Schulte, R.W.M.; Renner, K.; Peest, D.

    1991-01-01

    Pain symptoms caused by bone lesions of multiple myeloma can be relieved by a local irradiation treatment. To estimate the influence of systemic treatment on the palliative effect of local radiotherapy the records of 70 myeloma patients treated with chemotherapy combined with or followed by local irradiation were reviewed. The local response rate, defined as complete pain relief at the irradiated site, was 80 percent in patients receiving irradiation during chemotherapy (melphalan and prednisone) and this palliative effect endured 31.8+-3.6 months. If irradiation was started in the period without systemic treatment the local response rate was 39.6 percent and lasted 24.8+-17.9 months. In sites treated with more than one radiotherapy course 94 percent response after the 1st treatment, 56 percent after the 2nd and no response after the 3rd was achieved. The duration of local pain control was positively related to the applied radiation dose. It is concluded that irradiation during concomitant chemotherapy is superior to radiotherapy performed in a period without systemic treatment. Local long-term palliation can only be achieved by a sufficient high radiation dose. (author). 24 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  12. Euthanasia and palliative sedation in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Almagor, Raphael; Ely, E Wesley

    2018-01-04

    The aim of this article is to use data from Belgium to analyse distinctions between palliative sedation and euthanasia. There is a need to reduce confusion and improve communication related to patient management at the end of life specifically regarding the rapidly expanding area of patient care that incorporates a spectrum of nuanced yet overlapping terms such as palliative care, sedation, palliative sedation, continued sedation, continued sedation until death, terminal sedation, voluntary euthanasia and involuntary euthanasia. Some physicians and nurses mistakenly think that relieving suffering at the end of life by heavily sedating patients is a form of euthanasia, when indeed it is merely responding to the ordinary and proportionate needs of the patient. Concerns are raised about abuse in the form of deliberate involuntary euthanasia, obfuscation and disregard for the processes sustaining the management of refractory suffering at the end of life. Some suggestions designed to improve patient management and prevent potential abuse are offered. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Spirituality and distress in palliative care consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Judith; Paice, Judith A; Cameron, Jacqueline R; Shott, Susan

    2005-08-01

    One's spirituality or religious beliefs and practices may have a profound impact on how the individual copes with the suffering that so often accompanies advanced disease. Several previous studies suggest that negative religious coping can significantly affect health outcomes. The primary aim of this study was to explore the relationship between spirituality, religious coping, and symptoms of distress among a group of inpatients referred to the palliative care consult service. Pilot study. The study was conducted in a large academic medical center with a comprehensive Palliative Care and Home Hospice Program. (1) National Comprehensive Cancer Network Distress Management Assessment Tool; (2) Pargament Brief Religious Coping Scale (Brief RCOPE); (3) Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being (FACIT-Sp); (4) Puchalski's FICA; and (5) Profile of Mood States-Short Form (POMS-SF). The 31 subjects surveyed experienced moderate distress (5.8 +/- 2.7), major physical and psychosocial symptom burden, along with reduced function and significant caregiving needs. The majority (87.2%) perceived themselves to be at least somewhat spiritual, with 77.4% admitting to being at least somewhat religious. Negative religious coping (i.e., statements regarding punishment or abandonment by God) was positively associated with distress, confusion, depression, and negatively associated with physical and emotional well-being, as well as quality of life. Palliative care clinicians should be alert to symptoms of spiritual distress and intervene accordingly. Future research is needed to identify optimal techniques to address negative religious coping.

  14. Pediatric endocrine surgery development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan I. Dedov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Department of pediatric surgery at the Endocrinology Research Centre has been around for nearly two years. During operation, surgical treatment has received more than 500 patients with various endocrine disorders. The article discusses modern diagnostic approaches and surgical options for diseases included in the new direction of pediatric surgery – endocrine surgery in children. There are discussions about options for radical treatment of Graves disease in children, positive and negative aspects of surgical and radioactive iodine treatment. Is own stats of postoperative hyperparathyroidism. Is proposed to optimize the algorithm of actions in identifying thyroid nodules in children. In primary hyperparathyroidism, the emphasis is on the complexity of the postoperative management of patients related to the feature of children’s age in determining the severity of the reactions on the water-electrolyte disorders. Separately reviewed the literature of the adrenal glands diseases in children, demonstrating their own clinical cases which required surgical intervention. The authors describe the possibilities of modern neurosurgical equipment in the Endocrinology Research Centre in operations on the pituitary gland in children. Patients of different age groups performed transnasal transsphenoidal removal of tumors of the chiasm-sellar region using endoscopic assistance. The article also cited research data of pancreas diseases and their surgical treatment. Much attention is paid to the gender section of endocrine surgery in children. Discusses the tactics in disorders of sex development, gonadal tumors in children, diseases of the breast. In conclusion outlines the prospects for the development of endocrine surgery in children.

  15. Palliative care and neurology: time for a paradigm shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean; Kluger, Benzi

    2014-08-05

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Suboptimal palliative sedation in primary care: an exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pype, Peter; Teuwen, Inge; Mertens, Fien; Sercu, Marij; De Sutter, An

    2018-02-01

    Palliative sedation is a therapeutic option to control refractory symptoms in terminal palliative patients. This study aims at describing the occurrence and characteristics of suboptimal palliative sedations in primary care and at exploring the way general practitioners (GPs) experience suboptimal palliative sedation in their practice. We conducted a mixed methods study with a quantitative prospective survey in primary care and qualitative semi-structured interviews with GPs. The research team defined suboptimal palliative sedation as a time interval until deep sleep >1.5 h and/ or >2 awakenings after the start of the unconsciousness. Descriptive statistics were calculated on the quantitative data. Thematic analysis was used to analyse interview transcripts. We registered 63 palliative sedations in 1181 home deaths, 27 forms were completed. Eleven palliative sedations were suboptimal: eight due to the long time span until deep sleep; three due the number of unintended awakenings. GPs' interview analysis revealed two major themes: the shifting perception of failure and the burden of responsibility. Suboptimal palliative sedation occurs frequently in primary palliative care. Efficient communication towards family members is needed to prevent them from having unrealistic expectations and to prevent putting pressure on the GP to hasten the procedure. Sharing the burden of decision-making during the procedure with other health care professionals might diminish the heavy responsibility as perceived by GPs.

  17. Palliative sedation in end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltoni, Marco; Scarpi, Emanuela; Nanni, Oriana

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this review was to present and comment on recent data published on palliative sedation in palliative and end-of-life care. Palliative sedation is a medical procedure used to deal with the refractory symptoms occurring in the advanced stages of cancer. It has clinical, nursing, relational and ethical implications, making it a highly sensitive issue. Over the last 12 months, a number of authors have published interesting new findings on different areas of palliative sedation, that is prevalence, indications, monitoring, duration and choice of drugs. In particular, a clear definition of palliative sedation and of its more pronounced form, deep continuous sedation (DCS), has emerged. It has been confirmed that, when performed in the correct way and with the right aims, palliative sedation does not have a detrimental impact on survival. Recent findings confirm that palliative sedation is an integral part of a medical palliative care approach and is needed in certain clinical situations. It is a legitimate clinical practice from any ethical point of view. While oncologists should have a basic knowledge of the procedure, its in depth study is a core competency for palliative care physicians.

  18. [Providing regular relief; considerations for palliative care in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crul, B J; van Weel, C

    2001-10-20

    Over the last few decades the attention devoted to the palliative aspects of medicine, particularly those in hospital care, has declined due to the emphasis on medical technology. In Anglo-Saxon countries a review of this development resulted in structured palliative care that benefited terminally ill patients with a progressive fatal disease, especially cancer patients. Due to increasing national and international criticism of both the practice of euthanasia (assumed to be too liberal) and the lack of attention devoted to structured palliative care in the Netherlands, the Dutch government decided to improve the structure of palliative care. The government's viewpoint is based on the assumption that good palliative care that includes adequate pain control benefits patient care and might eventually lead to fewer requests for euthanasia. The improvements to palliative care should be realised by means of improvements in the structure, training and knowledge. Six academic medical clusters have been designated as Centres for the Development of Palliative Care (Dutch acronym: COPZ) for a 5-year period. Each COPZ must develop the various aspects needed to improve palliative care within the region it serves and ensure that its activities are carefully coordinated with those in the other centres. Research will focus on measuring the efficacy of palliative care as well as ethical and epidemiological aspects. A government committee will assess the appropriateness of the activities undertaken by each of the centres.

  19. Flemish palliative care nurses' attitudes toward euthanasia: a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Joris; van den Branden, Stef; van Iersel, Trudie; Broeckaert, Bert

    2009-10-01

    To adequately measure the attitudes of Flemish palliative care nurses toward euthanasia, and assess the relationship between these attitudes and demographic factors and the (perceived) influence of experience in palliative care on death anxiety. An anonymous questionnaire was sent to all nurses (n=589) employed in palliative care in Flanders, Belgium: 70.5% of the nurses (n=415) responded. A majority of the nurses supported the Belgian law regulating euthanasia but also believed that most euthanasia requests disappear as soon as a patient experiences the benefits of good palliative care. Three clusters were discovered: staunch advocates of euthanasia (150 nurses, 41.1%); moderate advocates of euthanasia (135 nurses, 37%); and (moderate) opponents of euthanasia (80 nurses, 21.9%). An absolute opposition between advocates and opponents of euthanasia was not observed. A statistically significant relationship was found between the euthanasia clusters and years of experience in palliative care, and (perceived) influence of experience in palliative care on anxiety when a patient dies. Flemish palliative care nurses' attitudes toward euthanasia are nuanced and contextual. By indicating that most euthanasia requests disappear as soon as a patient experiences the benefits of good palliative care, the nurses applied a 'palliative filter' a standard procedure in the case of a euthanasia request.

  20. Manipulating radicals: Using cobalt to steer radical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chirilă, A.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes research aimed at understanding and exploiting metallo-radical reactivity and explores reactions mediated by square planar, low-spin cobalt(II) complexes. A primary goal was to uncover novel reactivity of discrete cobalt(III)-bound carbene radicals generated upon reaction of the cobalt(II) catalysts with carbene precursors. Another important goal was to replace cobalt(II)-porphyrin catalysts with cheaper and easier to prepare metallo-radical analogues. Therefore the cata...

  1. Radical vs. Conservative Surgical Treatment of Hepatic Hydatid Cyst: A 10- Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ghaemi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatic hydatid cyst is caused by echinococcosis granulosis. It is a major health problem in endemic areas. The modern treatment of hydatid cysts of the liver varies from surgical intervention to percutaneous drainage or medical therapy. A high rate of complications following percutaneous drainage, and ineffectiveness of medical therapy have shown not to be the definitive treatments for the disease. Thus, surgery is still the best choice for the treatment of hydatid cyst of the liver. Surgical treatment methods can be divided into radical and conservative approaches. There is controversy regarding efficacy of the two surgical methods. In this study, we aimed to present a retrospective evaluation of the two surgical methods in patients treated for the hepatic hydatid cyst. Methods: This retrospective study reviewed medical records of 135 patients who underwent surgery for hepatic hydatid cyst from 1997 to 2007. Surgery comprised conservative methods (evacuation of the cyst content and excision of the inner cyst layers and radical methods (total excision of the cyst and removal of its outer layer. Results: One hundred thirty five patients underwent liver surgery. Conservative surgery was performed for 71 (53%, whereas, the remaining 64 patients (47% underwent radical surgery. Postoperative complications were 28% and 19%, respectively. Recurrence of the cyst in the conservative and radical surgery groups was noted to be 12.5 and 1.5%, respectively. The mean length of hospital stay was shorter in the radical surgery group (5 vs. 15 days. Conclusion: Radical surgery may be the preferred treatment for the hepatic hydatid cyst because of its low rate of postoperative complications and recurrence, as well as short hospital stay. Selection of the most appropriate treatment depends on the size, number, and location of the cyst(s, and presence of cystobiliary communications, and the availability of an experienced surgeon.

  2. Assessment of a Statewide Palliative Care Team Training Course: COMFORT Communication for Palliative Care Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Ferrell, Betty; Goldsmith, Joy; Ragan, Sandra L; Paice, Judith

    2016-07-01

    Despite increased attention to communication skill training in palliative care, few interprofessional training programs are available and little is known about the impact of such training. This study evaluated a communication curriculum offered to interprofessional palliative care teams and examined the longitudinal impact of training. Interprofessional, hospital-based palliative care team members were competitively selected to participate in a two-day training using the COMFORT(TM SM) (Communication, Orientation and options, Mindful communication, Family, Openings, Relating, Team) Communication for Palliative Care Teams curriculum. Course evaluation and goal assessment were tracked at six and nine months postcourse. Interprofessional palliative care team members (n = 58) representing 29 teams attended the course and completed course goals. Participants included 28 nurses, 16 social workers, 8 physicians, 5 chaplains, and one psychologist. Precourse surveys assessed participants' perceptions of institution-wide communication performance across the continuum of care and resources supporting optimum communication. Postcourse evaluations and goal progress monitoring were used to assess training effectiveness. Participants reported moderate communication effectiveness in their institutions, with the weakest areas being during bereavement and survivorship care. Mean response to course evaluation across all participants was greater than 4 (scale of 1 = low to 5 = high). Participants taught an additional 962 providers and initiated institution-wide training for clinical staff, new hires, and volunteers. Team member training improved communication processes and increased attention to communication with family caregivers. Barriers to goal implementation included a lack of institutional support as evidenced in clinical caseloads and an absence of leadership and funding. The COMFORT(TM SM) communication curriculum is effective palliative care communication

  3. [Palliative sedation at a university palliative care unit--a descriptive analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopprich, A; Günther, L D; Laufenberg-Feldmann, R; Reinholz, U; Weber, M

    2016-04-01

    Palliative sedation (pS) is indicated in the presence of end-stage disease with treatment-refractory symptoms not tolerable for the patient. We investigated the practice of pS at a university palliative care unit. Before starting pS the following data were documented: indication and decision making, type of sedation, life expectancy evaluated by the physician using the palliative prognostic index. Over the time of pS communication skills, depth of sedation, relief in symptoms, substitution of fluid and nutrition and used medications were collected. During evaluation time 99 patients died. 34 patients received pS (34 %). All patients suffered from cancer. Indications for palliative sedation were: terminal restlessness (56 %), dyspnea (39 %), pain (32 %), psychological distress (15 %), agitated delir (9 %), vomiting (3 %) and bleeding (3 %) (multiple nominations possible). In 31 cases (91 %) nurses were included for decision making. In 33 cases continuous sedation were initiated immediately (median duration 27.5 hours). The most applied medication was midazolam (94 %), sometimes combined with neuroleptics (44 %) and propofol (15 %). 91 % of the patients additionally received opioids. Artificial fluid was substituted in two cases. Palliative sedation started in the median 27.5 hours before death. The final physician assessment revealed complete symptom relief in 12 patients (35 %), very strong symptom relief in 20 patients (59 %) and moderate symptom relief in 2 patients (6 %). pS was successfully used as last resort for relief of treatment-refractory symptoms in one third of decedents at the investigated palliative care unit. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Palliative care and palliative radiation therapy education in radiation oncology: A survey of US radiation oncology program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Randy L; Colbert, Lauren E; Jones, Joshua; Racsa, Margarita; Kane, Gabrielle; Lutz, Steve; Vapiwala, Neha; Dharmarajan, Kavita V

    The purpose of this study was to assess the state of palliative and supportive care (PSC) and palliative radiation therapy (RT) educational curricula in radiation oncology residency programs in the United States. We surveyed 87 program directors of radiation oncology residency programs in the United States between September 2015 and November 2015. An electronic survey on PSC and palliative RT education during residency was sent to all program directors. The survey consisted of questions on (1) perceived relevance of PSC and palliative RT to radiation oncology training, (2) formal didactic sessions on domains of PSC and palliative RT, (3) effective teaching formats for PSC and palliative RT education, and (4) perceived barriers for integrating PSC and palliative RT into the residency curriculum. A total of 57 responses (63%) was received. Most program directors agreed or strongly agreed that PSC (93%) and palliative radiation therapy (99%) are important competencies for radiation oncology residents and fellows; however, only 67% of residency programs had formal educational activities in principles and practice of PSC. Most programs had 1 or more hours of formal didactics on management of pain (67%), management of neuropathic pain (65%), and management of nausea and vomiting (63%); however, only 35%, 33%, and 30% had dedicated lectures on initial management of fatigue, assessing role of spirituality, and discussing advance care directives, respectively. Last, 85% of programs reported having a formal curriculum on palliative RT. Programs were most likely to have education on palliative radiation to brain, bone, and spine, but less likely on visceral, or skin, metastasis. Residency program directors believe that PSC and palliative RT are important competencies for their trainees and support increasing education in these 2 educational domains. Many residency programs have structured curricula on PSC and palliative radiation education, but room for improvement exists in

  5. Robotic radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy: our early experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilescu, C; Sgarbură, O; Tudor, St; Popa, M; Turcanu, A; Florescu, A; Herlea, V; Anghel, R

    2009-01-01

    Robotic surgery overcomes some limitations of laparoscopic surgery for prostate, rectal and uterine cancer. In this study we analyze the feasibility of robotic radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in gynecological cancers in a developping program of robotic surgery. This prospective study started the 1st of March 2008. Since then, 250 cases of robotic surgery were performed out of which 29 cases addressed gynecological conditions. We selected all radical interventions summing up to 19 cases. Our final group consisted of 19 patients, a gedbetween 30 and 78 years old, with an average age of 53.22 years (+/- 10.03). Twelve patients were diagnosed with cervical cancer, the rest of them with endometrial cancer. Mean operative time was 180 +/- 23.45 min. Oral intake were started the next day after the operation and the patients were discharged 3.5 (+/- 1.2) days postoperatively. There were 3 urinary complications in patients with tumors adherent to the urinary bladder. We believe that robotic radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in gynecological cancers is a rapid, feasible, and secure method that should be used whenever available. However further prospective studies and late follow-up results are needed in order to fully assess the value of this new technology.

  6. [Use of music in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrbina, Dijana; Simunović, Dubravka; Santek, Vjerocka; Njegovan-Zvonarević, Tatjana

    2011-12-01

    Man is mortal, which means that as the earthly body perishes being, final. Disease and death will always be an inevitable and integral part of human experience. The way in which we try to identify and respond to the unique and individual needs of the dying is an indication of our maturity as a society. The number of people requiring palliative care is growing. Palliative care does not intend to either accelerate or postpone death she emphasizes the life and looks at dying as a normal process. It is an active form of care for patients with advanced, progressive illness, with the aim of suppressing pain and other symptoms in addition to providing psychological, social and spiritual support which ensures the best possible quality of life for patients and their families. Therefore requires a coordinated and interdisciplinary contribution team. The variety of professions in a team, and determine the needs of patients should be ready to provide physical, psychological, social and spiritual support using methods that result from an interdisciplinary, collaborative team approach. Development of a holistic approach and awareness in the medical and allied professions has led to a renewal of interest in the inclusion of music and other expressive media in contemporary concepts of palliative care, which are consistent with problem areas, clinical manifestations and the needs of patients. Music offers a direct and uncomplicated medium of intimacy, living in a man who listens to her, has a place where words lose their power. Music is like our existence, constantly polarizing and emotionally stimulating, as it touches the medium of the earliest layers of our becoming. The use of music in palliative care has proved very effective for a variety of effects that music creates in patients. These effects are achieved through the use of various musical techniques, such as musical improvisation, songwriting, receiving creative techniques, guided by imagination and music. These techniques

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  8. Mapping the scope of occupational therapy practice in palliative care: A European Association for Palliative Care cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva, Gail; Morgan, Deidre

    2018-05-01

    Occupational therapists play an integral role in the care of people with life-limiting illnesses. However, little is known about the scope of occupational therapy service provision in palliative care across Europe and factors influencing service delivery. This study aimed to map the scope of occupational therapy palliative care interventions across Europe and to explore occupational therapists' perceptions of opportunities and challenges when delivering and developing palliative care services. A 49-item online cross-sectional survey comprised of fixed and free text responses was securely hosted via the European Association for Palliative Care website. Survey design, content and recruitment processes were reviewed and formally approved by the European Association for Palliative Care Board of Directors. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis were used to analyse data. Setting/respondents: Respondents were European occupational therapists whose caseload included palliative care recipients (full-time or part-time). In total, 237 valid responses were analysed. Findings demonstrated a consistency in occupational therapy practice in palliative care between European countries. Clinician time was prioritised towards indirect patient care, with limited involvement in service development, leadership and research. A need for undergraduate and postgraduate education was identified. Organisational expectations and understanding of the scope of the occupational therapy role constrain the delivery of services to support patients and carers. Further development of occupational therapy in palliative care, particularly capacity building in leadership and research activities, is warranted. There is a need for continuing education and awareness raising of the role of occupational therapy in palliative care.

  9. Creation of minimum standard tool for palliative care in India and self-evaluation of palliative care programs using it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Rajagopal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is important to ensure that minimum standards for palliative care based on available resources are clearly defined and achieved. Aims: (1 Creation of minimum National Standards for Palliative Care for India. (2 Development of a tool for self-evaluation of palliative care organizations. (3 Evaluation of the tool in India. In 2006, Pallium India assembled a working group at the national level to develop minimum standards. The standards were to be evaluated by palliative care services in the country. Materials and Methods: The working group prepared a "standards" document, which had two parts - the first composed of eight "essential" components and the second, 22 "desirable" components. The working group sent the document to 86 hospice and palliative care providers nationwide, requesting them to self-evaluate their palliative care services based on the standards document, on a modified Likert scale. Results: Forty-nine (57% palliative care organizations responded, and their self-evaluation of services based on the standards tool was analyzed. The majority of the palliative care providers met most of the standards identified as essential by the working group. A variable percentage of organizations had satisfied the desirable components of the standards. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the "standards tool" could be applied effectively in practice for self-evaluation of quality of palliative care services.

  10. Palliative care in end-stage valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jill M; Cooper, Stephanie; Kirkpatrick, James N

    2017-08-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD), particularly aortic valve disease, is prevalent with increasing incidence. When surgery is not possible, or when risks outweigh benefits, percutaneous treatment options may offer effective alternatives. However, procedures may not always go as planned, and frail patients or those whose symptoms are caused by other comorbidities may not benefit from valve intervention at all. Significant effort should be made to assess frailty, comorbidities and patient goals prior to intervention. Palliative care (PC) should play a critical role in the care of patients with severe valve disease. PC is specialised medical care that aims to optimise health-related quality of life by managing symptoms and clarifying patient values and goals of care. It should be implemented at the time of diagnosis and continue throughout the disease course. Because of the paucity of studies dedicated to the provision of PC to patients with advanced VHD, further research is needed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial Study in Abdominal Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    , and finally, greatly improved postoperative recovery 5-7. In recent years, FTS has been applied to several surgical diseases including radical prostatectomy 8, cardiac surgery 9, total knee replacement 10, cesarean section11, coronary artery ...

  12. Cytoreductive surgery for men with metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolas Katelaris

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: This data supports recent findings demonstrating that radical prostatectomy for metastatic prostate cancer is feasible. Further studies are needed to explore the role of cytoreductive surgery with regards to the potential oncological benefit.

  13. Laparoscopic surgery compared to traditional abdominal surgery in the management of early stage cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, T; Ozekinci, M; Saruhan, Z; Sever, B; Pestereli, E

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare laparoscopic total radical hysterectomy with classic radical hysterectomy regarding parametrial, and vaginal resection, and lymphadenectomy. Laparoscopic or laparotomic total radical hysterectomy with advantages and disadvantages was offered to the patients diagnosed as having operable cervical cancer between 2007 and 2010. Lymph node status, resection of the parametria and vagina, and margin positivity were recorded for both groups. Data were collected prospectively. Statistical analysis was performed with the SPSS statistical software program. Totally, 53 cases had classical abdominal radical hysterectomy and 35 laparoscopic radical hysterectomy, respectively. Parametrial involvement was detected in four (11.4%) cases in laparoscopic radical surgery versus nine (16.9%) in laparatomic surgery. All the cases with parametrial involvement had free surgical margins of tumor. Also there were no significant statistical differences in lymph node number and metastasis between the two groups. There is no difference in anatomical considerations between laparoscopic and laparatomic radical surgery in the surgical management of cervical cancer.

  14. Palliative sedation in advanced cancer patients hospitalized in a specialized palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Palacio, Santiago; Giraldo Hoyos, Clara Elisa; Arias Rodríguez, Camilo; Mejía Arrieta, Daniel; Vargas Gómez, John Jairo; Krikorian, Alicia

    2018-03-29

    To describe the practice of palliative sedation (PS) in patients with advanced cancer in a specialized palliative care (PC) unit in Colombia. Descriptive prospective study including all adults with cancer hospitalized under PS in a cancer institute between January and July 2015 in Colombia. Variables examined were diagnosis, physical functioning, symptoms at the start of sedation, medications and dosages used, and type, level, and time of sedation. Descriptive and correlational statistics were obtained. Sixty-six patients were included, 70% of which were women. The patients had an average age of 61 years (range 24-87), and 74% had a Karnofsky Index (KI) of 50% or less. The most frequent diagnosis was breast cancer (22%), and 82% had metastatic cancer. The prevalence of palliative sedation was 2% and the most common symptoms indicating it were dyspnea (59%), delirium (45%), and pain (32%). All patients received midazolam as a sedative. The average time between the interval start and culmination of sedation was 44 h. There was a significant and inverse relationship between functionality and time under sedation. Palliative sedation is a valid therapeutic option for refractory symptoms causing suffering. The results correspond to international reports and guidelines, which suggests that PS is tailored to the needs of the individual patient while maintaining a high scientific standard, even in a context where PC is under development. However, further development of strategies and clear indications towards the use of PS in Colombia are needed, given its still scarce use.

  15. Measuring relatives’ perspectives on the quality of palliative care: the Consumer Quality Index Palliative Care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessen, S.J.J.; Francke, A.L.; Sixma, H.J.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Deliens, L.

    2013-01-01

    Context: A Consumer Quality Index (CQ-index) is a questionnaire assessing the actual care experiences and how important the recipient finds certain care aspects, as well as the priorities for improving quality. A CQ-index Palliative Care (CQ-index PC) for bereaved relatives was developed to measure

  16. A national guideline for palliative sedation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, Marian; van Wijlick, Eric; Legemaate, Johan; de Graeff, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    The first national guideline on palliative sedation in The Netherlands has been adopted by the General Board of the Royal Dutch Medical Association. By law, the physician is obliged to take this guideline into consideration. In this paper, we present the main principles of the guideline. Palliative

  17. Generalist palliative care in hospital: cultural and organisational interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Heidi; Jarlbaek, Lene; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2016-01-01

    : a quantitative study, in which three independent datasets were triangulated to study the organisation and evaluation of generalist palliative care, and a qualitative, ethnographic study exploring the culture of generalist palliative nursing care in medical departments. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: A Danish regional...

  18. [Providing regular relief; considerations for palliative care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crul, B.J.P.; Weel, C. van

    2001-01-01

    Over the last few decades the attention devoted to the palliative aspects of medicine, particularly those in hospital care, has declined due to the emphasis on medical technology. In Anglo-Saxon countries a review of this development resulted in structured palliative care that benefited terminally

  19. Leadership Development Initiative: Growing Global Leaders… Advancing Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Frank D; Moore, Shannon Y; Callaway, Mary V; Foley, Kathleen M

    2018-02-01

    The International Palliative Care Leadership Development Initiative (LDI) was a model demonstration project that aimed to expand the global network of palliative care leaders in low- and moderate-resource countries who are well positioned to apply their new leadership skills. Thirty-nine palliative medicine physicians from 25 countries successfully completed the two-year curriculum that included three thematic residential courses, mentorship, and site visits by senior global palliative care leaders and personal projects to apply their new leadership skills. The focus on self-reflection, leadership behaviors and practices, strategic planning, high-level communication, and teaching skills led to significant personal and professional transformation among the participants, mentors, and the LDI team. The resulting residential course curriculum and the personal leadership stories and biosketches of the leaders are now available open access at IPCRC.net. Already, within their first-year postgraduation, the leaders are using their new leadership skills to grow palliative care capacity through significant changes in policy, improved opioid/other medication availability, new and enhanced educational curricula and continuing education activities, and development/expansion of palliative care programs in their organizations and regions. We are not aware of another palliative care initiative that achieves the global reach and ripple effect that LDI has produced. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Defining palliative care in cystic fibrosis: A Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellon, E P; Goggin, J; Chen, E; Sabadosa, K; Hempstead, S E; Faro, A; Homa, K

    2018-05-01

    The goal of palliative care is to improve quality of life for people with serious illness. We aimed to create a cystic fibrosis (CF)-specific definition of palliative care. A working group of 36 CF care providers, researchers, palliative care providers, quality improvement experts, individuals with CF, and CF caregivers completed a series of questionnaires to rate the value of each of 22 attributes of palliative care, rank top attributes to construct definitions of palliative care, and then rate proposed definitions. An average of 28 participants completed each of four questionnaires, with consistent distribution of stakeholder roles across questionnaires. Many identified overlaps in routine CF care and palliative care and highlighted the importance of a definition that feels relevant across the lifespan. Modified Delphi methodology was used to define palliative care in CF. The definition will be used as the foundation for development of CF-specific palliative care guidelines. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Paediatric palliative care providers' experiences in rural KwaZulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based palliative care (including paediatric palliative care) is available to patients in rural ... reported that one of the most distressing tasks a nurse has to carry out is telling any .... die, as a miracle (such as a cure) is presented as a possibility.

  2. Palliative Care: Improving Nursing Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Karen; Price, Deborah; Duffy, Elizabeth; Galunas, Laura; Rodgers, Cheryl

    2017-10-01

    Oncology nurses affect patient care at every point along the cancer journey. This creates the perfect opportunity to educate patients and caregivers about palliative care early and often throughout treatment. However, healthcare providers frequently do not have the knowledge and confidence to engage in meaningful conversations about palliative care.
. The specific aims were to improve oncology nurses' palliative care knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors by providing a palliative care nursing education program. An additional aim was to increase the number of conversations with patients and families about palliative care.
. This project had a pre-/post-test design to assess knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors at baseline and one month after implementation of an established education curriculum. The teaching strategy included one four-hour class for oncology RNs with topics about the definition of palliative care, pain and symptom management, and how to have palliative care conversations.
. Results showed a statistically significant difference after the educational intervention for knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. The number of conversations with patients and caregivers about palliative and end-of-life care increased significantly.

  3. Postgraduate palliative care education: Evaluation of a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. We aimed to assess the postgraduate palliative care distance education programme of the University of Cape Town (UCT) in terms of its perceived ability to influence palliative care delivery. Methods. A mixed-methods approach, consisting of two surveys using open-ended and multiple-choice options, was conducted ...

  4. Palliative care awareness amongst religious leaders and seminarians

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: There exists scanty literature on the awareness of Nigerians towards palliative care. This study was conducted to determine the level of awareness of religious leaders and seminarians in Ibadan, Nigeria, on palliative care. Methods: Data obtained from a cross-section of 302 religious leaders and seminarians in ...

  5. Evaluation of the palliative effect of radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertsson, M.; Ewers, S.B.; Widmark, H.; Hambraeus, G.; Lillo-Gil, R.; Ranstam, J.; Lund Univ. Hospital

    1989-01-01

    149 patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with radiotherapy were evaluated. Eighty-one patients had treatment with palliative intent and 68 with curative intent. The 4-year actuarial survival was 1 and 5% respectively. The tumor size, Karnofsky index (KI) and radiation dose were prognostic factors. The duration of palliation of the patients dysphagia was dose-dependant. (orig.)

  6. Are Undergraduate Nurses Taught Palliative Care during Their Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Field, David

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 46 of 108 nurse educators in the United Kingdom indicated that diploma students received a mean of 7.8 hours and degree students 12.2 hours of palliative care training. Although 82% believed it should be a core component, 67% had difficulty finding qualified teachers. Palliative care knowledge was not formally assessed in most…

  7. Primary tumor location as a predictor of the benefit of palliative resection for colorectal cancer with unresectable metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong-Xin; Ma, Wen-Juan; Gu, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Tian-Qi; Huang, Zhi-Mei; Lu, Zhen-Hai; Gu, Yang-Kui

    2017-07-27

    It is still under debate that whether stage IV colorectal cancer patients with unresectable metastasis can benefit from primary tumor resection, especially for asymptomatic colorectal cancer patients. Retrospective studies have shown controversial results concerning the benefit from surgery. This retrospective study aims to evaluate whether the site of primary tumor is a predictor of palliative resection in asymptomatic stage IV colorectal cancer patients. One hundred ninety-four patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer were selected from Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center Database in the period between January 2007 and December 2013. All information was carefully reviewed and collected, including the treatment, age, sex, carcinoembryonic antigen, site of tumor, histology, cancer antigen 199, number of liver metastases, and largest diameter of liver metastasis. The univariate and multivariate analyses were used to detect the relationship between primary tumor resection and overall survival of unresectable stage IV colorectal cancer patients. One hundred twenty-five received palliative resection, and 69 received only chemotherapy. Multivariate analysis indicated that primary tumor site was one of the independent factors (RR 0.569, P = 0.007) that influenced overall survival. For left-side colon cancer patients, primary tumor resection prolonged the median overall survival time for 8 months (palliative resection vs. no palliative resection: 22 vs. 14 months, P = 0.009); however, for right-side colon cancer patients, palliative resection showed no benefit (12 vs. 10 months, P = 0.910). This study showed that left-side colon cancer patients might benefit from the primary tumor resection in terms of overall survival. This result should be further explored in a prospective study.

  8. Robotic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with this type of surgery give it some advantages over standard endoscopic techniques. The surgeon can make ... Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 87. Muller CL, Fried GM. Emerging technology in surgery: Informatics, electronics, robotics. In: ...

  9. Nose Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Health Home Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. Reproduction or republication strictly ... Terms of Use © Copyright 2018. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery 1650 Diagonal Rd Alexandria, ...

  10. After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around ... the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are How long ...

  11. Palliative pharmacological sedation for terminally ill adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, Elaine M; van Driel, Mieke L; McGregor, Leanne; Truong, Shani; Mitchell, Geoffrey

    2015-01-02

    Terminally ill people experience a variety of symptoms in the last hours and days of life, including delirium, agitation, anxiety, terminal restlessness, dyspnoea, pain, vomiting, and psychological and physical distress. In the terminal phase of life, these symptoms may become refractory, and unable to be controlled by supportive and palliative therapies specifically targeted to these symptoms. Palliative sedation therapy is one potential solution to providing relief from these refractory symptoms. Sedation in terminally ill people is intended to provide relief from refractory symptoms that are not controlled by other methods. Sedative drugs such as benzodiazepines are titrated to achieve the desired level of sedation; the level of sedation can be easily maintained and the effect is reversible. To assess the evidence for the benefit of palliative pharmacological sedation on quality of life, survival, and specific refractory symptoms in terminally ill adults during their last few days of life. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 11), MEDLINE (1946 to November 2014), and EMBASE (1974 to December 2014), using search terms representing the sedative drug names and classes, disease stage, and study designs. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs, non-RCTs, and observational studies (e.g. before-and-after, interrupted-time-series) with quantitative outcomes. We excluded studies with only qualitative outcomes or that had no comparison (i.e. no control group or no within-group comparison) (e.g. single arm case series). Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts of citations, and full text of potentially eligible studies. Two review authors independently carried out data extraction using standard data extraction forms. A third review author acted as arbiter for both stages. We carried out no meta-analyses due to insufficient data for pooling on any outcome; therefore, we reported

  12. FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF ENDOSCOPIC EXTRAPERITONEAL RADICAL INTRAFASCIAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Perlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endoscopic radical prostatectomy is a highly effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Intrafascial prostate dissection ensures early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. This article sums up our own experience of performing intrafascial endoscopic prostatectomy.Materials and methods. 25 patients have undergone this procedure. 12 months after surgery 88.2 % of the patients were fully continent, 11.7 % had symptoms of minimal stress urinary incontinence. We encountered no cases of positive surgical margins and one case of bio-chemical recurrence of the disease.Conclusion. Oncologically, intrafascial endoscopic radical prostatectomy is as effective as other modifications of radical prostatectomy and has the benefits of early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. 

  13. Hydroxyl radical reactivity with diethylhydroxylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorse, R.A. Jr.; Lii, R.R.; Saunders, B.B.

    1977-01-01

    Diethylhydroxylamine (DEHA) reacts with gas-phase hydroxyl radicals on every third collision, whereas the corresponding reaction in aqueous solution is considerably slower. The high gas-phase reactivity explains the predicted inhibitory effect of DEHA in atmospheric smog processes. Results from the studies in the aqueous phase are helpful in predicting the mechanism of the reaction of DEHA with hydroxyl radicals

  14. Muoniated acyl and thioacyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, Iain; Brodovitch, Jean-Claude; Ghandi, Khashayar; Percival, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    The product of the reaction of muonium with tert-butylisocyanate was previously assigned as the muoniated tert-butylaminyl radical (I. McKenzie, J.-C. Brodovitch, K. Ghandi, S. Kecman, P. W. Percival, Physica B 326 (2003) 76). This assignment is incorrect since the muon and 14 N hyperfine-coupling constants (hfcc) of this radical would have the opposite sign, which is in conflict with the experimental results. The radical is now reassigned as the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical, based on the similarities between the experimental muon and 14 N hfcc and hfcc calculated at the UB3LYP/6-311G(d,p)//UB3LYP/EPR-III level. The large zero-point energy in the N-Mu bond results in the dissociation barrier of the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical being above the combined energy of the reactants, in contrast to the N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical where the dissociation barrier lies below the combined energy of the reactants. The reaction of muonium with tert-butylisothiocyanate produced both conformers of the muoniated N-tert-butylthiocarbamoyl radical and their assignment was based on the similarities between the experimental and calculated muon hfcc. These are the first acyl and thioacyl radicals to be directly detected by muon spin spectroscopy

  15. Muoniated acyl and thioacyl radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Iain [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada); Brodovitch, Jean-Claude [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada); Ghandi, Khashayar [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada); Percival, Paul W. [TRIUMF and Department of Chemistry, 8888 University Drive, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby B.C., V5A 1S6 (Canada)]. E-mail: percival@sfu.ca

    2006-03-31

    The product of the reaction of muonium with tert-butylisocyanate was previously assigned as the muoniated tert-butylaminyl radical (I. McKenzie, J.-C. Brodovitch, K. Ghandi, S. Kecman, P. W. Percival, Physica B 326 (2003) 76). This assignment is incorrect since the muon and {sup 14}N hyperfine-coupling constants (hfcc) of this radical would have the opposite sign, which is in conflict with the experimental results. The radical is now reassigned as the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical, based on the similarities between the experimental muon and {sup 14}N hfcc and hfcc calculated at the UB3LYP/6-311G(d,p)//UB3LYP/EPR-III level. The large zero-point energy in the N-Mu bond results in the dissociation barrier of the muoniated N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical being above the combined energy of the reactants, in contrast to the N-tert-butylcarbamoyl radical where the dissociation barrier lies below the combined energy of the reactants. The reaction of muonium with tert-butylisothiocyanate produced both conformers of the muoniated N-tert-butylthiocarbamoyl radical and their assignment was based on the similarities between the experimental and calculated muon hfcc. These are the first acyl and thioacyl radicals to be directly detected by muon spin spectroscopy.

  16. Satisfaction with palliative care after stroke: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacquiere, Dylan; Bhimji, Khadija; Meggison, Hilary; Sinclair, John; Sharma, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The determinants of satisfaction for families of acute stroke patients receiving palliative care have not been extensively studied. We surveyed families to determine how they perceived palliative care after stroke. Families of patients palliated after ischemic stroke, intracerebral, or subarachnoid hemorrhage were approached. Four weeks after the patient's death, families were administered the After-Death Bereaved Family Member Interview to determine satisfaction with the care provided. Fifteen families participated. Families were most satisfied with participation in decision making and least satisfied with attention to emotional needs. In stroke-specific domains, families had less satisfaction with artificial feeding, hydration, and communication. Overall satisfaction was high (9.04 out of 10). Families of patients receiving palliative care at our institution showed generally high satisfaction with palliation after stroke; specific domains were identified for improvement. Further study in larger populations is required.

  17. Palliative Care: A Partnership Across the Continuum of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Aaron; Harrison, Debra A; Harrison, Jeffrey P

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care services are becoming more prevalent in the United States as greater portions of the population are requiring end-of-life services. Furthermore, recent policy changes and service foci have promoted more continuity and encompassing care. This study evaluates characteristics that distinguish hospitals with a palliative care program from hospitals without such a program in order to better define the markets and environments that promote the creation and usage of these programs. This study demonstrates that palliative care programs are more likely in communities with favorable economic factors and higher Medicare populations. Large hospitals with high occupancy rates and a high case mix index use palliative care programs to better meet patient needs and improve hospital efficiency. Managerial, nursing, and policy implications are discussed relating to further usage and implementation of palliative care programs.

  18. Developing organisational ethics in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Lars; Molander, Ulla; Benkel, Inger

    2017-03-01

    Palliative carers constantly face ethical problems. There is lack of organised support for the carers to handle these ethical problems in a consistent way. Within organisational ethics, we find models for moral deliberation and for developing organisational culture; however, they are not combined in a structured way to support carers' everyday work. The aim of this study was to describe ethical problems faced by palliative carers and develop an adapted organisational set of values to support the handling of these problems. Ethical problems were mapped out using focus groups and content analysis. The organisational culture were developed using normative analysis and focus group methodology within a participatory action research approach. Main participants and research context: A total of 15 registered nurses and 10 assistant nurses at a palliative unit (with 19 patient beds) at a major University Hospital in Sweden. Ethical considerations: The study followed standard ethics guidelines concerning informed consent and confidentiality. We found six categories of ethical problems (with the main focus on problems relating to the patient's loved ones) and five categories of organisational obstacles. Based on these findings, we developed a set of values in three levels: a general level, an explanatory level and a level of action strategies. The ethical problems found corresponded to problems in other studies with a notable exception, the large focus on patient loved ones. The three-level set of values is a way to handle risks of formulating abstract values not providing guidance in concrete care voiced in other studies. Developing a three-level set of values adapted to the specific ethical problems in a concrete care setting is a first step towards a better handling of ethical problems.

  19. Poverty Reduction in India through Palliative Care: A Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Cathy; Thyle, Ann; Duomai, Savita; Manak, Manju

    2017-01-01

    EMMS International and Emmanuel Hospital Association (EHA) implemented a pilot project, poverty reduction in India through palliative care (PRIPCare). A total of 129 interviews with patients and family enrolled in palliative care at three EHA hospitals (in Fatehpur, Lalitpur and Utraula) and staff discussions established that 66% of palliative care patients had lost livelihoods due to illness, 26% of patients' families had members who had lost livelihoods due to the illness, 98% of enrolled households had debts, 59% had loans for which they had sold assets, 69% of households took out debt after their family member fell ill, many patients do not know about government benefits and lack necessary documents, many village headmen require bribes to give people access to benefits, and many bereaved women and children lose everything. Palliative care enabled 85% of patients and families to spend less on medicines, 31% of patients received free medicines, all patients reduced use of out-patient departments (OPDs), 20% reduced use of inpatient departments (IPDs), and therefore spent less on travel, 8% of patients had started earning again due to improved health, members of 10% of families started earning again, and one hospital educated 171 village headmen and increased by 5% the number of patients and their families receiving government benefits. If only 0.7% of needy adults are receiving palliative care, these benefits could be delivered to 143 times more families, targeted effectively at poverty reduction. Palliative care has great scope to reduce that most desperate poverty in India caused by chronic illness. This article concerns a study by the UK NGO EMMS International and Indian NGO EHA, to assess whether palliative care reduces household poverty. EHA staff had noticed that many patients spend a lot on ineffective treatment before joining palliative care, many families do not know their entitlement to government healthcare subsidies or government pensions, and many

  20. Multiple myeloma in Niger Delta, Nigeria: complications and the outcome of palliative interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwabuko, Ogbonna Collins; Igbigbi, Elizabeth Eneikido; Chukwuonye, Innocent Ijezie; Nnoli, Martin Anazodo

    2017-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma (MM) is one of the hematological malignancies that require palliative care. This is because of the life-threatening nature and the suffering associated with the illness. The aim of this study is to bring to the fore the complications experienced by people living with MM in the Niger-Delta region of Nigeria and the outcome of various palliative interventions. Methods This was a 10-year multi-center retrospective study of 26 patients diagnosed and managed in three major centers in the Niger-Delta region of Nigeria from January 2003 to December 2012. Information on the clinical, laboratory, radiological data, and palliative treatment was obtained at presentation and subsequently at intervals of 3 months until the patient was lost to follow-up. Result The mean duration from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was 13.12 months (95% CI, 6.65–19.58). A total of 16 (61.5%), eight (30.8%), and two subjects (7.7%) presented in Durie–Salmon (DS) stages III, II, and I, respectively. The complications presented by patients at diagnoses included bone pain (84.6%), anemia (61.5%), nephropathy (23.1%), and hemiplegia (35%). All the patients received analgesics, while 50.0% received blood transfusion, 56.7% had surgery performed, 19% had hemodialysis, and 3.8% received radiotherapy. A total of 10 (38%) patients benefited from bisphosphonates (BPs). A total of 57.6% of patients were on melphalan–prednisone (MP) double regimen, while 19% and 8% patients were on MP–thalidomide and MP–bortezomib triple regimens, respectively. A total of 3.8% of patients at DS stage IIIB disease had autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT). Only 7.6% of the myeloma patients survived up to 5 years post diagnosis. The overall mean survival interval was 39.7 months (95% CI, 32.1–47.2). Conclusion Late diagnosis and inadequate palliative care account for major complications encountered by MM patients in the Niger-Delta region of Nigeria. This could be responsible for

  1. Thyroid Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hypothyroidism in Children and Adolescents Pediatric Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Nodules in Children and Adolescents Thyroid Surgery Resources Thyroid Surgery Brochure PDF Thyroid Surgery FAQs PDF En Español Cirugia De La Tiroides El folleto de Cirugia De La Tiroides Search Thyroid ...

  2. Cultural and spiritual considerations in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Carol O

    2011-10-01

    Culture is a fundamental part of one's being. Spirituality is integrated with culture and both play a significant role in a person's journey through life. Yet, culture and spirituality are often misunderstood and may not seem to be important in healthcare settings. For adults with cancer and their families, this cannot be ignored. This paper reviews The Purnell Model of Cultural Competence as a framework for considering culture and spirituality in healthcare and discusses the importance of acknowledging and incorporating practices that support culture and spirituality in healthcare settings. Examples of how to include cultural and spiritual care in palliative and end-of-life care in healthcare settings are provided.

  3. Million Dollar Baby (2004 and Palliative Care

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    José Elías García Sánchez

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The worst misfortune that can befall an old, tormented and fearful boxing trainer is that the pupil he is training and of whom he is very fond should have a lesion as serious as a quadriplegia. This is the crux of the plot in Million Dollar Baby. A person who suffers a quadriplegia sees how most of her physical and sensorial abilities disappear and habitually suffers psychological disturbances requiring palliative medical care. Relatives are subjected to great stress and suffering. All these aspects are reflected, in general accurately, in the film.

  4. Commissioning of specialist palliative care services in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Harriet; Finlay, Ilora; Downman, Maxwell; Dumas, James

    2018-03-01

    Some failures in end-of-life care have been attributed to inconsistent provision of palliative care across England. We aimed to explore the variation in commissioning of services by Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) using a data collection exercise. We sent a Freedom of Information request in the form of an open questionnaire to all 209 CCGs in England to assess their commissioning of palliative and end-of-life care services, mainly focused on the provision of specialist palliative care services. 29 CCGs provided information about the number of patients with some form of palliative care needs in their population. For specialist palliative care services, CCGs allocated budgets ranging from £51.83 to £2329.19 per patient per annum. 163 CCGs (77.90%) currently commission 7-day admission to their specialist palliative care beds. 82.84% of CCGs commission 7-day specialist palliative care services in patients' own homes and out-of-hours services rely heavily on hospice provision. 64 CCGs (31.37%) commission pain control teams, the majority of whom only operate in regular working hours. 68.14% of CCGs reported commissioning palliative care education of any sort for healthcare professionals and 44.85% of CCGs had no plans to update or review their palliative care services. The most important finding from this exercise is that the information CCGs hold about their population and services is not standardised. However, information based on data that are more objective, for example, population and total budget for palliative care, demonstrate wide variations in commissioning. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Quality of life in patients submitted to radical prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Débora Moura Miranda Goluart; Mário Alfredo Silveira Miranzi; Paulo Eduardo Nunes Goulart

    2014-01-01

    A cross-sectional study with a descriptive analysis of 81 patients submitted to radical prostatectomy (RP). Our objective was to correlate quality of life (QL) according to the EORTC-QLQ C30 with age group and time after surgery. Mean age was 65.7 years. Most sought the care of urology, asymptomatic. Some referred former smoking (49.9%) and high blood pressure (53.1%). Mean preoperative SBP was 8.4 ng/ml. Most participants were in stages T2c to T3, Gleason ?6 and over a year after surgery. Er...

  6. Computed tomography after radical pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple's procedure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.L. [Department of Radiology, Ipswich Hospital, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: simon.smith@ipswichhospital.nhs.uk; Hampson, F. [Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Duxbury, M. [Department of Surgery, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Little France, Edinburgh EH16 4SU (United Kingdom); Rae, D.M.; Sinclair, M.T. [Department of Pancreaticobiliary surgery, Ipswich Hospital, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Whipple's procedure (radical pancreaticoduodenectomy) is currently the only curative option for patients with periampullary malignancy. The surgery is highly complex and involves multiple anastomoses. Complications are common and can lead to significant postoperative morbidity. Early detection and treatment of complications is vital, and high-quality multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is currently the best method of investigation. This review outlines the surgical technique and illustrates the range of normal postoperative appearances together with the common complications.

  7. Function of local networks in palliative care: a Dutch view.

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    Nikbakht-Van de Sande, C V M Vahedi; van der Rijt, C C D; Visser, A Ph; ten Voorde, M A; Pruyn, J F A

    2005-08-01

    Although network formation is considered an effective method of stimulating the integrated delivery of palliative care, scientific evidence on the usefulness of network formation is scarce. In 1998 the Ministry of Health of The Netherlands started a 5-year stimulation program on palliative care by founding and funding six regional Centres for the Development of Palliative Care. These centers were structured around pivotal organizations such as university hospitals and comprehensive cancer centers. As part of the stimulation program a locoregional network model was introduced within each center for the Development of Palliative Care to integrate palliative care services in the Dutch health care system. We performed a study on network formation in the southwestern area of The Netherlands with 2.4 million inhabitants. The study aimed to answer the following questions: (1) how do networks in palliative care develop, which care providers participate and how do they function? (2) which are the achievements of the palliative care networks as perceived by their participants? (3) which are the success factors of the palliative care networks according to their participants and which factors predict the achievements? Between September 2000 and January 2004 eight local palliative care networks in the region of the Center for Development of Palliative Care-Rotterdam (southwestern area of The Netherlands) were closely followed to gain information on their characteristics and developmental course. At the start of the study semistructured interviews were held with the coordinators of the eight networks. The information from these interviews and from the network documents were used to constitute a questionnaire to assess the opinions and experiences of the network participants. According to the vast majority of responders, the most important reason to install the networks was the lack of integration between the existing local health care services. The networks were initiated to

  8. Pattern of palliative care, pain management and referral trends in patients receiving radiotherapy at a tertiary cancer center

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    Kuldeep Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain is a common primary symptom of advanced cancer and metastatic disease, occurring in 50-75% of all patients. Although palliative care and pain management are essential components in oncology practice, studies show that these areas are often inadequately addressed. Materials and Methods: We randomly selected 152 patients receiving palliative radiotherapy (PRT from October 2006 to August 2008, excluding metastatic bone lesions. Patients′ records were studied retrospectively. Results: A median follow-up of 21 weeks was available for 119 males and 33 females with a median age of 55 years. Maximum (60% patients were of head and neck cancers followed by esophagus (14%, lung (10% and others. Dysphagia, growth/ulcer and pain were the chief indications for PRT. Pain was present in 93 (61% cases out of which, 56 (60% were referred to pain clinic. All except one consulted pain clinic with a median pain score of 8 (0-10 point scale. Fifty-three of these 56 patients (96% received opioid-based treatment with adequate pain relief in 33% cases and loss of follow-up in 40% cases. Only five (3% cases were referred to a hospice. Twenty-two (14% cases were considered for radical treatment following excellent response to PRT. Conclusion: In this selective sample, the standard of analgesic treatment was found to be satisfactory. However, there is a lot of scope for improvement regarding referral to pain clinic and later to the hospice. Patients′ follow-up needs to be improved along with future studies evaluating those patients who were considered for further RT till radical dose. Programs to change the patients′ attitude towards palliative care, physicians′ (residents′ training to improve communication skills, and institutional policies may be promising strategies.

  9. [(Early) Palliative Care in Emergency Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spickermann, Maximilian; Lenz, Philipp

    2018-04-01

    At the end of life patients with a life-limiting disease are often admitted to emergency departments (ED). Mostly, in the setting of an ED there may not be enough time to meet the needs for palliative care (PC) of these patients. Therefore, integration of PC into the ED offers a solution to improve their treatment. In the outpatient setting a cooperation between prehospital emergency services, the patient's general practitioner and specialized outpatient PC teams may allow the patient to die at home - this is what most patients prefer at the end of life. Furthermore, due to the earlier integration of PC after admission the hospital stay is shortened. Also the number of PC consultations may increase. Additionally, a screening of PC hneeds among all patients visiting the ED may be beneficial: to avoid not meeting existing PC needs and to standardize the need of PC consultation. An example for such a screening tool is the "Palliative Care and Rapid Emergency Screening" (P-CaRES). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Palliative care and elderly health in Brazil

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    Angela Maria Amaral Soares Abou Ali

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years elderly population is increasing substantially, about 650,000 per year, as well as the concept of unifamílies, ie, families consisting of a single person. In this paper, is proposed a reflection about health of elderly in Brazil, and the conditions of a chronic disease and its acute state - terminal. In the actual society, capitalist and capitalized, the individual is valued by his production, losing his value when acquires a disabling illnesses. There is a growing need for work, and each time there is less time and resources to manage the permanence of an elderly patient at home, or pay for a caregiver. This situation leads families to resort to hospitalization, which in turn makes the hospitals overcrowded with patients in this state, affecting both emergency care as the treatment of chronic patients. This fact occurs due to lack of hospital infrastructure, as well by the lack of units of the healthy system capable of providing palliative care. The questioning about the elderly who need palliative care, and reflection about the type of care dispended for this kind of patient, should be the focal point of professional's reflections, capable to lead him to a new way of thinking and, consequently, to inspire him to act in a new way.

  11. Palliative radiation therapy for multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minowa, Yasushi; Sasai, Keisuke; Ishigaki, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1996-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a useful palliative modality for refractory lesions of multiple myeloma. It has been reported that total doses of 10 to 20 Gy are usually adequate to obtain some degree of pain relief. However, there are many patients who need additional doses to obtain sufficient pain relief. In this study. we retrospectively analyzed the records of patients with multiple myeloma irradiated at our department, in an attempt to develop an effective treatment policy for this disease. Twenty-nine patients with 53 lesions were treated between 1968 and 1993. Total irradiation doses were 4 to 60 Gy (median 40 Gy) with daily fractions of 2 Gy or less, and 16 to 51 Gy (median 30 Gy) with daily fractions greater than 2 Gy. Evaluated were 59 symptoms, including pain (68%), neurological abnormalities (15%), and masses (28%). Symptomatic remission was obtained in 33 of 36 (92%) lesions with pain, 6 of 8 (75%) with neurological abnormalities, and 13 of 15 (87%) mass lesions. Pain was partially relieved at a median TDF of 34, and completely at a median TDF of 66 (equivalent to 40-42 Gy with daily fractions of 2 Gy). Radiation therapy is an effective and palliative treatment method for symptomatic multiple myeloma. However, the treatment seems to require higher radiation doses than those reported to obtain adequate relief of symptoms. (author)

  12. The development of hospitalbased palliative care services in public hospitals in the Western Cape South Africa

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    L Gwyther

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With the recent approval of a South African (SA National Policy Framework and Strategy for Palliative Care by the National Health Council, it is pertinent to reflect on initiatives to develop palliative care services in public hospitals. This article reviews the development of hospital-based palliative care services in the Western Cape, SA. Palliative care services in SA started in the non-governmental sector in the 1980s. The first SA hospital-based palliative care team was established in Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital in 2001. The awareness of the benefit of palliative care in the hospital setting led to the development of isolated pockets of excellence providing palliative care in the public health sector in SA. This article describes models for palliative care at tertiary, provincial and district hospital level, which could inform development of hospital-based palliative care as the national policy for palliative care is implemented in SA.

  13. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Protocols in Major Urologic Surgery

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    Natalija Vukovic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the reviewThe analysis of the components of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS protocols in urologic surgery.Recent findingsERAS protocols has been studied for over 20 years in different surgical procedures, mostly in colorectal surgery. The concept of improving patient care and reducing postoperative complications was also applied to major urologic surgery and especially procedure of radical cystectomy. This procedure is technically challenging, due to a major surgical resection and high postoperative complication rate that may reach 65%. Several clinical pathways were introduced to improve perioperative course and reduce the length of hospital stay. These protocols differ from ERAS modalities in other surgeries. The reasons for this are longer operative time, increased risk of perioperative transfusion and infection, and urinary diversion achieved using transposed intestinal segments. Previous studies in this area analyzed the need for mechanical bowel preparation, postoperative nasogastric tube decompression, as well as the duration of urinary drainage. Furthermore, the attention has also been drawn to perioperative fluid optimization, pain management, and bowel function.SummaryNotwithstanding partial resemblance between the pathways in major urologic surgery and other pelvic surgeries, there are still scarce guidelines for ERAS protocols in urology, which is why further studies should assess the importance of preoperative medical optimization, implementation of thoracic epidural anesthesia and analgesia, and perioperative nutritional management.

  14. Radical production in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.; Akabani, G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes our effort to develop a metric for radiation exposure that is more fundamental than adsorbed dose and upon which a metric for exposure to chemicals could be based. This metric is based on the production of radicals by the two agents. Radicals produced by radiation in biological systems commonly assumed to be the same as those produced in water despite the presence of a variety of complex molecules. This may explain why the extensive efforts to describe the relationship between energy deposition (track structure) and molecular damage to DNA, based on the spectrum of radicals produced, have not been successful in explaining simple biological effects such as cell killing. Current models assume that DNA and its basic elements are immersed in water-like media and only model the production and diffusion of water-based radicals and their interaction with DNA structures; these models lack the cross sections associated with each macro-component of DNA and only treat water-based radicals. It has been found that such models are not realistic because DNA is not immersed in pure water. A computer code capable of simulating electron tracks, low-energy electrons, energy deposition in small molecules, and radical production and diffusion in water like media has been developed. This code is still in at a primitive stage and development is continuing. It is being used to study radical production by radiation, and radical diffusion and interactions in simple molecular systems following their production. We are extending the code to radical production by chemicals to complement our PBPK modeling efforts. It therefore has been developed primarily for use with radionuclides that are in biological materials, and not for radiation fields

  15. Feasibility of a rural palliative supportive service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesut, B; Hooper, B P; Robinson, C A; Bottorff, J L; Sawatzky, R; Dalhuisen, M

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare models for the delivery of palliative care to rural populations encounter common challenges: service gaps, the cost of the service in relation to the population, sustainability, and difficulty in demonstrating improvements in outcomes. Although it is widely agreed that a community capacity-building approach to rural palliative care is essential, how that approach can be achieved, evaluated and sustained remains in question. The purpose of this community-based research project is to test the feasibility and identify potential outcomes of implementing a rural palliative supportive service (RPaSS) for older adults living with life-limiting chronic illness and their family caregiver in the community. This paper reports on the feasibility aspects of the study. RPaSS is being conducted in two co-located rural communities with populations of approximately 10 000 and no specialized palliative services. Participants living with life-limiting chronic illness and their family caregivers are visited bi-weekly in the home by a nurse coordinator who facilitates symptom management, teaching, referrals, psychosocial and spiritual support, advance care planning, community support for practical tasks, and telephone-based support for individuals who must commute outside of the rural community for care. Mixed-method collection strategies are used to collect data on visit patterns; healthcare utilization; family caregiver needs; and participant needs, functional performance and quality of life. A community-based advisory committee worked with the investigative team over a 1-year period to plan RPaSS, negotiating the best fit between research methods and the needs of the community. Recruitment took longer than anticipated with service capacity being reached at 8 months. Estimated service capacity of one nurse coordinator, based on bi-weekly visits, is 25 participants and their family caregivers. A total of 393 in-person visits and 53 telephone visits were conducted between

  16. Guest Editorial: Processes of Radicalization and De-Radicalization

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    Donatella Della Porta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of radicalization and de-radicalization, understood as processes leading towards the increased or decreased use of political violence, is central to the question of how political violence emerges, how it can be prevented, and how it can be contained. The focus section of this issue of the International Journal of Conflict and Violence addresses radicalization and de-radicalization, seeking to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the processes, dynamics, and mechanisms involved and taking an interdisciplinary approach to overcome the fragmentation into separate disciplines and focus areas. Contributions by Pénélope Larzillière, Felix Heiduk, Bill Kissane, Hank Johnston, Christian Davenport and Cyanne Loyle, Veronique Dudouet, and Lasse Lindekilde address repressive settings, legitimacy, institutional aspects, organizational outcomes, and dynamics in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America.

  17. Redox properties of free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Results of electron transfer reactions observed and monitored by pulse radiolysis are reported. This technique allows determination of the first one-electron reduction or oxidation of a compound rather than the overall two-electron transfer usually reported. Pulse radiolysis allows the determination of absolute rate constants for reactions of free radicals and helps elucidate the mechanisms involved. Studies using this technique to study radicals derived from quinones, nitro compounds, pyridines, phenols, and anilines are reported. Radicals of biochemical interest arising from riboflavin, ascorbic acid, vitamin K 3 , vitamin E, MAD + , porphyrins, etc. have also been studied

  18. Hot wire radicals and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wengang; Gallagher, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Threshold ionization mass spectroscopy is used to measure radical (and stable gas) densities at the substrate of a tungsten hot wire (HW) reactor. We report measurements of the silane reaction probability on the HW and the probability of Si and H release from the HW. We describe a model for the atomic H release, based on the H 2 dissociation model. We note major variations in silicon-release, with dependence on prior silane exposure. Measured radical densities versus silane pressure yield silicon-silane and H-silane reaction rate coefficients, and the dominant radical fluxes to the substrate

  19. Establishment and preliminary outcomes of a palliative care research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter; Street, Annette; Graham, Suzanne; Aranda, Sanchia; O'Connor, Margaret; Thomas, Kristina; Jackson, Kate; Spruyt, Odette; Ugalde, Anna; Philip, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The difficulties in conducting palliative care research have been widely acknowledged. In order to generate the evidence needed to underpin palliative care provision, collaborative research is considered essential. Prior to formalizing the development of a research network for the state of Victoria, Australia, a preliminary study was undertaken to ascertain interest and recommendations for the design of such a collaboration. Three data-collection strategies were used: a cross-sectional questionnaire, interviews, and workshops. The questionnaire was completed by multidisciplinary palliative care specialists from across the state (n = 61); interviews were conducted with senior clinicians and academics (n = 21) followed by two stakeholder workshops (n = 29). The questionnaire was constructed specifically for this study, measuring involvement of and perceptions of palliative care research. Both the interview and the questionnaire data demonstrated strong support for a palliative care research network and aided in establishing a research agenda. The stakeholder workshops assisted with strategies for the formation of the Palliative Care Research Network Victoria (PCRNV) and guided the development of the mission and strategic plan. The research and efforts to date to establish the PCRNV are encouraging and provide optimism for the evolution of palliative care research in Australia. The international implications are highlighted.

  20. Music therapy for palliative care: A realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Tracey; Porter, Sam

    2017-08-01

    Music therapy has experienced a rising demand as an adjunct therapy for symptom management among palliative care patients. We conducted a realist review of the literature to develop a greater understanding of how music therapy might benefit palliative care patients and the contextual mechanisms that promote or inhibit its successful implementation. We searched electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase, Medline, and PsychINFO) for literature containing information on music therapy for palliative care. In keeping with the realist approach, we examined all relevant literature to develop theories that could explain how music therapy works. A total of 51 articles were included in the review. Music therapy was found to have a therapeutic effect on the physical, psychological, emotional, and spiritual suffering of palliative care patients. We also identified program mechanisms that help explain music therapy's therapeutic effects, along with facilitating contexts for implementation. Music therapy may be an effective nonpharmacological approach to managing distressing symptoms in palliative care patients. The findings also suggest that group music therapy may be a cost-efficient and effective way to support staff caring for palliative care patients. We encourage others to continue developing the evidence base in order to expand our understanding of how music therapy works, with the aim of informing and improving the provision of music therapy for palliative care patients.

  1. PALLIATIVE CARE IN GERIATRICS: CURRENT ISSUES AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Рonomareva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to identify the main problems and prospects of development of palliative care in geriatrics at the present stage. Method of research was to analyze the printed and electronic databases that meet the stated issues. The results of the study highlight the problems of the development of palliative care in geriatric practice: the lack of a developed procedure of rendering palliative care and adequate elderly patient selection criteria, the lack of trained professional staff. The main prospects-association of palliative practices and concepts of modern geriatrics required specialized geriatric assessment and the provision of clinical, medical, social and socio-psychological geriatric syndromes. While promising option for the development of palliative care geriatrics is the integration into the existing health care system, acceptance of the fact that it is a part of the specialized geriatric care. This requires the involvement and training of not only specialists with medical education, but also persons without medical training from among social workers and volunteers working in palliative care. Therefore, the obtained data allowed to conclude that topical is the development of palliative care in geriatrics, taking into account not only clinical but medico-social, socio-psychological features.

  2. Humor Assessment and Interventions in Palliative Care: A Systematic Review

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    Lisa M. Linge-Dahl

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The central goal of palliative care is to optimize the quality of life of patients suffering from life-limiting illnesses, which includes psychosocial and spiritual wellbeing. Research has demonstrated positive correlations between humor and laughter with life satisfaction and other aspects of wellbeing, and physiological symptoms can be improved by humorous stimuli.Objectives: The aim of this review is to evaluate humor interventions and assessments that have been applied in palliative care and to derive implications for future research.Methods: A systematic review of four databases identified 13 included studies. Criteria for inclusion were peer-reviewed English-language studies on humor interventions or assessments in a palliative care context.Results: Two studies on humor interventions and 11 studies on humor assessment were included in the systematic review. Most of these studies were about the patients' perspective on humor in palliative care. Findings showed that humor had a positive effect on patients, their relatives, and professional caregivers. Humor was widely perceived as appropriate and seen as beneficial to care in all studies.Conclusions: Even though humor interventions seem to be potentially useful in palliative care, descriptions evaluating their use are scarce. Overall, research on humor assessment and interventions in palliative care has remained limited in terms of quantity and quality. More research activities are needed to build a solid empirical foundation for implementing humor and laughter as part of regular palliative care activities.

  3. Core attitudes of professionals in palliative care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steffen T; Ramsenthaler, Christina; Bausewein, Claudia; Krischke, Norbert; Geiss, Gerlinde

    2009-08-01

    Self-awareness of one's own reactions towards patients and their relatives is of paramount importance for all professionals in palliative care. 'Core attitude' describes the way in which a person perceives himself and the world, and forms the basis for his actions and thoughts. The aim of this study is to explore what core attitude means for palliative care professionals and whether there is a specific core attitude in palliative care. Qualitative study with 10 face-to-face in-depth interviews with experts in palliative care (nurses, physicians, social workers, psychologists, chaplain) in Germany. Core attitude in palliative care can be best described with the following three domains: 1) personal characteristics; 2) experience of care; and 3) competence in care. Authenticity is the most important characteristic of professionals, along with honesty and mindfulness. Core attitude primarily becomes apparent in the relationship with the patient. Perception and listening are key competences. The experts emphasized the universality of the core attitude in the care of ill people. They stressed the importance and relevance of teaching core attitudes in palliative care education. In the field of palliative care, core attitude consists predominately of authenticity, manifests itself in relationships, and requires a high degree of perceptiveness.

  4. PROGRAM OF PALLIATIVE CANCER CARE – OUR EXPERIENCE

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    Iva Slánská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Annually more than 27,000 persons die of cancer in the Czech Republic and the overall incidence of malignancies is still increasing. These data shows the need for affordable and good follow-up care especially for patients without any cancer treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Currently the outpatient palliative cancer care gets more into the forefront. Prerequisite for a well working outpatient palliative care is cooperation with general practitioners and home health care agencies. The purpose of the so called program of palliative cancer care is to guide a patient in palliative cancer care and to improve the cooperation among health care providers. Methods: During the period from January 2008 to October 2010 we evaluated in patient without any oncology treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Results: In palliative outpatient clinic we treated 446 patients, 119 of them received home care services with average length of 27.8 days. 77 patients died at home, 51 in health facilities and 41 in inpatient hospice care. Conclusion: We present pilot study focusing on outpatient palliative cancer care which shows the real benefit from early indication of palliative cancer care. This type of care allows patients to stay as long as possible at home among their close relatives.

  5. Approach to Rectal Cancer Surgery

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    Terence C. Chua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rectal cancer is a distinct subset of colorectal cancer where specialized disease-specific management of the primary tumor is required. There have been significant developments in rectal cancer surgery at all stages of disease in particular the introduction of local excision strategies for preinvasive and early cancers, standardized total mesorectal excision for resectable cancers incorporating preoperative short- or long-course chemoradiation to the multimodality sequencing of treatment. Laparoscopic surgery is also increasingly being adopted as the standard rectal cancer surgery approach following expertise of colorectal surgeons in minimally invasive surgery gained from laparoscopic colon resections. In locally advanced and metastatic disease, combining chemoradiation with radical surgery may achieve total eradication of disease and disease control in the pelvis. Evidence for resection of metastases to the liver and lung have been extensively reported in the literature. The role of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for peritoneal metastases is showing promise in achieving locoregional control of peritoneal dissemination. This paper summarizes the recent developments in approaches to rectal cancer surgery at all these time points of the disease natural history.

  6. Palliative and end-of-life care in South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Mary E; Kerkvliet, Jennifer L; Mitchell, Amanda; Fahrenwald, Nancy L

    2014-05-01

    Geographical disparities play a significant role in palliative and end-of-life care access. This study assessed availability of palliative and end of life (hospice) care in South Dakota. Grounded in a conceptual model of advance care planning, this assessment explored whether South Dakota health care facilities had contact persons for palliative care, hospice services, and advance directives; health care providers with specialized training in palliative and hospice care; and a process for advance directives and advance care planning. Trained research assistants conducted a brief telephone survey. Of 668 health care eligible facilities, 455 completed the survey for a response rate of 68 percent (455 out of 668). Over one-half of facilities had no specific contact person for palliative care, hospice services and advance directives. Nursing homes reported the highest percentage of contacts for palliative care, hospice services and advance directives. Despite a lack of a specific contact person, nearly 75 percent of facilities reported having a process in place for addressing advance directives with patients; slightly over one-half (53 percent) reported having a process in place for advance care planning. Of participating facilities, 80 percent had no staff members with palliative care training, and 73 percent identified lack of staff members with end-of-life care training. Palliative care training was most commonly reported among hospice/home health facilities (45 percent). The results of this study demonstrate a clear need for a health care and allied health care workforce with specialized training in palliative and end-of-life care.

  7. Palliative care in home care: perceptions of occupational therapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séfora Gomez Portela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed at understanding and reflecting on the perceptions of occupational therapists regarding the implementation of palliative care in home care. This is an exploratory, qualitative study, through semi-structured interviews, conducted in the second semester of 2012 with eight occupational therapists with experience in palliative care in the city of São Paulo. Content analysis identified four themes: characterization and professional trajectory in the field, understanding the concepts of palliative care, home care and palliative care, and occupational therapy and palliative care in home care. The results suggest that the role of the occupational therapist in this field has taken place at different levels of health care, being addressed to people with varying needs. The use of the concept of palliative care by the interviewees exceeds the notion of end of life, following the changes in the epidemiological transition. They understand that professional services follow the trend of national palliative care services with focus on specialized levels, but manifest the importance of its implementation in primary and home care. Among the barriers to practice, they identified the complexity of “being at home “, peculiarities of palliative care with high cost demands, lack of infrastructure and implementation of the current policy. Professional training and scientific roduction in the area were viewed as inadequate, although they identified a call for change. The interviewees recognized palliative care in home care as a strong professional field, but one still requiring study and discussions regarding its limits and conditions of implementation, especially in the Unified Health System.

  8. Evaluation of the efficiency of combination palliative treatment in patients with metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Borisov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Experience with combination treatment, i.e. systemic therapy in combination with palliative surgery, in the treatment of metastatic kidney cancer is very rarely described in world literature.Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of combination treatment in combination with palliative cytoreductive surgery and targeted therapy and to define optimal indications for combination treatment.Subjects and methods. Data on 47 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC who received systemic (targeted therapy in combination or after incomplete cytoreduction (iCR were analyzed in this retrospective study. The proportion of men and women was 72.3 % and 27.7 %, respectively; their ratio was 2.6:1. All the patients (100% underwent surgical treatment as nephrectomy or kidney resection for primary tumor. In the patients who had received radical treatment in different periods, the median relapse-free survival was 25.3 (0-187 months; the mean follow-up duration in the study was 33.2 (27.4–39.0 months. Out of the histological characteristics of a primary tumor, its Fuhrman grade was studied. Prior to initiation of mRCC therapy, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC prognosis groups were assessed; the patients were divided into good (n = 9 (19.1 %, interim (n = 28 (59.6 %, and bad (n = 10 (21.3 % prognosis groups. Their total somatic status was separately rated using the ECOG scale: 0, (n = 10 (21.3%, 1 (n = 24 (51.1 %, and 2, (n = 13 (27.6 %. The sites of metastases were as follows: the lung (n = 29, bones (n = 18, adrenals (n = 11, recurrence in the removed kidney bed (n = 10, and liver (n = 10. Multiple organ involvements were detected in 22 (46.8 % patients. There were more than 5 metastases in one organ in 18 (40.0 % patients and only 15 (33.3 % were found to have a single focus in one organ. Whether iCR might be used as a separate line treatment was studied. A comparative analysis was made between 2 groups of

  9. A randomised, multicentre clinical trial of specialised palliative care plus standard treatment versus standard treatment alone for cancer patients with palliative care needs: the Danish palliative care trial (DanPaCT) protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna Thit; Damkier, Anette; Vejlgaard, Tove Bahn

    2013-01-01

    Advanced cancer patients experience considerable symptoms, problems, and needs. Early referral of these patients to specialised palliative care (SPC) could improve their symptoms and problems.The Danish Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) investigates whether patients with metastatic cancer, who report...... palliative needs in a screening, will benefit from being referred to 'early SPC'....

  10. Parameters of two-dimensional perineal ultrasonography for evaluation of urinary incontinence after Radical Prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Danilo Souza Lima da Costa Cruz; Carlos Arturo Levi D’Ancona; Jamal Baracat; Marco Antonio Dionisio Alves; Marcelo Cartapatti; Ronaldo Damião

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Urinary incontinence remains a major concern for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Its prevalence can reach 20% in the late postoperative period. Materials and Methods This clinical study investigated the differences of a dynamic evaluation of the urethra and pelvic floor contraction using perineal ultrasound in men without prostate surgery and in men submitted to radical prostatectomy with and without stress urinary incontinence. Ninety two male patients were includ...

  11. The proportionate value of proportionality in palliative sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jeffrey T

    2014-01-01

    Proportionality, as it pertains to palliative sedation, is the notion that sedation should be induced at the lowest degree effective for symptom control, so that the patient's consciousness may be preserved. The pursuit of proportionality in palliative sedation is a widely accepted imperative advocated in position statements and guidelines on this treatment. The priority assigned to the pursuit of proportionality, and the extent to which it is relevant for patients who qualify for palliative sedation, have been overstated. Copyright 2014 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  12. Radical Change by Entrepreneurial Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Nancy C

    1998-01-01

    .... Radical change by entrepreneurial design then becomes the focal point, in order to acquaint the reader with the strategies and tactics of well-known entrepreneurs who have been successful in molding...

  13. Penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Ralph, David

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy (RP) is believed to include neuropraxia, which leads to temporarily reduced oxygenation and subsequent structural changes in penile tissue. This results in veno-occlusive dysfunction, therefore, penile rehabilitation programmes...

  14. The evolution of robotic general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E B

    2009-01-01

    Surgical robotics in general surgery has a relatively short but very interesting evolution. Just as minimally invasive and laparoscopic techniques have radically changed general surgery and fractionated it into subspecialization, robotic technology is likely to repeat the process of fractionation even further. Though it appears that robotics is growing more quickly in other specialties, the changes digital platforms are causing in the general surgical arena are likely to permanently alter general surgery. This review examines the evolution of robotics in minimally invasive general surgery looking forward to a time where robotics platforms will be fundamental to elective general surgery. Learning curves and adoption techniques are explored. Foregut, hepatobiliary, endocrine, colorectal, and bariatric surgery will be examined as growth areas for robotics, as well as revealing the current uses of this technology.

  15. Should palliative care patients' hope be truthful, helpful or valuable? An interpretative synthesis of literature describing healthcare professionals' perspectives on hope of palliative care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsman, E.; Leget, C.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; Willems, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare professionals? perspectives on palliative care patients? hope influence communication. However, these perspectives have hardly been examined. Aim: To describe healthcare professionals? perspectives on palliative care patients? hope found in the literature. Design: The

  16. Should palliative care patients' hope be truthful, helpful or valuable? An interpretative synthesis of literature describing healthcare professionals' perspectives on hope of palliative care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsman, Erik; Leget, Carlo; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje; Willems, Dick

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare professionals' perspectives on palliative care patients' hope influence communication. However, these perspectives have hardly been examined. To describe healthcare professionals' perspectives on palliative care patients' hope found in the literature. The interpretative synthesis

  17. Radical prostatectomy. Results and indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacqmin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy is the surgical curative treatment of localized prostate cancer. The survival is good in young patients (<70) with T2 N0M0 tumors and more than 10 year's life expectancy. Side-effects are urinary incontinence, impotence and anastomosis stricture. Quality of life should be considered as an important factor for the choice of the patient between radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy and follow-up. (author)

  18. Radical Islamism and Failed Developmentalism

    OpenAIRE

    Rahnema, Saeed

    2008-01-01

    The rise of radical Islamism in recent years does not limit the applicability of the concept of cultural nationalism. Rather the two are intertwined in ways which this article will attempt to highlight. Islam took specific national forms as modern nation-states arose and the contemporary resurgence of radical Islamism also follows that modern pattern. I examine the emergence of the three most important movements in the Islamic world, namely, the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, Jama'at-e Islami i...

  19. Attitudes of palliative home care physicians towards palliative sedation at home in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Masedu, Francesco; Mercadante, Alessandro; Marinangeli, Franco; Aielli, Federica

    2017-05-01

    Information about the attitudes towards palliative sedation (PS) at home is limited. The aim of this survey was to assess the attitudes of palliative care physicians in Italy regarding PS at home. A questionnaire was submitted to a sample of palliative care physicians, asking information about their activity and attitudes towards PS at home. This is a survey of home care physicians in Italy who were involved in end-of-life care decisions at home. One hundred and fifty participants responded. A large heterogeneity of home care organizations that generate some problems was found. Indications, intention and monitoring of PS seem to be appropriate, although some cultural and logistic conditions were limiting the use of PS. Specialized home care physicians are almost involved to start PS at home. Midazolam was seldom available at home and opioids were more frequently used. These data should prompt health care agencies to make a minimal set of drugs easily available for home care. Further research is necessary to compare attitudes in countries with different sociocultural profiles.

  20. Differential Family Experience of Palliative Sedation Therapy in Specialized Palliative or Critical Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui-Shan; Chen, Szu-Yin; Cheung, Denise Shuk Ting; Wang, Shu-Yi; Lee, Jung Jae; Lin, Chia-Chin

    2018-02-21

    No study has examined the varying family experience of palliative sedation therapy (PST) for terminally ill patients in different settings. To examine and compare family concerns about PST use and its effect on the grief suffered by terminally ill patients' families in palliative care units (PCUs) or intensive care units (ICUs). A total of 154 family members of such patients were recruited in Taiwan, of whom 143 completed the study, with 81 from the PCU and 62 from the ICU. Data were collected on their concerns regarding PST during recruitment. Grief levels were assessed at three days and one month after the patient's death with the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief. Families' major concern about sedated patients in the PCU was that "there might be other ways to relieve symptoms" (90.2%), whereas families of ICU sedated patients gave the highest ratings to "feeling they still had something more to do" (93.55%), and "the patient's sleeping condition was not dignified" (93.55%). Family members recruited from the ICU tended to experience more grief than those from the PCU (P = 0.005 at Day 3 and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. When there are no good choices: illuminating the borderland between proportionate palliative sedation and palliative sedation to unconsciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Thomas T; Demme, Richard A; Quill, Timothy E

    2011-01-01

    Despite state-of-the-art palliative care, some patients will require proportionate palliative sedation as a last-resort option to relieve intolerable suffering at the end of life. In this practice, progressively increasing amounts of sedation are provided until the target suffering is sufficiently relieved. Uncertainty and debate arise when this practice approaches palliative sedation to unconsciousness (PSU), especially when unconsciousness is specifically intended or when the target symptoms are more existential than physical. We constructed a case series designed to highlight some of the common approaches and challenges associated with PSU and the more aggressive end of the spectrum of proportionate palliative sedation as retrospectively identified by palliative care consultants over the past 5 years from a busy inpatient palliative care service at a tertiary medical center in Rochester (NY, USA). Ten cases were identified as challenging by the palliative care attendings, of which four were selected for presentation for illustrative purposes because they touched on central issues including loss of capacity, the role of existential suffering, the complexity of clinical intention, the role of an institutional policy and use of anesthetics as sedative agents. Two other cases were selected focusing on responses to two special situations: a request for PSU that was rejected; and anticipatory planning for total sedation in the future. Although relatively rare, PSU and more aggressive end-of-the-spectrum proportionate palliative sedation represent responses to some of the most challenging cases faced by palliative care clinicians. These complex cases clearly require open communication and collaboration among caregivers, patients and family. Knowing how to identify these circumstances, and how to approach these interventions of last resort are critical skills for practitioners who take care of patients at the end of life.

  2. PALLIATIVE BRONCHOSCOPIC TREATMENT OF TUMOUR CENTRAL AIRWAYS STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Debeljak

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. This article presents our three year experience with bronchoscopic management of central bronchial tumours stenosis.Methods. In the years 2000, 2001, and 2002, 52 patients (43 men, 9 women, aged 62.3 ± 10.8 years with central airway obstruction because of primary or secondary malignant tumours in 47 cases (90% and benign diseases in 5 (10% were treated. Topical anaesthesia with Lidocaine in all 52 patients where flexible bronchoscopes Olympus were applied was used. Additionally, Fentanyl or Diprivane were used in 25 patients where rigid bronchoscopy (Storz was performed. Mechanical removal and electrocautery resection (Olympus were used for tumour resection. In 2 patients Polyflex stent (Rüsch was introduced into the trachea.Results. We treated 17 (33% tumours in the trachea, 14 (27% in the right, 15 (29% in the left main bronchi and 6 (11% in more peripheral bronchi. The combination of mechanical removal and electrocautery was applied in 32 (61%, mechanical removal alone in 4 (8% and electrocautery alone in 16 (31% of patients. Symptomatic relief was achieved in 41 (79% patients. In 47 patients with malignant tumours bronchoscopic intervention was applied during the first diagnostic procedure 28 times (60%, after additional surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy 14 times (30% and between additional therapeutic interventions 5 times (10%. The procedure had to be terminated in one patient due to hypoxemia. There was no immediate mortality.Conclusions. Mechanical desobstruction in combination with electrocautery through the flexible and/or rigid bronchoscopes and stent introduction in patients with central airways tumours are efficient and rather safe palliative procedures.

  3. Predicting death from surgery for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Dowd, Emma L; Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Baldwin, David R

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Current British guidelines advocate the use of risk prediction scores such as Thoracoscore to estimate mortality prior to radical surgery for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A recent publication used the National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA) to produce a score to predict 90day mortali...

  4. Learning curve for radical retropubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando J. A. Saito

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The learning curve is a period in which the surgical procedure is performed with difficulty and slowness, leading to a higher risk of complications and reduced effectiveness due the surgeon's inexperience. We sought to analyze the residents' learning curve for open radical prostatectomy (RP in a training program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective study from June 2006 to January 2008 in the academic environment of the University of São Paulo. Five residents operated on 184 patients during a four-month rotation in the urologic oncology division, mentored by the same physician assistants. We performed sequential analyses according to the number of surgeries, as follows: = 10, 11 to 19, 20 to 28, and = 29. RESULTS: The residents performed an average of 37 RP each. The average psa was 9.3 ng/mL and clinical stage T1c in 71% of the patients. The pathological stage was pT2 (73%, pT3 (23%, pT4 (4%, and 46% of the patients had a Gleason score 7 or higher. In all surgeries, the average operative time and estimated blood loss was 140 minutes and 488 mL. Overall, 7.2% of patients required blood transfusion, and 23% had positive surgical margins. CONCLUSION: During the initial RP learning curve, we found a significant reduction in the operative time; blood transfusion during the procedures and positive surgical margin rate were stable in our series.

  5. Predictors of Complications and Mortality in Patients with Self-Expanding Metallic Stents for the Palliation of Malignant Colonic Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Mafalda; Pinho, Rolando; Proença, Luísa; Silva, Joana; Ponte, Ana; Rodrigues, Jaime; Carvalho, João

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) for palliative purposes in malignant colonic obstruction are an alternative to surgery that has gained popularity over time. Methods We performed a retrospective study of patients submitted to SEMS for palliation of obstructing malignant colorectal cancer from 2005 to 2015 to evaluate predictive clinical factors for complications and mortality. Results Forty-five patients with high rates of technical and clinical success were included (97.8 and 95.6%, respectively), with complications occurring in 17.8% (8.9% perforations, 4.4% obstructions, and 4.4% migrations). The length of the stenosis was superior in patients with complications (p = 0.01); 11.1% of patients had a re-intervention (2.2% surgery and 8.9% placement of another SEMS). Relief of obstruction without intervention was maintained until death in 77.8% of patients and in 81.4% of patients who had immediate clinical success. The mortality rate was 37.2% at 30 days, 56.5% at 60 days, and 87.5% at 1 year. There were no predictors of survival identified, including age, sex, tumor stage, metastasis, or complications of the procedure. Discussion and Conclusions In this study, SEMS placement was associated with a high rate of technical and clinical success and a low rate of complications, being an option to palliate patients with obstructive neoplasia. The length of the stenosis was associated with a greater risk of complications. The majority of stent-related complications can be managed successfully without surgery. PMID:28848796

  6. Family conference in palliative care: concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rudval Souza da; Trindade, Géssica Sodré Sampaio; Paixão, Gilvânia Patrícia do Nascimento; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes da

    2018-01-01

    to analyze the attributes, antecedents and consequents of the family conference concept. Walker and Avante's method for concept analysis and the stages of the integrative review process, with a selection of publications in the PubMed, Cinahl and Lilacs databases focusing on the family conference theme in the context of palliative care. the most cited antecedents were the presence of doubts and the need to define a care plan. Family reunion and working instrument were evidenced as attributes. With respect to consequents, to promote the effective communication and to establish a plan of consensual action were the most remarkable elements. the scarcity of publications on the subject was observed, as well as and the limitation of the empirical studies to the space of intensive therapy. Thus, by analyzing the attributes, antecedents and consequents of the concept it was possible to follow their evolution and to show their efficacy and effectiveness as a therapeutic intervention.

  7. Specialized palliative care in advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmenlund, Kristina; Sjogren, Per; Nordly, Mie

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Due to the multiple physical, psychological, existential, and social symptoms involved, patients with advanced cancer often have a reduced quality of life (QoL), which requires specialized palliative care (SPC) interventions. The primary objective of the present systematic review...... was to review the existing literature about SPC and its effect on QoL, on physical and psychological symptoms, and on survival in adult patients with advanced cancer. Method: We utilized a search strategy based on the PICO (problem/population, intervention, comparison, and outcome) framework and employed....... The evidence in this field of study in general is still nascent, but there is growing support for the utilization of SPC to improve the quality of life of adult patients with advanced cancer. The evidence that SPC reduces physical and psychological symptoms is moderate, while the evidence that it prolongs...

  8. The Palliative Radiotherapy in Bone Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Min; Lee, Hyung Sik; Hur, Won Joo

    1994-01-01

    To objectively compare the response of the palliative radiotherapy in bone metastatic patients which decreases pain and prevents pathologic fractures, we introduced and applied the RTOG pain and narcotic measure system. From Oct in 1991 to July in 1993, thirty-two patients with painful bone metastases, 17 of them were solitary lesions and others were multiple lesions, were treated with mainly 6 MV photon otherwise 15 MV photon. Radiation doses to bone metastatic sites ranged about from 2000 to 4600cGy. Responses of radiation therapy were compared with days of pre-RT, RT finish, 3, 6, 9 months after the start of RT and solitary versus multiple lesions and follow up scores according to the RTOG measure system. Survival analysis was done. Pain and narcotic score of the entire patients were 7.3, 7.8 at the pre-RT period and 2.6, 3.9 at the immediate or 2 weeks after RT, which was 64%, 50% decrement compared with the pre-RT score. Pain scores of 3, 6 and 9 months after the beginning of irradiation were 3.6, 3.7 and 3.3. The best response found in the breast and prostate primaries was 84%, 78% decrement of pain score as compared with pre-RT score (statistically insignificant). Median survival was 5.5 months and mean survival was 5 months. We conclude that the RTOG pain and narcotic measure system in relatively effective scale in the comparison of before and after palliative irradiation to the painful bone metastatic sites but more detailed parameters will be required in the narcotic scoring system. More aggressive but less or similar toxic radiotherapy is needed in the patients having relatively long life expected time

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws ... out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws ...

  10. Improving communication on hope in palliative care. A qualitative study of palliative care professionals' metaphors of hope: grip, source, tune, and vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsman, Erik; Duggleby, Wendy; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl; Willems, Dick; Gagnon, Judith; Kruizinga, Renske; Leget, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Hope is important in palliative care. However, palliative care professionals' perspectives on hope are not well understood. Metaphors of hope are a way of better understanding these perspectives. To describe palliative care professionals' perspectives on hope by examining the hope metaphors they

  11. Radiotherapy enhances laser palliation of malignant dysphagia: a randomised study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargeant, I.R.; Thorpe, S.; Glover, J.R.; Bown, S.G. [National Medical Laser Centre, London (United Kingdom); Tobias, J.S.; Blackman, G. [University Coll., London (United Kingdom). Meyerstein Inst. of Oncology

    1997-03-01

    A major drawback of laser endoscopy in the palliation of malignant dysphagia is the need for repeated treatments. This study was designed to test whether external beam radiotherapy would reduce the necessity for repeated laser therapy. (author).

  12. Why Palliative Care for Children is Preferable to Euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Brian S

    2016-02-01

    Recent laws in Europe now allow for pediatric euthanasia. The author reviews some rationale for caution, and addresses why ensuring the availability of pediatric palliative care is an important step before allowing pediatric euthanasia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Laser photocoagulation in the palliation of colorectal malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, E. M.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1986-01-01

    Besides surgical intervention, there are virtually no palliative treatment modalities available for bleeding and/or obstructing colorectal malignancy. The usefulness and safety of laser photocoagulation was prospectively investigated in 63 patients with colorectal cancer. The merits were evaluated

  14. [eLearning service for home palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuyama, Toshikazu; Komatsu, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Daisuke; Fukushima, Osamu

    2008-12-01

    In order to support the home palliative care learning, we made the eLearning service for home palliative care (beta version) and tried to teach the palliative care to the medical staffs in the community. The various learners (such as nurses, pharmacists and the like) accessed to the online learning and used this eLearning service. After the learners finished eLearning for home palliative care, some questionnaires were distributed to the learners and analyzed by us. The analysis of questionnaires revealed that almost all were satisfied with our eLearning services. Especially the learners were not only interested in using the skills of opioids and the management of pain control, but they had a good cognition for the usage of opioids.

  15. Radiotherapy enhances laser palliation of malignant dysphagia: a randomised study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargeant, I.R.; Thorpe, S.; Glover, J.R.; Bown, S.G.; Tobias, J.S.; Blackman, G.

    1997-01-01

    A major drawback of laser endoscopy in the palliation of malignant dysphagia is the need for repeated treatments. This study was designed to test whether external beam radiotherapy would reduce the necessity for repeated laser therapy. (author)

  16. Using communication skills for difficult conversations in palliative care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-02

    Jul 2, 2011 ... research interests in primary palliative care and medical education. LINDa gaNca ... professional nurse administers medication and gives nursing care, the social worker .... future communication in the therapeutic relationship.

  17. The role of dentist in palliative care team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani P Mol

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The palliative doctor gives the ′touch of God′ as he/she takes care of the terminally ill patient. The oncologist encounters great difficulties in managing oral cavity problems of these patients. A trained dental doctor can help other doctors in dealing with these situations. But the general dental surgeon does not have enough idea about his part in these treatments. The community is also unaware of the role that a nearby dentist can play. Adequate training programs have to be conducted and awareness has to be created. A trained dentist will be a good team mate for the oncologist or radiotherapist or other doctors of the palliative care team. In this paper, a brief attempt is made to list a few areas in which a palliative care dentist can help other members of the palliative care team and also the patient in leading a better life.

  18. Understanding the concept and challenges of palliative care medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-06-25

    Jun 25, 2015 ... 2 Nephrology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Federal Medical Centre Umuahia, Abia ... Key words: Palliative care, pain control, hospice, spirituality, cancer, end-stage organ ... surgeons, nurses, pharmacists, laboratory.

  19. Cooperating with a palliative home-care team

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Palliative home-care teams often cooperate with general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses. Our aim was to evaluate a palliative home-care team from the viewpoint of GPs and district nurses. METHODS: GPs and district nurses received questionnaires at the start of home-care and one...... month later. Questions focussed on benefits to patients, training issues for professionals and cooperation between the home-care team and the GP/ district nurse. A combination of closed- and open-ended questions was used. RESULTS: Response rate was 84% (467/553). Benefits to patients were experienced...... by 91 %, mainly due to improvement in symptom management, 'security', and accessibility of specialists in palliative care. After one month, 57% of the participants reported to have learnt aspects of palliative care, primarily symptom control, and 89% of them found cooperation satisfactory...

  20. Smarter palliative care for cancer: Use of smartphone applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Rani Jamwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones are technologically advanced mobile phone devices which use software similar to computer-based devices as a user-friendly interface. This review article is aimed to inform the palliative care professionals, cancer patients and their caregivers about the role of smartphone applications (apps in the delivery of palliative care services, through a brief review of existing literature on the development, feasibility, analysis, and effectiveness of such apps. There is a dearth need for sincere palliative care clinicians to work together with software professionals to develop the suitable smartphone apps in accordance with the family/caregivers' necessities and patients' biopsychosocial characteristics that influence the technology driven evidence informed palliative cancer care.