WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiative transfer code

  1. History of one family of atmospheric radiative transfer codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gail P.; Wang, Jinxue; Hoke, Michael L.; Kneizys, F. X.; Chetwynd, James H., Jr.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Kimball, L. M.; McClatchey, Robert A.; Shettle, Eric P.; Clough, Shepard (.; Gallery, William O.; Abreu, Leonard W.; Selby, John E. A.

    1994-12-01

    Beginning in the early 1970's, the then Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory initiated a program to develop computer-based atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms. The first attempts were translations of graphical procedures described in a 1970 report on The Optical Properties of the Atmosphere, based on empirical transmission functions and effective absorption coefficients derived primarily from controlled laboratory transmittance measurements. The fact that spectrally-averaged atmospheric transmittance (T) does not obey the Beer-Lambert Law (T equals exp(-(sigma) (DOT)(eta) ), where (sigma) is a species absorption cross section, independent of (eta) , the species column amount along the path) at any but the finest spectral resolution was already well known. Band models to describe this gross behavior were developed in the 1950's and 60's. Thus began LOWTRAN, the Low Resolution Transmittance Code, first released in 1972. This limited initial effort has how progressed to a set of codes and related algorithms (including line-of-sight spectral geometry, direct and scattered radiance and irradiance, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, etc.) that contain thousands of coding lines, hundreds of subroutines, and improved accuracy, efficiency, and, ultimately, accessibility. This review will include LOWTRAN, HITRAN (atlas of high-resolution molecular spectroscopic data), FASCODE (Fast Atmospheric Signature Code), and MODTRAN (Moderate Resolution Transmittance Code), their permutations, validations, and applications, particularly as related to passive remote sensing and energy deposition.

  2. Atmospheric radiative transfer modeling: a summary of the AER codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clough, S.A. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Shephard, M.W. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States)]. E-mail: mshephar@aer.com; Mlawer, E.J. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Delamere, J.S. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Iacono, M.J. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Cady-Pereira, K. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Boukabara, S. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Brown, P.D. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The radiative transfer models developed at AER are being used extensively for a wide range of applications in the atmospheric sciences. This communication is intended to provide a coherent summary of the various radiative transfer models and associated databases publicly available from AER (http://www.rtweb.aer.com). Among the communities using the models are the remote sensing community (e.g. TES, IASI), the numerical weather prediction community (e.g. ECMWF, NCEP GFS, WRF, MM5), and the climate community (e.g. ECHAM5). Included in this communication is a description of the central features and recent updates for the following models: the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM); the line file creation program (LNFL); the longwave and shortwave rapid radiative transfer models, RRTM{sub L}W and RRTM{sub S}W; the Monochromatic Radiative Transfer Model (MonoRTM); the MT{sub C}KD Continuum; and the Kurucz Solar Source Function. LBLRTM and the associated line parameter database (e.g. HITRAN 2000 with 2001 updates) play a central role in the suite of models. The physics adopted for LBLRTM has been extensively analyzed in the context of closure experiments involving the evaluation of the model inputs (e.g. atmospheric state), spectral radiative measurements and the spectral model output. The rapid radiative transfer models are then developed and evaluated using the validated LBLRTM model.

  3. Radiation heat transfer model for the SCDAP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohal, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    A radiation heat transfer model has been developed for severe fuel damage analysis which accounts for anisotropic effects of reflected radiation. The model simplifies the view factor calculation which results in significant savings in computational cost with little loss of accuracy. Radiation heat transfer rates calculated by the isotropic and anisotropic models compare reasonably well with those calculated by other models. The model is applied to an experimental nuclear rod bundle during a slow boiloff of the coolant liquid, a situation encountered during a loss of coolant accident with severe fuel damage. At lower temperatures and also lower temperature gradients in the core, the anisotropic effect was not found to be significant

  4. FORLI radiative transfer and retrieval code for IASI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtmans, D.; Coheur, P.-F.; Wespes, C.; Clarisse, L.; Scharf, O.; Clerbaux, C.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; George, M.; Turquety, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper lays down the theoretical bases and the methods used in the Fast Optimal Retrievals on Layers for IASI (FORLI) software, which is developed and maintained at the “Université Libre de Bruxelles” (ULB) with the support of the “Laboratoire Atmosphères, Milieux, Observations Spatiales” (LATMOS) to process radiance spectra from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) in the perspective of local to global chemistry applications. The forward radiative transfer model (RTM) and the retrieval approaches are formulated and numerical approximations are described. The aim of FORLI is near-real-time provision of global scale concentrations of trace gases from IASI, either integrated over the altitude range of the atmosphere (total columns) or vertically resolved. To this end, FORLI uses precalculated table of absorbances. At the time of writing three gas-specific versions of this algorithm have been set up: FORLI-CO, FORLI-O 3 and FORLI-HNO 3 . The performances of each are reviewed and illustrations of results and early validations are provided, making the link to recent scientific publications. In this paper we stress the challenges raised by near-real-time processing of IASI, shortly describe the processing chain set up at ULB and draw perspectives for future developments and applications.

  5. General relativistic radiative transfer code in rotating black hole space-time: ARTIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Rohta; Umemura, Masayuki

    2017-02-01

    We present a general relativistic radiative transfer code, ARTIST (Authentic Radiative Transfer In Space-Time), that is a perfectly causal scheme to pursue the propagation of radiation with absorption and scattering around a Kerr black hole. The code explicitly solves the invariant radiation intensity along null geodesics in the Kerr-Schild coordinates, and therefore properly includes light bending, Doppler boosting, frame dragging, and gravitational redshifts. The notable aspect of ARTIST is that it conserves the radiative energy with high accuracy, and is not subject to the numerical diffusion, since the transfer is solved on long characteristics along null geodesics. We first solve the wavefront propagation around a Kerr black hole that was originally explored by Hanni. This demonstrates repeated wavefront collisions, light bending, and causal propagation of radiation with the speed of light. We show that the decay rate of the total energy of wavefronts near a black hole is determined solely by the black hole spin in late phases, in agreement with analytic expectations. As a result, the ARTIST turns out to correctly solve the general relativistic radiation fields until late phases as t ˜ 90 M. We also explore the effects of absorption and scattering, and apply this code for a photon wall problem and an orbiting hotspot problem. All the simulations in this study are performed in the equatorial plane around a Kerr black hole. The ARTIST is the first step to realize the general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics.

  6. Python Radiative Transfer Emission code (PyRaTE): non-LTE spectral lines simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritsis, A.; Yorke, H.; Tassis, K.

    2018-05-01

    We describe PyRaTE, a new, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) line radiative transfer code developed specifically for post-processing astrochemical simulations. Population densities are estimated using the escape probability method. When computing the escape probability, the optical depth is calculated towards all directions with density, molecular abundance, temperature and velocity variations all taken into account. A very easy-to-use interface, capable of importing data from simulations outputs performed with all major astrophysical codes, is also developed. The code is written in PYTHON using an "embarrassingly parallel" strategy and can handle all geometries and projection angles. We benchmark the code by comparing our results with those from RADEX (van der Tak et al. 2007) and against analytical solutions and present case studies using hydrochemical simulations. The code will be released for public use.

  7. Fast algorithm for two-dimensional data table use in hydrodynamic and radiative-transfer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slattery, W.L.; Spangenberg, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    A fast algorithm for finding interpolated atomic data in irregular two-dimensional tables with differing materials is described. The algorithm is tested in a hydrodynamic/radiative transfer code and shown to be of comparable speed to interpolation in regularly spaced tables, which require no table search. The concepts presented are expected to have application in any situation with irregular vector lengths. Also, the procedures that were rejected either because they were too slow or because they involved too much assembly coding are described

  8. Intercomparison of three microwave/infrared high resolution line-by-line radiative transfer codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Franz; Milz, Mathias; Buehler, Stefan A.; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    An intercomparison of three line-by-line (lbl) codes developed independently for atmospheric radiative transfer and remote sensing - ARTS, GARLIC, and KOPRA - has been performed for a thermal infrared nadir sounding application assuming a HIRS-like (High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder) setup. Radiances for the 19 HIRS infrared channels and a set of 42 atmospheric profiles from the "Garand dataset" have been computed. The mutual differences of the equivalent brightness temperatures are presented and possible causes of disagreement are discussed. In particular, the impact of path integration schemes and atmospheric layer discretization is assessed. When the continuum absorption contribution is ignored because of the different implementations, residuals are generally in the sub-Kelvin range and smaller than 0.1 K for some window channels (and all atmospheric models and lbl codes). None of the three codes turned out to be perfect for all channels and atmospheres. Remaining discrepancies are attributed to different lbl optimization techniques. Lbl codes seem to have reached a maturity in the implementation of radiative transfer that the choice of the underlying physical models (line shape models, continua etc) becomes increasingly relevant.

  9. Radiation heat transfer model in a spent fuel pool by TRACE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Saez, F.; Carlos, S.; Villanueva, J.F.; Martorell, S.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear policies have experienced an important change since Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident and the safety of spent fuels has been in the spot issue among all the safety concerns. The work presented consists of the thermohydraulic simulation of spent fuel pool behavior after a loss of coolant throughout transfer channel with loss of cooling transient is produced. The simulation is done with the TRACE code. One of the most important variables that define the behavior of the pool is cladding temperature, which evolution depends on the heat emission. In this work convection and radiation heat transfer is considered. When both heat transfer models are considered, a clear delay in achieving the maximum peak cladding temperature (1477 K) is observed compared with the simulation in which only convection heat transfer is considered. (authors)

  10. Performance of the dot product function in radiative transfer code SORD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkin, Sergey; Lyapustin, Alexei; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Holben, Brent

    2016-10-01

    The successive orders of scattering radiative transfer (RT) codes frequently call the scalar (dot) product function. In this paper, we study performance of some implementations of the dot product in the RT code SORD using 50 scenarios for light scattering in the atmosphere-surface system. In the dot product function, we use the unrolled loops technique with different unrolling factor. We also considered the intrinsic Fortran functions. We show results for two machines: ifort compiler under Windows, and pgf90 under Linux. Intrinsic DOT_PRODUCT function showed best performance for the ifort. For the pgf90, the dot product implemented with unrolling factor 4 was the fastest. The RT code SORD together with the interface that runs all the mentioned tests are publicly available from ftp://maiac.gsfc.nasa.gov/pub/skorkin/SORD_IP_16B (current release) or by email request from the corresponding (first) author.

  11. Milagro Version 2 An Implicit Monte Carlo Code for Thermal Radiative Transfer: Capabilities, Development, and Usage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.J. Urbatsch; T.M. Evans

    2006-02-15

    We have released Version 2 of Milagro, an object-oriented, C++ code that performs radiative transfer using Fleck and Cummings' Implicit Monte Carlo method. Milagro, a part of the Jayenne program, is a stand-alone driver code used as a methods research vehicle and to verify its underlying classes. These underlying classes are used to construct Implicit Monte Carlo packages for external customers. Milagro-2 represents a design overhaul that allows better parallelism and extensibility. New features in Milagro-2 include verified momentum deposition, restart capability, graphics capability, exact energy conservation, and improved load balancing and parallel efficiency. A users' guide also describes how to configure, make, and run Milagro2.

  12. The COBAIN (COntact Binary Atmospheres with INterpolation) Code for Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochoska, Angela; Prša, Andrej; Horvat, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Standard binary star modeling codes make use of pre-existing solutions of the radiative transfer equation in stellar atmospheres. The various model atmospheres available today are consistently computed for single stars, under different assumptions - plane-parallel or spherical atmosphere approximation, local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE) or non-LTE (NLTE), etc. However, they are nonetheless being applied to contact binary atmospheres by populating the surface corresponding to each component separately and neglecting any mixing that would typically occur at the contact boundary. In addition, single stellar atmosphere models do not take into account irradiance from a companion star, which can pose a serious problem when modeling close binaries. 1D atmosphere models are also solved under the assumption of an atmosphere in hydrodynamical equilibrium, which is not necessarily the case for contact atmospheres, as the potentially different densities and temperatures can give rise to flows that play a key role in the heat and radiation transfer.To resolve the issue of erroneous modeling of contact binary atmospheres using single star atmosphere tables, we have developed a generalized radiative transfer code for computation of the normal emergent intensity of a stellar surface, given its geometry and internal structure. The code uses a regular mesh of equipotential surfaces in a discrete set of spherical coordinates, which are then used to interpolate the values of the structural quantites (density, temperature, opacity) in any given point inside the mesh. The radiaitive transfer equation is numerically integrated in a set of directions spanning the unit sphere around each point and iterated until the intensity values for all directions and all mesh points converge within a given tolerance. We have found that this approach, albeit computationally expensive, is the only one that can reproduce the intensity distribution of the non-symmetric contact binary atmosphere and

  13. ODYSSEY: A PUBLIC GPU-BASED CODE FOR GENERAL RELATIVISTIC RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN KERR SPACETIME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Hung-Yi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, 11F of Astronomy-Mathematics Building, AS/NTU No. 1, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Yun, Kiyun; Yoon, Suk-Jin [Department of Astronomy and Center for Galaxy Evolution Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Younsi, Ziri [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Max-von-Laue-Straße 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-04-01

    General relativistic radiative transfer calculations coupled with the calculation of geodesics in the Kerr spacetime are an essential tool for determining the images, spectra, and light curves from matter in the vicinity of black holes. Such studies are especially important for ongoing and upcoming millimeter/submillimeter very long baseline interferometry observations of the supermassive black holes at the centers of Sgr A* and M87. To this end we introduce Odyssey, a graphics processing unit (GPU) based code for ray tracing and radiative transfer in the Kerr spacetime. On a single GPU, the performance of Odyssey can exceed 1 ns per photon, per Runge–Kutta integration step. Odyssey is publicly available, fast, accurate, and flexible enough to be modified to suit the specific needs of new users. Along with a Graphical User Interface powered by a video-accelerated display architecture, we also present an educational software tool, Odyssey-Edu, for showing in real time how null geodesics around a Kerr black hole vary as a function of black hole spin and angle of incidence onto the black hole.

  14. FitSKIRT: genetic algorithms to automatically fit dusty galaxies with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geyter, G.; Baes, M.; Fritz, J.; Camps, P.

    2013-02-01

    We present FitSKIRT, a method to efficiently fit radiative transfer models to UV/optical images of dusty galaxies. These images have the advantage that they have better spatial resolution compared to FIR/submm data. FitSKIRT uses the GAlib genetic algorithm library to optimize the output of the SKIRT Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Genetic algorithms prove to be a valuable tool in handling the multi- dimensional search space as well as the noise induced by the random nature of the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. FitSKIRT is tested on artificial images of a simulated edge-on spiral galaxy, where we gradually increase the number of fitted parameters. We find that we can recover all model parameters, even if all 11 model parameters are left unconstrained. Finally, we apply the FitSKIRT code to a V-band image of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 4013. This galaxy has been modeled previously by other authors using different combinations of radiative transfer codes and optimization methods. Given the different models and techniques and the complexity and degeneracies in the parameter space, we find reasonable agreement between the different models. We conclude that the FitSKIRT method allows comparison between different models and geometries in a quantitative manner and minimizes the need of human intervention and biasing. The high level of automation makes it an ideal tool to use on larger sets of observed data.

  15. SASKTRAN: A spherical geometry radiative transfer code for efficient estimation of limb scattered sunlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourassa, A.E.; Degenstein, D.A.; Llewellyn, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    The inversion of satellite-based observations of limb scattered sunlight for the retrieval of constituent species requires an efficient and accurate modelling of the measurement. We present the development of the SASKTRAN radiative transfer model for the prediction of limb scatter measurements at optical wavelengths by method of successive orders along rays traced in a spherical atmosphere. The component of the signal due to the first two scattering events of the solar beam is accounted for directly along rays traced in the three-dimensional geometry. Simplifying assumptions in successive scattering orders provide computational optimizations without severely compromising the accuracy of the solution. SASKTRAN is designed for the analysis of measurements from the OSIRIS instrument and the implementation of the algorithm is efficient such that the code is suitable for the inversion of OSIRIS profiles on desktop computers. SASKTRAN total limb radiance profiles generally compare better with Monte-Carlo reference models over a large range of solar conditions than the approximate spherical and plane-parallel models typically used for inversions

  16. Development and adaptation of conduction and radiation heat-transfer computer codes for the CFTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1981-08-01

    RODCON and HOTTEL are two computational methods used to calculate thermal and radiation heat transfer for the Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) analysis efforts. RODCON was developed at ORNL to calculate the internal temperature distribution of the fuel rod simulator (FRS) for the CFTL. RODCON solves the time-dependent heat transfer equation in two-dimensional (R angle) cylindrical coordinates at an axial plane with user-specified radial material zones and time- and position-variant surface conditions at the FRS periphery. Symmetry of the FRS periphery boundary conditions is not necessary. The governing elliptic, partial differential heat equation is cast into a fully implicit, finite-difference form by approximating the derivatives with a forward-differencing scheme with variable mesh spacing. The heat conduction path is circumferentially complete, and the potential mathematical problem at the rod center can be effectively ignored. HOTTEL is a revision of an algorithm developed by C.B. Baxi at the General Atomic Company (GAC) to be used in calculating radiation heat transfer in a rod bundle enclosed in a hexagonal duct. HOTTEL uses geometric view factors, surface emissivities, and surface areas to calculate the gray-body or composite view factors in an enclosure having multiple reflections in a nonparticipating medium

  17. HELIOS: An Open-source, GPU-accelerated Radiative Transfer Code for Self-consistent Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Matej; Grosheintz, Luc; Mendonça, João M.; Grimm, Simon L.; Lavie, Baptiste; Kitzmann, Daniel; Tsai, Shang-Min; Burrows, Adam; Kreidberg, Laura; Bedell, Megan; Bean, Jacob L.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Heng, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    We present the open-source radiative transfer code named HELIOS, which is constructed for studying exoplanetary atmospheres. In its initial version, the model atmospheres of HELIOS are one-dimensional and plane-parallel, and the equation of radiative transfer is solved in the two-stream approximation with nonisotropic scattering. A small set of the main infrared absorbers is employed, computed with the opacity calculator HELIOS-K and combined using a correlated-k approximation. The molecular abundances originate from validated analytical formulae for equilibrium chemistry. We compare HELIOS with the work of Miller-Ricci & Fortney using a model of GJ 1214b, and perform several tests, where we find: model atmospheres with single-temperature layers struggle to converge to radiative equilibrium; k-distribution tables constructed with ≳ 0.01 cm-1 resolution in the opacity function (≲ {10}3 points per wavenumber bin) may result in errors ≳ 1%-10% in the synthetic spectra; and a diffusivity factor of 2 approximates well the exact radiative transfer solution in the limit of pure absorption. We construct “null-hypothesis” models (chemical equilibrium, radiative equilibrium, and solar elemental abundances) for six hot Jupiters. We find that the dayside emission spectra of HD 189733b and WASP-43b are consistent with the null hypothesis, while the latter consistently underpredicts the observed fluxes of WASP-8b, WASP-12b, WASP-14b, and WASP-33b. We demonstrate that our results are somewhat insensitive to the choice of stellar models (blackbody, Kurucz, or PHOENIX) and metallicity, but are strongly affected by higher carbon-to-oxygen ratios. The code is publicly available as part of the Exoclimes Simulation Platform (exoclime.net).

  18. Supervised Transfer Sparse Coding

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shedivat, Maruan

    2014-07-27

    A combination of the sparse coding and transfer learn- ing techniques was shown to be accurate and robust in classification tasks where training and testing objects have a shared feature space but are sampled from differ- ent underlying distributions, i.e., belong to different do- mains. The key assumption in such case is that in spite of the domain disparity, samples from different domains share some common hidden factors. Previous methods often assumed that all the objects in the target domain are unlabeled, and thus the training set solely comprised objects from the source domain. However, in real world applications, the target domain often has some labeled objects, or one can always manually label a small num- ber of them. In this paper, we explore such possibil- ity and show how a small number of labeled data in the target domain can significantly leverage classifica- tion accuracy of the state-of-the-art transfer sparse cod- ing methods. We further propose a unified framework named supervised transfer sparse coding (STSC) which simultaneously optimizes sparse representation, domain transfer and classification. Experimental results on three applications demonstrate that a little manual labeling and then learning the model in a supervised fashion can significantly improve classification accuracy.

  19. GARLIC — A general purpose atmospheric radiative transfer line-by-line infrared-microwave code: Implementation and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Hedelt, Pascal; Hess, Michael; Mendrok, Jana; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    A suite of programs for high resolution infrared-microwave atmospheric radiative transfer modeling has been developed with emphasis on efficient and reliable numerical algorithms and a modular approach appropriate for simulation and/or retrieval in a variety of applications. The Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code — GARLIC — is suitable for arbitrary observation geometry, instrumental field-of-view, and line shape. The core of GARLIC's subroutines constitutes the basis of forward models used to implement inversion codes to retrieve atmospheric state parameters from limb and nadir sounding instruments. This paper briefly introduces the physical and mathematical basics of GARLIC and its descendants and continues with an in-depth presentation of various implementation aspects: An optimized Voigt function algorithm combined with a two-grid approach is used to accelerate the line-by-line modeling of molecular cross sections; various quadrature methods are implemented to evaluate the Schwarzschild and Beer integrals; and Jacobians, i.e. derivatives with respect to the unknowns of the atmospheric inverse problem, are implemented by means of automatic differentiation. For an assessment of GARLIC's performance, a comparison of the quadrature methods for solution of the path integral is provided. Verification and validation are demonstrated using intercomparisons with other line-by-line codes and comparisons of synthetic spectra with spectra observed on Earth and from Venus. - Highlights: • High resolution infrared-microwave radiative transfer model. • Discussion of algorithmic and computational aspects. • Jacobians by automatic/algorithmic differentiation. • Performance evaluation by intercomparisons, verification, validation

  20. GARLIC - A general purpose atmospheric radiative transfer line-by-line infrared-microwave code: Implementation and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Hedelt, Pascal; Hess, Michael; Mendrok, Jana; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2014-04-01

    A suite of programs for high resolution infrared-microwave atmospheric radiative transfer modeling has been developed with emphasis on efficient and reliable numerical algorithms and a modular approach appropriate for simulation and/or retrieval in a variety of applications. The Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code - GARLIC - is suitable for arbitrary observation geometry, instrumental field-of-view, and line shape. The core of GARLIC's subroutines constitutes the basis of forward models used to implement inversion codes to retrieve atmospheric state parameters from limb and nadir sounding instruments. This paper briefly introduces the physical and mathematical basics of GARLIC and its descendants and continues with an in-depth presentation of various implementation aspects: An optimized Voigt function algorithm combined with a two-grid approach is used to accelerate the line-by-line modeling of molecular cross sections; various quadrature methods are implemented to evaluate the Schwarzschild and Beer integrals; and Jacobians, i.e. derivatives with respect to the unknowns of the atmospheric inverse problem, are implemented by means of automatic differentiation. For an assessment of GARLIC's performance, a comparison of the quadrature methods for solution of the path integral is provided. Verification and validation are demonstrated using intercomparisons with other line-by-line codes and comparisons of synthetic spectra with spectra observed on Earth and from Venus.

  1. Ray-tracing 3D dust radiative transfer with DART-Ray: code upgrade and public release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Giovanni; Popescu, Cristina C.; Tuffs, Richard J.; Clarke, Adam J.; Debattista, Victor P.; Fischera, Jörg; Pasetto, Stefano; Rushton, Mark; Thirlwall, Jordan J.

    2017-11-01

    We present an extensively updated version of the purely ray-tracing 3D dust radiation transfer code DART-Ray. The new version includes five major upgrades: 1) a series of optimizations for the ray-angular density and the scattered radiation source function; 2) the implementation of several data and task parallelizations using hybrid MPI+OpenMP schemes; 3) the inclusion of dust self-heating; 4) the ability to produce surface brightness maps for observers within the models in HEALPix format; 5) the possibility to set the expected numerical accuracy already at the start of the calculation. We tested the updated code with benchmark models where the dust self-heating is not negligible. Furthermore, we performed a study of the extent of the source influence volumes, using galaxy models, which are critical in determining the efficiency of the DART-Ray algorithm. The new code is publicly available, documented for both users and developers, and accompanied by several programmes to create input grids for different model geometries and to import the results of N-body and SPH simulations. These programmes can be easily adapted to different input geometries, and for different dust models or stellar emission libraries.

  2. Considering polarization in MODIS-based cloud property retrievals by using a vector radiative transfer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Bingqi; Huang, Xin; Yang, Ping; Baum, Bryan A.; Kattawar, George W.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a full-vector, adding–doubling radiative transfer model is used to investigate the influence of the polarization state on cloud property retrievals from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. Two sets of lookup tables (LUTs) are developed for the retrieval purposes, both of which provide water cloud and ice cloud reflectivity functions at two wavelengths in various sun-satellite viewing geometries. However, only one of the LUTs considers polarization. The MODIS reflectivity observations at 0.65 μm (band 1) and 2.13 μm (band 7) are used to infer the cloud optical thickness and particle effective diameter, respectively. Results indicate that the retrievals for both water cloud and ice cloud show considerable sensitivity to polarization. The retrieved water and ice cloud effective diameter and optical thickness differences can vary by as much as ±15% due to polarization state considerations. In particular, the polarization state has more influence on completely smooth ice particles than on severely roughened ice particles. - Highlights: • Impact of polarization on satellite-based retrieval of water/ice cloud properties is studied. • Inclusion of polarization can change water/ice optical thickness and effective diameter values by up to ±15%. • Influence of polarization on cloud property retrievals depends on sun-satellite viewing geometries

  3. Thermal radiation heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, John R; Mengüç, M Pinar

    2011-01-01

    Providing a comprehensive overview of the radiative behavior and properties of materials, the fifth edition of this classic textbook describes the physics of radiative heat transfer, development of relevant analysis methods, and associated mathematical and numerical techniques. Retaining the salient features and fundamental coverage that have made it popular, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, Fifth Edition has been carefully streamlined to omit superfluous material, yet enhanced to update information with extensive references. Includes four new chapters on Inverse Methods, Electromagnetic Theory, Scattering and Absorption by Particles, and Near-Field Radiative Transfer Keeping pace with significant developments, this book begins by addressing the radiative properties of blackbody and opaque materials, and how they are predicted using electromagnetic theory and obtained through measurements. It discusses radiative exchange in enclosures without any radiating medium between the surfaces-and where heat conduction...

  4. Radiative heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Modest, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    The third edition of Radiative Heat Transfer describes the basic physics of radiation heat transfer. The book provides models, methodologies, and calculations essential in solving research problems in a variety of industries, including solar and nuclear energy, nanotechnology, biomedical, and environmental. Every chapter of Radiative Heat Transfer offers uncluttered nomenclature, numerous worked examples, and a large number of problems-many based on real world situations-making it ideal for classroom use as well as for self-study. The book's 24 chapters cover the four major areas in the field: surface properties; surface transport; properties of participating media; and transfer through participating media. Within each chapter, all analytical methods are developed in substantial detail, and a number of examples show how the developed relations may be applied to practical problems. It is an extensive solution manual for adopting instructors. Features: most complete text in the field of radiative heat transfer;...

  5. Fast multilevel radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paletou, Frédéric; Léger, Ludovick

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of recent advances in the field of numerical radiative transfer relies on approximate operator methods better known in astrophysics as Accelerated Lambda-Iteration (ALI). A superior class of iterative schemes, in term of rates of convergence, such as Gauss-Seidel and Successive Overrelaxation methods were therefore quite naturally introduced in the field of radiative transfer by Trujillo Bueno & Fabiani Bendicho (1995); it was thoroughly described for the non-LTE two-level atom case. We describe hereafter in details how such methods can be generalized when dealing with non-LTE unpolarised radiation transfer with multilevel atomic models, in monodimensional geometry.

  6. Fast multilevel radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paletou, Frederic; Leger, Ludovick

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of recent advances in the field of numerical radiative transfer relies on approximate operator methods better known in astrophysics as Accelerated Lambda-Iteration (ALI). A superior class of iterative schemes, in term of rates of convergence, such as Gauss-Seidel and successive overrelaxation methods were therefore quite naturally introduced in the field of radiative transfer by Trujillo Bueno and Fabiani Bendicho [A novel iterative scheme for the very fast and accurate solution of non-LTE radiative transfer problems. Astrophys J 1995;455:646]; it was thoroughly described for the non-LTE two-level atom case. We describe hereafter in details how such methods can be generalized when dealing with non-LTE unpolarised radiation transfer with multilevel atomic models, in monodimensional geometry

  7. Simulations of cloudy hyperspectral infrared radiances using the HT-FRTC, a fast PC-based multipurpose radiative transfer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havemann, S.; Aumann, H. H.; Desouza-Machado, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    The HT-FRTC uses principal components which cover the spectrum at a very high spectral resolution allowing very fast line-by-line-like, hyperspectral and broadband simulations for satellite-based, airborne and ground-based sensors. Using data from IASI and from the Airborne Research Interferometer Evaluation System (ARIES) on board the FAAM BAE 146 aircraft, variational retrievals in principal component space with HT-FRTC as forward model have demonstrated that valuable information on temperature and humidity profiles and on the cirrus cloud properties can be obtained simultaneously. The NASA/JPL/UMBC cloudy RTM inter-comparison project has been working on a global dataset consisting of 7377 AIRS spectra. Initial simulations with HT-FRTC for this dataset have been promising. A next step taken here is to investigate how sensitive the results are with respect to different assumptions in the cloud modelling. One aspect of this is to study how assumptions about the microphysical and related optical properties of liquid/ice clouds impact the statistics of the agreement between model and observations. The other aspect is about the cloud overlap scheme. Different schemes have been tested (maximum, random, maximum random). As the computational cost increases linearly with the number of cloud columns, it will be investigated if there is an optimal number of columns beyond which there is little additional benefit to be gained. During daytime the high wave number channels of AIRS are affected by solar radiation. With full scattering calculations using a monochromatic version of the Edwards-Slingo radiation code the HT-FRTC can model solar radiation reasonably well, but full scattering calculations are relatively expensive. Pure Chou scaling on the other hand can not properly describe scattering of solar radiation by clouds and requires additional refinements.

  8. Radiative transfer in molecular lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Cernicharo, J.

    2001-07-01

    The highly convergent iterative methods developed by Trujillo Bueno and Fabiani Bendicho (1995) for radiative transfer (RT) applications are generalized to spherical symmetry with velocity fields. These RT methods are based on Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel (GS), and SOR iteration and they form the basis of a new NLTE multilevel transfer code for atomic and molecular lines. The benchmark tests carried out so far are presented and discussed. The main aim is to develop a number of powerful RT tools for the theoretical interpretation of molecular spectra.

  9. TACO: a finite element heat transfer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, W.E. Jr.

    1980-02-01

    TACO is a two-dimensional implicit finite element code for heat transfer analysis. It can perform both linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady state problems. Either plane or axisymmetric geometries can be analyzed. TACO has the capability to handle time or temperature dependent material properties and materials may be either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent loadings and boundary conditions are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additionally, TACO has some specialized features such as internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance), bulk nodes, enclosure radiation with view factor calculations, and chemical reactive kinetics. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A bandwidth and profile minimization option is also available in the code. Graphical representation of data generated by TACO is provided by a companion post-processor named POSTACO. The theory on which TACO is based is outlined, the capabilities of the code are explained, the input data required to perform an analysis with TACO are described. Some simple examples are provided to illustrate the use of the code

  10. Utrecht Radiative Transfer Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Utrecht course ``The Generation and Transport of Radiation'' teaches basic radiative transfer to second-year students. It is a much-expanded version of the first chapter of Rybicki & Lightman's ``Radiative Processes in Astrophysics''. After this course, students understand why intensity is measured per steradian, have an Eddington-Barbier feel for optically thick line formation, and know that scattering upsets LTE. The text is a computer-aided translation by Ruth Peterson of my 1992 Dutch-language course. My aim is to rewrite this course in non-computer English and make it web-available at some time. In the meantime, copies of the Peterson translation are made yearly at Uppsala -- ask them, not me. Eventually it should become a textbook. The Utrecht course ``Radiative Transfer in Stellar Atmospheres'' is a 30-hour course for third-year students. It treats NLTE line formation in plane-parallel stellar atmospheres at a level intermediate between the books by Novotny and Boehm-Vitense, and Mihalas' ``Stellar Atmospheres''. After this course, students appreciate that epsilon is small, that radiation can heat or cool, and that computers have changed the field. This course is web-available since 1995 and is regularly improved -- but remains incomplete. Eventually it should become a textbook. The three Utrecht exercise sets ``Stellar Spectra A: Basic Line Formation'', ``Stellar Spectra B: LTE Line Formation'', and ``Stellar Spectra C: NLTE Line Formation'' are IDL-based computer exercises for first-year, second-year, and third-year students, respectively. They treat spectral classification, Saha-Boltzmann population statistics, the curve of growth, the FAL-C solar atmosphere model, the role of H-minus in the solar continuum, LTE formation of Fraunhofer lines, inversion tactics, the Feautrier method, classical lambda iteration, and ALI computation. The first two sets are web-available since 1998; the third will follow. Acknowledgement. Both courses owe much to previous

  11. 3D radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, M

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres is reviewed with special emphasis on the atmospheres of cool stars and applications. A short review of methods in 3D radiative transfer shows that mature methods exist, both for taking into account radiation as an energy transport mechanism in 3D (magneto-) hydrodynamical simulations of stellar atmospheres and for the diagnostic problem of calculating the emergent spectrum in more detail from such models, both assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and in non-LTE. Such methods have been implemented in several codes, and examples of applications are given.

  12. Optical colours and spectral indices of z = 0.1 eagle galaxies with the 3D dust radiative transfer code skirt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trayford, James W.; Camps, Peter; Theuns, Tom; Baes, Maarten; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.; Gunawardhana, Madusha L. P.; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2017-09-01

    We present mock optical images, broad-band and H α fluxes, and D4000 spectral indices for 30 145 galaxies from the eagle hydrodynamical simulation at redshift z = 0.1, modelling dust with the skirt Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The modelling includes a subgrid prescription for dusty star-forming regions, with both the subgrid obscuration of these regions and the fraction of metals in diffuse interstellar dust calibrated against far-infrared fluxes of local galaxies. The predicted optical colours as a function of stellar mass agree well with observation, with the skirt model showing marked improvement over a simple dust-screen model. The orientation dependence of attenuation is weaker than observed because eagle galaxies are generally puffier than real galaxies, due to the pressure floor imposed on the interstellar medium (ISM). The mock H α luminosity function agrees reasonably well with the data, and we quantify the extent to which dust obscuration affects observed H α fluxes. The distribution of D4000 break values is bimodal, as observed. In the simulation, 20 per cent of galaxies deemed 'passive' for the skirt model, I.e. exhibiting D4000 >1.8, are classified 'active' when ISM dust attenuation is not included. The fraction of galaxies with stellar mass greater than 1010 M⊙ that are deemed passive is slightly smaller than observed, which is due to low levels of residual star formation in these simulated galaxies. Colour images, fluxes and spectra of eagle galaxies are to be made available through the public eagle data base.

  13. Essentials of radiation heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Essentials of Radiation Heat Transfer is a textbook presenting the essential, fundamental information required to gain an understanding of radiation heat transfer and equips the reader with enough knowledge to be able to tackle more challenging problems. All concepts are reinforced by carefully chosen and fully worked examples, and exercise problems are provided at the end of every chapter. In a significant departure from other books on this subject, this book completely dispenses with the network method to solve problems of radiation heat transfer in surfaces. It instead presents the powerful radiosity-irradiation method and shows how this technique can be used to solve problems of radiation in enclosures made of one to any number of surfaces. The network method is not easily scalable. Secondly, the book introduces atmospheric radiation, which is now being considered as a potentially important area, in which engineers can contribute to the technology of remote sensing and atmospheric sciences in general, b...

  14. Engineering calculations in radiative heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, W A; Hopkins, D W

    1974-01-01

    Engineering Calculations in Radiative Heat Transfer is a six-chapter book that first explains the basic principles of thermal radiation and direct radiative transfer. Total exchange of radiation within an enclosure containing an absorbing or non-absorbing medium is then described. Subsequent chapters detail the radiative heat transfer applications and measurement of radiation and temperature.

  15. A relativistic radiation transfer benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munier, A.

    1988-01-01

    We use the integral form of the radiation transfer equation in an one dimensional slab to determine the time-dependent propagation of the radiation energy, flux and pressure in a collisionless homogeneous medium. First order v/c relativistic terms are included and the solution is given in the fluid frame and the laboratory frame

  16. Radiative transfer on discrete spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Preisendorfer, Rudolph W; Stark, M; Ulam, S

    1965-01-01

    Pure and Applied Mathematics, Volume 74: Radiative Transfer on Discrete Spaces presents the geometrical structure of natural light fields. This book describes in detail with mathematical precision the radiometric interactions of light-scattering media in terms of a few well established principles.Organized into four parts encompassing 15 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the derivations of the practical formulas and the arrangement of formulas leading to numerical solution procedures of radiative transfer problems in plane-parallel media. This text then constructs radiative tran

  17. Performance analysis of a parallel Monte Carlo code for simulating solar radiative transfer in cloudy atmospheres using CUDA-enabled NVIDIA GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russkova, Tatiana V.

    2017-11-01

    One tool to improve the performance of Monte Carlo methods for numerical simulation of light transport in the Earth's atmosphere is the parallel technology. A new algorithm oriented to parallel execution on the CUDA-enabled NVIDIA graphics processor is discussed. The efficiency of parallelization is analyzed on the basis of calculating the upward and downward fluxes of solar radiation in both a vertically homogeneous and inhomogeneous models of the atmosphere. The results of testing the new code under various atmospheric conditions including continuous singlelayered and multilayered clouds, and selective molecular absorption are presented. The results of testing the code using video cards with different compute capability are analyzed. It is shown that the changeover of computing from conventional PCs to the architecture of graphics processors gives more than a hundredfold increase in performance and fully reveals the capabilities of the technology used.

  18. Testing efficiency transfer codes for equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidmar, T.; Celik, N.; Cornejo Diaz, N.; Dlabac, A.; Ewa, I.O.B.; Carrazana Gonzalez, J.A.; Hult, M.; Jovanovic, S.; Lepy, M.-C.; Mihaljevic, N.; Sima, O.; Tzika, F.; Jurado Vargas, M.; Vasilopoulou, T.; Vidmar, G.

    2010-01-01

    Four general Monte Carlo codes (GEANT3, PENELOPE, MCNP and EGS4) and five dedicated packages for efficiency determination in gamma-ray spectrometry (ANGLE, DETEFF, GESPECOR, ETNA and EFFTRAN) were checked for equivalence by applying them to the calculation of efficiency transfer (ET) factors for a set of well-defined sample parameters, detector parameters and energies typically encountered in environmental radioactivity measurements. The differences between the results of the different codes never exceeded a few percent and were lower than 2% in the majority of cases.

  19. Calculation codes in radiation protection, radiation physics and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    These scientific days had for objective to draw up the situation of calculation codes of radiation transport, of sources estimation, of radiation doses managements and to draw the future perspectives. (N.C.)

  20. Radiation transfer and stellar atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swihart, T. L.

    This is a revised and expanded version of the author's Basic Physics of Stellar Atmospheres, published in 1971. The equation of transfer is considered, taking into account the intensity and derived quantities, the absorption coefficient, the emission coefficient, the source function, and special integrals for plane media. The gray atmosphere is discussed along with the nongray atmosphere, and aspects of line formation. Topics related to polarization are explored, giving attention to pure polarized radiation, general polarized radiation, transfer in a magnetic plasma, and Rayleigh scattering and the sunlit sky. Physical and astronomical constants, and a number of problems related to the subjects of the book are presented in an appendix.

  1. Code of practice for ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoo Boo Huat

    1995-01-01

    Prior to 1984, the use of ionizing radiation in Malaysia was governed by the Radioactive Substances Act of 1968. After 1984, its use came under the control of Act 304, called the Atomic Energy Licensing Act 1984. Under powers vested by the Act, the Radiation Protection (Basic Safety Standards) Regulations 1988 were formulated to regulate its use. These Acts do not provide information on proper working procedures. With the publication of the codes of Practice by The Standards and Industrial Research Institute of Malaysia (SIRIM), the users are now able to follow proper guidelines and use ionizing radiation safely and beneficially. This paper discusses the relevant sections in the following codes: 1. Code of Practice for Radiation Protection (Medical X-ray Diagnosis) MS 838:1983. 2. Code of Practice for Safety in Laboratories Part 4: Ionizing radiation MS 1042: Part 4: 1992. (author)

  2. Nonsteady heat conduction code with radiation boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Benenati, R.; Powell, J.

    1975-01-01

    A heat-transfer model for studying the temperature build-up in graphite blankets for fusion reactors is presented. In essence, the computer code developed is for two-dimensional, nonsteady heat conduction in heterogeneous, anisotropic solids with nonuniform internal heating. Thermal radiation as well as bremsstrahlung radiation boundary conditions are included. Numerical calculations are performed for two design options by varying the wall loading, bremsstrahlung, surface layer thickness and thermal conductivity, blanket dimensions, time step and grid size. (auth)

  3. The FLUFF code for calculating finned surface heat transfer -description and user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, C.J.

    1985-08-01

    FLUFF is a computer code for calculating heat transfer from finned surfaces by convection and radiation. It can also represent heat transfer by radiation to a partially emitting and absorbing medium within the fin cavity. The FLUFF code is useful not only for studying the behaviour of finned surfaces but also for deriving heat fluxes which can be applied as boundary conditions to other heat transfer codes. In this way models of bodies with finned surfaces may be greatly simplified since the fins need not be explicitly represented. (author)

  4. Radiation and combined heat transfer in channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamonis, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents numerical methods of calculation of radiative and combined heat transfer in channel flows of radiating as well as nonradiating media. Results obtained in calculations for flow conditions of combustion products from organic fuel products are given and methods used in determining the spectral optical properties of molecular gases are analyzed. The book presents applications of heat transfer in solving problems. Topic covered are as follows: optical properties of molecular gases; transfer equations for combined heat transfer; experimental technique; convective heat transfer in heated gas flows; radiative heat transfer in gaseous media; combined heat transfer; and radiative and combined heat transfer in applied problems

  5. RRTM: A rapid radiative transfer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mlawer, E.J.; Taubman, S.J.; Clough, S.A. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) for the calculation of longwave clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates has been developed. The model, which uses the correlated-k method, is both accurate and computationally fast. The foundation for RRTM is the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) from which the relevant k-distributions are obtained. LBLRTM, which has been extensively validated against spectral observations e.g., the high-resolution sounder and the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, is used to validate the flux and cooling rate results from RRTM. Validations of RRTM`s results have been performed for the tropical, midlatitude summer, and midlatitude winter atmospheres, as well as for the four Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) cases from the Spectral Radiance Experiment (SPECTRE). Details of some of these validations are presented below. RRTM has the identical atmospheric input module as LBLRTM, facilitating intercomparisons with LBLRTM and application of the model at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed sites.

  6. Parallel processing Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    Issues related to distributed-memory multiprocessing as applied to Monte Carlo radiation transport are discussed. Measurements of communication overhead are presented for the radiation transport code MCNP which employs the communication software package PVM, and average efficiency curves are provided for a homogeneous virtual machine

  7. Discrete diffusion Lyman α radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Tsang, Benny T.-H.; Bromm, Volker; Milosavljević, Miloš

    2018-06-01

    Due to its accuracy and generality, Monte Carlo radiative transfer (MCRT) has emerged as the prevalent method for Lyα radiative transfer in arbitrary geometries. The standard MCRT encounters a significant efficiency barrier in the high optical depth, diffusion regime. Multiple acceleration schemes have been developed to improve the efficiency of MCRT but the noise from photon packet discretization remains a challenge. The discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) scheme has been successfully applied in state-of-the-art radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations. Still, the established framework is not optimal for resonant line transfer. Inspired by the DDMC paradigm, we present a novel extension to resonant DDMC (rDDMC) in which diffusion in space and frequency are treated on equal footing. We explore the robustness of our new method and demonstrate a level of performance that justifies incorporating the method into existing Lyα codes. We present computational speedups of ˜102-106 relative to contemporary MCRT implementations with schemes that skip scattering in the core of the line profile. This is because the rDDMC runtime scales with the spatial and frequency resolution rather than the number of scatterings—the latter is typically ∝τ0 for static media, or ∝(aτ0)2/3 with core-skipping. We anticipate new frontiers in which on-the-fly Lyα radiative transfer calculations are feasible in 3D RHD. More generally, rDDMC is transferable to any computationally demanding problem amenable to a Fokker-Planck approximation of frequency redistribution.

  8. A Radiation Solver for the National Combustion Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockol, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    A methodology is given that converts an existing finite volume radiative transfer method that requires input of local absorption coefficients to one that can treat a mixture of combustion gases and compute the coefficients on the fly from the local mixture properties. The Full-spectrum k-distribution method is used to transform the radiative transfer equation (RTE) to an alternate wave number variable, g . The coefficients in the transformed equation are calculated at discrete temperatures and participating species mole fractions that span the values of the problem for each value of g. These results are stored in a table and interpolation is used to find the coefficients at every cell in the field. Finally, the transformed RTE is solved for each g and Gaussian quadrature is used to find the radiant heat flux throughout the field. The present implementation is in an existing cartesian/cylindrical grid radiative transfer code and the local mixture properties are given by a solution of the National Combustion Code (NCC) on the same grid. Based on this work the intention is to apply this method to an existing unstructured grid radiation code which can then be coupled directly to NCC.

  9. EFLOD code for reflood heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.R.

    1979-01-01

    A computer code called EFLOD has been developed for simulation of the heat transfer and hydrodynamics of a nuclear power reactor during the reflood phase of a loss-of-coolant accident. EFLOD models the downcomer, lower plenum, core, and upper plenum of a nuclear reactor vessel using seven control volumes assuming either homogeneous or unequal-velocity, unequal-temperature (UVUT) models of two-phase flow, depending on location within the vessel. The moving control volume concept in which a single control volume models the quench region in the core and moves with the core liquid level was developed and implemented in EFLOD so that three control volumes suffice to model the core region. A simplified UVUT model that assumes saturated liquid above the quench front was developed to handle the nonhomogeneous flow situation above the quench region. An explicit finite difference routine is used to model conduction heat transfer in the fuel, gap, and cladding regions of the fuel rod. In simulation of a selected FLECHT-SET experimental run, EFLOD successfully predicted the midplane maximum temperature and turnaround time as well as the time-dependent advance of the core liquid level. However, the rate of advancement of the quench level and the ensuing liquid entrainment were overpredicted during the early part of the transient

  10. Development of Off-take Model, Subcooled Boiling Model, and Radiation Heat Transfer Input Model into the MARS Code for a Regulatory Auditing of CANDU Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, C.; Rhee, B. W.; Chung, B. D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, S. H.; Kim, M. W. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Korea currently has four operating units of the CANDU-6 type reactor in Wolsong. However, the safety assessment system for CANDU reactors has not been fully established due to a lack of self-reliance technology. Although the CATHENA code had been introduced from AECL, it is undesirable to use a vendor's code for a regulatory auditing analysis. In Korea, the MARS code has been developed for decades and is being considered by KINS as a thermal hydraulic regulatory auditing tool for nuclear power plants. Before this decision, KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) had developed the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code for CANDU safety analyses by modifying the model of the existing PWR auditing tool, RELAP5/MOD3. The main purpose of this study is to transplant the CANDU models of the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code to the MARS code including a quality assurance of the developed models.

  11. Development of Off-take Model, Subcooled Boiling Model, and Radiation Heat Transfer Input Model into the MARS Code for a Regulatory Auditing of CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, C.; Rhee, B. W.; Chung, B. D.; Ahn, S. H.; Kim, M. W.

    2009-01-01

    Korea currently has four operating units of the CANDU-6 type reactor in Wolsong. However, the safety assessment system for CANDU reactors has not been fully established due to a lack of self-reliance technology. Although the CATHENA code had been introduced from AECL, it is undesirable to use a vendor's code for a regulatory auditing analysis. In Korea, the MARS code has been developed for decades and is being considered by KINS as a thermal hydraulic regulatory auditing tool for nuclear power plants. Before this decision, KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) had developed the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code for CANDU safety analyses by modifying the model of the existing PWR auditing tool, RELAP5/MOD3. The main purpose of this study is to transplant the CANDU models of the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code to the MARS code including a quality assurance of the developed models

  12. Benchmark results in radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.D.M.; Siewert, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    Several aspects of the F N method are reported, and the method is used to solve accurately some benchmark problems in radiative transfer in the field of atmospheric physics. The method was modified to solve cases of pure scattering and an improved process was developed for computing the radiation intensity. An algorithms for computing several quantities used in the F N method was done. An improved scheme to evaluate certain integrals relevant to the method is done, and a two-term recursion relation that has proved useful for the numerical evaluation of matrix elements, basic for the method, is given. The methods used to solve the encountered linear algebric equations are discussed, and the numerical results are evaluated. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. NASA space radiation transport code development consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, NASA established a consortium involving the Univ. of Tennessee (lead institution), the Univ. of Houston, Roanoke College and various government and national laboratories, to accelerate the development of a standard set of radiation transport computer codes for NASA human exploration applications. This effort involves further improvements of the Monte Carlo codes HETC and FLUKA and the deterministic code HZETRN, including developing nuclear reaction databases necessary to extend the Monte Carlo codes to carry out heavy ion transport, and extending HZETRN to three dimensions. The improved codes will be validated by comparing predictions with measured laboratory transport data, provided by an experimental measurements consortium, and measurements in the upper atmosphere on the balloon-borne Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB). In this paper, we present an overview of the consortium members and the current status and future plans of consortium efforts to meet the research goals and objectives of this extensive undertaking. (authors)

  14. Permanent phonetic identification code for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatua, R.; Somasundaram, S.; Srivastava, D.N.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes a system of self-checking short and easily memorisable 4-digit 'Permanent Phonetic Radiation Code' (PPRC) using radix 128 for Indians occupationally exposed to radiation, to facilitate entry of all radiation dose data pertaining to an individual in a single record of a file. The logic of PPRC is computer compatible. The necessary computer program has been developed in Health Physics Division for printing the PPRCs in Devanagari script through dot-matrix printers for making it understandable to the majority of the persons concerned. (author)

  15. The RAGE radiation-hydrodynamic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gittings, Michael; Clover, Michael; Betlach, Thomas; Byrne, Nelson; Ranta, Dale [Science Applications International Corp. MS A-1, 10260 Campus Point Drive, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Weaver, Robert; Coker, Robert; Dendy, Edward; Hueckstaedt, Robert; New, Kim; Oakes, W Rob [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS T087, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Stefan, Ryan [TaylorMade-adidas Golf, 5545 Fermi Court, Carlsbad, CA 92008-7324 (United States)], E-mail: michael.r.clover@saic.com

    2008-10-01

    We describe RAGE, the 'radiation adaptive grid Eulerian' radiation-hydrodynamics code, including its data structures, its parallelization strategy and performance, its hydrodynamic algorithm(s), its (gray) radiation diffusion algorithm, and some of the considerable amount of verification and validation efforts. The hydrodynamics is a basic Godunov solver, to which we have made significant improvements to increase the advection algorithm's robustness and to converge stiffnesses in the equation of state. Similarly, the radiation transport is a basic gray diffusion, but our treatment of the radiation-material coupling, wherein we converge nonlinearities in a novel manner to allow larger timesteps and more robust behavior, can be applied to any multi-group transport algorithm.

  16. The RAGE radiation-hydrodynamic code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittings, Michael; Clover, Michael; Betlach, Thomas; Byrne, Nelson; Ranta, Dale; Weaver, Robert; Coker, Robert; Dendy, Edward; Hueckstaedt, Robert; New, Kim; Oakes, W Rob; Stefan, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    We describe RAGE, the 'radiation adaptive grid Eulerian' radiation-hydrodynamics code, including its data structures, its parallelization strategy and performance, its hydrodynamic algorithm(s), its (gray) radiation diffusion algorithm, and some of the considerable amount of verification and validation efforts. The hydrodynamics is a basic Godunov solver, to which we have made significant improvements to increase the advection algorithm's robustness and to converge stiffnesses in the equation of state. Similarly, the radiation transport is a basic gray diffusion, but our treatment of the radiation-material coupling, wherein we converge nonlinearities in a novel manner to allow larger timesteps and more robust behavior, can be applied to any multi-group transport algorithm

  17. Radiative transfer in silylidene molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to search for silylidene (H2CSi in the interstellar medium, Izuha et al. (1996 recorded microwave spectrum of H2CSi in laboratory and made an unsuccessful attempt of its identification in IRC +10216, Ori KL, Sgr B2, through its 717-616 transition at 222.055 GHz. For finding out if there are other transitions of H2CSi which may help in its identification in the interstellar medium, we have considered 25 rotational levels of ortho-H2CSi connected by collisional transitions and 35 radiative transitions, and solved radiative transfer problem using the LVG approximation. We have found that the brightness temperatures of 919-818, 918-817, 101,10-919, 1019-918, 111,11-101,10, 111,10-1019 and 121,12-111,11 transition are larger than that of 717-616 transition. Thus, these transitions may help in detection of H2CSi in the interstellar medium.

  18. Code of practice for safety in laboratory - non ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli Jaya; Mohd Yusof Mohd Ali; Khoo Boo Huat; Khatijah Hashim

    1995-01-01

    The code identifies the non-ionizing radiation encountered in laboratories and the associated hazards. The code is intended as a laboratory standard reference document for general information on safety requirements relating to the usage of non-ionizing radiations in laboratories. The nonionizing radiations cover in this code, namely, are ultraviolet radiation, visible light, radio-frequency radiation, lasers, sound waves and ultrasonic radiation. (author)

  19. SEURAT: SPH scheme extended with ultraviolet line radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Makito; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Kenji; Semelin, Benoit; Yajima, Hidenobu; Umemura, Masayuki

    2018-05-01

    We present a novel Lyman alpha (Ly α) radiative transfer code, SEURAT (SPH scheme Extended with Ultraviolet line RAdiative Transfer), where line scatterings are solved adaptively with the resolution of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The radiative transfer method implemented in SEURAT is based on a Monte Carlo algorithm in which the scattering and absorption by dust are also incorporated. We perform standard test calculations to verify the validity of the code; (i) emergent spectra from a static uniform sphere, (ii) emergent spectra from an expanding uniform sphere, and (iii) escape fraction from a dusty slab. Thereby, we demonstrate that our code solves the {Ly} α radiative transfer with sufficient accuracy. We emphasize that SEURAT can treat the transfer of {Ly} α photons even in highly complex systems that have significantly inhomogeneous density fields. The high adaptivity of SEURAT is desirable to solve the propagation of {Ly} α photons in the interstellar medium of young star-forming galaxies like {Ly} α emitters (LAEs). Thus, SEURAT provides a powerful tool to model the emergent spectra of {Ly} α emission, which can be compared to the observations of LAEs.

  20. Validation of comprehensive space radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinn, J.L.; Simonsen, L.C.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    1998-01-01

    The HZETRN code has been developed over the past decade to evaluate the local radiation fields within sensitive materials on spacecraft in the space environment. Most of the more important nuclear and atomic processes are now modeled and evaluation within a complex spacecraft geometry with differing material components, including transition effects across boundaries of dissimilar materials, are included. The atomic/nuclear database and transport procedures have received limited validation in laboratory testing with high energy ion beams. The codes have been applied in design of the SAGE-III instrument resulting in material changes to control injurious neutron production, in the study of the Space Shuttle single event upsets, and in validation with space measurements (particle telescopes, tissue equivalent proportional counters, CR-39) on Shuttle and Mir. The present paper reviews the code development and presents recent results in laboratory and space flight validation

  1. RAPTOR. I. Time-dependent radiative transfer in arbitrary spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronzwaer, T.; Davelaar, J.; Younsi, Z.; Mościbrodzka, M.; Falcke, H.; Kramer, M.; Rezzolla, L.

    2018-05-01

    Context. Observational efforts to image the immediate environment of a black hole at the scale of the event horizon benefit from the development of efficient imaging codes that are capable of producing synthetic data, which may be compared with observational data. Aims: We aim to present RAPTOR, a new public code that produces accurate images, animations, and spectra of relativistic plasmas in strong gravity by numerically integrating the equations of motion of light rays and performing time-dependent radiative transfer calculations along the rays. The code is compatible with any analytical or numerical spacetime. It is hardware-agnostic and may be compiled and run both on GPUs and CPUs. Methods: We describe the algorithms used in RAPTOR and test the code's performance. We have performed a detailed comparison of RAPTOR output with that of other radiative-transfer codes and demonstrate convergence of the results. We then applied RAPTOR to study accretion models of supermassive black holes, performing time-dependent radiative transfer through general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamical (GRMHD) simulations and investigating the expected observational differences between the so-called fast-light and slow-light paradigms. Results: Using RAPTOR to produce synthetic images and light curves of a GRMHD model of an accreting black hole, we find that the relative difference between fast-light and slow-light light curves is less than 5%. Using two distinct radiative-transfer codes to process the same data, we find integrated flux densities with a relative difference less than 0.01%. Conclusions: For two-dimensional GRMHD models, such as those examined in this paper, the fast-light approximation suffices as long as errors of a few percent are acceptable. The convergence of the results of two different codes demonstrates that they are, at a minimum, consistent. The public version of RAPTOR is available at the following URL: http://https://github.com/tbronzwaer/raptor

  2. Light scattering reviews 8 radiative transfer and light scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2013-01-01

    Light scattering review (vol 8) is aimed at the presentation of recent advances in radiative transfer and light scattering optics. The topics to be covered include: scattering of light by irregularly shaped particles suspended in atmosphere (dust, ice crystals), light scattering by particles much larger as compared the wavelength of incident radiation, atmospheric radiative forcing, astrophysical radiative transfer, radiative transfer and optical imaging in biological media, radiative transfer of polarized light, numerical aspects of radiative transfer.

  3. FILM-30: A Heat Transfer Properties Code for Water Coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARSHALL, THERON D.

    2001-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer code has been written to calculate the heat transfer properties at the wetted perimeter of a coolant channel when provided the bulk water conditions. This computer code is titled FILM-30 and the code calculates its heat transfer properties by using the following correlations: (1) Sieder-Tate: forced convection, (2) Bergles-Rohsenow: onset to nucleate boiling, (3) Bergles-Rohsenow: partially developed nucleate boiling, (4) Araki: fully developed nucleate boiling, (5) Tong-75: critical heat flux (CHF), and (6) Marshall-98: transition boiling. FILM-30 produces output files that provide the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient at the wetted perimeter as a function of temperature. To validate FILM-30, the calculated heat transfer properties were used in finite element analyses to predict internal temperatures for a water-cooled copper mockup under one-sided heating from a rastered electron beam. These predicted temperatures were compared with the measured temperatures from the author's 1994 and 1998 heat transfer experiments. There was excellent agreement between the predicted and experimentally measured temperatures, which confirmed the accuracy of FILM-30 within the experimental range of the tests. FILM-30 can accurately predict the CHF and transition boiling regimes, which is an important advantage over current heat transfer codes. Consequently, FILM-30 is ideal for predicting heat transfer properties for applications that feature high heat fluxes produced by one-sided heating

  4. The Monte Carlo photoionization and moving-mesh radiation hydrodynamics code CMACIONIZE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, B.; Wood, K.

    2018-04-01

    We present the public Monte Carlo photoionization and moving-mesh radiation hydrodynamics code CMACIONIZE, which can be used to simulate the self-consistent evolution of HII regions surrounding young O and B stars, or other sources of ionizing radiation. The code combines a Monte Carlo photoionization algorithm that uses a complex mix of hydrogen, helium and several coolants in order to self-consistently solve for the ionization and temperature balance at any given type, with a standard first order hydrodynamics scheme. The code can be run as a post-processing tool to get the line emission from an existing simulation snapshot, but can also be used to run full radiation hydrodynamical simulations. Both the radiation transfer and the hydrodynamics are implemented in a general way that is independent of the grid structure that is used to discretize the system, allowing it to be run both as a standard fixed grid code, but also as a moving-mesh code.

  5. Aerosol effects in radiation transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binenko, V.I.; Harshvardhan, H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative properties and effects of aerosols are assessed for the following aerosol sources: relatively clean background aerosol, dust storms and dust outbreaks, anthropogenic pollution, and polluted cloud layers. Studies show it is the submicron aerosol fraction that plays a dominant radiative role in the atmosphere. The radiative effect of the aerosol depends not only on its loading but also on the underlying surface albedo and on solar zenith angle. It is only with highly reflecting surfaces such as Arctic ice that aerosols have a warming effect. Radiometric, microphysical, mineral composition, and refractive index measurements are presented for dust and in particular for the Saharan aerosol layer (SAL). Short-wave radiative heating of the atmosphere is caused by the SAL and is due mainly to absorption. However, the SAL does not contribute significantly to the long-wave thermal radiation budget. Field program studies of the radiative effects of aerosols are described. Anthropogenic aerosols deplete the incoming solar radiation. A case field study for a regional Ukrainian center is discussed. The urban aerosol causes a cooling of metropolitan centers, compared with outlying areas, during the day, which is followed by a warming trend at night. In another study, an increase in turbidity by a factor of 3 due to increased industrialization for Mexico City is noted, together with a drop in atmospheric transmission by 10% over a 50-year period. Numerous studies are cited that demonstrate that anthropogenic aerosols affect both the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds, which in turn affect regional climate. Particles acting as cloud nuclei are considered to have the greatest indirect effect on cloud absorptivity of short-wave radiation. Satellite observations show that low-level stratus clouds contaminated by ship exhaust at sea lead to an increase in cloud albedo

  6. Radiative transfer in type I supernovae atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isern, J.; Lopez, R.; Simonneau, E.

    1987-01-01

    Type I Supernovae are thought to be the result of the thermonuclear explosion of a carbon oxygen white dwarf in a close binary system. As the only direct information concerning the physics and the triggering mechanism of supernova explosions comes from the spectrophotometry of the emitted radiation, it is worthwhile to put considerable effort on the understanding of the radiation transfer in the supernovae envelopes in order to set constraints on the theoretical models of such explosions. In this paper we analyze the role played by the layers curvature on the radiative transfer. (Author)

  7. Line radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamp Inga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic and molecular line emission from protoplanetary disks contains key information of their detailed physical and chemical structures. To unravel those structures, we need to understand line radiative transfer in dusty media and the statistical equilibrium, especially of molecules. I describe here the basic principles of statistical equilibrium and illustrate them through the two-level atom. In a second part, the fundamentals of line radiative transfer are introduced along with the various broadening mechanisms. I explain general solution methods with their drawbacks and also specific difficulties encountered in solving the line radiative transfer equation in disks (e.g. velocity gradients. I am closing with a few special cases of line emission from disks: Radiative pumping, masers and resonance scattering.

  8. Heat Transfer treatment in computer codes for safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerele, A.; Gregoric, M.

    1984-01-01

    Increased number of operating nuclear power plants has stressed importance of nuclear safety evaluation. For this reason, accordingly to regulatory commission request, safety analyses with computer codes are preformed. In this paper part of this thermohydraulic models dealing with wall-to-fluid heat transfer correlations in computer codes TRAC=PF1, RELAP4/MOD5, RELAP5/MOD1 and COBRA-IV is discussed. (author)

  9. Verification and Validation of Heat Transfer Model of AGREE Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tak, N. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seker, V.; Drzewiecki, T. J.; Downar, T. J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, Michigan (United States); Kelly, J. M. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington (United States)

    2013-05-15

    The AGREE code was originally developed as a multi physics simulation code to perform design and safety analysis of Pebble Bed Reactors (PBR). Currently, additional capability for the analysis of Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) core is in progress. Newly implemented fluid model for a PMR core is based on a subchannel approach which has been widely used in the analyses of light water reactor (LWR) cores. A hexagonal fuel (or graphite block) is discretized into triangular prism nodes having effective conductivities. Then, a meso-scale heat transfer model is applied to the unit cell geometry of a prismatic fuel block. Both unit cell geometries of multi-hole and pin-in-hole types of prismatic fuel blocks are considered in AGREE. The main objective of this work is to verify and validate the heat transfer model newly implemented for a PMR core in the AGREE code. The measured data in the HENDEL experiment were used for the validation of the heat transfer model for a pin-in-hole fuel block. However, the HENDEL tests were limited to only steady-state conditions of pin-in-hole fuel blocks. There exist no available experimental data regarding a heat transfer in multi-hole fuel blocks. Therefore, numerical benchmarks using conceptual problems are considered to verify the heat transfer model of AGREE for multi-hole fuel blocks as well as transient conditions. The CORONA and GAMMA+ codes were used to compare the numerical results. In this work, the verification and validation study were performed for the heat transfer model of the AGREE code using the HENDEL experiment and the numerical benchmarks of selected conceptual problems. The results of the present work show that the heat transfer model of AGREE is accurate and reliable for prismatic fuel blocks. Further validation of AGREE is in progress for a whole reactor problem using the HTTR safety test data such as control rod withdrawal tests and loss-of-forced convection tests.

  10. Advanced Computational Methods for Thermal Radiative Heat Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tencer, John; Carlberg, Kevin Thomas; Larsen, Marvin E.; Hogan, Roy E.,

    2016-10-01

    Participating media radiation (PMR) in weapon safety calculations for abnormal thermal environments are too costly to do routinely. This cost may be s ubstantially reduced by applying reduced order modeling (ROM) techniques. The application of ROM to PMR is a new and unique approach for this class of problems. This approach was investigated by the authors and shown to provide significant reductions in the computational expense associated with typical PMR simulations. Once this technology is migrated into production heat transfer analysis codes this capability will enable the routine use of PMR heat transfer in higher - fidelity simulations of weapon resp onse in fire environments.

  11. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Coupled with Radiation Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susa, Hajime

    2006-04-01

    We have constructed a brand-new radiation hydrodynamics solver based upon Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, which works on a parallel computer system. The code is designed to investigate the formation and evolution of first-generation objects at z ≳ 10, where the radiative feedback from various sources plays important roles. The code can compute the fraction of chemical species e, H+, H, H-, H2, and H+2 by by fully implicit time integration. It also can deal with multiple sources of ionizing radiation, as well as radiation at Lyman-Werner band. We compare the results for a few test calculations with the results of one-dimensional simulations, in which we find good agreements with each other. We also evaluate the speedup by parallelization, which is found to be almost ideal, as long as the number of sources is comparable to the number of processors.

  12. Los Alamos radiation transport code system on desktop computing platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briesmeister, J.F.; Brinkley, F.W.; Clark, B.A.; West, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) consists of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes and data libraries. These codes were originally developed many years ago and have undergone continual improvement. With a large initial effort and continued vigilance, the codes are easily portable from one type of hardware to another. The performance of scientific work-stations (SWS) has evolved to the point that such platforms can be used routinely to perform sophisticated radiation transport calculations. As the personal computer (PC) performance approaches that of the SWS, the hardware options for desk-top radiation transport calculations expands considerably. The current status of the radiation transport codes within the LARTCS is described: MCNP, SABRINA, LAHET, ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, and ONELD. Specifically, the authors discuss hardware systems on which the codes run and present code performance comparisons for various machines

  13. International symposium on radiative heat transfer: Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The international symposium on radiative heat transfer was held on 14-18 August 1995 Turkey. The specialists discussed radiation transfer in materials processing and manufacturing, solution of radiative heat transfer equation, transient radiation problem and radiation-turbulence interactions, raditive properties of gases, atmospheric and stellar radiative transfer , radiative transfer and its applications, optical and radiative properties of soot particles, inverse radiation problems, partticles, fibres,thermophoresis and waves and modelling of comprehensive systems at the meeting. Almost 79 papers were presented in the meeting

  14. Calculation codes in radiation protection, radiation physics and dosimetry; Codes de calcul en radioprotection, radiophysique et dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    These scientific days had for objective to draw up the situation of calculation codes of radiation transport, of sources estimation, of radiation doses managements and to draw the future perspectives. (N.C.)

  15. Neutronics methods for thermal radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    The equations of thermal radiative transfer are time discretized in a semi-implicit manner, yielding a linear transport problem for each time step. The governing equation in this problem has the form of a neutron transport equation with fission but no scattering. Numerical methods are described, whose origins lie in neutron transport, and that have been successfully adapted to this new problem. Acceleration methods that have been developed specifically for the radiative transfer problem, but may have generalizations applicable in neutronics problems, are also discussed

  16. Non-linear heat transfer computer code by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagato, Kotaro; Takikawa, Noboru

    1977-01-01

    The computer code THETA-2D for the calculation of temperature distribution by the two-dimensional finite element method was made for the analysis of heat transfer in a high temperature structure. Numerical experiment was performed for the numerical integration of the differential equation of heat conduction. The Runge-Kutta method of the numerical experiment produced an unstable solution. A stable solution was obtained by the β method with the β value of 0.35. In high temperature structures, the radiative heat transfer can not be neglected. To introduce a term of the radiative heat transfer, a functional neglecting the radiative heat transfer was derived at first. Then, the radiative term was added after the discretion by variation method. Five model calculations were carried out by the computer code. Calculation of steady heat conduction was performed. When estimated initial temperature is 1,000 degree C, reasonable heat blance was obtained. In case of steady-unsteady temperature calculation, the time integral by THETA-2D turned out to be under-estimation for enthalpy change. With a one-dimensional model, the temperature distribution in a structure, in which heat conductivity is dependent on temperature, was calculated. Calculation with a model which has a void inside was performed. Finally, model calculation for a complex system was carried out. (Kato, T.)

  17. Matrix formulations of radiative transfer including the polarization effect in a coupled atmosphere-ocean system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Yoshifumi; Higurashi, Akiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Yokota, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    A vector radiative transfer model has been developed for a coupled atmosphere-ocean system. The radiative transfer scheme is based on the discrete ordinate and matrix operator methods. The reflection/transmission matrices and source vectors are obtained for each atmospheric or oceanic layer through the discrete ordinate solution. The vertically inhomogeneous system is constructed using the matrix operator method, which combines the radiative interaction between the layers. This radiative transfer scheme is flexible for a vertically inhomogeneous system including the oceanic layers as well as the ocean surface. Compared with the benchmark results, the computational error attributable to the radiative transfer scheme has been less than 0.1% in the case of eight discrete ordinate directions. Furthermore, increasing the number of discrete ordinate directions has produced computations with higher accuracy. Based on our radiative transfer scheme, simulations of sun glint radiation have been presented for wavelengths of 670 nm and 1.6 μm. Results of simulations have shown reasonable characteristics of the sun glint radiation such as the strongly peaked, but slightly smoothed radiation by the rough ocean surface and depolarization through multiple scattering by the aerosol-loaded atmosphere. The radiative transfer scheme of this paper has been implemented to the numerical model named Pstar as one of the OpenCLASTR/STAR radiative transfer code systems, which are widely applied to many radiative transfer problems, including the polarization effect.

  18. Radiative Transfer Modeling in Proto-planetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, David; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Kloster, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) are rich astronomical research environments. Planets form in circumstellar disks of gas and dust around YSOs. With ever increasing capabilities of the observational instruments designed to look at these proto-planetary disks, most notably GPI, SPHERE, and ALMA, more accurate interfaces must be made to connect modeling of the disks with observation. PaRTY (Parallel Radiative Transfer in YSOs) is a code developed previously to model the observable density and temperature structure of such a disk by self-consistently calculating the structure of the disk based on radiative transfer physics. We present upgrades we are implementing to the PaRTY code to improve its accuracy and flexibility. These upgrades include: creating a two-sided disk model, implementing a spherical coordinate system, and implementing wavelength-dependent opacities. These upgrades will address problems in the PaRTY code of infinite optical thickness, calculation under/over-resolution, and wavelength-independent photon penetration depths, respectively. The upgraded code will be used to better model disk perturbations resulting from planet formation.

  19. Transfer matrix method for four-flux radiative transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovick, Brian; Flom, Zachary; Zipp, Lucas; Krishnamurthy, Srini

    2017-07-20

    We develop a transfer matrix method for four-flux radiative transfer, which is ideally suited for studying transport through multiple scattering layers. The model predicts the specular and diffuse reflection and transmission of multilayer composite films, including interface reflections, for diffuse or collimated incidence. For spherical particles in the diffusion approximation, we derive closed-form expressions for the matrix coefficients and show remarkable agreement with numerical Monte Carlo simulations for a range of absorption values and film thicknesses, and for an example multilayer slab.

  20. Simulation of Hamming Coding and Decoding for Microcontroller Radiation Hardening

    OpenAIRE

    Rehab I. Abdul Rahman; Mazhar B. Tayel

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of hardening the 8051 micro-controller, able to assure reliable operation in the presence of bit flips caused by radiation. Aiming at avoiding such faults in the 8051 micro-controller, Hamming code protection was used in its SRAM memory and registers. A VHDL code has been used for this hamming code protection.

  1. Practical applications of radiative wireless power transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pflug, H.; Visser, H.J.; Keyrouz, S.

    2015-01-01

    For practical use of radiative wireless power transfer (WPT), it is necessary to design a system which is able to supply circuits with a dynamic loading characteristic. In this paper we present a practical way to obtain efficiency and dc output power characteristics of a WPT system. An Avago

  2. Line radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, Inga

    Atomic and molecular line emission from protoplanetary disks contains key information of their detailed physical and chemical structures. To unravel those structures, we need to understand line radiative transfer in dusty media and the statistical equilibrium, especially of molecules. I describe

  3. Application of nonlinear Krylov acceleration to radiative transfer problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, A. T.; Adams, M. L.; Morel, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    The iterative solution technique used for radiative transfer is normally nested, with outer thermal iterations and inner transport iterations. We implement a nonlinear Krylov acceleration (NKA) method in the PDT code for radiative transfer problems that breaks nesting, resulting in more thermal iterations but significantly fewer total inner transport iterations. Using the metric of total inner transport iterations, we investigate a crooked-pipe-like problem and a pseudo-shock-tube problem. Using only sweep preconditioning, we compare NKA against a typical inner / outer method employing GMRES / Newton and find NKA to be comparable or superior. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of applying diffusion-based preconditioning to grey problems in conjunction with NKA. (authors)

  4. Radiative transfer model for heterogeneous 3-D scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, D. S.; Kirchner, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    A general mathematical framework for simulating processes in heterogeneous 3-D scenes is presented. Specifically, a model was designed and coded for application to radiative transfers in vegetative scenes. The model is unique in that it predicts (1) the directional spectral reflectance factors as a function of the sensor's azimuth and zenith angles and the sensor's position above the canopy, (2) the spectral absorption as a function of location within the scene, and (3) the directional spectral radiance as a function of the sensor's location within the scene. The model was shown to follow known physical principles of radiative transfer. Initial verification of the model as applied to a soybean row crop showed that the simulated directional reflectance data corresponded relatively well in gross trends to the measured data. However, the model can be greatly improved by incorporating more sophisticated and realistic anisotropic scattering algorithms

  5. Radiation transport phenomena and modeling - part A: Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorence, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    The need to understand how particle radiation (high-energy photons and electrons) from a variety of sources affects materials and electronics has motivated the development of sophisticated computer codes that describe how radiation with energies from 1.0 keV to 100.0 GeV propagates through matter. Predicting radiation transport is the necessary first step in predicting radiation effects. The radiation transport codes that are described here are general-purpose codes capable of analyzing a variety of radiation environments including those produced by nuclear weapons (x-rays, gamma rays, and neutrons), by sources in space (electrons and ions) and by accelerators (x-rays, gamma rays, and electrons). Applications of these codes include the study of radiation effects on electronics, nuclear medicine (imaging and cancer treatment), and industrial processes (food disinfestation, waste sterilization, manufacturing.) The primary focus will be on coupled electron-photon transport codes, with some brief discussion of proton transport. These codes model a radiation cascade in which electrons produce photons and vice versa. This coupling between particles of different types is important for radiation effects. For instance, in an x-ray environment, electrons are produced that drive the response in electronics. In an electron environment, dose due to bremsstrahlung photons can be significant once the source electrons have been stopped

  6. Analytic transfer maps for Lie algebraic design codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Zeijts, J.; Neri, F.; Dragt, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Lie algebraic methods provide a powerful tool for modeling particle transport through Hamiltonian systems. Briefly summarized, Lie algebraic design codes work as follows: first the time t flow generated by a Hamiltonian system is represented by a Lie algebraic map acting on the initial conditions. Maps are generated for each element in the lattice or beamline under study. Next all these maps are concatenated into a one-turn or one-pass map that represents the complete dynamics of the system. Finally, the resulting map is analyzed and design decisions are made based on the linear and nonlinear entries in the map. The authors give a short description of how to find Lie algebraic transfer maps in analytic form, for inclusion in accelerator design codes. As an example they find the transfer map, through third order, for the combined-function quadrupole magnet, and use such magnets to correct detrimental third-order aberrations in a spot forming system

  7. Adaptation of radiation shielding code to space environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Koichi; Hara, Akihisa

    1992-01-01

    Recently, the trend to the development of space has heightened. To the development of space, many problems are related, and as one of them, there is the protection from cosmic ray. The cosmic ray is the radiation having ultrahigh energy, and there was not the radiation shielding design code that copes with cosmic ray so far. Therefore, the high energy radiation shielding design code for accelerators was improved so as to cope with the peculiarity that cosmic ray possesses. Moreover, the calculation of the radiation dose equivalent rate in the moon base to which the countermeasures against cosmic ray were taken was simulated by using the improved code. As the important countermeasures for the safety protection from radiation, the covering with regolith is carried out, and the effect of regolith was confirmed by using the improved code. Galactic cosmic ray, solar flare particles, radiation belt, the adaptation of the radiation shielding code HERMES to space environment, the improvement of the three-dimensional hadron cascade code HETCKFA-2 and the electromagnetic cascade code EGS 4-KFA, and the cosmic ray simulation are reported. (K.I.)

  8. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Yixuan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a. In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics.

  9. Fluid dynamics and heat transfer methods for the TRAC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, W.H.; Kirchner, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    A computer code called TRAC is being developed for analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents and other transients in light water reactors. This code involves a detailed, multidimensional description of two-phase flow coupled implicitly through appropriate heat transfer coefficients with a simulation of the temperature field in fuel and structural material. Because TRAC utilizes about 1000 fluid mesh cells to describe an LWR system, whereas existing lumped parameter codes typically involve fewer than 100 fluid cells, we have developed new highly implicit difference techniques that yield acceptable computing times on modern computers. Several test problems for which experimental data are available, including blowdown of single pipe and loop configurations with and without heated walls, have been computed with TRAC. Excellent agreement with experimental results has been obtained. (author)

  10. Fluid dynamics and heat transfer methods for the TRAC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, W.H.; Kirchner, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    A computer code called TRAC is being developed for analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents and other transients in light water reactors. This code involves a detailed, multidimensional description of two-phase flow coupled implicitly through appropriate heat transfer coefficients with a simulation of the temperature field in fuel and structural material. Because TRAC utilizes about 1000 fluid mesh cells to describe an LWR system, whereas existing lumped parameter codes typically involve fewer than 100 fluid cells, new highly implicit difference techniques are developed that yield acceptable computing times on modern computers. Several test problems for which experimental data are available, including blowdown of single pipe and loop configurations with and without heated walls, have been computed with TRAC. Excellent agreement with experimental results has been obtained

  11. Code of practice for radiation protection in veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, J.; Fenton, D.; McGarry, A.; McAllister, H.; Skelly, C

    2002-11-01

    This Code of Practice updates the Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in Veterinary Radiology prepared by the Nuclear Energy Board in June 1989. The Code is designed to give guidance to veterinary surgeons to ensure that they, their employees and members of the public are adequately protected from the hazards of ionising radiation arising from the use of X-ray equipment and radioactive substances in the practice of veterinary medicine. It reflects the regulations as specified in the Radiological Protection Act, 1991, (Ionising Radiation) Order, 2000 (S.I. No. 125 of 2000)

  12. Thermal radiation heat transfer in participating media by finite volume discretization using collimated beam incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harijishnu, R.; Jayakumar, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    The main objective of this paper is to study the heat transfer rate of thermal radiation in participating media. For that, a generated collimated beam has been passed through a two dimensional slab model of flint glass with a refractive index 2. Both Polar and azimuthal angle have been varied to generate such a beam. The Temperature of the slab and Snells law has been validated by Radiation Transfer Equation (RTE) in OpenFOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation), a CFD software which is the major computational tool used in Industry and research applications where the source code is modified in which radiation heat transfer equation is added to the case and different radiation heat transfer models are utilized. This work concentrates on the numerical strategies involving both transparent and participating media. Since Radiation Transfer Equation (RTE) is difficult to solve, the purpose of this paper is to use existing solver buoyantSimlpeFoam to solve radiation model in the participating media by compiling the source code to obtain the heat transfer rate inside the slab by varying the Intensity of radiation. The Finite Volume Method (FVM) is applied to solve the Radiation Transfer Equation (RTE) governing the above said physical phenomena.

  13. Modeling Radiative Heat Transfer and Turbulence-Radiation Interactions in Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Chandan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sircar, Arpan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Imren, Abdurrahman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Haworth, Daniel C [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Roy, Somesh P [Marquette University (United States); Ge, Wenjun [University of California Merced (United States); Modest, Michael F [University of California Merced (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Detailed radiation modelling in piston engines has received relatively little attention to date. Recently, it is being revisited in light of current trends towards higher operating pressures and higher levels of exhaust-gas recirculation, both of which enhance molecular gas radiation. Advanced high-efficiency engines also are expected to function closer to the limits of stable operation, where even small perturbations to the energy balance can have a large influence on system behavior. Here several different spectral radiation property models and radiative transfer equation (RTE) solvers have been implemented in an OpenFOAM-based engine CFD code, and simulations have been performed for a full-load (peak pressure ~200 bar) heavy-duty diesel engine. Differences in computed temperature fields, NO and soot levels, and wall heat transfer rates are shown for different combinations of spectral models and RTE solvers. The relative importance of molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation is examined. And the influence of turbulence-radiation interactions is determined by comparing results obtained using local mean values of composition and temperature to compute radiative emission and absorption with those obtained using a particle-based transported probability density function method.

  14. Condensation heat transfer coefficient with noncondensible gases for heat transfer in thermal hydraulic codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.; Hassan, Y.A.

    1995-01-01

    Condensation in the presence of noncondensible gases plays an important role in the nuclear industry. The RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code was used to study the ability of the code to predict this phenomenon. Two separate effects experiments were simulated using this code. These were the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) Pressurizer Experiment, the MIT Single Tube Experiment. A new iterative approach to calculate the interface temperature and the degraded heat transfer coefficient was developed and implemented in the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code. This model employs the heat transfer simultaneously. This model was found to perform much better than the reduction factor approach. The calculations using the new model were found to be in much better agreement with the experimental values

  15. Condensation heat transfer coefficient with noncondensible gases for heat transfer in thermal hydraulic codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, S.; Hassan, Y.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Condensation in the presence of noncondensible gases plays an important role in the nuclear industry. The RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code was used to study the ability of the code to predict this phenomenon. Two separate effects experiments were simulated using this code. These were the Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s (MIT) Pressurizer Experiment, the MIT Single Tube Experiment. A new iterative approach to calculate the interface temperature and the degraded heat transfer coefficient was developed and implemented in the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code. This model employs the heat transfer simultaneously. This model was found to perform much better than the reduction factor approach. The calculations using the new model were found to be in much better agreement with the experimental values.

  16. GAM-HEAT -- a computer code to compute heat transfer in complex enclosures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.E.; Taylor, J.R.; Kielpinski, A.L.; Steimke, J.L.

    1991-02-01

    The GAM-HEAT code was developed for heat transfer analyses associated with postulated Double Ended Guillotine Break Loss Of Coolant Accidents (DEGB LOCA) resulting in a drained reactor vessel. In these analyses the gamma radiation resulting from fission product decay constitutes the primary source of energy as a function of time. This energy is deposited into the various reactor components and is re- radiated as thermal energy. The code accounts for all radiant heat exchanges within and leaving the reactor enclosure. The SRS reactors constitute complex radiant exchange enclosures since there are many assemblies of various types within the primary enclosure and most of the assemblies themselves constitute enclosures. GAM-HEAT accounts for this complexity by processing externally generated view factors and connectivity matrices, and also accounts for convective, conductive, and advective heat exchanges. The code is applicable for many situations involving heat exchange between surfaces within a radiatively passive medium. The GAM-HEAT code has been exercised extensively for computing transient temperatures in SRS reactors with specific charges and control components. Results from these computations have been used to establish the need for and to evaluate hardware modifications designed to mitigate results of postulated accident scenarios, and to assist in the specification of safe reactor operating power limits. The code utilizes temperature dependence on material properties. The efficiency of the code has been enhanced by the use of an iterative equation solver. Verification of the code to date consists of comparisons with parallel efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory and with similar efforts at Westinghouse Science and Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA, and benchmarked using problems with known analytical or iterated solutions. All comparisons and tests yield results that indicate the GAM-HEAT code performs as intended

  17. Calculation codes for radiant heat transfers; Les codes de calcul de rayonnement thermique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This document reports on 12 papers about computerized simulation and modeling of radiant heat transfers and fluid flows in various industrial and domestic situations: space heating, metal industry (furnaces, boilers..), aerospace industry (turbojet engines, combustion chambers) etc.. This workshop was organized by the ``radiation`` section of the French society of thermal engineers. (J.S.)

  18. Calculation codes for radiant heat transfers; Les codes de calcul de rayonnement thermique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This document reports on 12 papers about computerized simulation and modeling of radiant heat transfers and fluid flows in various industrial and domestic situations: space heating, metal industry (furnaces, boilers..), aerospace industry (turbojet engines, combustion chambers) etc.. This workshop was organized by the ``radiation`` section of the French society of thermal engineers. (J.S.)

  19. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yixuan; Liu, Baoan; Shen, Sheng; Yu, Zongfu

    2016-06-01

    Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a). In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics. Thermal extraction works by using a specially designed thermal extractor to convert and guide the near-field energy to the far field, as shown in Fig. 1b. The same blackbody as shown in Fig. 1a is placed closely below the thermal extractor with a spacing smaller than the thermal wavelength. The near-field coupling transfers radiative energy with a density greater than σT4. The thermal extractor, made from transparent and high-index or structured materials, does not emit or absorb any radiation. It transforms the near-field energy and sends it toward the far field. As a result, the total amount of far-field radiative heat dissipated by the same blackbody is greatly enhanced above SσT4, where S is the area of the emitter. This paper will review the progress in thermal

  20. Recent developments in the Los Alamos radiation transport code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, R.A.; Parsons, K.

    1997-01-01

    A brief progress report on updates to the Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) for solving criticality and fixed-source problems is provided. LARTCS integrates the Diffusion Accelerated Neutral Transport (DANT) discrete ordinates codes with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The LARCTS code is being developed with a graphical user interface for problem setup and analysis. Progress in the DANT system for criticality applications include a two-dimensional module which can be linked to a mesh-generation code and a faster iteration scheme. Updates to MCNP Version 4A allow statistical checks of calculated Monte Carlo results

  1. Radiative Transfer Through Discs of Cataclysmic Variables

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korčáková, Daniela; Nagel, T.; Werner, K.; Suleimanov, V.; Votruba, Viktor

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1273, - (2010), s. 350-353 ISSN 1551-7616. [European White Dwarf Workshop /17./. Tübingen, 16.08.2010-20.08.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP205/09/P476 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : radiative transfer * Doppler effect, * accretion disks Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  2. Code of practice of radiation protection in fixed nuclear gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltayeb, M. A. M.

    2012-09-01

    The present work aims at developing and updating a code of practice of radiation protection in fixed nuclear gauges that comply with current international recommendations. The work also intended to evaluate the current radiation protection situation in two selected companies using nuclear gauges in Sudan. A draft of the code is proposed which includes the basic principle of protection such as source construction and gauges radiation monitoring, storage maintenance and leak testing as well as specific issues related to nuclear gauges. The practical part of this study included investigation of radiation protection in the comparisons using nuclear gauges for level detection, to evaluate the level of radiation protection and the compliance to the regulatory authority regulations. The result revealed that the two companies do not have an effective radiation protection program and that can lead to exposure of workers to unnecessary doses. Some recommendations were stated, if implemented they could improve the status of radiation protection in those companies. (Author)

  3. Polarized Radiative Transfer in Fluctuating Stochastic Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallah, M.; Degheidy, A.R.; Selim, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    The problem of polarized radiative transfer in a planar cluttered atmospheric medium (like cloudy atmosphere) is proposed. The solution is presented for an arbitrary absorption and scattering cross sections. The extinction function of the medium is assumed to be a continuous random function of position, with fluctuations about the mean taken as Gaussian distributed. The joint probability distribution function of these Gaussian random variables is used to calculate the ensemble-averaged quantities, such as reflectivity, radiative energy and radiative flux, for an arbitrary correlation function. A modified Gaussian probability distribution function is also used to average the solution in order to exclude the probable negative values of the optical variable. The problem is considered in half space medium which has specular reflecting boundary exposed to unit external incident flux. Numerical results of the average reflectivity, average radiant energy and average net flux are obtained for both Gaussian and modified Gaussian probability density functions at different degrees of polarization

  4. Radiative transfer through terrestrial atmosphere and ocean: Software package SCIATRAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanov, V.V.; Rozanov, A.V.; Kokhanovsky, A.A.; Burrows, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    SCIATRAN is a comprehensive software package for the modeling of radiative transfer processes in the terrestrial atmosphere and ocean in the spectral range from the ultraviolet to the thermal infrared (0.18–40μm) including multiple scattering processes, polarization, thermal emission and ocean–atmosphere coupling. The software is capable of modeling spectral and angular distributions of the intensity or the Stokes vector of the transmitted, scattered, reflected, and emitted radiation assuming either a plane-parallel or a spherical atmosphere. Simulations are done either in the scalar or in the vector mode (i.e. accounting for the polarization) for observations by space-, air-, ship- and balloon-borne, ground-based, and underwater instruments in various viewing geometries (nadir, off-nadir, limb, occultation, zenith-sky, off-axis). All significant radiative transfer processes are accounted for. These are, e.g. the Rayleigh scattering, scattering by aerosol and cloud particles, absorption by gaseous components, and bidirectional reflection by an underlying surface including Fresnel reflection from a flat or roughened ocean surface. The software package contains several radiative transfer solvers including finite difference and discrete-ordinate techniques, an extensive database, and a specific module for solving inverse problems. In contrast to many other radiative transfer codes, SCIATRAN incorporates an efficient approach to calculate the so-called Jacobians, i.e. derivatives of the intensity with respect to various atmospheric and surface parameters. In this paper we discuss numerical methods used in SCIATRAN to solve the scalar and vector radiative transfer equation, describe databases of atmospheric, oceanic, and surface parameters incorporated in SCIATRAN, and demonstrate how to solve some selected radiative transfer problems using the SCIATRAN package. During the last decades, a lot of studies have been published demonstrating that SCIATRAN is a valuable

  5. Application of the TEMPEST computer code to canister-filling heat transfer problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Faletti, D.W.; Budden, M.J.

    1988-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) researchers used the TEMPEST computer code to simulate thermal cooldown behavior of nuclear waste glass after it was poured into steel canisters for long-term storage. The objective of this work was to determine the accuracy and applicability of the TEMPEST code when used to compute canister thermal histories. First, experimental data were obtained to provide the basis for comparing TEMPEST-generated predictions. Five canisters were instrumented with appropriately located radial and axial thermocouples. The canister were filled using the pilot-scale ceramic melter (PSCM) at PNL. Each canister was filled in either a continous or a batch filling mode. One of the canisters was also filled within a turntable simulant (a group of cylindrical shells with heat transfer resistances similar to those in an actual melter turntable). This was necessary to provide a basis for assessing the ability of the TEMPEST code to also model the transient cooling of canisters in a melter turntable. The continous-fill model, Version M, was found to predict temperatures with more accuracy. The turntable simulant experiment demonstrated that TEMPEST can adequately model the asymmetric temperature field caused by the turntable geometry. Further, TEMPEST can acceptably predict the canister cooling history within a turntable, despite code limitations in computing simultaneous radiation and convection heat transfer between shells, along with uncertainty in stainless-steel surface emissivities. Based on the successful performance of TEMPEST Version M, development was initiated to incorporate 1) full viscous glass convection, 2) a dynamically adaptive grid that automatically follows the glass/air interface throughout the transient, and 3) a full enclosure radiation model to allow radiation heat transfer to non-nearest neighbor cells. 5 refs., 47 figs., 17 tabs

  6. A RADIATION TRANSFER SOLVER FOR ATHENA USING SHORT CHARACTERISTICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Jiang Yanfei

    2012-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiation MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where radiation pressure is small compared with gas pressure. For the latter case, the module is combined with the standard MHD integrators using operator splitting: we describe this approach in detail, including a new constraint on the time step for stability due to radiation diffusion modes. Implementation of the VET method for radiation pressure dominated flows is described in a companion paper. We present results from a suite of test problems for both the RT solver itself and for dynamical problems that include radiative heating and cooling. These tests demonstrate that the radiative transfer solution is accurate and confirm that the operator split method is stable, convergent, and efficient for problems of interest. We demonstrate there is no need to adopt ad hoc assumptions of questionable accuracy to solve RT problems in concert with MHD: the computational cost for our general-purpose module for simple (e.g., LTE gray) problems can be comparable to or less than a single time step of Athena's MHD integrators, and only few times more expensive than that for more general (non-LTE) problems.

  7. Radiation-emitting Electronic Product Codes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database contains product names and associated information developed by the Center for all products, both medical and non-medical, which emit radiation. It...

  8. SMRT: A new, modular snow microwave radiative transfer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Ghislain; Sandells, Melody; Löwe, Henning; Dumont, Marie; Essery, Richard; Floury, Nicolas; Kontu, Anna; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Maslanka, William; Mätzler, Christian; Morin, Samuel; Wiesmann, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Forward models of radiative transfer processes are needed to interpret remote sensing data and derive measurements of snow properties such as snow mass. A key requirement and challenge for microwave emission and scattering models is an accurate description of the snow microstructure. The snow microwave radiative transfer model (SMRT) was designed to cater for potential future active and/or passive satellite missions and developed to improve understanding of how to parameterize snow microstructure. SMRT is implemented in Python and is modular to allow easy intercomparison of different theoretical approaches. Separate modules are included for the snow microstructure model, electromagnetic module, radiative transfer solver, substrate, interface reflectivities, atmosphere and permittivities. An object-oriented approach is used with carefully specified exchanges between modules to allow future extensibility i.e. without constraining the parameter list requirements. This presentation illustrates the capabilities of SMRT. At present, five different snow microstructure models have been implemented, and direct insertion of the autocorrelation function from microtomography data is also foreseen with SMRT. Three electromagnetic modules are currently available. While DMRT-QCA and Rayleigh models need specific microstructure models, the Improved Born Approximation may be used with any microstructure representation. A discrete ordinates approach with stream connection is used to solve the radiative transfer equations, although future inclusion of 6-flux and 2-flux solvers are envisioned. Wrappers have been included to allow existing microwave emission models (MEMLS, HUT, DMRT-QMS) to be run with the same inputs and minimal extra code (2 lines). Comparisons between theoretical approaches will be shown, and evaluation against field experiments in the frequency range 5-150 GHz. SMRT is simple and elegant to use whilst providing a framework for future development within the

  9. Code of practice against radiation hazards at PINSTECH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubarak, M.A.; Javed, M.; Ahmad, S.

    1982-10-01

    It is the radiation safety policy of PAEC/PINSTECH that all radiation exposure should be kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A code of practice against radiation hazards at PINSTECH was written in 1972 which regulated the conduct of radiation work at PINSTECH. Since the radiation work at PINSTECH has greatly increased, it was considered necessary to revise the code so as to incorporate the new concepts in this field as well as to help meet the present requirements of radiation protection. The procedures set forth in this code are mandatory and in no case should any of them be deviated except under an emergency situation which may be handled according to procedures laid down in a separate manual ''Emergency Procedures at PARR-PINSTECH'' (PINSTECH/HP--19). All those supervising or performing any kind of radiation work are required to study and adhere to these procedures. Copy of this code should be kept in every radiation laboratory for ready reference. (author)

  10. Available computer codes and data for radiation transport analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trubey, D.K.; Maskewitz, B.F.; Roussin, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC), sponsored and supported by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA), is a technical institute serving the radiation transport and shielding community. It acquires, selects, stores, retrieves, evaluates, analyzes, synthesizes, and disseminates information on shielding and ionizing radiation transport. The major activities include: (1) operating a computer-based information system and answering inquiries on radiation analysis, (2) collecting, checking out, packaging, and distributing large computer codes, and evaluated and processed data libraries. The data packages include multigroup coupled neutron-gamma-ray cross sections and kerma coefficients, other nuclear data, and radiation transport benchmark problem results

  11. Validation of the community radiative transfer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Shouguo; Yang Ping; Weng Fuzhong; Liu Quanhua; Han Yong; Delst, Paul van; Li Jun; Baum, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    To validate the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) developed by the U.S. Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA), the discrete ordinate radiative transfer (DISORT) model and the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) are combined in order to provide a reference benchmark. Compared with the benchmark, the CRTM appears quite accurate for both clear sky and ice cloud radiance simulations with RMS errors below 0.2 K, except for clouds with small ice particles. In a computer CPU run time comparison, the CRTM is faster than DISORT by approximately two orders of magnitude. Using the operational MODIS cloud products and the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) atmospheric profiles as an input, the CRTM is employed to simulate the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances. The CRTM simulations are shown to be in reasonably close agreement with the AIRS measurements (the discrepancies are within 2 K in terms of brightness temperature difference). Furthermore, the impact of uncertainties in the input cloud properties and atmospheric profiles on the CRTM simulations has been assessed. The CRTM-based brightness temperatures (BTs) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), for both thin (τ 30) clouds, are highly sensitive to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature and cloud top pressure. However, for an optically thick cloud, the CRTM-based BTs are not sensitive to the uncertainties of cloud optical thickness, effective particle size, and atmospheric humidity profiles. On the contrary, the uncertainties of the CRTM-based TOA BTs resulting from effective particle size and optical thickness are not negligible in an optically thin cloud.

  12. Arcmancer: Geodesics and polarized radiative transfer library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihajoki, Pauli; Mannerkoski, Matias; Nättilä, Joonas; Johansson, Peter H.

    2018-05-01

    Arcmancer computes geodesics and performs polarized radiative transfer in user-specified spacetimes. The library supports Riemannian and semi-Riemannian spaces of any dimension and metric; it also supports multiple simultaneous coordinate charts, embedded geometric shapes, local coordinate systems, and automatic parallel propagation. Arcmancer can be used to solve various problems in numerical geometry, such as solving the curve equation of motion using adaptive integration with configurable tolerances and differential equations along precomputed curves. It also provides support for curves with an arbitrary acceleration term and generic tools for generating ray initial conditions and performing parallel computation over the image, among other tools.

  13. Matrix-exponential description of radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterman, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    By appling the matrix-exponential operator technique to the radiative-transfer equation in discrete form, new analytical solutions are obtained for the transmission and reflection matrices in the limiting cases x >1, where x is the optical depth of the layer. Orthongonality of the eigenvectors of the matrix exponential apparently yields new conditions for determining. Chandrasekhar's characteristic roots. The exact law of reflection for the discrete eigenfunctions is also obtained. Finally, when used in conjuction with the doubling method, the matrix exponential should result in reduction in both computation time and loss of precision

  14. Nonlinear response matrix methods for radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.F. Jr.; Lewis, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear response matrix formalism is presented for the solution of time-dependent radiative transfer problems. The essential feature of the method is that within each computational cell the temperature is calculated in response to the incoming photons from all frequency groups. Thus the updating of the temperature distribution is placed within the iterative solution of the spaceangle transport problem, instead of being placed outside of it. The method is formulated for both grey and multifrequency problems and applied in slab geometry. The method is compared to the more conventional source iteration technique. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  15. Acceleration of a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochstedler, R.D.; Smith, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    Execution time for the Integrated TIGER Series (ITS) Monte Carlo radiation transport code has been reduced by careful re-coding of computationally intensive subroutines. Three test cases for the TIGER (1-D slab geometry), CYLTRAN (2-D cylindrical geometry), and ACCEPT (3-D arbitrary geometry) codes were identified and used to benchmark and profile program execution. Based upon these results, sixteen top time-consuming subroutines were examined and nine of them modified to accelerate computations with equivalent numerical output to the original. The results obtained via this study indicate that speedup factors of 1.90 for the TIGER code, 1.67 for the CYLTRAN code, and 1.11 for the ACCEPT code are achievable. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  16. SKIRT: The design of a suite of input models for Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baes, M.; Camps, P.

    2015-09-01

    The Monte Carlo method is the most popular technique to perform radiative transfer simulations in a general 3D geometry. The algorithms behind and acceleration techniques for Monte Carlo radiative transfer are discussed extensively in the literature, and many different Monte Carlo codes are publicly available. On the contrary, the design of a suite of components that can be used for the distribution of sources and sinks in radiative transfer codes has received very little attention. The availability of such models, with different degrees of complexity, has many benefits. For example, they can serve as toy models to test new physical ingredients, or as parameterised models for inverse radiative transfer fitting. For 3D Monte Carlo codes, this requires algorithms to efficiently generate random positions from 3D density distributions. We describe the design of a flexible suite of components for the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The design is based on a combination of basic building blocks (which can be either analytical toy models or numerical models defined on grids or a set of particles) and the extensive use of decorators that combine and alter these building blocks to more complex structures. For a number of decorators, e.g. those that add spiral structure or clumpiness, we provide a detailed description of the algorithms that can be used to generate random positions. Advantages of this decorator-based design include code transparency, the avoidance of code duplication, and an increase in code maintainability. Moreover, since decorators can be chained without problems, very complex models can easily be constructed out of simple building blocks. Finally, based on a number of test simulations, we demonstrate that our design using customised random position generators is superior to a simpler design based on a generic black-box random position generator.

  17. Controlling Energy Radiations of Electromagnetic Waves via Frequency Coding Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haotian; Liu, Shuo; Wan, Xiang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Dan; Li, Lianlin; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-09-01

    Metamaterials are artificial structures composed of subwavelength unit cells to control electromagnetic (EM) waves. The spatial coding representation of metamaterial has the ability to describe the material in a digital way. The spatial coding metamaterials are typically constructed by unit cells that have similar shapes with fixed functionality. Here, the concept of frequency coding metamaterial is proposed, which achieves different controls of EM energy radiations with a fixed spatial coding pattern when the frequency changes. In this case, not only different phase responses of the unit cells are considered, but also different phase sensitivities are also required. Due to different frequency sensitivities of unit cells, two units with the same phase response at the initial frequency may have different phase responses at higher frequency. To describe the frequency coding property of unit cell, digitalized frequency sensitivity is proposed, in which the units are encoded with digits "0" and "1" to represent the low and high phase sensitivities, respectively. By this merit, two degrees of freedom, spatial coding and frequency coding, are obtained to control the EM energy radiations by a new class of frequency-spatial coding metamaterials. The above concepts and physical phenomena are confirmed by numerical simulations and experiments.

  18. A rapid radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, X.; Smith, E. A.; Justus, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over alternative two-stream solutions is that in addition to yielding the irradiance components, which turn out to be mathematically equivalent to the delta-Eddington approximation, the radiance field can also be expanded in a mathematically consistent fashion. Tests with the model against a more precise multistream discrete ordinate model over a wide range of input parameters demonstrate that the new approximate method typically produces average radiance differences of less than 5%, with worst average differences of approximately 10%-15%. By the same token, the computational speed of the new model is some tens to thousands times faster than that of the more precise model when its stream resolution is set to generate precise calculations.

  19. Computer codes for problems of isotope and radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remer, M.

    1986-12-01

    A survey is given of computer codes for problems in isotope and radiation research. Altogether 44 codes are described as titles with abstracts. 17 of them are in the INIS scope and are processed individually. The subjects are indicated in the chapter headings: 1) analysis of tracer experiments, 2) spectrum calculations, 3) calculations of ion and electron trajectories, 4) evaluation of gamma irradiation plants, and 5) general software

  20. Radiatively driven relativistic spherical winds under relativistic radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukue, J.

    2018-05-01

    We numerically investigate radiatively driven relativistic spherical winds from the central luminous object with mass M and luminosity L* under Newtonian gravity, special relativity, and relativistic radiative transfer. We solve both the relativistic radiative transfer equation and the relativistic hydrodynamical equations for spherically symmetric flows under the double-iteration processes, to obtain the intensity and velocity fields simultaneously. We found that the momentum-driven winds with scattering are quickly accelerated near the central object to reach the terminal speed. The results of numerical solutions are roughly fitted by a relation of \\dot{m}=0.7(Γ _*-1)\\tau _* β _* β _out^{-2.6}, where \\dot{m} is the mass-loss rate normalized by the critical one, Γ* the central luminosity normalized by the critical one, τ* the typical optical depth, β* the initial flow speed at the central core of radius R*, and βout the terminal speed normalized by the speed of light. This relation is close to the non-relativistic analytical solution, \\dot{m} = 2(Γ _*-1)\\tau _* β _* β _out^{-2}, which can be re-expressed as β _out^2/2 = (Γ _*-1)GM/c^2 R_*. That is, the present solution with small optical depth is similar to that of the radiatively driven free outflow. Furthermore, we found that the normalized luminosity (Eddington parameter) must be larger than unity for the relativistic spherical wind to blow off with intermediate or small optical depth, i.e. Γ _* ≳ \\sqrt{(1+β _out)^3/(1-β _out)}. We briefly investigate and discuss an isothermal wind.

  1. Radiation protection code of practice in academic and research institutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, A. A. M.

    2010-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to establish a code of practice on radiation protection for safe control of radiation sources used in academic and research institutes, another aim of this study was to assess the current situation of radiation protection in some of the academic and research institutes.To achieve the aims of this study, a draft of a code of practice has been developed which is based on international and local relevant recommendation. The developed code includes the following main issues: regulatory responsibilities, radiation protection program and design of radiation installations. The second aim had been accomplished by conducting inspection visits to five (A, B, C, D and E) academic and to four (F, G, H and I ) research institutes. Eight of such institutes are located in Khartoum State and the ninth one is in Madani city (Aljazeera State). The inspection activities have been carried out using a standard inspection check list developed by the regulatory authority of the Sudan. The inspection missions to the above mentioned institutes involved also evaluation of radiation levels around the premises and storage areas of radiation sources. The dose rate measurement around radiation sources locations were found to be quite low. This mainly is due to the fact that the activities of most radionuclides that are used in these institutes are quite low ( in the range of micro curies). Also ,most the x-ray machines that were found in use for scientific academic and research purposes work at low k Vp of maximum 60 k Vp. None of the radiation workers in the inspected institutes has a personal radiation monitoring device, therefor staff dose levels have not been assessed. However it was noted that in most of the academic/ research studies radiation workers are only exposed to very low levels of radiation and for a very short time that dose not exceed 1 minute, therefore the expected occupational exposure of the staff is very low. Radiation measurement in public

  2. Code of practice : safe use of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    Ionizing radiation is used extensively in the field of scientific research. The risk of uncontrolled exposure to both the worker and the environment is ever present. The purpose of this Code is to set out practices considered by the CSIRO Health and Safety Committee to be appropriate for CSIRO staff and, if followed, they will result in appropriate protection for research staff and the environment. The Code does not cover sources of non-ionizing radiation such as microwave ovens, RF generators and laser sources

  3. Method for calculating internal radiation and ventilation with the ADINAT heat-flow code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butkovich, T.R.; Montan, D.N.

    1980-01-01

    One objective of the spent fuel test in Climax Stock granite (SFTC) is to correctly model the thermal transport, and the changes in the stress field and accompanying displacements from the application of the thermal loads. We have chosen the ADINA and ADINAT finite element codes to do these calculations. ADINAT is a heat transfer code compatible to the ADINA displacement and stress analysis code. The heat flow problem encountered at SFTC requires a code with conduction, radiation, and ventilation capabilities, which the present version of ADINAT does not have. We have devised a method for calculating internal radiation and ventilation with the ADINAT code. This method effectively reproduces the results from the TRUMP multi-dimensional finite difference code, which correctly models radiative heat transport between drift surfaces, conductive and convective thermal transport to and through air in the drifts, and mass flow of air in the drifts. The temperature histories for each node in the finite element mesh calculated with ADINAT using this method can be used directly in the ADINA thermal-mechanical calculation

  4. User's manual for the Heat Pipe Space Radiator design and analysis Code (HEPSPARC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainley, Donald C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat pipe space radiatior code (HEPSPARC), was written for the NASA Lewis Research Center and is used for the design and analysis of a radiator that is constructed from a pumped fluid loop that transfers heat to the evaporative section of heat pipes. This manual is designed to familiarize the user with this new code and to serve as a reference for its use. This manual documents the completed work and is intended to be the first step towards verification of the HEPSPARC code. Details are furnished to provide a description of all the requirements and variables used in the design and analysis of a combined pumped loop/heat pipe radiator system. A description of the subroutines used in the program is furnished for those interested in understanding its detailed workings.

  5. ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS FOR RADIATIVE TRANSFER: IMPLICATIONS FOR GIANT PLANET FORMATION BY DISK INSTABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2009-01-01

    The disk instability mechanism for giant planet formation is based on the formation of clumps in a marginally gravitationally unstable protoplanetary disk, which must lose thermal energy through a combination of convection and radiative cooling if they are to survive and contract to become giant protoplanets. While there is good observational support for forming at least some giant planets by disk instability, the mechanism has become theoretically contentious, with different three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics codes often yielding different results. Rigorous code testing is required to make further progress. Here we present two new analytical solutions for radiative transfer in spherical coordinates, suitable for testing the code employed in all of the Boss disk instability calculations. The testing shows that the Boss code radiative transfer routines do an excellent job of relaxing to and maintaining the analytical results for the radial temperature and radiative flux profiles for a spherical cloud with high or moderate optical depths, including the transition from optically thick to optically thin regions. These radial test results are independent of whether the Eddington approximation, diffusion approximation, or flux-limited diffusion approximation routines are employed. The Boss code does an equally excellent job of relaxing to and maintaining the analytical results for the vertical (θ) temperature and radiative flux profiles for a disk with a height proportional to the radial distance. These tests strongly support the disk instability mechanism for forming giant planets.

  6. Homogenization of some radiative heat transfer models: application to gas-cooled reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ganaoui, K.

    2006-09-01

    In the context of homogenization theory we treat some heat transfer problems involving unusual (according to the homogenization) boundary conditions. These problems are defined in a solid periodic perforated domain where two scales (macroscopic and microscopic) are to be taken into account and describe heat transfer by conduction in the solid and by radiation on the wall of each hole. Two kinds of radiation are considered: radiation in an infinite medium (non-linear problem) and radiation in cavity with grey-diffuse walls (non-linear and non-local problem). The derived homogenized models are conduction problems with an effective conductivity which depend on the considered radiation. Thus we introduce a framework (homogenization and validation) based on mathematical justification using the two-scale convergence method and numerical validation by simulations using the computer code CAST3M. This study, performed for gas cooled reactors cores, can be extended to other perforated domains involving the considered heat transfer phenomena. (author)

  7. Simulation of solar radiative transfer in cumulus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuev, V.E.; Titov, G.A. [Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-04-01

    This work presents a 3-D model of radiative transfer which is used to study the relationship between the spatial distribution of cumulus clouds and fluxes (albedo and transmittance) of visible solar radiation.

  8. Influence of radiation heat transfer during a severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazares R, R. I.; Epinosa P, G.; Varela H, J. R.; Vazquez R, A. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Polo L, M. A., E-mail: ricardo-cazares@hotmail.com [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this work is to determine the influence of the radiation heat transfer on an average fuel channel during a severe accident of a BWR nuclear power plant. The analysis considers the radiation heat transfer in a participating medium, where the gases inside the system participate in the radiation heat transfer. We consider the steam-water mixture as an isothermal gray gas, and the boundaries of the system as a gray diffuse isothermal surface for the clad and refractory surfaces for the rest, and consider the average fuel channel as an enclosure system. During a severe accident, generation and diffusion of hydrogen begin at high temperature range (1,273 to 2,100 K), and the fuel rod cladding oxidation, but the hydrogen generated do not participate in the radiation heat transfer because it does not have any radiation properties. The heat transfer process in the fuel assembly is considered with a reduced order model, and from this, the convection and the radiation heat transfer is introduced in the system. In this paper, a system with and without the radiation heat transfer term was calculated and analyzed in order to obtain the influence of the radiation heat transfer on the average fuel channel. We show the behavior of radiation heat transfer effects on the temporal evolution of the hydrogen concentration and temperature profiles in a fuel assembly, where a stream of steam is flowing. Finally, this study is a practical complement for more accurate modeling of a severe accident analysis. (Author)

  9. Influence of radiation heat transfer during a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazares R, R. I.; Epinosa P, G.; Varela H, J. R.; Vazquez R, A.; Polo L, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the influence of the radiation heat transfer on an average fuel channel during a severe accident of a BWR nuclear power plant. The analysis considers the radiation heat transfer in a participating medium, where the gases inside the system participate in the radiation heat transfer. We consider the steam-water mixture as an isothermal gray gas, and the boundaries of the system as a gray diffuse isothermal surface for the clad and refractory surfaces for the rest, and consider the average fuel channel as an enclosure system. During a severe accident, generation and diffusion of hydrogen begin at high temperature range (1,273 to 2,100 K), and the fuel rod cladding oxidation, but the hydrogen generated do not participate in the radiation heat transfer because it does not have any radiation properties. The heat transfer process in the fuel assembly is considered with a reduced order model, and from this, the convection and the radiation heat transfer is introduced in the system. In this paper, a system with and without the radiation heat transfer term was calculated and analyzed in order to obtain the influence of the radiation heat transfer on the average fuel channel. We show the behavior of radiation heat transfer effects on the temporal evolution of the hydrogen concentration and temperature profiles in a fuel assembly, where a stream of steam is flowing. Finally, this study is a practical complement for more accurate modeling of a severe accident analysis. (Author)

  10. Interference-exact radiative transfer equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partanen, Mikko; Haÿrynen, Teppo; Oksanen, Jani

    2017-01-01

    Maxwell's equations with stochastic or quantum optical source terms accounting for the quantum nature of light. We show that both the nonlocal wave and local particle features associated with interference and emission of propagating fields in stratified geometries can be fully captured by local damping...... and scattering coefficients derived from the recently introduced quantized fluctuational electrodynamics (QFED) framework. In addition to describing the nonlocal optical interference processes as local directionally resolved effects, this allows reformulating the well known and widely used radiative transfer...... equation (RTE) as a physically transparent interference-exact model that extends the useful range of computationally efficient and quantum optically accurate interference-aware optical models from simple structures to full optical devices....

  11. Radiatively-suppressed spherical accretion under relativistic radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukue, Jun

    2018-03-01

    We numerically examine radiatively-suppressed relativistic spherical accretion flows on to a central object with mass M under Newtonian gravity and special relativity. We simultaneously solve both the relativistic radiative transfer equation and the relativistic hydrodynamical equations for spherically symmetric flows under the double iteration process in the case of the intermediate optical depth. We find that the accretion flow is suppressed, compared with the freefall case in the nonrelativistic regime. For example, in the case of accretion on to a luminous core with accretion luminosity L*, the freefall velocity v normalized by the speed of light c under the radiative force in the nonrelativistic regime is β (\\hat{r}) = v/c = -√{(1-Γ _*)/(\\hat{r}+1-Γ _*)}, where Γ* (≡ L*/LE, LE being the Eddington luminosity) is the Eddington parameter and \\hat{r} (= r/rS, rS being the Schwarzschild radius) the normalized radius, whereas the infall speed at the central core is ˜0.7β(1), irrespective of the mass-accretion rate. This is due to the relativistic effect; the comoving flux is enhanced by the advective flux. We briefly examine and discuss an isothermal case, where the emission takes place in the entire space.

  12. Development of the computer code to monitor gamma radiation in the nuclear facility environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmad, Y. R.; Pudjiyanto, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Computer codes for gamma radiation monitoring in the vicinity of nuclear facility which have been developed could be introduced to the commercial potable gamma analyzer. The crucial stage of the first year activity was succeeded ; that is the codes have been tested to transfer data file (pulse high distribution) from Micro NOMAD gamma spectrometer (ORTEC product) and the convert them into dosimetry and physics quantities. Those computer codes are called as GABATAN (Gamma Analyzer of Batan) and NAGABAT (Natural Gamma Analyzer of Batan). GABATAN code can isable to used at various nuclear facilities for analyzing gamma field up to 9 MeV, while NAGABAT could be used for analyzing the contribution of natural gamma rays to the exposure rate in the certain location

  13. Radiation Coupling with the FUN3D Unstructured-Grid CFD Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The HARA radiation code is fully-coupled to the FUN3D unstructured-grid CFD code for the purpose of simulating high-energy hypersonic flows. The radiation energy source terms and surface heat transfer, under the tangent slab approximation, are included within the fluid dynamic ow solver. The Fire II flight test, at the Mach-31 1643-second trajectory point, is used as a demonstration case. Comparisons are made with an existing structured-grid capability, the LAURA/HARA coupling. The radiative surface heat transfer rates from the present approach match the benchmark values within 6%. Although radiation coupling is the focus of the present work, convective surface heat transfer rates are also reported, and are seen to vary depending upon the choice of mesh connectivity and FUN3D ux reconstruction algorithm. On a tetrahedral-element mesh the convective heating matches the benchmark at the stagnation point, but under-predicts by 15% on the Fire II shoulder. Conversely, on a mixed-element mesh the convective heating over-predicts at the stagnation point by 20%, but matches the benchmark away from the stagnation region.

  14. Code of practice for radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamed, M. I.

    2010-05-01

    In aim of this study was to develop a draft for a new code practice for radiation protection in nuclear medicine that meets the current relevant international recommendation. The draft includes the following main fields: methods of radiation protection for workers, patients and public. Also, the principles of safe design of nuclear medicine departments, quality assurance program, proper manipulation of radiation sources including radioactive waste and emergency preparedness and response. The practical part of this study includes inspections of three nuclear medicine departments available in Sudan so as to assess the degree of compliance of those departments with what is stated in this code. The inspection missions have been conducted using a checklist that addresses all items that may affect radiation raincoat issues in addition to per formin area radiation monitoring around the installation of the radioactive sources. The results of this revealed that most of the departments do not have effective radiation protection program which in turn could lead to unnecessary exposure to patients, public and workers. Finally, some recommendations are given that - if implemented - could improve the status of radiation protection in nuclear medicine department. (Author)

  15. grmonty: A MONTE CARLO CODE FOR RELATIVISTIC RADIATIVE TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Gammie, Charles F.; Leung, Po Kin; Moscibrodzka, Monika

    2009-01-01

    We describe a Monte Carlo radiative transport code intended for calculating spectra of hot, optically thin plasmas in full general relativity. The version we describe here is designed to model hot accretion flows in the Kerr metric and therefore incorporates synchrotron emission and absorption, and Compton scattering. The code can be readily generalized, however, to account for other radiative processes and an arbitrary spacetime. We describe a suite of test problems, and demonstrate the expected N -1/2 convergence rate, where N is the number of Monte Carlo samples. Finally, we illustrate the capabilities of the code with a model calculation, a spectrum of the slowly accreting black hole Sgr A* based on data provided by a numerical general relativistic MHD model of the accreting plasma.

  16. The computer code system for reactor radiation shielding in design of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chunhuai; Fu Shouxin; Liu Guilian

    1995-01-01

    The computer code system used in reactor radiation shielding design of nuclear power plant includes the source term codes, discrete ordinate transport codes, Monte Carlo and Albedo Monte Carlo codes, kernel integration codes, optimization code, temperature field code, skyshine code, coupling calculation codes and some processing codes for data libraries. This computer code system has more satisfactory variety of codes and complete sets of data library. It is widely used in reactor radiation shielding design and safety analysis of nuclear power plant and other nuclear facilities

  17. Abstracts of digital computer code packages. Assembled by the Radiation Shielding Information Center. [Radiation transport codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGill, B.; Maskewitz, B.F.; Anthony, C.M.; Comolander, H.E.; Hendrickson, H.R.

    1976-01-01

    The term ''code package'' is used to describe a miscellaneous grouping of materials which, when interpreted in connection with a digital computer, enables the scientist--user to solve technical problems in the area for which the material was designed. In general, a ''code package'' consists of written material--reports, instructions, flow charts, listings of data, and other useful material and IBM card decks (or, more often, a reel of magnetic tape) on which the source decks, sample problem input (including libraries of data) and the BCD/EBCDIC output listing from the sample problem are written. In addition to the main code, and any available auxiliary routines are also included. The abstract format was chosen to give to a potential code user several criteria for deciding whether or not he wishes to request the code package. (RWR)

  18. Simulations of corrosion product transfer with the OSCAR V1.2 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacquait, F.; Francescatto, J.; Broutin, F.; Genin, J.B.; Benier, G.; Girard, M.; You, D.; Ranchoux, G.; Bonnefon, J.; Bachet, M.; Riot, G.

    2012-09-01

    Activated Corrosion Products (ACPs) generate a radiation field in PWRs, which is the major contributor to the dose absorbed by nuclear power plant staff working during shutdown operations and maintenance. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms that control the corrosion product transfer is of the highest importance. Since the 1970's, the R and D strategy in France has been based on experiments in test loops representative of PWR conditions, on in-situ gamma spectrometry measurements of the PWR primary system contamination and on simulation code development. The simulation of corrosion product transfers in PWR primary circuits is a major challenge since it involves many physical and chemical phenomena including: corrosion, dissolution, precipitation, erosion, deposition, convection, activation... In addition to the intrinsic difficulty of multi-physics modelling, the primary systems present severe operating conditions (300 deg. C, 150 bar, neutron flux, fluid velocity up to 15 m.s -1 and very low corrosion product concentrations). The purpose of the OSCAR code, developed by the CEA in cooperation with EDF and AREVA NP, is to predict the PWR primary system contamination by corrosion and fission products. The OSCAR code is considered to be not only a tool for numerical simulations and predictions (operational practices improvements and new-built PWRs design) but also one that might combine and organise all new knowledge useful to progress on contamination. The OSCAR code for Products of Corrosion, OSCAR PC, allows researchers to analyse the corrosion product behaviour and to calculate the ACP volume and surface activities of the primary and auxiliary systems. In the new version, OSCAR PC V1.2, the corrosion product transfer in the particulate form is enhanced and a new feature is the possibility to simulate cold shutdowns. In order to validate this version, the contamination transfer has been simulated in 5 French PWRs with different operating and

  19. Prototype demonstration of radiation therapy planning code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, R.C.; Adams, K.J.; Estes, G.P.; Hughes, L.S. III; Waters, L.S.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiation therapy planning is the process by which a radiation oncologist plans a treatment protocol for a patient preparing to undergo radiation therapy. The objective is to develop a protocol that delivers sufficient radiation dose to the entire tumor volume, while minimizing dose to healthy tissue. Radiation therapy planning, as currently practiced in the field, suffers from inaccuracies made in modeling patient anatomy and radiation transport. This project investigated the ability to automatically model patient-specific, three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in advanced Los Alamos radiation transport codes (such as MCNP), and to efficiently generate accurate radiation dose profiles in these geometries via sophisticated physics modeling. Modem scientific visualization techniques were utilized. The long-term goal is that such a system could be used by a non-expert in a distributed computing environment to help plan the treatment protocol for any candidate radiation source. The improved accuracy offered by such a system promises increased efficacy and reduced costs for this important aspect of health care

  20. The Palaeoclimate and Terrestrial Exoplanet Radiative Transfer Model Intercomparison Project (PALAEOTRIP: experimental design and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Goldblatt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate radiative transfer calculation is fundamental to all climate modelling. For deep palaeoclimate, and increasingly terrestrial exoplanet climate science, this brings both the joy and the challenge of exotic atmospheric compositions. The challenge here is that most standard radiation codes for climate modelling have been developed for modern atmospheric conditions and may perform poorly away from these. The palaeoclimate or exoclimate modeller must either rely on these or use bespoke radiation codes, and in both cases rely on either blind faith or ad hoc testing of the code. In this paper, we describe the protocols for the Palaeoclimate and Terrestrial Exoplanet Radiative Transfer Model Intercomparison Project (PALAEOTRIP to systematically address this. This will compare as many radiation codes used for palaeoclimate or exoplanets as possible, with the aim of identifying the ranges of far-from-modern atmospheric compositions in which the codes perform well. This paper describes the experimental protocol and invites community participation in the project through 2017–2018.

  1. Calculation of the Thermal Radiation Benchmark Problems for a CANDU Fuel Channel Analysis Using the CFX-10 Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Park, Joo Hwan; Rhee, Bo Wook

    2006-07-15

    To justify the use of a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code for a CANDU fuel channel analysis, especially for the radiation heat transfer dominant conditions, the CFX-10 code is tested against three benchmark problems which were used for the validation of a radiation heat transfer in the CANDU analysis code, a CATHENA. These three benchmark problems are representative of the CANDU fuel channel configurations from a simple geometry to whole fuel channel geometry. With assumptions of a non-participating medium completely enclosed with the diffuse, gray and opaque surfaces, the solutions of the benchmark problems are obtained by the concept of surface resistance to radiation accounting for the view factors and the emissivities. The view factors are calculated by the program MATRIX version 1.0 avoiding the difficulty of hand calculation for the complex geometries. For the solutions of the benchmark problems, the temperature or the net radiation heat flux boundary conditions are prescribed for each radiating surface to determine the radiation heat transfer rate or the surface temperature, respectively by using the network method. The Discrete Transfer Model (DTM) is used for the CFX-10 radiation model and its calculation results are compared with the solutions of the benchmark problems. The CFX-10 results for the three benchmark problems are in close agreement with these solutions, so it is concluded that the CFX-10 with a DTM radiation model can be applied to the CANDU fuel channel analysis where a surface radiation heat transfer is a dominant mode of the heat transfer.

  2. Calculation of the Thermal Radiation Benchmark Problems for a CANDU Fuel Channel Analysis Using the CFX-10 Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Park, Joo Hwan; Rhee, Bo Wook

    2006-07-01

    To justify the use of a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code for a CANDU fuel channel analysis, especially for the radiation heat transfer dominant conditions, the CFX-10 code is tested against three benchmark problems which were used for the validation of a radiation heat transfer in the CANDU analysis code, a CATHENA. These three benchmark problems are representative of the CANDU fuel channel configurations from a simple geometry to whole fuel channel geometry. With assumptions of a non-participating medium completely enclosed with the diffuse, gray and opaque surfaces, the solutions of the benchmark problems are obtained by the concept of surface resistance to radiation accounting for the view factors and the emissivities. The view factors are calculated by the program MATRIX version 1.0 avoiding the difficulty of hand calculation for the complex geometries. For the solutions of the benchmark problems, the temperature or the net radiation heat flux boundary conditions are prescribed for each radiating surface to determine the radiation heat transfer rate or the surface temperature, respectively by using the network method. The Discrete Transfer Model (DTM) is used for the CFX-10 radiation model and its calculation results are compared with the solutions of the benchmark problems. The CFX-10 results for the three benchmark problems are in close agreement with these solutions, so it is concluded that the CFX-10 with a DTM radiation model can be applied to the CANDU fuel channel analysis where a surface radiation heat transfer is a dominant mode of the heat transfer

  3. LIME - a flexible, non-LTE line excitation and radiation transfer method for millimeter and far-infrared wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, Christian; Hogerheijde, Michiel

    2010-01-01

    We present a new code for solving the molecular and atomic excitation and radiation transfer problem in a molecular gas and predicting emergent spectra. This code works in arbitrary three dimensional geometry using unstructured Delaunay latices for the transport of photons. Various physical model...

  4. Evaluation method for radiative heat transfer in polydisperse water droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Shigenao; Nakai, Hirotaka; Sakurai, Atsushi; Komiya, Atsuki

    2008-01-01

    Simplifications of the model for nongray radiative heat transfer analysis in participating media comprised of polydisperse water droplets are presented. Databases of the radiative properties for a water droplet over a wide range of wavelengths and diameters are constructed using rigorous Mie theory. The accuracy of the radiative properties obtained from the database interpolation is validated by comparing them with those obtained from the Mie calculations. The radiative properties of polydisperse water droplets are compared with those of monodisperse water droplets with equivalent mean diameters. Nongray radiative heat transfer in the anisotropic scattering fog layer, including direct and diffuse solar irradiations and infrared sky flux, is analyzed using REM 2 . The radiative heat fluxes within the fog layer containing polydisperse water droplets are compared with those in the layer containing monodisperse water droplets. Through numerical simulation of the radiative heat transfer, polydisperse water droplets can be approximated by using the Sauter diameter, a technique that can be useful in several research fields, such as engineering and atmospheric science. Although this approximation is valid in the case of pure radiative transfer problems, the Sauter diameter is reconfirmed to be the appropriate diameter for approximating problems in radiative heat transfer, although volume-length mean diameter shows better accordance in some cases. The CPU time for nongray radiative heat transfer analysis with a fog model is evaluated. It is proved that the CPU time is decreased by using the databases and the approximation method for polydisperse particulate media

  5. Computer codes in nuclear safety, radiation transport and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordy, J.M.; Kodeli, I.; Menard, St.; Bouchet, J.L.; Renard, F.; Martin, E.; Blazy, L.; Voros, S.; Bochud, F.; Laedermann, J.P.; Beaugelin, K.; Makovicka, L.; Quiot, A.; Vermeersch, F.; Roche, H.; Perrin, M.C.; Laye, F.; Bardies, M.; Struelens, L.; Vanhavere, F.; Gschwind, R.; Fernandez, F.; Quesne, B.; Fritsch, P.; Lamart, St.; Crovisier, Ph.; Leservot, A.; Antoni, R.; Huet, Ch.; Thiam, Ch.; Donadille, L.; Monfort, M.; Diop, Ch.; Ricard, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to describe the present state of computer codes dedicated to radiation transport or radiation source assessment or dosimetry. The presentations have been parted into 2 sessions: 1) methodology and 2) uses in industrial or medical or research domains. It appears that 2 different calculation strategies are prevailing, both are based on preliminary Monte-Carlo calculations with data storage. First, quick simulations made from a database of particle histories built though a previous Monte-Carlo simulation and secondly, a neuronal approach involving a learning platform generated through a previous Monte-Carlo simulation. This document gathers the slides of the presentations

  6. Radiative heat transfer in the extreme near field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeongtae; Song, Bai; Fernández-Hurtado, Víctor; Lee, Woochul; Jeong, Wonho; Cui, Longji; Thompson, Dakotah; Feist, Johannes; Reid, M T Homer; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2015-12-17

    Radiative transfer of energy at the nanometre length scale is of great importance to a variety of technologies including heat-assisted magnetic recording, near-field thermophotovoltaics and lithography. Although experimental advances have enabled elucidation of near-field radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as 20-30 nanometres (refs 4-6), quantitative analysis in the extreme near field (less than 10 nanometres) has been greatly limited by experimental challenges. Moreover, the results of pioneering measurements differed from theoretical predictions by orders of magnitude. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with embedded thermocouples, in conjunction with new microdevices capable of periodic temperature modulation, to measure radiative heat transfer down to gaps as small as two nanometres. For our experiments we deposited suitably chosen metal or dielectric layers on the scanning probes and microdevices, enabling direct study of extreme near-field radiation between silica-silica, silicon nitride-silicon nitride and gold-gold surfaces to reveal marked, gap-size-dependent enhancements of radiative heat transfer. Furthermore, our state-of-the-art calculations of radiative heat transfer, performed within the theoretical framework of fluctuational electrodynamics, are in excellent agreement with our experimental results, providing unambiguous evidence that confirms the validity of this theory for modelling radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as a few nanometres. This work lays the foundations required for the rational design of novel technologies that leverage nanoscale radiative heat transfer.

  7. MQRAD, a computer code for synchrotron radiation from quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Teruhisa.

    1984-01-01

    The computer code, MQRAD, is developed for the calculation of the synchrotron radiation from the particles passing through quadrupole magnets at the straight section of the electron-positron colliding machine. This code computes the distributions of photon numbers and photon energies at any given points on the beam orbit. In this code, elements such as the quadrupole magnets and the drift spaces can be divided into many sub-elements in order to obtain the results with good accuracy. The synchrotron radiation produced by inserted quadrupole magnets at the interaction region of the electron-positron collider is one of the main background sources to the detector. The masking system against the synchrotron radiation at TRISTAN is very important because of the relatively high beam energy and the long straight section, which are 30 GeV and 100 meters, respectively. MQRAD has been used to design the masking system of the TOPAZ detector and the result is presented here as an example. (author)

  8. A NUMERICAL SCHEME FOR SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS BASED ON SOLVING THE TIME-DEPENDENT RADIATIVE TRANSFER EQUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohsuga, Ken; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2016-02-20

    We develop a numerical scheme for solving the equations of fully special relativistic, radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHDs), in which the frequency-integrated, time-dependent radiation transfer equation is solved to calculate the specific intensity. The radiation energy density, the radiation flux, and the radiation stress tensor are obtained by the angular quadrature of the intensity. In the present method, conservation of total mass, momentum, and energy of the radiation magnetofluids is guaranteed. We treat not only the isotropic scattering but also the Thomson scattering. The numerical method of MHDs is the same as that of our previous work. The advection terms are explicitly solved, and the source terms, which describe the gas–radiation interaction, are implicitly integrated. Our code is suitable for massive parallel computing. We present that our code shows reasonable results in some numerical tests for propagating radiation and radiation hydrodynamics. Particularly, the correct solution is given even in the optically very thin or moderately thin regimes, and the special relativistic effects are nicely reproduced.

  9. ''adding'' algorithm for the Markov chain formalism for radiation transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, L.W.

    1979-01-01

    The Markov chain radiative transfer method of Esposito and House has been shown to be both efficient and accurate for calculation of the diffuse reflection from a homogeneous scattering planetary atmosphere. The use of a new algorithm similar to the ''adding'' formula of Hansen and Travis extends the application of this formalism to an arbitrarily deep atmosphere. The basic idea for this algorithm is to consider a preceding calculation as a single state of a new Markov chain. Successive application of this procedure makes calculation possible for any optical depth without increasing the size of the linear system used. The time required for the algorithm is comparable to that for a doubling calculation for a homogeneous atmosphere, but for a non-homogeneous atmosphere the new method is considerably faster than the standard ''adding'' routine. As with he standard ''adding'' method, the information on the internal radiation field is lost during the calculation. This method retains the advantage of the earlier Markov chain method that the time required is relatively insensitive to the number of illumination angles or observation angles for which the diffuse reflection is calculated. A technical write-up giving fuller details of the algorithm and a sample code are available from the author

  10. Radiative Transfer Reconsidered as a Quantum Kinetic Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Radiative transfer—quantum kinetic theory—anomalous dispersion. 1. ... able for the elaboration of transport codes (e.g. based on the Monte-Carlo technique ... this function is not a true probability density function but rather a quasiprobability.

  11. The radiation protection code of practice in teletherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadlalla, N. S. M.

    2010-05-01

    This study aimed to provide a document (code) for the standard practice in teletherapy facilities to be a reference and guide for establishing new teletherapy facilities or mending an existing one, another aim was to evaluated the teletherapy facilities with regard to their compliance to the recommendations and guides mentioned in this document. This document includes: safety specifications for teletherapy equipment, facility planning and shielding design, radiation protection and work practice, quality assurance and personnel requirements and responsibilities. In order to assess the degree of compliance of the two centers in the country with what was stated in the developed document IAEA inspection checklist was utilized and made some radiation measurement were made around the treatment rooms. The results of such inspection mission revealed that the current status of radiation protection in both of inspected centers is almost similar and both are not satisfactory as many of the essential items of radiation protection as stipulated in this document were not followed, which lead to unnecessary, radiation exposure to patients and staff. Finally, some recommendations that may help to improve the status of radiation protection in radiotherapy departments in Sudan are given. (Author)

  12. Submandibular salivary gland transfer prevents radiation-induced xerostomia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Naresh; Seikaly, Hadi; McGaw, Timothy; Coulter, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Background: Xerostomia is a significant morbidity of radiation therapy in the management of head and neck cancers. We hypothesized that the surgical transfer of one submandibular salivary gland to submental space, outside the proposed radiation field, prior to starting radiation treatment, would prevent xerostomia. Methods: We are conducting a prospective clinical trial where the submandibular gland is transferred as part of the surgical intervention. The patients are followed clinically, with salivary flow studies and University of Washington quality of life questionnaire. Results: We report early results of 16 patients who have undergone this procedure. Seven patients have finished and 2 patients are currently undergoing radiation treatment. In 2 patients, no postoperative radiation treatment was indicated. Two patients are waiting to start radiation treatment and 2 patients refused treatment after surgery. The surgical transfer was abandoned in 1 patient. All of the transferred salivary glands were positioned outside the proposed radiation fields and were functional. The patients did not complain of any xerostomia and developed only minimal oral mucositis. There were no surgical complications. Conclusions: Surgical transfer of a submandibular salivary gland to the submental space (outside the radiation field) preserves its function and prevents the development of radiation-induced xerostomia

  13. Radiative transfer in atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Z.; Stamnes, K.; Weeks, W.F. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Tsay, S.C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Radiative energy is critical in controlling the heat and mass balance of sea ice, which significantly affects the polar climate. In the polar oceans, light transmission through the atmosphere and sea ice is essential to the growth of plankton and algae and, consequently, to the microbial community both in the ice and in the ocean. Therefore, the study of radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean system is of particular importance. Lacking a properly coupled radiative transfer model for the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system, a consistent study of the radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, snow, sea ice, and ocean system has not been undertaken before. The radiative transfer processes in the atmosphere and in the ice and ocean have been treated separately. Because the radiation processes in the atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean depend on each other, this separate treatment is inconsistent. To study the radiative interaction between the atmosphere, clouds, snow, sea ice, and ocean, a radiative transfer model with consistent treatment of radiation in the coupled system is needed and is under development.

  14. GLERL Radiation Transfer Through Freshwater Ice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radiation transmittance (ratio of transmitted to incident radiation) through clear ice, refrozen slush ice and brash ice, from ice surface to ice-water interface in...

  15. Development of platform to compare different wall heat transfer packages for system analysis codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min-Gil; Lee, Won Woong; Lee, Jeong Ik; Shin, Sung Gil

    2016-01-01

    System thermal hydraulic (STH) analysis code is used for analyzing and evaluating the safety of a designed nuclear system. The system thermal hydraulic analysis code typically solves mass, momentum and energy conservation equations for multiple phases with sets of selected empirical constitutive equations to close the problem. Several STH codes are utilized in academia, industry and regulators, such as MARS-KS, SPACE, RELAP5, COBRA-TF, TRACE, and so on. Each system thermal hydraulic code consists of different sets of governing equations and correlations. However, the packages and sets of correlations of each code are not compared quantitatively yet. Wall heat transfer mode transition maps of SPACE and MARS-KS have a little difference for the transition from wall nucleate heat transfer mode to wall film heat transfer mode. Both codes have the same heat transfer packages and correlations in most region except for wall film heat transfer mode. Most of heat transfer coefficients calculated for the range of selected variables of SPACE are the same with those of MARS-KS. For the intervals between 500K and 540K of wall temperature, MARS-KS selects the wall film heat transfer mode and Bromley correlation but SPACE select the wall nucleate heat transfer mode and Chen correlation. This is because the transition from nucleate boiling to film boiling of MARS-KS is earlier than SPACE. More detailed analysis of the heat transfer package and flow regime package will be followed in the near future

  16. Transient radiative transfer in a scattering slab considering polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hongliang; Ben, Xun; Tan, Heping

    2013-11-04

    The characteristics of the transient and polarization must be considered for a complete and correct description of short-pulse laser transfer in a scattering medium. A Monte Carlo (MC) method combined with a time shift and superposition principle is developed to simulate transient vector (polarized) radiative transfer in a scattering medium. The transient vector radiative transfer matrix (TVRTM) is defined to describe the transient polarization behavior of short-pulse laser propagating in the scattering medium. According to the definition of reflectivity, a new criterion of reflection at Fresnel surface is presented. In order to improve the computational efficiency and accuracy, a time shift and superposition principle is applied to the MC model for transient vector radiative transfer. The results for transient scalar radiative transfer and steady-state vector radiative transfer are compared with those in published literatures, respectively, and an excellent agreement between them is observed, which validates the correctness of the present model. Finally, transient radiative transfer is simulated considering the polarization effect of short-pulse laser in a scattering medium, and the distributions of Stokes vector in angular and temporal space are presented.

  17. Light scattering reviews 9 light scattering and radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    This book details modern methods of the radiative transfer theory. It presents recent advances in light scattering (measurements and theory) and highlights the newest developments in remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties.

  18. Bivariational calculations for radiation transfer in an inhomogeneous participating media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Wakil, S.A.; Machali, H.M.; Haggag, M.H.; Attia, M.T.

    1986-07-01

    Equations for radiation transfer are obtained for dispersive media with space dependent albedo. Bivariational bound principle is used to calculate the reflection and transmission coefficients for such media. Numerical results are given and compared. (author)

  19. Towards linearization of atmospheric radiative transfer in spherical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, Holger H.; Landgraf, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    We present a general approach for the linearization of radiative transfer in a spherical planetary atmosphere. The approach is based on the forward-adjoint perturbation theory. In the first part we develop the theoretical background for a linearization of radiative transfer in spherical geometry. Using an operator formulation of radiative transfer allows one to derive the linearization principles in a universally valid notation. The application of the derived principles is demonstrated for a radiative transfer problem in simplified spherical geometry in the second part of this paper. Here, we calculate the derivatives of the radiance at the top of the atmosphere with respect to the absorption properties of a trace gas species in the case of a nadir-viewing satellite instrument

  20. Fast and simple model for atmospheric radiative transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, F.C.; Kokhanovsky, A.A.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Radiative transfer models (RTMs) are of utmost importance for quantitative remote sensing, especially for compensating atmospheric perturbation. A persistent trade-off exists between approaches that prefer accuracy at the cost of computational complexity, versus those favouring simplicity at the

  1. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Thompson, Kelly G.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2011-01-01

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique. (author)

  2. Heat transfer augmentation of a car radiator using nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Adnan M.; Bakar, R. A.; Kadirgama, K.; Sharma, K. V.

    2014-05-01

    The car radiator heat transfer enhancement by using TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles dispersed in water as a base fluid was studied experimentally. The test rig is setup as a car radiator with tubes and container. The range of Reynolds number and volume fraction are (250-1,750) and (1.0-2.5 %) respectively. Results showed that the heat transfer increases with increasing of nanofluid volume fraction. The experimental data is agreed with other investigator.

  3. Maximal near-field radiative heat transfer between two plates

    OpenAIRE

    Nefzaoui, Elyes; Ezzahri, Younès; Drevillon, Jérémie; Joulain, Karl

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Near-field radiative transfer is a promising way to significantly and simultaneously enhance both thermo-photovoltaic (TPV) devices power densities and efficiencies. A parametric study of Drude and Lorentz models performances in maximizing near-field radiative heat transfer between two semi-infinite planes separated by nanometric distances at room temperature is presented in this paper. Optimal parameters of these models that provide optical properties maximizing the r...

  4. Evaluation of coded aperture radiation detectors using a Bayesian approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Kyle, E-mail: mille856@andrew.cmu.edu [Auton Lab, The Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Huggins, Peter [Auton Lab, The Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Labov, Simon; Nelson, Karl [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Dubrawski, Artur [Auton Lab, The Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2016-12-11

    We investigate tradeoffs arising from the use of coded aperture gamma-ray spectrometry to detect and localize sources of harmful radiation in the presence of noisy background. Using an example application scenario of area monitoring and search, we empirically evaluate weakly supervised spectral, spatial, and hybrid spatio-spectral algorithms for scoring individual observations, and two alternative methods of fusing evidence obtained from multiple observations. Results of our experiments confirm the intuition that directional information provided by spectrometers masked with coded aperture enables gains in source localization accuracy, but at the expense of reduced probability of detection. Losses in detection performance can however be to a substantial extent reclaimed by using our new spatial and spatio-spectral scoring methods which rely on realistic assumptions regarding masking and its impact on measured photon distributions.

  5. Code of practice for radiation protection in dentistry (1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This code is intended as a guide to safe practices and lays down detailed requirements for the following protective measures : allocation of responsibility and need for clinical assessment of the indications for radiography; provision of appropriate equipment, film and processing facilities; adoption of procedures to minimise exposure to radiation. This code deals with radiographic procedures commonly used in general and specialist dental practice. These entail : intra-oral radiography: periapical, bitewing and occlusal views; panoramic radiography: intra-oral tube radiography and panoramic tomography; radiography of the complete skull or certain parts of the dento-maxillo-facial region; hand and wrist radiography for the sole purpose of the determination of the bone age

  6. Discrete-ordinates finite-element method for atmospheric radiative transfer and remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstl, S.A.W.; Zardecki, A.

    1985-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of modern discrete-ordinates finite-element methods for the solution of radiative transfer problems in meteorology, climatology, and remote sensing applications are evaluated. After the common basis of the formulation of radiative transfer problems in the fields of neutron transport and atmospheric optics is established, the essential features of the discrete-ordinates finite-element method are described including the limitations of the method and their remedies. Numerical results are presented for 1-D and 2-D atmospheric radiative transfer problems where integral as well as angular dependent quantities are compared with published results from other calculations and with measured data. These comparisons provide a verification of the discrete-ordinates results for a wide spectrum of cases with varying degrees of absorption, scattering, and anisotropic phase functions. Accuracy and computational speed are also discussed. Since practically all discrete-ordinates codes offer a builtin adjoint capability, the general concept of the adjoint method is described and illustrated by sample problems. Our general conclusion is that the strengths of the discrete-ordinates finite-element method outweight its weaknesses. We demonstrate that existing general-purpose discrete-ordinates codes can provide a powerful tool to analyze radiative transfer problems through the atmosphere, especially when 2-D geometries must be considered

  7. Investigation and assessment of wall heat transfer correlations in SPACE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Woo; Kim, Kyung Doo; Moon, Sang Ki; Choi, Ki Yong; Park, Hyun Sik

    2010-06-01

    SPACE, which is a safety analysis code for nuclear power plants, has been developed to analyze the multidimensional, two-component and three-field flow. This code can be applied to safety analysis for approval which is thermal-hydraulic analysis to support the nuclear power station design, establishment of accident ease strategy, development of operating guide line, experiment plan and analysis. To do so, SPACE code has 12 wall heat transfer mode and the corresponding models and correlations to deal with the physical heat transfer phenomenon in wall surface. In this report, the physical correlation models regarding the wall heat transfer are explained and their performance is assessed against several SET

  8. Two phase nonequilibrium heat transfer in the TRAC-PD2 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandell, D.A.; Liles, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    TRAC is a best-estimate, multidimensional, nonequilibrium computer code intended for the analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA's) in light water reactors. TRAC-PD2 is the third, detailed, pressurized water reactor version of the code. The TRAC code is modular both by components and by function. That is, vessels, pipes, pumps, etc. can be coupled together in any manner in order to simulate a reactor or a particular experimental facility. Individual physical phenomena are also coded in separate subroutines. This paper discusses the wall to fluid heat transfer coefficient correlations, the interfacial heat transfer models, and presents results for several experimental facilities

  9. Hyper fast radiative transfer for the physical retrieval of surface parameters from SEVIRI observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liuzzi, G; Masiello, G; Serio, C; Blasi, M G; Venafra, S

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the theoretical aspects of a fast scheme for the physical retrieval of surface temperature and emissivity from SEVIRI data, their implementation and some sample results obtained. The scheme is based on a Kalman Filter approach, which effectively exploits the temporal continuity in the observations of the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) platform, on which SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager) operates. Such scheme embodies in its core a physical retrieval algorithm, which employs an hyper fast radiative transfer code highly customized for this retrieval task. Radiative transfer and its customizations are described in detail. Fastness, accuracy and stability of the code are fully documented for a variety of surface features, showing a peculiar application to the massive Greek forest fires in August 2007. (paper)

  10. Application of the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) to Scattering by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) to Scattering by a Dust Aerosol Layer. ... Incident radiation in its journey through the atmosphere before reaching the earth surface encounters particles of different sizes and composition such as dust aerosols resulting in interactions that lead to absorption and scattering.

  11. A study of Monte Carlo radiative transfer through fractal clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C.; Lavallec, D.; O`Hirok, W.; Ricchiazzi, P. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    An understanding of radiation transport (RT) through clouds is fundamental to studies of the earth`s radiation budget and climate dynamics. The transmission through horizontally homogeneous clouds has been studied thoroughly using accurate, discreet ordinates radiative transfer models. However, the applicability of these results to general problems of global radiation budget is limited by the plane parallel assumption and the fact that real clouds fields show variability, both vertically and horizontally, on all size scales. To understand how radiation interacts with realistic clouds, we have used a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model to compute the details of the photon-cloud interaction on synthetic cloud fields. Synthetic cloud fields, generated by a cascade model, reproduce the scaling behavior, as well as the cloud variability observed and estimated from cloud satellite data.

  12. BUSH: A computer code for calculating steady state heat transfer in LWR rod bundles under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, I.M.

    1982-01-01

    The computer code BUSH has been developed for the calculation of steady state heat transfer in a rod bundle. For a given power, flow and geometry it can calculate the temperatures in the rods, coolant and shroud assuming that at any axial level each rod can be described by one temperature and the coolant fluid is also radially uniform at this level. Heat transfer by convection and radiation are handled and the geometry is flexible enough to model nearly all types of envisaged shroud design for the SUPERSARA test series. The modular way in which BUSH has been written makes it suitable for future development, either within the present BUSH framework or as part of a more advanced code

  13. ARC Code TI: Self-Healing Independent File Transfer (Shift)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Shift is a lightweight framework for high performance local and remote file transfers that provides resiliency across a wide variety of failure scenarios through...

  14. Radiation curable compositions useful as transfer coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarty, W.H.; Nagy, F.A.; Guarino, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is on a method for applying a coating to a thin porous substrate and reducing absorption of the coating into the substrate by applying a radiation-curable composition to a carrying web; the radiation-curable coating composition having a crosslink density of 0.02 to about 1.0 determined by calculation of the gram moles of branch points per 100 grams of uncured coating, and a glass transition temperature of the radiation cured coating within the approximate range of -80 degrees to +100 degrees C. The carrying web being of a nature such that the coating composition, when cured, will not adhere to its surface

  15. Collection of regulatory texts relative to radiation protection. Part 2: by-laws, decisions, non-codified decrees / Collection of legal and statutory provisions relative to radiation protection. Part 2: by-laws and decisions taken in application of the Public Health Code and Labour Code concerning the protection of populations, patients and workers against the risks of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas, Robert; Feries, Jean; Marzorati, Frank; Chevalier, Celine; Lachaume, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    This second part gathers texts extracted from the Public Health Code and related to ionizing radiations (general measures for the protection of the population, exposure to natural radiations, general regime of authorizations and declarations, purchase, retailing, importation, exportation, transfer and elimination of radioactive sources, protection of persons exposed to ionizing radiations for medical or forensics purposes, situations of radiological emergency and of sustained exposure to ionizing radiations, control), to the safety of waters and food products, and to the control of medical devices, to the protection of patients. It also contains extracts for the Labour Code related to workers protection. This document is an update of the previous version from March 2011

  16. Deciphering free-radical code of radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volovyk, S.; Bazyka, D.; Loganovsky, K.; Bebeshko, V.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: Ionizing radiation is fundamental environmental factor for life origin and evolution. Free radicals, primordial 'sea' for life conceiving and existence, induced by cosmic and terrestrial background radiation, are evolutionally archetypal, ubiquitous, and omnipotent in physiological- pathophysiological dichotomy. Classical free-radical paradigm in radiation biology and medicine, focused in essence on oxidative damage, needs new conceptualization and generalization. Methods: Suggested novel insights into free radicals dual immanent nature and functions in organism systems are based on original concepts of radicals dynamic charge transfer (CT) - redox ambivalence (interactional nucleo-, electro-, and ambiphilicity spectrum); pertinent chemical reactivity and selectivity delocalization model; physiological functional ambivalence and complementarity, and dynamic free-radical homeostasis. Results: Subtle perturbations in radicals CT spatiotemporal homeodynamics, in responsive signaling / controlling networks, concomitant alterations in genes expression, transcription, and apoptosis, redox control of mitochondrial ET chain, telomere/telomerase balance, DNA CT, circadian clock, hemispheric biochemical dominance/accentuation, including alteration of nitric oxide-superoxide complementarity, membranes permeability, neurotransmission pattern, synaptic circuitry, etc under radiation exposure have more fundamental impact on organism systems (especially CNS and CVS) deterioration than simple radicals inflicted oxidative (nitrosative) damage of cellular constituents. Conclusions: This novel conceptualization of free-radical paradigm constitutes new dimension in deciphering molecular mechanisms of radiation effects on subtle borderline norm-pathology and continuity-discontinuity dichotomy in organisms systems disorders - CT(redox)omics, which involves investigation of CT, redox, and spin states of free radicals, DNA bases

  17. On similarity and scaling of the radiative transfer equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrescu, C.; Stephens, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    The present paper shows how the well-known similarity and scaling concepts are properties of the radiative transfer equation and not specifically of the degree of anisotropy of the phase function. It is shown that the key assumption regarding the angular dependence of the radiative field is essential in determining both the value for the parameter used to scale the radiative transfer, as well as the number of streams used in calculating the radiances for various atmospheric problems. Simulations performed on realistic type of cirrus clouds, characterized by strongly anisotropic functions, demonstrates the superior computational advantage for accurately simulating radiances. A new approach for determining the scaling parameter is introduced

  18. Coded aperture imaging: the modulation transfer function for uniformly redundant arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    Coded aperture imaging uses many pinholes to increase the SNR for intrinsically weak sources when the radiation can be neither reflected nor refracted. Effectively, the signal is multiplexed onto an image and then decoded, often by a computer, to form a reconstructed image. We derive the modulation transfer function (MTF) of such a system employing uniformly redundant arrays (URA). We show that the MTF of a URA system is virtually the same as the MTF of an individual pinhole regardless of the shape or size of the pinhole. Thus, only the location of the pinholes is important for optimum multiplexing and decoding. The shape and size of the pinholes can then be selected based on other criteria. For example, one can generate self-supporting patterns, useful for energies typically encountered in the imaging of laser-driven compressions or in soft x-ray astronomy. Such patterns contain holes that are all the same size, easing the etching or plating fabrication efforts for the apertures. A new reconstruction method is introduced called delta decoding. It improves the resolution capabilities of a coded aperture system by mitigating a blur often introduced during the reconstruction step

  19. Advanced Machine Learning Emulators of Radiative Transfer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps-Valls, G.; Verrelst, J.; Martino, L.; Vicent, J.

    2017-12-01

    Physically-based model inversion methodologies are based on physical laws and established cause-effect relationships. A plethora of remote sensing applications rely on the physical inversion of a Radiative Transfer Model (RTM), which lead to physically meaningful bio-geo-physical parameter estimates. The process is however computationally expensive, needs expert knowledge for both the selection of the RTM, its parametrization and the the look-up table generation, as well as its inversion. Mimicking complex codes with statistical nonlinear machine learning algorithms has become the natural alternative very recently. Emulators are statistical constructs able to approximate the RTM, although at a fraction of the computational cost, providing an estimation of uncertainty, and estimations of the gradient or finite integral forms. We review the field and recent advances of emulation of RTMs with machine learning models. We posit Gaussian processes (GPs) as the proper framework to tackle the problem. Furthermore, we introduce an automatic methodology to construct emulators for costly RTMs. The Automatic Gaussian Process Emulator (AGAPE) methodology combines the interpolation capabilities of GPs with the accurate design of an acquisition function that favours sampling in low density regions and flatness of the interpolation function. We illustrate the good capabilities of our emulators in toy examples, leaf and canopy levels PROSPECT and PROSAIL RTMs, and for the construction of an optimal look-up-table for atmospheric correction based on MODTRAN5.

  20. Radiative heat transfer in low-dimensional systems -- microscopic mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Lilia; Phan, Anh; Drosdoff, David

    2013-03-01

    Radiative heat transfer between objects can increase dramatically at sub-wavelength scales. Exploring ways to modulate such transport between nano-systems is a key issue from fundamental and applied points of view. We advance the theoretical understanding of radiative heat transfer between nano-objects by introducing a microscopic model, which takes into account the individual atoms and their atomic polarizabilities. This approach is especially useful to investigate nano-objects with various geometries and give a detailed description of the heat transfer distribution. We employ this model to study the heat exchange in graphene nanoribbon/substrate systems. Our results for the distance separations, substrates, and presence of extended or localized defects enable making predictions for tailoring the radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale. Financial support from the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-06ER46297 is acknowledged.

  1. Radiation effects on heat transfer in heat exchangers, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yasuo; Watanabe, Kenji; Taira, Tatsuji.

    1980-01-01

    In a high temperature gas-cooled reactor system, in which the working fluid exchanges heat at high temperature near 1000 deg C, the heat transfer acceleration by positively utilizing the radiation heat transfer between solid surfaces should be considered. This paper reports on the results of experiment and analysis for the effects of radiant heat on the heat transfer performance at elevated temperature by applying the heat transfer-accelerating method using radiators to the heat exchanger with tube bundle composed of two channels of heating and heated sides. As the test heat exchangers, a parallel counter flow exchanger and the cross flow exchanger simulating helical tubes were employed, and the results studied on the characteristics of each heat exchanger are described. The plates placed in parallel to flow in every space of the tube bundle arranged in a matrix were used as the heat transfer accelerator. The effects of acceleration with the plates were the increase of heat transmission from 12 to 24% and 12 to 38% in the parallel flow and cross flow heat exchangers, respectively. Also, it was clarified that the theoretical analysis, in which it was assumed that the region within pitch S and two radiator plates, with a heat-transferring tube placed at the center, is the minimum domain for calculation, and that the heat exchange by radiation occurs only between the domain and the adjacent domains, can estimate the heat transfer-accelerating effect and the temperature distribution in a heat exchanger with sufficient accuracy. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. A dual-sided coded-aperture radiation detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penny, R.D.; Hood, W.E.; Polichar, R.M.; Cardone, F.H.; Chavez, L.G.; Grubbs, S.G.; Huntley, B.P.; Kuharski, R.A.; Shyffer, R.T.; Fabris, L.; Ziock, K.P.; Labov, S.E.; Nelson, K.

    2011-01-01

    We report the development of a large-area, mobile, coded-aperture radiation imaging system for localizing compact radioactive sources in three dimensions while rejecting distributed background. The 3D Stand-Off Radiation Detection System (SORDS-3D) has been tested at speeds up to 95 km/h and has detected and located sources in the millicurie range at distances of over 100 m. Radiation data are imaged to a geospatially mapped world grid with a nominal 1.25- to 2.5-m pixel pitch at distances out to 120 m on either side of the platform. Source elevation is also extracted. Imaged radiation alarms are superimposed on a side-facing video log that can be played back for direct localization of sources in buildings in urban environments. The system utilizes a 37-element array of 5x5x50 cm 3 cesium-iodide (sodium) detectors. Scintillation light is collected by a pair of photomultiplier tubes placed at either end of each detector, with the detectors achieving an energy resolution of 6.15% FWHM (662 keV) and a position resolution along their length of 5 cm FWHM. The imaging system generates a dual-sided two-dimensional image allowing users to efficiently survey a large area. Imaged radiation data and raw spectra are forwarded to the RadioNuclide Analysis Kit (RNAK), developed by our collaborators, for isotope ID. An intuitive real-time display aids users in performing searches. Detector calibration is dynamically maintained by monitoring the potassium-40 peak and digitally adjusting individual detector gains. We have recently realized improvements, both in isotope identification and in distinguishing compact sources from background, through the installation of optimal-filter reconstruction kernels.

  3. Academic Training - The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 27, 28, 29 June 11:00-12:00 - TH Conference Room, bldg. 4 The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry F. Salvat Gavalda,Univ. de Barcelona, A. FERRARI, CERN-AB, M. SILARI, CERN-SC Lecture 1. Transport and interaction of electromagnetic radiation F. Salvat Gavalda,Univ. de Barcelona Interaction models and simulation schemes implemented in modern Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport will be briefly reviewed. Different schemes for simulating electron transport will be discussed. Condensed algorithms, which rely on multiple-scattering theories, are comparatively fast, but less accurate than mixed algorithms, in which hard interactions (with energy loss or angular deflection larger than certain cut-off values) are simulated individually. The reliability, and limitations, of electron-interaction models and multiple-scattering theories will be analyzed. Benchmark comparisons of simu...

  4. Ethical codes. Fig leaf argument, ballast or cultural element for radiation protection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gellermann, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The international association for radiation protection (IRPA) adopted in May 2004 a Code of Ethics in order to allow their members to hold an adequate professional level of ethical line of action. Based on this code of ethics the professional body of radiation protection (Fachverband fuer Strahlenschutz) has developed its own ethical code and adopted in 2005.

  5. Vector Green's function algorithm for radiative transfer in plane-parallel atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin Yi [School of Physics, University of New South Wales (Australia)]. E-mail: yi.qin@csiro.au; Box, Michael A. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales (Australia)

    2006-01-15

    Green's function is a widely used approach for boundary value problems. In problems related to radiative transfer, Green's function has been found to be useful in land, ocean and atmosphere remote sensing. It is also a key element in higher order perturbation theory. This paper presents an explicit expression of the Green's function, in terms of the source and radiation field variables, for a plane-parallel atmosphere with either vacuum boundaries or a reflecting (BRDF) surface. Full polarization state is considered but the algorithm has been developed in such way that it can be easily reduced to solve scalar radiative transfer problems, which makes it possible to implement a single set of code for computing both the scalar and the vector Green's function.

  6. Vector Green's function algorithm for radiative transfer in plane-parallel atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Yi; Box, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Green's function is a widely used approach for boundary value problems. In problems related to radiative transfer, Green's function has been found to be useful in land, ocean and atmosphere remote sensing. It is also a key element in higher order perturbation theory. This paper presents an explicit expression of the Green's function, in terms of the source and radiation field variables, for a plane-parallel atmosphere with either vacuum boundaries or a reflecting (BRDF) surface. Full polarization state is considered but the algorithm has been developed in such way that it can be easily reduced to solve scalar radiative transfer problems, which makes it possible to implement a single set of code for computing both the scalar and the vector Green's function

  7. Radiation transfer in inhomogeneous exponential media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezcan, C.; Akcay, H.

    2006-01-01

    The angular distribution of the radiation intensity and the related constants C and D* are calculated for a new choice of c(x) having the form of the Morse potential in quantum mechanics c(x)=1-a-be -2αx +de -αx . We use the modified Eddington method. The radiation intensity in this method is given in terms of the unknown even and odd functions of the space variable x and the direction cosine μ. The coefficients of these functions depend only on the space variables and satisfy second order differential equations. We solve the resulting second order differential equation using the Nikiforov-Uvarov method. The method provides exact analytical expressions and is not previously used to solve radiation problems. The numerical results are listed in a table for both the constants C and D* and the albedo and in the limiting cases are compared with the homogeneous values. (orig.)

  8. Radiation-induced Mass Transfer through Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Levdansky, V.V.; Smolík, Jiří; Moravec, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 2 (2009), s. 125-128 ISSN 0735-1933 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400720804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : mass transfer * adiation * membrane Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.189, year: 2009

  9. User's Manual: Routines for Radiative Heat Transfer and Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risch, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the intensity and spectral distribution of radiation emanating from a heated surface has applications in many areas of science and engineering. Areas of research in which the quantification of spectral radiation is used routinely include thermal radiation heat transfer, infrared signature analysis, and radiation thermometry. In the analysis of radiation, it is helpful to be able to predict the radiative intensity and the spectral distribution of the emitted energy. Presented in this report is a set of routines written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) and incorporating functions specific to Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) that are useful for predicting the radiative behavior of heated surfaces. These routines include functions for calculating quantities of primary importance to engineers and scientists. In addition, the routines also provide the capability to use such information to determine surface temperatures from spectral intensities and for calculating the sensitivity of the surface temperature measurements to unknowns in the input parameters.

  10. The Coding and Effector Transfer of Movement Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Attila J.; Muhlbauer, Thomas; Shea, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments utilizing a 14-element arm movement sequence were designed to determine if reinstating the visual-spatial coordinates, which require movements to the same spatial locations utilized during acquisition, results in better effector transfer than reinstating the motor coordinates, which require the same pattern of homologous muscle…

  11. Super-Planckian far-field radiative heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Hurtado, V.; Fernández-Domínguez, A. I.; Feist, J.; García-Vidal, F. J.; Cuevas, J. C.

    2018-01-01

    We present here a theoretical analysis that demonstrates that the far-field radiative heat transfer between objects with dimensions smaller than the thermal wavelength can overcome the Planckian limit by orders of magnitude. To guide the search for super-Planckian far-field radiative heat transfer, we make use of the theory of fluctuational electrodynamics and derive a relation between the far-field radiative heat transfer and the directional absorption efficiency of the objects involved. Guided by this relation, and making use of state-of-the-art numerical simulations, we show that the far-field radiative heat transfer between highly anisotropic objects can largely overcome the black-body limit when some of their dimensions are smaller than the thermal wavelength. In particular, we illustrate this phenomenon in the case of suspended pads made of polar dielectrics like SiN or SiO2. These structures are widely used to measure the thermal transport through nanowires and low-dimensional systems and can be employed to test our predictions. Our work illustrates the dramatic failure of the classical theory to predict the far-field radiative heat transfer between micro- and nanodevices.

  12. Code of Nursing Practice for Staff Exposed to Ionizing Radiation (1984)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This Code, published by the National Health and Medical Research Council and intended for nurses and auxiliary staff provides general guidance on radiation protection. The Code is supplementary to radiation control legislation relating to the use of ionizing radiation in medical practice. The principles established by the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been taken into account. (NEA) [fr

  13. 3D-radiative transfer in terrestrial atmosphere: An efficient parallel numerical procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, L. P.; Germogenova, T. A.; Nikolaeva, O. V.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Kuznetsov, V. S.

    2003-04-01

    Light propagation and scattering in terrestrial atmosphere is usually studied in the framework of the 1D radiative transfer theory [1]. However, in reality particles (e.g., ice crystals, solid and liquid aerosols, cloud droplets) are randomly distributed in 3D space. In particular, their concentrations vary both in vertical and horizontal directions. Therefore, 3D effects influence modern cloud and aerosol retrieval procedures, which are currently based on the 1D radiative transfer theory. It should be pointed out that the standard radiative transfer equation allows to study these more complex situations as well [2]. In recent year the parallel version of the 2D and 3D RADUGA code has been developed. This version is successfully used in gammas and neutrons transport problems [3]. Applications of this code to radiative transfer in atmosphere problems are contained in [4]. Possibilities of code RADUGA are presented in [5]. The RADUGA code system is an universal solver of radiative transfer problems for complicated models, including 2D and 3D aerosol and cloud fields with arbitrary scattering anisotropy, light absorption, inhomogeneous underlying surface and topography. Both delta type and distributed light sources can be accounted for in the framework of the algorithm developed. The accurate numerical procedure is based on the new discrete ordinate SWDD scheme [6]. The algorithm is specifically designed for parallel supercomputers. The version RADUGA 5.1(P) can run on MBC1000M [7] (768 processors with 10 Gb of hard disc memory for each processor). The peak productivity is equal 1 Tfl. Corresponding scalar version RADUGA 5.1 is working on PC. As a first example of application of the algorithm developed, we have studied the shadowing effects of clouds on neighboring cloudless atmosphere, depending on the cloud optical thickness, surface albedo, and illumination conditions. This is of importance for modern satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms development. [1] Sobolev

  14. An anisotropic diffusion approximation to thermal radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Seth R.; Larsen, Edward W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an anisotropic diffusion (AD) method that uses transport-calculated AD coefficients to efficiently and accurately solve the thermal radiative transfer (TRT) equations. By assuming weak gradients and angular moments in the radiation intensity, we derive an expression for the radiation energy density that depends on a non-local function of the opacity. This nonlocal function is the solution of a transport equation that can be solved with a single steady-state transport sweep once per time step, and the function's second angular moment is the anisotropic diffusion tensor. To demonstrate the AD method's efficacy, we model radiation flow down a channel in 'flatland' geometry. (author)

  15. Heat transfer in Rockwool modelling and method of measurement. Modelling radiative heat transfer in fibrous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyrboel, Susanne

    1998-05-01

    Fibrous materials are some of the most widely used materials for thermal insulation. In this project the focus of interest has been on fibrous materials for building application. Interest in improving the thermal properties of insulation materials is increasing as legislation is being tightened to reduce the overall energy consumption. A knowledge of the individual heat transfer mechanisms - whereby heat is transferred within a particular material is an essential tool to improve continuously the thermal properties of the material. Heat is transferred in fibrous materials by four different transfer mechanisms: conduction through air, conduction through fibres, thermal radiation and convection. In a particular temperature range the conduction through air can be regarded as a constant, and conduction through fibres is an insignificant part of the total heat transfer. Radiation, however, constitutes 25-40% of the total heat transfer in light fibrous materials. In Denmark and a number of other countries convection in fibrous materials is considered as non-existent when calculating heat transmission as well as when designing building structures. Two heat transfer mechanisms have been the focus of the current project: radiation heat transfer and convection. The radiation analysis serves to develop a model that can be used in further work to gain a wider knowledge of the way in which the morphology of the fibrous material, i.e. fibre diameter distribution, fibre orientation distribution etc., influences the radiation heat transfer under different conditions. The convection investigation serves to examine whether considering convection as non-existent is a fair assumption to use in present and future building structures. The assumption applied in practically is that convection makes a notable difference only in very thick insulation, at external temperatures below -20 deg. C, and at very low densities. For lager thickness dimensions the resulting heat transfer through the

  16. K. Schwarzschild's problem in radiation transfer theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutily, B.; Chevallier, L.; Pelkowski, J.

    2006-01-01

    We solve exactly the problem of a finite slab receiving an isotropic radiation on one side and no radiation on the other side. This problem-to be more precise the calculation of the source function within the slab-was first formulated by K. Schwarzschild in 1914. We first solve it for unspecified albedos and optical thicknesses of the atmosphere, in particular for an albedo very close to 1 and a very large optical thickness in view of some astrophysical applications. Then we focus on the conservative case (albedo=1), which is of great interest for the modeling of grey atmospheres in radiative equilibrium. Ten-figure tables of the conservative source function are given. From the analytical expression of this function, we deduce (1) a simple relation between the effective temperature of a grey atmosphere in radiative equilibrium and the temperature of the black body that irradiates it (2) the temperature at any point of the atmosphere when it is in local thermodynamical equilibrium. This temperature distribution is the counterpart, for a finite slab, of Hopf's distribution in a half-space. Its graphical representation is given for various optical thicknesses of the atmosphere

  17. Some fundamental considerations of the equation of radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriyan, J.G.; Sudarshan, E.C.G.

    1978-10-01

    The radiation transfer of the vector electromagnetic field was first formulated by Chandrasekhar while deriving the polarization characteristics of a sunlit sky. There are two subtle problems underlying this treatment. The first concerns the crucial identification of a Stokes parameter with the specific intensity of radiation. While both depend on position in 3-D space, the latter has, intrinsic to it, an additional angular dependence defining the flow of the radiation field. How can this inadequacy be remedied without damaging the results obtained heretofore from Chandrasekhar's formalism. The second problem arises from the fact that the radiative transfer equation describes the transport of an incoherent radiation field through space. This, however, seems to contradict the results of the Van Cittert-Zernike-Wolf theorem which implies that an incoherent field develops coherence as it passes through free space implying, of course, that the radiative transfer equation must involve not incoherent but partially coherent fields. The vector transfer equation of the direct beam (Beer's law) is derived from first principles. The analysis of this equation provides a satisfactory resolution of these two problems. The result also shows that the Beer's law will have to be modified to a matrix law to accommodate systems that are not spherically symmetric. 13 references

  18. Numerical analysis of the effects of radiation heat transfer and ionization energy loss on the cavitation Bubble's dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdi, M.; Ebrahimi, R.; Shams, M.

    2011-01-01

    A numerical scheme for simulating the acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation was developed. Bubble instantaneous radius was obtained using Gilmore equation which considered the compressibility of the liquid. A uniform temperature was assumed for the inside gas during the collapse. Radiation heat transfer inside the bubble and the heat conduction to the bubble was considered. The numerical code was validated with the experimental data and a good correspondence was observed. The dynamics of hydrofoil cavitation bubble were also investigated. It was concluded that the thermal radiation heat transfer rate strongly depended on the cavitation number, initial bubble radius and hydrofoil angle of attack. -- Highlights: → Heat transfer and ionization energy losses were analyzed in the cavitation bubble. → Radiation of hydrodynamic bubble was approximately equal to the black body. → Radiation heat transfer did not affect the bubble dynamic. → Conduction decreased the bubble pressure and increased the bubble temperature. → Ionization decreased the temperature and increased the pressure in the bubble.

  19. MULTI2D - a computer code for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, R.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Ramírez, J.

    2009-06-01

    required. Nature of problem: In inertial confinement fusion and related experiments with lasers and particle beams, energy transport by thermal radiation becomes important. Under these conditions, the radiation field strongly interacts with the hydrodynamic motion through emission and absorption processes. Solution method: The equations of radiation transfer coupled with Lagrangian hydrodynamics, heat diffusion and beam tracing (laser or ions) are solved, in two-dimensional axial-symmetric geometry ( R-Z coordinates) using a fractional step scheme. Radiation transfer is solved with angular resolution. Matter properties are either interpolated from tables (equations-of-state and opacities) or computed by user routines (conductivities and beam attenuation). Restrictions: The code has been designed for typical conditions prevailing in inertial confinement fusion (ns time scale, matter states close to local thermodynamical equilibrium, negligible radiation pressure, …). Although a wider range of situations can be treated, extrapolations to regions beyond this design range need special care. Unusual features: A special computer language, called r94, is used at top levels of the code. These parts have to be converted to standard C by a translation program (supplied as part of the package). Due to the complexity of code (hydro-code, grid generation, user interface, graphic post-processor, translator program, installation scripts) extensive manuals are supplied as part of the package. Running time: 567 seconds for the example supplied.

  20. Transfer of radiation technology to developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Vitomir; Ridwan, Mohammad

    1993-10-01

    Transfer of technology is a complex process with many facets, options and constraints. While the concept is an important step in bringing industrialization process to agricultural based countries, it is clear, however, that a country will only benefit from a new technology if it addresses a real need, and if it can be absorbed and adapted to suit the existing cultural and technological base. International Atomic Energy Agency, as UN body, has a mandate to promote nuclear applicationsand assist Member States in transfer of technology for peaceful applications. This mandate has been pursued by many different mechanisms developed in the past years: technical assistance, coordinated research programmes, scientific and technical meetings, publications, etc. In all these activities the Agency is the organizer and initiator, but main contributions come from expert services from developed countries and, increasingly, from developing countries themselves. The technical cooperation among developing coutries more and more becomes part of different programmes. In particular, regional cooperation has been demonstrated as an effective instrument for transfer of technology from developed and among developing countries. Some examples of actual programmes are given.

  1. TRUST. I. A 3D externally illuminated slab benchmark for dust radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, K. D.; Baes, M.; Bianchi, S.; Camps, P.; Juvela, M.; Kuiper, R.; Lunttila, T.; Misselt, K. A.; Natale, G.; Robitaille, T.; Steinacker, J.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The radiative transport of photons through arbitrary three-dimensional (3D) structures of dust is a challenging problem due to the anisotropic scattering of dust grains and strong coupling between different spatial regions. The radiative transfer problem in 3D is solved using Monte Carlo or Ray Tracing techniques as no full analytic solution exists for the true 3D structures. Aims: We provide the first 3D dust radiative transfer benchmark composed of a slab of dust with uniform density externally illuminated by a star. This simple 3D benchmark is explicitly formulated to provide tests of the different components of the radiative transfer problem including dust absorption, scattering, and emission. Methods: The details of the external star, the slab itself, and the dust properties are provided. This benchmark includes models with a range of dust optical depths fully probing cases that are optically thin at all wavelengths to optically thick at most wavelengths. The dust properties adopted are characteristic of the diffuse Milky Way interstellar medium. This benchmark includes solutions for the full dust emission including single photon (stochastic) heating as well as two simplifying approximations: One where all grains are considered in equilibrium with the radiation field and one where the emission is from a single effective grain with size-distribution-averaged properties. A total of six Monte Carlo codes and one Ray Tracing code provide solutions to this benchmark. Results: The solution to this benchmark is given as global spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and images at select diagnostic wavelengths from the ultraviolet through the infrared. Comparison of the results revealed that the global SEDs are consistent on average to a few percent for all but the scattered stellar flux at very high optical depths. The image results are consistent within 10%, again except for the stellar scattered flux at very high optical depths. The lack of agreement between

  2. The improvement of the heat transfer model for sodium-water reaction jet code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiguchi, Yoshirou; Yamamoto, Hajime; Kamoshida, Norio; Murata, Shuuichi

    2001-02-01

    For confirming the reasonable DBL (Design Base Leak) on steam generator (SG), it is necessary to evaluate phenomena of sodium-water reaction (SWR) in an actual steam generator realistically. The improvement of a heat transfer model on sodium-water reaction (SWR) jet code (LEAP-JET ver.1.40) and application analysis to the water injection tests for confirmation of propriety for the code were performed. On the improvement of the code, the heat transfer model between a inside fluid and a tube wall was introduced instead of the prior model which was heat capacity model including both heat capacity of the tube wall and inside fluid. And it was considered that the fluid of inside the heat exchange tube was able to treat as water or sodium and typical heat transfer equations used in SG design were also introduced in the new heat transfer model. Further additional work was carried out in order to improve the stability of the calculation for long calculation time. The test calculation using the improved code (LEAP-JET ver.1.50) were carried out with conditions of the SWAT-IR·Run-HT-2 test. It was confirmed that the SWR jet behavior on the result and the influence to the result of the heat transfer model were reasonable. And also on the improved code (LEAP-JET ver.1.50), user's manual was revised with additional I/O manual and explanation of the heat transfer model and new variable name. (author)

  3. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ionising and non-ionising radiation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Neil; Auvinen, Anssi; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Erdmann, Friederike; de Vries, Esther; Greinert, Rüdiger; Harrison, John; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Ionising radiation can transfer sufficient energy to ionise molecules, and this can lead to chemical changes, including DNA damage in cells. Key evidence for the carcinogenicity of ionising radiation comes from: follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan; other epidemiological studies of groups that have been exposed to radiation from medical, occupational or environmental sources; experimental animal studies; and studies of cellular responses to radiation. Considering exposure to environmental ionising radiation, inhalation of naturally occurring radon is the major source of radiation in the population - in doses orders of magnitude higher than those from nuclear power production or nuclear fallout. Indoor exposure to radon and its decay products is an important cause of lung cancer; radon may cause approximately one in ten lung cancers in Europe. Exposures to radon in buildings can be reduced via a three-step process of identifying those with potentially elevated radon levels, measuring radon levels, and reducing exposure by installation of remediation systems. In the 4th Edition of the European Code against Cancer it is therefore recommended to: "Find out if you are exposed to radiation from naturally high radon levels in your home. Take action to reduce high radon levels". Non-ionising types of radiation (those with insufficient energy to ionise molecules) - including extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields as well as radiofrequency electromagnetic fields - are not an established cause of cancer and are therefore not addressed in the recommendations to reduce cancer risk. Copyright © 2015 International Agency for Research on Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Stochastic radiative transfer model for mixture of discontinuous vegetation canopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabanov, Nikolay V.; Huang, D.; Knjazikhin, Y.; Dickinson, R.E.; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2007-01-01

    Modeling of the radiation regime of a mixture of vegetation species is a fundamental problem of the Earth's land remote sensing and climate applications. The major existing approaches, including the linear mixture model and the turbid medium (TM) mixture radiative transfer model, provide only an approximate solution to this problem. In this study, we developed the stochastic mixture radiative transfer (SMRT) model, a mathematically exact tool to evaluate radiation regime in a natural canopy with spatially varying optical properties, that is, canopy, which exhibits a structured mixture of vegetation species and gaps. The model solves for the radiation quantities, direct input to the remote sensing/climate applications: mean radiation fluxes over whole mixture and over individual species. The canopy structure is parameterized in the SMRT model in terms of two stochastic moments: the probability of finding species and the conditional pair-correlation of species. The second moment is responsible for the 3D radiation effects, namely, radiation streaming through gaps without interaction with vegetation and variation of the radiation fluxes between different species. We performed analytical and numerical analysis of the radiation effects, simulated with the SMRT model for the three cases of canopy structure: (a) non-ordered mixture of species and gaps (TM); (b) ordered mixture of species without gaps; and (c) ordered mixture of species with gaps. The analysis indicates that the variation of radiation fluxes between different species is proportional to the variation of species optical properties (leaf albedo, density of foliage, etc.) Gaps introduce significant disturbance to the radiation regime in the canopy as their optical properties constitute major contrast to those of any vegetation species. The SMRT model resolves deficiencies of the major existing mixture models: ignorance of species radiation coupling via multiple scattering of photons (the linear mixture model

  5. Formal Solutions for Polarized Radiative Transfer. III. Stiffness and Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janett, Gioele; Paganini, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    Efficient numerical approximation of the polarized radiative transfer equation is challenging because this system of ordinary differential equations exhibits stiff behavior, which potentially results in numerical instability. This negatively impacts the accuracy of formal solvers, and small step-sizes are often necessary to retrieve physical solutions. This work presents stability analyses of formal solvers for the radiative transfer equation of polarized light, identifies instability issues, and suggests practical remedies. In particular, the assumptions and the limitations of the stability analysis of Runge–Kutta methods play a crucial role. On this basis, a suitable and pragmatic formal solver is outlined and tested. An insightful comparison to the scalar radiative transfer equation is also presented.

  6. Strain-induced modulation of near-field radiative transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanekar, Alok; Ricci, Matthew; Tian, Yanpei; Gregory, Otto; Zheng, Yi

    2018-06-11

    In this theoretical study, we present a near-field thermal modulator that exhibits change in radiative heat transfer when subjected to mechanical stress/strain. The device has two terminals at different temperatures separated by vacuum: one fixed and one stretchable. The stretchable side contains one-dimensional grating. When subjected to mechanical strain, the effective optical properties of the stretchable side are affected upon deformation of the grating. This results in modulation of surface waves across the interfaces influencing near-field radiative heat transfer. We show that for a separation of 100 nm, it is possible to achieve 25% change in radiative heat transfer for a strain of 10%.

  7. Radiative heat transfer by the Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett †, James P; Cho, Young I; Greene, George A; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Yang, Wen-Jei; Kudo, Kazuhiko

    1995-01-01

    This book presents the basic principles and applications of radiative heat transfer used in energy, space, and geo-environmental engineering, and can serve as a reference book for engineers and scientists in researchand development. A PC disk containing software for numerical analyses by the Monte Carlo method is included to provide hands-on practice in analyzing actual radiative heat transfer problems.Advances in Heat Transfer is designed to fill the information gap between regularly scheduled journals and university level textbooks by providing in-depth review articles over a broader scope than journals or texts usually allow.Key Features* Offers solution methods for integro-differential formulation to help avoid difficulties* Includes a computer disk for numerical analyses by PC* Discusses energy absorption by gas and scattering effects by particles* Treats non-gray radiative gases* Provides example problems for direct applications in energy, space, and geo-environmental engineering

  8. Radiative Transfer Model for Contaminated Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    reflectance of potassium chlorate and ammonium nitrate contaminated surfaces in mid-wavelength and long-wavelength infrared for detection. Our framework...obtained excellent or good results for lab measurements of potassium chlorate on most aluminum surfaces; however, ammonium nitrate on painted aluminum...misidentify potassium chlorate as ammonium nitrate and vice versa). We also observed moderate success on field data. 15. SUBJECT TERMS radiative

  9. Assessing 1D Atmospheric Solar Radiative Transfer Models: Interpretation and Handling of Unresolved Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, H. W.; Stephens, G. L.; Partain, P. T.; Bergman, J. W.; Bonnel, B.; Campana, K.; Clothiaux, E. E.; Clough, S.; Cusack, S.; Delamere, J.; Edwards, J.; Evans, K. F.; Fouquart, Y.; Freidenreich, S.; Galin, V.; Hou, Y.; Kato, S.; Li, J.;  Mlawer, E.;  Morcrette, J.-J.;  O'Hirok, W.;  Räisänen, P.;  Ramaswamy, V.;  Ritter, B.;  Rozanov, E.;  Schlesinger, M.;  Shibata, K.;  Sporyshev, P.;  Sun, Z.;  Wendisch, M.;  Wood, N.;  Yang, F.

    2003-08-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to assess the performance of 1D solar radiative transfer codes that are used currently both for research and in weather and climate models. Emphasis is on interpretation and handling of unresolved clouds. Answers are sought to the following questions: (i) How well do 1D solar codes interpret and handle columns of information pertaining to partly cloudy atmospheres? (ii) Regardless of the adequacy of their assumptions about unresolved clouds, do 1D solar codes perform as intended?One clear-sky and two plane-parallel, homogeneous (PPH) overcast cloud cases serve to elucidate 1D model differences due to varying treatments of gaseous transmittances, cloud optical properties, and basic radiative transfer. The remaining four cases involve 3D distributions of cloud water and water vapor as simulated by cloud-resolving models. Results for 25 1D codes, which included two line-by-line (LBL) models (clear and overcast only) and four 3D Monte Carlo (MC) photon transport algorithms, were submitted by 22 groups. Benchmark, domain-averaged irradiance profiles were computed by the MC codes. For the clear and overcast cases, all MC estimates of top-of-atmosphere albedo, atmospheric absorptance, and surface absorptance agree with one of the LBL codes to within ±2%. Most 1D codes underestimate atmospheric absorptance by typically 15-25 W m-2 at overhead sun for the standard tropical atmosphere regardless of clouds.Depending on assumptions about unresolved clouds, the 1D codes were partitioned into four genres: (i) horizontal variability, (ii) exact overlap of PPH clouds, (iii) maximum/random overlap of PPH clouds, and (iv) random overlap of PPH clouds. A single MC code was used to establish conditional benchmarks applicable to each genre, and all MC codes were used to establish the full 3D benchmarks. There is a tendency for 1D codes to cluster near their respective conditional benchmarks, though intragenre variances typically exceed those for

  10. Near-field radiative heat transfer between metasurfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Jin; Dyakov, Sergey A.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials possess artificial bulk and surface electromagnetic states. Tamed dispersion properties of surface waves allow one to achieve a controllable super-Planckian radiative heat transfer (RHT) process between two closely spaced objects. We numerically demonstrate enhanced RHT between two...... and highly geometrically tailorable. Our simulation also reveals thermally excited nonresonant surface waves in constituent metallic materials may play a prevailing role for RHT at an extremely small separation between two metal plates, rendering metamaterial modes insignificant for the energy-transfer...

  11. Maximal near-field radiative heat transfer between two plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefzaoui, Elyes; Ezzahri, Younès; Drévillon, Jérémie; Joulain, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Near-field radiative transfer is a promising way to significantly and simultaneously enhance both thermo-photovoltaic (TPV) devices power densities and efficiencies. A parametric study of Drude and Lorentz models performances in maximizing near-field radiative heat transfer between two semi-infinite planes separated by nanometric distances at room temperature is presented in this paper. Optimal parameters of these models that provide optical properties maximizing the radiative heat flux are reported and compared to real materials usually considered in similar studies, silicon carbide and heavily doped silicon in this case. Results are obtained by exact and approximate (in the extreme near-field regime and the electrostatic limit hypothesis) calculations. The two methods are compared in terms of accuracy and CPU resources consumption. Their differences are explained according to a mesoscopic description of nearfield radiative heat transfer. Finally, the frequently assumed hypothesis which states a maximal radiative heat transfer when the two semi-infinite planes are of identical materials is numerically confirmed. Its subsequent practical constraints are then discussed. Presented results enlighten relevant paths to follow in order to choose or design materials maximizing nano-TPV devices performances.

  12. FEHM, Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyvoloski, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; and double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities. 2 - Methods: FEHM uses a preconditioned conjugate gradient solution of coupled linear equations and a fully implicit, fully coupled Newton Raphson solution of nonlinear equations. It has the capability of simulating transport using either a advection/diffusion solution or a particle tracking method. 3 - Restriction on the complexity of the problem: Disk space and machine memory are the only limitations

  13. Performance tuning Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Intel Xeon Phi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, is a designed for dual use for forecasting and research. WRF offers multiple physics options that can be combined in any way. One of the physics options is radiance computation. The major source for energy for the earth's climate is solar radiation. Thus, it is imperative to accurately model horizontal and vertical distribution of the heating. Goddard solar radiative transfer model includes the absorption duo to water vapor,ozone, ozygen, carbon dioxide, clouds and aerosols. The model computes the interactions among the absorption and scattering by clouds, aerosols, molecules and surface. Finally, fluxes are integrated over the entire longwave spectrum.In this paper, we present our results of optimizing the Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Intel Many Integrated Core Architecture (MIC) hardware. The Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor is the first product based on Intel MIC architecture, and it consists of up to 61 cores connected by a high performance on-die bidirectional interconnect. The coprocessor supports all important Intel development tools. Thus, the development environment is familiar one to a vast number of CPU developers. Although, getting a maximum performance out of MICs will require using some novel optimization techniques. Those optimization techniques are discusses in this paper. The optimizations improved the performance of the original Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Xeon Phi 7120P by a factor of 2.2x. Furthermore, the same optimizations improved the performance of the Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on a dual socket configuration of eight core Intel Xeon E5-2670 CPUs by a factor of 2.1x compared to the original Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme code.

  14. Radiative transfer in disc galaxies - V. The accuracy of the KB approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dukhang; Baes, Maarten; Seon, Kwang-Il; Camps, Peter; Verstocken, Sam; Han, Wonyong

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the accuracy of an approximate radiative transfer technique that was first proposed by Kylafis & Bahcall (hereafter the KB approximation) and has been popular in modelling dusty late-type galaxies. We compare realistic galaxy models calculated with the KB approximation with those of a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The SKIRT code fully takes into account of the contribution of multiple scattering whereas the KB approximation calculates only single scattered intensity and multiple scattering components are approximated. We find that the KB approximation gives fairly accurate results if optically thin, face-on galaxies are considered. However, for highly inclined (I ≳ 85°) and/or optically thick (central face-on optical depth ≳1) galaxy models, the approximation can give rise to substantial errors, sometimes, up to ≳40 per cent. Moreover, it is also found that the KB approximation is not always physical, sometimes producing infinite intensities at lines of sight with high optical depth in edge-on galaxy models. There is no `simple recipe' to correct the errors of the KB approximation that is universally applicable to any galaxy models. Therefore, it is recommended that the full radiative transfer calculation be used, even though it is slower than the KB approximation.

  15. Radiative transfer code: Application to the calculation of PAR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The production of carbon in the ocean, the so-called primary production, depends on various physico- biological ... We developed a model (Chami et al. 1997) to simulate .... and the gaseous transmittance for ozone, oxygen and water vapor ...

  16. Evaluation of Advanced Models for PAFS Condensation Heat Transfer in SPACE Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Byoung-Uhn; Kim, Seok; Park, Yu-Sun; Kang, Kyung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Tae-Hwan; Yun, Byong-Jo [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The PAFS (Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System) is operated by the natural circulation to remove the core decay heat through the PCHX (Passive Condensation Heat Exchanger) which is composed of the nearly horizontal tubes. For validation of the cooling and operational performance of the PAFS, PASCAL (PAFS Condensing Heat Removal Assessment Loop) facility was constructed and the condensation heat transfer and natural convection phenomena in the PAFS was experimentally investigated at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). From the PASCAL experimental result, it was found that conventional system analysis code underestimated the condensation heat transfer. In this study, advanced condensation heat transfer models which can treat the heat transfer mechanisms with the different flow regimes in the nearly horizontal heat exchanger tube were analyzed. The models were implemented in a thermal hydraulic safety analysis code, SPACE (Safety and Performance Analysis Code for Nuclear Power Plant), and it was evaluated with the PASCAL experimental data. With an aim of enhancing the prediction capability for the condensation phenomenon inside the PCHX tube of the PAFS, advanced models for the condensation heat transfer were implemented into the wall condensation model of the SPACE code, so that the PASCAL experimental result was utilized to validate the condensation models. Calculation results showed that the improved model for the condensation heat transfer coefficient enhanced the prediction capability of the SPACE code. This result confirms that the mechanistic modeling for the film condensation in the steam phase and the convection in the condensate liquid contributed to enhance the prediction capability of the wall condensation model of the SPACE code and reduce conservatism in prediction of condensation heat transfer.

  17. Fractional integration and radiative transfer in a multifractal atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naud, C.; Schertzer, D. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Lovejoy, S. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)

    1996-04-01

    Recently, Cess et al. (1995) and Ramathan et al. (1995) cited observations which exhibit an anomalous absorption of cloudy skies in comparison with the value predicted by usual models and which thus introduce large uncertainties for climatic change assessments. These observation raise questions concerning the way general circulation models have been tuned for decades, relying on classical methods, of both radiative transfer and dynamical modeling. The observations also tend to demonstrate that homogeneous models are simply not relevant in relating the highly variable properties of clouds and radiation fields. However smoothed, the intensity of cloud`s multi-scattered radiation fields reflect this extreme variability.

  18. Simulation of heat and mass transfer in boiling water with the Melodif code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freydier, P.; Chen, O.; Olive, J.; Simonin, O.

    1991-04-01

    The Melodif code is developed at Electricite de France, Research and Development Division. It is an eulerian two dimensional code for the simulation of turbulent two phase flows (a three dimensional code derived from Melodif, ASTRID, is currently being prepared). Melodif is based on the two fluid model, solving the equations of conservation for mass, momentum and energy, for both phases. In such a two fluid model, the description of interfacial transfers between phases is a crucial issue. The model used applies to a dominant continuous phase, and a dispersed phase. A good description of interfacial momentum transfer exists in the standard MELODIF code: the drag force, the apparent mass force... are taken into account. An important factor for interfacial transfers is the interfacial area per volume unit. With the assumption of spherical gas bubbles, an equation has been written for this variable. In the present wok, a model has been tested for interfacial heat and mass transfer in the case of boiling water: it is assumed that mass transfer is controlled by heat transfer through the latent massic energy taken in the phase that vaporizes (or condenses). This heat and mass transfer model has been tested in various configurations: - a cylinder with water flowing inside, is being heated. Boiling takes place near the wall, while bubbles migrating to the core of the flow recondense. This roughly simulates a sub-cooled boiling phenomenon. - a box containing liquid water is depressurized. Boiling takes place in the whole volume of the fluid. The Melodif code can simulate this configuration due to the implicitation of the relation between interphase mass transfer and the pressure variable

  19. GPU-BASED MONTE CARLO DUST RADIATIVE TRANSFER SCHEME APPLIED TO ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heymann, Frank; Siebenmorgen, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional parallel Monte Carlo (MC) dust radiative transfer code is presented. To overcome the huge computing-time requirements of MC treatments, the computational power of vectorized hardware is used, utilizing either multi-core computer power or graphics processing units. The approach is a self-consistent way to solve the radiative transfer equation in arbitrary dust configurations. The code calculates the equilibrium temperatures of two populations of large grains and stochastic heated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Anisotropic scattering is treated applying the Heney-Greenstein phase function. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the object is derived at low spatial resolution by a photon counting procedure and at high spatial resolution by a vectorized ray tracer. The latter allows computation of high signal-to-noise images of the objects at any frequencies and arbitrary viewing angles. We test the robustness of our approach against other radiative transfer codes. The SED and dust temperatures of one- and two-dimensional benchmarks are reproduced at high precision. The parallelization capability of various MC algorithms is analyzed and included in our treatment. We utilize the Lucy algorithm for the optical thin case where the Poisson noise is high, the iteration-free Bjorkman and Wood method to reduce the calculation time, and the Fleck and Canfield diffusion approximation for extreme optical thick cells. The code is applied to model the appearance of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at optical and infrared wavelengths. The AGN torus is clumpy and includes fluffy composite grains of various sizes made up of silicates and carbon. The dependence of the SED on the number of clumps in the torus and the viewing angle is studied. The appearance of the 10 μm silicate features in absorption or emission is discussed. The SED of the radio-loud quasar 3C 249.1 is fit by the AGN model and a cirrus component to account for the far-infrared emission.

  20. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case

  1. One-dimensional transient radiative transfer by lattice Boltzmann method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hongliang; Tan, Heping

    2013-10-21

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is extended to solve transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional slab containing scattering media subjected to a collimated short laser irradiation. By using a fully implicit backward differencing scheme to discretize the transient term in the radiative transfer equation, a new type of lattice structure is devised. The accuracy and computational efficiency of this algorithm are examined firstly. Afterwards, effects of the medium properties such as the extinction coefficient, the scattering albedo and the anisotropy factor, and the shapes of laser pulse on time-resolved signals of transmittance and reflectance are investigated. Results of the present method are found to compare very well with the data from the literature. For an oblique incidence, the LBM results in this paper are compared with those by Monte Carlo method generated by ourselves. In addition, transient radiative transfer in a two-Layer inhomogeneous media subjected to a short square pulse irradiation is investigated. At last, the LBM is further extended to study the transient radiative transfer in homogeneous medium with a refractive index discontinuity irradiated by the short pulse laser. Several trends on the time-resolved signals different from those for refractive index of 1 (i.e. refractive-index-matched boundary) are observed and analysed.

  2. Thermosolutal MHD flow and radiative heat transfer with viscous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates double diffusive convection MHD flow past a vertical porous plate in a chemically active fluid with radiative heat transfer in the presence of viscous work and heat source. The resulting nonlinear dimensionless equations are solved by asymptotic analysis technique giving approximate analytic ...

  3. Free convection effects and radiative heat transfer in MHD Stokes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present note deals with the effects of radiative heat transfer and free convection in MHD for a flow of an electrically conducting, incompressible, dusty viscous fluid past an impulsively started vertical non-conducting plate, under the influence of transversely applied magnetic field. The heat due to viscous dissipation and ...

  4. New radiative transfer models for obscuring tori in active galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bemmel, IM; Dullemond, CP

    Two-dimensional radiative transfer is employed to obtain the broad-band infrared spectrum of active galaxies. In the models we vary the geometry and size of the obscuring medium, the surface density, the opacity and the grain size distribution. Resulting spectral energy distributions are constructed

  5. Free convection effects and radiative heat transfer in MHD Stokes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... radiative heat transfer is useful for predicting the heat feedback to the burning surface ... petroleum technology, to study the movement of natural gas, oil and water ... (e.g. sea water, rain water, and sewage) past an impulsively started infinite ...

  6. MONTE CARLO RADIATION TRANSFER SIMULATIONS OF PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION IN LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzati, Davide [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, 301 Weniger Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    We present MCRaT, a Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer code for self-consistently computing the light curves and spectra of the photospheric emission from relativistic, unmagnetized jets. We apply MCRaT to a relativistic hydrodynamic simulation of a long-duration gamma-ray burst jet, and present the resulting light curves and time-dependent spectra for observers at various angles from the jet axis. We compare our results to observational results and find that photospheric emission is a viable model to explain the prompt phase of long-duration gamma-ray bursts at the peak frequency and above, but faces challenges when reproducing the flat spectrum below the peak frequency. We finally discuss possible limitations of these results both in terms of the hydrodynamics and the radiation transfer and how these limitations could affect the conclusions that we present.

  7. Linearized vector radiative transfer model MCC++ for a spherical atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postylyakov, O.V.

    2004-01-01

    Application of radiative transfer models has shown that optical remote sensing requires extra characteristics of radiance field in addition to the radiance intensity itself. Simulation of spectral measurements, analysis of retrieval errors and development of retrieval algorithms are in need of derivatives of radiance with respect to atmospheric constituents under investigation. The presented vector spherical radiative transfer model MCC++ was linearized, which allows the calculation of derivatives of all elements of the Stokes vector with respect to the volume absorption coefficient simultaneously with radiance calculation. The model MCC++ employs Monte Carlo algorithm for radiative transfer simulation and takes into account aerosol and molecular scattering, gas and aerosol absorption, and Lambertian surface albedo. The model treats a spherically symmetrical atmosphere. Relation of the estimated derivatives with other forms of radiance derivatives: the weighting functions used in gas retrieval and the air mass factors used in the DOAS retrieval algorithms, is obtained. Validation of the model against other radiative models is overviewed. The computing time of the intensity for the MCC++ model is about that for radiative models treating sphericity of the atmosphere approximately and is significantly shorter than that for the full spherical models used in the comparisons. The simultaneous calculation of all derivatives (i.e. with respect to absorption in all model atmosphere layers) and the intensity is only 1.2-2 times longer than the calculation of the intensity only

  8. CODE's new solar radiation pressure model for GNSS orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, D.; Meindl, M.; Beutler, G.; Dach, R.; Schaer, S.; Lutz, S.; Prange, L.; Sośnica, K.; Mervart, L.; Jäggi, A.

    2015-08-01

    The Empirical CODE Orbit Model (ECOM) of the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE), which was developed in the early 1990s, is widely used in the International GNSS Service (IGS) community. For a rather long time, spurious spectral lines are known to exist in geophysical parameters, in particular in the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) and in the estimated geocenter coordinates, which could recently be attributed to the ECOM. These effects grew creepingly with the increasing influence of the GLONASS system in recent years in the CODE analysis, which is based on a rigorous combination of GPS and GLONASS since May 2003. In a first step we show that the problems associated with the ECOM are to the largest extent caused by the GLONASS, which was reaching full deployment by the end of 2011. GPS-only, GLONASS-only, and combined GPS/GLONASS solutions using the observations in the years 2009-2011 of a global network of 92 combined GPS/GLONASS receivers were analyzed for this purpose. In a second step we review direct solar radiation pressure (SRP) models for GNSS satellites. We demonstrate that only even-order short-period harmonic perturbations acting along the direction Sun-satellite occur for GPS and GLONASS satellites, and only odd-order perturbations acting along the direction perpendicular to both, the vector Sun-satellite and the spacecraft's solar panel axis. Based on this insight we assess in the third step the performance of four candidate orbit models for the future ECOM. The geocenter coordinates, the ERP differences w. r. t. the IERS 08 C04 series of ERPs, the misclosures for the midnight epochs of the daily orbital arcs, and scale parameters of Helmert transformations for station coordinates serve as quality criteria. The old and updated ECOM are validated in addition with satellite laser ranging (SLR) observations and by comparing the orbits to those of the IGS and other analysis centers. Based on all tests, we present a new extended ECOM which

  9. Modelling radiative heat transfer inside a basin type solar still

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhlopa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer inside a basin type solar still has been investigated using two models with (model 1) and without (model 2) taking into account optical view factors. The coefficient of radiative heat exchange (h r,w-gc ) between the water and cover surfaces of a practical solar still was computed using the two models. Simulation results show that model 1 yields lower values of h r,w-gc and the root mean square error than model 2. It is therefore concluded that the accuracy of modelling the performance of a basin-type solar still can be improved by incorporating view factors. - Highlights: • Radiative heat transfer in a basin type solar still has been investigated. • Two models with and without view factors were used. • The model with view factors exhibits a lower magnitude of root mean square error. • View factors affect the accuracy of modelling the performance of the solar still

  10. Microwave radiative transfer intercomparison study for 3-D dichroic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglia, A.; Davis, C.P.; Emde, C.; Simmer, C.

    2007-01-01

    Three different numerical methods capable of solving the radiative transfer of microwave radiation within 3-D dichroic media are compared. A case study, represented by an intense rain shaft populated by perfectly oriented oblate raindrops, is analysed in detail, including a discussion of the behaviour of all four Stokes components. Results demonstrate an acceptable agreement between all Monte Carlo methods. The method based on a discrete ordinates scheme agrees only qualitatively with the Monte Carlo outputs. Because of its lower computational cost the backward Monte Carlo technique based on importance sampling represents the most efficient way to face passive microwave radiative transfer problems related to optically thick 3-D structured clouds including non-spherical preferentially oriented hydrometeors

  11. Internal radiation dose calculations with the INREM II computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Killough, G.G.

    1978-01-01

    A computer code, INREM II, was developed to calculate the internal radiation dose equivalent to organs of man which results from the intake of a radionuclide by inhalation or ingestion. Deposition and removal of radioactivity from the respiratory tract is represented by the Internal Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group Lung Model. A four-segment catenary model of the gastrointestinal tract is used to estimate movement of radioactive material that is ingested, or swallowed after being cleared from the respiratory tract. Retention of radioactivity in other organs is specified by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions. The formation and decay of radioactive daughters is treated explicitly, with each radionuclide in the decay chain having its own uptake and retention parameters, as supplied by the user. The dose equivalent to a target organ is computed as the sum of contributions from each source organ in which radioactivity is assumed to be situated. This calculation utilizes a matrix of dosimetric S-factors (rem/μCi-day) supplied by the user for the particular choice of source and target organs. Output permits the evaluation of components of dose from cross-irradiations when penetrating radiations are present. INREM II has been utilized with current radioactive decay data and metabolic models to produce extensive tabulations of dose conversion factors for a reference adult for approximately 150 radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of light-water-reactor fuel cycles. These dose conversion factors represent the 50-year dose commitment per microcurie intake of a given radionuclide for 22target organs including contributions from specified source organs and surplus activity in the rest of the body. These tabulations are particularly significant in their consistent use of contemporary models and data and in the detail of documentation

  12. A fast infrared radiative transfer model for overlapping clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Jianguo; Yang Ping; Huang Hunglung; Davies, James E.; Li Jun; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.

    2007-01-01

    A fast infrared radiative transfer model (FIRTM2) appropriate for application to both single-layered and overlapping cloud situations is developed for simulating the outgoing infrared spectral radiance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In FIRTM2 a pre-computed library of cloud reflectance and transmittance values is employed to account for one or two cloud layers, whereas the background atmospheric optical thickness due to gaseous absorption can be computed from a clear-sky radiative transfer model. FIRTM2 is applicable to three atmospheric conditions: (1) clear-sky (2) single-layered ice or water cloud, and (3) two simultaneous cloud layers in a column (e.g., ice cloud overlying water cloud). Moreover, FIRTM2 outputs the derivatives (i.e., Jacobians) of the TOA brightness temperature with respect to cloud optical thickness and effective particle size. Sensitivity analyses have been carried out to assess the performance of FIRTM2 for two spectral regions, namely the longwave (LW) band (587.3-1179.5 cm -1 ) and the short-to-medium wave (SMW) band (1180.1-2228.9 cm -1 ). The assessment is carried out in terms of brightness temperature differences (BTD) between FIRTM2 and the well-known discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT), henceforth referred to as BTD (F-D). The BTD (F-D) values for single-layered clouds are generally less than 0.8 K. For the case of two cloud layers (specifically ice cloud over water cloud), the BTD (F-D) values are also generally less than 0.8 K except for the SMW band for the case of a very high altitude (>15 km) cloud comprised of small ice particles. Note that for clear-sky atmospheres, FIRTM2 reduces to the clear-sky radiative transfer model that is incorporated into FIRTM2, and the errors in this case are essentially those of the clear-sky radiative transfer model

  13. Fundamental radiation effect on polymers energy transfer from radiation to polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguchi, T.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer modification as cross-link, chain scission, and graft-polymerization by radiation is initiated by the quantum energy transferred from radiation to polymers. The active species for chemical reactions are produced through ionization or activation of polymer molecules for any radiation source. The energy transfer occurs mainly by ionic interaction between radiation and polymer molecule, and the contribution from the collision interaction is miner. The radiation of electromagnetic wave as X-ray or γ-ray generates the energetic electron which induces ionic interaction with polymer molecule. The energy loss profile along the penetration to polymer material is much different among the radiation sources of EB, γ-ray, and ion beams in the macroscopic mechanism. In this article, the behavior of single event, that is, the event induced by one electron, γ-ray, ion, and neutron is described by the macroscopic mechanism and by the microscopic mechanism. (authors)

  14. Three-dimensional transfer of solar radiation in clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a theoretical study of the effects of cloud geometry on the transfer of incident solar radiation is presented. These results indicate that a three-dimensional description of cloud geometry is a necessary prerequisite to the accurate determination of the emerging radiation field. Models which make the plane parallel assumption are therefore frequently inadequate. Both a Monte Carlo method and an analytic method were used to model the three-dimensional transfer of radiation. At the expense of considerable computation time the Monte Carlo model provides accurate values of the fluxes and intensities (averages over π/30 steradians) emerging from clouds which can be described as a set of connected cuboidal cells, each cell being homogeneous with respect to extinction coefficient, single scatter albedo and phase function. The analytic model, based on an extension of Eddington's approximation to three dimensions and to anisotropic scattering, is efficient to use, but is restricted to clouds made up of a single cuboidal cell and is more accurate for large clouds than small ones. By an iterated approach, involving integration of the source function along line of sight, the analytic model provides both fluxes and intensities of the emerging radiation at any specified point on the cloud's surface. These models were both applied to a systematic study of the transfer of solar radiation in isolated cuboidal clouds of arbitraty dimensions, the results of which illustrate the importance of considering the total cloud geometry in any attempt at realistic modelling. A study of the transfer of radiation in stratiform clouds with turretted top surfaces also indicated that even for these clouds the plane parallel assumption was often not tenable

  15. Coupling hydrodynamics with comoving frame radiative transfer. I. A unified approach for OB and WR stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, A. A. C.; Hamann, W.-R.; Todt, H.; Hainich, R.; Shenar, T.

    2017-07-01

    Context. For more than two decades, stellar atmosphere codes have been used to derive the stellar and wind parameters of massive stars. Although they have become a powerful tool and sufficiently reproduce the observed spectral appearance, they can hardly be used for more than measuring parameters. One major obstacle is their inconsistency between the calculated radiation field and the wind stratification due to the usage of prescribed mass-loss rates and wind-velocity fields. Aims: We present the concepts for a new generation of hydrodynamically consistent non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (non-LTE) stellar atmosphere models that allow for detailed studies of radiation-driven stellar winds. As a first demonstration, this new kind of model is applied to a massive O star. Methods: Based on earlier works, the PoWR code has been extended with the option to consistently solve the hydrodynamic equation together with the statistical equations and the radiative transfer in order to obtain a hydrodynamically consistent atmosphere stratification. In these models, the whole velocity field is iteratively updated together with an adjustment of the mass-loss rate. Results: The concepts for obtaining hydrodynamically consistent models using a comoving-frame radiative transfer are outlined. To provide a useful benchmark, we present a demonstration model, which was motivated to describe the well-studied O4 supergiant ζPup. The obtained stellar and wind parameters are within the current range of literature values. Conclusions: For the first time, the PoWR code has been used to obtain a hydrodynamically consistent model for a massive O star. This has been achieved by a profound revision of earlier concepts used for Wolf-Rayet stars. The velocity field is shaped by various elements contributing to the radiative acceleration, especially in the outer wind. The results further indicate that for more dense winds deviations from a standard β-law occur.

  16. Mathematical models of the theory of the radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Ch.

    2007-06-01

    We are interested in various different models arising in radiative transfer, which describe the interactions between the medium and the photons. The radiation is described in terms of energy and energy flux in the macroscopic view, the material being described by the Euler equations (radiative hydrodynamic model). In another way, the radiation can be seen as a collection of photons, in the microscopic view point; the photons can be absorbed or emitted by the material. The absorption and the emission of photons depend on the internal excitation and ionization state of the material. We begin with the local existence (in time) of smooth solutions to a system coupling the Euler equations and the transfer equation. This system describes the exchange of energy and moment between the radiation and the material. Next, we give an asymptotic discussion for this model in the NON-LTE regime and get a simple system: coupling the Euler equations with an elliptic equation. We show the existence of (smooth) shock profiles to this system and the regularity of the shock profile as a function of the strength of the shock. Then we study the asymptotic stability of the shock profile. Finally, we study a system describing the radiation and the internal state of the material, in the microscopic view point. We prove the existence of the solution to this system and study the convergence towards the statistical equilibrium. The theoretical results are illustrated by numerical simulations. (author)

  17. Near-field radiative heat transfer in mesoporous alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Feng Yan-Hui; Zhang Xin-Xin; Huang Cong-Liang; Wang Ge

    2015-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of mesoporous material has aroused the great interest of scholars due to its wide applications such as insulation, catalyst, etc. Mesoporous alumina substrate consists of uniformly distributed, unconnected cylindrical pores. Near-field radiative heat transfer cannot be ignored, when the diameters of the pores are less than the characteristic wavelength of thermal radiation. In this paper, near-field radiation across a cylindrical pore is simulated by employing the fluctuation dissipation theorem and Green function. Such factors as the diameter of the pore, and the temperature of the material are further analyzed. The research results show that the radiative heat transfer on a mesoscale is 2∼4 orders higher than on a macroscale. The heat flux and equivalent thermal conductivity of radiation across a cylindrical pore decrease exponentially with pore diameter increasing, while increase with temperature increasing. The calculated equivalent thermal conductivity of radiation is further developed to modify the thermal conductivity of the mesoporous alumina. The combined thermal conductivity of the mesoporous alumina is obtained by using porosity weighted dilute medium and compared with the measurement. The combined thermal conductivity of mesoporous silica decreases gradually with pore diameter increasing, while increases smoothly with temperature increasing, which is in good agreement with the experimental data. The larger the porosity, the more significant the near-field effect is, which cannot be ignored. (paper)

  18. Non-grey benchmark results for two temperature non-equilibrium radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, B.; Olson, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    Benchmark solutions to time-dependent radiative transfer problems involving non-equilibrium coupling to the material temperature field are crucial for validating time-dependent radiation transport codes. Previous efforts on generating analytical solutions to non-equilibrium radiative transfer problems were all restricted to the one-group grey model. In this paper, a non-grey model, namely the picket-fence model, is considered for a two temperature non-equilibrium radiative transfer problem in an infinite medium. The analytical solutions, as functions of space and time, are constructed in the form of infinite integrals for both the diffusion description and transport description. These expressions are evaluated numerically and the benchmark results are generated. The asymptotic solutions for large and small times are also derived in terms of elementary functions and are compared with the exact results. Comparisons are given between the transport and diffusion solutions and between the grey and non-grey solutions. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Mirage, a food chain transfer and dosimetric impact code in relation with atmospheric and liquid dispersion codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dorpe, F.; Jourdain, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The numerical code M.I.R.A.G.E. (Module of Radiological impact calculations on the Environment due to accidental or chronic nuclear releases through Aqueous and Gas media) has been developed to simulate the radionuclides transfer in the biosphere and food chains, as well as the dosimetric impact on man, after accidental or chronic releases in the environment by nuclear installations. The originality of M.I.R.A.G.E. is to propose a single tool chained downstream with various atmospheric and liquid dispersion codes. The code M.I.R.A.G.E. is a series of modules which makes it possible to carry out evaluations on the transfers in food chains and human dose impact. Currently, M.I.R.A.G.E. is chained with a Gaussian atmospheric dispersion code H.A.R.M.A.T.T.A.N. (Cea), a 3 D atmospheric dispersion code with Lagrangian model named M.I.N.E.R.V.E.-S.P.R.A.Y. (Aria Technology) and a 3 D groundwater transfer code named M.A.R.T.H.E. (B.R.G.M.). M.I.R.A.G.E. uses concentration or activity result files as initial data input for its calculations. The application initially calculates the concentrations in the various compartments of the environment (soils, plants, animals). The results are given in the shape of concentration and dose maps and also on a particular place called a reference group for dosimetric impact (like a village or a specific population group located around a nuclear installation). The input and output data of M.I.R.A.G.E. can have geographic coordinates and thus readable by a G.I.S. M.I.R.A.G. E.is an opened system with which it is easy to chain other codes of dispersion that those currently used. The calculations uncoupled with dispersion calculations are also possible by manual seizure of the dispersion data (contamination of a tablecloth, particular value in a point, etc.). M.I.R.A.G.E. takes into account soil deposits and resuspension phenomenon, transfers in plants and animals (choice of agricultural parameters, types of plants and animals, etc

  20. On the derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiative transport in graded index media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.M.; Tan, J.Y.; Liu, L.H.

    2012-01-01

    Light transport in graded index media follows a curved trajectory determined by Fermat's principle. Besides the effect of variation of the refractive index on the transport of radiative intensity, the curved ray trajectory will induce geometrical effects on the transport of polarization ellipse. This paper presents a complete derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiation transport in absorption, emission and scattering graded index media. The derivation is based on the analysis of the conserved quantities for polarized light transport along curved trajectory and a novel approach. The obtained transfer equation can be considered as a generalization of the classic vector radiative transfer equation that is only valid for uniform refractive index media. Several variant forms of the transport equation are also presented, which include the form for Stokes parameters defined with a fixed reference and the Eulerian forms in the ray coordinate and in several common orthogonal coordinate systems.

  1. Entropy flow and generation in radiative transfer between surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.M.; Basu, S. [Georgia Institute of Technolgy, Atlanta, GA (United States). George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-02-15

    Entropy of radiation has been used to derive the laws of blackbody radiation and determine the maximum efficiency of solar energy conversion. Along with the advancement in thermophotovoltaic technologies and nanoscale heat radiation, there is an urgent need to determine the entropy flow and generation in radiative transfer between nonideal surfaces when multiple reflections are significant. This paper investigates entropy flow and generation when incoherent multiple reflections are included, without considering the effects of interference and photon tunneling. The concept of partial equilibrium is applied to interpret the monochromatic radiation temperature of thermal radiation, T{sub l}(l,{omega}), which is dependent on both wavelength l and direction {omega}. The entropy flux and generation can thus be evaluated for nonideal surfaces. It is shown that several approximate expressions found in the literature can result in significant errors in entropy analysis even for diffuse-gray surfaces. The present study advances the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium thermal radiation and will have a significant impact on the future development of thermophotovoltaic and other radiative energy conversion devices. (author)

  2. The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Ferrari, Alfredo; Silari, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Transport and interaction of electromagnetic radiation Interaction models and simulation schemes implemented in modern Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport will be briefly reviewed. In these codes, photon transport is simulated by using the detailed scheme, i.e., interaction by interaction. Detailed simulation is easy to implement, and the reliability of the results is only limited by the accuracy of the adopted cross sections. Simulations of electron and positron transport are more difficult, because these particles undergo a large number of interactions in the course of their slowing down. Different schemes for simulating electron transport will be discussed. Condensed algorithms, which rely on multiple-scattering theories, are comparatively fast, but less accurate than mixed algorithms, in which hard interactions (with energy loss or angular deflection larger than certain cut-off values) are simulated individually. The reliability, and limitations, of electron-interacti...

  3. BARTTest: Community-Standard Atmospheric Radiative-Transfer and Retrieval Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph; Himes, Michael D.; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Blecic, Jasmina; Challener, Ryan C.

    2018-01-01

    Atmospheric radiative transfer (RT) codes are used both to predict planetary and brown-dwarf spectra and in retrieval algorithms to infer atmospheric chemistry, clouds, and thermal structure from observations. Observational plans, theoretical models, and scientific results depend on the correctness of these calculations. Yet, the calculations are complex and the codes implementing them are often written without modern software-verification techniques. The community needs a suite of test calculations with analytically, numerically, or at least community-verified results. We therefore present the Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Test Suite, or BARTTest. BARTTest has four categories of tests: analytically verified RT tests of simple atmospheres (single line in single layer, line blends, saturation, isothermal, multiple line-list combination, etc.), community-verified RT tests of complex atmospheres, synthetic retrieval tests on simulated data with known answers, and community-verified real-data retrieval tests.BARTTest is open-source software intended for community use and further development. It is available at https://github.com/ExOSPORTS/BARTTest. We propose this test suite as a standard for verifying atmospheric RT and retrieval codes, analogous to the Held-Suarez test for general circulation models. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NX12AI69G, NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G, and NASA Exoplanets Research Program grant NNX17AB62G.

  4. Numerical analysis of the effects of radiation heat transfer and ionization energy loss on the cavitation Bubble's dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, M.; Ebrahimi, R.; Shams, M.

    2011-06-01

    A numerical scheme for simulating the acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation was developed. Bubble instantaneous radius was obtained using Gilmore equation which considered the compressibility of the liquid. A uniform temperature was assumed for the inside gas during the collapse. Radiation heat transfer inside the bubble and the heat conduction to the bubble was considered. The numerical code was validated with the experimental data and a good correspondence was observed. The dynamics of hydrofoil cavitation bubble were also investigated. It was concluded that the thermal radiation heat transfer rate strongly depended on the cavitation number, initial bubble radius and hydrofoil angle of attack.

  5. Use of radiation to transfer alien chromosome segments to wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, E.R.

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can accomplish the transfer of genetic information from species so distantly related to wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em Thell.) that their chromosomes pair very little, if at all, with those of wheat, even in the absence of the homoeologous-pairing suppressor Ph1. In a successful transfer, the alien segment must almost always replace a homoeologous wheat segment, but radiation induces translocations largely at random; therefore automatic selection in favor of desirable translocations must be provided if the size of the project is to be kept within reasonable limits. Pollen selection will occur if seeds or plants monosomic for both an alien chromosome and one of its wheat homoeologues are irradiated. Making the plants also deficient for Ph1 may increase the number of suitable transfers. High-frequency occurrence of the desired alien character in M2 head-rows from plants grown from irradiated seed can identify favorable transfers with little cytological work. Irradiation of plants shortly before meiosis, using them to pollinate ditelosomics or double ditelosomics for the wheat arm or chromosome concerned, and cytologically examining offspring which have the alien character can not only identify the desirable transfers, but also reveal the lengths of the alien segments involved

  6. Efficiency transfer using the GEANT4 code of CERN for HPGe gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagren, S.; Tekaya, M.Ben; Reguigui, N.; Gharbi, F.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we apply the GEANT4 code of CERN to calculate the peak efficiency in High Pure Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometry using three different procedures. The first is a direct calculation. The second corresponds to the usual case of efficiency transfer between two different configurations at constant emission energy assuming a reference point detection configuration and the third, a new procedure, consists on the transfer of the peak efficiency between two detection configurations emitting the gamma ray in different energies assuming a “virtual” reference point detection configuration. No pre-optimization of the detector geometrical characteristics was performed before the transfer to test the ability of the efficiency transfer to reduce the effect of the ignorance on their real magnitude on the quality of the transferred efficiency. The obtained and measured efficiencies were found in good agreement for the two investigated methods of efficiency transfer. The obtained agreement proves that Monte Carlo method and especially the GEANT4 code constitute an efficient tool to obtain accurate detection efficiency values. The second investigated efficiency transfer procedure is useful to calibrate the HPGe gamma detector for any emission energy value for a voluminous source using one point source detection efficiency emitting in a different energy as a reference efficiency. The calculations preformed in this work were applied to the measurement exercise of the EUROMET428 project. A measurement exercise where an evaluation of the full energy peak efficiencies in the energy range 60–2000 keV for a typical coaxial p-type HpGe detector and several types of source configuration: point sources located at various distances from the detector and a cylindrical box containing three matrices was performed. - Highlights: • The GEANT4 code of CERN has been used to transfer the peak efficiency from point to points and voluminous detection configurations in HPGe gamma

  7. Radiation transport phenomena and modeling. Part A: Codes; Part B: Applications with examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Beutler, D.E.

    1997-09-01

    This report contains the notes from the second session of the 1997 IEEE Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference Short Course on Applying Computer Simulation Tools to Radiation Effects Problems. Part A discusses the physical phenomena modeled in radiation transport codes and various types of algorithmic implementations. Part B gives examples of how these codes can be used to design experiments whose results can be easily analyzed and describes how to calculate quantities of interest for electronic devices

  8. Code of practice for the safe use of ionizing radiation in secondary schools (1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The code of practice is intended for schools and indicates the basic philosophy behind the current approach to the control of hazards associated with the use of ionizing radiation. The purpose of this code is to provide guidance on safe and proper practices in the use of radiation. It covers modes of radiation exposure, shielding, dose limits, responsibility, general rules, x-ray generators, general control of radioactive sources, sealed sources and unsealed sources

  9. Radiative heat transfer between nanoparticles enhanced by intermediate particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiative heat transfer between two polar nanostructures at different temperatures can be enhanced by resonant tunneling of surface polaritons. Here we show that the heat transfer between two nanoparticles is strongly varied by the interactions with a third nanoparticle. By controlling the size of the third particle, the time scale of thermalization toward the thermal bath temperature can be modified over 5 orders of magnitude. This effect provides control of temperature distribution in nanoparticle aggregation and facilitates thermal management at nanoscale.

  10. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang-Kong; Dalvit, Diego A R

    2015-01-01

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. Finally, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials. (paper)

  11. Turbomachinery Heat Transfer and Loss Modeling for 3D Navier-Stokes Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Ameri, Ali

    2005-01-01

    This report's contents focus on making use of NASA Glenn on-site computational facilities,to develop, validate, and apply models for use in advanced 3D Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes to enhance the capability to compute heat transfer and losses in turbomachiney.

  12. Light scattering reviews 7 radiative transfer and optical properties of atmosphere and underlying surface

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    This book describes modern advances in radiative transfer and light scattering. Coverage includes fast radiative transfer techniques, use of polarization in remote sensing and recent developments in remote sensing of snow properties from space observations.

  13. Fire Intensity Data for Validation of the Radiative Transfer Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchat, Thomas K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jernigan, Dann A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A set of experiments and test data are outlined in this report that provides radiation intensity data for the validation of models for the radiative transfer equation. The experiments were performed with lightly-sooting liquid hydrocarbon fuels that yielded fully turbulent fires 2 m diameter). In addition, supplemental measurements of air flow and temperature, fuel temperature and burn rate, and flame surface emissive power, wall heat, and flame height and width provide a complete set of boundary condition data needed for validation of models used in fire simulations.

  14. A statewide teleradiology system reduces radiation exposure and charges in transferred trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Justin J J; Moren, Alexis; Diggs, Brian; Houser, Ben; Eastes, Lynn; Brand, Dawn; Bilyeu, Pamela; Schreiber, Martin; Kiraly, Laszlo

    2016-05-01

    Trauma transfer patients routinely undergo repeat imaging because of inefficiencies within the radiology system. In 2009, the virtual private network (VPN) telemedicine system was adopted throughout Oregon allowing virtual image transfer between hospitals. The startup cost was a nominal $3,000 per hospital. A retrospective review from 2007 to 2012 included 400 randomly selected adult trauma transfer patients based on a power analysis (200 pre/200 post). The primary outcome evaluated was reduction in repeat computed tomography (CT) scans. Secondary outcomes included cost savings, emergency department (ED) length of stay (LOS), and spared radiation. All data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U and chi-square tests. P less than .05 indicated significance. Spared radiation was calculated as a weighted average per body region, and savings was calculated using charges obtained from Oregon Health and Science University radiology current procedural terminology codes. Four-hundred patients were included. Injury Severity Score, age, ED and overall LOS, mortality, trauma type, and gender were not statistically different between groups. The percentage of patients with repeat CT scans decreased after VPN implementation: CT abdomen (13.2% vs 2.8%, P < .01) and cervical spine (34.4% vs 18.2%, P < .01). Post-VPN, the total charges saved in 2012 for trauma transfer patients was $333,500, whereas the average radiation dose spared per person was 1.8 mSV. Length of stay in the ED for patients with Injury Severity Score less than 15 transferring to the ICU was decreased (P < .05). Implementation of a statewide teleradiology network resulted in fewer total repeat CT scans, significant savings, decrease in radiation exposure, and decreased LOS in the ED for patients with less complex injuries. The potential for health care savings by widespread adoption of a VPN is significant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ethical codes. Fig leaf argument, ballast or cultural element for radiation protection?; Ethik-Codes. Feigenblatt, Ballast oder Kulturelement fuer den Strahlenschutz?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gellermann, Rainer [Nuclear Control and Consulting GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The international association for radiation protection (IRPA) adopted in May 2004 a Code of Ethics in order to allow their members to hold an adequate professional level of ethical line of action. Based on this code of ethics the professional body of radiation protection (Fachverband fuer Strahlenschutz) has developed its own ethical code and adopted in 2005.

  16. BACKWARD AND FORWARD MONTE CARLO METHOD IN POLARIZED RADIATIVE TRANSFER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, Huang; Guo-Dong, Shi; Ke-Yong, Zhu, E-mail: huangy_zl@263.net [School of Aeronautical Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-03-20

    In general, the Stocks vector cannot be calculated in reverse in the vector radiative transfer. This paper presents a novel backward and forward Monte Carlo simulation strategy to study the vector radiative transfer in the participated medium. A backward Monte Carlo process is used to calculate the ray trajectory and the endpoint of the ray. The Stocks vector is carried out by a forward Monte Carlo process. A one-dimensional graded index semi-transparent medium was presented as the physical model and the thermal emission consideration of polarization was studied in the medium. The solution process to non-scattering, isotropic scattering, and the anisotropic scattering medium, respectively, is discussed. The influence of the optical thickness and albedo on the Stocks vector are studied. The results show that the U, V-components of the apparent Stocks vector are very small, but the Q-component of the apparent Stocks vector is relatively larger, which cannot be ignored.

  17. Analytical heat transfer modeling of a new radiation calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obame Ndong, Elysée [Department of Industrial Engineering and Maintenance, University of Sciences and Technology of Masuku (USTM), BP 941 Franceville (Gabon); Grenoble Electrical Engineering Laboratory (G2Elab), University Grenoble Alpes and CNRS, G2Elab, F38000 Grenoble (France); Gallot-Lavallée, Olivier [Grenoble Electrical Engineering Laboratory (G2Elab), University Grenoble Alpes and CNRS, G2Elab, F38000 Grenoble (France); Aitken, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.aitken@g2elab.grenoble-inp.fr [Grenoble Electrical Engineering Laboratory (G2Elab), University Grenoble Alpes and CNRS, G2Elab, F38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-06-10

    Highlights: • Design of a new calorimeter for measuring heat power loss in electrical components. • The calorimeter can operate in a temperature range from −50 °C to 150 °C. • An analytical model of heat transfers for this new calorimeter is presented. • The theoretical sensibility of the new apparatus is estimated at ±1 mW. - Abstract: This paper deals with an analytical modeling of heat transfers simulating a new radiation calorimeter operating in a temperature range from −50 °C to 150 °C. The aim of this modeling is the evaluation of the feasibility and performance of the calorimeter by assessing the measurement of power losses of some electrical devices by radiation, the influence of the geometry and materials. Finally a theoretical sensibility of the new apparatus is estimated at ±1 mW. From these results the calorimeter has been successfully implemented and patented.

  18. System for selection of radiation source transfer trucks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Yoshinori; Ito, Kojiro.

    1970-01-01

    A device for selection of trucks each of which load and transfer a radiation source to an irradiation room above a water pool is installed at the end of a pair of rails fixed to the bottom of the pool. This device is equipped with a number of laterally shiftable rail pairs which may be brought into successive alignment with the fixed rails and is adapted to receive, carry and fix a truck on each rail pair. If one of said trucks is selected for irradiation in a desired irradiation room, the rail pair carrying this truck is shifted to align and couple with the fixed rail pair whereupon the truck is driven and transferred to a position on the fixed rails below the desired room and elevated thereinto. Accordingly, a plurality of trucks can optionally be shunted on a line of fixed rails without unloading the respective radiation sources. (Ohno, Y.)

  19. Analytical heat transfer modeling of a new radiation calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obame Ndong, Elysée; Gallot-Lavallée, Olivier; Aitken, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Design of a new calorimeter for measuring heat power loss in electrical components. • The calorimeter can operate in a temperature range from −50 °C to 150 °C. • An analytical model of heat transfers for this new calorimeter is presented. • The theoretical sensibility of the new apparatus is estimated at ±1 mW. - Abstract: This paper deals with an analytical modeling of heat transfers simulating a new radiation calorimeter operating in a temperature range from −50 °C to 150 °C. The aim of this modeling is the evaluation of the feasibility and performance of the calorimeter by assessing the measurement of power losses of some electrical devices by radiation, the influence of the geometry and materials. Finally a theoretical sensibility of the new apparatus is estimated at ±1 mW. From these results the calorimeter has been successfully implemented and patented.

  20. Analytical model for bottom reflooding heat transfer in light water reactors (the UCFLOOD code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrieta, L.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1978-08-01

    The UCFLOOD code is based on mechanistic models developed to analyze bottom reflooding of a single flow channel and its associated fuel rod, or a tubular test section with internal flow. From the hydrodynamic point of view the flow channel is divided into a single-phase liquid region, a continuous-liquid two-phase region, and a dispersed-liquid region. The void fraction is obtained from drift flux models. For heat transfer calculations, the channel is divided into regions of single-phase-liquid heat transfer, nucleate boiling and forced-convection vaporization, inverted-annular film boiling, and dispersed-flow film boiling. The heat transfer coefficients are functions of the local flow conditions. Good agreement of calculated and experimental results has been obtained. A code user's manual is appended

  1. BALTORO a general purpose code for coupling discrete ordinates and Monte-Carlo radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zazula, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The general purpose code BALTORO was written for coupling the three-dimensional Monte-Carlo /MC/ with the one-dimensional Discrete Ordinates /DO/ radiation transport calculations. The quantity of a radiation-induced /neutrons or gamma-rays/ nuclear effect or the score from a radiation-yielding nuclear effect can be analysed in this way. (author)

  2. Investigation of transient conduction–radiation heat transfer in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammad Mehdi Keshtkar

    2018-04-17

    Apr 17, 2018 ... For absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering medium, the radiative heat transfer in any discrete direction s_m with direction index m is given as. dIm dsm. ¼ s_m. :rImрr; s_m. ЮјАbIm ю Sm. р16Ю .... thermore, V is the volume of the cell defined as dx В dy and. Im p and Sm p are the intensities and ...

  3. New radiative transfer models for obscuring tori in active galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    van Bemmel, I. M.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional radiative transfer is employed to obtain the broad-band infrared spectrum of active galaxies. In the models we vary the geometry and size of the obscuring medium, the surface density, the opacity and the grain size distribution. Resulting spectral energy distributions are constructed for different orientations of the toroid. Colour-colour comparisons with observational data are consistent with previous observations that the emission longward of 60 micron is produced by star-fo...

  4. Multiple scattering theory of radiative transfer in inhomogeneous atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanal, M.

    1973-01-01

    In this paper we treat the multiple scattering theory of radiative transfer in plane-parallel inhomogeneous atmospheres. The treatment presented here may be adopted to model atmospheres characterized by an optical depth dependent coherent scattering phase function. For the purpose of illustration we consider the semi-infinite medium in which the absorption property of the atmosphere is characterized by an exponential function. The methodology employed here is the extension of the case treated previously by the author for homogeneous atmospheres.

  5. A k-distribution-based radiation code and its computational optimization for an atmospheric general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Miho; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2008-01-01

    The gas absorption process scheme in the broadband radiative transfer code 'mstrn8', which is used to calculate atmospheric radiative transfer efficiently in a general circulation model, is improved. Three major improvements are made. The first is an update of the database of line absorption parameters and the continuum absorption model. The second is a change to the definition of the selection rule for gas absorption used to choose which absorption bands to include. The last is an upgrade of the optimization method used to decrease the number of quadrature points used for numerical integration in the correlated k-distribution approach, thereby realizing higher computational efficiency without losing accuracy. The new radiation package termed 'mstrnX' computes radiation fluxes and heating rates with errors less than 0.6 W/m 2 and 0.3 K/day, respectively, through the troposphere and the lower stratosphere for any standard AFGL atmospheres. A serious cold bias problem of an atmospheric general circulation model using the ancestor code 'mstrn8' is almost solved by the upgrade to 'mstrnX'

  6. Code system to compute radiation dose in human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryman, J.C.; Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.; Davis, J.L.; Tang, J.S.; Kerr, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    Monte Carlo photon transport code and a code using Monte Carlo integration of a point kernel have been revised to incorporate human phantom models for an adult female, juveniles of various ages, and a pregnant female at the end of the first trimester of pregnancy, in addition to the adult male used earlier. An analysis code has been developed for deriving recommended values of specific absorbed fractions of photon energy. The computer code system and calculational method are described, emphasizing recent improvements in methods

  7. Analysis of radiative heat transfer in the presence of obscurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, L.; Weissman, Y.

    1981-05-01

    Numerical simulation of radiative heat transfer problems in general axisymmetric geometry in the presence of an active gas is considered. Such simulation requires subdivision of the radiating surfaces into discrete elements, which are in the present case radiating rings. While the effect of a participating medium is easily taken into account by integration along the lines of vision between the surface elements, the calculation of the different obscurations poses the main difficulty. We have written a closed expression which formulates the problem exactly, and then developed a systematic and compact computational approach to the obscuration problem in complex configurations. The present procedure is particularly suited to computer calculations associated with engineering applications in the aircraft and furnace industries. (author)

  8. Development of a GPU-based high-performance radiative transfer model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Bormin; Mielikainen, Jarno; Oh, Hyunjong; Allen Huang, Hung-Lung

    2011-01-01

    speedup for 1 GPU and 1455x speedup for all 4 GPUs, both with respect to the original CPU-based single-threaded Fortran code with the -O 2 compiling optimization. The significant 1455x speedup using a computer with four GPUs means that the proposed GPU-based high-performance forward model is able to compute one day's amount of 1,296,000 IASI spectra within nearly 10 min, whereas the original single CPU-based version will impractically take more than 10 days. This model runs over 80% of the theoretical memory bandwidth with asynchronous data transfer. A novel CPU-GPU pipeline implementation of the IASI radiative transfer model is proposed. The GPU-based high-performance IASI radiative transfer model is suitable for the assimilation of the IASI radiance observations into the operational numerical weather forecast model.

  9. Study and application of Dot 3.5 computer code in radiation shielding problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, A.C.; Mendonca, A.G.; Maiorino, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The application of nuclear transportation code S sub(N), Dot 3.5, to radiation shielding problems is revised. Aiming to study the better available option (convergence scheme, calculation mode), of DOT 3.5 computer code to be applied in radiation shielding problems, a standard model from 'Argonne Code Center' was selected and a combination of several calculation options to evaluate the accuracy of the results and the computational time was used, for then to select the more efficient option. To illustrate the versatility and efficacy in the application of the code for tipical shielding problems, the streaming neutrons calculation along a sodium coolant channel is ilustrated. (E.G.) [pt

  10. Validation of the TASS/SMR-S Code for the PRHRS Condensation Heat Transfer Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, In Sub; Yang, Soo Hyoung; Chung, Young Jong; Lee, Won Jae

    2011-01-01

    When some accidents or events are occurred in the SMART, the secondary system is used to remove the core decay heat for the long time such as a feedwater system. But if the feedwater system can't remove the residual core heat because of its malfunction, the core decay heat is removed using the Passive Residual Heat Removal System (PRHRS). The PRHRS is passive type safety system adopted to enhance the safety of the SMART. It can fundamentally eliminate the uncertainty of operator action. TASS/SMR-S (Transient And Setpoint Simulation/ System-integrated Modular Reactor-Safety) code has various heat transfer models reflecting the design features of the SMART. One of the heat transfer models is the PRHRS condensation heat transfer model. The role of this model is to calculate the heat transfer coefficient in the heat exchanger (H/X) tube side using the relevant heat transfer correlations for all of the heat transfer modes. In this paper, the validation of the condensation heat transfer model was carried out using the POSTECH H/X heat transfer test

  11. Fuel Transfer Cask; Procedure Option and Radiation Protection during Transferring the Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Khairul Ariff Mustafa; Nurhayati Ramli; Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim; Mohd Fazli Zakaria

    2011-01-01

    Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) has been operating almost 30 years. Many components are ageing. Nuclear Malaysia has taken an initiative to manage this ageing problem to prolong the life of the reactor. Hence, reactor upgrading project already commence started with the reactor console. To upgrade the core, all the fuel must be taken out from the core. A conceptual design of fuel transfer cask already done. This paper will discuss about the option of safe working procedure for transferring the fuel to the spent fuel pool for temporary. Hence, radiation protection for operator should be considered during the process. (author)

  12. Radiative transfer with scattering for domain-decomposed 3D MHD simulations of cool stellar atmospheres : numerical methods and application to the quiet, non-magnetic, surface of a solar-type star

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayek, W.; Asplund, M.; Carlsson, M.; Trampedach, R.; Collet, R.; Gudiksen, B.V.; Hansteen, V.H.; Leenaarts, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837946

    2010-01-01

    Aims. We present the implementation of a radiative transfer solver with coherent scattering in the new BIFROST code for radiative magneto-hydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of stellar surface convection. The code is fully parallelized using MPI domain decomposition, which allows for large grid sizes

  13. Preliminary Numerical Analysis of Convective Heat Transfer Loop Using MARS Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yongjae; Seo, Gwang Hyeok; Jeun, Gyoodong; Kim, Sung Joong [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The MARS has been developed adopting two major modules: RELAP5/MOD3 (USA) for one-dimensional (1D) two-fluid model for two-phase flows and COBRA-TF code for a three-dimensional (3D), two-fluid, and three-field model. In addition to the MARS code, TRACE (USA) is a modernized thermal-hydraulics code designed to consolidate and extend the capabilities of NRC's 3 legacy safety code: TRAC-P, TRAC-B and RELAP. CATHARE (French) is also thermal-hydraulic system analysis code for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) safety. There are several researches on comparing experimental data with simulation results by the MARS code. Kang et al. conducted natural convection heat transfer experiments of liquid gallium loop, and the experimental data were compared to MARS simulations. Bang et al. examined the capability of the MARS code to predict condensation heat transfer experiments with a vertical tube containing a non-condensable gas. Moreover, Lee et al. adopted MELCOR, which is one of the severe accident analysis codes, to evaluate several strategies for the severe accident mitigation. The objective of this study is to conduct the preliminary numerical analysis for the experimental loop at HYU using the MARS code, especially in order to provide relevant information on upcoming experiments for the undergraduate students. In this study, the preliminary numerical analysis for the convective heat transfer loop was carried out using the MARS Code. The major findings from the numerical simulations can be summarized as follows. In the calculations of the outlet and surface temperatures, the several limitations were suggested for the upcoming single-phase flow experiments. The comparison work for the HTCs shows validity for the prepared input model. This input could give useful information on the experiments. Furthermore, the undergraduate students in department of nuclear engineering, who are going to be taken part in the experiments, could prepare the program with the input, and will

  14. Preliminary Numerical Analysis of Convective Heat Transfer Loop Using MARS Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yongjae; Seo, Gwang Hyeok; Jeun, Gyoodong; Kim, Sung Joong

    2014-01-01

    The MARS has been developed adopting two major modules: RELAP5/MOD3 (USA) for one-dimensional (1D) two-fluid model for two-phase flows and COBRA-TF code for a three-dimensional (3D), two-fluid, and three-field model. In addition to the MARS code, TRACE (USA) is a modernized thermal-hydraulics code designed to consolidate and extend the capabilities of NRC's 3 legacy safety code: TRAC-P, TRAC-B and RELAP. CATHARE (French) is also thermal-hydraulic system analysis code for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) safety. There are several researches on comparing experimental data with simulation results by the MARS code. Kang et al. conducted natural convection heat transfer experiments of liquid gallium loop, and the experimental data were compared to MARS simulations. Bang et al. examined the capability of the MARS code to predict condensation heat transfer experiments with a vertical tube containing a non-condensable gas. Moreover, Lee et al. adopted MELCOR, which is one of the severe accident analysis codes, to evaluate several strategies for the severe accident mitigation. The objective of this study is to conduct the preliminary numerical analysis for the experimental loop at HYU using the MARS code, especially in order to provide relevant information on upcoming experiments for the undergraduate students. In this study, the preliminary numerical analysis for the convective heat transfer loop was carried out using the MARS Code. The major findings from the numerical simulations can be summarized as follows. In the calculations of the outlet and surface temperatures, the several limitations were suggested for the upcoming single-phase flow experiments. The comparison work for the HTCs shows validity for the prepared input model. This input could give useful information on the experiments. Furthermore, the undergraduate students in department of nuclear engineering, who are going to be taken part in the experiments, could prepare the program with the input, and will

  15. Code of practice for conducting radiation work at PINSTECH (revised 1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Atta, M.A.; Orfi, S.D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary objective of this code is to achieve standard of radiation protection and safety set by Pakistan Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection (PNSRP) ordinance 1984 and PNSRP regulations 1990. Secondary objective remains to make all best efforts to implement latest ICRP recommendations. The revised code of practice sets forth the objective of adequate system radiological safety of radiation workers, environment and general public. The code provides the guidance to persons and authorities who are responsible for the protection of workers and those who are concerned with the planning and management of personnel monitoring services. The procedures set forth in the code are mandatory and in no case should any of them be deviated under normal conditions. All those supervising and performing any kind of radiation work are required to study and adhere to those procedures and shell make all possible efforts to keep the exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), social and economic factor being taken into account. (author)

  16. Analytical properties of the radiance in atmospheric radiative transfer theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    It is demonstrated mathematically strictly that state density functions, as the radiance (specific intensity), exist to describe certain state properties of transported photons on microscopic and the state of the radiation field on macroscopic scale, which have independent physical meanings. Analytical properties as boundedness, continuity, differentiability and integrability of these functions to describe the photon transport are discussed. It is shown that the density functions may be derived based on the assumption of photons as real particles of non-zero and finite size, independently of usual electrodynamics, and certain historically postulated functional relationships between them were proved, that is, these functions can be derived mathematically strictly and consistently within the framework of the theory of the phenomenological radiative transfer if one takes the theory seriously by really assuming photons as particles. In this sense these functions may be treated as fundamental physical quantities within the scope of this theory, if one considers the possibility of the existence of photons. -- Highlights: • Proof of existence of the radiance within the scope of the theory of atmospheric radiative transfer. • Proof of relations between the photon number and photon energy density function and the radiance. • Strictly mathematical derivation of the analytical properties of these state density functions

  17. Computing Radiative Transfer in a 3D Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Allmen, Paul; Lee, Seungwon

    2012-01-01

    A package of software computes the time-dependent propagation of a narrow laser beam in an arbitrary three- dimensional (3D) medium with absorption and scattering, using the transient-discrete-ordinates method and a direct integration method. Unlike prior software that utilizes a Monte Carlo method, this software enables simulation at very small signal-to-noise ratios. The ability to simulate propagation of a narrow laser beam in a 3D medium is an improvement over other discrete-ordinate software. Unlike other direct-integration software, this software is not limited to simulation of propagation of thermal radiation with broad angular spread in three dimensions or of a laser pulse with narrow angular spread in two dimensions. Uses for this software include (1) computing scattering of a pulsed laser beam on a material having given elastic scattering and absorption profiles, and (2) evaluating concepts for laser-based instruments for sensing oceanic turbulence and related measurements of oceanic mixed-layer depths. With suitable augmentation, this software could be used to compute radiative transfer in ultrasound imaging in biological tissues, radiative transfer in the upper Earth crust for oil exploration, and propagation of laser pulses in telecommunication applications.

  18. Accelerating execution of the integrated TIGER series Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.M.; Hochstedler, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    Execution of the integrated TIGER series (ITS) of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport codes has been accelerated by modifying the FORTRAN source code for more efficient computation. Each member code of ITS was benchmarked and profiled with a specific test case that directed the acceleration effort toward the most computationally intensive subroutines. Techniques for accelerating these subroutines included replacing linear search algorithms with binary versions, replacing the pseudo-random number generator, reducing program memory allocation, and proofing the input files for geometrical redundancies. All techniques produced identical or statistically similar results to the original code. Final benchmark timing of the accelerated code resulted in speed-up factors of 2.00 for TIGER (the one-dimensional slab geometry code), 1.74 for CYLTRAN (the two-dimensional cylindrical geometry code), and 1.90 for ACCEPT (the arbitrary three-dimensional geometry code)

  19. Accelerating execution of the integrated TIGER series Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. M.; Hochstedler, R. D.

    1997-02-01

    Execution of the integrated TIGER series (ITS) of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport codes has been accelerated by modifying the FORTRAN source code for more efficient computation. Each member code of ITS was benchmarked and profiled with a specific test case that directed the acceleration effort toward the most computationally intensive subroutines. Techniques for accelerating these subroutines included replacing linear search algorithms with binary versions, replacing the pseudo-random number generator, reducing program memory allocation, and proofing the input files for geometrical redundancies. All techniques produced identical or statistically similar results to the original code. Final benchmark timing of the accelerated code resulted in speed-up factors of 2.00 for TIGER (the one-dimensional slab geometry code), 1.74 for CYLTRAN (the two-dimensional cylindrical geometry code), and 1.90 for ACCEPT (the arbitrary three-dimensional geometry code).

  20. A study of the 3D radiative transfer effect in cloudy atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okata, M.; Teruyuki, N.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of the effect of clouds in the atmosphere is a significant problem in the Earth's radiation budget study with their large uncertainties of microphysics and the optical properties. In this situation, we still need more investigations of 3D cloud radiative transer problems using not only models but also satellite observational data.For this purpose, we have developed a 3D-Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code that is implemented with various functions compatible with the OpenCLASTR R-Star radiation code for radiance and flux computation, i.e. forward and backward tracing routines, non-linear k-distribution parameterization (Sekiguchi and Nakajima, 2008) for broad band solar flux calculation, and DM-method for flux and TMS-method for upward radiance (Nakajima and Tnaka 1998). We also developed a Minimum cloud Information Deviation Profiling Method (MIDPM) as a method for a construction of 3D cloud field with MODIS/AQUA and CPR/CloudSat data. We then selected a best-matched radar reflectivity factor profile from the library for each of off-nadir pixels of MODIS where CPR profile is not available, by minimizing the deviation between library MODIS parameters and those at the pixel. In this study, we have used three cloud microphysical parameters as key parameters for the MIDPM, i.e. effective particle radius, cloud optical thickness and top of cloud temperature, and estimated 3D cloud radiation budget. We examined the discrepancies between satellite observed and mode-simulated radiances and three cloud microphysical parameter's pattern for studying the effects of cloud optical and microphysical properties on the radiation budget of the cloud-laden atmospheres.

  1. Efficiency transfer using the GEANT4 code of CERN for HPGe gamma spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagren, S; Tekaya, M Ben; Reguigui, N; Gharbi, F

    2016-01-01

    In this work we apply the GEANT4 code of CERN to calculate the peak efficiency in High Pure Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometry using three different procedures. The first is a direct calculation. The second corresponds to the usual case of efficiency transfer between two different configurations at constant emission energy assuming a reference point detection configuration and the third, a new procedure, consists on the transfer of the peak efficiency between two detection configurations emitting the gamma ray in different energies assuming a "virtual" reference point detection configuration. No pre-optimization of the detector geometrical characteristics was performed before the transfer to test the ability of the efficiency transfer to reduce the effect of the ignorance on their real magnitude on the quality of the transferred efficiency. The obtained and measured efficiencies were found in good agreement for the two investigated methods of efficiency transfer. The obtained agreement proves that Monte Carlo method and especially the GEANT4 code constitute an efficient tool to obtain accurate detection efficiency values. The second investigated efficiency transfer procedure is useful to calibrate the HPGe gamma detector for any emission energy value for a voluminous source using one point source detection efficiency emitting in a different energy as a reference efficiency. The calculations preformed in this work were applied to the measurement exercise of the EUROMET428 project. A measurement exercise where an evaluation of the full energy peak efficiencies in the energy range 60-2000 keV for a typical coaxial p-type HpGe detector and several types of source configuration: point sources located at various distances from the detector and a cylindrical box containing three matrices was performed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. User's manual for the FEHM application - A finite-element heat- and mass-transfer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyvoloski, G.A.; Robinson, B.A.; Dash, Z.V.; Trease, L.L.

    1997-07-01

    The use of this code is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and groundwater flow. A primary use of the FEHM application will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields and mass transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones below the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved in the FEHM application by using the finite-element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat- and mass-transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. In fact, FEHM is capable of describing flow that is dominated in many areas by fracture and fault flow, including the inherently three-dimensional flow that results from permeation to and from faults and fractures. The code can handle coupled heat and mass-transfer effects, such as boiling, dryout, and condensation that can occur in the near-field region surrounding the potential repository and the natural convection that occurs through Yucca Mountain due to seasonal temperature changes. This report outlines the uses and capabilities of the FEHM application, initialization of code variables, restart procedures, and error processing. The report describes all the data files, the input data, including individual input records or parameters, and the various output files. The system interface is described, including the software environment and installation instructions

  3. The effect of turbulence-radiation interaction on radiative entropy generation and heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, Miguel; Semiao, Viriato

    2007-01-01

    The analysis under the second law of thermodynamics is the gateway for optimisation in thermal equipments and systems. Through entropy minimisation techniques it is possible to increase the efficiency and overall performance of all kinds of thermal systems. Radiation, being the dominant mechanism of heat transfer in high-temperature systems, plays a determinant role in entropy generation within such equipments. Turbulence is also known to be a major player in the phenomenon of entropy generation. Therefore, turbulence-radiation interaction is expected to have a determinant effect on entropy generation. However, this is a subject that has not been dealt with so far, at least to the extent of the authors' knowledge. The present work attempts to fill that void, by studying the effect of turbulence-radiation interaction on entropy generation. All calculations are approached in such a way as to make them totally compatible with standard engineering methods for radiative heat transfer, namely the discrete ordinates method. It was found that turbulence-radiation interaction does not significantly change the spatial pattern of entropy generation, or heat transfer, but does change significantly their magnitude, in a way approximately proportional to the square of the intensity of turbulence

  4. Code of practice on radiation protection in the mining and milling of radioactive ores 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This Code was formulated under provisions of the Environment Protection (Nuclear Codes) Act 1978 in close consultation with the Governments of the States and the Northern Territory. It is a major revision of the Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in the Mining and Milling of Radioactive Ores (1980), incorporating changes flowing from advances in internationally agreed radiation protection philosophy, and experience gained in Australia in uranium mining and milling operations and the extraction of monazite from mineral sands. The Code specifies the standards, practices, procedures, and measures to prevent or limit risk to employees and to the public from uranium mining and milling, mineral sands operations and extraction of radioactive ores. To assist the industry in meeting the requirements and responsibilities imposed by the Code, guidelines to the former Code will be reviewed and, if appropriate, revised. New guidelines to assist compliance with changed requirements will also be prepared. The Act provides for the revision of codes of practice. The Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in the Mining and Milling of Radioactive Ores (1987) will be reviewed from time to time and revised if necessary to ensure that the highest standards of radiation protection in the mining and milling of radioactive ores are maintained.

  5. Code of practice on radiation protection in the mining and milling of radioactive ores 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Code was formulated under provisions of the Environment Protection (Nuclear Codes) Act 1978 in close consultation with the Governments of the States and the Northern Territory. It is a major revision of the Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in the Mining and Milling of Radioactive Ores (1980), incorporating changes flowing from advances in internationally agreed radiation protection philosophy, and experience gained in Australia in uranium mining and milling operations and the extraction of monazite from mineral sands. The Code specifies the standards, practices, procedures, and measures to prevent or limit risk to employees and to the public from uranium mining and milling, mineral sands operations and extraction of radioactive ores. To assist the industry in meeting the requirements and responsibilities imposed by the Code, guidelines to the former Code will be reviewed and, if appropriate, revised. New guidelines to assist compliance with changed requirements will also be prepared. The Act provides for the revision of codes of practice. The Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in the Mining and Milling of Radioactive Ores (1987) will be reviewed from time to time and revised if necessary to ensure that the highest standards of radiation protection in the mining and milling of radioactive ores are maintained

  6. Computer codes for tasks in the fields of isotope and radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, K.; Gebhardt, O.

    1978-11-01

    Concise descriptions of computer codes developed for solving problems in the fields of isotope and radiation research at the Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung (ZfI) are compiled. In part two the structure of the ZfI program library MABIF is outlined and a complete list of all codes available is given

  7. Theory of radiative transfer in a strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, S [Ibaraki Univ., Mito (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1975-07-01

    A theory is presented of the radiative transfer in a magnetized plasma with the opacity determined by the Thomson scattering. The Thomson cross section in the magnetic field is highly anisotropic and polarization-dependent. In order to cope with this situation, it is found useful to deal directly with the scattering amplitude (2x2 matrix in the polarization vector space) rather than the intensity. In this way it is possible to take into account the coherent superposition of the forward multiple-scattering amplitudes as a photon propagates. The equation of transfer is established accordingly and approximate solutions are found in the limits of small and large optical thickness. The latter solution is used to find the intensity and the polarization of thermal X-rays from a magnetic dipole star. The concept of mean free path is discussed and also it is shown that the Faraday rotation naturally comes about as a result of the multiple forward scattering.

  8. Comparison of vibrational conductivity and radiative energy transfer methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bot, A.

    2005-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the comparison of two methods well suited for the prediction of the wideband response of built-up structures subjected to high-frequency vibrational excitation. The first method is sometimes called the vibrational conductivity method and the second one is rather known as the radiosity method in the field of acoustics, or the radiative energy transfer method. Both are based on quite similar physical assumptions i.e. uncorrelated sources, mean response and high-frequency excitation. Both are based on analogies with some equations encountered in the field of heat transfer. However these models do not lead to similar results. This paper compares the two methods. Some numerical simulations on a pair of plates joined along one edge are provided to illustrate the discussion.

  9. A Monte Carlo Code for Relativistic Radiation Transport Around Kerr Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy David; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  10. Computer codes in nuclear safety, radiation transport and dosimetry; Les codes de calcul en radioprotection, radiophysique et dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordy, J M; Kodeli, I; Menard, St; Bouchet, J L; Renard, F; Martin, E; Blazy, L; Voros, S; Bochud, F; Laedermann, J P; Beaugelin, K; Makovicka, L; Quiot, A; Vermeersch, F; Roche, H; Perrin, M C; Laye, F; Bardies, M; Struelens, L; Vanhavere, F; Gschwind, R; Fernandez, F; Quesne, B; Fritsch, P; Lamart, St; Crovisier, Ph; Leservot, A; Antoni, R; Huet, Ch; Thiam, Ch; Donadille, L; Monfort, M; Diop, Ch; Ricard, M

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this conference was to describe the present state of computer codes dedicated to radiation transport or radiation source assessment or dosimetry. The presentations have been parted into 2 sessions: 1) methodology and 2) uses in industrial or medical or research domains. It appears that 2 different calculation strategies are prevailing, both are based on preliminary Monte-Carlo calculations with data storage. First, quick simulations made from a database of particle histories built though a previous Monte-Carlo simulation and secondly, a neuronal approach involving a learning platform generated through a previous Monte-Carlo simulation. This document gathers the slides of the presentations.

  11. Markovian approach: From Ising model to stochastic radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassianov, E.; Veron, D.

    2009-01-01

    The origin of the Markovian approach can be traced back to 1906; however, it gained explicit recognition in the last few decades. This overview outlines some important applications of the Markovian approach, which illustrate its immense prestige, respect, and success. These applications include examples in the statistical physics, astronomy, mathematics, computational science and the stochastic transport problem. In particular, the overview highlights important contributions made by Pomraning and Titov to the neutron and radiation transport theory in a stochastic medium with homogeneous statistics. Using simple probabilistic assumptions (Markovian approximation), they have introduced a simplified, but quite realistic, representation of the neutron/radiation transfer through a two-component discrete stochastic mixture. New concepts and methodologies introduced by these two distinguished scientists allow us to generalize the Markovian treatment to the stochastic medium with inhomogeneous statistics and demonstrate its improved predictive performance for the down-welling shortwave fluxes. (authors)

  12. Unravelling radiative energy transfer in solid-state lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikov, Rustamzhon; Press, Daniel Aaron; Ganesh Kumar, Baskaran; Sadeghi, Sadra; Nizamoglu, Sedat

    2018-01-01

    Today, a wide variety of organic and inorganic luminescent materials (e.g., phosphors, quantum dots, etc.) are being used for lighting and new materials (e.g., graphene, perovskite, etc.) are currently under investigation. However, the understanding of radiative energy transfer is limited, even though it is critical to understand and improve the performance levels of solid-state lighting devices. In this study, we derived a matrix approach that includes absorption, reabsorption, inter-absorption and their iterative and combinatorial interactions for one and multiple types of fluorophores, which is simplified to an analytical matrix. This mathematical approach gives results that agree well with the measured spectral and efficiency characteristics of color-conversion light-emitting diodes. Moreover, it also provides a deep physical insight by uncovering the entire radiative interactions and their contribution to the output optical spectrum. The model is universal and applicable for all kinds of fluorophores.

  13. Infrared radiative transfer in dense disks around young stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, W.R.F.

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional radiative transfer program has been used to determine the temperature distribution within cylindrically symmetric, centrally heated dust clouds. In particular, the disk-shaped structures observed around young luminous stars have been modeled. Changing the dust distribution in these disks primarily affected the observed morphology in the near-infrared and far-infrared, and at millimeter wavelengths. The overall cloud spectrum, however, was mainly determined by the characteristics of the grains themselves. Comparison with published far-infrared and molecular line data has indicated that the dust density can generally be modeled by a power-law distribution in r with index of -2 and an exponential in z with disk thickness proportional to 1/r. When observed nearly edge-on, scattered direct stellar radiation is observed in the polar regions in the form of comet-shaped lobes of emission. 26 references

  14. Projection methods for line radiative transfer in spherical media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusha, L. S.; Nagendra, K. N.

    An efficient numerical method called the Preconditioned Bi-Conjugate Gradient (Pre-BiCG) method is presented for the solution of radiative transfer equation in spherical geometry. A variant of this method called Stabilized Preconditioned Bi-Conjugate Gradient (Pre-BiCG-STAB) is also presented. These methods are based on projections on the subspaces of the n dimensional Euclidean space mathbb {R}n called Krylov subspaces. The methods are shown to be faster in terms of convergence rate compared to the contemporary iterative methods such as Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel and Successive Over Relaxation (SOR).

  15. Formal Solutions for Polarized Radiative Transfer. I. The DELO Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janett, Gioele; Carlin, Edgar S.; Steiner, Oskar; Belluzzi, Luca, E-mail: gioele.janett@irsol.ch [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno (IRSOL), 6605 Locarno-Monti (Switzerland)

    2017-05-10

    The discussion regarding the numerical integration of the polarized radiative transfer equation is still open and the comparison between the different numerical schemes proposed by different authors in the past is not fully clear. Aiming at facilitating the comprehension of the advantages and drawbacks of the different formal solvers, this work presents a reference paradigm for their characterization based on the concepts of order of accuracy , stability , and computational cost . Special attention is paid to understand the numerical methods belonging to the Diagonal Element Lambda Operator family, in an attempt to highlight their specificities.

  16. A multilevel method for conductive-radiative heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banoczi, J.M.; Kelley, C.T. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We present a fast multilevel algorithm for the solution of a system of nonlinear integro-differential equations that model steady-state combined radiative-conductive heat transfer. The equations can be formulated as a compact fixed point problem with a fixed point map that requires both a solution of the linear transport equation and the linear heat equation for its evaluation. We use fast transport solvers developed by the second author, to construct an efficient evaluation of the fixed point map and then apply the Atkinson-Brakhage, method, with Newton-GMRES as the coarse mesh solver, to the full nonlinear system.

  17. FOKN: a relativistic Fokker-Planck code with large angle scattering and radiation losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, G.; Scharlemann, T.; Wood, L.; Weaver, T.; Chu, T.; Lee, G.

    1976-07-01

    FOKN is a computer code which employs a relativistic Fokker-Planck algorithm to evolve the distribution functions of the various mutually interacting components of a multi-species plasma forward in time, with the optional addition of high angle, large energy and momentum transfer interactions between the various charged species of the plasma. As a computational expediency, the latter processes are handled by transfer matrices which are generated separately by another code, RNUX, so that once specific transfer matrices are generated, they can be used over and over by FOKN provided the group structures are compatible

  18. New theory of radiative energy transfer in free electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, E.

    1976-01-01

    A new theory of radiative energy transfer in free, statistically stationary electromagnetic fields is presented. It provides a model for energy transport that is rigorous both within the framework of the stochastic theory of the classical field as well as within the framework of the theory of the quantized field. Unlike the usual phenomenological model of radiative energy transfer that centers around a single scalar quantity (the specific intensity of radiation), our theory brings into evidence the need for characterizing the energy transport by means of two (related) quantities: a scalar and a vector that may be identified, in a well-defined sense, with ''angular components'' of the average electromagnetic energy density and of the average Poynting vector, respectively. Both of them are defined in terms of invariants of certain new electromagnetic correlation tensors. In the special case when the field is statistically homogeneous, our model reduces to the usual one and our angular component of the average electromagnetic energy density, when multiplied by the vacuum speed of light, then acquires all the properties of the specific intensity of radiation. When the field is not statistically homogeneous our model approximates to the usual phenomenological one, provided that the angular correlations between plane wave modes of the field extend over a sufficiently small solid angle of directions about the direction of propagation of each mode. It is tentatively suggested that, when suitably normalized, our angular component of the average electromagnetic energy density may be interpreted as a quasi-probability (general quantum-mechancial phase-space distribution function, such as Wigner's) for the position and the momentum of a photon

  19. Radiation protection for human exploration of the moon and mars: Application of the mash code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.O.; Santoro, R.T.; Drischler, J.D.; Barnes, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding code system -- MASH, developed for the Department of Defense for calculating radiation protection factors for armored vehicles against neutron and gamma radiation, has been used to assess the dose from reactor radiation to an occupant in a habitat on Mars. The capability of MASH to reproduce measured data is summarized to demonstrate the accuracy of the code. The estimation of the radiation environment in an idealized reactor-habitat model is reported to illustrate the merits of the adjoint Monte Carlo procedure for space related studies. The reactor radiation dose for different reactor-habitat surface configurations to a habitat occupant is compared with the natural radiation dose acquired during a 500-day Mars mission

  20. Calculation code of mass and heat transfer in a pulsed column for Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Takeshi; Takahashi, Keiki

    1993-01-01

    A calculation code for extraction behavior analysis in a pulsed column employed at an extraction process of a reprocessing plant was developed. This code was also combined with our previously developed calculation code for axial temperature profiles in a pulsed column. The one-dimensional dispersion model was employed for both of the extraction behavior analysis and the axial temperature profile analysis. The reported values of the fluid characteristics coefficient, the transfer coefficient and the diffusivities in the pulsed column were used. The calculated concentration profiles of HNO 3 , U and Pu for the steady state have a good agreement with the reported experimental results. The concentration and temperature profiles were calculated under the operation conditions which induce the abnormal U extraction behavior, i.e. U extraction zone is moved to the bottom of the column. Thought there is slight difference between calculated and experimental value, it is appeared that our developed code can be applied to the simulation under the normal operation condition and the relatively slowly transient condition. Pu accumulation phenomena was analyzed with this code and the accumulation tendency is similar to the reported analysis results. (author)

  1. Homogenization of a Conductive-Radiative Heat Transfer Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibi Zakaria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the contribution of the second order corrector in periodic homogenization applied to a conductive-radiative heat transfer problem. Especially, for a heat conduction problem in a periodically perforated domain with a non-local boundary condition modelling the radiative heat transfer, if this model contains an oscillating thermal source and a thermal exchange with the perforations, the second order corrector helps us to model the gradients which appear between the source area and the perforations. Ce papier est consacré à montrer l’influence du correcteur de second ordre en homogénéisation périodique. Dans l’homogénéisation d’un problème de conduction rayonnement dans un domaine périodiquement perforé par plusieurs trous, on peut voir une contribution non négligeable de ce correcteur lors de la présence d’une source thermique oscillante et d’un échange thermique dans les perforations. Ce correcteur nous permet de modéliser les gradients qui apparaissent entre la zone de la source thermique et les perforations.

  2. Spectral element method for vector radiative transfer equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.M.; Liu, L.H.; Hsu, P.-F.; Tan, J.Y.

    2010-01-01

    A spectral element method (SEM) is developed to solve polarized radiative transfer in multidimensional participating medium. The angular discretization is based on the discrete-ordinates approach, and the spatial discretization is conducted by spectral element approach. Chebyshev polynomial is used to build basis function on each element. Four various test problems are taken as examples to verify the performance of the SEM. The effectiveness of the SEM is demonstrated. The h and the p convergence characteristics of the SEM are studied. The convergence rate of p-refinement follows the exponential decay trend and is superior to that of h-refinement. The accuracy and efficiency of the higher order approximation in the SEM is well demonstrated for the solution of the VRTE. The predicted angular distribution of brightness temperature and Stokes vector by the SEM agree very well with the benchmark solutions in references. Numerical results show that the SEM is accurate, flexible and effective to solve multidimensional polarized radiative transfer problems.

  3. Quasilinear simulation of auroral kilometric radiation by a relativistic Fokker-Planck code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Y.

    1991-01-01

    An intense terrestrial radiation called the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) is believed to be generated by cyclotron maser instability. We study a quasilinear evolution of this instability by means of a two-dimensional relativistic Fokker-Planck code which treats waves and distributions self-consistently, including radiation loss and electron source and sink. We compare the distributions and wave amplitude with spacecraft observations to elucidate physical processes involved. 3 refs., 1 fig

  4. The use of the SRIM code for calculation of radiation damage induced by neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, A.; Hamidi, S.; Asadabad, Mohsen Asadi

    2017-12-01

    Materials subjected to neutron irradiation will being evolve to structural changes by the displacement cascades initiated by nuclear reaction. This study discusses a methodology to compute primary knock-on atoms or PKAs information that lead to radiation damage. A program AMTRACK has been developed for assessing of the PKAs information. This software determines the specifications of recoil atoms (using PTRAC card of MCNPX code) and also the kinematics of interactions. The deterministic method was used for verification of the results of (MCNPX+AMTRACK). The SRIM (formely TRIM) code is capable to compute neutron radiation damage. The PKAs information was extracted by AMTRACK program, which can be used as an input of SRIM codes for systematic analysis of primary radiation damage. Then the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) radiation damage on reactor pressure vessel is calculated.

  5. Effect of high linear energy transfer radiation on biological membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, D.; Srivastava, M.; Kale, R.K.; Sarma, A.

    1998-01-01

    Cellular membranes are vital elements, and their integrity is extremely essential for the viability of the cells. We studied the effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the membranes. Rabbit erythrocytes (1 x 10 7 cells/ml) and microsomes (0.6 mg protein/ml) prepared from liver of rats were irradiated with 7 Li ions of energy 6.42 MeV/u and 16 O ions of energy 4.25 MeV/u having maximum LET values of 354 keV/μm and 1130 keV/μm, respectively. 7 Li- and 16 O-induced microsomal lipid peroxidation was found to increase with fluence. The 16 O ions were more effective than 7 Li ions, which could be due to the denser energy distribution in the track and the yield of free radicals. These findings suggested that the biological membranes could be peroxidized on exposure to high-LET radiation. Inhibition of the lipid peroxidation was observed in the presence of a membrane-active drug, chlorpromazine (CPZ), which could be due to scavenging of free radicals (mainly HO. and ROO.), electron donation, and hydrogen transfer reactions. The 7 Li and 16 O ions also induced hemolysis in erythrocytes. The extent of hemolysis was found to be a function of time and fluence, and showed a characteristic sigmoidal pattern. The 16 O ions were more effective in the lower fluence range than 7 Li ions. These results were compared with lipid peroxidation and hemolysis induced by gamma-radiation. (orig.)

  6. Intercomparison on the usage of computational codes in radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, R.; Pesic, M.; Pavlovic, R.

    2003-01-01

    SRNA-2KG software package was modified for this work to include necessary input and output data and for predicted voxelized geometry and dosimetry. SRNA is a Monte Carlo code developed for applications in proton transport, radiotherapy and dosimetry. Protons within energy range from 100 keV to 250 MeV with predefined spectra are transported in 3D geometry through material zones confined by planes and second order surfaces or in 3D voxelized geometry. The code can treat proton transport in a few hundred different materials including elements from Z=1 to Z=98. Simulation of proton transport is based on the multiple scattering theory of charged particles and on the model for compound nucleus decay

  7. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ionising and non-ionising radiation and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. McColl (Neil); A. Auvinen (Anssi); A. Kesminiene (Ausrele); C. Espina (Carolina); F. Erdmann (Friederike); E. de Vries (Esther); R. Greinert (Rüdiger); J. Harrison (John); J. Schüz (Joachim)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIonising radiation can transfer sufficient energy to ionise molecules, and this can lead to chemical changes, including DNA damage in cells. Key evidence for the carcinogenicity of ionising radiation comes from: follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan; other

  8. Shared acoustic codes underlie emotional communication in music and speech-Evidence from deep transfer learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Coutinho

    Full Text Available Music and speech exhibit striking similarities in the communication of emotions in the acoustic domain, in such a way that the communication of specific emotions is achieved, at least to a certain extent, by means of shared acoustic patterns. From an Affective Sciences points of view, determining the degree of overlap between both domains is fundamental to understand the shared mechanisms underlying such phenomenon. From a Machine learning perspective, the overlap between acoustic codes for emotional expression in music and speech opens new possibilities to enlarge the amount of data available to develop music and speech emotion recognition systems. In this article, we investigate time-continuous predictions of emotion (Arousal and Valence in music and speech, and the Transfer Learning between these domains. We establish a comparative framework including intra- (i.e., models trained and tested on the same modality, either music or speech and cross-domain experiments (i.e., models trained in one modality and tested on the other. In the cross-domain context, we evaluated two strategies-the direct transfer between domains, and the contribution of Transfer Learning techniques (feature-representation-transfer based on Denoising Auto Encoders for reducing the gap in the feature space distributions. Our results demonstrate an excellent cross-domain generalisation performance with and without feature representation transfer in both directions. In the case of music, cross-domain approaches outperformed intra-domain models for Valence estimation, whereas for Speech intra-domain models achieve the best performance. This is the first demonstration of shared acoustic codes for emotional expression in music and speech in the time-continuous domain.

  9. Shared acoustic codes underlie emotional communication in music and speech—Evidence from deep transfer learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Music and speech exhibit striking similarities in the communication of emotions in the acoustic domain, in such a way that the communication of specific emotions is achieved, at least to a certain extent, by means of shared acoustic patterns. From an Affective Sciences points of view, determining the degree of overlap between both domains is fundamental to understand the shared mechanisms underlying such phenomenon. From a Machine learning perspective, the overlap between acoustic codes for emotional expression in music and speech opens new possibilities to enlarge the amount of data available to develop music and speech emotion recognition systems. In this article, we investigate time-continuous predictions of emotion (Arousal and Valence) in music and speech, and the Transfer Learning between these domains. We establish a comparative framework including intra- (i.e., models trained and tested on the same modality, either music or speech) and cross-domain experiments (i.e., models trained in one modality and tested on the other). In the cross-domain context, we evaluated two strategies—the direct transfer between domains, and the contribution of Transfer Learning techniques (feature-representation-transfer based on Denoising Auto Encoders) for reducing the gap in the feature space distributions. Our results demonstrate an excellent cross-domain generalisation performance with and without feature representation transfer in both directions. In the case of music, cross-domain approaches outperformed intra-domain models for Valence estimation, whereas for Speech intra-domain models achieve the best performance. This is the first demonstration of shared acoustic codes for emotional expression in music and speech in the time-continuous domain. PMID:28658285

  10. Shared acoustic codes underlie emotional communication in music and speech-Evidence from deep transfer learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Eduardo; Schuller, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Music and speech exhibit striking similarities in the communication of emotions in the acoustic domain, in such a way that the communication of specific emotions is achieved, at least to a certain extent, by means of shared acoustic patterns. From an Affective Sciences points of view, determining the degree of overlap between both domains is fundamental to understand the shared mechanisms underlying such phenomenon. From a Machine learning perspective, the overlap between acoustic codes for emotional expression in music and speech opens new possibilities to enlarge the amount of data available to develop music and speech emotion recognition systems. In this article, we investigate time-continuous predictions of emotion (Arousal and Valence) in music and speech, and the Transfer Learning between these domains. We establish a comparative framework including intra- (i.e., models trained and tested on the same modality, either music or speech) and cross-domain experiments (i.e., models trained in one modality and tested on the other). In the cross-domain context, we evaluated two strategies-the direct transfer between domains, and the contribution of Transfer Learning techniques (feature-representation-transfer based on Denoising Auto Encoders) for reducing the gap in the feature space distributions. Our results demonstrate an excellent cross-domain generalisation performance with and without feature representation transfer in both directions. In the case of music, cross-domain approaches outperformed intra-domain models for Valence estimation, whereas for Speech intra-domain models achieve the best performance. This is the first demonstration of shared acoustic codes for emotional expression in music and speech in the time-continuous domain.

  11. FEHMN 1.0: Finite element heat and mass transfer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyvoloski, G.; Dash, Z.; Kelkar, S.

    1991-04-01

    A computer code is described which can simulate non-isothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media. It is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and ground-water flow. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved using the finite element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat and mass transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. A summary of the equations in the model and the numerical solution procedure are provided in this report. A user's guide and sample problems are also included. The main use of FEHMN will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields in the saturated zone below the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. 33 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs

  12. Validation of Heat Transfer and Film Cooling Capabilities of the 3-D RANS Code TURBO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The capabilities of the 3-D unsteady RANS code TURBO have been extended to include heat transfer and film cooling applications. The results of simulations performed with the modified code are compared to experiment and to theory, where applicable. Wilcox s k-turbulence model has been implemented to close the RANS equations. Two simulations are conducted: (1) flow over a flat plate and (2) flow over an adiabatic flat plate cooled by one hole inclined at 35 to the free stream. For (1) agreement with theory is found to be excellent for heat transfer, represented by local Nusselt number, and quite good for momentum, as represented by the local skin friction coefficient. This report compares the local skin friction coefficients and Nusselt numbers on a flat plate obtained using Wilcox's k-model with the theory of Blasius. The study looks at laminar and turbulent flows over an adiabatic flat plate and over an isothermal flat plate for two different wall temperatures. It is shown that TURBO is able to accurately predict heat transfer on a flat plate. For (2) TURBO shows good qualitative agreement with film cooling experiments performed on a flat plate with one cooling hole. Quantitatively, film effectiveness is under predicted downstream of the hole.

  13. Numerical analysis of the effects of radiation heat transfer and ionization energy loss on the cavitation Bubble's dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdi, M. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, R. [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shams, M., E-mail: shams@kntu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Pardis St., Molla-Sadra Ave, Vanak. Sq., P.O. Box: 19395-1999, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-13

    A numerical scheme for simulating the acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation was developed. Bubble instantaneous radius was obtained using Gilmore equation which considered the compressibility of the liquid. A uniform temperature was assumed for the inside gas during the collapse. Radiation heat transfer inside the bubble and the heat conduction to the bubble was considered. The numerical code was validated with the experimental data and a good correspondence was observed. The dynamics of hydrofoil cavitation bubble were also investigated. It was concluded that the thermal radiation heat transfer rate strongly depended on the cavitation number, initial bubble radius and hydrofoil angle of attack. -- Highlights: → Heat transfer and ionization energy losses were analyzed in the cavitation bubble. → Radiation of hydrodynamic bubble was approximately equal to the black body. → Radiation heat transfer did not affect the bubble dynamic. → Conduction decreased the bubble pressure and increased the bubble temperature. → Ionization decreased the temperature and increased the pressure in the bubble.

  14. Multi-Group Reductions of LTE Air Plasma Radiative Transfer in Cylindrical Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoggins, James; Magin, Thierry Edouard Bertran; Wray, Alan; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2013-01-01

    Air plasma radiation in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) within cylindrical geometries is studied with an application towards modeling the radiative transfer inside arc-constrictors, a central component of constricted-arc arc jets. A detailed database of spectral absorption coefficients for LTE air is formulated using the NEQAIR code developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The database stores calculated absorption coefficients for 1,051,755 wavelengths between 0.04 µm and 200 µm over a wide temperature (500K to 15 000K) and pressure (0.1 atm to 10.0 atm) range. The multi-group method for spectral reduction is studied by generating a range of reductions including pure binning and banding reductions from the detailed absorption coefficient database. The accuracy of each reduction is compared to line-by-line calculations for cylindrical temperature profiles resembling typical profiles found in arc-constrictors. It is found that a reduction of only 1000 groups is sufficient to accurately model the LTE air radiation over a large temperature and pressure range. In addition to the reduction comparison, the cylindrical-slab formulation is compared with the finite-volume method for the numerical integration of the radiative flux inside cylinders with varying length. It is determined that cylindrical-slabs can be used to accurately model most arc-constrictors due to their high length to radius ratios.

  15. Numerical simulations of a coupled radiative?conductive heat transfer model using a modified Monte Carlo method

    KAUST Repository

    Kovtanyuk, Andrey E.; Botkin, Nikolai D.; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Radiative-conductive heat transfer in a medium bounded by two reflecting and radiating plane surfaces is considered. This process is described by a nonlinear system of two differential equations: an equation of the radiative heat transfer

  16. Radiation Shielding Information Center: a source of computer codes and data for fusion neutronics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGill, B.L.; Roussin, R.W.; Trubey, D.K.; Maskewitz, B.F.

    1980-01-01

    The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC), established in 1962 to collect, package, analyze, and disseminate information, computer codes, and data in the area of radiation transport related to fission, is now being utilized to support fusion neutronics technology. The major activities include: (1) answering technical inquiries on radiation transport problems, (2) collecting, packaging, testing, and disseminating computing technology and data libraries, and (3) reviewing literature and operating a computer-based information retrieval system containing material pertinent to radiation transport analysis. The computer codes emphasize methods for solving the Boltzmann equation such as the discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques, both of which are widely used in fusion neutronics. The data packages include multigroup coupled neutron-gamma-ray cross sections and kerma coefficients, other nuclear data, and radiation transport benchmark problem results

  17. Directional radiometry and radiative transfer: A new paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements with directional radiometers and calculations based on the radiative transfer equation (RTE) have been at the very heart of weather and climate modeling and terrestrial remote sensing. The quantification of the energy budget of the Earth's climate system requires exquisite measurements and computations of the incoming and outgoing electromagnetic energy, while global characterization of climate system's components relies heavily on theoretical inversions of observational data obtained with various passive and active instruments. The same basic problems involving electromagnetic energy transport and its use for diagnostic and characterization purposes are encountered in numerous other areas of science, biomedicine, and engineering. Yet both the discipline of directional radiometry and the radiative transfer theory (RTT) have traditionally been based on phenomenological concepts many of which turn out to be profound misconceptions. Contrary to the widespread belief, a collimated radiometer does not, in general, measure the flow of electromagnetic energy along its optical axis, while the specific intensity does not quantify the amount of electromagnetic energy transported in a given direction. The recently developed microphysical approach to radiative transfer and directional radiometry is explicitly based on the Maxwell equations and clarifies the physical nature of measurements with collimated radiometers and the actual content of the RTE. It reveals that the specific intensity has no fundamental physical meaning besides being a mathematical solution of the RTE, while the RTE itself is nothing more than an intermediate auxiliary equation. Only under special circumstances detailed in this review can the solution of the RTE be used to compute the time-averaged local Poynting vector as well as be measured by a collimated radiometer. These firmly established facts make the combination of the RTE and a collimated radiometer useful in a well-defined range of

  18. The Intercomparison of 3D Radiation Codes (I3RC): Showcasing Mathematical and Computational Physics in a Critical Atmospheric Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. B.; Cahalan, R. F.

    2001-05-01

    The Intercomparison of 3D Radiation Codes (I3RC) is an on-going initiative involving an international group of over 30 researchers engaged in the numerical modeling of three-dimensional radiative transfer as applied to clouds. Because of their strong variability and extreme opacity, clouds are indeed a major source of uncertainty in the Earth's local radiation budget (at GCM grid scales). Also 3D effects (at satellite pixel scales) invalidate the standard plane-parallel assumption made in the routine of cloud-property remote sensing at NASA and NOAA. Accordingly, the test-cases used in I3RC are based on inputs and outputs which relate to cloud effects in atmospheric heating rates and in real-world remote sensing geometries. The main objectives of I3RC are to (1) enable participants to improve their models, (2) publish results as a community, (3) archive source code, and (4) educate. We will survey the status of I3RC and its plans for the near future with a special emphasis on the mathematical models and computational approaches. We will also describe some of the prime applications of I3RC's efforts in climate models, cloud-resolving models, and remote-sensing observations of clouds, or that of the surface in their presence. In all these application areas, computational efficiency is the main concern and not accuracy. One of I3RC's main goals is to document the performance of as wide a variety as possible of three-dimensional radiative transfer models for a small but representative number of ``cases.'' However, it is dominated by modelers working at the level of linear transport theory (i.e., they solve the radiative transfer equation) and an overwhelming majority of these participants use slow-but-robust Monte Carlo techniques. This means that only a small portion of the efficiency vs. accuracy vs. flexibility domain is currently populated by I3RC participants. To balance this natural clustering the present authors have organized a systematic outreach towards

  19. On the time-dependent radiative transfer in photospheric plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, A.L.; Schweizer, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The paper is the second of a series investigating time-dependent radiative transfer processes of x-rays in photospheric plasmas. A quantitative discussion is presented of analytical results derived earlier along with a comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. The geometry considered is a homogeneous plasma ball with radius R. The source is concentrated on a concentric shell with radius r 0 < R. Point sources at the centre of the ball or semi-infinite geometries are discussed as limiting cases. Diffusion profiles are given for every scattering order and the total profile appears as the sum over these individual profiles. The comparison with Monte Carlo results is used to test the accuracy of the analytical approach and to adjust the time profiles of the first few scattering orders. The analytical theory yields good results over a wide range of situations. (author)

  20. Radiative Transfer Theory Verified by Controlled Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Goldstein, Dennis H.; Chowdhary, Jacek; Lompado, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of high-accuracy controlled laboratory measurements of the Stokes reflection matrix for suspensions of submicrometer-sized latex particles in water and compare them with the results of a numerically exact computer solution of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE). The quantitative performance of the VRTE is monitored by increasing the volume packing density of the latex particles from 2 to 10. Our results indicate that the VRTE can be applied safely to random particulate media with packing densities up to 2. VRTE results for packing densities of the order of 5 should be taken with caution, whereas the polarized bidirectional reflectivity of suspensions with larger packing densities cannot be accurately predicted. We demonstrate that a simple modification of the phase matrix entering the VRTE based on the so-called static structure factor can be a promising remedy that deserves further examination.

  1. Fluctuation theory for radiative transfer in random media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, Guillaume; Jing Wenjia

    2011-01-01

    We consider the effect of small scale random fluctuations of the constitutive coefficients on boundary measurements of solutions to radiative transfer equations. As the correlation length of the random oscillations tends to zero, the transport solution is well approximated by a deterministic, averaged, solution. In this paper, we analyze the random fluctuations to the averaged solution, which may be interpreted as a central limit correction to homogenization. With the inverse transport problem in mind, we characterize the random structure of the singular components of the transport measurement operator. In regimes of moderate scattering, such components provide stable reconstructions of the constitutive parameters in the transport equation. We show that the random fluctuations strongly depend on the decorrelation properties of the random medium.

  2. Development and preliminary assessment of the wall condensation heat transfer models for the SPACE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Sik; Choi, Ki Yong; Moon, Sang Ki; Kim, Jung Woo; Kim, Kyung Doo

    2009-01-01

    The wall condensation heat transfer models are developed for the SPACE code and are assessed for various condensation conditions. Both default and alternative models were selected through an extensive literature survey. For a pure steam condensation, a maximum value among the Nusselt, Chato, and Shah's correlations is used in order to consider the geometric and turbulent effects. In the presence of non-condensable gases, the Colburn-Hougen's diffusion model was used as a default model and a non-iterative condensation model proposed by No and Park was selected as an alternative model. The wall condensation heat transfer models were assessed preliminarily by using arbitrary test conditions. Both wall condensation models could simulate the heat transfer coefficients and heat fluxes in the vertical, horizontal and turbulent conditions quite reasonably for a pure steam condensation. Both the default and alternative wall condensation models were also verified for the condensation heat transfer coefficient and heat flux in the presence of noncondensable gas. However, some improvements and further detailed verification are necessary for the condensation phenomena in the presence of noncondensable gas

  3. Premar-2: a Monte Carlo code for radiative transport simulation in atmospheric environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupini, E.

    1999-01-01

    The peculiarities of the PREMAR-2 code, aimed at radiation transport Monte Carlo simulation in atmospheric environments in the infrared-ultraviolet frequency range, are described. With respect to the previously developed PREMAR code, besides plane multilayers, spherical multilayers and finite sequences of vertical layers, each one with its own atmospheric behaviour, are foreseen in the new code, together with the refraction phenomenon, so that long range, highly slanted paths can now be more faithfully taken into account. A zenithal angular dependence of the albedo coefficient has moreover been introduced. Lidar systems, with spatially independent source and telescope, are allowed again to be simulated, and, in this latest version of the code, sensitivity analyses to be performed. According to this last feasibility, consequences on radiation transport of small perturbations in physical components of the atmospheric environment may be analyze and the related effects on searched results estimated. The availability of a library of physical data (reaction coefficients, phase functions and refraction indexes) is required by the code, providing the essential features of the environment of interest needed of the Monte Carlo simulation. Variance reducing techniques have been enhanced in the Premar-2 code, by introducing, for instance, a local forced collision technique, especially apt to be used in Lidar system simulations. Encouraging comparisons between code and experimental results carried out at the Brasimone Centre of ENEA, have so far been obtained, even if further checks of the code are to be performed [it

  4. The FluxCompensator: Making Radiative Transfer Models of Hydrodynamical Simulations Directly Comparable to Real Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepferl, Christine M.; Robitaille, Thomas P., E-mail: koepferl@usm.lmu.de [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-11-01

    When modeling astronomical objects throughout the universe, it is important to correctly treat the limitations of the data, for instance finite resolution and sensitivity. In order to simulate these effects, and to make radiative transfer models directly comparable to real observations, we have developed an open-source Python package called the FluxCompensator that enables the post-processing of the output of 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes, such as Hyperion. With the FluxCompensator, realistic synthetic observations can be generated by modeling the effects of convolution with arbitrary point-spread functions, transmission curves, finite pixel resolution, noise, and reddening. Pipelines can be applied to compute synthetic observations that simulate observatories, such as the Spitzer Space Telescope or the Herschel Space Observatory . Additionally, this tool can read in existing observations (e.g., FITS format) and use the same settings for the synthetic observations. In this paper, we describe the package as well as present examples of such synthetic observations.

  5. The FluxCompensator: Making Radiative Transfer Models of Hydrodynamical Simulations Directly Comparable to Real Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepferl, Christine M.; Robitaille, Thomas P.

    2017-11-01

    When modeling astronomical objects throughout the universe, it is important to correctly treat the limitations of the data, for instance finite resolution and sensitivity. In order to simulate these effects, and to make radiative transfer models directly comparable to real observations, we have developed an open-source Python package called the FluxCompensator that enables the post-processing of the output of 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes, such as Hyperion. With the FluxCompensator, realistic synthetic observations can be generated by modeling the effects of convolution with arbitrary point-spread functions, transmission curves, finite pixel resolution, noise, and reddening. Pipelines can be applied to compute synthetic observations that simulate observatories, such as the Spitzer Space Telescope or the Herschel Space Observatory. Additionally, this tool can read in existing observations (e.g., FITS format) and use the same settings for the synthetic observations. In this paper, we describe the package as well as present examples of such synthetic observations.

  6. An Algorithm to Compress Line-transition Data for Radiative-transfer Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos, Patricio E.

    2017-11-01

    Molecular line-transition lists are an essential ingredient for radiative-transfer calculations. With recent databases now surpassing the billion-line mark, handling them has become computationally prohibitive, due to both the required processing power and memory. Here I present a temperature-dependent algorithm to separate strong from weak line transitions, reformatting the large majority of the weaker lines into a cross-section data file, and retaining the detailed line-by-line information of the fewer strong lines. For any given molecule over the 0.3-30 μm range, this algorithm reduces the number of lines to a few million, enabling faster radiative-transfer computations without a significant loss of information. The final compression rate depends on how densely populated the spectrum is. I validate this algorithm by comparing Exomol’s HCN extinction-coefficient spectra between the complete (65 million line transitions) and compressed (7.7 million) line lists. Over the 0.6-33 μm range, the average difference between extinction-coefficient values is less than 1%. A Python/C implementation of this algorithm is open-source and available at https://github.com/pcubillos/repack. So far, this code handles the Exomol and HITRAN line-transition format.

  7. Verification of calculational models of heat exchange crisis and overcrisis heat transfer, used in the KORSAR code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezrukov, Yu.A.; Shchekoldin, V.I.

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the Gidropress OKB (Special Design Bureau) experimental data bank one verified the KORSAR code design models and correlations as to heat exchange crisis and overcrisis heat transfer as applied to the WWER reactor normal and emergency conditions. The VI.006.000 version of KORSAR code base calculations is shown to describe adequately the conducted experiments and to deviate insignificantly towards the conservative approach. So it may be considered as one of the codes ensuring more precise estimation [ru

  8. Investigation of Improved Methods in Power Transfer Efficiency for Radiating Near-Field Wireless Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A metamaterial-inspired efficient electrically small antenna is proposed, firstly. And then several improving power transfer efficiency (PTE methods for wireless power transfer (WPT systems composed of the proposed antenna in the radiating near-field region are investigated. Method one is using a proposed antenna as a power retriever. This WPT system consisted of three proposed antennas: a transmitter, a receiver, and a retriever. The system is fed by only one power source. At a fixed distance from receiver to transmitter, the distance between the transmitter and the retriever is turned to maximize power transfer from the transmitter to the receiver. Method two is using two proposed antennas as transmitters and one antenna as receiver. The receiver is placed between the two transmitters. In this system, two power sources are used to feed the two transmitters, respectively. By adjusting the phase difference between the two feeding sources, the maximum PTE can be obtained at the optimal phase difference. Using the same configuration as method two, method three, where the maximum PTE can be increased by regulating the voltage (or power ratio of the two feeding sources, is proposed. In addition, we combine the proposed methods to construct another two schemes, which improve the PTE at different extent than classical WPT system.

  9. Finite volume method for radiative heat transfer in an unstructured flow solver for emitting, absorbing and scattering media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazdallah, Moncef; Feldheim, Véronique; Claramunt, Kilian; Hirsch, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of the finite volume method to solve the radiative transfer equation in a commercial code. The particularity of this work is that the method applied on unstructured hexahedral meshes does not need a pre-processing step establishing a particular marching order to visit all the control volumes. The solver simply visits the faces of the control volumes as numbered in the hexahedral unstructured mesh. A cell centred mesh and a spatial differencing step scheme to relate facial radiative intensities to nodal intensities is used. The developed computer code based on FVM has been integrated in the CFD solver FINE/Open from NUMECA Int. Radiative heat transfer can be evaluated within systems containing uniform, grey, emitting, absorbing and/or isotropically or linear anisotropically scattering medium bounded by diffuse grey walls. This code has been validated for three test cases. The first one is a three dimensional rectangular enclosure filled with emitting, absorbing and anisotropically scattering media. The second is the differentially heated cubic cavity. The third one is the L-shaped enclosure. For these three test cases a good agreement has been observed when temperature and heat fluxes predictions are compared with references taken, from literature.

  10. Radiative heat transfer and water content in atmosphere of Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarov, M.Y.; Gal'stev, A.P.; Shari, V.P.

    1985-01-01

    The authors present the procedure for calculating optical characteristics of the main components and the effective fluxes in the atmosphere of Venus, and concrete results of the calculations. They are compared to the results of other authors and to the experimantal data. Integration was carried out by the Simpson method with automatic selection of the step or interval for a given relative integrating accuracy delta. The calculations were done with a BESM-6 computer. Using this procedure and data on absorbtion coefficients, calculations of the spectrum of effective flux were carried out for a pure carbon dioxide atmosphere and for an atmosphere containing water vapor at various relative admixtures, for different altitude profiles of temperature and cloudiness albedo. Thus, the comparisons made, enable the authors to judge about the degree of agreement of the F(z) altitude profile, in some regions of the planet where measurements have been made, rather than about the absolute values of the heat fluxes. In conclusion, the authors point out that the task of calculating in detail the radiation balance in Venus' lower atmosphere, as also the problem of a more reliable interpretation of the experimantal data, is coupled with the necessity of elaborating reliable models of the atmospheric components' optical characteristics, which determine the radiative transfer of heat

  11. Martian Radiative Transfer Modeling Using the Optimal Spectral Sampling Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eluszkiewicz, J.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Uymin, G.; Moncet, J.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The large volume of existing and planned infrared observations of Mars have prompted the development of a new martian radiative transfer model that could be used in the retrievals of atmospheric and surface properties. The model is based on the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS) method [1]. The method is a fast and accurate monochromatic technique applicable to a wide range of remote sensing platforms (from microwave to UV) and was originally developed for the real-time processing of infrared and microwave data acquired by instruments aboard the satellites forming part of the next-generation global weather satellite system NPOESS (National Polarorbiting Operational Satellite System) [2]. As part of our on-going research related to the radiative properties of the martian polar caps, we have begun the development of a martian OSS model with the goal of using it to perform self-consistent atmospheric corrections necessary to retrieve caps emissivity from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra. While the caps will provide the initial focus area for applying the new model, it is hoped that the model will be of interest to the wider Mars remote sensing community.

  12. Geometrical modification transfer between specific meshes of each coupled physical codes. Application to the Jules Horowitz research reactor experimental devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplex, B.

    2011-01-01

    The CEA develops and uses scientific software, called physical codes, in various physical disciplines to optimize installation and experimentation costs. During a study, several physical phenomena interact, so a code coupling and some data exchanges between different physical codes are required. Each physical code computes on a particular geometry, usually represented by a mesh composed of thousands to millions of elements. This PhD Thesis focuses on the geometrical modification transfer between specific meshes of each coupled physical code. First, it presents a physical code coupling method where deformations are computed by one of these codes. Next, it discusses the establishment of a model, common to different physical codes, grouping all the shared data. Finally, it covers the deformation transfers between meshes of the same geometry or adjacent geometries. Geometrical modifications are discrete data because they are based on a mesh. In order to permit every code to access deformations and to transfer them, a continuous representation is computed. Two functions are developed, one with a global support, and the other with a local support. Both functions combine a simplification method and a radial basis function network. A whole use case is dedicated to the Jules Horowitz reactor. The effect of differential dilatations on experimental device cooling is studied. (author) [fr

  13. Analysis of radiation field distribution in Yonggwang unit 3 with MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Woo; Ha, Wi Ho; Shin, Chang Ho; Kim, Soon Young; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2004-01-01

    Radiation field analysis is performed at the inside of the containment building of nuclear power plant(NPP) using the well-known MCNP code. The target NPP in this study is Yonggwang Unit 3 Cycle 8. In this work, whole transport calculations were done using MCNPX 2.4.0 due to the functional benefits, such as Mesh Tally, that the code provides. The neutron spectra released from the operating reactor core were firstly evaluated as a radiation source term, and then dose distributions in the work areas of the NPP were calculated

  14. Modeling radiation belt dynamics using a 3-D layer method code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Ma, Q.; Tao, X.; Zhang, Y.; Teng, S.; Albert, J. M.; Chan, A. A.; Li, W.; Ni, B.; Lu, Q.; Wang, S.

    2017-08-01

    A new 3-D diffusion code using a recently published layer method has been developed to analyze radiation belt electron dynamics. The code guarantees the positivity of the solution even when mixed diffusion terms are included. Unlike most of the previous codes, our 3-D code is developed directly in equatorial pitch angle (α0), momentum (p), and L shell coordinates; this eliminates the need to transform back and forth between (α0,p) coordinates and adiabatic invariant coordinates. Using (α0,p,L) is also convenient for direct comparison with satellite data. The new code has been validated by various numerical tests, and we apply the 3-D code to model the rapid electron flux enhancement following the geomagnetic storm on 17 March 2013, which is one of the Geospace Environment Modeling Focus Group challenge events. An event-specific global chorus wave model, an AL-dependent statistical plasmaspheric hiss wave model, and a recently published radial diffusion coefficient formula from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) statistics are used. The simulation results show good agreement with satellite observations, in general, supporting the scenario that the rapid enhancement of radiation belt electron flux for this event results from an increased level of the seed population by radial diffusion, with subsequent acceleration by chorus waves. Our results prove that the layer method can be readily used to model global radiation belt dynamics in three dimensions.

  15. Collection of regulatory texts related to radiation protection (collection of legal and regulatory measures related to radiation protection). Part 1: laws and decrees (Extracts of the Public Health Code and of the Labour Code dealing with the protection of population, patients and workers against the hazards of ionizing radiations); Part 2: orders, decisions, non codified decrees (Orders and decisions taken in application of the Public Health Code and of the Labour Code dealing with the protection of population, patients and workers against the hazards of ionizing radiations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas, R.; Saad, N.; Niel, X.; Cottin, V.; Lachaume, J.L.; Feries, J.

    2011-01-01

    The first part contains legal and regulatory texts extracted from the Public Health Code and related to health general protection and to health products (medical devices), from the Social Security Code, and from the Labour Code related to individual work relationships, to health and safety at work, to work places, to work equipment and means of protection, to the prevention of some exposure risks and of risks related to some activities. The second part gathers texts extracted from the Public Health Code and related to ionizing radiations (general measures for the protection of the population, exposure to natural radiations, general regime of authorizations and declarations, purchase, retailing, importation, exportation, transfer and elimination of radioactive sources, protection of persons exposed to ionizing radiations for medical or forensics purposes, situations of radiological emergency and of sustained exposure to ionizing radiations, control), to the safety of waters and food products, and to the control of medical devices, to the protection of patients. It also contains extracts for the Labour Code related to workers protection

  16. Recent Progress of the Synchrotron Radiation Calculation Code SPECTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, T.; Kitamura, H.

    2007-01-01

    SPECTRA is a computer software to calculate optical properties of synchrotron radiation (SR) emitted by electrons passing through magnetic devices such as bending magnets, wigglers and undulators. It has been used to design various devices in the SR beamline, such as high heat-load components in the front-end section and optical elements in the optics hutch. In addition, the electron beam quality can be estimated by comparison between the measured and calculated properties of SR. Since the first announcement, numerous improvements have been made to SPECTRA to achieve less computation time with higher numerical accuracy. In addition, a number of functions have been added to follow the user's demand. In this paper, recent progress of SPECTRA is presented and details of the new functions are explained together with several examples

  17. Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermohydraulics Code Testing for Supercritical Water Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-08-01

    The supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water cooled reactor concept which uses water pressurized above its thermodynamic critical pressure as the reactor coolant. This concept offers high thermal efficiencies and a simplified reactor system, and is hence expected to help to improve economic competitiveness. Various kinds of SCWR concepts have been developed, with varying combinations of reactor type (pressure vessel or pressure tube) and core spectrum (thermal, fast or mixed). There is great interest in both developing and developed countries in the research and development (R&D) and conceptual design of SCWRs. Considering the high interest shown in a number of Member States, the IAEA established in 2008 the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermo-hydraulics Code Testing for SCWRs. The aim was to foster international collaboration in the R&D of SCWRs in support of Member States’ efforts and under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department’s Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR) and Heavy Water Reactors (TWG-HWR). The two key objectives of the CRP were to establish accurate databases on the thermohydraulics of supercritical pressure fluids and to test analysis methods for SCWR thermohydraulic behaviour to identify code development needs. In total, 16 institutes from nine Member States and two international organizations were involved in the CRP. The thermohydraulics phenomena investigated in the CRP included heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of supercritical pressure fluids, development of new heat transfer prediction methods, critical flow during depressurization from supercritical conditions, flow stability and natural circulation in supercritical pressure systems. Two code testing benchmark exercises were performed for steady state heat transfer and flow stability in a heated channel. The CRP was completed with the planned outputs in

  18. Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermohydraulics Code Testing for Supercritical Water Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-08-15

    The supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water cooled reactor concept which uses water pressurized above its thermodynamic critical pressure as the reactor coolant. This concept offers high thermal efficiencies and a simplified reactor system, and is hence expected to help to improve economic competitiveness. Various kinds of SCWR concepts have been developed, with varying combinations of reactor type (pressure vessel or pressure tube) and core spectrum (thermal, fast or mixed). There is great interest in both developing and developed countries in the research and development (R&D) and conceptual design of SCWRs. Considering the high interest shown in a number of Member States, the IAEA established in 2008 the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermo-hydraulics Code Testing for SCWRs. The aim was to foster international collaboration in the R&D of SCWRs in support of Member States’ efforts and under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department’s Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR) and Heavy Water Reactors (TWG-HWR). The two key objectives of the CRP were to establish accurate databases on the thermohydraulics of supercritical pressure fluids and to test analysis methods for SCWR thermohydraulic behaviour to identify code development needs. In total, 16 institutes from nine Member States and two international organizations were involved in the CRP. The thermohydraulics phenomena investigated in the CRP included heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of supercritical pressure fluids, development of new heat transfer prediction methods, critical flow during depressurization from supercritical conditions, flow stability and natural circulation in supercritical pressure systems. Two code testing benchmark exercises were performed for steady state heat transfer and flow stability in a heated channel. The CRP was completed with the planned outputs in

  19. CIPHER: coded imager and polarimeter for high-energy radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Caroli, E; Dusi, W; Bertuccio, G; Sampietro, M

    2000-01-01

    The CIPHER instrument is a hard X- and soft gamma-ray spectroscopic and polarimetric coded mask imager based on an array of cadmium telluride micro-spectrometers. The position-sensitive detector (PSD) will be arranged in 4 modules of 32x32 crystals, each of 2x2 mm sup 2 cross section and 10 mm thickness giving a total active area of about 160 cm sup 2. The micro-spectrometer characteristics allow a wide operating range from approx 10 keV to 1 MeV, while the PSD is actively shielded by CsI crystals on the bottom in order to reduce background. The mask, based on a modified uniformly redundant array (MURA) pattern, is four times the area of the PSD and is situated at about 100 cm from the CdTe array top surface. The CIPHER instrument is proposed for a balloon experiment, both in order to assess the performance of such an instrumental concept for a small/medium-size satellite survey mission and to perform an innovative measurement of the Crab polarisation level. The CIPHER's field of view allows the instrument to...

  20. The use of a heat transfer coefficient for describing the radiative exchange between water vapour and the bounding walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eifler, W.; Shepherd, I.M.

    1983-01-01

    During the ''severe-fuel-damage'' experiments of the SUPER SARA test program radiation heat transfer will play an important part. For the analysis of these experiments it should be modelled therefore in a particularly appropriate manner. Based on the same engineering type principles which are used in the radiation model of the TRAC code version for boiling water reactors a new model has been developed. This model is less computer time consuming than the TRAC model and particularly appropriate for the use in the subchannel - type bundle computer code which is planned to be developed for the analysis of the ''severe-fuel-damage'' experiments. Sample calculations for the ''severe-fuel-damage'' test array show that the difference between the results obtained with the new model and those obtained with the TRAC model is in general not significant

  1. Model validation of GAMMA code with heat transfer experiment for KO TBM in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yum, Soo Been; Lee, Eo Hwak; Lee, Dong Won; Park, Goon Cherl

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► In this study, helium supplying system was constructed. ► Preparation for heat transfer experiment in KO TBM condition using helium supplying system was progressed. ► To get more applicable results, test matrix was made to cover the condition for KO TBM. ► Using CFD code; CFX 11, validation and modification for system code GAMMA was performed. -- Abstract: By considering the requirements for a DEMO-relevant blanket concept, Korea (KO) has proposed a He cooled molten lithium (HCML) test blanket module (TBM) for testing in ITER. A performance analysis for the thermal–hydraulics and a safety analysis for the KO TBM have been carried out using a commercial CFD code, ANSYS-CFX, and a system code, GAMMA (GAs multicomponent mixture analysis), which was developed by the gas cooled reactor in Korea. To verify the codes, a preliminary study was performed by Lee using a single TBM first wall (FW) mock-up made from the same material as the KO TBM, ferritic martensitic steel, using a 6 MPa nitrogen gas loop. The test was performed at pressures of 1.1, 1.9 and 2.9 MPa, and under various ranges of flow rate from 0.0105 to 0.0407 kg/s with a constant wall temperature condition. In the present study, a thermal–hydraulic test was performed with the newly constructed helium supplying system, in which the design pressure and temperature were 9 MPa and 500 °C, respectively. In the experiment, the same mock-up was used, and the test was performed under the conditions of 3 MPa pressure, 30 °C inlet temperature and 70 m/s helium velocity, which are almost same conditions of the KO TBM FW. One side of the mock-up was heated with a constant heat flux of 0.3–0.5 MW/m 2 using a graphite heating system, KoHLT-2 (Korea heat load test facility-2). Because the comparison result between CFX 11 and GAMMA showed a difference tendency, the modification of heat transfer correlation included in GAMMA was performed. And the modified GAMMA showed the strong parity with CFX

  2. Application of advanced model of radiative heat transfer in a rod geometry to QUENCH and PARAMETER tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, A.D.; Kobelev, G.V.; Astafieva, V.O.

    2007-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer is very important in different fields of mechanical engineering and related technologies including nuclear reactors, heat transfer in furnaces, aerospace, different high-temperature assemblies. In particular, in the course of a hypothetical severe accident at PWR-type nuclear reactor the temperatures inside the reactor vessel reach high values at which taking into account of radiative heat exchange between the structures of reactor (including core and other reactor vessel elements) gets important. Radiative heat transfer dominates the late phase of severe accident because radiative heat fluxes (proportional to T4, where T is the temperature) are generally considerably higher than convective and conductive heat fluxes in a system. In particular, heat transfer due to radiation determines the heating and degradation of the core and surrounding steel in-vessel structures and finally influences the composition, temperature and mass of materials pouring out of the reactor vessel after its loss of integrity. Existing models of radiative heat exchange use many limitations and approximations: approximate estimation of view factors and beam lengths; the geometry change in the course of the accident is neglected; the database for emissivities of materials is not complete; absorption/emission by steam-noncondensable medium is taken into account approximately. The module MRAD was developed in this paper to model the radiative heat exchange in rod-like geometry typical of PWR-type reactor. Radiative heat exchange is computed using dividing on zones (zonal method) as in existing radiation models implemented to severe accident numerical codes such as ICARE, SCDAP/RELAP, MELCOR but improved in following aspects: new approach to evaluation of view factors and mean beam length; detailed evaluation of gas absorptivity and emissivity; account of effective radiative thermal conductivity for the large core; account of geometry modification in the course of severe

  3. Best estimate radiation heat transfer model developed for TRAC-BD1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spore, J.W.; Giles, M.M.; Shumway, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A best estimate radiation heat transfer model for analysis of BWR fuel bundles has been developed and compared with 8 x 8 fuel bundle data. The model includes surface-to-surface and surface-to-two-phase fluid radiation heat transfer. A simple method of correcting for anisotropic reflection effects has been included in the model

  4. Polarized scattered light from self-luminous exoplanets. Three-dimensional scattering radiative transfer with ARTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolker, T.; Min, M.; Stam, D. M.; Mollière, P.; Dominik, C.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Direct imaging has paved the way for atmospheric characterization of young and self-luminous gas giants. Scattering in a horizontally-inhomogeneous atmosphere causes the disk-integrated polarization of the thermal radiation to be linearly polarized, possibly detectable with the newest generation of high-contrast imaging instruments. Aims: We aim to investigate the effect of latitudinal and longitudinal cloud variations, circumplanetary disks, atmospheric oblateness, and cloud particle properties on the integrated degree and direction of polarization in the near-infrared. We want to understand how 3D atmospheric asymmetries affect the polarization signal in order to assess the potential of infrared polarimetry for direct imaging observations of planetary-mass companions. Methods: We have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code (ARTES) for scattered light simulations in (exo)planetary atmospheres. The code is applicable to calculations of reflected light and thermal radiation in a spherical grid with a parameterized distribution of gas, clouds, hazes, and circumplanetary material. A gray atmosphere approximation is used for the thermal structure. Results: The disk-integrated degree of polarization of a horizontally-inhomogeneous atmosphere is maximal when the planet is flattened, the optical thickness of the equatorial clouds is large compared to the polar clouds, and the clouds are located at high altitude. For a flattened planet, the integrated polarization can both increase or decrease with respect to a spherical planet which depends on the horizontal distribution and optical thickness of the clouds. The direction of polarization can be either parallel or perpendicular to the projected direction of the rotation axis when clouds are zonally distributed. Rayleigh scattering by submicron-sized cloud particles will maximize the polarimetric signal whereas the integrated degree of polarization is significantly reduced with micron

  5. Development of a space radiation Monte Carlo computer simulation based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsky, L; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Carminati, F; Brun, R

    2001-01-01

    This NASA funded project is proceeding to develop a Monte Carlo-based computer simulation of the radiation environment in space. With actual funding only initially in place at the end of May 2000, the study is still in the early stage of development. The general tasks have been identified and personnel have been selected. The code to be assembled will be based upon two major existing software packages. The radiation transport simulation will be accomplished by updating the FLUKA Monte Carlo program, and the user interface will employ the ROOT software being developed at CERN. The end-product will be a Monte Carlo-based code which will complement the existing analytic codes such as BRYNTRN/HZETRN presently used by NASA to evaluate the effects of radiation shielding in space. The planned code will possess the ability to evaluate the radiation environment for spacecraft and habitats in Earth orbit, in interplanetary space, on the lunar surface, or on a planetary surface such as Mars. Furthermore, it will be usef...

  6. Creation and utilization of a World Wide Web based space radiation effects code: SIREST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleterry, R. C. Jr; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Tripathi, R. K.; Thibeault, S. A.; Noor, A. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badavi, F. F.; Chang, C. K.; Qualls, G. D.; hide

    2001-01-01

    In order for humans and electronics to fully and safely operate in the space environment, codes like HZETRN (High Charge and Energy Transport) must be included in any designer's toolbox for design evaluation with respect to radiation damage. Currently, spacecraft designers do not have easy access to accurate radiation codes like HZETRN to evaluate their design for radiation effects on humans and electronics. Today, the World Wide Web is sophisticated enough to support the entire HZETRN code and all of the associated pre and post processing tools. This package is called SIREST (Space Ionizing Radiation Effects and Shielding Tools). There are many advantages to SIREST. The most important advantage is the instant update capability of the web. Another major advantage is the modularity that the web imposes on the code. Right now, the major disadvantage of SIREST will be its modularity inside the designer's system. This mostly comes from the fact that a consistent interface between the designer and the computer system to evaluate the design is incomplete. This, however, is to be solved in the Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE) program currently being funded by NASA.

  7. Process of cross section generation for radiation shielding calculations, using the NJOY code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, S.; Corcuera, R.P.

    1986-10-01

    The process of multigroup cross sections generation for radiation shielding calculations, using the NJOY code, is explained. Photon production cross sections, processed by the GROUPR module, and photon interaction cross sections processed by the GAMINR are given. These data are compared with the data produced by the AMPX system and published data. (author) [pt

  8. The Premar Code for the Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation Transport In the Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupini, E.; Borgia, M.G.; Premuda, M.

    1997-03-01

    The Montecarlo code PREMAR is described, which allows the user to simulate the radiation transport in the atmosphere, in the ultraviolet-infrared frequency interval. A plan multilayer geometry is at present foreseen by the code, witch albedo possibility at the lower boundary surface. For a given monochromatic point source, the main quantities computed by the code are the absorption spatial distributions of aerosol and molecules, together with the related atmospheric transmittances. Moreover, simulation of of Lidar experiments are foreseen by the code, the source and telescope fields of view being assigned. To build-up the appropriate probability distributions, an input data library is assumed to be read by the code. For this purpose the radiance-transmittance LOWTRAN-7 code has been conveniently adapted as a source of the library so as to exploit the richness of information of the code for a large variety of atmospheric simulations. Results of applications of the PREMAR code are finally presented, with special reference to simulations of Lidar system and radiometer experiments carried out at the Brasimone ENEA Centre by the Environment Department

  9. Development of a coupling code for PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Z.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, H.; Wang, M.

    2012-01-01

    PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming is important for the safe of the personnel and equipment, thus calculation has to be performed to evaluate the neutron flux distribution around the reactor. For this calculation, the deterministic codes have difficulties in fine geometrical modeling and need huge computer resource; and the Monte Carlo codes require very long sampling time to obtain results with acceptable precision. Therefore, a coupling method has been developed to eliminate the two problems mentioned above in each code. In this study, we develop a coupling code named DORT2MCNP to link the Sn code DORT and Monte Carlo code MCNP. DORT2MCNP is used to produce a combined surface source containing top, bottom and side surface simultaneously. Because SDEF card is unsuitable for the combined surface source, we modify the SOURCE subroutine of MCNP and compile MCNP for this application. Numerical results demonstrate the correctness of the coupling code DORT2MCNP and show reasonable agreement between the coupling method and the other two codes (DORT and MCNP). (authors)

  10. Radiation physics and shielding codes and analyses applied to design-assist and safety analyses of CANDUR and ACRTM reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydogdu, K.; Boss, C. R.

    2006-01-01

    heavily on experience and engineering judgement, consistent with the ALARA philosophy. Special care is taken to ensure that the best estimate dose rates are used to the extent possible when applying ALARA. Provisions for safeguards equipment are made throughout the fuel-handling route in CANDU and ACR reactors. For example, the fuel bundle counters rely on the decay gammas from the fission products in spent-fuel bundles to record the number of fuel movements. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards system for CANDU and ACR reactors is based on item (fuel bundle) accounting. It involves a combination of IAEA inspection with containment and surveillance, and continuous unattended monitoring. The spent fuel bundle counter monitors spent fuel bundles as they are transferred from the fuelling machine to the spent fuel bay. The shielding and dose-rate analysis need to be carried out so that the bundle counter functions properly. This paper includes two codes used in criticality safety analyses. Criticality safety is a unique phenomenon and codes that address criticality issues will demand specific validations. However, it is recognised that some of the codes used in radiation physics will also be used in criticality safety assessments. (authors)

  11. PEREGRINE: An all-particle Monte Carlo code for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Chandler, W.P.; Rathkopf, J.A.; Svatos, M.M.; White, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver a lethal dose to the tumor while minimizing the dose to normal tissues. To carry out this task, it is critical to calculate correctly the distribution of dose delivered. Monte Carlo transport methods have the potential to provide more accurate prediction of dose distributions than currently-used methods. PEREGRINE is a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the specific purpose of modeling the effects of radiation therapy. PEREGRINE transports neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles, including protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, and alpha particles. This paper describes the PEREGRINE transport code and some preliminary results for clinically relevant materials and radiation sources

  12. Calculational model and code for corrosion products transfer in sodium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizawa, Katsuyuki; Kikuchi, Takao; Nihei, Isao; Horie, Junnosuke

    1987-01-01

    The parameters to predict LMFBR radioactive CP behaviour are obtained by fitting the model to the release rates and distribution of deposits in experimental sodium loops. Analysis of the downstream effect for Co-60 deposition confirms that the mechanism controlling Co-60 transfer is diffusion through the boundary sublayer in the flowing sodium. On the other hand, analysis of Mn-54 deposition suggests that the controlling mechanism for this nuclide is probably an intermediate case between diffusion-control in the liquid and reaction-control at steel surfaces. The super-stoichiometric release of Mn-54 and the sub-stoichiometric release of Co-60 are interpreted from their model parameters as being likely related to their solubilities in sodium. The computer code developed for this model is named PSYCHE. (orig./HP)

  13. Sparse tensor spherical harmonics approximation in radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grella, K.; Schwab, Ch.

    2011-01-01

    The stationary monochromatic radiative transfer equation is a partial differential transport equation stated on a five-dimensional phase space. To obtain a well-posed problem, boundary conditions have to be prescribed on the inflow part of the domain boundary. We solve the equation with a multi-level Galerkin FEM in physical space and a spectral discretization with harmonics in solid angle and show that the benefits of the concept of sparse tensor products, known from the context of sparse grids, can also be leveraged in combination with a spectral discretization. Our method allows us to include high spectral orders without incurring the 'curse of dimension' of a five-dimensional computational domain. Neglecting boundary conditions, we find analytically that for smooth solutions, the convergence rate of the full tensor product method is retained in our method up to a logarithmic factor, while the number of degrees of freedom grows essentially only as fast as for the purely spatial problem. For the case with boundary conditions, we propose a splitting of the physical function space and a conforming tensorization. Numerical experiments in two physical and one angular dimension show evidence for the theoretical convergence rates to hold in the latter case as well.

  14. Test plan for validation of the radiative transfer equation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricks, Allen Joseph; Grasser, Thomas W.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Jernigan, Dann A.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2010-09-01

    As the capabilities of numerical simulations increase, decision makers are increasingly relying upon simulations rather than experiments to assess risks across a wide variety of accident scenarios including fires. There are still, however, many aspects of fires that are either not well understood or are difficult to treat from first principles due to the computational expense. For a simulation to be truly predictive and to provide decision makers with information which can be reliably used for risk assessment the remaining physical processes must be studied and suitable models developed for the effects of the physics. A set of experiments are outlined in this report which will provide soot volume fraction/temperature data and heat flux (intensity) data for the validation of models for the radiative transfer equation. In addition, a complete set of boundary condition measurements will be taken to allow full fire predictions for validation of the entire fire model. The experiments will be performed with a lightly-sooting liquid hydrocarbon fuel fire in the fully turbulent scale range (2 m diameter).

  15. Approximate models for broken clouds in stochastic radiative transfer theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doicu, Adrian; Efremenko, Dmitry S.; Loyola, Diego; Trautmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents approximate models in stochastic radiative transfer theory. The independent column approximation and its modified version with a solar source computed in a full three-dimensional atmosphere are formulated in a stochastic framework and for arbitrary cloud statistics. The nth-order stochastic models describing the independent column approximations are equivalent to the nth-order stochastic models for the original radiance fields in which the gradient vectors are neglected. Fast approximate models are further derived on the basis of zeroth-order stochastic models and the independent column approximation. The so-called “internal mixing” models assume a combination of the optical properties of the cloud and the clear sky, while the “external mixing” models assume a combination of the radiances corresponding to completely overcast and clear skies. A consistent treatment of internal and external mixing models is provided, and a new parameterization of the closure coefficient in the effective thickness approximation is given. An efficient computation of the closure coefficient for internal mixing models, using a previously derived vector stochastic model as a reference, is also presented. Equipped with appropriate look-up tables for the closure coefficient, these models can easily be integrated into operational trace gas retrieval systems that exploit absorption features in the near-IR solar spectrum. - Highlights: • Independent column approximation in a stochastic setting. • Fast internal and external mixing models for total and diffuse radiances. • Efficient optimization of internal mixing models to match reference models

  16. Use of a general-purpose heat-transfer code for casting simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, W.C.

    1975-07-01

    The practical use of numerical techniques in simulating casting solidification dictate that a general purpose heat transfer code be used and that results be obtained in an easy-to-analyze format. Color film plotting routines were developed for use with NASA's CINDA-3G heat transfer code; the combination of which meet the above criteria. The subroutine LQSLTR written for SINDA, the successor to CINDA-3G, was verified by comparing calculated results obtained using LQSLTR with those obtained using the specific heat method for handling the heat of fusion. Excellent agreement existed when similar data was used. When the more restrictive requirement of a 1 0 F melting range was used, comparable results were obtained. Uranium and lead rod castings were cast in instrumented graphite molds and the solidification sequence simulated using CINDA-3G. Discrepancies attributed to initial assumptions of instantaneous mold filling, uniform melt temperature, and intimate metal/mold contact were encountered. Further calculations using a model incorporating a gap between the mold and casting showed that the intimate contact assumption could not be used; a three-dimensional model also showed that the thermocouple assemblies used with the platinum--platinum-10 percent rhodium were a significant perturbation to the system. An L-shaped steel casting was simulated and the results compared to those reported in the literature. The experimental data for this casting were reproduced within the accuracy permitted by the thermal conductivity of the sand, thus demonstrating that agreement can be obtained when the mold material does not act as a chill. (U.S.)

  17. DGR, GGR; molecular dynamical codes for simulating radiation damages in diamond and graphite crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taji, Yukichi

    1984-06-01

    Development has been made of molecular dynamical codes DGR and GGR to simulate radiation damages yielded in the diamond and graphite structure crystals, respectively. Though the usual molecular dynamical codes deal only with the central forces as the mutual interactions between atoms, the present codes can take account of noncentral forces to represent the effect of the covalent bonds characteristic of diamond or graphite crystals. It is shown that lattice defects yielded in these crystals are stable by themselves in the present method without any supports of virtual surface forces set on the crystallite surfaces. By this effect the behavior of lattice defects has become possible to be simulated in a more realistic manner. Some examples of the simulation with these codes are shown. (author)

  18. A vector radiative transfer model for coupled atmosphere and ocean systems with a rough interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Pengwang; Hu Yongxiang; Chowdhary, Jacek; Trepte, Charles R.; Lucker, Patricia L.; Josset, Damien B.

    2010-01-01

    We report on an exact vector (polarized) radiative transfer (VRT) model for coupled atmosphere and ocean systems. This VRT model is based on the successive order of scattering (SOS) method, which virtually takes all the multiple scattering processes into account, including atmospheric scattering, oceanic scattering, reflection and transmission through the rough ocean surface. The isotropic Cox-Munk wave model is used to derive the ref and transmission matrices for the rough ocean surface. Shadowing effects are included by the shadowing function. We validated the SOS results by comparing them with those calculated by two independent codes based on the doubling/adding and Monte Carlo methods. Two error analyses related to the ocean color remote sensing are performed in the coupled atmosphere and ocean systems. One is the scalar error caused by ignoring the polarization in the whole system. The other is the error introduced by ignoring the polarization of the light transmitted through the ocean interface. Both errors are significant for the cases studied. This code fits for the next generation of ocean color study because it converges fast for absorbing medium as, for instance, ocean.

  19. Designing a Polymerase Chain Reaction Device Working with Radiation and Convection Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madadelahi, M.; Kalan, K.; Shamloo, A.

    2018-05-01

    Gene proliferation is vital for infectious and genetic diseases diagnosis from a blood sample, even before birth. In addition, DNA sequencing, genetic finger-print analyzing, and genetic mutation detecting can be mentioned as other procedures requiring gene reproduction. Polymerase chain reaction, briefly known as PCR, is a convenient and effective way to accomplish this task; where the DNA containing sample faces three temperature phases alternatively. These phases are known as denaturation, annealing, and elongation/extension which in this study -regarding the type of the primers and the target DNA sequence- are set to occur at 95, 58, and 72 degrees of Celsius. In this study, a PCR device has been designed and fabricated which uses radiation and convection heat transfer at the same time to set and control the mentioned thermal sections. A 300W incandescent light bulb able to immediately turn off and on along with two 8×8 cm DC fans, controlled by a microcontroller as well as PID and PD controller codes are used to monitor the applied thermal cycles. In designing the controller codes it has been concerned that they not only control the temperature over the set-points as well as possible, but also increase the temperature variation rate between each two phases. The temperature data were plotted and DNA samples were used to assess the device function.

  20. Radiative heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Modest, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This introduction reviews why combustion and radiation are important, as well as the technical challenges posed by radiation. Emphasis is on interactions among turbulence, chemistry and radiation (turbulence-chemistry-radiation interactions – TCRI) in Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulations. Subsequent chapters cover: chemically reacting turbulent flows; radiation properties, Reynolds transport equation (RTE) solution methods, and TCRI; radiation effects in laminar flames; TCRI in turbulent flames; and high-pressure combustion systems. This Brief presents integrated approach that includes radiation at the outset, rather than as an afterthought. It stands as the most recent developments in physical modeling, numerical algorithms, and applications collected in one monograph.

  1. Primary processes in radiation chemistry. LET (Linear Energy Transfer) effect in water radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trupin-Wasselin, V.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiations on aqueous solutions leads to water ionization and then to the formation of radical species and molecular products (e - aq , H . , OH . , H 2 O 2 , H 2 ). It has been shown that the stopping power, characterized by the LET value (Linear Energy Transfer) becomes different when the nature of the ionizing radiations is different. Few data are nowadays available for high LET radiations such as protons and high energy heavy ions. These particles have been used to better understand the primary processes in radiation chemistry. The yield of a chemical dosimeter (the Fricke dosimeter) and those of the hydrogen peroxide have been determined for different LET. The effect of the dose rate on the Fricke dosimeter yield and on the H 2 O 2 yield has been studied too. When the dose rate increases, an increase of the molecular products yield is observed. At very high dose rate, this yield decreases on account of the attack of the molecular products by radicals. The H 2 O 2 yield in alkaline medium decreases when the pH reaches 12. This decrease can be explained by a slowing down of the H 2 O 2 formation velocity in alkaline medium. Superoxide radical has also been studied in this work. A new detection method: the time-resolved chemiluminescence has been perfected for this radical. This technique is more sensitive than the absorption spectroscopy. Experiments with heavy ions have allowed to determine the O 2 .- yield directly in the irradiation cell. The experimental results have been compared with those obtained with a Monte Carlo simulation code. (O.M.)

  2. Why a New Code for Novae Evolution and Mass Transfer in Binaries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Shaviv

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most interesting problems in Cataclysmic Variables is the long time scale evolution. This problem appears in long time evolution, which is also very important in the search for the progenitor of SN Ia. The classical approach to overcome this problem in the simulation of novae evolution is to assume: (1 A constant in time, rate of mass transfer. (2 The mass transfer rate that does not vary throughout the life time of the nova, even when many eruptions are considered. Here we show that these assumptions are valid only for a single thermonuclear flash and such a calculation cannot be the basis for extrapolation of the behavior over many flashes. In particular, such calculation cannot be used to predict under what conditions an accreting WD may reach the Chandrasekhar mass and collapse. We report on a new code to attack this problem. The basic idea is to create two parallel processes, one calculating the mass losing star and the other the accreting white dwarf. The two processes communicate continuously with each other and follow the time depended mass loss.

  3. Collection of regulatory texts relative to radiation protection. Part 2: orders and decisions taken in application of the Public Health Code and Labour Code concerning the protection of populations, patients and workers against the risks of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-05-01

    This collection of texts includes the general measures of population protection, exposure to natural radiations, general system of authorizations and statements, protection of persons exposed to ionizing radiations for medical purpose, situations of radiological emergency and long exposure to ionizing radiations, penal dispositions, application of the Public Health code and application of the Labour code. Chronological contents by date of publication is given. (N.C.)

  4. Polymers under ionizing radiation: the study of energy transfers to radiation induced defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced defects created in polymers submitted to ionizing radiations, under inert atmosphere, present the same trend as a function of the dose. When the absorbed dose increases, their concentrations increase then level off. This behavior can be assigned to energy transfers from the polymer to the previously created macromolecular defects; the latter acting as energy sinks. During this thesis, we aimed to specify the influence of a given defect, namely the trans-vinylene, in the behavior of polyethylene under ionizing radiations. For this purpose, we proposed a new methodology based on the specific insertion, at various concentrations, of trans-vinylene groups in the polyethylene backbone through chemical synthesis. This enables to get rid of the variety of created defects on one hand and on the simultaneity of their creation on the other hand. Modified polyethylenes, containing solely trans-vinylene as odd groups, were irradiated under inert atmosphere, using either low LET beams (gamma, beta) or high LET beams (swift heavy ions). During irradiations, both macromolecular defects and H 2 emission were quantified. According to experimental results, among all defects, the influence of the trans-vinylene on the behavior of polyethylene is predominant. (author) [fr

  5. High-order solution methods for grey discrete ordinates thermal radiative transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maginot, Peter G., E-mail: maginot1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Ragusa, Jean C., E-mail: jean.ragusa@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Morel, Jim E., E-mail: morel@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    This work presents a solution methodology for solving the grey radiative transfer equations that is both spatially and temporally more accurate than the canonical radiative transfer solution technique of linear discontinuous finite element discretization in space with implicit Euler integration in time. We solve the grey radiative transfer equations by fully converging the nonlinear temperature dependence of the material specific heat, material opacities, and Planck function. The grey radiative transfer equations are discretized in space using arbitrary-order self-lumping discontinuous finite elements and integrated in time with arbitrary-order diagonally implicit Runge–Kutta time integration techniques. Iterative convergence of the radiation equation is accelerated using a modified interior penalty diffusion operator to precondition the full discrete ordinates transport operator.

  6. Application of OMEGA Monte Carlo codes for radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Jiang, Steve B.

    1998-01-01

    The accuracy of conventional dose algorithms for radiosurgery treatment planning is limited, due to the inadequate consideration of the lateral radiation transport and the difficulty of acquiring accurate dosimetric data for very small beams. In the present paper, some initial work on the application of Monte Carlo method in radiation treatment planning in general, and in radiosurgery treatment planning in particular, has been presented. Two OMEGA Monte Carlo codes, BEAM and DOSXYZ, are used. The BEAM code is used to simulate the transport of particles in the linac treatment head and radiosurgery collimator. A phase space file is obtained from the BEAM simulation for each collimator size. The DOSXYZ code is used to calculate the dose distribution in the patient's body reconstructed from CT slices using the phase space file as input. The accuracy of OMEGA Monte Carlo simulation for radiosurgery dose calculation is verified by comparing the calculated and measured basic dosimetric data for several radiosurgery beams and a 4 x 4 cm 2 conventional beam. The dose distributions for three clinical cases are calculated using OMEGA codes as the dose engine for an in-house developed radiosurgery treatment planning system. The verification using basic dosimetric data and the dose calculation for clinical cases demonstrate the feasibility of applying OMEGA Monte Carlo code system to radiosurgery treatment planning. (author)

  7. A Radiation Chemistry Code Based on the Green's Function of the Diffusion Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic radiation track structure codes are of great interest for space radiation studies and hadron therapy in medicine. These codes are used for a many purposes, notably for microdosimetry and DNA damage studies. In the last two decades, they were also used with the Independent Reaction Times (IRT) method in the simulation of chemical reactions, to calculate the yield of various radiolytic species produced during the radiolysis of water and in chemical dosimeters. Recently, we have developed a Green's function based code to simulate reversible chemical reactions with an intermediate state, which yielded results in excellent agreement with those obtained by using the IRT method. This code was also used to simulate and the interaction of particles with membrane receptors. We are in the process of including this program for use with the Monte-Carlo track structure code Relativistic Ion Tracks (RITRACKS). This recent addition should greatly expand the capabilities of RITRACKS, notably to simulate DNA damage by both the direct and indirect effect.

  8. The effect on radiation damage of structural material in a hybrid system by using a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günay, Mehtap; Şarer, Başar; Kasap, Hızır

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of some fluids on gas production rates in structural material were investigated. • The MCNPX-2.7.0 Monte Carlo code was used for three-dimensional calculations. • It was found that biggest contribution to gas production rates comes from Fe isotope of the. • The desirable values for 5% SFG-PuO 2 with respect to radiation damage were specified. - Abstract: In this study, the molten salt-heavy metal mixtures 99–95% Li20Sn80-1-5% SFG-Pu, 99–95% Li20Sn80-1-5% SFG-PuF4, 99-95% Li20Sn80-1-5% SFG-PuO2 were used as fluids. The fluids were used in the liquid first-wall, blanket and shield zones of the designed hybrid reactor system. 9Cr2WVTa ferritic steel with the width of 4 cm was used as the structural material. The parameters of radiation damage are proton, deuterium, tritium, He-3 and He-4 gas production rates. In this study, the effects of the selected fluid on the radiation damage, in terms of individual as well as total isotopes in the structural material, were investigated for 30 full power years (FPYs). Three-dimensional analyses were performed using the most recent version of the MCNPX-2.7.0 Monte Carlo radiation transport code and the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library

  9. Radiation protection of workers in the mining and milling of radioactive ores. Code of practice and technical addendum. 1983 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This Code of Practice sets forth the means of ensuring protection against ionizing radiation for workers engaged in mining and milling of radioactive ores: general provisions outlining the responsibilities of the employer and the worker, limits of radiation exposure, administrative organization of radiation protection, radiation surveillance, engineering and administrative protective measures and medical surveillance. It is designed to facilitate the preparation and adoption of national and local regulations and factory rules for radiation protection in mining and milling of radioactive ores.

  10. Preparation of functions of computer code GENGTC and improvement for two-dimensional heat transfer calculations for irradiation capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasushi; Someya, Hiroyuki; Ito, Haruhiko.

    1992-11-01

    Capsules for irradiation tests in the JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor), consist of irradiation specimens surrounded by a cladding tube, holders, an inner tube and a container tube (from 30mm to 65mm in diameter). And the annular gaps between these structural materials in the capsule are filled with liquids or gases. Cooling of the capsule is done by reactor primary coolant flowing down outside the capsule. Most of the heat generated by fission in fuel specimens and gamma absorption in structural materials is directed radially to the capsule container outer surface. In thermal performance calculations for capsule design, an one(r)-dimensional heat transfer computer code entitled (Generalyzed Gap Temperature Calculation), GENGTC, originally developed in Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S.A., has been frequently used. In designing a capsule, are needed many cases of parametric calculations with respect to changes materials and gap sizes. And in some cases, two(r,z)-dimensional heat transfer calculations are needed for irradiation test capsules with short length fuel rods. Recently the authors improved the original one-dimensional code GENGTC, (1) to simplify preparation of input data, (2) to perform automatic calculations for parametric survey based on design temperatures, ect. Moreover, the computer code has been improved to perform r-z two-dimensional heat transfer calculation. This report describes contents of the preparation of the one-dimensional code GENGTC and the improvement for the two-dimensional code GENGTC-2, together with their code manuals. (author)

  11. A 1D radiative transfer benchmark with polarization via doubling and adding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapol, B. D.

    2017-11-01

    Highly precise numerical solutions to the radiative transfer equation with polarization present a special challenge. Here, we establish a precise numerical solution to the radiative transfer equation with combined Rayleigh and isotropic scattering in a 1D-slab medium with simple polarization. The 2-Stokes vector solution for the fully discretized radiative transfer equation in space and direction derives from the method of doubling and adding enhanced through convergence acceleration. Updates to benchmark solutions found in the literature to seven places for reflectance and transmittance as well as for angular flux follow. Finally, we conclude with the numerical solution in a partially randomly absorbing heterogeneous medium.

  12. Principles of the radiosity method versus radiative transfer for canopy reflectance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstl, Siegfried A. W.; Borel, Christoph C.

    1992-01-01

    The radiosity method is introduced to plant canopy reflectance modeling. We review the physics principles of the radiosity method which originates in thermal radiative transfer analyses when hot and cold surfaces are considered within a given enclosure. The radiosity equation, which is an energy balance equation for discrete surfaces, is described and contrasted with the radiative transfer equation, which is a volumetric energy balance equation. Comparing the strengths and weaknesses of the radiosity method and the radiative transfer method, we conclude that both methods are complementary to each other. Results of sample calculations are given for canopy models with up to 20,000 discrete leaves.

  13. Light scattering by multiple spheres: comparison between Maxwell theory and radiative-transfer-theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Florian; Schäfer, Jan; Kienle, Alwin

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to compare results of classical radiative transfer theory against exact solutions of Maxwell theory for a high number of spheres. We calculated light propagation in a cubic scattering region (20 x 20 x 20 microm(3)) consisting of different concentrations of polystyrene spheres in water (diameter 2 microm) by an analytical solution of Maxwell theory and by a numerical solution of radiative transfer theory. The relative deviation of differential as well as total scattering cross sections obtained by both approaches was evaluated for each sphere concentration. For the considered case, we found that deviations due to radiative transfer theory remain small, even for concentrations up to ca. 20 vol. %.

  14. Near-field radiative heat transfer under temperature gradients and conductive transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Weiliang; Rodriguez, Alejandro W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Messina, Riccardo [CNRS-Univ. de Montpellier (France). Lab. Charles Coulomb

    2017-05-01

    We describe a recently developed formulation of coupled conductive and radiative heat transfer (RHT) between objects separated by nanometric, vacuum gaps. Our results rely on analytical formulas of RHT between planar slabs (based on the scattering-matrix method) as well as a general formulation of RHT between arbitrarily shaped bodies (based on the fluctuating-volume current method), which fully captures the existence of temperature inhomogeneities. In particular, the impact of RHT on conduction, and vice versa, is obtained via self-consistent solutions of the Fourier heat equation and Maxwell's equations. We show that in materials with low thermal conductivities (e.g. zinc oxides and glasses), the interplay of conduction and RHT can strongly modify heat exchange, exemplified for instance by the presence of large temperature gradients and saturating flux rates at short (nanometric) distances. More generally, we show that the ability to tailor the temperature distribution of an object can modify the behaviour of RHT with respect to gap separations, e.g. qualitatively changing the asymptotic scaling at short separations from quadratic to linear or logarithmic. Our results could be relevant to the interpretation of both past and future experimental measurements of RHT at nanometric distances.

  15. Prediction of the 21-cm signal from reionization: comparison between 3D and 1D radiative transfer schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghara, Raghunath; Mellema, Garrelt; Giri, Sambit K.; Choudhury, T. Roy; Datta, Kanan K.; Majumdar, Suman

    2018-05-01

    Three-dimensional radiative transfer simulations of the epoch of reionization can produce realistic results, but are computationally expensive. On the other hand, simulations relying on one-dimensional radiative transfer solutions are faster but limited in accuracy due to their more approximate nature. Here, we compare the performance of the reionization simulation codes GRIZZLY and C2-RAY which use 1D and 3D radiative transfer schemes, respectively. The comparison is performed using the same cosmological density fields, halo catalogues, and source properties. We find that the ionization maps, as well as the 21-cm signal maps from these two simulations are very similar even for complex scenarios which include thermal feedback on low-mass haloes. The comparison between the schemes in terms of the statistical quantities such as the power spectrum of the brightness temperature fluctuation agrees with each other within 10 per cent error throughout the entire reionization history. GRIZZLY seems to perform slightly better than the seminumerical approaches considered in Majumdar et al. which are based on the excursion set principle. We argue that GRIZZLY can be efficiently used for exploring parameter space, establishing observations strategies, and estimating parameters from 21-cm observations.

  16. PBMC: Pre-conditioned Backward Monte Carlo code for radiative transport in planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Muñoz, A.; Mills, F. P.

    2017-08-01

    PBMC (Pre-Conditioned Backward Monte Carlo) solves the vector Radiative Transport Equation (vRTE) and can be applied to planetary atmospheres irradiated from above. The code builds the solution by simulating the photon trajectories from the detector towards the radiation source, i.e. in the reverse order of the actual photon displacements. In accounting for the polarization in the sampling of photon propagation directions and pre-conditioning the scattering matrix with information from the scattering matrices of prior (in the BMC integration order) photon collisions, PBMC avoids the unstable and biased solutions of classical BMC algorithms for conservative, optically-thick, strongly-polarizing media such as Rayleigh atmospheres.

  17. A three-dimensional model of solar radiation transfer in a non-uniform plant canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashova, N. T.; Mukhartova, Yu V.

    2018-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of solar radiation transfer in a non-uniform plant canopy was developed. It is based on radiative transfer equations and a so-called turbid medium assumption. The model takes into account the multiple scattering contributions of plant elements in radiation fluxes. These enable more accurate descriptions of plant canopy reflectance and transmission in different spectral bands. The model was applied to assess the effects of plant canopy heterogeneity on solar radiation transmission and to quantify the difference in a radiation transfer between photosynthetically active radiation PAR (=0.39-0.72 μm) and near infrared solar radiation NIR (Δλ = 0.72-3.00 μm). Comparisons of the radiative transfer fluxes simulated by the 3D model within a plant canopy consisted of sparsely planted fruit trees (plant area index, PAI - 0.96 m2 m-2) with radiation fluxes simulated by a one-dimensional (1D) approach, assumed horizontal homogeneity of plant and leaf area distributions, showed that, for sunny weather conditions with a high solar elevation angle, an application of a simplified 1D approach can result in an underestimation of transmitted solar radiation by about 22% for PAR, and by about 26% for NIR.

  18. The coupling of MATISSE and the SE-WORKBENCH: a new solution for simulating efficiently the atmospheric radiative transfer and the sea surface radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathala, Thierry; Douchin, Nicolas; Latger, Jean; Caillault, Karine; Fauqueux, Sandrine; Huet, Thierry; Lubarre, Luc; Malherbe, Claire; Rosier, Bernard; Simoneau, Pierre

    2009-05-01

    The SE-WORKBENCH workshop, also called CHORALE (French acceptation for "simulated Optronic Acoustic Radar battlefield") is used by the French DGA (MoD) and several other Defense organizations and companies all around the World to perform multi-sensors simulations. CHORALE enables the user to create virtual and realistic multi spectral 3D scenes that may contain several types of target, and then generate the physical signal received by a sensor, typically an IR sensor. The SE-WORKBENCH can be used either as a collection of software modules through dedicated GUIs or as an API made of a large number of specialized toolkits. The SE-WORKBENCH is made of several functional block: one for geometrically and physically modeling the terrain and the targets, one for building the simulation scenario and one for rendering the synthetic environment, both in real and non real time. Among the modules that the modeling block is composed of, SE-ATMOSPHERE is used to simulate the atmospheric conditions of a Synthetic Environment and then to integrate the impact of these conditions on a scene. This software product generates an exploitable physical atmosphere by the SE WORKBENCH tools generating spectral images. It relies on several external radiative transfer models such as MODTRAN V4.2 in the current version. MATISSE [4,5] is a background scene generator developed for the computation of natural background spectral radiance images and useful atmospheric radiative quantities (radiance and transmission along a line of sight, local illumination, solar irradiance ...). Backgrounds include atmosphere, low and high altitude clouds, sea and land. A particular characteristic of the code is its ability to take into account atmospheric spatial variability (temperatures, mixing ratio, etc) along each line of sight. An Application Programming Interface (API) is included to facilitate its use in conjunction with external codes. MATISSE is currently considered as a new external radiative transfer

  19. The Radiative Heat Transfer Properties of Molten Salts and Their Relevance to the Design of Advanced Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaleff, Ethan Solomon

    information. The IRAC design is validated by modeling the experiment in Fluent which shows that the IRAC should be capable of measuring absorption coefficients within 10%. Chapter 4 contains a parallel effort to experimental techniques, whereby information on absorption in salts is pursued using the Density Functional Theory code VASP. Photon-electron interactions are studied in pure salts such as LiF and are shown to be broadly transparent. Transition metal Fluoride salts such as KF-ZrF4 are shown to be broadly opaque. The addition of small amounts of transition metal impurities is studied by insertion of Chromium into the salt mixtures, which causes otherwise transparent salts to exhibit absorption coefficients significant to heat transfer. The spectral absorption coefficient for FLiNaK with Chromium is presented as is the average absorption coefficient as a function of impurity concentration. Chapter 5 discusses experimental efforts undertaken at The Ohio State University. Challenges with the constructed experimental apparatus are discussed and suggestions for future improvement on the technique are included. Finally, Chapter 6 contains broad conclusions pertaining to radiative transfer in advanced reactors.

  20. Graphene-assisted near-field radiative heat transfer between corrugated polar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has attracted great attention in nanoelectronics, optics, and energy harvesting. Here, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered corrugated silica is investigated based on the exact scattering theory. It is found that graphene can improve the radiative heat flux between silica gratings by more than one order of magnitude and alleviate the performance sensitivity to lateral shift. The underlying mechanism is mainly attributed to the improved photon tunneling of modes away from phonon resonances. Besides, coating with graphene leads to nonlocal radiative transfer that breaks Derjaguin's proximity approximation and enables corrugated silica to outperform bulk silica in near-field radiation.

  1. Radiative and conductive heat transfer in a nongrey semitransparent medium. Application to fire protection curtains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berour, Nacer; Lacroix, David E-mail: david.lacroix@lemta.uhp-nancy.fr; Boulet, Pascal; Jeandel, Gerard

    2004-06-01

    This paper deals with heat transfer in nongrey media which scatter, absorb and emit radiation. Considering a two dimensional geometry, radiative and conductive phenomena through the medium have been taken into account. The radiative part of the problem was solved using the discrete ordinate method with classical S{sub n} quadratures. The absorption and scattering coefficients involved in the radiative transfer equation (RTE) were obtained from the Mie theory. Conduction inside the medium was linked to the RTE through the energy conservation. Validation of the model has been achieved with several simulation of water spray curtains used as fire protection walls.

  2. A passive and active microwave-vector radiative transfer (PAM-VRT) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun; Min, Qilong

    2015-01-01

    A passive and active microwave vector radiative transfer (PAM-VRT) package has been developed. This fast and accurate forward microwave model, with flexible and versatile input and output components, self-consistently and realistically simulates measurements/radiation of passive and active microwave sensors. The core PAM-VRT, microwave radiative transfer model, consists of five modules: gas absorption (two line-by-line databases and four fast models); hydrometeor property of water droplets and ice (spherical and nonspherical) particles; surface emissivity (from Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM)); vector radiative transfer of successive order of scattering (VSOS); and passive and active microwave simulation. The PAM-VRT package has been validated against other existing models, demonstrating good accuracy. The PAM-VRT not only can be used to simulate or assimilate measurements of existing microwave sensors, but also can be used to simulate observation results at some new microwave sensors. - Highlights: • A novel microwave vector radiative transfer model is developed. • It can simulate passive and active microwave radiative transfer simultaneously. • It can be applied to simulate measurements for different types of viewing geometry. • The accuracy of this model has been validated against other existing models

  3. 3D-TRANS-2003, Workshop on Common Tools and Interfaces for Radiation Transport Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Description: Contents proceedings of Workshop on Common Tools and Interfaces for Deterministic Radiation Transport, for Monte Carlo and Hybrid Codes with a proposal to develop the following: GERALD - A General Environment for Radiation Analysis and Design. GERALD intends to create a unifying software environment where the user can define, solve and analyse a nuclear radiation transport problem using available numerical tools seamlessly. This environment will serve many purposes: teaching, research, industrial needs. It will also help to preserve the existing analytical and numerical knowledge base. This could represent a significant step towards solving the legacy problem. This activity should contribute to attracting young engineers to nuclear science and engineering and contribute to competence and knowledge preservation and management. This proposal was made at the on Workshop on C ommon Tools and Interfaces for Deterministic Radiation Transport, for Monte Carlo and Hybrid Codes , held from 25-26 September 2003 in connection with the conference SNA-2003. A first success with the development of such tools was achieved with the BOT3P2.0 and 3.0 codes providing an easy procedure and mechanism for defining and displaying 3D geometries and materials both in the form of refineable meshes for deterministic codes or Monte Carlo geometries consistent with deterministic models. Advanced SUSD: Improved tools for Sensitivity/Uncertainty Analysis. The development of tools for the analysis and estimation of sensitivities and uncertainties in calculations, or their propagation through complex computational schemes, in the field of neutronics, thermal hydraulics and also thermo-mechanics is of increasing importance for research and engineering applications. These tools allow establishing better margins for engineering designs and for the safe operation of nuclear facilities. Such tools are not sufficiently developed, but their need is increasingly evident in many activities

  4. A development of computer code for evaluating internal radiation dose through ingestion and inhalation pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Yong Ho; Chun, Ki Jung; Kim, Kook Chan; Kim, Sang Bok; Kim, Jin Kyu

    1991-07-01

    The computer codes were developed to evaluate internal radiation dose when radioactive isotopes released from nuclear facilities are taken through ingestion and inhalation pathways. Food chain models and relevant data base representing the agricultural and social environment of Korea are set up. An equilibrium model-KFOOD, which can deal with routine releases from a nuclear facility and a dynamic model-ECOREA, which is suitable for the description of acute radioactivity release following nuclear accident. (Author)

  5. Solar radiation transfer in the inhomogeneous atmosphere; Solarer Strahlungstransport in der inhomogenen Atmosphaere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheirer, R.

    2001-07-01

    A most profound knowledge about the radiative characteristics of clouds is required for the development of realistic atmospheric circulation models and cloud remote sensing algorithms. At present, cloud fields are treated extremely simplified in both application areas. Cloud radiative flux parameterizations in atmospheric circulation models as well as the correlation between radiance and cloud properties as required for remote sensing algorithm are usually based on the assumption of plane-parallel homogeneous (PPHOM) clouds. Compared to realistically 3D cloud fields, this simplification leads to large systematic errors. In order to quantify these errors a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been developed and applied to 3D cloud fields. The latter origin from the non-hydrostatic 3D atmospheric model GESIMA. Absorption and scattering properties of the cloud particles have been calculated by means of Mie-theory for spherical water droplets and a ray-tracing code for non-spherical ice, rain, and snow particles. Line by line calculations have been used to obtain the absorption properties of the relevant atmospheric gases. (orig.) [German] Die Erstellung realistischer Zirkulationsmodelle der Atmosphaere erfordert unter Anderem eine moeglichst genaue Kenntnis der Strahlungseigenschaften von Wolken. Auch fuer Ableitung und Korrektur von Fernerkundungsalgorithmen sind die Einfluesse der Wolken auf die zu messenden Strahldichten von grosser Bedeutung. In den beiden genannten Anwendungen werden Wolkenfelder zur Zeit nur in stark vereinfachter Weise beruecksichtigt. Parameterisierungen der Strahlungsfluesse bei bewoelkter Atmosphaere in atmosphaerischen Zirkulationsmodellen, sowie die Ableitung der Zusammenhaenge zwischen Strahldichten und optischen Wolkeneigenschaften basieren auf der Annahme von planparallelen und horizontal homogenen Wolken (PPHOM). Diese Approximation kann gegenueber der dreidimensionalen Strahlungstransportberechnung (3D) zu erheblichen Fehlern

  6. Radiative heat transfer analysis in pure water heater used for semiconductor processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.H.; Kudo, K.; Mochida, A.; Ogawa, T.; Kadotani, K.

    2004-01-01

    A simplified one-dimensional model is presented to analyze the non-gray radiative transfer in pure water heater used in the rinsing processes within semiconductor production lines, and the ray-tracing method is extended to simulate the radiative heat transfer. To examine the accuracy of the simplified model, the distribution of radiation absorption is determined by the ray-tracing method based the simplified model and compared with the data obtained by three-dimensional non-gray model in combination with Monte Carlo method in reference, and the effects of the water thickness on the radiation absorption are analyzed. The results show that the simplified model has a good accuracy in solving the radiation absorption in the pure water heater. The radiation absorption increases with the water thickness, but when the water thickness is greater than 50 mm, the radiation absorption increases very slowly with the water thickness

  7. IPRT polarized radiative transfer model intercomparison project - Three-dimensional test cases (phase B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emde, Claudia; Barlakas, Vasileios; Cornet, Céline; Evans, Frank; Wang, Zhen; Labonotte, Laurent C.; Macke, Andreas; Mayer, Bernhard; Wendisch, Manfred

    2018-04-01

    Initially unpolarized solar radiation becomes polarized by scattering in the Earth's atmosphere. In particular molecular scattering (Rayleigh scattering) polarizes electromagnetic radiation, but also scattering of radiation at aerosols, cloud droplets (Mie scattering) and ice crystals polarizes. Each atmospheric constituent produces a characteristic polarization signal, thus spectro-polarimetric measurements are frequently employed for remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties. Retrieval algorithms require efficient radiative transfer models. Usually, these apply the plane-parallel approximation (PPA), assuming that the atmosphere consists of horizontally homogeneous layers. This allows to solve the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) efficiently. For remote sensing applications, the radiance is considered constant over the instantaneous field-of-view of the instrument and each sensor element is treated independently in plane-parallel approximation, neglecting horizontal radiation transport between adjacent pixels (Independent Pixel Approximation, IPA). In order to estimate the errors due to the IPA approximation, three-dimensional (3D) vector radiative transfer models are required. So far, only a few such models exist. Therefore, the International Polarized Radiative Transfer (IPRT) working group of the International Radiation Commission (IRC) has initiated a model intercomparison project in order to provide benchmark results for polarized radiative transfer. The group has already performed an intercomparison for one-dimensional (1D) multi-layer test cases [phase A, 1]. This paper presents the continuation of the intercomparison project (phase B) for 2D and 3D test cases: a step cloud, a cubic cloud, and a more realistic scenario including a 3D cloud field generated by a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model and typical background aerosols. The commonly established benchmark results for 3D polarized radiative transfer are available at the IPRT website (http

  8. Using Procedure Codes to Define Radiation Toxicity in Administrative Data: The Devil is in the Details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Anne-Marie; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; Chang, YunKyung; Carpenter, William R; Chen, Ronald C; Sturmer, Til

    2017-05-01

    Systematic coding systems are used to define clinically meaningful outcomes when leveraging administrative claims data for research. How and when these codes are applied within a research study can have implications for the study validity and their specificity can vary significantly depending on treatment received. Data are from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked dataset. We use propensity score methods in a retrospective cohort of prostate cancer patients first examined in a recently published radiation oncology comparative effectiveness study. With the narrowly defined outcome definition, the toxicity event outcome rate ratio was 0.88 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval, 0.71-1.08). With the broadly defined outcome, the rate ratio was comparable, with 0.89 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval, 0.76-1.04), although individual event rates were doubled. Some evidence of surveillance bias was suggested by a higher rate of endoscopic procedures the first year of follow-up in patients who received proton therapy compared with those receiving intensity-modulated radiation treatment (11.15 vs. 8.90, respectively). This study demonstrates the risk of introducing bias through subjective application of procedure codes. Careful consideration is required when using procedure codes to define outcomes in administrative data.

  9. Successive Transfers Relating to Movable Tangible Assets and Acquisition of Property under Article 937, Paragraph (1 of the Civil Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Ioan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Apparently article 1275, paragraph (1 of the Civil Code covers all situations that may arise in practice, without making a distinction for the constituent or transferring contracts if they are of the same or of different nature. However, we appreciate that article 1275 of the Civil Code does not apply in all situations of successive transfers relating to movable tangible property granted by the same legal subject. Corroborating this text with the norms in article 937 paragraph (1 of the Civil Code and article1273 paragraph (1 of the Civil Code it leads to the solution according to which article 1275 of the Civil Code regards only the cases where the transfer of successive property are of the same nature, the onerous primary act has not resulted in immediate transmission of real previous right of the document with the free subsidiary title and when the primal act is free, and the alternative is onerous. It is excluded, thus from the application of the rule in question when the primary onerous act had as effect the immediate transmission of the real right and then, but without having occurred the delivery of the asset by the acquirer, it was concluded a document with a free title, subsidiary.

  10. The third RAdiation transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise: Documenting progress in canopy reflectance models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widlowski, J.L.; Taberner, M.; Pinty, B.; Bruniquel-Pinel, V.; Disney, M.I.; Fernandes, R.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J.P.; Gobron, N.; Kuusk, A.; Lavergne, T.; LeBlanc, S.; Lewis, P.E.; Martin, E.; Mõttus, M.; North, P.R.J.; Qin, W.; Robustelli, M.; Rochdi, N.; Ruiloba, R.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Verstraete, M.M.; Xie, D.

    2007-01-01

    [1] The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison ( RAMI) initiative benchmarks canopy reflectance models under well-controlled experimental conditions. Launched for the first time in 1999, this triennial community exercise encourages the systematic evaluation of canopy reflectance models on a

  11. Third Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise : Documenting progress in canopy reflectance models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widlowski, J.-L.; Taberner, M.; Pinty, B.; Bruniquel-Pinel, V.; Disney, M.; Fernandes, R.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J.P.; Gobron, N.; Kuusk, A.; Lavergne, T.; Leblanc, S.; Lewis, P.E.; Martin, E.; Mottus, M.; North, P.R.J.; Qin, W.; Robustelli, M.; Rochdi, N.; Ruiloba, R.; Soler, C.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Xie, D.; Thompson, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) initiative benchmarks canopy reflectance models under well‐controlled experimental conditions. Launched for the first time in 1999, this triennial community exercise encourages the systematic evaluation of canopy reflectance models on a voluntary

  12. Extending generalized Kubelka-Munk to three-dimensional radiative transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Christopher; Kim, Arnold D

    2015-08-10

    The generalized Kubelka-Munk (gKM) approximation is a linear transformation of the double spherical harmonics of order one (DP1) approximation of the radiative transfer equation. Here, we extend the gKM approximation to study problems in three-dimensional radiative transfer. In particular, we derive the gKM approximation for the problem of collimated beam propagation and scattering in a plane-parallel slab composed of a uniform absorbing and scattering medium. The result is an 8×8 system of partial differential equations that is much easier to solve than the radiative transfer equation. We compare the solutions of the gKM approximation with Monte Carlo simulations of the radiative transfer equation to identify the range of validity for this approximation. We find that the gKM approximation is accurate for isotropic scattering media that are sufficiently thick and much less accurate for anisotropic, forward-peaked scattering media.

  13. A new radiative transfer scattering phase function discretisation approach with inherent energy conservation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roos, TH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available large sphere scattering phase function distributions of interest for packed bed radiative heat transfer: the analytic distribution for a diffusely reflecting sphere (a backscattering test case) and the distribution for a transparent sphere (n = 1...

  14. Radiation heat transfer through the gas of a sodium cooled fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradel, P.; Frachet, S.; Petit, D.

    1984-04-01

    Analysis based on results from the COCA test campaign and Germinal mockup of Super Phenix upper shuttings, of the heat transfers and radiation attenuation due to sodium aerosols between the free surface of sodium and the upper shuttings

  15. Global existence of a generalized solution for the radiative transfer equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golse, F.; Perthame, B.

    1984-01-01

    We prove global existence of a generalized solution of the radiative transfer equations, extending Mercier's result to the case of a layer with an initially cold area. Our Theorem relies on the results of Crandall and Ligett [fr

  16. Directional Radiometry and Radiative Transfer: the Convoluted Path From Centuries-old Phenomenology to Physical Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    This Essay traces the centuries-long history of the phenomenological disciplines of directional radiometry and radiative transfer in turbid media, discusses their fundamental weaknesses, and outlines the convoluted process of their conversion into legitimate branches of physical optics.

  17. Using RADMC-3D to model the radiative transfer of spectral lines in protoplanetary disks and envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, John; Terebey, Susan

    2018-06-01

    Protoplanetary disks are the birthplaces of planets in our universe. Observations of these disks with radio telescopes like the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) offer great insight into the star and planet formation process. Comparing theories of formation with observations requires tracing the energy transfer via electromagnetic radiation, known as radiative transfer. To determine the temperature distribution of circumstellar material, a Monte Carlo code (Whitney et al. [1]) was used to to perform the radiative transfer through dust. The goal of this research is to utilize RADMC-3D [2] to handle the spectral line radiative transfer computations. An existing model of a rotating ring was expanded to include emission from the C18O isotopologue of carbon monoxide using data from the Leiden Atomic and Molecular Database (LAMDA). This feature of our model compliments ALMA's ability to measure C18O line emission, a proxy for disk rotation. In addition to modeling gas in the protoplanetary disk, dust also plays an important role. The generic description of absorption and scattering for dust provided by RADMC-3D was changed in favor of a more physically-realistic description with OH5 grains. This description is more appropriate in high-density regions of the envelope around a protostar. Further improvements, such as consideration for the finite resolution of observations, have been implemented. The task at present is to compare our model with observations of protoplanetary systems like L1527. Some results of these comparisons will be presented.[1] Whitney et al. 2013, ApJS, 207:30[2] RADMC-3D: http://www.ita.uni-heidelberg.de/~dullemond/software/radmc-3d/

  18. A difference quotient-numerical integration method for solving radiative transfer problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Peizhu

    1992-01-01

    A difference quotient-numerical integration method is adopted to solve radiative transfer problems in an anisotropic scattering slab medium. By using the method, the radiative transfer problem is separated into a system of linear algebraic equations and the coefficient matrix of the system is a band matrix, so the method is very simple to evaluate on computer and to deduce formulae and easy to master for experimentalists. An example is evaluated and it is shown that the method is precise

  19. Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model for Contaminated Rough Surfaces: A Framework for Detection System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    example for the detection of a potassium chlorate contaminated “car” with a CO2 tunable laser system. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Radiative transfer...detector m-out-of-n detector Potassium chlorate Probability theory System performance Probability of detection and false alarm iii...for the detection of a potassium chlorate contaminated “car” with a CO2 tunable laser system. Subject Terms Radiative transfer, contaminated

  20. Directional radiometry and radiative transfer: The convoluted path from centuries-old phenomenology to physical optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    This Essay traces the centuries-long history of the phenomenological disciplines of directional radiometry and radiative transfer in turbid media, discusses their fundamental weaknesses, and outlines the convoluted process of their conversion into legitimate branches of physical optics. - Highlights: • History of phenomenological radiometry and radiative transfer is described. • Fundamental weaknesses of these disciplines are discussed. • The process of their conversion into legitimate branches of physical optics is summarized

  1. Treating voxel geometries in radiation protection dosimetry with a patched version of the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and MCNPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, K W; Daffara, C; Gualdrini, G; Pierantoni, M; Ferrari, P

    2007-01-01

    The question of Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in voxel geometries is addressed. Patched versions of the MCNP and MCNPX codes are developed aimed at transporting radiation both in the standard geometry mode and in the voxel geometry treatment. The patched code reads an unformatted FORTRAN file derived from DICOM format data and uses special subroutines to handle voxel-to-voxel radiation transport. The various phases of the development of the methodology are discussed together with the new input options. Examples are given of employment of the code in internal and external dosimetry and comparisons with results from other groups are reported.

  2. Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in the Mining and Processing of Mineral Sands (1982) (Western Australia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Code establishes radiation safety practices for the mineral sands industry in Western Australia. The Code prescribes, not only for operators and managers of mines and processing plants but for their employees as well, certain duties designed to ensure that radiation exposure is kept as low as reasonably practicable. The Code further provides for the management of wastes, again with a view to keeping contaminant concentrations and dose rates within specified levels. Finally, provision is made for the rehabilitation of those sites in which mining or processing operations have ceased by restoring the areas to designated average radiation levels. (NEA) [fr

  3. Evaluation of the computer code system RADHEAT-V4 by analysing benchmark problems on radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yukio; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1990-11-01

    A computer code system RADHEAT-V4 has been developed for safety evaluation on radiation shielding of nuclear fuel facilities. To evaluate the performance of the code system, 18 benchmark problem were selected and analysed. Evaluated radiations are neutron and gamma-ray. Benchmark problems consist of penetration, streaming and skyshine. The computed results show more accurate than those by the Sn codes ANISN and DOT3.5 or the Monte Carlo code MORSE. Big core memory and many times I/O are, however, required for RADHEAT-V4. (author)

  4. User's Manual for the FEHM Application-A Finite-Element Heat- and Mass-Transfer Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George A. Zyvoloski; Bruce A. Robinson; Zora V. Dash; Lynn L. Trease

    1997-07-07

    This document is a manual for the use of the FEHM application, a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer computer code that can simulate nonisothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media. The use of this code is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and groundwater flow. A primary use of the FEHM application will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields and mass transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones below the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved in the FEHM application by using the finite-element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat- and mass-transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. In fact, FEHM is capable of describing flow that is dominated in many areas by fracture and fault flow, including the inherently three-dimensional flow that results from permeation to and from faults and fractures. The code can handle coupled heat and mass-transfer effects, such as boiling, dryout, and condensation that can occur in the near-field region surrounding the potential repository and the natural convection that occurs through Yucca Mountain due to seasonal temperature changes. The code is also capable of incorporating the various adsorption mechanisms, ranging from simple linear relations to nonlinear isotherms, needed to describe the very complex transport processes at Yucca Mountain. This report outlines the uses and capabilities of the FEHM application, initialization of code variables, restart procedures, and error processing. The report describes all the data files, the input data

  5. Multiscale solutions of radiative heat transfer by the discrete unified gas kinetic scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Cun-Hai; Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2018-06-01

    The radiative transfer equation (RTE) has two asymptotic regimes characterized by the optical thickness, namely, optically thin and optically thick regimes. In the optically thin regime, a ballistic or kinetic transport is dominant. In the optically thick regime, energy transport is totally dominated by multiple collisions between photons; that is, the photons propagate by means of diffusion. To obtain convergent solutions to the RTE, conventional numerical schemes have a strong dependence on the number of spatial grids, which leads to a serious computational inefficiency in the regime where the diffusion is predominant. In this work, a discrete unified gas kinetic scheme (DUGKS) is developed to predict radiative heat transfer in participating media. Numerical performances of the DUGKS are compared in detail with conventional methods through three cases including one-dimensional transient radiative heat transfer, two-dimensional steady radiative heat transfer, and three-dimensional multiscale radiative heat transfer. Due to the asymptotic preserving property, the present method with relatively coarse grids gives accurate and reliable numerical solutions for large, small, and in-between values of optical thickness, and, especially in the optically thick regime, the DUGKS demonstrates a pronounced computational efficiency advantage over the conventional numerical models. In addition, the DUGKS has a promising potential in the study of multiscale radiative heat transfer inside the participating medium with a transition from optically thin to optically thick regimes.

  6. Radiative transfer solutions for coupled atmosphere ocean systems using the matrix operator technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollstein, André; Fischer, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Accurate radiative transfer models are the key tools for the understanding of radiative transfer processes in the atmosphere and ocean, and for the development of remote sensing algorithms. The widely used scalar approximation of radiative transfer can lead to errors in calculated top of atmosphere radiances. We show results with errors in the order of±8% for atmosphere ocean systems with case one waters. Variations in sea water salinity and temperature can lead to variations in the signal of similar magnitude. Therefore, we enhanced our scalar radiative transfer model MOMO, which is in use at Freie Universität Berlin, to treat these effects as accurately as possible. We describe our one-dimensional vector radiative transfer model for an atmosphere ocean system with a rough interface. We describe the matrix operator scheme and the bio-optical model for case one waters. We discuss some effects of neglecting polarization in radiative transfer calculations and effects of salinity changes for top of atmosphere radiances. Results are shown for the channels of the satellite instruments MERIS and OLCI from 412.5 nm to 900 nm.

  7. COXPRO-II: a computer program for calculating radiation and conduction heat transfer in irradiated fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, C.A.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the computer program COXPRO-II, which was written for performing thermal analyses of irradiated fuel assemblies in a gaseous environment with no forced cooling. The heat transfer modes within the fuel pin bundle are radiation exchange among fuel pin surfaces and conduction by the stagnant gas. The array of parallel cylindrical fuel pins may be enclosed by a metal wrapper or shroud. Heat is dissipated from the outer surface of the fuel pin assembly by radiation and convection. Both equilateral triangle and square fuel pin arrays can be analyzed. Steady-state and unsteady-state conditions are included. Temperatures predicted by the COXPRO-II code have been validated by comparing them with experimental measurements. Temperature predictions compare favorably to temperature measurements in pressurized water reactor (PWR) and liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) simulated, electrically heated fuel assemblies. Also, temperature comparisons are made on an actual irradiated Fast-Flux Test Facility (FFTF) LMFBR fuel assembly

  8. Synthetic radiation diagnostics in PIConGPU. Integrating spectral detectors into particle-in-cell codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pausch, Richard; Burau, Heiko; Huebl, Axel; Steiniger, Klaus [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Debus, Alexander; Widera, Rene; Bussmann, Michael [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We present the in-situ far field radiation diagnostics in the particle-in-cell code PIConGPU. It was developed to close the gap between simulated plasma dynamics and radiation observed in laser plasma experiments. Its predictive capabilities, both qualitative and quantitative, have been tested against analytical models. Now, we apply this synthetic spectral diagnostics to investigate plasma dynamics in laser wakefield acceleration, laser foil irradiation and plasma instabilities. Our method is based on the far field approximation of the Lienard-Wiechert potential and allows predicting both coherent and incoherent radiation spectrally from infrared to X-rays. Its capability to resolve the radiation polarization and to determine the temporal and spatial origin of the radiation enables us to correlate specific spectral signatures with characteristic dynamics in the plasma. Furthermore, its direct integration into the highly-scalable GPU framework of PIConGPU allows computing radiation spectra for thousands of frequencies, hundreds of detector positions and billions of particles efficiently. In this talk we will demonstrate these capabilities on resent simulations of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) and high harmonics generation during target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA).

  9. Calculations of combined radiation and convection heat transfer in rod bundles under emergency cooling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, K.H.; Gonzalez-Santalo, J.M.; Tien, C.L.

    1976-01-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the heat transfer coefficients from the fuel rods to the steam-droplet mixture typical of Boiling Water Reactors under Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) operation conditions during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. The model includes the heat transfer by convection to the vapor, the radiation from the surfaces to both the water droplets and the vapor, and the effects of droplet evaporation. The combined convection and radiation heat transfer coefficient can be evaluated with respect to the characteristic droplet size. Calculations of the heat transfer coefficient based on the droplet sizes obtained from the existing literature are consistent with those determined empirically from the Full-Length-Emergency-Cooling-Heat-Transfer (FLECHT) program. The present model can also be used to assess the effects of geometrical distortions (or deviations from nominal dimensions) on the heat transfer to the cooling medium in a rod bundle

  10. DIFFERENCES IN WATER VAPOR RADIATIVE TRANSFER AMONG 1D MODELS CAN SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT THE INNER EDGE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jun; Wang, Yuwei [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Leconte, Jérémy; Forget, François [Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, CNRS, Paris (France); Wolf, Eric T. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado in Boulder, CO (United States); Goldblatt, Colin [School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Feldl, Nicole [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, CA (United States); Merlis, Timothy [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at McGill University, Montréal (Canada); Koll, Daniel D. B.; Ding, Feng; Abbot, Dorian S., E-mail: junyang@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: abbot@uchicago.edu [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-08-01

    An accurate estimate of the inner edge of the habitable zone is critical for determining which exoplanets are potentially habitable and for designing future telescopes to observe them. Here, we explore differences in estimating the inner edge among seven one-dimensional radiative transfer models: two line-by-line codes (SMART and LBLRTM) as well as five band codes (CAM3, CAM4-Wolf, LMDG, SBDART, and AM2) that are currently being used in global climate models. We compare radiative fluxes and spectra in clear-sky conditions around G and M stars, with fixed moist adiabatic profiles for surface temperatures from 250 to 360 K. We find that divergences among the models arise mainly from large uncertainties in water vapor absorption in the window region (10 μ m) and in the region between 0.2 and 1.5 μ m. Differences in outgoing longwave radiation increase with surface temperature and reach 10–20 W m{sup 2}; differences in shortwave reach up to 60 W m{sup 2}, especially at the surface and in the troposphere, and are larger for an M-dwarf spectrum than a solar spectrum. Differences between the two line-by-line models are significant, although smaller than among the band models. Our results imply that the uncertainty in estimating the insolation threshold of the inner edge (the runaway greenhouse limit) due only to clear-sky radiative transfer is ≈10% of modern Earth’s solar constant (i.e., ≈34 W m{sup 2} in global mean) among band models and ≈3% between the two line-by-line models. These comparisons show that future work is needed that focuses on improving water vapor absorption coefficients in both shortwave and longwave, as well as on increasing the resolution of stellar spectra in broadband models.

  11. DIFFERENCES IN WATER VAPOR RADIATIVE TRANSFER AMONG 1D MODELS CAN SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT THE INNER EDGE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun; Wang, Yuwei; Leconte, Jérémy; Forget, François; Wolf, Eric T.; Goldblatt, Colin; Feldl, Nicole; Merlis, Timothy; Koll, Daniel D. B.; Ding, Feng; Abbot, Dorian S.

    2016-01-01

    An accurate estimate of the inner edge of the habitable zone is critical for determining which exoplanets are potentially habitable and for designing future telescopes to observe them. Here, we explore differences in estimating the inner edge among seven one-dimensional radiative transfer models: two line-by-line codes (SMART and LBLRTM) as well as five band codes (CAM3, CAM4-Wolf, LMDG, SBDART, and AM2) that are currently being used in global climate models. We compare radiative fluxes and spectra in clear-sky conditions around G and M stars, with fixed moist adiabatic profiles for surface temperatures from 250 to 360 K. We find that divergences among the models arise mainly from large uncertainties in water vapor absorption in the window region (10 μ m) and in the region between 0.2 and 1.5 μ m. Differences in outgoing longwave radiation increase with surface temperature and reach 10–20 W m 2 ; differences in shortwave reach up to 60 W m 2 , especially at the surface and in the troposphere, and are larger for an M-dwarf spectrum than a solar spectrum. Differences between the two line-by-line models are significant, although smaller than among the band models. Our results imply that the uncertainty in estimating the insolation threshold of the inner edge (the runaway greenhouse limit) due only to clear-sky radiative transfer is ≈10% of modern Earth’s solar constant (i.e., ≈34 W m 2 in global mean) among band models and ≈3% between the two line-by-line models. These comparisons show that future work is needed that focuses on improving water vapor absorption coefficients in both shortwave and longwave, as well as on increasing the resolution of stellar spectra in broadband models.

  12. Bridging the Radiative Transfer Models for Meteorology and Solar Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y.; Sengupta, M.

    2017-12-01

    Radiative transfer models are used to compute solar radiation reaching the earth surface and play an important role in both meteorology and solar energy studies. Therefore, they are designed to meet the needs of specialized applications. For instance, radiative transfer models for meteorology seek to provide more accurate cloudy-sky radiation compared to models used in solar energy that are geared towards accuracy in clear-sky conditions associated with the maximum solar resource. However, models for solar energy applications are often computationally faster, as the complex solution of the radiative transfer equation is parameterized by atmospheric properties that can be acquired from surface- or satellite-based observations. This study introduces the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) recent efforts to combine the advantages of radiative transfer models designed for meteorology and solar energy applictions. A fast all-sky radiation model, FARMS-NIT, was developed to efficiently compute narrowband all-sky irradiances over inclined photovoltaic (PV) panels. This new model utilizes the optical preperties from a solar energy model, SMARTS, to computes surface radiation by considering all possible paths of photon transmission and the relevent scattering and absorption attenuation. For cloudy-sky conditions, cloud bidirectional transmittance functions (BTDFs) are provided by a precomputed lookup table (LUT) by LibRadtran. Our initial results indicate that FARMS-NIT has an accuracy that is similar to LibRadtran, a highly accurate multi-stream model, but is significantly more efficient. The development and validation of this model will be presented.

  13. Radiative transfer in a strongly magnetized plasma. I. Effects of Anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, W.

    1981-01-01

    We present results of radiative transfer calculations for radiating slabs and columns of strongly magnetized plasma. The angular dependence of the escaping radiation was found numerically by Feautrier's method, using the differential scattering cross sections derived by Ventura. We also give an approximate analytical expression for the anisotropy of the outgoing radiation, based on a system of two coupled diffusion equations for ordinary and extraordinary photons. Giving the polarization dependence of the beaming pattern of radiating slabs as well as columns, we generalize previous results of Basko and Kanno. Some implications for models of the pulsating X-ray source Her X-1 are discussed

  14. Radiative transfer modeling through terrestrial atmosphere and ocean accounting for inelastic processes: Software package SCIATRAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanov, V.V.; Dinter, T.; Rozanov, A.V.; Wolanin, A.; Bracher, A.; Burrows, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    SCIATRAN is a comprehensive software package which is designed to model radiative transfer processes in the terrestrial atmosphere and ocean in the spectral range from the ultraviolet to the thermal infrared (0.18–40 μm). It accounts for multiple scattering processes, polarization, thermal emission and ocean–atmosphere coupling. The main goal of this paper is to present a recently developed version of SCIATRAN which takes into account accurately inelastic radiative processes in both the atmosphere and the ocean. In the scalar version of the coupled ocean–atmosphere radiative transfer solver presented by Rozanov et al. we have implemented the simulation of the rotational Raman scattering, vibrational Raman scattering, chlorophyll and colored dissolved organic matter fluorescence. In this paper we discuss and explain the numerical methods used in SCIATRAN to solve the scalar radiative transfer equation including trans-spectral processes, and demonstrate how some selected radiative transfer problems are solved using the SCIATRAN package. In addition we present selected comparisons of SCIATRAN simulations with those published benchmark results, independent radiative transfer models, and various measurements from satellite, ground-based, and ship-borne instruments. The extended SCIATRAN software package along with a detailed User's Guide is made available for scientists and students, who are undertaking their own research typically at universities, via the web page of the Institute of Environmental Physics (IUP), University of Bremen: (http://www.iup.physik.uni-bremen.de). - Highlights: • A new version of the software package SCIATRAN is presented. • Inelastic scattering in water and atmosphere is implemented in SCIATRAN. • Raman scattering and fluorescence can be included in radiative transfer calculations. • Comparisons to other radiative transfer models show excellent agreement. • Comparisons to observations show consistent results.

  15. Review of the Monte Carlo and deterministic codes in radiation protection and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagziria, H.

    2000-02-01

    Modelling a physical system can be carried out either stochastically or deterministically. An example of the former method is the Monte Carlo technique, in which statistically approximate methods are applied to exact models. No transport equation is solved as individual particles are simulated and some specific aspect (tally) of their average behaviour is recorded. The average behaviour of the physical system is then inferred using the central limit theorem. In contrast, deterministic codes use mathematically exact methods that are applied to approximate models to solve the transport equation for the average particle behaviour. The physical system is subdivided in boxes in the phase-space system and particles are followed from one box to the next. The smaller the boxes the better the approximations become. Although the Monte Carlo method has been used for centuries, its more recent manifestation has really emerged from the Manhattan project of the Word War II. Its invention is thought to be mainly due to Metropolis, Ulah (through his interest in poker), Fermi, von Neuman and Richtmeyer. Over the last 20 years or so, the Monte Carlo technique has become a powerful tool in radiation transport. This is due to users taking full advantage of richer cross section data, more powerful computers and Monte Carlo techniques for radiation transport, with high quality physics and better known source spectra. This method is a common sense approach to radiation transport and its success and popularity is quite often also due to necessity, because measurements are not always possible or affordable. In the Monte Carlo method, which is inherently realistic because nature is statistical, a more detailed physics is made possible by isolation of events while rather elaborate geometries can be modelled. Provided that the physics is correct, a simulation is exactly analogous to an experimenter counting particles. In contrast to the deterministic approach, however, a disadvantage of the

  16. Experimental investigation of convective heat transfer augmentation for car radiator using ZnO–water nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Hafiz Muhammad; Ali, Hassan; Liaquat, Hassan; Bin Maqsood, Hafiz Talha; Nadir, Malik Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    New experimental data are reported for water based nanofluids to enhance the heat transfer performance of a car radiator. ZnO nanoparticles have been added into base fluid in different volumetric concentrations (0.01%, 0.08%, 0.2% and 0.3%). The effect of these volumetric concentrations on the heat transfer performance for car radiator is determined experimentally. Fluid flow rate has been varied in a range of 7–11 LPM (liter per minute) (corresponding Reynolds number range was 17,500–27,600). Nanofluids showed heat transfer enhancement compared to the base fluid for all concentrations tested. The best heat transfer enhancement up to 46% was found compared to base fluid at 0.2% volumetric concentration. A further increase in volumetric concentration to 0.3% has shown a decrease in heat transfer enhancement compared to 0.2% volumetric concentration. Fluid inlet temperature was kept in a range of 45–55 °C. An increase in fluid inlet temperature from 45 °C to 55 °C showed increase in heat transfer rate up to 4%. - Highlights: • ZnO–water nanofluids were used for car radiator thermal enhancement. • Heat transfer enhancement up to 46% was achieved comparing pure water. • 0.2% vol. concentration of ZnO found to be optimum for heat transfer. • Heat transfer was found weakly dependant on the fluid inlet temperature

  17. Application of the MASH v1.0 Code System to radiological warfare radiation threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.O.; Santoro, R.T.; Smith, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear hardening capabilities of US and foreign ground force systems is a primary concern of the Department of Defense (DoD) and US Army. The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System -- MASH v1.0 was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to analyze these capabilities, i.e. the shielding effectiveness, for prompt radiation from a nuclear weapon detonation. Rapidly changing world events and the proliferation of nuclear weapons related technology have increased the kinds of nuclear threats to include intentionally dispersed radiation sources and fallout from tactical nuclear weapons used in the modern AirLand battlefield scenario. Consequently, a DoD area of increasing interest focuses on determining the shielding effectiveness of foreign and US armored vehicles to radiological warfare and fallout radiation threats. To demonstrate the applicability of MASH for analyzing dispersed radiation source problems, calculations have been completed for two distributed sources; a dispersed radiation environment simulated by a uniformly distributed 60 Co source, and a 235 U fission weapon fallout source. Fluence and dose assessments were performed for the free-field, the inside of a steel-walled two-meter box, in a phantom standing in the free-field, and in a phantom standing in the two-meter box. The results indicate substantial radiation protection factors for the 60 Co dispersed radiation source and the fallout source compared to the prompt radiation protection factors. The dose protection factors ranged from 40 to 95 for the two-meter box and from 55 to 123 for the mid-gut position of the phantom standing in the box. The results further indicate that a 60 Co source might be a good first order approximation for a tactical fission weapon fallout protection factor analysis

  18. Model of heat transfer by radiation in a pool of spent fuel by TRACE; Modelo de transmision de calor por radiacion en una piscina de combustible gastado mediante TRACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Saez, F.; Carlos Alberola, S.; Martorell Alsina, J. J.; Villanueva Lopez, J. F.

    2013-07-01

    The work involves the simulation thermal-hydraulic of a spent fuel pool to cause a transient loss of coolant with coolant loss through the transfer channel. The simulation performed with the Best Estimate TRACE code. To follow the evolution of behavior of the pool, a variable is important to follow the sheath temperature, whose evolution depends on the heat that gets broadcast. In this simulation was considered the transfer by convection and has been compared with the evolution of Variable considering convection plus radiation. The proposed radiation pattern RADGEN obtains code data for use in TRACE. With this model, obtains an evolution of the temperature in the transient pod less conservative.

  19. CT dosimetry computer codes: Their influence on radiation dose estimates and the necessity for their revision under new ICRP radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. P.; Lee, J.; Bolch, W. E.

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) dosimetry computer codes have been most commonly used due to their user friendliness, but with little consideration for potential uncertainty in estimated organ dose and their underlying limitations. Generally, radiation doses calculated with different CT dosimetry computer codes were comparable, although relatively large differences were observed for some specific organs or tissues. The largest difference in radiation doses calculated using different computer codes was observed for Siemens Sensation CT scanners. Radiation doses varied with patient age and sex. Younger patients and adult females receive a higher radiation dose in general than adult males for the same CT technique factors. There are a number of limitations of current CT dosimetry computer codes. These include unrealistic modelling of the human anatomy, a limited number of organs and tissues for dose calculation, inability to alter patient height and weight, and non-applicability to new CT technologies. Therefore, further studies are needed to overcome these limitations and to improve CT dosimetry. (authors)

  20. Properties of a local dust storm on Mars' Atlantis Chaos by means of radiative transfer modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Fabrizio; Altieri, Francesca; Geminale, Anna; Bellucci, Giancarlo; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Carrozzo, Giacomo; Sindoni, Giuseppe; Grassi, Davide

    2017-04-01

    In this study we present the analysis of the dust properties in a local storm imaged in the Atlantis Chaos region on Mars by the OMEGA spectrometer (Bibring et al., 2004) on March 2nd 2005 (ORB1441_5). By means of an inverse radiative transfer code we study the dust properties across the region and try to infer the connection be-tween the local storm dynamics and the orography. OMEGA is a visible and near-IR mapping spectrometer, operating in the spectral range 0.38-5.1 μm with three separate channels with different spectral resolution. The instrument's IFOV is 1.2 mrad. To analyze the storm properties we have used the inverse radiative transfer model MITRA (Oliva et al., 2016; Sindoni et al., 2013) to retrieve the effective radius reff, the optical depth at 880 nm τ880 and the top pressure tp of the dust layer. We used the Mars Climate Database (MCD, Forget et al., 1999) to obtain the atmospheric properties of the studied region to be used as input in our model. Moreover we used the optical constants from Wolff et al. (2009) to describe the dust composition. The properties from the surface have been obtained by ap-plying the SAS method (Geminale et al., 2015) to observations of the same region relatively clear from dust. All retrievals have been performed in the spectral range 500 ÷ 2500 nm. Here we describe the result from our analysis carried out on selected regions of the storm and characterized by a different optical depth of the dust. Aknowledgements: This study has been performed within the UPWARDS project and funded in the context of the European Union's Horizon 2020 Programme (H2020-Compet-08-2014), grant agreement UPWARDS-633127. References: Bibring, J-P. et al., 2004. OMEGA: Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activité. Mars Express: the scientific payload, Ed. by Andrew Wilson, scientific coordination: Agustin Chicarro. ESA SP-1240, Noordwijk, Netherlands: ESA Publications Division, ISBN 92-9092-556-6, 2004, p. 37 - 49. Forget

  1. Heat transfer enhancement of car radiator using aqua based magnesium oxide nanofluids

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Hafiz Muhammad; Azhar Muhammad Danish; Saleem Musab; Saeed Qazi Samie; Saieed Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this research paper is on the application of water based MgO nanofluids for thermal management of a car radiator. Nanofluids of different volumetric concentrations (i.e. 0.06%, 0.09% and 0.12%) were prepared and then experimentally tested for their heat transfer performance in a car radiator. All concentrations showed enhancement in heat transfer compared to the pure base fluid. A peak heat transfer enhancement of 31% was obtained at 0.12 % vol...

  2. A Forward GPS Multipath Simulator Based on the Vegetation Radiative Transfer Equation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuerui; Jin, Shuanggen; Xia, Junming

    2017-06-05

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have been widely used in navigation, positioning and timing. Nowadays, the multipath errors may be re-utilized for the remote sensing of geophysical parameters (soil moisture, vegetation and snow depth), i.e., GPS-Multipath Reflectometry (GPS-MR). However, bistatic scattering properties and the relation between GPS observables and geophysical parameters are not clear, e.g., vegetation. In this paper, a new element on bistatic scattering properties of vegetation is incorporated into the traditional GPS-MR model. This new element is the first-order radiative transfer equation model. The new forward GPS multipath simulator is able to explicitly link the vegetation parameters with GPS multipath observables (signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), code pseudorange and carrier phase observables). The trunk layer and its corresponding scattering mechanisms are ignored since GPS-MR is not suitable for high forest monitoring due to the coherence of direct and reflected signals. Based on this new model, the developed simulator can present how the GPS signals (L1 and L2 carrier frequencies, C/A, P(Y) and L2C modulations) are transmitted (scattered and absorbed) through vegetation medium and received by GPS receivers. Simulation results show that the wheat will decrease the amplitudes of GPS multipath observables (SNR, phase and code), if we increase the vegetation moisture contents or the scatters sizes (stem or leaf). Although the Specular-Ground component dominates the total specular scattering, vegetation covered ground soil moisture has almost no effects on the final multipath signatures. Our simulated results are consistent with previous results for environmental parameter detections by GPS-MR.

  3. Structure of the solar photosphere studied from the radiation hydrodynamics code ANTARES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, P.; Lemmerer, B.; Hanslmeier, A.; Zaqarashvili, T.; Veronig, A.; Grimm-Strele, H.; Muthsam, H. J.

    2017-09-01

    The ANTARES radiation hydrodynamics code is capable of simulating the solar granulation in detail unequaled by direct observation. We introduce a state-of-the-art numerical tool to the solar physics community and demonstrate its applicability to model the solar granulation. The code is based on the weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite volume method and by its implementation of local mesh refinement is also capable of simulating turbulent fluids. While the ANTARES code already provides promising insights into small-scale dynamical processes occurring in the quiet-Sun photosphere, it will soon be capable of modeling the latter in the scope of radiation magnetohydrodynamics. In this first preliminary study we focus on the vertical photospheric stratification by examining a 3-D model photosphere with an evolution time much larger than the dynamical timescales of the solar granulation and of particular large horizontal extent corresponding to 25''×25'' on the solar surface to smooth out horizontal spatial inhomogeneities separately for up- and downflows. The highly resolved Cartesian grid thereby covers ˜4 Mm of the upper convection zone and the adjacent photosphere. Correlation analysis, both local and two-point, provides a suitable means to probe the photospheric structure and thereby to identify several layers of characteristic dynamics: The thermal convection zone is found to reach some ten kilometers above the solar surface, while convectively overshooting gas penetrates even higher into the low photosphere. An ≈145 km wide transition layer separates the convective from the oscillatory layers in the higher photosphere.

  4. AREVA Developments for an Efficient and Reliable use of Monte Carlo codes for Radiation Transport Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapoutier, Nicolas; Mollier, François; Nolin, Guillaume; Culioli, Matthieu; Mace, Jean-Reynald

    2017-09-01

    In the context of the rising of Monte Carlo transport calculations for any kind of application, AREVA recently improved its suite of engineering tools in order to produce efficient Monte Carlo workflow. Monte Carlo codes, such as MCNP or TRIPOLI, are recognized as reference codes to deal with a large range of radiation transport problems. However the inherent drawbacks of theses codes - laboring input file creation and long computation time - contrast with the maturity of the treatment of the physical phenomena. The goals of the recent AREVA developments were to reach similar efficiency as other mature engineering sciences such as finite elements analyses (e.g. structural or fluid dynamics). Among the main objectives, the creation of a graphical user interface offering CAD tools for geometry creation and other graphical features dedicated to the radiation field (source definition, tally definition) has been reached. The computations times are drastically reduced compared to few years ago thanks to the use of massive parallel runs, and above all, the implementation of hybrid variance reduction technics. From now engineering teams are capable to deliver much more prompt support to any nuclear projects dealing with reactors or fuel cycle facilities from conceptual phase to decommissioning.

  5. AREVA Developments for an Efficient and Reliable use of Monte Carlo codes for Radiation Transport Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapoutier Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the rising of Monte Carlo transport calculations for any kind of application, AREVA recently improved its suite of engineering tools in order to produce efficient Monte Carlo workflow. Monte Carlo codes, such as MCNP or TRIPOLI, are recognized as reference codes to deal with a large range of radiation transport problems. However the inherent drawbacks of theses codes - laboring input file creation and long computation time - contrast with the maturity of the treatment of the physical phenomena. The goals of the recent AREVA developments were to reach similar efficiency as other mature engineering sciences such as finite elements analyses (e.g. structural or fluid dynamics. Among the main objectives, the creation of a graphical user interface offering CAD tools for geometry creation and other graphical features dedicated to the radiation field (source definition, tally definition has been reached. The computations times are drastically reduced compared to few years ago thanks to the use of massive parallel runs, and above all, the implementation of hybrid variance reduction technics. From now engineering teams are capable to deliver much more prompt support to any nuclear projects dealing with reactors or fuel cycle facilities from conceptual phase to decommissioning.

  6. International symposium on standards and codes of practice in medical radiation dosimetry. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The development of radiation measurement standards by National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and their dissemination to Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), cancer therapy centres and hospitals represent essential aspects of the radiation dosimetry measurement chain. Although the demands for accuracy in radiotherapy initiated the establishment of such measurement chains, similar traceable dosimetry procedures have been implemented, or are being developed, in other areas of radiation medicine (e.g. diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine), in radiation protection and in industrial applications of radiation. In the past few years the development of primary standards of absorbed dose to water in 60 Co for radiotherapy dosimetry has made direct calibrations in terms of absorbed dose to water available in many countries for the first time. Some laboratories have extended the development of these standards to high energy photon and electron beams and to low and medium energy x-ray beams. Other countries, however, still base their dosimetry for radiotherapy on air kerma standards. Dosimetry for conventional external beam radiotherapy was probably the field where standardized procedures adopted by medical physicists at hospitals were developed first. Those were related to exposure and air kerma standards. The recent development of Codes of Practice (or protocols) based on the concept of absorbed dose to water has led to changes in calibration procedures at hospitals. The International Code of Practice for Dosimetry Based on Standards of Absorbed Dose to Water (TRS 398) was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), World Health Organization (WHO), Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) and is expected to be adopted in many countries worldwide. It provides recommendations for the dosimetry of all types of beams (except neutrons) used in external radiotherapy and satisfies

  7. International symposium on standards and codes of practice in medical radiation dosimetry. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The development of radiation measurement standards by National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and their dissemination to Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), cancer therapy centres and hospitals represent essential aspects of the radiation dosimetry measurement chain. Although the demands for accuracy in radiotherapy initiated the establishment of such measurement chains, similar traceable dosimetry procedures have been implemented, or are being developed, in other areas of radiation medicine (e.g. diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine), in radiation protection and in industrial applications of radiation. In the past few years the development of primary standards of absorbed dose to water in {sup 60}Co for radiotherapy dosimetry has made direct calibrations in terms of absorbed dose to water available in many countries for the first time. Some laboratories have extended the development of these standards to high energy photon and electron beams and to low and medium energy x-ray beams. Other countries, however, still base their dosimetry for radiotherapy on air kerma standards. Dosimetry for conventional external beam radiotherapy was probably the field where standardized procedures adopted by medical physicists at hospitals were developed first. Those were related to exposure and air kerma standards. The recent development of Codes of Practice (or protocols) based on the concept of absorbed dose to water has led to changes in calibration procedures at hospitals. The International Code of Practice for Dosimetry Based on Standards of Absorbed Dose to Water (TRS 398) was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), World Health Organization (WHO), Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) and is expected to be adopted in many countries worldwide. It provides recommendations for the dosimetry of all types of beams (except neutrons) used in external radiotherapy and

  8. Gas Temperature and Radiative Heat Transfer in Oxy-fuel Flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäckström, Daniel; Johansson, Robert; Andersson, Klas

    This work presents measurements of the gas temperature, including fluctuations, and its influence on the radiative heat transfer in oxy-fuel flames. The measurements were carried out in the Chalmers 100 kW oxy-fuel test unit. The in-furnace gas temperature was measured by a suction pyrometer...... on the radiative heat transfer shows no effect of turbulence-radiation interaction. However, by comparing with temperature fluctuations in other flames it can be seen that the fluctuations measured here are relatively small. Further research is needed to clarify to which extent the applied methods can account...

  9. Thermal radiation influence on MHD flow of a rotating fluid with heat transfer through EFGM solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, D. V. V. Krishna; Chaitanya, G. S. Krishna; Raju, R. Srinivasa

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this research work is to find the EFGM solutions of the unsteady magnetohydromagnetic natural convection heat transfer flow of a rotating, incompressible, viscous, Boussinesq fluid is presented in this study in the presence of radiative heat transfer. The Rosseland approximation for an optically thick fluid is invoked to describe the radiative flux. Numerical results obtained show that a decrease in the temperature boundary layer occurs when the Prandtl number and the radiation parameter are increased and the flow velocity approaches steady state as the time parameter t is increased. These findings are in quantitative agreement with earlier reported studies.

  10. Radiative Transfer Simulations of Cosmic Reionization With Pop II and III Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trac, Hy; Cen, Renyue

    2008-03-01

    We have simulated 3 large volume, high resolution realizations of cosmic reionization using a hybrid code that combines a N-body algorithm for dark matter, prescriptions for baryons and star formation, and a radiative transfer algorithm for ionizing photons. Our largest simulation, with 24 billion particles in a 100 Mpc/h box, simultaneously provides (1) the mass resolution needed to resolve dark matter halos down to a virial temperatures of 104 K and (2) the volume needed to fairly sample highly biased sources and large HII regions. We model the stellar initial mass function (IMF) by following the spatially dependent gas metallicity evolution, and distinguish between the first generation (Population III) stars and the second generation (Population II) stars. The Population III stars, with a top-heavy IMF, produce an order of magnitude more ionizing photons at high redshifts z>~10, resulting in a more extended reionization. In our simulations, complete overlap of HII regions occurs at z~6.5 and the computed mass and volume weighted residual HI fractions at 5measurements from SDSS. The values for the Thomson optical depth are consistent within 1-σ of the current best-fit value from the WMAP Year 3 data release.

  11. Infrared spectrophotometry and radiative transfer in optically thick circumstellar dust envelopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, K.M.

    1976-01-01

    The Two-Micron Sky Survey of Neugebauer and Leighton and, more recently, the AFCRL Infrared Sky Survey of Walker and Price have detected numerous compact, isolated, bright infrared sources which are not identified with previously cataloged stars. Observations of many such objects suggest that extensive circumstellar dust envelopes modify the flux from a central source. The present investigations employ broad bandpass photometry at lambda lambda 1.65 μm to 12.5 μm and narrow bandpass spectrophotometry (Δ lambda/lambda approximately 0.015) at lambda lambda 2-4 μm and lambda lambda 8-13 μm to determine the properties of a large sample of such infrared sources. Infrared spectrophotometry can clearly differentiate between normal stars of spectral types M(''oxygen-rich'') and C (''carbon-rich'') on the basis of characteristic absorption bands arising in cool stellar atmospheres. Most of the 2 μ Sky Survey and many of the AFCRL Sky Survey sources appear to be stars of spectral types M and C which are differentiated from normal cool comparison stars only by the presence of extensive circumstellar dust envelopes. Due to the large optical depth of the envelopes, the flux from the star and from the dust cannot be simply separated. Hence solutions of radiative transfer through spherically symmetric envelopes of arbitrary optical depth were generated by a generalized computer code which employed opacities of real dust

  12. Radiative transfer calculations of the diffuse ionized gas in disc galaxies with cosmic ray feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, Bert; Wood, Kenneth; Girichidis, Philipp; Hill, Alex S.; Peters, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    The large vertical scale heights of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in disc galaxies are challenging to model, as hydrodynamical models including only thermal feedback seem to be unable to support gas at these heights. In this paper, we use a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiation transfer code to post-process disc simulations of the Simulating the Life-Cycle of Molecular Clouds project that include feedback by cosmic rays. We show that the more extended discs in simulations including cosmic ray feedback naturally lead to larger scale heights for the DIG which are more in line with observed scale heights. We also show that including a fiducial cosmic ray heating term in our model can help to increase the temperature as a function of disc scale height, but fails to reproduce observed DIG nitrogen and sulphur forbidden line intensities. We show that, to reproduce these line emissions, we require a heating mechanism that affects gas over a larger density range than is achieved by cosmic ray heating, which can be achieved by fine tuning the total luminosity of ionizing sources to get an appropriate ionizing spectrum as a function of scale height. This result sheds a new light on the relation between forbidden line emissions and temperature profiles for realistic DIG gas distributions.

  13. Dust Radiative Transfer Modeling of the Infrared Ring around the Magnetar SGR 1900+14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natale, G. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Rea, N.; Torres, D. F.; Girart, J. M. [Institute of Space Sciences (IEEC–CSIC), Campus UAB, Carrer de Can Magrans S/N, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Lazzati, D. [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, 301 Weniger Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Perna, R., E-mail: gnatale@uclan.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    A peculiar infrared ring-like structure was discovered by Spitzer around the strongly magnetized neutron star SGR 1900+14. This infrared (IR) structure was suggested to be due to a dust-free cavity, produced by the Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGRs) Giant Flare occurring in 1998, and kept illuminated by surrounding stars. Using a 3D dust radiative transfer code, we aimed to reproduce the emission morphology and the integrated emission flux of this structure assuming different spatial distributions and densities for the dust, and different positions for the illuminating stars. We found that a dust-free ellipsoidal cavity can reproduce the shape, flux, and spectrum of the ring-like IR emission, provided that the illuminating stars are inside the cavity and that the interstellar medium has high gas density ( n {sub H} ∼ 1000 cm{sup −3}). We further constrain the emitting region to have a sharp inner boundary and to be significantly extended in the radial direction, possibly even just a cavity in a smooth molecular cloud. We discuss possible scenarios for the formation of the dustless cavity and the particular geometry that allows it to be IR-bright.

  14. Radiative transfer modeling through terrestrial atmosphere and ocean accounting for inelastic processes: Software package SCIATRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, V. V.; Dinter, T.; Rozanov, A. V.; Wolanin, A.; Bracher, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2017-06-01

    SCIATRAN is a comprehensive software package which is designed to model radiative transfer processes in the terrestrial atmosphere and ocean in the spectral range from the ultraviolet to the thermal infrared (0.18-40 μm). It accounts for multiple scattering processes, polarization, thermal emission and ocean-atmosphere coupling. The main goal of this paper is to present a recently developed version of SCIATRAN which takes into account accurately inelastic radiative processes in both the atmosphere and the ocean. In the scalar version of the coupled ocean-atmosphere radiative transfer solver presented by Rozanov et al. [61] we have implemented the simulation of the rotational Raman scattering, vibrational Raman scattering, chlorophyll and colored dissolved organic matter fluorescence. In this paper we discuss and explain the numerical methods used in SCIATRAN to solve the scalar radiative transfer equation including trans-spectral processes, and demonstrate how some selected radiative transfer problems are solved using the SCIATRAN package. In addition we present selected comparisons of SCIATRAN simulations with those published benchmark results, independent radiative transfer models, and various measurements from satellite, ground-based, and ship-borne instruments. The extended SCIATRAN software package along with a detailed User's Guide is made available for scientists and students, who are undertaking their own research typically at universities, via the web page of the Institute of Environmental Physics (IUP), University of Bremen: http://www.iup.physik.uni-bremen.de.

  15. Iterative linear solvers in a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code: Methods and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, C.; Brown, P.N.; Falgout, R.; Graziani, F.; Jones, J.

    1999-01-01

    Computer codes containing both hydrodynamics and radiation play a central role in simulating both astrophysical and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) phenomena. A crucial aspect of these codes is that they require an implicit solution of the radiation diffusion equations. The authors present in this paper the results of a comparison of five different linear solvers on a range of complex radiation and radiation-hydrodynamics problems. The linear solvers used are diagonally scaled conjugate gradient, GMRES with incomplete LU preconditioning, conjugate gradient with incomplete Cholesky preconditioning, multigrid, and multigrid-preconditioned conjugate gradient. These problems involve shock propagation, opacities varying over 5--6 orders of magnitude, tabular equations of state, and dynamic ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian) meshes. They perform a problem size scalability study by comparing linear solver performance over a wide range of problem sizes from 1,000 to 100,000 zones. The fundamental question they address in this paper is: Is it more efficient to invert the matrix in many inexpensive steps (like diagonally scaled conjugate gradient) or in fewer expensive steps (like multigrid)? In addition, what is the answer to this question as a function of problem size and is the answer problem dependent? They find that the diagonally scaled conjugate gradient method performs poorly with the growth of problem size, increasing in both iteration count and overall CPU time with the size of the problem and also increasing for larger time steps. For all problems considered, the multigrid algorithms scale almost perfectly (i.e., the iteration count is approximately independent of problem size and problem time step). For pure radiation flow problems (i.e., no hydrodynamics), they see speedups in CPU time of factors of ∼15--30 for the largest problems, when comparing the multigrid solvers relative to diagonal scaled conjugate gradient

  16. Analysis of radiative heat transfer impact in cross-flow tube and fin heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanuszkiewicz-Drapała Małgorzata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A cross-flow, tube and fin heat exchanger of the water – air type is the subject of the analysis. The analysis had experimental and computational form and was aimed for evaluation of radiative heat transfer impact on the heat exchanger performance. The main element of the test facility was an enlarged recurrent segment of the heat exchanger under consideration. The main results of measurements are heat transfer rates, as well as temperature distributions on the surface of the first fin obtained by using the infrared camera. The experimental results have been next compared to computational ones coming from a numerical model of the test station. The model has been elaborated using computational fluid dynamics software. The computations have been accomplished for two cases: without radiative heat transfer and taking this phenomenon into account. Evaluation of the radiative heat transfer impact in considered system has been done by comparing all the received results.

  17. Comparison of Radiation Transport Codes, HZETRN, HETC and FLUKA, Using the 1956 Webber SPE Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Handler, Thomas; Gabriel, Tony A.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Reddell, Brandon; Clowdsley, Martha S.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Protection of astronauts and instrumentation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) in the harsh environment of space is of prime importance in the design of personal shielding, spacec raft, and mission planning. Early entry of radiation constraints into the design process enables optimal shielding strategies, but demands efficient and accurate tools that can be used by design engineers in every phase of an evolving space project. The radiation transport code , HZETRN, is an efficient tool for analyzing the shielding effectiveness of materials exposed to space radiation. In this paper, HZETRN is compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETC-HEDS and FLUKA, for a shield/target configuration comprised of a 20 g/sq cm Aluminum slab in front of a 30 g/cm^2 slab of water exposed to the February 1956 SPE, as mode led by the Webber spectrum. Neutron and proton fluence spectra, as well as dose and dose equivalent values, are compared at various depths in the water target. This study shows that there are many regions where HZETRN agrees with both HETC-HEDS and FLUKA for this shield/target configuration and the SPE environment. However, there are also regions where there are appreciable differences between the three computer c odes.

  18. Radiation heat transfer within an open-cycle MHD generator channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delil, A. A. M.

    1983-05-01

    Radiation heat transfer in an MHD generator was modeled using the Sparrow and Cess model for radiation in an emitting, absorbing and scattering medium. The resulting general equations can be considerably reduced by introducing simplifying approximations for the channel and MHD gas properties. The simplifications lead to an engineering model, which is very useful for one-dimensional channel flow approximation. The model can estimate thermo-optical MHD gas properties, which can be substituted in the energy equation. The model considers the contribution of solid particles in the MHD gas to radiation heat transfer, considerable in coal-fired closed cycle MHD generators. The modeling is applicable also for other types of flow at elevated temperatures, where radiation heat transfer is an important quantity.

  19. The log mean heat transfer rate method of heat exchanger considering the influence of heat radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.-L.; Ke, M.-T.; Ku, S.-S.

    2009-01-01

    The log mean temperature difference (LMTD) method is conventionally used to calculate the total heat transfer rate of heat exchangers. Because the heat radiation equation contains the 4th order exponential of temperature which is very complicate in calculations, thus LMTD method neglects the influence of heat radiation. From the recent investigation of a circular duct in some practical situations, it is found that even in the situation of the temperature difference between outer duct surface and surrounding is low to 1 deg. C, the heat radiation effect can not be ignored in the situations of lower ambient convective heat coefficient and greater surface emissivities. In this investigation, the log mean heat transfer rate (LMHTR) method which considering the influence of heat radiation, is developed to calculate the total heat transfer rate of heat exchangers.

  20. Finite element method for radiation heat transfer in multi-dimensional graded index medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.H.; Zhang, L.; Tan, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    In graded index medium, ray goes along a curved path determined by Fermat principle, and curved ray-tracing is very difficult and complex. To avoid the complicated and time-consuming computation of curved ray trajectories, a finite element method based on discrete ordinate equation is developed to solve the radiative transfer problem in a multi-dimensional semitransparent graded index medium. Two particular test problems of radiative transfer are taken as examples to verify this finite element method. The predicted dimensionless net radiative heat fluxes are determined by the proposed method and compared with the results obtained by finite volume method. The results show that the finite element method presented in this paper has a good accuracy in solving the multi-dimensional radiative transfer problem in semitransparent graded index medium

  1. Benchmark numerical solutions for radiative heat transfer in two-dimensional medium with graded index distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L.H. [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92 West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China)]. E-mail: lhliu@hit.edu.cn

    2006-11-15

    In graded index media, the ray goes along a curved path determined by Fermat principle. Generally, the curved ray trajectory in graded index media is a complex implicit function, and the curved ray tracing is very difficult and complex. Only for some special refractive index distributions, the curved ray trajectory can be expressed as a simple explicit function. Two important examples are the layered and the radial graded index distributions. In this paper, the radiative heat transfer problems in two-dimensional square semitransparent with layered and radial graded index distributions are analyzed. After deduction of the ray trajectory, the radiative heat transfer problems are solved by using the Monte Carlo curved ray-tracing method. Some numerical solutions of dimensionless net radiative heat flux and medium temperature are tabulated as the benchmark solutions for the future development of approximation techniques for multi-dimensional radiative heat transfer in graded index media.

  2. SCIATRAN 3.1: A new radiative transfer model and retrieval package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Rozanov, Vladimir; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Burrows, John P.

    The SCIATRAN 3.1 package is a result of further development of the SCIATRAN 2.X software family which, similar to previous versions, comprises a radiative transfer model and a retrieval block. After an implementation of the vector radiative transfer model in SCIATRAN 3.0 the spectral range covered by the model has been extended into the thermal infrared ranging to approximately 40 micrometers. Another major improvement has been done accounting for the underlying surface effects. Among others, a sophisticated representation of the water surface with a bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) has been implemented accounting for the Fresnel reflection of the polarized light and for the effect of foam. A newly developed representation for a snow surface allows radiative transfer calculations to be performed within an unpolluted or soiled snow layer. Furthermore, a new approach has been implemented allowing radiative transfer calculations to be performed for a coupled atmosphere-ocean system. This means that, the underlying ocean is not considered as a purely reflecting surface any more. Instead, full radiative transfer calculations are performed within the water allowing the user to simulate the radiance within both the atmosphere and the ocean. Similar to previous versions, the simulations can be performed for any viewing geometry typi-cal for atmospheric observations in the UV-Vis-NIR-TIR spectral range (nadir, limb, off-axis, etc.) as well as for any observer location within or outside the Earth's atmosphere including underwater observations. Similar to the precursor version, the new model is freely available for non-commercial use via the web page of the University of Bremen. In this presentation a short description of the software package, especially of the new features of the radiative transfer model is given, including remarks on the availability for the scientific community. Furthermore, some application examples of the radiative transfer model are

  3. Spectral tuning of near-field radiative heat transfer by graphene-covered metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiheng; Wang, Ao; Xuan, Yimin

    2018-03-01

    When two gratings are respectively covered by a layer of graphene sheet, the near-field radiative heat transfer between two parallel gratings made of silica (SiO2) could be greatly improved. As the material properties of doped silicon (n-type doping concentration is 1020 cm-3, marked as Si-20) and SiO2 differ greatly, we theoretically investigate the near-field radiative heat transfer between two parallel graphene-covered gratings made of Si-20 to explore some different phenomena, especially for modulating the spectral properties. The radiative heat flux between two parallel bulks made of Si-20 can be enhanced by using gratings instead of bulks. When the two gratings are respectively covered by a layer of graphene sheet, the radiative heat flux between two gratings made of Si-20 can be further enhanced. By tuning graphene chemical potential μ and grating filling factor f, due to the interaction between surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) of graphene sheets and grating structures, the spectral properties of the radiative heat flux between two parallel graphene-covered gratings can be effectively regulated. This work will develop and supplement the effects of materials on the near-field radiative heat transfer for this kind of system configuration, paving a way to modulate the spectral properties of near-field radiative heat transfer.

  4. GRAVE: An Interactive Geometry Construction and Visualization Software System for the TORT Nuclear Radiation Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakeman, E.D.

    2000-01-01

    A software system, GRAVE (Geometry Rendering and Visual Editor), has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform interactive visualization and development of models used as input to the TORT three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport code. Three-dimensional and two-dimensional visualization displays are included. Display capabilities include image rotation, zoom, translation, wire-frame and translucent display, geometry cuts and slices, and display of individual component bodies and material zones. The geometry can be interactively edited and saved in TORT input file format. This system is an advancement over the current, non-interactive, two-dimensional display software. GRAVE is programmed in the Java programming language and can be implemented on a variety of computer platforms. Three- dimensional visualization is enabled through the Visualization Toolkit (VTK), a free-ware C++ software library developed for geometric and data visual display. Future plans include an extension of the system to read inputs using binary zone maps and combinatorial geometry models containing curved surfaces, such as those used for Monte Carlo code inputs. Also GRAVE will be extended to geometry visualization/editing for the DORT two-dimensional transport code and will be integrated into a single GUI-based system for all of the ORNL discrete ordinates transport codes

  5. Monte Carlo method for polarized radiative transfer in gradient-index media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.M.; Tan, J.Y.; Liu, L.H.

    2015-01-01

    Light transfer in gradient-index media generally follows curved ray trajectories, which will cause light beam to converge or diverge during transfer and induce the rotation of polarization ellipse even when the medium is transparent. Furthermore, the combined process of scattering and transfer along curved ray path makes the problem more complex. In this paper, a Monte Carlo method is presented to simulate polarized radiative transfer in gradient-index media that only support planar ray trajectories. The ray equation is solved to the second order to address the effect induced by curved ray trajectories. Three types of test cases are presented to verify the performance of the method, which include transparent medium, Mie scattering medium with assumed gradient index distribution, and Rayleigh scattering with realistic atmosphere refractive index profile. It is demonstrated that the atmospheric refraction has significant effect for long distance polarized light transfer. - Highlights: • A Monte Carlo method for polarized radiative transfer in gradient index media. • Effect of curved ray paths on polarized radiative transfer is considered. • Importance of atmospheric refraction for polarized light transfer is demonstrated

  6. Abstracts of digital computer code packages assembled by the Radiation Shielding Information Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, B.J.; Maskewitz, B.F.

    1985-04-01

    This publication, ORNL/RSIC-13, Volumes I to III Revised, has resulted from an internal audit of the first 168 packages of computing technology in the Computer Codes Collection (CCC) of the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC). It replaces the earlier three documents published as single volumes between 1966 to 1972. A significant number of the early code packages were considered to be obsolete and were removed from the collection in the audit process and the CCC numbers were not reassigned. Others not currently being used by the nuclear R and D community were retained in the collection to preserve technology not replaced by newer methods, or were considered of potential value for reference purposes. Much of the early technology, however, has improved through developer/RSIC/user interaction and continues at the forefront of the advancing state-of-the-art.

  7. Abstracts of digital computer code packages assembled by the Radiation Shielding Information Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, B.J.; Maskewitz, B.F.

    1985-04-01

    This publication, ORNL/RSIC-13, Volumes I to III Revised, has resulted from an internal audit of the first 168 packages of computing technology in the Computer Codes Collection (CCC) of the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC). It replaces the earlier three documents published as single volumes between 1966 to 1972. A significant number of the early code packages were considered to be obsolete and were removed from the collection in the audit process and the CCC numbers were not reassigned. Others not currently being used by the nuclear R and D community were retained in the collection to preserve technology not replaced by newer methods, or were considered of potential value for reference purposes. Much of the early technology, however, has improved through developer/RSIC/user interaction and continues at the forefront of the advancing state-of-the-art

  8. TIERCE: A code system for particles and radiation transport in thick targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bersillon, O.; Bauge, E.; Borne, F.; Clergeau, J.F.; Collin, M.; Cotten, D.; Delaroche, J.P.; Duarte, H.; Flament, J.L.; Girod, M.; Gosselin, G.; Granier, T.; Hilaire, S.; Morel, P.; Perrier, R.; Romain, P.; Roux, L. [CEA, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France). Service de Physique Nucleaire

    1997-09-01

    Over the last few years, a great effort at Bruyeres-le-Chatel has been the development of the TIERCE code system for the transport of particles and radiations in complex geometry. The comparison of calculated results with experimental data, either microscopic (double differential spectra, residual nuclide yield...) or macroscopic (energy deposition, neutron leakage...), shows the need to improve the nuclear reaction models used. We present some new developments concerning data required for the evaporation model in the framework of a microscopic approach. 22 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Nongray radiative heat transfer analysis in the anisotropic scattering fog layer subjected to solar irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Shigenao; Mori, Yusuke; Sakai, Seigo

    2004-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer in the fog layer is analyzed. Direct and diffuse solar irradiation, and infrared sky flux are considered as incident radiation. Anisotropic scattering of radiation by water droplets is taken into account. Absorption and emission of radiation by water droplets and radiative gases are also considered. Furthermore, spectral dependences of radiative properties of irradiation, reflectivity, gas absorption and scattering and absorption of mist are considered. The radiation element method by ray emission model (REM 2 ) is used for the nongray radiation analysis. Net downward radiative heat flux at the sea surface and radiative equilibrium temperature distribution in the fog layer are calculated for several conditions. Transmitted solar flux decreases as liquid water content (LWC) in the fog increases. However, the value does not become zero but has the value about 60 W/m 2 . The effect of humidity and mist on radiative cooling at night is investigated. Due to high temperature and humidity condition, the radiation cooling at night is not so large even in the clear sky. Furthermore, the radiative equilibrium temperature distribution in the fog layer in the daytime is higher as LWC increases, and the inversion layer of temperature occurs

  10. Validation of Numerical Schemes in a Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Code for a Natural Convection Heat Transfer of a Molten Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Tae; Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan Yeol; Park, Rae Joon; Song, Jin Ho

    2010-01-01

    It is postulated that a fuel of a water-cooled nuclear reactor can be melted during a hypothetical severe accident. There are two strategies for cooling the molten corium, which are in-vessel corium cooling and exvessel corium cooling. They can be chosen depending on cooling characteristics of the reactor. The coolability of the molten pool is determined by comparing the thermal load from the pool and the maximum heat flux removable by cooling mechanism such as radiative or boiling heat transfer on the pool boundaries. In order to evaluate the molten pool coolability, it is important to correctly expect the thermal load by a natural convection heat transfer of the corium pool. Many correlations have been developed by conducting experiments for the natural convection of a pool. The main parameters of the heat transfer by the natural convection are Rayleigh (Ra) number, Prandtl (Pr) number and the geometry of the pool. Sometimes, the use of the correlations for the evaluation of the thermal load from the molten pool is limited by a high Ra number of the pool and its different shape from the existing correlations. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used for the analysis of the heat transfer by a natural convection. In principle, CFD is applicable to the corium pool analysis. But unfortunately, some difficulties are encountered during the analysis, which are from numerical and physical instabilities. The physical instability is from turbulence fluctuation and inverted thermal layer near the upper surface of the volumetric-heated molten pool with a high Ra number. In order to resolve turbulent natural convection, buoyancy-modified two-equation turbulence models such as a k-e or k-w model with time-averaged Navier- Stokes equations are commonly used. Because an unsteadiness of a natural convection becomes nontrivial in a high Ra number pool, it is very difficult to get accurate heat flux on the pool surface with the time averaged turbulence model. Recently

  11. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Some specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000 ® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results

  12. A tensor formulation of the equation of transfer for spherically symmetric flows. [radiative transfer in seven dimensional Riemannian space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, B. M.

    1976-01-01

    A tensor formulation of the equation of radiative transfer is derived in a seven-dimensional Riemannian space such that the resulting equation constitutes a divergence in any coordinate system. After being transformed to a spherically symmetric comoving coordinate system, the transfer equation contains partial derivatives in angle and frequency, as well as optical depth due to the effects of aberration and the Doppler shift. However, by virtue of the divergence form of this equation, the divergence theorem may be applied to yield a numerical differencing scheme which is expected to be stable and to conserve luminosity. It is shown that the equation of transfer derived by this method in a Lagrangian coordinate system may be reduced to that given by Castor (1972), although it is, of course, desirable to leave the equation in divergence form.

  13. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for radiative transfer in spherical symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmann, D.; Bolte, J.; Patzer, A. B. C.

    2016-11-01

    The discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (DG-FEM) is successfully applied to treat a broad variety of transport problems numerically. In this work, we use the full capacity of the DG-FEM to solve the radiative transfer equation in spherical symmetry. We present a discontinuous Galerkin method to directly solve the spherically symmetric radiative transfer equation as a two-dimensional problem. The transport equation in spherical atmospheres is more complicated than in the plane-parallel case owing to the appearance of an additional derivative with respect to the polar angle. The DG-FEM formalism allows for the exact integration of arbitrarily complex scattering phase functions, independent of the angular mesh resolution. We show that the discontinuous Galerkin method is able to describe accurately the radiative transfer in extended atmospheres and to capture discontinuities or complex scattering behaviour which might be present in the solution of certain radiative transfer tasks and can, therefore, cause severe numerical problems for other radiative transfer solution methods.

  14. Radiative transfer equation for graded index medium in cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.H.; Zhang, L.; Tan, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    In graded index medium, the ray goes along a curved path determined by Fermat principle, and the curved ray-tracing is very difficult and complex. To avoid the complicated and time-consuming computation of curved ray trajectory, the methods not based on ray-tracing technique need to be developed for the solution of radiative transfer in graded index medium. For this purpose, in this paper the streaming operator along a curved ray trajectory in original radiative transfer equation for graded index medium is transformed and expressed in spatial and angular ordinates and the radiative transfer equation for graded index medium in cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems are derived. The conservative and the non-conservative forms of radiative transfer equation for three-dimensional graded index medium are given, which can be used as base equations to develop the numerical simulation methods, such as finite volume method, discrete ordinates method, and finite element method, for radiative transfer in graded index medium in cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems

  15. Free Thyroid Transfer: A Novel Procedure to Prevent Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Jeffrey; Almarzouki, Hani; Barber, Brittany; Scrimger, Rufus; Romney, Jacques; O'Connell, Daniel; Urken, Mark; Seikaly, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The incidence of hypothyroidism after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) has been found to be ≤53%. Medical treatment of hypothyroidism can be costly and difficult to titrate. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of free thyroid transfer as a strategy for the prevention of radiation-induced damage to the thyroid gland during radiation therapy for HNC. Methods and Materials: A prospective feasibility study was performed involving 10 patients with a new diagnosis of advanced HNC undergoing ablative surgery, radial forearm free-tissue transfer reconstruction, and postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy. During the neck dissection, hemithyroid dissection was completed with preservation of the thyroid arterial and venous supply for implantation into the donor forearm site. All patients underwent a diagnostic thyroid technetium scan 6 weeks and 12 months postoperatively to examine the functional integrity of the transferred thyroid tissue. Results: Free thyroid transfer was executed in 9 of the 10 recruited patients with advanced HNC. The postoperative technetium scans demonstrated strong uptake of technetium at the forearm donor site at 6 weeks and 12 months for all 9 of the transplanted patients. Conclusions: The thyroid gland can be transferred as a microvascular free transfer with maintenance of function. This technique could represent a novel strategy for maintenance of thyroid function after head and neck irradiation.

  16. Free Thyroid Transfer: A Novel Procedure to Prevent Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jeffrey [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Almarzouki, Hani [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Barber, Brittany, E-mail: brittanybarber0@gmail.com [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Scrimger, Rufus [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Romney, Jacques [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); O' Connell, Daniel [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Urken, Mark [Institute for Head and Neck and Thyroid Cancers, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York (United States); Seikaly, Hadi [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The incidence of hypothyroidism after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) has been found to be ≤53%. Medical treatment of hypothyroidism can be costly and difficult to titrate. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of free thyroid transfer as a strategy for the prevention of radiation-induced damage to the thyroid gland during radiation therapy for HNC. Methods and Materials: A prospective feasibility study was performed involving 10 patients with a new diagnosis of advanced HNC undergoing ablative surgery, radial forearm free-tissue transfer reconstruction, and postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy. During the neck dissection, hemithyroid dissection was completed with preservation of the thyroid arterial and venous supply for implantation into the donor forearm site. All patients underwent a diagnostic thyroid technetium scan 6 weeks and 12 months postoperatively to examine the functional integrity of the transferred thyroid tissue. Results: Free thyroid transfer was executed in 9 of the 10 recruited patients with advanced HNC. The postoperative technetium scans demonstrated strong uptake of technetium at the forearm donor site at 6 weeks and 12 months for all 9 of the transplanted patients. Conclusions: The thyroid gland can be transferred as a microvascular free transfer with maintenance of function. This technique could represent a novel strategy for maintenance of thyroid function after head and neck irradiation.

  17. User`s manual for the FEHM application -- A finite-element heat- and mass-transfer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zyvoloski, G.A.; Robinson, B.A.; Dash, Z.V.; Trease, L.L.

    1997-07-01

    The use of this code is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and groundwater flow. A primary use of the FEHM application will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields and mass transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones below the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved in the FEHM application by using the finite-element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat- and mass-transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. In fact, FEHM is capable of describing flow that is dominated in many areas by fracture and fault flow, including the inherently three-dimensional flow that results from permeation to and from faults and fractures. The code can handle coupled heat and mass-transfer effects, such as boiling, dryout, and condensation that can occur in the near-field region surrounding the potential repository and the natural convection that occurs through Yucca Mountain due to seasonal temperature changes. This report outlines the uses and capabilities of the FEHM application, initialization of code variables, restart procedures, and error processing. The report describes all the data files, the input data, including individual input records or parameters, and the various output files. The system interface is described, including the software environment and installation instructions.

  18. HELIOS-CR - A 1-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code with inline atomic kinetics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, J.J.; Golovkin, I.E.; Woodruff, P.R.

    2006-01-01

    HELIOS-CR is a user-oriented 1D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code to simulate the dynamic evolution of laser-produced plasmas and z-pinch plasmas. It includes an in-line collisional-radiative (CR) model for computing non-LTE atomic level populations at each time step of the hydrodynamics simulation. HELIOS-CR has been designed for ease of use, and is well-suited for experimentalists, as well as graduate and undergraduate student researchers. The energy equations employed include models for laser energy deposition, radiation from external sources, and high-current discharges. Radiative transport can be calculated using either a multi-frequency flux-limited diffusion model, or a multi-frequency, multi-angle short characteristics model. HELIOS-CR supports the use of SESAME equation of state (EOS) tables, PROPACEOS EOS/multi-group opacity data tables, and non-LTE plasma properties computed using the inline CR modeling. Time-, space-, and frequency-dependent results from HELIOS-CR calculations are readily displayed with the HydroPLOT graphics tool. In addition, the results of HELIOS simulations can be post-processed using the SPECT3D Imaging and Spectral Analysis Suite to generate images and spectra that can be directly compared with experimental measurements. The HELIOS-CR package runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac OSX platforms, and includes online documentation. We will discuss the major features of HELIOS-CR, and present example results from simulations

  19. Homoeologous chromatin exchange in a radiation-induced gene transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, J.; Knott, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the ionizing-radiation-induced translocations between alien and wheat chromosomes show no deleterious effects and are transmitted normally through the pollen. Translocations of this type will be called ''compensating''. In one such compensating translocation, designated T4, it was found that chromatin in the long arm of wheat chromosome 7D was replaced with homoeologous chromatin of the Agropyron chromosome

  20. Homoeologous chromatin exchange in a radiation-induced gene transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvorak, J; Knott, D R [Department of Crop Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

    1977-03-01

    Some of the ionizing-radiation-induced translocations between alien and wheat chromosomes show no deleterious effects and are transmitted normally through the pollen. Translocations of this type will be called ''compensating''. In one such compensating translocation, designated T4, it was found that chromatin in the long arm of wheat chromosome 7D was replaced with homologous chromatin of the Agropyron chromosome.

  1. Analysis of turbulent natural convection heat transfer in a lower plenum during external cooling using the COSMO code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, H.; Sawatari, Y.; Imada, T.

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of a large volumetrically heated melt pool is important to evaluate the feasibility of in-vessel retention by external flooding as an accident management. The COSMO (Coolability Simulation of Molten corium during severe accident) code has been developed at NUPEC to simulate turbulent natural convection heat transfer with internal heat source. The COSMO code solves thermal hydraulic conservation equations with turbulent model and can simulate melting and solidification process. The standard k-ε model has a limitation to describe the turbulent natural convection in the very high Rayleigh number condition (10 16 -10 17 ) assumed to occur in a lower plenum of RPV during a severe accident. This limitation results from the assumption of an analogy of momentum and energy transfer phenomena in the standard model. In this paper the modified turbulent model in which the turbulent number is treated, as a function of the flux Richardson number derived from the experiment, has been incorporated and verified by using the BALI experiments. It was found that the prediction of averaged Nusselt number became better than that of the standard model. In order to extend the COSMO code to the actual scale analysis under the external flooding conditions, more realistic boundary condition derived from the experiments should be treated. In this work the CHF correlation from ULPU experiment or the heat transfer coefficient correlation from CYBL experiment have been applied. The preliminary analysis of an actual scale analysis has been carried out under the condition of the TMI-2 accident. (author)

  2. Code of Practice for the Protection of Persons against Ionizing Radiations arising from Medical and Dental Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1972-01-01

    This Code is a revision of the 1964 Code of Practice for the protection of persons against ionizing radiations arising from medical and dental use. This revised Code (which does not have the force of law) applies to the use of ionizing radiations arising from all forms of medical and dental practice and from allied research involving human subjects. It covers both workers, patients and members of the public. Although the arrangements recommended relate primarily to institutions they should be applied, as far as possible, by all medical and dental practitioners. The Code has been drawn up in the light of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and of the views of the Medical Research Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations.

  3. Code of Practice for the Protection of Persons against Ionizing Radiations arising from Medical and Dental Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    This Code is a revision of the 1964 Code of Practice for the protection of persons against ionizing radiations arising from medical and dental use. This revised Code (which does not have the force of law) applies to the use of ionizing radiations arising from all forms of medical and dental practice and from allied research involving human subjects. It covers both workers, patients and members of the public. Although the arrangements recommended relate primarily to institutions they should be applied, as far as possible, by all medical and dental practitioners. The Code has been drawn up in the light of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and of the views of the Medical Research Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations. (NEA) [fr

  4. Energy efficient rateless codes for high speed data transfer over free space optical channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Geetha; Kulkarni, Muralidhar; Acharya, U. S.

    2015-03-01

    Terrestrial Free Space Optical (FSO) links transmit information by using the atmosphere (free space) as a medium. In this paper, we have investigated the use of Luby Transform (LT) codes as a means to mitigate the effects of data corruption induced by imperfect channel which usually takes the form of lost or corrupted packets. LT codes, which are a class of Fountain codes, can be used independent of the channel rate and as many code words as required can be generated to recover all the message bits irrespective of the channel performance. Achieving error free high data rates with limited energy resources is possible with FSO systems if error correction codes with minimal overheads on the power can be used. We also employ a combination of Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) with provision for modification of threshold and optimized LT codes with belief propagation for decoding. These techniques provide additional protection even under strong turbulence regimes. Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) is another method of improving link reliability. Performance of ARQ is limited by the number of retransmissions and the corresponding time delay. We prove through theoretical computations and simulations that LT codes consume less energy per bit. We validate the feasibility of using energy efficient LT codes over ARQ for FSO links to be used in optical wireless sensor networks within the eye safety limits.

  5. Development and preliminary verification of 2-D transport module of radiation shielding code ARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Penghe; Chen Yixue; Zhang Bin; Zang Qiyong; Yuan Longjun; Chen Mengteng

    2013-01-01

    The 2-D transport module of radiation shielding code ARES is two-dimensional neutron and radiation shielding code. The theory model was based on the first-order steady state neutron transport equation, adopting the discrete ordinates method to disperse direction variables. Then a set of differential equations can be obtained and solved with the source iteration method. The 2-D transport module of ARES was capable of calculating k eff and fixed source problem with isotropic or anisotropic scattering in x-y geometry. The theoretical model was briefly introduced and series of benchmark problems were verified in this paper. Compared with the results given by the benchmark, the maximum relative deviation of k eff is 0.09% and the average relative deviation of flux density is about 0.60% in the BWR cells benchmark problem. As for the fixed source problem with isotropic and anisotropic scattering, the results of the 2-D transport module of ARES conform with DORT very well. These numerical results of benchmark problems preliminarily demonstrate that the development process of the 2-D transport module of ARES is right and it is able to provide high precision result. (authors)

  6. 3D PiC code investigations of Auroral Kilometric Radiation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, K M; McConville, S L; Speirs, D C; Ronald, K; Phelps, A D R; Bingham, R; Cross, A W; Robertson, C W; Whyte, C G; He, W; Vorgul, I; Cairns, R A; Kellett, B J

    2014-01-01

    Efficient (∼1%) electron cyclotron radio emissions are known to originate in the X mode from regions of locally depleted plasma in the Earths polar magnetosphere. These emissions are commonly referred to as the Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR). AKR occurs naturally in these polar regions where electrons are accelerated by electric fields into the increasing planetary magnetic dipole. Here conservation of the magnetic moment converts axial to rotational momentum forming a horseshoe distribution in velocity phase space. This distribution is unstable to cyclotron emission with radiation emitted in the X-mode. Initial studies were conducted in the form of 2D PiC code simulations [1] and a scaled laboratory experiment that was constructed to reproduce the mechanism of AKR. As studies progressed, 3D PiC code simulations were conducted to enable complete investigation of the complex interaction dimensions. A maximum efficiency of 1.25% is predicted from these simulations in the same mode and frequency as measured in the experiment. This is also consistent with geophysical observations and the predictions of theory.

  7. Heat transfer including radiation and slag particles evolution in MHD channel-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    Accurate estimates of convective and radiative heat transfer in the magnetohydrodynamic channel are provided. Calculations performed for a base load-size channel indicate that heat transfer by gas radiation almost equals that by convection for smooth walls, and amounts to 70% as much as the convective heat transfer for rough walls. Carbon dioxide, water vapor, and potassium atoms are the principal participating gases. The evolution of slag particles by homogeneous nucleation and condensation is also investigated. The particle-size spectrum so computed is later utilized to analyze the radiation enhancement by slag particles in the MHD diffuser. The impact of the slag particle spectrum on the selection of a workable and design of an efficient seed collection system is discussed

  8. Impact of melting heat transfer and nonlinear radiative heat flux mechanisms for the generalized Burgers fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqar Azeem Khan

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the analysis of melting heat and mass transfer characteristics in the stagnation point flow of an incompressible generalized Burgers fluid over a stretching sheet in the presence of non-linear radiative heat flux. A uniform magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. The governing equations in dimensional form are reduced to a system of dimensionless expressions by implementation of suitable similarity transformations. The resulting dimensionless problem governing the generalized Burgers is solved analytically by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM. The effects of different flow parameters like the ratio parameter, magnetic parameter, Prandtl number, melting parameter, radiation parameter, temperature ratio parameter and Schmidt number on the velocity, heat and mass transfer characteristics are computed and presented graphically. Moreover, useful discussions in detail are carried out with the help of plotted graphs and tables. Keywords: Generalized Burgers fluid, Non-linear radiative flow, Magnetic field, Melting heat transfer

  9. Homogenization of some radiative heat transfer models: application to gas-cooled reactor cores; Homogeneisation de modeles de transferts thermiques et radiatifs: application au coeur des reacteurs a caloporteur gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ganaoui, K

    2006-09-15

    In the context of homogenization theory we treat some heat transfer problems involving unusual (according to the homogenization) boundary conditions. These problems are defined in a solid periodic perforated domain where two scales (macroscopic and microscopic) are to be taken into account and describe heat transfer by conduction in the solid and by radiation on the wall of each hole. Two kinds of radiation are considered: radiation in an infinite medium (non-linear problem) and radiation in cavity with grey-diffuse walls (non-linear and non-local problem). The derived homogenized models are conduction problems with an effective conductivity which depend on the considered radiation. Thus we introduce a framework (homogenization and validation) based on mathematical justification using the two-scale convergence method and numerical validation by simulations using the computer code CAST3M. This study, performed for gas cooled reactors cores, can be extended to other perforated domains involving the considered heat transfer phenomena. (author)

  10. Radiative Heat Transfer Modeling in Fibrous Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Sadaf; Panerai, Francesco; Borner, Arnaud; Ferguson, Joseph C.; Wray, Alan; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2017-01-01

    Phenolic-Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system material for successful atmospheric entries. The objective of the current work is to compute the effective radiative conductivity of fibrous porous media, such as preforms used to make PICA, to enable the efficient design of materials that can meet the thermal performance goals of forthcoming space exploration missions.

  11. Improvement of boiling heat transfer by radiation induced boiling enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Yasuyuki; Okamoto, Koji; Madarame, Haruki; Takamasa, Tomoji

    2003-01-01

    For nuclear reactor systems, the critical heat flux (CHF) data is very important because it limits reactor efficiency. Improvement of CHF requires that the cooling liquid can contact the heating surface, or a high-wettability, highly hydrophilic heating surface, even if a vapor bubble layer is generated on the surface. In our previous study, we confirmed that the surface wettability changed significantly or that highly hydrophilic conditions were achieved, after irradiation of 60 Co gamma ray, by the Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) phenomenon. To delineate the effect of RISA on boiling phenomena, surface wettability in a high-temperature environment and critical heat flux (CHF) of metal oxides irradiated by gamma rays were investigated. A CHF experiment in the pool boiling condition was carried out under atmospheric pressure. The heating test section made of titanium was 0.2 mm in thickness, 3 mm in height, and 60 mm in length. Oxidation of the surface was carried out by plasma jetting for 40 seconds. The test section was irradiated by 60 Co gamma ray with predetermined radiation intensity and period. The CHF of oxidized titanium was improved up to 100 percent after 800 kGy 60 Co gamma ray irradiation. We call this effect Radiation Induced Boiling Enhancement (RIBE). Before we conducted the CHF experiment, contact angles of the test pieces were measured to show the relationship between wettability and CHF. The CHF in the present experiment increases will surface wettability in the same manner as shown by Liaw and Dhir's results. (author)

  12. Improvement of boiling heat transfer by radiation induced boiling enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Y.; Okamoto, K.; Madarame, H.; Takamasa, T.

    2003-01-01

    For nuclear reactor systems, the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) data is very important because it limits reactor efficiency. Improvement of CHF requires that the cooling liquid can contact the heating surface, or a high-wettability, highly hydrophilic heating surface, even if a vapor bubble layer is generated on the surface. In our previous study, we confirmed that the surface wettability changed significantly or that highly hydrophilic conditions were achieved, after irradiation of 60Co gamma ray, by the Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) phenomenon. To delineate the effect of RISA on boiling phenomena, surface wettability in a high-temperature environment and Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of metal oxides irradiated by gamma rays were investigated. A CHF experiment in the pool boiling condition was carried out under atmospheric pressure. The heating test section made of titanium was 0.2mm in thickness, 3mm in height, and 60mm in length. Oxidation of the surfaces was carried out by plasma jetting for 40 seconds. The test section was irradiated by 60Co gamma ray with predetermined radiation intensity and period. The CHF of oxidized titanium was improved up to 100 percent after 800kGy 60Co gamma ray irradiation. We call this effect Radiation Induced Boiling Enhancement (RIBE). Before we conducted the CHF experiment, contact angles of the test pieces were measured to show the relationship between wettability and CHF. The CHF in the present experiment increases with surface wettability in the same manner as shown by Liaw and Dhir's results

  13. Heat transfer analysis of radiator using graphene oxide nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao Ponangi, Babu; Sumanth, S.; Krishna, V.; Seetharam, T. R.; Seetharamu, K. N.

    2018-04-01

    As the technology is developing day by day, there is a requirement for enhancement in performance of automobile radiator to have a better performance of the IC Engine and fuel effectiveness. One of the major and recent approach to upgrade the performance of a radiator is that nanoparticles must be suspended in the general coolant (Ethylene Glycol – Water) which form nanofluids. Present work has been carried out by suspending graphene oxide nanoparticles in 50:50 Ethylene Glycol and RO-Water as base fluid. Experimentation is carried out by using three volume concentrations of the nanofluid (0.02%, 0.03% and 0.04%) and at different volumetric flow rates ranging from 3 to 6 LPM. Effect of volume concentration, inlet temperature and flow rate on Effectiveness, pressure drop and friction factor has been studied experimentally. Effectiveness versus NTU curves are plotted for further design calculations. The results show that the nanofluids will enhance the performance of an automobile radiator when compared with base fluid. Results also shows a maximum of 56.45% and 41.47% improvement in effectiveness for 0.03% volume concentration and 5 LPM flow rate at 40°C and 50°C inlet temperatures respectively.

  14. Near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered hyperbolic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiao-Juan; Li, Jian-Wen; Wang, Tong-Biao; Zhang, De-Jian; Liu, Wen-Xing; Liao, Qing-Hua; Yu, Tian-Bao; Liu, Nian-Hua

    2018-04-01

    We propose the use of graphene-covered silicon carbide (SiC) nanowire arrays (NWAs) for theoretical studies of near-field radiative heat transfer. The SiC NWAs exhibit a hyperbolic characteristic at an appropriately selected filling-volume fraction. The surface plasmon supported by graphene and the hyperbolic modes supported by SiC NWAs significantly affect radiative heat transfer. The heat-transfer coefficient (HTC) between the proposed structures is larger than that between SiC NWAs. We also find that the chemical potential of graphene plays an important role in modulating the HTC. The tunability of chemical potential through gate voltage enables flexible control of heat transfer using the graphene-covered SiC NWAs.

  15. Ultra thin metallic coatings to control near field radiative heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Sirvent, R.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical calculation of the changes in the near field radiative heat transfer between two surfaces due to the presence of ultra thin metallic coatings on semiconductors. Depending on the substrates, the radiative heat transfer is modulated by the thickness of the ultra thin film. In particular we consider gold thin films with thicknesses varying from 4 to 20 nm. The ultra-thin film has an insulator-conductor transition close to a critical thickness of dc = 6.4 nm and there is an increase in the near field spectral heat transfer just before the percolation transition. Depending on the substrates (Si or SiC) and the thickness of the metallic coatings we show how the near field heat transfer can be increased or decreased as a function of the metallic coating thickness. The calculations are based on available experimental data for the optical properties of ultrathin coatings.

  16. Near-field radiative heat transfer between clusters of dielectric nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, J.; Zhao, J.M.; Liu, L.H.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we explore the near-field radiative heat transfer between two clusters of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles using the many-body radiative heat transfer theory. The effects of fractal dimension of clusters, many-body interaction between nanoparticles and relative orientation of clusters on the thermal conductance are studied. Meanwhile, the applicability of the equivalent volume spheres (EVS) approximation for near-field radiative heat transfer between clusters is examined. It is observed that the thermal conductance is larger for clusters with larger fractal dimension, which is more significant in the near-field. The thermal conductance of EVS resembles that of the clusters, but EVS overestimates the conductance of clusters, especially in the near-field. Compared to the case of two nanoparticles, the conductance of nanoparticle clusters decays much slower with increasing distance in the near-field, but shares similar dependence on the distance in the far-field. The thermal conductance of SiC nanoparticle clusters is inhibited by the many-body interaction when surface phonon polariton is supported but enhanced at frequencies close to the resonance frequency. The total thermal conductance is decreased due to many-body interaction among particles in the cluster. The relative orientation between the clusters is also an important factor in the near-field, especially for clusters with lower fractal dimension. - Highlights: • Near-field radiative heat transfer between clusters of nanoparticles is studied. • The many-body radiative heat transfer theory is applied for rigorous analysis. • The accuracy of equivalent volume spheres approximation is examined. • Clusters with larger fractal dimension have larger radiative thermal conductance. • Many-body interaction inhibits the total radiative thermal conductance.

  17. Theory of many-body radiative heat transfer without the constraint of reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Guo, Yu; Fan, Shanhui

    2018-03-01

    Using a self-consistent scattered field approach based on fluctuational electrodynamics, we develop compact formulas for radiative heat transfer in many-body systems without the constraint of reciprocity. The formulas allow for efficient numerical calculation for a system consisting of a large number of bodies, and are in principle exact. As a demonstration, for a nonreciprocal many-body system, we investigate persistent heat current at thermal equilibrium and directional heat transfer when the system is away from thermal equilibrium.

  18. CFD analysis of heat transfer performance of graphene based hybrid nanofluid in radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Bharath R.; Sanketh Mogeraya, K.; Manjunath, D. M.; Rao Ponangi, Babu; Rajendra Prasad, K. S.; Krishna, V.

    2018-04-01

    For Improved performance of an automobile engine, Cooling systems are one of the critical systems that need attention. With increased capacity to carry away large amounts of wasted heat, performance of an engine is increased. Current research on Nano-fluids suggests that they offer higher heat transfer rate compared to that of conventional coolants. Hence this project seeks to investigate the use of hybrid-nanofluids in radiators so as to increase its heat transfer performance. Carboxyl Graphene and Graphene Oxide based nanoparticles were selected due to the very high thermal conductivity of Graphene. System Analysis of the radiator was performed by considering a small part of the whole automobile radiator modelled using SEIMENS NX. CFD analysis was conducted using ANSYS FLUENT® for the nanofluid defined and the increase in effectiveness was compared to that of conventional coolants. Usage of such nanofluids for a fixed cooling requirement in the future can lead to significant downsizing of the radiator.

  19. The weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model for arbitrary solution methods in radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modest, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the weighted-sum-of-gray-gases approach for radiative transfer in non-gray participating media, first developed by Hottel in the context of the zonal method, has been shown to be applicable to the general radiative equation of transfer. Within the limits of the weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model (non-scattering media within a black-walled enclosure) any non-gray radiation problem can be solved by any desired solution method after replacing the medium by an equivalent small number of gray media with constant absorption coefficients. Some examples are presented for isothermal media and media at radiative equilibrium, using the exact integral equations as well as the popular P-1 approximation of the equivalent gray media solution. The results demonstrate the equivalency of the method with the quadrature of spectral results, as well as the tremendous computer times savings (by a minimum of 95%) which are achieved

  20. Scattering by a slab containing randomly located cylinders: comparison between radiative transfer and electromagnetic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, L; Mareschal, P; Vukadinovic, N; Thibaud, J B; Greffet, J J

    2001-02-01

    This study is devoted to the examination of scattering of waves by a slab containing randomly located cylinders. For the first time to our knowledge, the complete transmission problem has been solved numerically. We have compared the radiative transfer theory with a numerical solution of the wave equation. We discuss the coherent effects, such as forward-scattering dip and backscattering enhancement. It is seen that the radiative transfer equation can be used with great accuracy even for optically thin systems whose geometric thickness is comparable with the wavelength. We have also shown the presence of dependent scattering.

  1. PRECONDITIONED BI-CONJUGATE GRADIENT METHOD FOR RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN SPHERICAL MEDIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anusha, L. S.; Nagendra, K. N.; Paletou, F.; Leger, L.

    2009-01-01

    A robust numerical method called the Preconditioned Bi-Conjugate Gradient (Pre-BiCG) method is proposed for the solution of the radiative transfer equation in spherical geometry. A variant of this method called Stabilized Preconditioned Bi-Conjugate Gradient (Pre-BiCG-STAB) is also presented. These are iterative methods based on the construction of a set of bi-orthogonal vectors. The application of the Pre-BiCG method in some benchmark tests shows that the method is quite versatile, and can handle difficult problems that may arise in astrophysical radiative transfer theory.

  2. Radiative transfer theory for active remote sensing of a layer of small ellipsoidal scatterers. [of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L.; Kubacsi, M. C.; Kong, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied within the Rayleigh approximation to calculate the backscattering cross section of a layer of randomly positioned and oriented small ellipsoids. The orientation of the ellipsoids is characterized by a probability density function of the Eulerian angles of rotation. The radiative transfer equations are solved by an iterative approach to first order in albedo. In the half space limit the results are identical to those obtained via the approach of Foldy's and distorted Born approximation. Numerical results of the theory are illustrated using parameters encountered in active remote sensing of vegetation layers. A distinctive characteristic is the strong depolarization shown by vertically aligned leaves.

  3. A research program on radiative transfer model development in support of the ARM program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research effort is to develop radiative transfer models that are consistent with ARM spectral radiance measurements for clear and cloudy atmospheres. Our approach is to develop the model physics and related databases with a line-by-line model in the context of available spectral radiance measurements. The line-by-line model then functions as an intermediate standard to both develop and validate rapid radiative transfer models appropriate to GCM applications. A preprint of an extended abstract for the 1994 AMS volume describing a Quality Measurement Experiment using the ARM spectral data is included as an attachment

  4. Radio galaxies radiation transfer, dynamics, stability and evolution of a synchrotron plasmon

    CERN Document Server

    Pacholczyk, A G

    1977-01-01

    Radio Galaxies: Radiation Transfer, Dynamics, Stability and Evolution of a Synchrotron Plasmon deals with the physics of a region in space containing magnetic field and thermal and relativistic particles (a plasmon). The synchrotron emission and absorption of this region are discussed, along with the properties of its spectrum; its linear and circular polarization; transfer of radiation through such a region; its dynamics and expansion; and interaction with external medium.Comprised of eight chapters, this volume explores the stability, turbulence, and acceleration of particles in a synchrotro

  5. Premar-2: a Monte Carlo code for radiative transport simulation in atmospheric environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna, (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    The peculiarities of the PREMAR-2 code, aimed at radiation transport Monte Carlo simulation in atmospheric environments in the infrared-ultraviolet frequency range, are described. With respect to the previously developed PREMAR code, besides plane multilayers, spherical multilayers and finite sequences of vertical layers, each one with its own atmospheric behaviour, are foreseen in the new code, together with the refraction phenomenon, so that long range, highly slanted paths can now be more faithfully taken into account. A zenithal angular dependence of the albedo coefficient has moreover been introduced. Lidar systems, with spatially independent source and telescope, are allowed again to be simulated, and, in this latest version of the code, sensitivity analyses to be performed. According to this last feasibility, consequences on radiation transport of small perturbations in physical components of the atmospheric environment may be analyze and the related effects on searched results estimated. The availability of a library of physical data (reaction coefficients, phase functions and refraction indexes) is required by the code, providing the essential features of the environment of interest needed of the Monte Carlo simulation. Variance reducing techniques have been enhanced in the Premar-2 code, by introducing, for instance, a local forced collision technique, especially apt to be used in Lidar system simulations. Encouraging comparisons between code and experimental results carried out at the Brasimone Centre of ENEA, have so far been obtained, even if further checks of the code are to be performed. [Italian] Nel presente rapporto vengono descritte le principali caratteristiche del codice di calcolo PREMAR-2, che esegue la simulazione Montecarlo del trasporto della radiazione elettromagnetica nell'atmosfera, nell'intervallo di frequenza che va dall'infrarosso all'ultravioletto. Rispetto al codice PREMAR precedentemente sviluppato, il codice

  6. Modeling of the coupled radiative and conductive heat transfer within fibrous media at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauvois, Yann

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, the effective heat transfer properties of fibrous medium are determined by taking into account a coupling of heat conduction and radiation. A virtual, statistically homogeneous, two-phase fibrous sample has been built by stacking finite absorbing cylinders in vacuum. These cylinders are dispersed according to prescribed distribution functions defining the cylinder positions and orientations. Cylinder overlappings are allowed. Extinction, absorption and scattering are characterised by radiative statistical functions which allow the Beerian behaviour of a medium to be assessed (or not). They are accurately determined with a Monte Carlo method. Whereas the gaseous phase exhibits a Beerian behaviour, the fibre phase is strongly non Beerian. The radiative power field deposited within the fibrous material is calculated by resolving a model which couples a Generalized Radiative Transfer Equation (GRTE) and a classic Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). The model of conduction transfer is based on a random walk method without meshing. The simulation of Brownian motion of walkers in fibres allows the energy equation to be solved. The idea of the method is to characterize the temperature in an elementary volume by the density of walkers, which roam the medium. The problem is governed by boundary conditions; A constant concentration of walkers (or a constant flux) is associated with a fixed temperature (or flux). (author) [fr

  7. A Radiation Chemistry Code Based on the Greens Functions of the Diffusion Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation produces several radiolytic species such as.OH, e-aq, and H. when interacting with biological matter. Following their creation, radiolytic species diffuse and chemically react with biological molecules such as DNA. Despite years of research, many questions on the DNA damage by ionizing radiation remains, notably on the indirect effect, i.e. the damage resulting from the reactions of the radiolytic species with DNA. To simulate DNA damage by ionizing radiation, we are developing a step-by-step radiation chemistry code that is based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE), which is able to follow the trajectories of all particles and their reactions with time. In the recent years, simulations based on the GFDE have been used extensively in biochemistry, notably to simulate biochemical networks in time and space and are often used as the "gold standard" to validate diffusion-reaction theories. The exact GFDE for partially diffusion-controlled reactions is difficult to use because of its complex form. Therefore, the radial Green's function, which is much simpler, is often used. Hence, much effort has been devoted to the sampling of the radial Green's functions, for which we have developed a sampling algorithm This algorithm only yields the inter-particle distance vector length after a time step; the sampling of the deviation angle of the inter-particle vector is not taken into consideration. In this work, we show that the radial distribution is predicted by the exact radial Green's function. We also use a technique developed by Clifford et al. to generate the inter-particle vector deviation angles, knowing the inter-particle vector length before and after a time step. The results are compared with those predicted by the exact GFDE and by the analytical angular functions for free diffusion. This first step in the creation of the radiation chemistry code should help the understanding of the contribution of the indirect effect in the

  8. Thermal-Flow Code for Modeling Gas Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qunzhen; Mathias, Edward C.; Heman, Joe R.; Smith, Cory W.

    2000-01-01

    A new, thermal-flow simulation code, called SFLOW. has been developed to model the gas dynamics, heat transfer, as well as O-ring and flow path erosion inside the space shuttle solid rocket motor joints by combining SINDA/Glo, a commercial thermal analyzer. and SHARPO, a general-purpose CFD code developed at Thiokol Propulsion. SHARP was modified so that friction, heat transfer, mass addition, as well as minor losses in one-dimensional flow can be taken into account. The pressure, temperature and velocity of the combustion gas in the leak paths are calculated in SHARP by solving the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations while the heat conduction in the solid is modeled by SINDA/G. The two codes are coupled by the heat flux at the solid-gas interface. A few test cases are presented and the results from SFLOW agree very well with the exact solutions or experimental data. These cases include Fanno flow where friction is important, Rayleigh flow where heat transfer between gas and solid is important, flow with mass addition due to the erosion of the solid wall, a transient volume venting process, as well as some transient one-dimensional flows with analytical solutions. In addition, SFLOW is applied to model the RSRM nozzle joint 4 subscale hot-flow tests and the predicted pressures, temperatures (both gas and solid), and O-ring erosions agree well with the experimental data. It was also found that the heat transfer between gas and solid has a major effect on the pressures and temperatures of the fill bottles in the RSRM nozzle joint 4 configuration No. 8 test.

  9. Prevention of radiation induced xerostomia by surgical transfer of submandibular salivary gland into the submental space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Naresh; Seikaly, Hadi; Harris, Jeff; Williams, David; Liu, Richard; McGaw, Timothy; Hofmann, Henry; Robinson, Don; Hanson, John; Barnaby, Pam

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Xerostomia is a significant morbidity of radiation treatment in the management of head and neck cancers. We hypothesized that the surgical transfer of one submandibular salivary gland to the submental space, where it can be shielded from radiation treatment (XRT), would prevent xerostomia. Materials and methods: We conducted a prospective Phase II clinical trial and the patients were followed clinically with salivary flow studies and the University of Washington Quality of Life questionnaire. Results: We report the results on 76 evaluable patients. The salivary gland transfer was done in 60 patients. Nine patients (of 60) did not have postoperative XRT and in eight patients (of 60) the transferred gland was not shielded from XRT due to proximity of disease. The median follow up is 14 months. Of the 43 patients with the salivary gland transfer and post-operative XRT with protection of the transferred gland, 81% have none or minimal xerostomia, and 19% developed moderate to severe xerostomia. Three patients (6.9%) developed local recurrence, five patients (11.6%) developed distant metastases and five patients (11.6%) have died. There were no complications attributed to the surgical procedure. Conclusion: Surgical transfer of a submandibular salivary gland to the submental space preserves its function and prevents the development of radiation induced xerostomia

  10. Advances in the discrete ordinates and finite volume methods for the solution of radiative heat transfer problems in participating media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, Pedro J.

    2014-01-01

    Many methods are available for the solution of radiative heat transfer problems in participating media. Among these, the discrete ordinates method (DOM) and the finite volume method (FVM) are among the most widely used ones. They provide a good compromise between accuracy and computational requirements, and they are relatively easy to integrate in CFD codes. This paper surveys recent advances on these numerical methods. Developments concerning the grid structure (e.g., new formulations for axisymmetrical geometries, body-fitted structured and unstructured meshes, embedded boundaries, multi-block grids, local grid refinement), the spatial discretization scheme, and the angular discretization scheme are described. Progress related to the solution accuracy, solution algorithm, alternative formulations, such as the modified DOM and FVM, even-parity formulation, discrete-ordinates interpolation method and method of lines, and parallelization strategies is addressed. The application to non-gray media, variable refractive index media, and transient problems is also reviewed. - Highlights: • We survey recent advances in the discrete ordinates and finite volume methods. • Developments in spatial and angular discretization schemes are described. • Progress in solution algorithms and parallelization methods is reviewed. • Advances in the transient solution of the radiative transfer equation are appraised. • Non-gray media and variable refractive index media are briefly addressed

  11. Pomarning-eddington approximation for time-dependent radiation transfer in finite slab media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Wakil, S.A.; Degheidy, A.R.; Sallah, M.

    2005-01-01

    The time-dependent monoenergetic radiation transfer equation with linear anisotropic scattering is proposed. Pomraning-Eddington approximation is used to calculate the radiation intensity in finite plane-parallel media. Numerical results are done for the isotropic media. Shielding calculations are shown for reflectivity and transmissivity at different times. The medium is assumed to have specular-reflecting boundaries. Two different weight functions are introduced to force the boundary conditions to be fulfilled

  12. Radiation Effects on the Flow and Heat Transfer over a Moving Plate in a Parallel Stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishak, Anuar

    2009-01-01

    Effects of thermal radiation on the steady laminar boundary layer flow over a moving plate in a moving fluid is investigated. Under certain conditions, the present problem reduces to the classical Blasius and Sakiadis problems. It is found that dual solutions exist when the plate and the fluid move in the opposite directions. Moreover, the existence of thermal radiation is to reduce the heat transfer rate at the surface. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  13. Multigroup Approximation of Radiation Transfer in SF6 Arc Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milada Bartlova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The first order of the method of spherical harmonics (P1-approximation has been used to evaluate the radiation properties of arc plasmas of various mixtures of SF6 and PTFE ((C2F4n, polytetrafluoroethylene in the temperature range (1000 ÷ 35 000 K and pressures from 0.5 to 5 MPa. Calculations have been performed for isothermal cylindrical plasma of various radii (0.01 ÷ 10 cm. The frequency dependence of the absorption coefficients has been handled using the Planck and Rosseland averaging methods for several frequency intervals. Results obtained using various means calculated for different choices of frequency intervals are discussed.

  14. Physical Processes and Applications of the Monte Carlo Radiative Energy Deposition (MRED) Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Warren, Kevin M.; Sierawski, Brian D.; King, Michael P.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.; Auden, Elizabeth C.

    2015-08-01

    MRED is a Python-language scriptable computer application that simulates radiation transport. It is the computational engine for the on-line tool CRÈME-MC. MRED is based on c++ code from Geant4 with additional Fortran components to simulate electron transport and nuclear reactions with high precision. We provide a detailed description of the structure of MRED and the implementation of the simulation of physical processes used to simulate radiation effects in electronic devices and circuits. Extensive discussion and references are provided that illustrate the validation of models used to implement specific simulations of relevant physical processes. Several applications of MRED are summarized that demonstrate its ability to predict and describe basic physical phenomena associated with irradiation of electronic circuits and devices. These include effects from single particle radiation (including both direct ionization and indirect ionization effects), dose enhancement effects, and displacement damage effects. MRED simulations have also helped to identify new single event upset mechanisms not previously observed by experiment, but since confirmed, including upsets due to muons and energetic electrons.

  15. Review of relative biological effectiveness dependence on linear energy transfer for low-LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, Nezahat; Muirhead, Colin R

    2009-01-01

    Information on Japanese A-bomb survivors exposed to gamma radiation has been used to estimate cancer risks for the whole range of photon (x-rays) and electron energies which are commonly encountered by radiation workers in the work place or by patients and workers in diagnostic radiology. However, there is some uncertainty regarding the radiation effectiveness of various low-linear energy transfer (low-LET) radiations (x-rays, gamma radiation and electrons). In this paper we review information on the effectiveness of low-LET radiations on the basis of epidemiological and in vitro radiobiological studies. Data from various experimental studies for chromosome aberrations and cell transformation in human lymphocytes and from epidemiological studies of the Japanese A-bomb survivors, patients medically exposed to radiation for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and occupational exposures of nuclear workers are considered. On the basis of in vitro cellular radiobiology, there is considerable evidence that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-energy low-LET radiation (gamma radiation, electrons) is less than that of low-energy low-LET radiation (x-rays, betas). This is a factor of about 3 to 4 for 29 kVp x-rays (e.g. as in diagnostic radiation exposures of the female breast) and for tritium beta-rays (encountered in parts of the nuclear industry) relative to Co-60 gamma radiation and 2-5 MeV gamma-rays (as received by the Japanese A-bomb survivors). In epidemiological studies, although for thyroid and breast cancer there appears to be a small tendency for the excess relative risks to decrease as the radiation energy increases for low-LET radiations, it is not statistically feasible to draw any conclusion regarding an underlying dependence of cancer risk on LET for the nominally low-LET radiations. (review)

  16. Radiation-hard optoelectronic data transfer for the CMS tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troska, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    An introduction to the physics prospects of future experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be given, along with the rather stringent requirements placed on their detectors by the LHC environment. Emphasis will be placed upon the particle tracking detectors, and the particular problem of their readout systems. The novel analogue optical readout scheme chosen by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the LHC will provide the basis for the thesis. The reasons for preferring analogue optical data transmission in CMS will be given, leading to a description of a generic optical readout scheme and its components. The particular scheme chosen by CMS makes as wide as possible use of commercially available components. These will be given greatest importance, with descriptions of component operation and characteristics pertinent to successful readout of the CMS tracker within the constraints of the LHC environment. Of particular concern is the effect of the LHC's harsh radiation environment on the operational characteristics of the readout system and its components. Work on radiation effects in components of the CMS tracker optical readout system will be described. This work includes the effects of ionising (gamma photon) and particle (neutron, proton, pion) irradiation on the operational characteristics and reliability of laser diodes, photodiodes, and optical fibres. System integration issues are discussed in the context of the long-term operation of the full CMS tracker readout system under laboratory conditions. It will be shown that system stability can be maintained even under widely varying ambient conditions. (author)

  17. Studying effects of non-equilibrium radiative transfer via HPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-24

    This report presents slides on Ph.D. Research Goals; Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) Implications; Calculating an Opacity; Opacity: Pictographic Representation; Opacity: Pictographic Representation; Opacity: Pictographic Representation; Collisional Radiative Modeling; Radiative and Collisional Excitation; Photo and Electron Impact Ionization; Autoionization; The Rate Matrix; Example: Total Photoionization rate; The Rate Coefficients; inlinlte version 1.1; inlinlte: Verification; New capabilities: Rate Matrix – Flexibility; Memory Option Comparison; Improvements over previous DCA solver; Inter- and intra-node load balancing; Load Balance – Full Picture; Load Balance – Full Picture; Load Balance – Internode; Load Balance – Scaling; Description; Performance; xRAGE Simulation; Post-process @ 2hr; Post-process @ 4hr; Post-process @ 8hr; Takeaways; Performance for 1 realization; Motivation for QOI; Multigroup Er; Transport and NLTE large effects (1mm, 1keV); Transport large effect, NLTE lesser (1mm, 750eV); Blastwave Diagnostici – Description & Performance; Temperature Comparison; NLTE has effect on dynamics at wall; NLTE has lesser effect in the foam; Global Takeaways; The end.

  18. SPECT3D - A multi-dimensional collisional-radiative code for generating diagnostic signatures based on hydrodynamics and PIC simulation output

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E.; Wang, P.; Woodruff, P. R.; Pereyra, N. A.

    2007-05-01

    SPECT3D is a multi-dimensional collisional-radiative code used to post-process the output from radiation-hydrodynamics (RH) and particle-in-cell (PIC) codes to generate diagnostic signatures (e.g. images, spectra) that can be compared directly with experimental measurements. This ability to post-process simulation code output plays a pivotal role in assessing the reliability of RH and PIC simulation codes and their physics models. SPECT3D has the capability to operate on plasmas in 1D, 2D, and 3D geometries. It computes a variety of diagnostic signatures that can be compared with experimental measurements, including: time-resolved and time-integrated spectra, space-resolved spectra and streaked spectra; filtered and monochromatic images; and X-ray diode signals. Simulated images and spectra can include the effects of backlighters, as well as the effects of instrumental broadening and time-gating. SPECT3D also includes a drilldown capability that shows where frequency-dependent radiation is emitted and absorbed as it propagates through the plasma towards the detector, thereby providing insights on where the radiation seen by a detector originates within the plasma. SPECT3D has the capability to model a variety of complex atomic and radiative processes that affect the radiation seen by imaging and spectral detectors in high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments. LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) or non-LTE atomic level populations can be computed for plasmas. Photoabsorption rates can be computed using either escape probability models or, for selected 1D and 2D geometries, multi-angle radiative transfer models. The effects of non-thermal (i.e. non-Maxwellian) electron distributions can also be included. To study the influence of energetic particles on spectra and images recorded in intense short-pulse laser experiments, the effects of both relativistic electrons and energetic proton beams can be simulated. SPECT3D is a user-friendly software package that runs

  19. Effect resonance radiation transfer of excitation porous silicon to I sub 2 molecules sorbed in pores

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharchenko, K V; Kuznetsov, M B; Chistyakov, A A; Karavanskij, V A

    2001-01-01

    One studies the effect of resonance radiation-free transfer of electronic excitation between silicon nanocrystals and iodine molecules sorbed in pores. The experiment procedure includes laser-induced luminescence and laser desorption mass spectrometry. One analyzes photoluminescence spectra prior to and upon iodine sorption. Excitation of iodine through the mechanism of resonance transfer is determined to result in desorption of the iodine sorbed molecules with relatively high kinetic energies (3-1 eV). One evaluated the peculiar distance of resonance transfer the approximate value of which was equal to 2 nm

  20. The accuracy of seminumerical reionization models in comparison with radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Anne

    2018-06-01

    We have developed a modular seminumerical code that computes the time and spatially dependent ionization of neutral hydrogen (H I), neutral (He I), and single-ionized helium (He II) in the intergalactic medium (IGM). The model accounts for recombinations and provides different descriptions for the photoionization rate that are used to calculate the residual H I} fraction in ionized regions. We compare different seminumerical reionization schemes to a radiative transfer (RT) simulation. We use the RT simulation as a benchmark, and find that the seminumerical approaches produce similar H II and He II morphologies and power spectra of the H I 21 cm signal throughout reionization. As we do not track partial ionization of He II, the extent of the double-ionized helium (He III) regions is consistently smaller. In contrast to previous comparison projects, the ionizing emissivity in our seminumerical scheme is not adjusted to reproduce the redshift evolution of the RT simulation, but directly derived from the RT simulation spectra. Among schemes that identify the ionized regions by the ratio of the number of ionization and absorption events on different spatial smoothing scales, we find those that mark the entire sphere as ionized when the ionization criterion is fulfilled to result in significantly accelerated reionization compared to the RT simulation. Conversely, those that flag only the central cell as ionized yield very similar but slightly delayed redshift evolution of reionization, with up to 20 per cent ionizing photons lost. Despite the overall agreement with the RT simulation, our results suggest that constraining ionizing emissivity-sensitive parameters from seminumerical galaxy formation-reionization models are subject to photon nonconservation.