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Sample records for radiative rapidly rotating

  1. Rapidly rotating pulsar radiation in vacuum nonlinear electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, V I; Pimenov, A B; Sokolov, V A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate vacuum nonlinear electrodynamics corrections on rapidly rotating pulsar radiation and spin-down in the perturbative QED approach (post-Maxwellian approximation). An analytical expression for the pulsar's radiation intensity has been obtained and analyzed.

  2. Rapidly rotating pulsar radiation in vacuum nonlinear electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, V.I.; Pimenov, A.B.; Sokolov, V.A. [Moscow State University, Physics Department, Moscow (Russian Federation); Denisova, I.P. [Moscow Aviation Institute (National Research University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    In this paper we investigate the corrections of vacuum nonlinear electrodynamics on rapidly rotating pulsar radiation and spin-down in the perturbative QED approach (post-Maxwellian approximation). An analytical expression for the pulsar's radiation intensity has been obtained and analyzed. (orig.)

  3. Rapidly rotating pulsar radiation in vacuum nonlinear electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, V. I.; Denisova, I. P.; Pimenov, A. B.; Sokolov, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the corrections of vacuum nonlinear electrodynamics on rapidly rotating pulsar radiation and spin-down in the perturbative QED approach (post-Maxwellian approximation). An analytical expression for the pulsar's radiation intensity has been obtained and analyzed.

  4. Rapidly rotating red giants

    CERN Document Server

    Gehan, Charlotte; Michel, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Stellar oscillations give seismic information on the internal properties of stars. Red giants are targets of interest since they present mixed modes, which behave as pressure modes in the convective envelope and as gravity modes in the radiative core. Mixed modes thus directly probe red giant cores, and allow in particular the study of their mean core rotation. The high-quality data obtained by CoRoT and Kepler satellites represent an unprecedented perspective to obtain thousands of measurements of red giant core rotation, in order to improve our understanding of stellar physics in deep stellar interiors. We developed an automated method to obtain such core rotation measurements and validated it for stars on the red giant branch. In this work, we particularly focus on the specific application of this method to red giants having a rapid core rotation. They show complex spectra where it is tricky to disentangle rotational splittings from mixed-mode period spacings. We demonstrate that the method based on the id...

  5. The Rapidly Rotating Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures at a continuum of scales, from large to small. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. In the present work, imaging techniques of time-distance helioseismology applied to observational data reveal no long-range order in the convective motion. We conservatively bound the associated velocity magnitudes, as a function of depth and the spherical-harmonic degree l to be 20-100 times weaker than prevailing estimates within the wavenumber band l ux of a solar luminosity outwards? The Sun is seemingly a much faster rotator than previously thought, with advection dominated by Coriolis forces at scales l < 60.

  6. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R., E-mail: renan@dfte.ufrn.br [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitário, Natal RN (Brazil)

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  7. Kepler rapidly rotating giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, A D; Bravo, J P; Paz-Chinchón, F; Chagas, M L das; Leão, I C; de Oliveira, G Pereira; da Silva, R Rodrigues; Roque, S; de Oliveira, L L A; da Silva, D Freire; De Medeiros, J R

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of sub-stellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present letter we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points for remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the Sun rotation. These giants are combined with 6 other recently listed in the literature for mid-IR diagnostic based on WISE information, from which a trend for an infrared excess is revealed for at least a half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  8. Rapidly rotating neutron star progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnov, K. A.; Kuranov, A. G.; Kolesnikov, D. A.; Popov, S. B.; Porayko, N. K.

    2016-12-01

    Rotating proto-neutron stars can be important sources of gravitational waves to be searched for by present-day and future interferometric detectors. It was demonstrated by Imshennik that in extreme cases the rapid rotation of a collapsing stellar core may lead to fission and formation of a binary proto-neutron star which subsequently merges due to gravitational wave emission. In this paper, we show that such dynamically unstable collapsing stellar cores may be the product of a former merger process of two stellar cores in a common envelope. We applied population synthesis calculations to assess the expected fraction of such rapidly rotating stellar cores which may lead to fission and formation of a pair of proto-neutron stars. We have used the BSE (Binary Star Evolution) population synthesis code supplemented with a new treatment of stellar core rotation during the evolution via effective core-envelope coupling, characterized by the coupling time, τc. The validity of this approach is checked by direct MESA calculations of the evolution of a rotating 15 M⊙ star. From comparison of the calculated spin distribution of young neutron stars with the observed one, reported by Popov and Turolla, we infer the value τc ≃ 5 × 105 yr. We show that merging of stellar cores in common envelopes can lead to collapses with dynamically unstable proto-neutron stars, with their formation rate being ˜0.1-1 per cent of the total core collapses, depending on the common envelope efficiency.

  9. Rapidly rotating neutron star progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnov, K. A.; Kuranov, A. G.; Kolesnikov, D. A.; Popov, S. B.; Porayko, N. K.

    2016-08-01

    Rotating proto-neutron stars can be important sources of gravitational waves to be searched for by present-day and future interferometric detectors. It was demonstrated by Imshennik that in extreme cases the rapid rotation of a collapsing stellar core may lead to fission and formation of a binary proto-neutron star which subsequently merges due to gravitational wave emission. In the present paper, we show that such dynamically unstable collapsing stellar cores may be the product of a former merger process of two stellar cores in a common envelope. We applied population synthesis calculations to assess the expected fraction of such rapidly rotating stellar cores which may lead to fission and formation of a pair of proto-neutron stars. We have used the BSE population synthesis code supplemented with a new treatment of stellar core rotation during the evolution via effective core-envelope coupling, characterized by the coupling time, τc. The validity of this approach is checked by direct MESA calculations of the evolution of a rotating 15 M⊙ star. From comparison of the calculated spin distribution of young neutron stars with the observed one, reported by Popov and Turolla, we infer the value τc ≃ 5 × 105 years. We show that merging of stellar cores in common envelopes can lead to collapses with dynamically unstable proto-neutron stars, with their formation rate being ˜0.1 - 1% of the total core collapses, depending on the common envelope efficiency.

  10. Rapidly rotating neutron star progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Postnov, K A; Kolesnikov, D A; Popov, S B; Porayko, N K

    2016-01-01

    Rotating proto-neutron stars can be important sources of gravitational waves to be searched for by present-day and future interferometric detectors. It was demonstrated by Imshennik that in extreme cases the rapid rotation of a collapsing stellar core may lead to fission and formation of a binary proto-neutron star which subsequently merges due to gravitational wave emission. In the present paper, we show that such dynamically unstable collapsing stellar cores may be the product of a former merger process of two stellar cores in a common envelope. We applied population synthesis calculations to assess the expected fraction of such rapidly rotating stellar cores which may lead to fission and formation of a pair of proto-neutron stars. We have used the BSE population synthesis code supplemented with a new treatment of stellar core rotation during the evolution via effective core-envelope coupling, characterized by the coupling time, $\\tau_c$. The validity of this approach is checked by direct MESA calculations ...

  11. Wreathes of Magnetism in Rapidly Rotating Suns

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Benjamin P; Brun, Allan Sacha; Toomre, Juri

    2009-01-01

    When our Sun was young it rotated much more rapidly than now. Observations of young, rapidly rotating stars indicate that many possess substantial magnetic activity and strong axisymmetric magnetic fields. We conduct simulations of dynamo action in rapidly rotating suns with the 3-D MHD anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code to explore the complex coupling between rotation, convection and magnetism. Here we study dynamo action realized in the bulk of the convection zone for two systems, rotating at three and five times the current solar rate. We find that substantial organized global-scale magnetic fields are achieved by dynamo action in these systems. Striking wreathes of magnetism are built in the midst of the convection zone, coexisting with the turbulent convection. This is a great surprise, for many solar dynamo theories have suggested that a tachocline of penetration and shear at the base of the convection zone is a crucial ingredient for organized dynamo action, whereas these simulations do not includ...

  12. Gravitational radiation from a rotating magnetic dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational radiation emitted by a rotating magnetic dipole is calculated. Formulas for the polarization amplitudes and the radiated power are obtained in closed forms, considering both the near and radiation zones of the dipole. For a neutron star, a comparison is made with other sources of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation.

  13. Mode visibilities in rapidly rotating stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, D. R.; Prat, V.; Barban, C.; van 't Veer-Menneret, C.; MacGregor, K. B.

    2013-02-01

    Context. Mode identification is a crucial step to comparing observed frequencies with theoretical ones. However, it has proven to be particularly difficult in rapidly rotating stars. An important reason for this is the lack of simple frequency patterns such as those present in solar-type pulsators. This problem is further aggravated in δ Scuti stars by their particularly rich frequency spectra. Aims: As a first step to obtaining further observational constraints towards mode identification in rapid rotators, we aim to accurately calculate mode visibilities and amplitude ratios while fully taking into account the effects of rotation. Methods: We derive the relevant equations for calculating mode visibilities in different photometric bands while fully taking into account the geometric distortion from both the centrifugal deformation and the pulsation modes, the variations in effective gravity, and an approximate treatment of the temperature variations, given the adiabatic nature of the pulsation modes. These equations are then applied to 2D oscillation modes, calculated using the TOP code (Two-dimension Oscillation Program), in fully distorted 2D models based on the self-consistent field (SCF) method. The specific intensities come from a grid of Kurucz atmospheres, thereby taking into account limb and gravity darkening. Results: We obtain mode visibilities and amplitude ratios for 2 M⊙ models with rotation rates ranging from 0 to 80% of the critical rotation rate. Based on these calculations, we confirm a number of results from earlier studies, such as the increased visibility of numerous chaotic modes at sufficient rotation rates, the simpler frequency spectra with dominant island modes for pole-on configurations, or the dependence of amplitude ratios on inclination and azimuthal order in rotating stars. In addition, we explain how the geometric shape of the star leads to a smaller contrast between pole-on and equator-on visibilities of equatorially

  14. Critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgarte, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the first fully relativistic simulations of the critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids. We observe critical scaling both in subcritical evolutions, in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space, and in supercritical evolutions that lead to the formation of black holes. We measure the mass and angular momentum of these black holes, and find that both show critical scaling with critical exponents that are consistent with perturbative results. The critical exponents are universal; they are not affected by angular momentum, and are independent of the direction in which the critical curve, which separates subcritical from supercritical evolutions in our two-dimensional parameter space, is crossed. In particular, these findings suggest that the angular momentum decreases more rapidly than the square of the mass, so that, as criticality is approached, the collapse leads to the formation of a non-spinning black hole. We also demonstrate excellent agreement ...

  15. Light curves from rapidly rotating neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Numata, Kazutoshi

    2010-01-01

    We calculate light curves produced by a hot spot of a rapidly rotating neutron star, assuming that the spot is perturbed by a core $r$-mode, which is destabilized by emitting gravitational waves. To calculate light curves, we take account of relativistic effects such as the Doppler boost due to the rapid rotation and light bending assuming the Schwarzschild metric around the neutron star. We assume that the core $r$-modes penetrate to the surface fluid ocean to have sufficiently large amplitudes to disturb the spot. For a $l'=m$ core $r$-mode, the oscillation frequency $\\omega\\approx2m\\Omega/[l'(l'+1)]$ defined in the co-rotating frame of the star will be detected by a distant observer, where $l'$ and $m$ are respectively the spherical harmonic degree and the azimuthal wave number of the mode, and $\\Omega$ is the spin frequency of the star. In a linear theory of oscillation, using a parameter $A$ we parametrize the mode amplitudes such that ${\\rm max}\\left(|\\xi_\\theta|,|\\xi_\\phi|\\right)/R=A$ at the surface, w...

  16. Critical Collapse of Rotating Radiation Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarte, Thomas W; Gundlach, Carsten

    2016-06-03

    We present results from the first fully relativistic simulations of the critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids. We observe critical scaling both in subcritical evolutions-in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space-and in supercritical evolutions, which lead to the formation of black holes. We measure the mass and angular momentum of these black holes, and find that both show critical scaling with critical exponents that are consistent with perturbative results. The critical exponents are universal: they are not affected by angular momentum, and are independent of the direction in which the critical curve, which separates subcritical from supercritical evolutions in our two-dimensional parameter space, is crossed. In particular, these findings suggest that the angular momentum decreases more rapidly than the square of the mass, so that, as criticality is approached, the collapse leads to the formation of a nonspinning black hole. We also demonstrate excellent agreement of our numerical data with new closed-form extensions of power-law scalings that describe the mass and angular momentum of rotating black holes formed close to criticality.

  17. Light Curves of Rapidly Rotating Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Braje, T M; Rauch, K P; Braje, Timothy M.; Romani, Roger W.; Rauch, Kevin P.

    2000-01-01

    We consider the effect of rapid rotation on the light curves of neutron stars with hot polar caps. For $P \\approx 3$ms spin periods, the pulse fractions can be as much as an order of magnitude larger than with simple slowly-rotating (Schwarzschild) estimates. Doppler boosting, in particular, leads to characteristic distortion and ``soft lags'' in the pulse profiles, which are easily measurable in light curves with moderate energy resolution. With $\\sim 10^5$ photons it should also be possible to isolate the more subtle distortions of light travel time variations and frame dragging. Detailed analysis of high quality millisecond pulsar data from upcoming X-ray missions must include these effects.

  18. Radiation directivity rotation by acoustic metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xue; Liang, Bin, E-mail: liangbin@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: jccheng@nju.edu.cn; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun, E-mail: liangbin@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: jccheng@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Likun [Department of Physics and Center for Nonlinear Dynamics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-08-31

    We use a metamaterial-based scheme to rotate the radiation directivity of sound radiated by a source surrounded by the structure. The rotation is demonstrated through both numerical simulations and experiments. The performance persists within a broadband and is entirely independent of the location and pattern of source inside, suggesting great potential in various practical scenarios where both the signal frequency and source position may vary significantly. We have also investigated the possibility to realize versatile controls of radiation direction by tailoring the structural parameters. Our design with special directivity-steering capability may open route to loudspeaker and auditorium acoustics designs and medical ultrasound applications.

  19. Vega is a rapidly rotating star

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, D M; Pauls, T A; Armstrong, J T; Benson, J A; Gilbreath, G C; Hindsley, R B; Hutter, D J; Johnston, K J; Mozurkewich, D; Schmitt, H R

    2006-01-01

    Vega, the second brightest star in the northern hemisphere, serves as a primary spectral type standard. While its spectrum is dominated by broad hydrogen lines, the narrower lines of the heavy elements suggested slow to moderate rotation, giving confidence that the ground-based calibration of its visibile spectrum could be safely extrapolated into the ultraviolet and near-infrared (through atmosphere models), where it also serves as the primary photometric calibrator. But there have been problems: the star is too bright compared to its peers and it has unusually shaped absorption line profiles, leading some to suggest that it is a distorted, rapidly rotating star seen pole-on. Here we report optical interferometric observations of Vega which detect the asymmetric brightness distribution of the bright, slightly offset polar axis of a star rotating at 93% of breakup speed. In addition to explaining the unusual brightness and line shape pecularities, this result leads to the prediction of an excess of near-infra...

  20. Rapid Development of the Radiation Curing Sector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Radiation curing is an advanced material surface treatment technology using ultraviolet (UV) radiation and electronic beams (EB). With the greater attention paid to environ mentel protection in recent years ,radiation curing has developed rapidly.

  1. Dynamic Instability of Rapidly Rotating Protostars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, B. K.; Durisen, R. H.; Johnson, M. S.; Davis, G. A.

    1994-12-01

    Modern studies of collapse and fragmentation of protostellar clouds suggest a wide variety of outcomes, depending on the assumed initial conditions. Individual equilibrium objects which result from collapse are likely to be in rapid rotation and can have a wide range of structures. We have undertaken a survey of parameter space in order to examine the role of dynamic instabilities in the subsequent evolution of these objects. For the purposes of conducting a systematic study, we so far have considered only the n = 3/2 polytropic equilibrium states that might form from the collapse of uniformly rotating spherical clouds. By varying the central concentration of the assumed initial cloud, we obtain equilibrium states distinguished primarily by their different specific angular momentum distributions. These equilibrium states span the range between starlike objects with angular momentum distributions analogous to the Maclaurin spheroids and objects more accurately described as massive Keplerian disks around stars. Using a new SCF code to generate the n = 3/2 axisymmetric equilibrium states and an improved 3D hydrodynamics code, we have investigated the the onset and nature of global dynamic instabilities in these objects. The starlike objects are unstable to barlike instabilities at T/|W| gtorder 0.27, where T/|W| is the ratio of total rotational kinetic energy to gravitational potential energy. These instabilities are vigorous and lead to violent ejection of mass and angular momentum. As the angular momentum distribution shifts to the other extreme, one- and two-armed spiral instabilities begin to dominate at considerably lower T/|W|. These instabilities appear to be driven by the SLING and swing mechanisms. In extremely flattened disks, one-armed spirals dominate all other disturbances but eventually saturate at nonlinear amplitude without producing fragmentation. We conclude that the nature of the global instabilities encountered during the process of star formation

  2. Gravity-Darkened Seasons: Insolation Around Rapid Rotators

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlers, John P

    2016-01-01

    I model the effect of rapid stellar rotation on a planet's insolation. Fast-rotating stars have induced pole-to-equator temperature gradients (known as gravity-darkening) of up to several thousand Kelvin that affect the star's luminosity and peak emission wavelength as a function of latitude. When orbiting such a star, a planet's annual insolation can strongly vary depending on its orbit inclination. Specifically, inclined orbits result in temporary exposure to the star's hotter poles. I find that gravity-darkening can drive changes in a planet's equilibrium temperature of up to $\\sim15\\%$ due to increased irradiance near the stellar poles. This effect can also vary a planet's exposure to UV radiation by up to $\\sim80\\%$ throughout its orbit as it is exposed to an irradiance spectrum corresponding to different stellar effective temperatures over time.

  3. Transit Lightcurves of Extrasolar Planets Orbiting Rapidly-Rotating Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Jason W

    2009-01-01

    Main-sequence stars earlier than spectral type ~F6 or so are expected to rotate rapidly due to their radiative exteriors. This rapid rotation leads to an oblate stellar figure. It also induces the photosphere to be hotter (by up to several thousand Kelvin) at the pole than at the equator as a result of a process called gravity darkening that was first predicted by von Zeipel (1924). Transits of extrasolar planets across such a non-uniform, oblate disk yield unusual and distinctive lightcurves that can be used to determine the relative alignment of the stellar rotation pole and the planet orbit normal. This spin-orbit alignment can be used to constrain models of planet formation and evolution. Orderly planet formation and migration within a disk that is coplanar with the stellar equator will result in spin-orbit alignment. More violent planet-planet scattering events should yield spin-orbit misaligned planets. Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements of transits of lower-mass stars show that some planets are spin-orbi...

  4. Gravitational waves from rapidly rotating neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Haskell, Brynmor; D`Angelo, Caroline; Degenaar, Nathalie; Glampedakis, Kostas; Ho, Wynn C G; Lasky, Paul D; Melatos, Andrew; Oppenoorth, Manuel; Patruno, Alessandro; Priymak, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    Rapidly rotating neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries have been proposed as an interesting source of gravitational waves. In this chapter we present estimates of the gravitational wave emission for various scenarios, given the (electromagnetically) observed characteristics of these systems. First of all we focus on the r-mode instability and show that a 'minimal' neutron star model (which does not incorporate exotica in the core, dynamically important magnetic fields or superfluid degrees of freedom), is not consistent with observations. We then present estimates of both thermally induced and magnetically sustained mountains in the crust. In general magnetic mountains are likely to be detectable only if the buried magnetic field of the star is of the order of $B\\approx 10^{12}$ G. In the thermal mountain case we find that gravitational wave emission from persistent systems may be detected by ground based interferometers. Finally we re-asses the idea that gravitational wave emission may be balancing the ac...

  5. HOW CAN NEWLY BORN RAPIDLY ROTATING NEUTRON STARS BECOME MAGNETARS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Quan; Yu, Yun-Wei, E-mail: yuyw@mail.ccnu.edu.cn [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2014-05-10

    In a newly born (high-temperature and Keplerian rotating) neutron star, r-mode instability can lead to stellar differential rotation, which winds the seed poloidal magnetic field (∼10{sup 11} G) to generate an ultra-high (∼10{sup 17} G) toroidal field component. Subsequently, by succumbing to the Tayler instability, the toroidal field could be partially transformed into a new poloidal field. Through such dynamo processes, the newly born neutron star with sufficiently rapid rotation could become a magnetar on a timescale of ∼10{sup 2} {sup –} {sup 3} s, with a surface dipolar magnetic field of ∼10{sup 15} G. Accompanying the field amplification, the star could spin down to a period of ∼5 ms through gravitational wave radiation due to the r-mode instability and, in particular, the non-axisymmetric stellar deformation caused by the toroidal field. This scenario provides a possible explanation for why the remnant neutron stars formed in gamma-ray bursts and superluminous supernovae could be millisecond magnetars.

  6. Light Curves for Rapidly-Rotating Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cadeau, C; Leahy, D; Campbell, S S; Cadeau, Coire; Morsink, Sharon M.; Leahy, Denis; Campbell, Sheldon S.

    2006-01-01

    We present raytracing computations for light emitted from the surface of a rapidly-rotating neutron star in order to construct light curves for X-ray pulsars and bursters. These calculations are for realistic models of rapidly-rotating neutron stars which take into account both the correct exterior metric and the oblate shape of the star. We find that the most important effect arising from rotation comes from the oblate shape of the rotating star. We find that approximating a rotating neutron star as a sphere introduces serious errors in fitted values of the star's radius and mass if the rotation rate is very large. However, in most cases acceptable fits to the ratio M/R can be obtained with the spherical approximation.

  7. Experimental investigation of a rapidly rotating turbulent duct flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maartensson, G.E.; Johansson, A.V. [Department of Mechanics, KTH, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Gunnarsson, J. [Bombardier Transportation, Vaesteraas (Sweden); Moberg, H. [Alfa Laval, 14780 Tumba (Sweden)

    2002-09-01

    Rapidly rotating duct flow is studied experimentally with Rotation numbers in the interval. To achieve this, in combination with relatively high Reynolds numbers (5,000-30,000 based on the hydraulic radius), water was used as the working medium. Square and rectangular duct cross-sections were used and the angle between the rotation vector and the main axis of the duct was varied. The influence of the rotation on the pressure drop in the duct was investigated and suitable scalings of this quantity were studied. (orig.)

  8. ON THE NATURE OF RAPIDLY ROTATING SINGLE EVOLVED STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, R. Rodrigues; Canto Martins, B. L.; De Medeiros, J. R., E-mail: renan@dfte.ufrn.br [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitário, Natal RN (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the nature of the rapidly rotating, apparently single giant based on rotational and radial velocity measurements carried out by the CORAVEL spectrometers. From the analyzed sample, composed of 2010 spectroscopic, apparently single, evolved stars of luminosity classes IV, III, II, and Ib with spectral types G and K, we classified 30 stars that presented unusual, moderate to rapid rotation. This work reports, for the first time, the presence of these abnormal rotators among subgiant, bright giant, and Ib supergiant stars. To date, this class of stars was reported only among giant stars of luminosity class III. Most of these abnormal rotators present an IRAS infrared excess, which, in principle, can be related to dust around these stars.

  9. Supernova Seismology: Gravitational Wave Signatures of Rapidly Rotating Core Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GW) generated during a core-collapse supernova open a window into the heart of the explosion. At core bounce, progenitors with rapid core rotation rates exhibit a characteristic GW signal which can be used to constrain the properties of the core of the progenitor star. We investigate the dynamics of rapidly rotating core collapse, focusing on hydrodynamic waves generated by the core bounce and the GW spectrum they produce. The centrifugal distortion of the rapidly rotating proto-neutron star (PNS) leads to the generation of axisymmetric quadrupolar oscillations within the PNS and surrounding envelope. Using linear perturbation theory, we estimate the frequencies, amplitudes, damping times, and GW spectra of the oscillations. Our analysis provides a qualitative explanation for several features of the GW spectrum and shows reasonable agreement with nonlinear hydrodynamic simulations, although a few discrepancies due to non-linear/rotational effects are evident. The dominant early postbounce...

  10. Rapidly rotating polytropes in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Gregory B.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1994-01-01

    We construct an extensive set of equilibrium sequences of rotating polytropes in general relativity. We determine a number of important physical parameters of such stars, including maximum mass and maximum spin rate. The stability of the configurations against quasi-radial perturbations is diagnosed. Two classes of evolutionary sequences of fixed rest mass and entropy are explored: normal sequences which behave very much like Newtonian evolutionary sequences, and supramassive sequences which exist solely because of relativistic effects. Dissipation leading to loss of angular momentum causes a star to evolve in a quasi-stationary fashion along an evolutionary sequence. Supramassive sequences evolve towards eventual catastrophic collapse to a black hole. Prior to collapse, the star must spin up as it loses angular momentum, an effect which may provide an observational precursor to gravitational collapse to a black hole.

  11. Gravitational Wave Signatures from Low-mode Spiral Instabilities in Rapidly Rotating Supernova Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei

    2013-01-01

    We study properties of gravitational waves (GWs) from rotating core-collapse of a 15 solar mass star by performing three-dimensional general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations with an approximate neutrino transport. By parametrically changing the precollapse angular momentum, we focus on the effects of rotation on the GW signatures in the early postbounce evolution. Regarding three-flavor neutrino transport, we solve the energy-averaged set of radiation energy and momentum. In addition to the gravitational quadrupole radiation from matter motions, we take into account GWs from anisotropic neutrino emission. With these computations, our results present evidence that non-axisymmetric instabilities play an essential role in determining the GW signatures in the rotating postbounce evolution. For our rapidly rotating models, we show that precollapse density inhomogeneities give rise to millisecond variations in the waveforms. During prompt convection, we find that the waveforms show narrow-band and highly quasi...

  12. Rapid and Decentralized Human Waste Treatment by Microwave Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tu Anh; Babel, Sandhya; Boonyarattanakalin, Siwarutt; Koottatep, Thammarat

    2016-09-07

    This study evaluates the technical feasibility of using microwave radiation for the rapid treatment of human feces. Human feces of 1000 g were radiated with a commercially available household microwave oven (with rotation) at different exposure time lengths (30, 50, 60, 70, and 75 minutes) and powers (600, 800, and 1000 W). Volume reduction over 90% occurred after 1000 W microwave radiation for 75 minutes. Pathogen eradiation performances of six log units or more at a high range of microwave powers were achieved. Treatments with the same energy input of 1000 Wh, but at lower powers with prolonged exposure times, significantly enhanced moisture removal and volume reduction. Microwave radiation caused carbonization and resulted in a more stable end product. The energy content of the samples after microwave treatment at 1000 W and 75 minutes is 3517 ± 8.85 calories/g of dried sample, and the product can also be used as compost.

  13. Radio emission from rapidly-rotating cool giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Walter, Frederick M.; Florkowski, David R.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a VLA program are reported to examine the radio continuum emission from 11 rapidly-rotating cool giant stars, all of which were originally believed to be single stars. Six of the 11 stars were detected as radio sources, including FK Com and HR 9024, for which there exist multifrequency observations. HD 199178, UZ Lib (now known to be a binary system), and HD 82558, for which there is only 6-cm data. The radio properties of these stars are compared with those of the active, rapidly rotating evolved stars found in the RS CVn binary systems.

  14. Asymmetric core-collapse of rapidly-rotating massive star

    CERN Document Server

    Gilkis, Avishai

    2016-01-01

    Non-axisymmetric features are found in the core-collapse of a rapidly-rotating massive star, which may have important implications for magnetic field amplification and production of a bipolar outflow that can explode the star, as well as for r-process nucleosynthesis and natal kicks. The collapse of an evolved rapidly-rotating massive star is followed in three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using the FLASH code with neutrino leakage. A rotating proto-neutron star (PNS) forms with a non-zero linear velocity. This process might contribute to the natal kick of the remnant compact object. The PNS is surrounded by a turbulent medium, where high shearing is likely to amplify magnetic fields, which in turn can drive a bipolar outflow. Neutron-rich material in the PNS vicinity may induce strong r-process nucleosynthesis. The rapidly-rotating PNS possesses a rotational energy of E>10foe, some of which may possibly be deposited later on in the SN ejecta through a magnetar spin down process. These processes may be...

  15. Rapidly rotating neutron stars in $R$-squared gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S; Kokkotas, Kostas D

    2015-01-01

    $f(R)$ theories of gravity are one of the most popular alternative explanations for dark energy and therefore studying the possible astrophysical implications of these theories is an important task. In the present paper we make a substantial advance in this direction by considering rapidly rotating neutron stars in $R^2$ gravity. The results are obtained numerically and the method we use is non-perturbative and self-consistent. The neutron star properties, such as mass, radius and moment of inertia, are studied in detail and the results show that rotation magnifies the deviations from general relativity and the maximum mass and moment of inertia can reach very high values. This observation is similar to previous studies of rapidly rotating neutron stars in other alternative theories of gravity, such as the scalar-tensor theories, and it can potentially lead to strong astrophysical manifestations.

  16. Rapid Rotation Above and Below the Substellar Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basri, G.

    1999-05-01

    I present the results of a multiyear survey of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, at high spectral resolution. The echelle spectra were gathered with the HIRES spectrometer at the Keck Observatory. One primary purpose was to determine rotational velocities for many objects of the late M and L spectral classes. Some of these objects are confirmed brown dwarfs, others are stars near the bottom of the main sequence, and some might be either. I show that the initial indication provided by BRI 0021, that such objects tend to be rapidly rotating and display little H-alpha emission, proves to be a common characteristic. There is a general trend to higher rotation velocities as one looks to objects of lower luminosity; the fastest rotator found so far is the brown dwarf Kelu-1 at 80 km/s (which implies a rotation period of about 90 minutes!). The most active object, PC 0025 (which may well be a brown dwarf), is a relatively slow rotator and probably very young. I discuss a possible explanation for these results: the dynamos for these objects are fully turbulent, driven by convection (and therefore indirectly by the object's luminosity), and quenched when the rotational velocities become too fast in comparison to the convective velocities. I thank the NSF for its support through grant AST96-18439.

  17. Hydromagnetic quasi-geostrophic modes in rapidly rotating planetary cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canet, E.; Finlay, Chris; Fournier, A.

    2014-01-01

    The core of a terrestrial-type planet consists of a spherical shell of rapidly rotating, electrically conducting, fluid. Such a body supports two distinct classes of quasi-geostrophic (QG) eigenmodes: fast, primarily hydrodynamic, inertial modes with period related to the rotation time scale......, or shorter than, their oscillation time scale.Based on our analysis, we expect Mercury to be in a regime where the slow magnetic modes are of quasi-free decay type. Earth and possibly Ganymede, with their larger Elsasser numbers, may possess slow modes that are in the transition regime of weak diffusion...

  18. Interior Matter Estimates of Rapidly Rotating Compact Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Na-na

    2010-01-01

    The authors try to probe the inner components of rapidly rotating compact stars such as the millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 and the possible sub-millisecond pulsar XTE J1739-285 in their own way by comparing the genuine rotation frequencies under different theoretical models with the observational data, which may exert more stringent constraint on matter composition of compact stars. According to their treatment, the SAX J1808.4-3658 is a star with exotic matter and XTE J1739-285 a hybrid star.

  19. In situ deformations in the immature brain during rapid rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nicole G; Natesh, Rahul; Szczesny, Spencer E; Ryall, Karen; Eucker, Stephanie A; Coats, Brittany; Margulies, Susan S

    2010-04-01

    Head trauma is the leading cause of death and debilitating injury in children. Computational models are important tools used to understand head injury mechanisms but they must be validated with experimental data. In this communication we present in situ measurements of brain deformation during rapid, nonimpact head rotation in juvenile pigs of different ages. These data will be used to validate computational models identifying age-dependent thresholds of axonal injury. Fresh 5 days (n=3) and 4 weeks (n=2) old piglet heads were transected horizontally and secured in a container. The cut surface of each brain was marked and covered with a transparent, lubricated plate that allowed the brain to move freely in the plane of rotation. For each brain, a rapid (20-28 ms) 65 deg rotation was applied sequentially at 50 rad/s, 75 rad/s, and 75 rad/s. Each rotation was digitally captured at 2500 frames/s (480x320 pixels) and mark locations were tracked and used to compute strain using an in-house program in MATLAB. Peak values of principal strain (E(peak)) were significantly larger during deceleration than during acceleration of the head rotation (prad/s rotation than during the first 75 rad/s rotation (prad/s and the possibility that similar changes may have occurred at 50 rad/s. Analyzing only lower velocity (50 rad/s) rotations, E(peak) significantly increased with age (16.5% versus 12.4%, p<0.003), which was likely due to the larger brain mass and smaller viscoelastic modulus of the 4 weeks old pig brain compared with those of the 5 days old. Strain measurement error for the overall methodology was estimated to be 1%. Brain tissue strain during rapid, nonimpact head rotation in the juvenile pig varies significantly with age. The empirical data presented will be used to validate computational model predictions of brain motion under similar loading conditions and to assist in the development of age-specific thresholds for axonal injury. Future studies will examine the brain

  20. Rotating embedded black holes: Entropy and Hawking's radiation

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we derive a class of rotating embedded black holes. Then we study Hawking's radiation effects on these embedded black holes. The surface gravity, entropy and angular velocity are given for each of these black holes.

  1. On Hawking Radiation of 3D Rotating Hairy Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Belhaj, A; Moumni, H EL; Masmar, K; Sedra, M B

    2015-01-01

    We study the Hawking radiation of 3D rotating hairy black holes. More concretely, we compute the transition probability of a bosonic and fermionic particle in such backgrounds. Thew, we show that the transition probability is independent of the nature of the particle. It is observed that the charge of the scalar hair B and the rotation parameter a control such a probability.

  2. Equatorially trapped convection in a rapidly rotating spherical shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, Benjamin; Julien, Keith; Knobloch, Edgar

    2016-11-01

    Convection plays a preponderant role in driving geophysical flows. Unfortunately, these flows are often characterized by rapid rotation (i.e. small Ekman number E) which renders the equations stiff and introduces a scale separation in the system: for example the wavelength of the marginal mode at the onset of convection in a rapidly rotating sphere scales like E 1 / 3 and is modulated by a E 1 / 6 envelope. These scalings keep the fully nonlinear dynamics of the internal convection in Earth's core (E 1015) out of reach from direct numerical simulations, analytical work and experiments on one hand, but advocate for the development of reduced models on the other hand. We present a reduced model derived in a shallow gap spherical shell geometry. As the Rayleigh number is increased, the flow is first destabilized in the equatorial region where the dynamics remains trapped. The linear stability is analyzed and the fully nonlinear dynamics is presented.

  3. Instability windows and evolution of rapidly rotating neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gusakov, Mikhail E; Kantor, Elena M

    2013-01-01

    We consider an instability of rapidly rotating neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with respect to excitation of r-modes (which are analogous to Earth's Rossby waves controlled by the Coriolis force). We argue that finite temperature effects in the superfluid core of a neutron star lead to a resonance coupling and enhanced damping (and hence stability) of oscillation modes at certain stellar temperatures. We demonstrate that neutron stars with high spin frequency spend a substantial amount of time at these `resonance' temperatures. This finding allows us to explain puzzling observations of hot rapidly rotating neutron stars in LMXBs and to predict a new class of hot non-accreting rapidly rotating neutron stars, some of which may have already been observed and tentatively identified as quiescent LMXB (qLMXB) candidates. We also impose a new theoretical limit on the neutron star spin frequency, explaining the cut-off spin frequency ~730 Hz, following from the statistical analysis of accreting milli...

  4. RRTM: A rapid radiative transfer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mlawer, E.J.; Taubman, S.J.; Clough, S.A. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) for the calculation of longwave clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates has been developed. The model, which uses the correlated-k method, is both accurate and computationally fast. The foundation for RRTM is the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) from which the relevant k-distributions are obtained. LBLRTM, which has been extensively validated against spectral observations e.g., the high-resolution sounder and the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, is used to validate the flux and cooling rate results from RRTM. Validations of RRTM`s results have been performed for the tropical, midlatitude summer, and midlatitude winter atmospheres, as well as for the four Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) cases from the Spectral Radiance Experiment (SPECTRE). Details of some of these validations are presented below. RRTM has the identical atmospheric input module as LBLRTM, facilitating intercomparisons with LBLRTM and application of the model at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed sites.

  5. Clinical applications of advanced rotational radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalichowski, Adrian

    Purpose: With a fast adoption of emerging technologies, it is critical to fully test and understand its limits and capabilities. In this work we investigate new graphic processing unit (GPU) based treatment planning algorithm and its applications in helical tomotherapy dose delivery. We explore the limits of the system by applying it to challenging clinical cases of total marrow irradiation (TMI) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We also analyze the feasibility of alternative fractionation schemes for total body irradiation (TBI) and TMI based on reported historical data on lung dose and interstitial pneumonitis (IP) incidence rates. Methods and Materials: An anthropomorphic phantom was used to create TMI plans using the new GPU based treatment planning system and the existing CPU cluster based system. Optimization parameters were selected based on clinically used values for field width, modulation factor and pitch. Treatment plans were also created on Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems Inc, Palo Alto, CA) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for dose delivery on IX treatment unit. A retrospective review was performed of 42 publications that reported IP rates along with lung dose, fractionation regimen, dose rate and chemotherapy. The analysis consisted of nearly thirty two hundred patients and 34 unique radiation regimens. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine parameters associated with IP and establish does response function. Results: The results showed very good dosimetric agreement between the GPU and CPU calculated plans. The results from SBRT study show that GPU planning system can maintain 90% target coverage while meeting all the constraints of RTOG 0631 protocol. Beam on time for Tomotherapy and flattening filter free RapidArc was much faster than for Vero or Cyberknife. Retrospective data analysis showed that lung dose and Cyclophosphomide (Cy) are both predictors of IP in TBI/TMI treatments. The

  6. Hawking radiation of non-asymptotically flat rotating black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakalli, Izzet; Aslan, Onur Atilla

    2016-04-01

    We study the Hawking radiation of non-asymptotically flat rotating linear dilaton black holes, which are the solutions to the 4D Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion action by using the semi-classical radiation spectrum method. Using scalar perturbations, we show that both angular and radial equations produce exact analytical solutions. Thus, we obtain a precise radiation spectrum for the rotating linear dilaton black hole. The high-frequency regime does not yield the standard Hawking temperature of this black hole computed from the surface gravity. However, we show in detail that the specific low-frequency band of the radiation spectrum allows for the original Hawking temperature of the rotating linear dilaton black hole. The computations are also exhibited graphically.

  7. Asteroseismology of rapidly rotating neutron stars - an alternative approach

    CERN Document Server

    Doneva, Daniela D

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we examine gravitational wave asteroseismology relations for f-modes of rapidly rotating neutron stars. An approach different to the previous studies is employed - first, the moment of inertia is used instead of the stellar radius, and second, the normalization of the oscillation frequencies and damping times is different. It was shown that in the non-rotating case this can lead to a much stronger equation of state independence and our goal is to generalize the static relations to the rapidly rotating case and values of the spherical mode number $l\\ge2$. We employ realistic equations of state that cover a very large range of stiffness in order to check better the universality of the relations. At the end we explore the inverse problem, i.e. obtain the neutron star parameters from the observed gravitational frequencies and damping times. It turns out that with this new set of relations we can solve the inverse problem with a very good accuracy using three frequencies that was not possible ...

  8. Rapid rotators revisited: absolute dimensions of KOI-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Ian D.; Morello, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    We analyse Kepler light-curves of the exoplanet Kepler Object of Interest no. 13b (KOI-13b) transiting its moderately rapidly rotating (gravity-darkened) parent star. A physical model, with minimal ad hoc free parameters, reproduces the time-averaged light-curve at the ∼10 parts per million level. We demonstrate that this Roche-model solution allows the absolute dimensions of the system to be determined from the star's projected equatorial rotation speed, ve sin i*, without any additional assumptions; we find a planetary radius RP = (1.33 ± 0.05) R♃, stellar polar radius Rp★ = (1.55 ± 0.06) R⊙, combined mass M* + MP( ≃ M*) = (1.47 ± 0.17) M⊙ and distance d ≃ (370 ± 25) pc, where the errors are dominated by uncertainties in relative flux contribution of the visual-binary companion KOI-13B. The implied stellar rotation period is within ∼5 per cent of the non-orbital, 25.43-hr signal found in the Kepler photometry. We show that the model accurately reproduces independent tomographic observations, and yields an offset between orbital and stellar-rotation angular-momentum vectors of 60.25° ± 0.05°.

  9. Spherical convective dynamos in the rapidly rotating asymptotic regime

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Julien; Fournier, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Self-sustained convective dynamos in planetary systems operate in an asymptotic regime of rapid rotation, where a balance is thought to hold between the Coriolis, pressure, buoyancy and Lorentz forces (the MAC balance). Classical numerical solutions have previously been obtained in a regime of moderate rotation where viscous and inertial forces are still significant. We define a unidimensional path in parameter space between classical models and asymptotic conditions from the requirements to enforce a MAC balance and to preserve the ratio between the magnetic diffusion and convective overturn times (the magnetic Reynolds number). Direct numerical simulations performed along this path show that the spatial structure of the solution at scales larger than the magnetic dissipation length is largely invariant. This enables the definition of large-eddy simulations resting on the assumption that small-scale details of the hydrodynamic turbulence are irrelevant to the determination of the large-scale asymptotic state...

  10. Nonlinear r-modes in rapidly rotating relativistic stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergioulas, N; Font, J A

    2001-02-12

    The r-mode instability in rotating relativistic stars has been shown recently to have important astrophysical implications, provided that r-modes are not saturated at low amplitudes by nonlinear effects or by dissipative mechanisms. Here, we present the first study of nonlinear r-modes in isentropic, rapidly rotating relativistic stars, via 3D general-relativistic hydrodynamical evolutions. We find that (1) on dynamical time scales, there is no strong nonlinear coupling of r-modes to other modes at amplitudes of order one-the maximum r-mode amplitude is of order unity. (2) r-modes and inertial modes in isentropic stars are predominantly discrete modes. (3) The kinematical drift associated with r-modes appears to be present in our simulations, but confirmation requires more precise initial data.

  11. Latitude distribution of nonradial pulsations in rapidly rotating B stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankov, S.; Mathias, P.; Domiciano de Souza, A., Jr.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Aerts, C.

    2004-05-01

    We present a method for the analysis of latitude distribution associated with temperature and/or velocity perturbations of the stellar surface due to non-radial pulsation (NRP) modes in rapidly rotating B stars. The technique is applied together with Fourier Doppler Imaging (FDI) to high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic observations of ɛ Per. The main advantage of this approach is that it decomposed complex multi-periodic line profile variations into single components, allowing the detailed analysis of each mode seperately. We study the 10.6-d-1 frequency that is particularly important for modal analysis of non-radial pulsations in the star.

  12. Radiation spectrum of a high-dimensional rotating black hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This study extends the classical Damour-Ruffini method and discusses Hawking radiation in a (n + 4)-dimensional rotating black hole. Under the condition that the total energy and angular momentum of spacetime are conservative, but angular momentum a = J/M of unit mass of the black hole is variable, taking into consideration the reaction of the radiation of the particle to the spacetime, a new Tortoise coordinate transformation and discuss the black hole radiation spectrum is discussed. The radiation spectrum that satisfies the unitary principle in the general case is derived.

  13. An Analysis of the Rapidly Rotating Bp star HD 133880

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. D.; Grunhut, J.; Shultz, M.; Wade, G.; Landstreet, J. D.; Bohlender, D.; Lim, J.; Wong, K.; Drake, S.; Linsky, J.

    2012-01-01

    HD 133880 is a rapidly rotating chemically peculiar B-type (Bp) star (nu sin i approx = 103km/s) and is host to one of the strongest magnetic fields of any Ap/Bp star. A member of the Upper Centaurus Lupus association, it is a star with a well-determined age of 16 Myr. 12 new spectra, four of which are polarimetric, obtained from the FEROS, ESPaDOnS and HARPS instruments, provide sufficient material from which to re-evaluate the magnetic field and obtain a first approximation to the atmospheric abundance distributions of He, O, Mg, Si, Ti. Cr, Fe, Ni, Pr and Nd. An abundance analysis was carried out using ZEEMAN, a program which synthesizes spectral line profiles for stars with permeating magnetic fields. The magnetic field structure was characterized by a colinear multipole expansion from the observed variations of the longitudinal and surface fields with rotational phase. Both magnetic hemispheres are clearly visible during the stellar rotation, and thus a three-ring abundance distribution model encompassing both magnetic poles and magnetic equator with equal spans in colatitude was adopted. Using the new magnetic field measurements and optical photometry together with previously published data, we refine the period of HD 133880 to P = 0.877 476 +/- 0.000009 d. Our simple axisymmetric magnetic field model is based on a predominantly quadrupolar component that roughly describes the field variations. Using spectrum synthesis, we derived mean abundances for O, Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Fe and Pr. All elements; except Mg, are overabundant compared to the Son. Mg appears to be approximately uniform over the stellar surface, while all other elements are more abundant in the negative magnetic hemisphere than in the positive magnetic hemisphere. In contrast to most Ap/Bp stars which show an underabundance in 0, in HD 133880 this element is clearly overabundant compared to the solar abundance ratio. In studying the Ha and Paschen lines in the optical spectra, we could not

  14. Convection-driven dynamos in the limit of rapid rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Michael; Long, Louie; Nieves, David; Julien, Keith; Tobias, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Most large-scale planetary magnetic fields are thought to be driven by rapidly rotating convection. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) remains an important tool for investigating the physics of dynamos, but remains severely restricted in parameter space relative to geo- and astrophysical systems. Asymptotic models provide a complimentary approach to DNS that have the ability to access planetary-like magnetohydrodynamical regimes. We utilize an asymptotic dynamo model to investigate the influence of convective flow regime on dynamo action. We find that the spatial characteristics of the large-scale magnetic field are dependent only weakly on changes in flow behavior. In contrast, the behavior of the small-scale magnetic field is directly dependent on, and therefore shows significant variations with, the small-scale convective flow field. These results may suggest why many previous DNS studies, which reside in a vastly different parameter space relative to planets, are nonetheless successful in reproducing many of the observed features of planetary magnetic fields.

  15. An Analysis of the Rapidly Rotating Bp Star HD 133880

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, J D; Shultz, M; Wade, G; Landstreet, J D; Bohlender, D; Lim, J; Wong, K; Drake, S; Linsky, J

    2012-01-01

    HD 133880 is a rapidly rotating Bp star and host to one of the strongest magnetic fields of any Bp star. A member of the Upper Centaurus Lupus association, it is a star with a well-determined age of 16 Myr. Twelve new spectra obtained from the FEROS, ESPaDOnS, and HARPS instruments, provide sufficient material from which to re-evaluate the magnetic field and obtain a first approximation to the atmospheric abundance distributions of various elements. Using the new magnetic field measurements and optical photometry together with previously published data, we refine the period of HD 133880 to P = 0.877476 \\pm 0.000009 days. The magnetic field structure was characterised by a colinear multipole expansion from the observed variations of the longitudinal and surface fields with rotational phase. This simple axisymmetric magnetic field model is based on a predominantly quadrupolar component that roughly describes the field variations. Using spectrum synthesis, we derived mean abundances for O, Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Fe, Nd...

  16. Magnetohydrodynamics flow over a rapidly rotating axisymmetric wavy disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Myung Sup [Korea Testing Laboratory, 222-13 Guro3-dong Guro-gu, Seoul 152-718 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jun Sang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Halla University, Halla dae 1-gil, HeungUp, Wonju, Kangwon-do 220-712 (Korea, Republic of); Hyun, Jae Min, E-mail: jspark@halla.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Kusong-dong, Yusong-gu, Taejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    A numerical study of Magnetohydrodynamics boundary layer flow over a rapidly rotating wavy disc was performed under which magnetic fields are imposed by a circular electric coil. The shape of the disc is assumed to be axisymmetric and sinusoidal in the radial direction, and semi-infinite space over the disc steadily rotating is occupied by an electrically conducting fluid. The study was conducted for the case where the representative Reynolds number is very large and the magnetic Reynolds number is negligibly small. The effect of Lorentz force on fluid motion was precisely investigated as the main external controlling force. The generalized boundary layer equation, including both magnetic field and heat flux, is derived to examine interactions among the effects of wavy surface shape, magnetic field and heat flux from the disc surface. Two cases of uniform magnetic field, much studied in previous research, and of non-uniform magnetic field, realized by a circular coil, have been scrutinized. Details of velocity profile, skin friction coefficient and heat transfer coefficient are given.

  17. Optimum Location of Thermal Radiation Shield in Superconducting Rotating Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikiran, P. A.; Rao, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    Superconducting rotating machines have rotor maintained at low temperatures, below the critical temperature of the superconductor. This establishes large temperature difference between the cold rotor and surroundings, resulting in large heat leak into rotor through conduction, convection and radiation. Minimizing this heat leak is essential to reduce the power expense of cryogenic cooling system. A radiation shield is anchored at a suitable location on torque tube to minimize the radiation heat leak into the cold rotor. This paper presents a methodology to determine the optimum location of this anchor-point of radiation shield for a given geometry, which minimizes the total heat leak into cold rotor. The location of radiation shield is found to be depending on emissivity of cold rotor.

  18. An analysis of the rapidly rotating Bp star HD 133880

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. D.; Grunhut, J.; Shultz, M.; Wade, G.; Landstreet, J. D.; Bohlender, D.; Lim, J.; Wong, K.; Drake, S.; Linsky, J.

    2012-06-01

    HD 133880 is a rapidly rotating chemically peculiar B-type (Bp) star (v sin i≃ 103 km s-1) and is host to one of the strongest magnetic fields of any Ap/Bp star. A member of the Upper Centaurus Lupus association, it is a star with a well-determined age of 16 Myr. 12 new spectra, four of which are polarimetric, obtained from the FEROS, ESPaDOnS and HARPS instruments, provide sufficient material from which to re-evaluate the magnetic field and obtain a first approximation to the atmospheric abundance distributions of He, O, Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Pr and Nd. An abundance analysis was carried out using ZEEMAN, a program which synthesizes spectral line profiles for stars with permeating magnetic fields. The magnetic field structure was characterized by a colinear multipole expansion from the observed variations of the longitudinal and surface fields with rotational phase. Both magnetic hemispheres are clearly visible during the stellar rotation, and thus a three-ring abundance distribution model encompassing both magnetic poles and magnetic equator with equal spans in colatitude was adopted. Using the new magnetic field measurements and optical photometry together with previously published data, we refine the period of HD 133880 to P= 0.877 476 ± 0.000 009 d. Our simple axisymmetric magnetic field model is based on a predominantly quadrupolar component that roughly describes the field variations. Using spectrum synthesis, we derived mean abundances for O, Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Fe and Pr. All elements, except Mg, are overabundant compared to the Sun. Mg appears to be approximately uniform over the stellar surface, while all other elements are more abundant in the negative magnetic hemisphere than in the positive magnetic hemisphere. In contrast to most Ap/Bp stars which show an underabundance in O, in HD 133880 this element is clearly overabundant compared to the solar abundance ratio. In studying the Hα and Paschen lines in the optical spectra, we could not unambiguously

  19. Featured Image: Making a Rapidly Rotating Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    These stills from a simulation show the evolution (from left to right and top to bottom) of a high-mass X-ray binary over 1.1 days, starting after the star on the right fails to explode as a supernova and then collapses into a black hole. Many high-mass X-ray binaries like the well-known Cygnus X-1, the first source widely accepted to be a black hole host rapidly spinning black holes. Despite our observations of these systems, however, were still not sure how these objects end up with such high rotation speeds. Using simulations like that shown above, a team of scientists led by Aldo Batta (UC Santa Cruz) has demonstrated how a failed supernova explosion can result in such a rapidly spinning black hole. The authors work shows that in a binary where one star attempts to explode as a supernova and fails it doesnt succeed in unbinding the star the large amount of fallback material can interact with the companion star and then accrete onto the black hole, spinning it up in the process. You can read more about the authors simulations and conclusions in the paper below.CitationAldo Batta et al 2017 ApJL 846 L15. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa8506

  20. Radiation from an accelerating neutral body: The case of rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarman, Tolga; Arik, Metin; Kholmetskii, Alexander L.

    2013-11-01

    diatomic molecule, for instance). If the object reaches its final state in a given medium, say air, and "friction" is present, such as the case of a dental drill, then energy should keep being supplied to it, to overcome friction, which is present either inside the "inner mechanism of rotation" or in its surroundings. In other words, the object in the latter case, would be constantly subject to a friction force, countering its motion, and tending to make it fall to lower rotational energy states. Any fluctuations in the power supply, on the other hand, will slow down the rotating object, no matter how indiscernibly. The small decrease in the rotational velocity is yet reincreased by restoring the power supply, thus perpetually securing a stationary rotational motion. Thereby, the object in this final state, due to fluctuations in either friction or power supply, or both, shall further be expected to emit a radiation of energy , where is the final angular velocity of the object in rotation. What is more is that our team has very successfully measured what is predicted here, and they will report their experimental results in a subsequent article. The approach presented here seems to shed light on the mysterious sonoluminescence. It also triggers the possibility of sensing earthquakes due to radiation that should be emitted by the faults, on which the seismic stress keeps increasing until the crackdown. By the same token, also two colliding (neutral) objects are expected to emit radiation.

  1. Jeans instability of rotating magnetized quantum plasma: Influence of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, H., E-mail: hjoshi8525@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Mewar University, Chittorgarh (Raj.) India (India); Pensia, R. K. [Department of Physics, Govt. Girls College, Neemuch (M.P.) India (India)

    2015-07-31

    The effect of radiative heat-loss function and rotation on the Jeans instability of quantum plasma is investigated. The basic set of equations for this problem is constructed by considering quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model. Using normal mode analysis, the general dispersion relation is obtained. This dispersion relation is studied in both, longitudinal and transverse direction of propagations. In both case of longitudinal and transverse direction of propagation, the Jeans instability criterion is modified due to presence of radiative heat-loss function and quantum correction.

  2. GUP assisted Hawking radiation of rotating acoustic black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakalli, I.; Övgün, A.; Jusufi, K.

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies (Steinhauer in Nat. Phys. 10:864, 2014, Phys. Rev. D 92:024043, 2015) provide compelling evidences that Hawking radiation could be experimentally proven by using an analogue black hole. In this paper, taking this situation into account we study the quantum gravitational effects on the Hawking radiation of rotating acoustic black holes. For this purpose, we consider the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) in the phenomenon of quantum tunneling. We firstly take the modified commutation relations into account to compute the GUP modified Hawking temperature when the massive scalar particles tunnel from this black hole. Then, we find a remarkably instructive expression for the GUP entropy to derive the quantum gravity corrected Hawking temperature of the rotating acoustic black hole.

  3. GUP Assisted Hawking Radiation of Rotating Acoustic Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Sakalli, I; Jusufi, K

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies [J. Steinhauer, Nature Phys., $\\textbf{10}$, 864 (2014); Phys. Rev. D $\\textbf{92}$, 024043 (2015)] provide compelling evidences that Hawking radiation could be experimentally proven by using an analogue black hole. In this paper, taking this situation into account we study the quantum gravitational effects on the Hawking radiation of rotating acoustic black holes. For this purpose, we consider the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) in the phenomenon of quantum tunneling. We firstly take the modified commutation relations into account to compute the GUP modified Hawking temperature when the massive scalar particles tunnel from this black hole. Then, we find a remarkably instructive expression for the GUP entropy to derive the quantum gravity corrected Hawking temperature of the rotating acoustic black hole.

  4. The shape of a rapidly rotating polytrope with index unity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopik, Jerzy; Mach, Patryk; Odrzywołek, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    We show that the solutions obtained in the paper `An exact solution for arbitrarily rotating gaseous polytropes with index unity' by Kong, Zhang, and Schubert represent only approximate solutions of the free-boundary Euler-Poisson system of equations describing uniformly rotating, self-gravitating polytropes with index unity. We discuss the quality of such solutions as approximations to the rigidly rotating equilibrium polytropic configurations.

  5. Buoyancy in tropical cyclones and other rapidly rotating atmospheric vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger K.; Montgomery, Michael T.; Zhu, Hongyan

    2005-07-01

    Motivated primarily by its application to understanding tropical-cyclone intensification and maintenance, we re-examine the concept of buoyancy in rapidly rotating vortices, distinguishing between the buoyancy of the symmetric balanced vortex or system buoyancy, and the local buoyancy associated with cloud dynamics. The conventional definition of buoyancy is contrasted with a generalized form applicable to a vortex, which has a radial as well as a vertical component. If, for the special case of axisymmetric motions, the balanced density and pressure distribution of a rapidly rotating vortex are used as the reference state, the buoyancy field then characterizes the unbalanced density perturbations, i.e. the local buoyancy. We show how to determine such a reference state without approximation. The generation of the toroidal circulation of a vortex, which is necessary for vortex amplification, is characterized in the vorticity equation by the baroclinicity vector. This vector depends, inter-alia, on the horizontal (or radial) gradient of buoyancy evaluated along isobaric surfaces. We show that for a tropical-cyclone-scale vortex, the buoyancy so calculated is significantly different from that calculated at constant height or on surfaces of constant σ ( σ = ( p - p*)/( ps - p*), where p is the actual pressure, p* some reference pressure and ps is the surface pressure). Since many tropical-cyclone models are formulated using σ-coordinates, we examine the calculation of buoyancy on σ-surfaces and derive an expression for the baroclinicity vector in σ-coordinates. The baroclinic forcing term in the azimuthal vorticity equation for an axisymmetric vortex is shown to be approximately equal to the azimuthal component of the curl of the generalized buoyancy. A scale analysis indicates that the vertical gradient of the radial component of generalized buoyancy makes a comparatively small contribution to the generation of toroidal vorticity in a tropical cyclone, but may be

  6. Pulsations of rapidly rotating stars: I. The ACOR numerical code

    CERN Document Server

    Ouazzani, Rhita-Maria; Reese, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Very high precision seismic space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler provide the means of testing the modeling of transport processes in stellar interiors. For some stars, such as solar-like and red giant stars, a rotational splitting is measured. However, in order to fully exploit these splittings and constrain the rotation profile, one needs to be able to calculate them accurately. For some other stars, such as $\\delta$ Scuti and Be stars, for instance, the observed pulsation spectra are modified by rotation to such an extent that a perturbative treatment of the effects of rotation is no longer valid. We present here a new two-dimensional non-perturbative code, called ACOR (\\textit{Adiabatic Code of Oscillation including Rotation}) which allows us to compute adiabatic non-radial pulsations of rotating stars, without making any assumptions on the sphericity of the star, the fluid properties (i.e. baroclinicity) or the rotation profile. The 2D non-perturbative calculations fully take into account the centrifug...

  7. Rapid emission angle selection for rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present a rapid emission angle selection (REAS) method that enables the efficient selection of the azimuthal shield angle for rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). The REAS method produces a Pareto curve from which a potential RSBT user can select a treatment plan that balances the tradeoff between delivery time and tumor dose conformity. Methods: Two cervical cancer patients were considered as test cases for the REAS method. The RSBT source considered was a Xoft AxxentTM electronic brachytherapy source, partially shielded with 0.5 mm of tungsten, which traveled inside a tandem intrauterine applicator. Three anchor RSBT plans were generated for each case using dose-volume optimization, with azimuthal shield emission angles of 90°, 180°, and 270°. The REAS method converts the anchor plans to treatment plans for all possible emission angles by combining neighboring beamlets to form beamlets for larger emission angles. Treatment plans based on exhaustive dose-volume optimization (ERVO) and exhaustive surface optimization (ERSO) were also generated for both cases. Uniform dwell-time scaling was applied to all plans such that that high-risk clinical target volume D90 was maximized without violating the D2cc tolerances of the rectum, bladder, and sigmoid colon. Results: By choosing three azimuthal emission angles out of 32 potential angles, the REAS method performs about 10 times faster than the ERVO method. By setting D90 to 85–100 Gy10, the delivery times used by REAS generated plans are 21.0% and 19.5% less than exhaustive surface optimized plans used by the two clinical cases. By setting the delivery time budget to 5–25 and 10–30 min/fx, respectively, for two the cases, the D90 contributions for REAS are improved by 5.8% and 5.1% compared to the ERSO plans. The ranges used in this comparison were selected in order to keep both D90 and the delivery time within acceptable limits. Conclusions: The REAS method enables efficient RSBT

  8. EB radiation crosslinking of elastomers [rapid communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bik, J.; Głuszewski, W.; Rzymski, W. M.; Zagórski, Z. P.

    2003-06-01

    Radiation-induced crosslinking is proposed as successful alternative to conventional, chemical methods of crosslinking of elastomers. Hydrogenated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber was irradiated with 10 MeV electron beam to doses up to 300 kGy. Irradiated samples were investigated for the extent of crosslinking and for properties important for understanding of mechanisms. It follows from sol-gel analysis, that for 100 crosslinking acts there are 6-9 acts of chain scission. It is less than expected from the 20% participation of multi-ionization spurs, also in the solid state, as announced during the previous 9th Tihany Conference (Radiat. Phys. Chem. 56 (1999) 559). However, the apparent too low yield of multi-ionization spurs could be explained by partial conversion of scission products into crosslinks of specific trifunctional Y type. Our investigations confirm the usefulness of consideration of different radiation spurs in polymers, as well as in all, low LET irradiated media.

  9. Spacelike gravitational radiation extraction from rotating binary black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbiriba, Breno C. O.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce an alternate method for gravitational radiation extraction for binary black hole mergers where we do not use a single extraction radius at the intermediate field region but instead use a whole spherical shell of three-dimensional (3D) data and continue its evolution using the linearized (Teukolsky) evolution to a final distant radiation extraction radius. We implement this using the Hahndol code for the 3D evolution, and use the “Lazarus” procedure to convert the numerical data into the linearized data. The final waveform is compatible with the ones obtained from the full 3D evolutions with some minor variations that require further study. In the process, we tested the “Lazarus” method with our numerical 3D implementation and gauges showing that even with the advanced gauges suitable for 3D rotating binary evolutions, we recover the same type of limited results obtained in the original work.

  10. Could the Most Luminous Supernova ASASSN-15lh Be Powered by a Newborn Rapidly-Rotating Strange Quark Star?

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Z G; Wang, J S; Wang, L J; Yu, Y W

    2015-01-01

    Strange quark stars (SQSs), consisting of quark matter with comparable numbers of deconfined up, down and strange quarks, have so far remained a hypothetical class of compact objects. Observationally, it is difficult to distinguish between SQSs and neutron stars (NSs), because both classes of stars have similar structural and cooling features for stellar masses above one solar mass. Here we show that the most luminous supernova discovered recently, ASASSN-15lh, could have been powered by a newborn strongly-magnetized pulsar rotating with a nearly Keplerian period. A quick rotational-energy loss as a result of gravitational-radiation-driven r-mode instability in a hot young rapidly rotating NS, together with the fact that this instability is highly suppressed due to large bulk viscosity in an SQS, leads to the conclusion that such an ultra-energetic supernova may provide a "smoking gun" signature for the birth of an SQS.

  11. Rossby-wave turbulence in a rapidly rotating sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Schaeffer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a quasi-geostrophic numerical model to study the turbulence of rotating flows in a sphere, with realistic Ekman friction and bulk viscous dissipation. The forcing is caused by the destabilization of an axisymmetric Stewartson shear layer, generated by differential rotation, resulting in a forcing at rather large scales. The equilibrium regime is strongly anisotropic and inhomogeneous but exhibits a steep m-5 spectrum in the azimuthal (periodic direction, at scales smaller than the injection scale. This spectrum has been proposed by Rhines for a Rossby wave turbulence. For some parameter range, we observe a turbulent flow dominated by a large scale vortex located in the shear layer, reminding us of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter.

  12. The comparative hydrodynamics of rapid rotation by predatory appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, M J; Anderson, P S L; Van Wassenbergh, S; Matthews, D G; Summers, A P; Patek, S N

    2016-11-01

    Countless aquatic animals rotate appendages through the water, yet fluid forces are typically modeled with translational motion. To elucidate the hydrodynamics of rotation, we analyzed the raptorial appendages of mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) using a combination of flume experiments, mathematical modeling and phylogenetic comparative analyses. We found that computationally efficient blade-element models offered an accurate first-order approximation of drag, when compared with a more elaborate computational fluid-dynamic model. Taking advantage of this efficiency, we compared the hydrodynamics of the raptorial appendage in different species, including a newly measured spearing species, Coronis scolopendra The ultrafast appendages of a smasher species (Odontodactylus scyllarus) were an order of magnitude smaller, yet experienced values of drag-induced torque similar to those of a spearing species (Lysiosquillina maculata). The dactyl, a stabbing segment that can be opened at the distal end of the appendage, generated substantial additional drag in the smasher, but not in the spearer, which uses the segment to capture evasive prey. Phylogenetic comparative analyses revealed that larger mantis shrimp species strike more slowly, regardless of whether they smash or spear their prey. In summary, drag was minimally affected by shape, whereas size, speed and dactyl orientation dominated and differentiated the hydrodynamic forces across species and sizes. This study demonstrates the utility of simple mathematical modeling for comparative analyses and illustrates the multi-faceted consequences of drag during the evolutionary diversification of rotating appendages. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. On the dust zoning of rapidly rotating cometary nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpis, H. L. F.; Mendis, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of nuclear rotation on the surface of a cometary nucleus (a comet at 1 AU that is H2O dominated and has a radius of 1 km) are considered. It is shown that this dust does not accumulate uniformly on the surface, which here is considered spherical. While dust particles in the two polar cap regions and an equatorial belt remain at rest on the surface, those in two midlatitude bands migrate toward the equator, stopping at the two low latitudes to form dust ridges. As the nucleus spins up, both the polar caps and the equatorial belt shrink in size, and the dust ridges move toward the equator, eventually spinning off the dust from the nucleus when the nuclear rotation period is less than about 3.3 hr. For larger particles for which the gas buoyancy is negligible, migration takes place only if the rotation period is not significantly larger than the critical value of 3.3 hr or if the surface friction is abnormally small.

  14. A solar eruption driven by rapid sunspot rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, Guiping; Wang, Shuo; Zhang, Hongqi; Li, Gang; Jing, Ju; Su, Jiangtao; Li, Xing; Xu, Haiqing; Du, Guohui; Wang, Haimin

    2014-01-01

    We present the observation of a major solar eruption that is associated with fast sunspot rotation. The event includes a sigmoidal filament eruption, a coronal mass ejection, and a GOES X2.1 flare from NOAA active region 11283. The filament and some overlying arcades were partially rooted in a sunspot. The sunspot rotated at $\\sim$10$^\\circ$ per hour rate during a period of 6 hours prior to the eruption. In this period, the filament was found to rise gradually along with the sunspot rotation. Based on the HMI observation, for an area along the polarity inversion line underneath the filament, we found gradual pre-eruption decreases of both the mean strength of the photospheric horizontal field ($B_h$) and the mean inclination angle between the vector magnetic field and the local radial (or vertical) direction. These observations are consistent with the pre-eruption gradual rising of the filament-associated magnetic structure. In addition, according to the Non-Linear Force-Free-Field reconstruction of the coron...

  15. Numerical solutions of general-relativistic field equations for rapidly rotating neutron stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴雪君; 须重明

    1997-01-01

    Stationary axial symmetric equilibrium configurations rapidly rotating with uniform angular velocity in the framework of genera! relativity are considered. Sequences of models are numerically computed by means of a computer code that solves the full Einstein equations exactly. This code employs Neugebauer’s minimal surface formalism, where the field equations are equivalent to two-dimensional minimal surface equations for 4 metric potentials. The calculations are based upon 10 different equations of state. Results of various structures of neutron stars and the rotational effects on stellar structures and properties are reported. Finally some limits to equations of state of neutron stars and the stability for rapidly rotating relativistic neutron stars are discussed.

  16. Rapid Rotation and Nonradial Pulsations $\\kappa$-Mechanism Excitation of G-Modes in B Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ushomirsky, G; Ushomirsky, Greg; Bildsten, Lars

    1998-01-01

    Several classes of stars (most notably O and B main-sequence stars, as well as accreting white dwarfs and neutron stars) rotate quite rapidly, at spin frequencies greater than the typical g-mode frequencies. We discuss how rapid rotation modifies the $\\kappa$-mechanism excitation and observability of g-mode oscillations. We find that, by affecting the timescale match between the mode period and the thermal time at the driving zone, rapid rotation stabilizes some of the g-modes that are excited in a non-rotating star, and, conversely, excites g-modes that are damped in absence of rotation. The fluid velocities and temperature perturbations are strongly concentrated near the equator for most g-modes in rapidly rotating stars, which means that a favorable viewing angle may be required to observe the pulsations. Moreover, the stability of modes of the same $l$ but different $m$ is affected differently by rotation. We illustrate this by considering g-modes in Slowly Pulsating B-type stars as a function of the rota...

  17. Direct imaging rapidly-rotating non-Kerr black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bambi, Cosimo, E-mail: Cosimo.Bambi@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 80333 Munich (Germany); Caravelli, Francesco, E-mail: fcaravelli@perimeterinstitute.ca [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute, 14476 Golm (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Modesto, Leonardo, E-mail: lmodesto@perimeterinstitute.ca [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    Recently, two of us have argued that non-Kerr black holes in gravity theories different from General Relativity may have a topologically non-trivial event horizon. More precisely, the spatial topology of the horizon of non-rotating and slow-rotating objects would be a 2-sphere, like in Kerr space-time, while it would change above a critical value of the spin parameter. When the topology of the horizon changes, the black hole central singularity shows up. The accretion process from a thin disk can potentially overspin these black holes and induce the topology transition, violating the Weak Cosmic Censorship Conjecture. If the astrophysical black hole candidates are not the black holes predicted by General Relativity, we might have the quite unique opportunity to see their central region, where classical physics breaks down and quantum gravity effects should appear. Even if the quantum gravity region turned out to be extremely small, at the level of the Planck scale, the size of its apparent image would be finite and potentially observable with future facilities.

  18. Constraining properties of rapidly rotating neutron stars using data from heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Krastev, Plamen G; Worley, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    Aims.- Properties, structure, and thermal evolution of neutron stars are determined by the equation of state of stellar matter. Recent data on isospin-diffusion in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies and the size of neutron skin in $^{208}Pb$ have constrained considerably the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and, in turn, the equation of state of neutron-rich nucleonic matter. These constraints could provide useful information about the global properties of rapidly rotating neutron stars. Methods.- Models of rapidly rotating neutron stars are constructed applying several nucleonic equations of state. Particular emphasis is placed on configurations rotating rigidly at 716 and 1122Hz. The range of allowed hydrostatic equilibrium solutions is determined and tested for stability. The effect of rotation on the internal composition and thermal properties of neutron stars is also examined. Results.- At a given rotational frequency, each equation of state yields a range of possible neutron ...

  19. Efficiency of Synchrotron Radiation from Rotation-powered Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaka, Shota; Tanaka, Shuta J.

    2017-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation is widely considered to be the origin of the pulsed non-thermal emissions from rotation-powered pulsars in optical and X-ray bands. In this paper, we study the synchrotron radiation emitted by the created electron and positron pairs in the pulsar magnetosphere to constrain the energy conversion efficiency from the Poynting flux to the particle energy flux. We model two pair creation processes, two-photon collision, which efficiently works in young γ-ray pulsars (≲106 year), and magnetic pair creation, which is the dominant process to supply pairs in old pulsars (≳106 year). Using the analytical model, we derive the maximum synchrotron luminosity as a function of the energy conversion efficiency. From the comparison with observations, we find that the energy conversion efficiency to the accelerated particles should be an order of unity in the magnetosphere, even though we make a number of the optimistic assumptions to enlarge the synchrotron luminosity. In order to explain the luminosity of the non-thermal X-ray/optical emission from pulsars with low spin-down luminosity L sd ≲ 1034 erg s‑1, non-dipole magnetic field components should be dominant at the emission region. For the γ-ray pulsars with L sd ≲ 1035 erg s‑1, observed γ-ray to X-ray and optical flux ratios are much higher than the flux ratio between curvature and the synchrotron radiations. We discuss some possibilities such as the coexistence of multiple accelerators in the magnetosphere as suggested from the recent numerical simulation results. The obtained maximum luminosity would be useful to select observational targets in X-ray and optical bands.

  20. Synchrotron and Smith-Purcell radiations from a charge rotating around a cylindrical grating

    CERN Document Server

    Saharian, A A; Mkrtchyan, A R; Khachatryan, B V

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the radiation from a charge rotating around conductors with cylindrical symmetry. First the problem is considered with a charge rotating around a conducting cylinder immersed in a homogeneous medium. The surface charge and current densities induced on the cylinder surface are evaluated. A formula is derived for the spectral-angular density of the radiation intensity. In the second part, we study the radiation for a charge rotating around a diffraction grating on a cylindrical surface with metallic strips parallel to the cylinder axis. The effect of the grating on the radiation intensity is approximated by the surface currents induced on the strips by the field of the rotating charge. The expressions are derived for the electric and magnetic fields and for the angular density of the radiation intensity on a given harmonic. We show that the interference between the synchrotron and Smith-Purcell radiations may lead to interesting features. In particular, the behavior of the radiation intensity on ...

  1. Outflowing disk formation in B[e] supergiants due to rotation and bi--stability in radiation driven winds

    CERN Document Server

    Cure, M; Cidale, L

    2005-01-01

    The effects of rapid rotation and bi-stability upon the density contrast between the equatorial and polar directions of a B[e] supergiant are re-investigated. Based upon a new slow solution for different high rotational radiation driven winds (Cur\\'e 2004) and the fact that bi--stability allows a change in the line--force parameters ($\\alpha$, $k$, and $\\delta$), the equatorial densities are about $10^2$--$10^4$ times higher than the polar ones. These values are in qualitative agreement with the observations.

  2. Further Results from the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey: Rapidly Rotating Late ON Giants

    CERN Document Server

    Walborn, Nolan R; Sota, Alfredo; Alfaro, Emilio J; Morrell, Nidia I; Barba, Rodolfo H; Arias, Julia I; Gamen, Roberto C

    2011-01-01

    With new data from the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey, we confirm and expand the ONn category of late-O, nitrogen-enriched (N), rapidly rotating (n) giants. In particular, we have discovered two "clones" (HD 102415 and HD 117490) of one of the most rapidly rotating O stars previously known (HD 191423, "Howarth's Star"). We compare the locations of these objects in the theoretical HR Diagram to those of slowly rotating ON dwarfs and supergiants. All ON giants known to date are rapid rotators, whereas no ON dwarf or supergiant is; but all ON stars are small fractions of their respective spectral-type/luminosity-class/rotational subcategories. The ONn giants, displaying both substantial processed material and high rotation at an intermediate evolutionary stage, may provide significant information about the development of those properties. They may have preserved high initial rotational velocities or been spun up by TAMS core contraction; but alternatively and perhaps more likely, they may be products of bi...

  3. Galaxy Rotation and Rapid Supermassive Black Hole Binary Coalescence

    CERN Document Server

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    During a galaxy merger, the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in each galaxy is thought to sink to the center of the potential and form a supermassive black hole binary; this binary can eject stars via 3-body scattering, bringing the SMBHs ever closer. In a static spherical galaxy model, the binary stalls at a separation of about a parsec after ejecting all the stars in its loss cone -- this is the well-known final parsec problem. However it has been shown that SMBH binaries in non-spherical galactic nuclei harden at a nearly constant rate until reaching the gravitational wave regime. Here we use a suite of direct N-body simulations to follow SMBH binary evolution in both corotating and counterrotating flattened galaxy models. For N larger than 500K, we find that the evolution of the SMBH binary is convergent, and is independent of the particle number. Rotation in general increases the hardening rate of SMBH binaries even more effectively than galaxy geometry alone. SMBH binary hardening rates are similar for co...

  4. Rossby waves and polar spots in rapidly rotating stars: Implications for stellar wind evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Zaqarashvili, T V; Ballester, J L; Carbonell, M; Khodachenko, M L; Lammer, H; Leitzinger, M; Odert, P

    2011-01-01

    Rapidly rotating stars show short-period oscillations in magnetic activity and polar appearance of starspots. The aim of this paper is to study large-scale shallow water waves in the tachoclines of rapidly rotating stars and their connection to the periodicity and the formation of starspots at high latitudes. Shallow-water magnetohydrodynamic equations were used to study the dynamics of large-scale waves at the rapidly rotating stellar tachoclines in the presence of toroidal magnetic field. Dispersion relations and latitudinal distribution of wave modes were derived. We found that low-frequency magnetic Rossby waves tend to be located at poles, but high-frequency magnetic Poincare waves are concentrated near the equator in rapidly rotating stars. These results have important implications for the evolution of the stellar wind in young Sun-like stars. Unstable magnetic Rossby waves may lead to the local enhancement of magnetic flux at high latitudes of tachoclines in rapidly rotating stars. The enhanced magneti...

  5. Rapid Black Hole Growth under Anisotropic Radiation Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Sugimura, Kazuyuki; Yajima, Hidenobu; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid accretion of gases onto massive black holes (BHs) is considered to have played an important role in the growth of the observed high-redshift (z > 6) supermassive BHs. Here, we present the results of our two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of rapidly accreting BHs under anisotropic radiation. We model the radiation from the central circum-BH accretion disk considering the shadowing effect by the outer part of the disk. We find that the flow structure reaches a steady state, which consists of a polar ionized outflowing region, where the gas is pushed outward by the super-Eddington radiation pressure, and an equatorial neutral inflowing region, where the gas falls toward the central BH in a Bondi-like accretion fashion without affected by radiation feedback. The resulting accretion rate is much higher than that in the case of isotropic radiation, and far exceeds the Eddington-limited rate and even reaches around the Bondi value. We find that the solid angle of the equatorial inflowing regio...

  6. Rapid rotational crust-core relaxation in magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-01-01

    If a magnetar interior $B$-field exceeds $10^{15}$ G it will unpair the proton superconductor in the star's core by inducing diamagnetic currents which destroy the Cooper pair coherence. Then, the $P$-wave neutron superfluid in these non-superconducting regions will couple to the stellar plasma by scattering of protons off the quasiparticles confined in the cores of neutron vortices via the strong (nuclear) force. The dynamical time-scales associated with this interaction span from several minutes at the crust-core interface to a few seconds in the deep core. We show that (a) the rapid crust-core coupling is incompatible with oscillation models of magnetars which decouple completely the core superfluid from the crust and (b) magnetar precession is damped by the coupling of normal fluids to the superfluid core and, if observed, needs to be forced or continuously excited by seismic activity.

  7. Rapid black hole growth under anisotropic radiation feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Kazuyuki; Hosokawa, Takashi; Yajima, Hidenobu; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2017-07-01

    Discovery of high-redshift (z > 6) supermassive black holes (BHs) may indicate that the rapid (or super-Eddington) gas accretion has aided their quick growth. Here, we study such rapid accretion of the primordial gas on to intermediate-mass (102-105 M⊙) BHs under anisotropic radiation feedback. We perform two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations that solve the flow structure across the Bondi radius, from far outside of the Bondi radius down to a central part that is larger than a circum-BH accretion disc. The radiation from the unresolved circum-BH disc is analytically modelled considering self-shadowing effect. We show that the flow settles into a steady state, where the flow structure consists of two distinct parts: (1) bipolar ionized outflowing regions, where the gas is pushed outward by thermal gas pressure and super-Eddington radiation pressure, and (2) an equatorial neutral inflowing region, where the gas falls towards the central BH without affected by radiation feedback. The resulting accretion rate is much higher than that in the case of isotropic radiation, far exceeding the Eddington-limited rate to reach a value slightly lower than the Bondi one. The opening angle of the equatorial inflowing region is determined by the luminosity and directional dependence of the central radiation. We find that photoevaporation from its surfaces set the critical opening angle of about 10° below which the accretion to the BH is quenched. We suggest that the shadowing effect allows even stellar-remnant BHs to grow rapidly enough to become high-redshift supermassive BHs.

  8. Search for the Jacobi shape transition in rapidly rotating nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, D; Swiatecki, W J; Clark, R M; Cromaz, M; Deleplanque, M A; Fallon, P; Görgen, A; Lane, G J; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; Myers, W; Stephens, F S; Svensson, C E; Vetter, K; 10.1103/PhysRevC.66.024317

    2002-01-01

    We have studied quasicontinuous gamma radiation from reactions of /sup 48/Ca beams on targets of /sup 50/Ti, /sup 64/Ni, /sup 96/Zr, and /sup 124/Sn. The bombarding energies were in the range 195-215 Me V, and were chosen so as to bring in a high angular momentum without severe fragmentation of the cross sections for fusion residues. Experiments were performed both with the 8PI spectrometer at the LBNL 88-Inch Cyclotron, and with Gammasphere at the ANL ATLAS accelerator. The results have been analyzed in a variety of ways, with the consistent result that in all but the heaviest target, the nuclear moments of inertia tend to increase with increasing angular momentum up to the highest values observed. This could come from a transition towards a highly deformed Jacobi-like shape, or possibly be due to the appearance of high-j intruder orbitals at the Fermi surface. We will argue that these effects can be equivalent. (25 refs).

  9. The causality between the rapid rotation of a sunspot and an X3.4 flare

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Li Yan; Zhong-Quan Qu; Cheng-Lin Xu; Zhi-Ke Xue; De-Fang Kong

    2009-01-01

    Using multi-wavelength data of Hinode, the rapid rotation of a sunspot in ac-tive region NOAA 10930 is studied in detail. We found extraordinary counterclockwise rotation of the sunspot with positive polarity before an X3.4 flare. From a series of vector magnetograms, it is found that magnetic force lines are highly sheared along the neu-tral line accompanying the sunspot rotation. Furthermore, it is also found that sheared loops and an inverse S-shaped magnetic loop in the corona formed gradually after the sunspot rotation. The X3.4 flare can be reasonably regarded as a result of this movement. A detailed analysis provides evidence that sunspot rotation leads to magnetic field linestwisting in the photosphere. The twist is then transported into the corona and triggers flares.

  10. Giant coronal loops dominate the quiescent X-ray emission in rapidly rotating M stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, O; Garraffo, C; Saar, S H; Wolk, S J; Kashyap, V L; Drake, J J; Pillitteri, I

    2016-01-01

    Observations indicate that magnetic fields in rapidly rotating stars are very strong, on both small and large scales. What is the nature of the resulting corona? Here we seek to shed some light on this question. We use the results of an anelastic dynamo simulation of a rapidly rotating fully-convective M-star to drive a physics-based model for the stellar corona. We find that due to the several kilo Gauss large-scale magnetic fields at high latitudes, the corona and its X-ray emission are dominated by star-size large hot loops, while the smaller, underlying colder loops are not visible much in the X-ray. Based on this result we propose that, in rapidly rotating stars, emission from such coronal structures dominates the quiescent, cooler but saturated X-ray emission.

  11. Rapidly rotating neutron stars with a massive scalar field—structure and universal relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doneva, Daniela D.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2016-11-01

    We construct rapidly rotating neutron star models in scalar-tensor theories with a massive scalar field. The fact that the scalar field has nonzero mass leads to very interesting results since the allowed range of values of the coupling parameters is significantly broadened. Deviations from pure general relativity can be very large for values of the parameters that are in agreement with the observations. We found that the rapid rotation can magnify the differences several times compared to the static case. The universal relations between the normalized moment of inertia and quadrupole moment are also investigated both for the slowly and rapidly rotating cases. The results show that these relations are still EOS independent up to a large extend and the deviations from pure general relativity can be large. This places the massive scalar-tensor theories amongst the few alternative theories of gravity that can be tested via the universal I-Love-Q relations.

  12. Rapidly rotating neutron stars with a massive scalar field - structure and universal relations

    CERN Document Server

    Doneva, Daniela D

    2016-01-01

    We construct rapidly rotating neutron star models in scalar-tensor theories with a massive scalar field. The fact that the scalar field has nonzero mass leads to very interesting results since the allowed range of values of the coupling parameters is significantly broadened. These deviations from pure general relativity can be very large for values of the parameters that are in agreement with the observations. The rapid rotation can magnify the differences several times compared to the static case. The universal relations between the normalized moment of inertia and quadrupole moment are also investigated both for the slowly and rapidly rotating cases. The results show that these relations are still EOS independent up to a large extend and the deviations from pure general relativity can be large. This places the massive scalar-tensor theories amongst the few alternative theories of gravity that can be tested via the universal $I$-Love-$Q$ relations.

  13. The radiative zone of the Sun and the tachocline: stability of baroclinic patterns of differential rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Caleo, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Barotropic rotation and radiative equilibrium are mutually incompatible in stars. The issue is often addressed by allowing for a meridional circulation, but this is not devoid of theoretical complications. Models of rotation in the Sun which maintain strict radiative equilibrium, making use of the observation that the Sun is not in a state of barotropic rotation, have recently been suggested. To investigate the dynamical behaviour of these solutions, we study the local stability of stratified, weakly magnetized, differentially rotating fluids to non-axisymmetric perturbations. Finite heat conductivity, kinematic viscosity, and resistivity are present. The evolution of local embedded perturbations is governed by a set of coupled, ordinary differential equations with time-dependent coefficients. Two baroclinic models of rotation for the upper radiative zone and tachocline are studied: (i) an interpolation based on helioseismology data, (ii) a theoretical solution directly compatible with radiative equilibrium. ...

  14. The Hawking evaporation process of rapidly-rotating black holes: an almost continuous cascade of gravitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emek Hefer (Israel); The Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-07-15

    It is shown that rapidly-rotating Kerr black holes are characterized by the dimensionless ratio τ{sub gap}/τ{sub emission} = O(1), where τ{sub gap} is the average time gap between the emissions of successive Hawking quanta and τ{sub emission} is the characteristic timescale required for an individual Hawking quantum to be emitted from the black hole. This relation implies that the Hawking cascade from rapidly-rotating black holes has an almost continuous character. Our results correct some inaccurate claims that recently appeared in the literature regarding the nature of the Hawking black-hole evaporation process. (orig.)

  15. Rapid determination of Faraday rotation in optical glasses by means of secondary Faraday modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofronie, M; Elisa, M; Sava, B A; Boroica, L; Valeanu, M; Kuncser, V

    2015-05-01

    A rapid high sensitive method for determining the Faraday rotation of optical glasses is proposed. Starting from an experimental setup based on a Faraday rod coupled to a lock-in amplifier in the detection chain, two methodologies were developed for providing reliable results on samples presenting low and large Faraday rotations. The proposed methodologies were critically discussed and compared, via results obtained in transmission geometry, on a new series of aluminophosphate glasses with or without rare-earth doping ions. An example on how the method can be used for a rapid examination of the optical homogeneity of the sample with respect to magneto-optical effects is also provided.

  16. Ancient hybridization fuels rapid cichlid fish adaptive radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Joana I.; Marques, David A.; Mwaiko, Salome; Wagner, Catherine E.; Excoffier, Laurent; Seehausen, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Understanding why some evolutionary lineages generate exceptionally high species diversity is an important goal in evolutionary biology. Haplochromine cichlid fishes of Africa's Lake Victoria region encompass >700 diverse species that all evolved in the last 150,000 years. How this ‘Lake Victoria Region Superflock' could evolve on such rapid timescales is an enduring question. Here, we demonstrate that hybridization between two divergent lineages facilitated this process by providing genetic variation that subsequently became recombined and sorted into many new species. Notably, the hybridization event generated exceptional allelic variation at an opsin gene known to be involved in adaptation and speciation. More generally, differentiation between new species is accentuated around variants that were fixed differences between the parental lineages, and that now appear in many new combinations in the radiation species. We conclude that hybridization between divergent lineages, when coincident with ecological opportunity, may facilitate rapid and extensive adaptive radiation. PMID:28186104

  17. Rapidly Rotating Neutron Stars in Dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Mojica, Sindy; Zagermann, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We construct sequences of rapidly rotating neutron stars in dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory, employing two equations of state for the nuclear matter. We analyze the dependence of the physical properties of these neutron stars on the Gauss-Bonnet coupling strength. For a given equation of state we determine the physically relevant domain of rapidly rotating neutron stars, which is delimited by the set of neutron stars rotating at the Kepler limit, the set of neutron stars along the secular instability line, and the set of static neutron stars. As compared to Einstein gravity, the presence of the Gauss-Bonnet term decreases this domain, leading to lower values for the maximum mass as well as to smaller central densities. The quadrupole moment is decreased by the Gauss-Bonnet term for rapidly rotating neutron stars, while it is increased for slowly rotating neutron stars. The universal relation between the quadrupole moment and the moment of inertia found in General Relativity appears to extend to dilaton...

  18. Rapid Analysis of Mass Distribution of Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapp, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Radiation Shielding Evaluation Toolset (RADSET) is a computer program that rapidly calculates the spatial distribution of mass of an arbitrary structure for use in ray-tracing analysis of the radiation-shielding properties of the structure. RADSET was written to be used in conjunction with unmodified commercial computer-aided design (CAD) software that provides access to data on the structure and generates selected three-dimensional-appearing views of the structure. RADSET obtains raw geometric, material, and mass data on the structure from the CAD software. From these data, RADSET calculates the distribution(s) of the masses of specific materials about any user-specified point(s). The results of these mass-distribution calculations are imported back into the CAD computing environment, wherein the radiation-shielding calculations are performed.

  19. Radiation-induced bystander effect: early process and rapid assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, K N; Hou, Jue; Liu, Qian; Han, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is a biological process that has received attention over the past two decades. RIBE refers to a plethora of biological effects in non-irradiated cells, including induction of genetic damages, gene expression, cell transformation, proliferation and cell death, which are initiated by receiving bystander signals released from irradiated cells. RIBE brings potential hazards to normal tissues in radiotherapy, and imparts a higher risk from low-dose radiation than we previously thought. Detection with proteins related to DNA damage and repair, cell cycle control, proliferation, etc. have enabled rapid assessment of RIBE in a number of research systems such as cultured cells, three-dimensional tissue models and animal models. Accumulated experimental data have suggested that RIBE may be initiated rapidly within a time frame as short as several minutes after radiation. These have led to the requirement of techniques capable of rapidly assessing RIBE itself as well as assessing the early processes involved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Topological Numbers and Edge State of Hierarchical State in Rapidly Rotating Ultracold Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Bo; CHEN Zeng-Bing

    2005-01-01

    The effective theory for the hierarchical fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect is proposed. We also derive the topological numbers K matrix and t vector and the general edge excitation from the effective theory. One can find that the two issues in rapidly rotating ultracold atoms are similar to those in electron FQH liquid.

  1. R-mode frequencies of rapidly and differentially rotating relativistic neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirenti, Cecilia; Jasiulek, Michael

    2017-01-01

    R-modes are a promising source of gravitational waves for ground based detectors. If the precise frequency is known, guided gravitational wave searches with higher detectability are possible. Many authors have calculated the r-mode frequency because of its physical importance. For the dominant mode its value is 4/3 times the angular velocity of the star, subject to various corrections, of which the most important are relativistic and rotational corrections. Here we extend the results from previous works and investigate the effect of rapid rotation and differential rotation on the r-mode frequency. We evolve the perturbation equations in Cowling approximation in time using finite differencing methods to compute the r-mode frequency for sequences of rotating neutron stars with polytropic equations of state. The results presented here are relevant to the design of gravitational wave and electromagnetic r-mode searches.

  2. The Radiative Transfer Approach to Rotational Motions - Estimation of Crustal Scattering Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Gaebler; Christoph Sens-Schönfelder; Korn, M.

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo solutions to the Radiative Transfer Equations are used to model translational and rotational motion seismogram envelopes in random elastic media. Crustal attenuation and scattering parameters are estimated in a nonlinear inversion process. High amounts of rotational energy can be measured in the seismic wave-field excited by earthquakes or even by ambient seismic noise sources. The observation of these three additional components of rotational motions can provide independent infor...

  3. Hawking radiation of scalar particles from accelerating and rotating black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillani, Usman A.; Rehman, Mudassar; Saifullah, K., E-mail: mani_precious2001@yahoo.com, E-mail: mudassar051@yahoo.com, E-mail: saifullah@qau.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-06-01

    Hawking radiation of uncharged and charged scalar particles from accelerating and rotating black holes is studied. We calculate the tunneling probabilities of these particles from the rotation and acceleration horizons of these black holes. Using this method we recover the correct Hawking temperature as well.

  4. First vs. second rotation of a poplar short rotation coppice: leaf area development, light interception and radiation use efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broeckx LS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Given the high expectations for lignocellulosic biomass as one of the potential solutions for energy security and climate change mitigation, commercial scale studies over several rotations are crucial to assess the potential and the sustainability of short rotation coppice (SRC cultures for bioenergy. The first and the second rotation of the SRC poplar (Populus plantation of the present study differed significantly in biomass yield and in productivity determinants and their relationships. Coppicing enhanced leaf area development, radiation interception and woody biomass productivity. High total leaf area and radiation use efficiency (RUE equally contributed to the high biomass yield during the establishment rotation, while RUE became the most important determinant of biomass yield after coppice. The study confirmed the significant genotypic variation in biomass productivity and its underlying determinants, also among more recently selected poplar genotypes. The absence of a correlation between intercepted radiation and RUE suggests the potential of selecting for genotypes combining high total leaf area and photosynthetic carbon uptake in future breeding programs for yield maximization towards sustainable bioenergy cultivation.

  5. Rapidly Rotating, X-ray Bright Stars in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Steve B; Boyd, Padi; Smith, Krista Lynne; Gelino, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    We present Kepler light curves and optical spectroscopy of twenty X-ray bright stars located in the Kepler field of view. The stars, spectral type FK, show evidence for rapid rotation including chromospheric activity 100 times or more above the Sun at maximum and flaring behavior in their light curves. Eighteen of our objects appear to be (sub)giants and may belong to the class of FK Com variables, that is evolved rapidly spinning single stars with no excretion disk and high levels of chromospheric activity. Such stars are rare and are likely the result of W UMa binary mergers, a process believed to produce the FK Com class of variable and their descendants. The FK Com stage, including the presence of an excretion disk, is short-lived but leads to longer-lived stages consisting of single, rapidly rotating evolved (sub)giants with high levels of stellar activity.

  6. Radiation from a charge rotating inside a cylindrical grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotanjyan, A. S.; Mkrtchyan, A. R.; Saharian, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the spectral-angular distribution for the radiation emitted by a point charge moving along a helical trajectory inside a cylindrical grating with conducting strips. Two types of the radiation processes are realized: undulator and Smith-Purcell radiations. Their relative contributions to the total radiation intensity are discussed in various asymptotic regions of the parameters describing the diffraction grating and for large harmonics. The region of the parameters is specified for which the interference effects between the undulator and Smith-Purcell radiations are essential.

  7. A large-scale dynamo and magnetoturbulence in rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mösta, Philipp; Ott, Christian D; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F; Schnetter, Erik; Haas, Roland

    2015-12-17

    Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is important in many high-energy astrophysical systems, where instabilities can amplify the local magnetic field over very short timescales. Specifically, the magnetorotational instability and dynamo action have been suggested as a mechanism for the growth of magnetar-strength magnetic fields (of 10(15) gauss and above) and for powering the explosion of a rotating massive star. Such stars are candidate progenitors of type Ic-bl hypernovae, which make up all supernovae that are connected to long γ-ray bursts. The magnetorotational instability has been studied with local high-resolution shearing-box simulations in three dimensions, and with global two-dimensional simulations, but it is not known whether turbulence driven by this instability can result in the creation of a large-scale, ordered and dynamically relevant field. Here we report results from global, three-dimensional, general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations. We show that hydromagnetic turbulence in rapidly rotating protoneutron stars produces an inverse cascade of energy. We find a large-scale, ordered toroidal field that is consistent with the formation of bipolar magnetorotationally driven outflows. Our results demonstrate that rapidly rotating massive stars are plausible progenitors for both type Ic-bl supernovae and long γ-ray bursts, and provide a viable mechanism for the formation of magnetars. Moreover, our findings suggest that rapidly rotating massive stars might lie behind potentially magnetar-powered superluminous supernovae.

  8. THE MOST LUMINOUS SUPERNOVA ASASSN-15LH: SIGNATURE OF A NEWBORN RAPIDLY ROTATING STRANGE QUARK STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Z. G.; Wang, S. Q.; Wang, J. S. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wang, L. J. [Key Laboratory of Space Astronomy and Technology, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Yu, Y. W., E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we show that the most luminous supernova discovered very recently, ASASSN-15lh, could have been powered by a newborn ultra-strongly magnetized pulsar, which initially rotates near the Kepler limit. We find that if this pulsar is a neutron star, its rotational energy could be quickly lost as a result of gravitational-radiation-driven r-mode instability; if it is a strange quark star (SQS), however, this instability is highly suppressed due to a large bulk viscosity associated with the nonleptonic weak interaction among quarks and thus most of its rotational energy could be extracted to drive ASASSN-15lh. Therefore, we conclude that such an ultra-energetic supernova provides a possible signature for the birth of an SQS.

  9. Integrable multi atom matter-radiation models without rotating wave approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Kundu, Anjan

    2004-01-01

    Interacting matter-radiation models close to physical systems are proposed, which without rotating wave approximation and with matter-matter interactions are Bethe ansatz solvable. This integrable system is constructed from the elliptic Gaudin model at high spin limit, where radiative excitation can be included perturbatively.

  10. Radiation spectrum of rotating Gdel black hole and correction entropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽春; 林海; 李怀繁; 赵仁

    2011-01-01

    We study the Hawking radiation of the scalar field in the rotating Gdel black hole in minimal five-dimensional supergravity. We not only derive radiation spectra that satisfy the unitary principle but also obtain the correction term of Bekenstein-Hawking

  11. Time-series Doppler images and surface differential rotation of the effectively-single rapidly-rotating K-giant KU Pegasi

    CERN Document Server

    Kővári, Zs; Strassmeier, K G; Carroll, T A; Weber, M; Kriskovics, L; Oláh, K; Vida, K; Granzer, T

    2016-01-01

    According to most stellar dynamo theories, differential rotation (DR) plays a crucial role for the generation of toroidal magnetic fields. Numerical models predict surface differential rotation to be anti-solar for rapidly-rotating giant stars, i.e., their surface angular velocity could increase with stellar latitude. However, surface differential rotation has been derived only for a handful of individual giant stars to date. The spotted surface of the K-giant KU Pegasi is investigated in order to detect its time evolution and quantify surface differential rotation. We present altogether 11 Doppler images from spectroscopic data collected with the robotic telescope STELLA between 2006--2011. All maps are obtained with the surface reconstruction code iMap. Differential rotation is extracted from these images by detecting systematic (latitude-dependent) spot displacements. We apply a cross-correlation technique to find the best differential rotation law. The surface of KU Peg shows cool spots at all latitudes a...

  12. R-mode frequencies of rapidly and differentially rotating relativistic neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Jasiulek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    R-modes of neutron stars could be a source of gravitational waves for ground based detectors. If the precise frequency $\\sigma$ is known, guided gravitational wave searches with enhanced detectability are possible. Because of its physical importance many authors have calculated the r-mode frequency. For the dominant mode, the associated gravitational wave frequency is 4/3 times the angular velocity of the star $\\Omega$, subject to various corrections of which relativistic and rotational corrections are the most important. This has led several authors to investigate the dependence of the r-mode frequency on factors such as the relativistic compactness parameter ($M/R$) and the angular velocity of stars with different equations of state. The results found so far, however, are almost independent of the equation of state. Here we investigate the effect of rapid rotation and differential rotation on $\\sigma$. We evolve the perturbation equations using the Cowling approximation by applying finite differencing metho...

  13. Oscillation modes in the rapidly rotating Slowly Pulsating B-type star $\\bmu$ Eridani

    CERN Document Server

    Daszyńska-Daszkiewicz, J; Jerzykiewicz, M; Handler, G

    2014-01-01

    We present results of a search for identification of modes responsible for the six most significant frequency peaks detected in the rapidly rotating SPB star $\\mu$ Eridani. All published and some unpublished photometric data are used in our new analysis. The mode identification is carried out with the method developed by Daszy\\'nska-Daszkiewicz et al. employing the phases and amplitudes from multi-band photometric data and relying on the traditional approximation for the treatment of oscillations in rotating stars. Models consistent with the observed mean parameters are considered. For the five frequency peaks, the candidates for the identifications are searched amongst unstable modes. In the case of the third frequency, which is an exact multiple of the orbital frequency, this condition is relaxed. The systematic search is continued up to a harmonic degree $\\ell =6$. Determination of the angular numbers, $(\\ell,m)$, is done simultaneously with the rotation rate, $V_{\\rm rot}$, and the inclination angle, $i$,...

  14. Large-scale vortices in rapidly rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Guervilly, Céline; Jones, Chris A

    2014-01-01

    Using numerical simulations of rapidly rotating Boussinesq convection in a Cartesian box, we study the formation of long-lived, large-scale, depth-invariant coherent structures. These structures, which consist of concentrated cyclones, grow to the horizontal size of the box, with velocities significantly larger than the convective motions. We vary the rotation rate, the thermal driving and the aspect ratio in order to determine the domain of existence of these large-scale vortices (LSV). We find that two conditions are required for their formation. First, the Rayleigh number, a meaure of the thermal driving, must be several times its value at the linear onset of convection; this corresponds to Reynolds numbers, based on the convective velocity and the box depth, $\\gtrsim 100$. Second, the rotational constraint on the convection structures must be strong. This requires that the local Rossby number, based on the convective velocity and the horizontal convective scale, $\\lesssim 0.15$. Simulations in which certa...

  15. Transfer of PSR0531 rotation energy to the radiation of the Crab nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machabeli, G.; Gogoberidze, G.; Shapakidze, D.; Midelashvili, E.

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on the transfer of the Crab pulsar rotation energy to the electrostatic plasma waves of the pulsar magnetosphere by means of parametric instability. The energy of generated Langmuir waves is redistributed both to the pulsar radiation and the radiation of Crab nebula. It is shown that the power of the electrostatic waves transmitted to the Nebula is much greater than the power of Langmuir waves responsible for the generation of high frequency pulsar radiation.

  16. Strong field dynamo action in rapidly rotating convection with no inertia

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, David W

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is generated by dynamo action driven by convection in the outer core. Owing to the rapid rotation and small viscosity, the dynamical balance is believed to be between buoyancy, Coriolis and magnetic forces; inertial forces play no role. It is thus extremely important to produce explicit solutions with these features. However, from the traditional approach of solving the full governing equations at low Ekman numbers, it is not clear that the asymptotic regime has been captured. Here we adopt a complementary approach consisting of a model of rapidly rotating convection in which inertial forces are neglected from the outset. Within this framework we are able to construct a new branch of solutions in which the dynamo generates a strong magnetic field that satisfies the expected force balance. The resulting strongly magnetised convection is dramatically different to the corresponding solutions in which the magnetic field is weak.

  17. Synchrotron and Smith-Purcell radiations from a charge rotating around a cylindrical grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharian, A. A.; Kotanjyan, A. S.; Mkrtchyan, A. R.; Khachatryan, B. V.

    2017-07-01

    We study the radiation for a charge rotating around a diffraction grating on a cylindrical surface with metallic strips parallel to the cylinder axis. The effect of the grating on the radiation intensity is approximated by the surface currents induced on the strips by the field of the rotating charge. The expressions are derived for the vector potential and for the angular density of the radiation intensity on a given harmonic. We show that the behavior of the radiation intensity on large harmonics can be essentially different from that for a charge rotating in the vacuum. For the geometry of diffraction grating the radiation intensity on higher harmonics does not vanish for small angles with respect to the cylinder axis. For given characteristics of the charge, by the choice of the parameters of the diffraction grating, one can have highly directional radiation near the normal to the plane of the charge rotation. With decreasing energy, the relative contribution of the synchrotron radiation decreases and the Smith-Purcell part is dominant.

  18. Quadrupole Moments of Rapidly Rotating Compact Objects in Dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Mojica, Sindy

    2014-01-01

    We consider rapidly rotating black holes and neutron stars in dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet (EGBd) theory and determine their quadrupole moments, which receive a contribution from the dilaton. The quadrupole moment of EGBd black holes can be considerably larger than the Kerr value. For neutron stars, the universality property of the $\\hat I$-$\\hat Q$ relation between the scaled moment of inertia and the scaled quadrupole moment appears to extend to EGBd theory.

  19. Determination of very rapid molecular rotation by using the central electron paramagnetic resonance line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurban, Mark R

    2013-02-21

    Picosecond rotational correlation times of perdeuterated tempone (PDT) are found in alkane and aromatic liquids by directly using the spectral width of the central electron paramagnetic resonance line. This is done by mathematically eliminating the nonsecular spectral density from the spectral parameter equations, thereby removing the need to assume a particular form for it. This is preferable to fitting a constant correction factor to the spectral density, because such a factor does not fit well in the low picosecond range. The electron-nuclear spin dipolar interaction between the probe and solvent is shown to be negligible for the very rapid rotation of PDT in these liquids at the temperatures of the study. The rotational correlation times obtained with the proposed method generally agree to within experimental uncertainty with those determined by using the traditional parameters. Using the middle line width offers greater precision and smoother trends. Previous work with the central line width is discussed, and past discrepancies are explained as possibly resulting from residual inhomogeneous broadening. The rotational correlation time almost forms a common curve across all of the solvents when plotted with respect to isothermal compressibility, which shows the high dependence of rotation on liquid free volume.

  20. SUN-LIKE MAGNETIC CYCLES IN THE RAPIDLY ROTATING YOUNG SOLAR ANALOG HD 30495

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egeland, Ricky [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Metcalfe, Travis S. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut St. Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Hall, Jeffrey C. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Henry, Gregory W., E-mail: egeland@ucar.edu [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd., Box 9501, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States)

    2015-10-10

    A growing body of evidence suggests that multiple dynamo mechanisms can drive magnetic variability on different timescales, not only in the Sun but also in other stars. Many solar activity proxies exhibit a quasi-biennial (∼2 year) variation, which is superimposed upon the dominant 11 year cycle. A well-characterized stellar sample suggests at least two different relationships between rotation period and cycle period, with some stars exhibiting long and short cycles simultaneously. Within this sample, the solar cycle periods are typical of a more rapidly rotating star, implying that the Sun might be in a transitional state or that it has an unusual evolutionary history. In this work, we present new and archival observations of dual magnetic cycles in the young solar analog HD 30495, a ∼1 Gyr old G1.5 V star with a rotation period near 11 days. This star falls squarely on the relationships established by the broader stellar sample, with short-period variations at ∼1.7 years and a long cycle of ∼12 years. We measure three individual long-period cycles and find durations ranging from 9.6 to 15.5 years. We find the short-term variability to be intermittent, but present throughout the majority of the time series, though its occurrence and amplitude are uncorrelated with the longer cycle. These essentially solar-like variations occur in a Sun-like star with more rapid rotation, though surface differential rotation measurements leave open the possibility of a solar equivalence.

  1. CALCULATING THE MOLECULAR INTERNAL ROTATING STERIC FACTOR OF POLYMERS BY THE RADIATION CROSSLINKING METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wanxi; SUN Jiazhen

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, calculating the molecular internal rotating steric factor of polymers by the radiation crosslinking method is studied and a relationship between the molecular internal rotating steric factor (σ) and crosslinking parameter β is established[1] by taking account of the effect of polymer chain flexibility on β value. σ value of polymer obtained by this method is in agreement with that given with other method.

  2. Hawking radiation of spin-1 particles from a three-dimensional rotating hairy black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakalli, I.; Ovgun, A., E-mail: ali.ovgun@emu.edu.tr [Eastern Mediterranean University Famagusta, North Cyprus, Department of Physics (Turkey)

    2015-09-15

    We study the Hawking radiation of spin-1 particles (so-called vector particles) from a three-dimensional rotating black hole with scalar hair using a Hamilton–Jacobi ansatz. Using the Proca equation in the WKB approximation, we obtain the tunneling spectrum of vector particles. We recover the standard Hawking temperature corresponding to the emission of these particles from a rotating black hole with scalar hair.

  3. Rapid enzymatic response to compensate UV radiation in copepods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sol Souza

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation (UVR causes physical damage to DNA, carboxylation of proteins and peroxidation of lipids in copepod crustaceans, ubiquitous and abundant secondary producers in most aquatic ecosystems. Copepod adaptations for long duration exposures include changes in behaviour, changes in pigmentation and ultimately changes in morphology. Adaptations to short-term exposures are little studied. Here we show that short-duration exposure to UVR causes the freshwater calanoid copepod, Eudiaptomus gracilis, to rapidly activate production of enzymes that prevent widespread collateral peroxidation (glutathione S-transferase, GST, that regulate apoptosis cell death (Caspase-3, Casp-3, and that facilitate neurotransmissions (cholinesterase-ChE. None of these enzyme systems is alone sufficient, but they act in concert to reduce the stress level of the organism. The interplay among enzymatic responses provides useful information on how organisms respond to environmental stressors acting on short time scales.

  4. Weakened magnetic braking as the origin of anomalously rapid rotation in old field stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Saders, Jennifer L; Ceillier, Tugdual; Metcalfe, Travis S; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Pinsonneault, Marc H; García, Rafael A; Mathur, Savita; Davies, Guy R

    2016-01-14

    A knowledge of stellar ages is crucial for our understanding of many astrophysical phenomena, and yet ages can be difficult to determine. As they become older, stars lose mass and angular momentum, resulting in an observed slowdown in surface rotation. The technique of 'gyrochronology' uses the rotation period of a star to calculate its age. However, stars of known age must be used for calibration, and, until recently, the approach was untested for old stars (older than 1 gigayear, Gyr). Rotation periods are now known for stars in an open cluster of intermediate age (NGC 6819; 2.5 Gyr old), and for old field stars whose ages have been determined with asteroseismology. The data for the cluster agree with previous period-age relations, but these relations fail to describe the asteroseismic sample. Here we report stellar evolutionary modelling, and confirm the presence of unexpectedly rapid rotation in stars that are more evolved than the Sun. We demonstrate that models that incorporate dramatically weakened magnetic braking for old stars can--unlike existing models--reproduce both the asteroseismic and the cluster data. Our findings might suggest a fundamental change in the nature of ageing stellar dynamos, with the Sun being close to the critical transition to much weaker magnetized winds. This weakened braking limits the diagnostic power of gyrochronology for those stars that are more than halfway through their main-sequence lifetimes.

  5. Weakened magnetic braking as the origin of anomalously rapid rotation in old field stars

    CERN Document Server

    van Saders, Jennifer L; Metcalfe, Travis S; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Pinsonneault, Marc H; García, Rafael A; Mathur, Savita; Davies, Guy R

    2016-01-01

    A knowledge of stellar ages is crucial for our understanding of many astrophysical phenomena, and yet ages can be difficult to determine. As they become older, stars lose mass and angular momentum, resulting in an observed slowdown in surface rotation. The technique of 'gyrochronology' uses the rotation period of a star to calculate its age. However, stars of known age must be used for calibration, and, until recently, the approach was untested for old stars (older than 1 gigayear, Gyr). Rotation periods are now known for stars in an open cluster of intermediate age (NGC 6819; 2.5 Gyr old), and for old field stars whose ages have been determined with asteroseismology. The data for the cluster agree with previous period-age relations, but these relations fail to describe the asteroseismic sample. Here we report stellar evolutionary modelling, and confirm the presence of unexpectedly rapid rotation in stars that are more evolved than the Sun. We demonstrate that models that incorporate dramatically weakened mag...

  6. Analytical solutions in rotating linear dilaton black holes: Hawking radiation of charged massive scalar particles

    CERN Document Server

    Sakalli, I

    2016-01-01

    Hawking radiation of charged massive spin-0 particles are studied in the gravitational, electromagnetic, dilaton, and axion fields of rotating linear dilaton black holes. In this geometry, we separate the covariant Klein--Gordon equation into radial and angular parts and obtain the exact solutions of both the equations in terms of the confluent Heun functions. Using the radial solution, we analyze the behavior of the wave solutions near the event horizon of the rotating linear dilaton black hole and derive its Hawking radiation spectrum via the Damour--Ruffini--Sannan method.

  7. 3D Relativistic MHD Simulation of a Tilted Accretion Disk Around a Rapidly Rotating Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Fragile, P Chris; Blaes, Omer M; Salmonson, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    We posit that accreting compact objects, including stellar mass black holes and neutron stars as well as supermassive black holes, may undergo extended periods of accretion during which the angular momentum of the disk at large scales is misaligned with that of the compact object. In such a scenario, Lense-Thirring precession caused by the rotating compact object can dramatically affect the disk. In this presentation we describe results from a three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an MRI turbulent disk accreting onto a tilted rapidly rotating black hole. For this case, the disk does not achieve the commonly described Bardeen-Petterson configuration; rather, it remains nearly planar, undergoing a slow global precession. Accretion from the disk onto the hole occurs predominantly through two opposing plunging streams that start from high latitudes with respect to both the black-hole and disk midplanes. This is a consequence of the non-sphericity of the gravitational spacetime of the bl...

  8. Circular polarizations of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae: a clear indication of rapid rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Hayama, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Ko; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    We propose to employ the circular polarization of gravitational waves emitted by core-collapse supernovae as an unequivocal indication of rapid rotation deep in their cores. It has been demonstrated by three dimensional simulations that non-axisymmetric accretion flows may develop spontaneously via hydrodynamical instabilities in the post-bounce cores. It is not surprising then that the gravitational waves emitted by such fluid motions are circularly polarized. We show in this letter that a network of the second generation detectors of gravitational waves worldwide may be able to detect such polarizations up to the opposite side of Galaxy as long as the rotation period is shorter than a few seconds prior to collapse.

  9. Efficiency of passive magnetic-confinement methods for rapidly rotating rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    1985-11-01

    Rapidly rotating, large-diameter rings have potential for use as low-cost electrical-energy storage devices. The efficiency of passive electromagnetic and electrodynamic methods to confine the rotating rings is investigated. Confinement methods examined include repulsive image force, repulsive null flux, attractive image force, and radially stable attractive. For each method the decay time is given in terms of the ring material properties and design parameters. The repulsive techniques are shown to have decay times of less than a day when optimized within a set of practical design constraints. The two attractive levitation methods result in the largest decay times, but are inherently unstable. When null-flux stabilizers are used with attractive levitation, the decay time is shown to depend on magnetic field inhomogeneity. Finally, an inherently stable and very efficient attractive levitation method is proposed. The new method is based on an analogy with alternating-gradient synchrotrons and should have application in high-speed ground transportation.

  10. Enhanced gamma radiation toward the rotation axis from the immediate vicinity of extremely rotating black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Yoogeun; Pu, Hung-Yi; Hirotani, Kouichi; Matsushita, Satoki; Kong, Albert K. H.; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the acceleration of electrons and positrons by magnetic-field-aligned electric fields in the polar funnel of an accreting black hole (BH). Applying the pulsar outer-gap theory to BH magnetospheres, we find that such a lepton accelerator arises in the immediate vicinity of the event horizon due to frame-dragging, and that their gamma-ray luminosity increases with decreasing accretion rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the gamma-ray flux is enhanced along the rotation axis by...

  11. Dissipation of Gravitational Radiation by a Rotating Universes Binary

    CERN Document Server

    de Matos, Clovis Jacinto

    2011-01-01

    Assuming a gravitational type interaction between two different universes derived from Verlinde's entropic approach to gravitation in combination with Sorkin's definition of Universe's quantum information content. One calculates that a binary system made of two different universes with equal mass, spinning around the system's center of mass is highly unstable, since it would dissipate almost instantaneously its total mechanical energy under the form of gravitational radiation. One estimates this dissipation process to last approximately $\\tau\\sim 9.27\\times10^{-105}$ seconds.

  12. Inverse cascade and symmetry breaking in rapidly-rotating Boussinesq convection

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, B; Proctor, M R E

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present numerical simulations of rapidly-rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection in the Boussinesq approximation with stress-free boundary conditions. At moderately low Rossby number and large Rayleigh number, we show that a large-scale depth-invariant flow is formed, reminiscent of the condensate state observed in two-dimensional flows. We show that the large-scale circulation shares many similarities with the so-called vortex, or slow-mode, of forced rotating turbulence. Our investigations show that at a fixed rotation rate the large-scale vortex is only observed for a finite range of Rayleigh numbers, as the quasi-two-dimensional nature of the flow disappears at very high Rayleigh numbers. We observe slow vortex merging events and find a non-local inverse cascade of energy in addition to the regular direct cascade associated with fast small-scale turbulent motions. Finally, we show that cyclonic structures are dominant in the small-scale turbulent flow and this symmetry breaking persists in ...

  13. Bounds on Heat Transport in Rapidly Rotating Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Grooms, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The heat transport in rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection is considered in the limit of rapid rotation (small Ekman number $E$) and strong thermal forcing (large Rayleigh number $Ra$). The analysis proceeds from a set of asymptotically reduced equations appropriate for rotationally constrained dynamics; the conjectured range of validity for these equations is $Ra \\lesssim E^{-8/5}$. A rigorous bound on heat transport of $Nu \\le 20.56Ra^3E^4$ is derived in the limit of infinite Prandtl number using the background method. We demonstrate that the exponent in this bound cannot be improved on using a piece-wise monotonic background temperature profile like the one used here. This is true for finite Prandtl numbers as well, i.e. $Nu \\lesssim Ra^3$ is the best upper bound for this particular setup of the background method. The feature that obstructs the availability of a better bound in this case is the appearance of small-scale thermal plumes emanating from (or entering) the thermal boundary layer.

  14. Sun-Like Magnetic Cycles in the Rapidly-Rotating Young Solar Analog HD 30495

    CERN Document Server

    Egeland, Ricky; Hall, Jeffrey C; Henry, Gregory W

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that multiple dynamo mechanisms can drive magnetic variability on different timescales, not only in the Sun but also in other stars. Many solar activity proxies exhibit a quasi-biennial ($\\sim$2 year) variation, which is superimposed upon the dominant 11 year cycle. A well-characterized stellar sample suggests at least two different relationships between rotation period and cycle period, with some stars exhibiting long and short cycles simultaneously. Within this sample, the solar cycle periods are typical of a more rapidly rotating star, implying that the Sun might be in a transitional state or that it has an unusual evolutionary history. In this work, we present new and archival observations of dual magnetic cycles in the young solar analog HD 30495, an $\\sim$1 Gyr-old G1.5V star with a rotation period near 11 days. This star falls squarely on the relationships established by the broader stellar sample, with short-period variations at $\\sim$1.7 years and a long cycle of $...

  15. Effects of the Core-collapse Supernova Ejecta Impact on a Rapidly Rotating Massive Companion Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunhua; Lü, Guoliang; Wang, Zhaojun

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the effects of the core-collapse supernova (CCSN) ejecta on a rapidly rotating and massive companion star. We show that the stripped mass is twice as high as that of a massive but nonrotating companion star. In close binaries with orbital periods of about 1 day, the stripped masses reach up to ∼ 1 {M}ȯ . By simulating the evolutions of the rotational velocities of the massive companion stars based on different stripped masses, we find that the rotational velocity decreases greatly for a stripped mass higher than about 1 {M}ȯ . Of all the known high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), Cygnus X-3 and 1WGA J0648.024418 have the shortest orbital periods, 0.2 and 1.55 days, respectively. The optical counterpart of the former is a Wolf-Rayet star, whereas it is a hot subdwarf for the latter. Applying our model to the two HMXBs, we suggest that the hydrogen-rich envelopes of their optical counterparts may have been stripped by CCSN ejecta.

  16. The Taylor-Proudman column in a rapidly-rotating compressible fluid I. energy transports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Sang [Halla University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A theoretical study is made of the steady flow of a compressible fluid in a rapidly rotating finite cylinder. Flow is generated by imposing mechanical and/or thermal disturbances at the rotating endwall disks. Both the Ekman and Rossby numbers are small. An examination is made of the energy budget for a control volume in the Ekman boundary layer. A combination of physical variables, which is termed the energy flux content, consisting of temperature and modified angular momentum, emerges to be relevant. The distinguishing features of a compressible fluid, in contrast to those of an incompressible fluid, are noted. A plausible argument is given to explain the difficulty in achieving the Taylor-Proudman column in a compressible rotating fluid. For the Taylor-Proudman column to be sustained, in the interior, it is shown that the net energy transport between the solid disk wall and the interior fluid should vanish. Physical rationalizations are facilitated by resorting to the concept of the afore-stated energy flux content.

  17. The radiative zone of the Sun and the tachocline: stability of baroclinic patterns of differential rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleo, Andrea; Balbus, Steven A.

    2016-04-01

    Barotropic rotation and radiative equilibrium are mutually incompatible in stars. The issue is often addressed by allowing for a meridional circulation, but this is not devoid of theoretical complications. Models of rotation in the Sun which maintain strict radiative equilibrium, making use of the observation that the Sun is not in a state of barotropic rotation, have recently been suggested. To investigate the dynamical behaviour of these solutions, we study the local stability of stratified, weakly magnetized, differentially rotating fluids to non-axisymmetric perturbations. Finite heat conductivity, kinematic viscosity, and resistivity are present. The evolution of local embedded perturbations is governed by a set of coupled, ordinary differential equations with time-dependent coefficients. Two baroclinic models of rotation for the upper radiative zone and tachocline are studied: (i) an interpolation based on helioseismology data, (ii) a theoretical solution directly compatible with radiative equilibrium. The growth of the local Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability appears to be suppressed, largely because of the viscosity. An extensive exploration of wavenumber space is carried out, with and without a magnetic field. Although we easily find classical local instabilities when they ought formally to be present, for the Sun the analysis reveals neither unstable solutions, nor even solutions featuring a large transient growth. We have not ruled out larger scale or non-linear instabilities, nor have we rigorously proven local stability. But rotational configurations in close agreement with observations, generally thought to be vulnerable to the classic local Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability, do appear to be locally stable under rather general circumstances.

  18. On the effect of laterally varying boundary heat flux on rapidly rotating spherical shell convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Swarandeep; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2017-08-01

    The onset of convection in a rotating spherical shell subject to laterally varying heat flux at the outer boundary is considered in this paper. The focus is on the geophysically relevant regime of rapid rotation (low Ekman number) where the natural length scale of convection is significantly smaller than the length scale imposed by the boundary heat flux pattern. Contrary to earlier studies at a higher Ekman number, we find a substantial reduction in the onset Rayleigh number Rac with increasing lateral variation. The decrease in Rac is shown to be closely correlated to the equatorial heat flux surplus in the steady, basic state solution. The consistency of such a correlation makes the estimation of Rac possible without solving the full stability problem. The steady baroclinic flow has a strong cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry in the kinetic helicity only for equatorially symmetric lateral variations, with possible implications for dynamo action. Equatorially antisymmetric variations, on the other hand, break the symmetry of the mean flow, in turn negating its helicity. Analysis of the perturbation solution reveals strongly localized clusters through which convection rolls drift in and out at a frequency higher than that for the reference case with homogeneous boundary heat flux. Large lateral variations produce a marked decrease in the azimuthal length scale of columns, which indicates that small-scale motions are essential to the transport of heat in rapidly rotating, localized convection. With an equatorially antisymmetric heat flux pattern, convection in individual clusters goes through an asynchronous wax-wane cycle whose frequency is much lower than the drift rate of the columns. These continual variations in convection intensity may in turn result in fluctuations in the magnetic field intensity, an effect that needs to be considered in dynamo models. Finally, there is a notable analogy between the role of a laterally varying boundary heat flux and the role of a

  19. VARIABILITY IN HOT CARBON-DOMINATED ATMOSPHERE (HOT DQ) WHITE DWARFS: RAPID ROTATION?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kurtis A.; Bierwagen, Michael [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Texas A and M University-Commerce, P.O. Box 3011, Commerce, TX, 75429 (United States); Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.; Falcon, Ross E., E-mail: Kurtis.Williams@tamuc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX, 78712 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    Hot white dwarfs (WDs) with carbon-dominated atmospheres (hot DQs) are a cryptic class of WDs. In addition to their deficiency of hydrogen and helium, most of these stars are highly magnetic, and a large fraction vary in luminosity. This variability has been ascribed to nonradial pulsations, but increasing data call this explanation into question. We present studies of short-term variability in seven hot DQ WDs. Three (SDSS J1426+5752, SDSS J2200−0741, and SDSS J2348−0942) were known to be variable. Their photometric modulations are coherent over at least two years, and we find no evidence for variability at frequencies that are not harmonics. We present the first time-series photometry for three additional hot DQs (SDSS J0236−0734, SDSS J1402+3818, and SDSS J1615+4543); none are observed to vary, but the signal-to-noise is low. Finally, we present high speed photometry for SDSS J0005−1002, known to exhibit a 2.1-day photometric variation; we do not observe any short-term variability. Monoperiodicity is rare among pulsating WDs, so we contemplate whether the photometric variability is due to rotation rather than pulsations; similar hypotheses have been raised by other researchers. If the variability is due to rotation, then hot DQ WDs as a class contain many rapid rotators. Given the lack of companions to these stars, the origin of any fast rotation is unclear—both massive progenitor stars and double degenerate merger remnants are possibilities. We end with suggestions of future work that would best clarify the nature of these rare, intriguing objects.

  20. Assessing the Value of an Optional Radiation Oncology Clinical Rotation During the Core Clerkships in Medical School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Malatesta, Theresa M.; Den, Robert B.; Wuthrick, Evan; Ahn, Peter H.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Shi, Wenyin; Dicker, Adam P.; Anne, P. Rani; Bar-Ad, Voichita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: timothy.showalter@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Few medical students are given proper clinical training in oncology, much less radiation oncology. We attempted to assess the value of adding a radiation oncology clinical rotation to the medical school curriculum. Methods and Materials: In July 2010, Jefferson Medical College began to offer a 3-week radiation oncology rotation as an elective course for third-year medical students during the core surgical clerkship. During 2010 to 2012, 52 medical students chose to enroll in this rotation. The rotation included outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, didactic sessions, and case-based presentations by the students. Tests of students' knowledge of radiation oncology were administered anonymously before and after the rotation to evaluate the educational effectiveness of the rotation. Students and radiation oncology faculty were given surveys to assess feedback about the rotation. Results: The students' prerotation test scores had an average of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61-66%). The postrotation test scores improved to an average of 82% (95% CI, 80-83%; 18% absolute improvement). In examination question analysis, scores improved in clinical oncology from 63% to 79%, in radiobiology from 70% to 77%, and in medical physics from 62% to 88%. Improvements in all sections but radiobiology were statistically significant. Students rated the usefulness of the rotation as 8.1 (scale 1-9; 95% CI, 7.3-9.0), their understanding of radiation oncology as a result of the rotation as 8.8 (95% CI, 8.5-9.1), and their recommendation of the rotation to a classmate as 8.2 (95% CI, 7.6-9.0). Conclusions: Integrating a radiation oncology clinical rotation into the medical school curriculum improves student knowledge of radiation oncology, including aspects of clinical oncology, radiobiology, and medical physics. The rotation is appreciated by both students and faculty.

  1. Transformation of the multipolar components of gravitational radiation under rotations and boosts

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, L; Cardoso, V; Sperhake, U

    2008-01-01

    We study the transformation of multipolar decompositions of gravitational radiation under rotations and boosts. Rotations to the remnant black hole's frame simplify the waveforms from the merger of generic spinning black hole binaries. Boosts may be important to get an accurate gravitational-wave phasing, especially for configurations leading to large recoil velocities of the remnant. As a test of our formalism we revisit the classic problem of point particles falling into a Schwarzschild black hole. Then we highlight by specific examples the importance of choosing the right frame in numerical simulations of unequal-mass, spinning binary black-hole mergers.

  2. Two-dimensionalization of the flow driven by a slowly rotating impeller in a rapidly rotating fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Machicoane, Nathanaël; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We characterize the two-dimensionalization process in the turbulent flow produced by an impeller rotating at a rate $\\omega$ in a fluid rotating at a rate $\\Omega$ around the same axis for Rossby number $Ro=\\omega/\\Omega$ down to $10^{-2}$. The flow can be described as the superposition of a large-scale vertically invariant global rotation and small-scale shear layers detached from the impeller blades. As $Ro$ decreases, the large-scale flow is subjected to azimuthal modulations. In this regime, the shear layers can be described in terms of wakes of inertial waves traveling with the blades, originating from the velocity difference between the non-axisymmetric large-scale flow and the blade rotation. The wakes are well defined and stable at low Rossby number, but they become disordered at $Ro$ of order of 1. This experiment provides insight into the route towards pure two-dimensionalization induced by a background rotation for flows driven by a non-axisymmetric rotating forcing.

  3. Identification of dominant flow structures in rapidly rotating convection of liquid metals using Dynamic Mode Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, S.; Schmid, P. J.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth's metal core acts as a dynamo whose efficiency in generating and maintaining the magnetic field is essentially determined by the rotation rate and the convective motions occurring in its outer liquid part. For the description of the primary physics in the outer core the idealized system of rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection is often invoked, with the majority of studies considering only working fluids with Prandtl numbers of Pr ≳ 1. However, liquid metals are characterized by distinctly smaller Prandtl numbers which in turn result in an inherently different type of convection. Here, we will present results from direct numerical simulations of rapidly rotating convection in a fluid with Pr ≈ 0.025 in cylindrical containers and Ekman numbers as low as 5 × 10-6. In this system, the Coriolis force is the source of two types of inertial modes, the so-called wall modes, that also exist at moderate Prandtl numbers, and cylinder-filling oscillatory modes, that are a unique feature of small Prandtl number convection. The obtained flow fields were analyzed using the Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD). This technique allows to extract and identify the structures that govern the dynamics of the system as well as their corresponding frequencies. We have investigated both the regime where the flow is purely oscillatory and the regime where wall modes and oscillatory modes co-exist. In the purely oscillatory regime, high and low frequency oscillatory modes characterize the flow. When both types of modes are present, the DMD reveals that the wall-attached modes dominate the flow dynamics. They precess with a relatively low frequency in retrograde direction. Nonetheless, also in this case, high frequency oscillations have a significant contribution.

  4. Scaling and excitation of combined convection in a rapidly rotating plane layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starchenko, S. V., E-mail: sstarchenko@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnesium, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The optimum (to my mind) scaling of the combined thermal and compositional convection in a rapidly rotating plane layer is proposed.This scaling follows from self-consistent estimates of typical physical quantities. Similarity coefficients are introduced for the ratio convection dissipation/convection generation (s) and the ratio thermal convection/compositional convection (r). The third new and most important coefficient δ is the ratio of the characteristic size normal to the axis of rotation to the layer thickness. The faster the rotation, the lower δ. In the case of the liquid Earth core, δ ~ 10{sup –3} substitutes for the generally accepted Ekman number (E ~ 10{sup –15}) and s ~ 10{sup –6} substitutes for the inverse Rayleigh number 1/Ra ~ 10{sup –30}. It is found that, at turbulent transport coefficients, number s and the Prandtl number are on the order of unity for any objects and δ is independent of transport coefficients. As a result of expansion in powers of δ, an initially 3D system of six variables is simplified to an almost 2D system of four variables without δ. The problem of convection excitation in the main volume is algebraically solved and this problem for critical values is analytically solved. Dispersion relations and general expressions for critical wavenumbers, numbers s (which determine Rayleigh numbers), other critical parameters, and asymptotic solutions are derived. Numerical estimates are made for the liquid cores in the planets that resemble the Earth. Further possible applications of the results obtained are proposed for the interior of planets, moons, their oceans, stars, and experimental objects.

  5. A Rapid Generation Method of Character Doll with Rotatable Limbs Oriented to 3D Printer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lin; CHU Xiao-li; Nie Wen-chao

    2014-01-01

    Currently, 3D printing of the character dolls is a very practical application for the average person. But the model of doll which can be obtained is static so the posture of the doll is single. On the other hand, the modification of the model is very difficult to non-professions. This paper proposes an rapid generation method of character doll with rotatable limbs, which is through adding the sphere joint to the doll’s model automatically. After the model is segmented by drawing a line interactively, the sphere joint is created based on the segmentation boundary through entity modeling method. Lastly the two models of the doll and the joint are composited and printed. Some doll’s model are tested on the FDM(Fused Deposition Modeling) 3D printer using this process. The results are more interesting and the efficiency has been greatly improved compared with modifying the model manually.

  6. The exterior field of slowly and rapidly rotating neutron stars: Rehabilitating spacetime metrics involving hyperextreme objects

    CERN Document Server

    Manko, V S

    2016-01-01

    The 4-parameter exact solution presumably describing the exterior gravitational field of a generic neutron star is presented in a concise explicit form defined by only three potentials. In the equatorial plane, the metric functions of the solution are found to be given by particularly simple expressions that make them very suitable for the use in concrete applications. Following Pappas and Apostolatos, we perform a comparison of the multipole structure of the solution with the multipole moments of the known physically realistic Berti-Stergioulas numerical models of neutron stars to argue that the hyperextreme sectors of the solution are not less (but possibly even more) important for the correct description of rapidly rotating neutron stars than the subextreme sector involving exclusively the black-hole constituents. We have also worked out in explicit form an exact analog of the well-known Hartle-Thorne approximate metric.

  7. Approaching the Asymptotic Regime of Rapidly Rotating Convection: Boundary Layers vs Interior Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Stellmach, S; Julien, K; Vasil, G; Cheng, J S; Ribeiro, A; King, E M; Aurnou, J M

    2014-01-01

    Rapidly rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection is studied by combining results from direct numerical simulations (DNS), laboratory experiments and asymptotic modeling. The asymptotic theory is shown to provide a good description of the bulk dynamics at low, but finite Rossby number. However, large deviations from the asymptotically predicted heat transfer scaling are found, with laboratory experiments and DNS consistently yielding much larger Nusselt numbers than expected. These deviations are traced down to dynamically active Ekman boundary layers, which are shown to play an integral part in controlling heat transfer even for Ekman numbers as small as $10^{-7}$. By adding an analytical parameterization of the Ekman transport to simulations using stress-free boundary conditions, we demonstrate that the heat transfer jumps from values broadly compatible with the asymptotic theory to states of strongly increased heat transfer, in good quantitative agreement with no-slip DNS and compatible with the experimental d...

  8. Subcritical convection in a rapidly rotating sphere at low Prandtl number

    CERN Document Server

    Guervilly, Celine

    2016-01-01

    We study non-linear convection in a low Prandtl number fluid ($Pr = 0.01-0.1$) in a rapidly rotating sphere with internal heating. We use a numerical model based on the quasi-geostrophic approximation, in which variations of the axial vorticity along the rotation axis are neglected, whereas the temperature field is fully three-dimensional. We identify two separate branches of convection close to onset: (i) a well-known weak branch for Ekman numbers greater than $10^{-6}$, which is continuous at the onset (supercritical bifurcation) and consists of a superposition of thermal Rossby waves, and (ii) a novel strong branch at lower Ekman numbers, which is discontinuous at the onset. The strong branch becomes subcritical for Ekman numbers of the order of $10^{-8}$. On the strong branch, the Reynolds number of the flow is greater than $10^3$, and a strong zonal flow with multiple jets develops, even close to the non-linear onset of convection. We find that the subcriticality is amplified by decreasing the Prandtl nu...

  9. Low-Cost Rotating Experimentation in Compressor Aerodynamics Using Rapid Prototyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Michaud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid evolution of additive manufacturing, 3D printed parts are no longer limited to display purposes but can also be used in structural applications. The objective of this paper is to show that 3D prototyping can be used to produce low-cost rotating turbomachinery rigs capable of carrying out detailed flow measurements that can be used, among other things, for computational fluid dynamics (CFD code validation. A fully instrumented polymer two-stage axial-mixed flow compressor test rig was designed and fabricated with stereolithography (SLA technology by a team of undergraduate students as part of a senior-year design course. Experiments were subsequently performed on this rig to obtain both the overall pressure rise characteristics of the compressor and the stagnation pressure distributions downstream of the blade rows for comparison with CFD simulations. In doing so, this work provides a first-of-a-kind assessment of the use of polymer additive technology for low-cost rotating turbomachinery experimentation with detailed measurements.

  10. Hawking Radiation via Damour-Ruffini Method in Squashed Charged Rotating Kaluza-Klein Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ji-Wan; Wu, Jing-He; Liu, Xian-Ming

    2017-02-01

    Using the Damour-Ruffini method, Hawking radiation of charged particles from squashed charged rotating five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein black holes is investigated extensively. Under the generalized tortoise coordinate transformation, Hawking temperature of the black holes is calculated by using charged scalar particles and Dirac fermions respectively. We find that the obtained Hawking temperature for charged Dirac fermions is the same as for charged scalar particles. What's more, the spectrum of Hawking radiation contains the information of the size of the extra dimension, which could provide insight for further investigation of large extra dimensions in the future.

  11. Radiation Effects in Flow through Porous Medium over a Rotating Disk with Variable Fluid Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the radiation effects in flow through porous medium over a permeable rotating disk with velocity slip and temperature jump. Fluid properties density (ρ, viscosity (μ, and thermal conductivity (κ are taken to be dependent on temperature. Particular case considering these fluid properties’ constant is also discussed. The governing partial differential equations are converted into nonlinear normal differential equation using similarity alterations. Transformed system of equations is solved numerically by using Runge-Kutta method with shooting technique. Effects of various parameters such as porosity parameter K, suction parameter Ws, rotational Reynolds number Re, Knudsen number Kn, Prandtl number Pr, radiation parameter N, and relative temperature difference parameter ε on velocity profiles along radial, tangential, and axial direction and temperature distribution are investigated for both variable fluid properties and constant fluid properties. Results obtained are analyzed and depicted through graphs and table.

  12. Hawking Radiation of Spin-1 Particles From Three Dimensional Rotating Hairy Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Sakalli, I

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we study the Hawking radiation (HR) of spin-1 particles -- so-called vector particles -- from a three dimensional (3D) rotating black hole with scalar hair (RBHWSH) using Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) ansatz. Putting the Proca equation amalgamated with the WKB approximation in process, the tunneling spectrum of vector particles is obtained. We recover the standard Hawking temperature corresponding to the emission of these particles from RBHWSH.

  13. The rapid formation of a large rotating disk galaxy three billion years after the Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzel, R; Tacconi, L J; Eisenhauer, F; Schreiber, N M Förster; Cimatti, A; Daddi, E; Bouché, N; Davies, R; Lehnert, M D; Lutz, D; Nesvadba, N; Verma, A; Abuter, R; Shapiro, K; Sternberg, A; Renzini, A; Kong, X; Arimoto, N; Mignoli, M

    2006-08-17

    Observations and theoretical simulations have established a framework for galaxy formation and evolution in the young Universe. Galaxies formed as baryonic gas cooled at the centres of collapsing dark-matter haloes; mergers of haloes and galaxies then led to the hierarchical build-up of galaxy mass. It remains unclear, however, over what timescales galaxies were assembled and when and how bulges and disks--the primary components of present-day galaxies--were formed. It is also puzzling that the most massive galaxies were more abundant and were forming stars more rapidly at early epochs than expected from models. Here we report high-angular-resolution observations of a representative luminous star-forming galaxy when the Universe was only 20% of its current age. A large and massive rotating protodisk is channelling gas towards a growing central stellar bulge hosting an accreting massive black hole. The high surface densities of gas, the high rate of star formation and the moderately young stellar ages suggest rapid assembly, fragmentation and conversion to stars of an initially very gas-rich protodisk, with no obvious evidence for a major merger.

  14. Anisotropies in the Neutrino Fluxes and Heating Profiles in Two-dimensional, Time-dependent, Multi-group Radiation Hydrodynamics Simulations of Rotating Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Walder, R; Ott, C D; Livne, E; Jarrah, M

    2004-01-01

    Using the 2D multi-group, flux-limited diffusion version of the code VULCAN/2D, that also incorporates rotation, we have calculated the collapse, bounce, shock formation, and early post-bounce evolutionary phases of a core-collapse supernova for a variety of initial rotation rates. This is the first series of such multi-group calculations undertaken in supernova theory with fully multi-D tools. We find that though rotation generates pole-to-equator angular anisotropies in the neutrino radiation fields, the magnitude of the asymmetries is not as large as previously estimated. Moreover, we find that the radiation field is always more spherically symmetric than the matter distribution, with its plumes and convective eddies. We present the dependence of the angular anisotropy of the neutrino fields on neutrino species, neutrino energy, and initial rotation rate. Only for our most rapidly rotating model do we start to see qualitatively different hydrodynamics, but for the lower rates consistent with the pre-collap...

  15. The reversal of the rotational modulation rates of the north and south components of Saturn kilometric radiation near equinox

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D. A. Gurnett; J. B. Groene; A. M. Persoon; J. D. Menietti; S.-Y. Ye; W. S. Kurth; R. J. MacDowall; A. Lecacheux

    2010-01-01

      It has been known for many years that Saturn emits intense radio emissions at kilometer wavelengths and that this radiation is modulated by the rotation of the planet at a rate that varies slowly...

  16. Magnetogasdynamic Cylindrical Shock Waves in a Rotating Nonideal Gas with Radiation Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, J. P.; Patel, Nanhey

    2015-03-01

    A similarity solution is presented for a cylindrical magnetogasdynamic shock wave in a rotating nonideal gas in the presence of a variable axial magnetic field in the case where the radiation heat flux is of importance. The initial angular velocity of the medium is assumed to vary as some power of the distance from the symmetry axis. The radiation heat flux is evaluated from the equation of motion without explicit use of the radiation transfer equations. It is shown that the gas nonidealness increases the shock strength but decreases the shock velocity. On the other hand, the presence of a magnetic field decreases the shock strength but increases the shock velocity. Moreover, the shock velocity increases with the ratio of specific heats. The total energy of the shock wave increases with time.

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of the interplay effect in respiratory-gated RapidArc radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Craig [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Yang, Yong, E-mail: yangy2@upmc.edu; Li, Tianfang; Zhang, Yongqian; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with gating capability has had increasing adoption in many clinics in the United States. In this new technique, dose rate, gantry rotation speed, and the leaf motion speed of multileaf collimators (MLCs) are modulated dynamically during gated beam delivery to achieve highly conformal dose coverage of the target and normal tissue sparing. Compared with the traditional gated intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique, this complicated beam delivery technique may result in larger dose errors due to the intrafraction tumor motion. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dosimetric influence of the interplay effect for the respiration-gated VMAT technique (RapidArc, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Our work consisted of two parts: (1) Investigate the interplay effect for different target residual errors during gated RapidArc delivery using a one-dimensional moving phantom capable of producing stable sinusoidal movement; (2) Evaluate the dosimetric influence in ten clinical patients’ treatment plans using a moving phantom driven with a patient-specific respiratory curve. Methods: For the first part of this study, four plans were created with a spherical target for varying residual motion of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 cm. Appropriate gating windows were applied for each. The dosimetric effect was evaluated using EDR2 film by comparing the gated delivery with static delivery. For the second part of the project, ten gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy cases were selected and reoptimized to be delivered by the gated RapidArc technique. These plans were delivered to a phantom, and again the gated treatments were compared to static deliveries by the same methods. Results: For regular sinusoidal motion, the dose delivered to the target was not substantially affected by the gating windows when evaluated with the gamma statistics, suggesting the interplay effect has a small role in respiratory-gated Rapid

  18. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  19. Strong-field dynamo action in rapidly rotating convection with no inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David W; Cattaneo, Fausto

    2016-06-01

    The earth's magnetic field is generated by dynamo action driven by convection in the outer core. For numerical reasons, inertial and viscous forces play an important role in geodynamo models; however, the primary dynamical balance in the earth's core is believed to be between buoyancy, Coriolis, and magnetic forces. The hope has been that by setting the Ekman number to be as small as computationally feasible, an asymptotic regime would be reached in which the correct force balance is achieved. However, recent analyses of geodynamo models suggest that the desired balance has still not yet been attained. Here we adopt a complementary approach consisting of a model of rapidly rotating convection in which inertial forces are neglected from the outset. Within this framework we are able to construct a branch of solutions in which the dynamo generates a strong magnetic field that satisfies the expected force balance. The resulting strongly magnetized convection is dramatically different from the corresponding solutions in which the field is weak.

  20. Investigations of non-hydrostatic, stably stratified and rapidly rotating flows

    CERN Document Server

    Nieves, David; Juilen, Keith; Weiss, Jeffrey B

    2016-01-01

    We present an investigation of rapidly rotating (small Rossby number $Ro\\ll 1$) and stratified turbulence where the stratification strength is varied from weak (large Froude number $Fr\\gg1$) to strong ($Fr\\ll1$). The investigation is set in the context of a reduced model derived from the Boussinesq equations that efficiently retains anisotropic inertia-gravity waves with order-one frequencies and highlights a regime of wave-eddy interactions. Numerical simulations of the reduced model are performed where energy is injected by a stochastic forcing of vertical velocity, which forces wave modes only. The simulations reveal two regimes characterized by the presence of well-formed, persistent and thin turbulent layers of locally-weakened stratification at small Froude numbers, and by the absence of layers at large Froude numbers. Both regimes are characterized by a large-scale barotropic dipole enclosed by small-scale turbulence. When the Reynolds number is not too large a direct cascade of barotropic kinetic ener...

  1. Effects of Hall current and radiation absorption on MHD micropolar fluid in a rotating system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.V. Satya Narayana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to study the effects of Hall current and radiation absorption on MHD free convection mass transfer flow of a micropolar fluid in a rotating frame of reference. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicular to the porous surface in which absorbs micropolar fluid with a constant suction velocity. The entire system rotates about the axes normal to the plate with uniform angular velocity Ω. The dimensionless governing equations for this investigation are reduced to a system of linear differential equations using regular perturbation method, and equations are solved analytically. The influence of various flow parameters of the flow field has been discussed and explained graphically. The present study is of immediate interest in geophysical, cosmically fluid dynamics, medicine, biology, and all those processes which are greatly embellished by a strong magnetic field with a low density of the gas.

  2. Magnetic field topology and chemical abundance distributions of the young, rapidly rotating, chemically peculiar star HR 5624

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochukhov, O.; Silvester, J.; Bailey, J. D.; Landstreet, J. D.; Wade, G. A.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The young, rapidly rotating Bp star HR 5624 (HD 133880) shows an unusually strong non-sinusoidal variability of its longitudinal magnetic field. This behaviour was previously interpreted as the signature of an exceptionally strong, quadrupole-dominated surface magnetic field geometry. Aims: We studied the magnetic field structure and chemical abundance distributions of HR 5624 with the aim to verify the unusual quadrupolar nature of its magnetic field and to investigate correlations between the field topology and chemical spots. Methods: We analysed high-resolution, time series Stokes parameter spectra of HR 5624 with the help of a magnetic Doppler imaging inversion code based on detailed polarised radiative transfer modelling of the line profiles. Results: We refined the stellar parameters, revised the rotational period, and obtained new longitudinal magnetic field measurements. Our magnetic Doppler inversions reveal that the field structure of HR 5624 is considerably simpler and the field strength is much lower than proposed by previous studies. We find a maximum local field strength of 12 kG and a mean field strength of 4 kG, which is about a factor of three weaker than predicted by quadrupolar field models. Our model implies that overall large-scale field topology of HR 5624 is better described as a distorted, asymmetric dipole rather than an axisymmetric quadrupole. The chemical abundance maps of Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Fe, and Nd obtained in our study are characterised by large-scale, high-contrast abundance patterns. These structures correlate weakly with the magnetic field geometry and, in particular, show no distinct element concentrations in the horizontal field regions predicted by theoretical atomic diffusion calculations. Conclusions: We conclude that the surface magnetic field topology of HR 5624 is not as unusual as previously proposed. Considering these results together with other recent magnetic mapping analyses of early-type stars suggests that

  3. Core Collapse Supernovae Using CHIMERA: Gravitational Radiation from Non-Rotating Progenitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakunin, Konstantin [Florida Atlantic University; Marronetti, Pedro [Florida Atlantic University; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL; Bruenn, S. W. [Florida Atlantic University; Lee, Ching-Tsai [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chertkow, Merek A [ORNL; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Blondin, J. M. [North Carolina State University; Lentz, Eric J [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Yoshida, S. [University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

    2011-01-01

    The CHIMERA code is a multi-dimensional multi-physics engine dedicated primarily to the simulation of core collapse supernova explosions. One of the most important aspects of these explosions is their capacity to produce gravitational radiation that is detectable by earth-based laser-interferometric gravitational wave observatories such as LIGO and VIRGO. We present here preliminary gravitational signatures of two-dimensional models with non-rotating progenitors. These simulations exhibit explosions, which are followed for more than half a second after stellar core bounce.

  4. A rapid rotation to an inverted seated posture inhibits muscle force, activation, heart rate and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Pramod; Grover, Varun; DiSanto, Mario C; Button, Duane C; Behm, David G

    2013-08-01

    Although previous studies have demonstrated neuromuscular and cardiovascular changes with slow inversion rates, emergencies, such as overturned vehicles and helicopters can occur rapidly. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in neuromuscular and cardiovascular responses with rapid (1 s) and slower (3 s) transitions from upright to inverted seated positions. Twenty-two subjects performed separate and concurrent unilateral elbow flexion and leg extension maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) for 6 s in an upright seated position and when inverted with 1 and 3 s rotations. Elbow flexion and leg extension force; biceps, triceps, quadriceps and hamstrings electromyographic (EMG) activity, heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured. Whether the elbow flexion or leg extension contractions occurred concurrently or individually, significant (p leg extension MVC as compared to the initial second of rotation to inversion. HR, SBP and DBP demonstrated (p < 0.001) decreases when inverted within 1 and 3 s rotations as compared to upright. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that irrespective of rotation speed, inversion inhibited neuromuscular and cardiovascular responses, similar to the more deliberate, slower rotation of previous inversion studies.

  5. R-mode oscillations of rapidly rotating Newtonian stars - A new numerical scheme and its application to the spin evolution of neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Karino, S; Eriguchi, Y; Karino, Shigeyuki; Yoshida, Shin'ichirou; Yoshida, Shijun; Eriguchi, Yoshiharu

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a new numerical scheme to solve r-mode oscillations of {\\it rapidly rotating polytropic stars} in Newtonian gravity. In this scheme, Euler perturbations of the density, three components of the velocity are treated as four unknown quantities together with the oscillation frequency. For the basic equations of oscillations, the compatibility equations are used instead of the linearized equations of motion. By using this scheme, we have solved the classical r-mode oscillations of rotational equilibrium sequences of polytropes with the polytropic indices $N = 0.5, 1.0$ and 1.5 for $m = 2, 3$ and 4 modes. Here $m$ is the rank of the spherical harmonics $Y_l^m$. These results have been applied to investigate evolution of uniformly rotating hot young neutron stars by considering the effect of gravitational radiation and viscosity. We have found that the maximum angular velocities of neutron stars are around 10-20% of the Keplerian angular velocity irrespective of the softness of matter. This confirm...

  6. Rapid energization of radiation belt electrons by nonlinear wave trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Katoh

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We show that nonlinear wave trapping plays a significant role in both the generation of whistler-mode chorus emissions and the acceleration of radiation belt electrons to relativistic energies. We have performed particle simulations that successfully reproduce the generation of chorus emissions with rising tones. During this generation process we find that a fraction of resonant electrons are energized very efficiently by special forms of nonlinear wave trapping called relativistic turning acceleration (RTA and ultra-relativistic acceleration (URA. Particle energization by nonlinear wave trapping is a universal acceleration mechanism that can be effective in space and cosmic plasmas that contain a magnetic mirror geometry.

  7. SU-E-J-259: Quantification of Rotational Localization Offset in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y; Nguyen, N; Lee, S; Liu, F [Rhode Island Hospital / Warren Alpert Medical, Providence, RI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To verify the necessity of 6D localization detection and correction in radiation therapy. Methods: An anthropomorphic head and neck phantom was used to test the BrainLab ExacTrac x-ray imaging system. After initial positioning, both ExacTrac and the on-board kV CBCT were used to detect the offset at the same position, using both manual and automatic registration algorithms. Then 6D offset including rotational errors up to 5 degree were introduced. Both ExacTrac and CBCT were used to correct the offsets and the residual errors were evaluated. Finally, 6D offset detected by ExacTrac for a C-Spine patient was reported. Results: The differences in 3D offset detected by ExacTrac and CBCT were 1.5 ± 1.2(Lateral), 2.7 ± 2.7(Vertical), and 4.0 ± 6.3(longitudinal) mm with manual registration while the corresponding differences decreased to 0.6 ± 0.3, 1.0 ± 0.3, and 0.3 ± 0.3 when automatic registration were used. CBCT corrected the translational offset to within 0.5 mm but the rotational errors remained and detected by the ExacTrac system (Yaw=2.1, Roll=1.1, Pitch=1.4 degree). When similar offset was introduced and corrected using ExacTrac, the residual error detected by both CBCT and ExacTrac were within 0.5 mm / 0.5 degree. The average offset from the 112 ExacTrac x-ray corrections for the C-Spine patient was 0.6 ± 1.6 (lateral), 5.4 ± 8(vertical), 1.6±1.1(longitudinal) mm, and 0.7 ± 0.6 (pitch), 0.7 ± 0.4(roll), 1.2 ± 0.7 (yaw) degree. Larger rotational errors, with a maximum of 2.7 degree (corresponds to about 1.5 to 4.5 mm offset for a POI 10 to 30 cm away from the isocenter), were observed when couch rotational were involved. Conclusion: Rotational errors are common in patient localization, especially when couch rotation is involved. Both appropriate imaging system and 6D robotic couch are necessary to detect and correct the rotational localization errors.

  8. Non-radial oscillations of the rapidly rotating Be star HD 163868

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savonije, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Oscillations in rotating stars with frequency barsigma of the same order or smaller than the rotation rate Omega cannot be described by a single spherical harmonic due to the effect of the Coriolis force. This is a serious complication which is usually treated by writing the eigenfunctions

  9. Non-radial oscillations of the rapidly rotating Be star HD 163868

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savonije, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Oscillations in rotating stars with frequency barsigma of the same order or smaller than the rotation rate Omega cannot be described by a single spherical harmonic due to the effect of the Coriolis force. This is a serious complication which is usually treated by writing the eigenfunctions

  10. Exact two-dimensionalization of rapidly rotating large-Reynolds-number flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gallet, Basile

    2015-01-01

    We consider the flow of a Newtonian fluid in a three-dimensional domain, rotating about a vertical axis and driven by a vertically invariant horizontal body-force. This system admits vertically invariant solutions that satisfy the 2D Navier-Stokes equation. At high Reynolds number and without global rotation, such solutions are usually unstable to three-dimensional perturbations. By contrast, for strong enough global rotation, we prove rigorously that the 2D (and possibly turbulent) solutions are stable to vertically dependent perturbations: the flow becomes 2D in the long-time limit. These results shed some light on several fundamental questions of rotating turbulence: for arbitrary Reynolds number and small enough Rossby number, the system is attracted towards purely 2D flow solutions, which display no energy dissipation anomaly and no cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry. Finally, these results challenge the applicability of wave turbulence theory to describe stationary rotating turbulence in bounded domains.

  11. Patient QA systems for rotational radiation therapy: a comparative experimental study with intentional errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredh, Anna; Scherman, Jonas Bengtsson; Fog, Lotte S; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of commercial patient quality assurance (QA) systems to detect linear accelerator-related errors. Four measuring systems (Delta(4®), OCTAVIUS(®), COMPASS, and Epiqa™) designed for patient specific quality assurance for rotational radiation therapy were compared by measuring four clinical rotational intensity modulated radiation therapy plans as well as plans with introduced intentional errors. The intentional errors included increasing the number of monitor units, widening of the MLC banks, and rotation of the collimator. The measurements were analyzed using the inherent gamma evaluation with 2% and 2 mm criteria and 3% and 3 mm criteria. When applicable, the plans with intentional errors were compared with the original plans both by 3D gamma evaluation and by inspecting the dose volume histograms produced by the systems. There was considerable variation in the type of errors that the various systems detected; the failure rate for the plans with errors varied between 0% and 72%. When using 2% and 2 mm criteria and 95% as a pass rate the Delta(4®) detected 15 of 20 errors, OCTAVIUS(®) detected 8 of 20 errors, COMPASS detected 8 of 20 errors, and Epiqa™ detected 20 of 20 errors. It was also found that the calibration and measuring procedure could benefit from improvements for some of the patient QA systems. The various systems can detect various errors and the sensitivity to the introduced errors depends on the plan. There was poor correlation between the gamma evaluation pass rates of the QA procedures and the deviations observed in the dose volume histograms.

  12. Detection of binary and multiple systems among rapidly rotating K and M dwarf stars from Kepler data

    CERN Document Server

    Oláh, Katalin; Joss, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    From an examination of ~18,000 Kepler light curves of K- and M-stars we find some 500 which exhibit rotational periods of less than 2 days. Among such stars, approximately 50 show two or more incommensurate periodicities. We discuss the tools that allow us to differentiate between rotational modulation and other types of light variations, e.g., due to pulsations or binary modulations. We find that these multiple periodicities are independent of each other and likely belong to different, but physically bound, stars. This scenario was checked directly by UKIRT and adaptive optics imaging, time-resolved Fourier transforms, and pixel-level analysis of the data. Our result is potentially important for discovering young multiple stellar systems among rapidly rotating K- and M-dwarfs.

  13. Rapid Post-Miocene tectonic rotation associated with the San Gregorio Fault Zone in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Eric J.; Horns, Daniel M.; Verosub, Kenneth L.

    1991-12-01

    Paleomagnetic measurements of samples from the Mio-Pliocene Purisima Formation demonstrate that the Pomponio tectonic block of central coastal California has rotated clockwise by approximately 35° to 55° within the last 2.5 million years. The most likely interpretation of this data is that the Pomponio block is broken into several small blocks which have rotated by various amounts. The data suggest that rotations contribute to vertical deformation and secondary faulting within the central San Andreas Fault System, and that they play an important role in the accommodation of shear along the fault system.

  14. THE INTERACTION OF LIQUID DROPS WITH A ROTATING GAS STREAM WITHIN A RAPIDLY REVOLVING ANNULAR ENCLOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. AROUSSI

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The flow phenomena occurring around a rotating shaft are extremely complex and are a common feature in turbomachinery such as the bearing chambers of aero engines. As the liquid jet impinges onto the shaft, circumferential streams of lubricating liquid droplets centrifuge away from the rotor surface and impinge onto the inner circumference of the stationary case. A further break-up of drops occurred whilst rotating around the shaft before impacting on to the casing surface. Non-intrusive laser techniques have been employed to aid the visualisation processes and the analysis of the flow phenomena occurring within the rotating annular enclosure. Results reveal that, the liquid flow conditions and the shaft rotation regimes, along with the aerodynamic movement of the air circulating around the shaft influence the dynamics of the droplets and consequently the lubrication processes within the bearing chambers.

  15. Effects of Thermal Radiation on Hydromagnetic Flow due to a Porous Rotating Disk with Hall Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P Anjali Devi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation effect on steady laminar hydromagnetic flow of a viscous, Newtonian and electrically conducting fluid past a porous rotating infinite disk is studied taking Hall current into account. The system of axisymmetric nonlinear partial differential equations governing the MHD flow and heat transfer are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by introducing suitable similarity variables introduced by von Karman and the resulting nonlinear equations are solved numerically using Runge-Kutta based shooting method. A parametric study of all parameters involved was conducted and a representative set of results showing the effect of the magnetic field, the radiation parameter, the uniform suction/injection parameter and Hall parameter are illustrated graphically. The numerical values of the radial and tangential skin-friction coefficient and Nusselt number are calculated and displayed in the tables showing the effects of various parameters. Finally, a good comparison between the present numerical predictions and the previously published data are presented in the absence of magnetic field and radiation.

  16. SU-E-T-592: Comparison of Low Dose Volume and Integral Dose in Rotational Arc Radiation Therapy Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, J; Song, H; Liu, R; Qi, S; Hu, A

    2012-06-01

    To compare low dose volume and integral dose of various rotational arc radiation therapy modalities, including helical tomotherapy (HT) and other volumetric modulated arc therapies (VMAT). A digital cylindrical phantom and an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom were used in the study. HT treatment was planned on TomoTherapy Planning Station (Accuray) and VMAT plans were generated on Pinnacle (Philips) and Eclipse (Varian). Same objectives and criteria were used for all the planning tasks. Tomotherapy plans were made with both 1cm jaw and 2.5cm jaw. Pinnacle SmartArc and Eclipse RapidArc plans used 1 arc and 2 arcs. Plan quality was evaluated by dose-volume histograms, conformity index (CI), and heterogeneity index (HI). V10% and V20% of body were used in quantifying low dose volume. Integral doses were computed for each plan and compared. Dose profiles across the target center were retrieved to show the rate of dose falls off. All arc TPS generated clinically acceptable plan with comparable target CI and HI. The V20% of body of the cylindrical phantom case were 3551cc, 4054cc, 3375cc, 3438cc, 3714cc and 3679cc for tomotherapy 1 cm and 2 cm jaw, SmartArc 1 arc and 2 arc, and RapidArc 1 arc and 2 arc plans, respectively. The integral doses were 19.67, 22.78, 18.68, 18.50, 19.78 and 19.73 Joule, respectively. For the anthropomorphic phantom, the integral doses were 81.69, 102.77, 84.5 and 82.5 Joule for tomotherapy 1cm, 2cm, SmartArc 1arc and RapidArc 1arc, respectively. Dose profiles showed tomotherapy 1cm plan had similar longitudinal penumbra as SmartArc and RapidArc, while tomotherapy 2.5cm plan produced significant broader penumbra. Similar low dose volume and integral dose are found in SmartArc, Rapid Arc, and as well as helical tomotherapy plan of 1cm jaw. Tomotherapy plans of 2.5cm jaw, however, shows higher low dose volume and integral dose. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Evolution of a magnetic field in a differentially rotating radiative zone

    CERN Document Server

    Gaurat, Mathieu; Lignières, François; Gastine, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Recent spectropolarimetric surveys of main-sequence intermediate-mass stars have exhibited a dichotomy in the distribution of the observed magnetic field between the kG dipoles of Ap/Bp stars and the sub-Gauss magnetism of Vega and Sirius. We would like to test whether this dichotomy is linked to the stability versus instability of large-scale magnetic configurations in differentially rotating radiative zones. We computed the axisymmetric magnetic field obtained from the evolution of a dipolar field threading a differentially rotating shell. A full parameter study including various density profiles and initial and boundary conditions was performed with a 2D numerical code. We then focused on the ratio between the toroidal and poloidal components of the magnetic field and discuss the stability of the configurations dominated by the toroidal component using local stability criteria and insights from recent 3D numerical simulations. The numerical results and a simple model show that the ratio between the toroida...

  18. Hawking Radiation of Warped Anti de Sitter and Rotating Hairy Black Holes with Scalar Hair

    CERN Document Server

    Gursel, H

    2015-01-01

    This thesis mainly focuses on the Hawking radiation (HR) evacuating from the surface of the objects that have earned a reputation as the most extraordinary objects existing so far; the black holes (BHs). Throughout this study, quantum tunneling (QT) process serves as the model for the HR of scalar, vector and Dirac particles. The scalar and Dirac particles are anticipated to be tunneling through the horizon of rotating scalar hairy black holes (RHSBHs); whilst the vector particles are associated with a rotating warped anti de-Sitter black hole (WAdS3BH) embedded in a (2+1) dimensional fabric. It is no coincidence that for all three cases; the standard HT expression is derived. Additionally, the engagement of conformal field theory (CFT) with anti de-Sitter (AdS) space presents itself to the reader and the methodologies of Klein-Gordon equation (KGE), Dirac equation and Proca equations (PEs) are introduced. For all three cases, Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) approach is used, together with Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB...

  19. The TF Limit for Rapidly Rotating Bose Gases in Anharmonic Traps

    CERN Document Server

    Bru, J -B; Pickl, P; Yngvason, J

    2007-01-01

    Starting from the full many body Hamiltonian we derive the leading order energy and density asymptotics for the ground state of a dilute, rotating Bose gas in an anharmonic trap in the ` Thomas Fermi' (TF) limit when the Gross-Pitaevskii coupling parameter and/or the rotation velocity tend to infinity. Although the many-body wave function is expected to have a complicated phase, the leading order contribution to the energy can be computed by minimizing a simple functional of the density alone.

  20. A closed form solution for the rapid shear of homogeneous turbulence in a rotating frame with and without stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassinos, S. C.

    2000-11-01

    A closed-form solution for the evolution of one-point statistics is derived for the case of initially two-dimensional three-component (2D-3C) homogeneous turbulence deformed by rapid shear in a rotating frame. Cases with and without stratification are considered. Except for small total shear, the analytical result is shown to be in good agreement with the numerical solution of the governing equations, linearized for rapid distortions, and solved for the more general initial case of 3D-3C isotropic homogeneous turbulence. Based on this agreement, we show that the closed-from solution provides insight into the stabilizing and destabilizing effects of frame rotation on homogeneous stratified shear flow, and provides a useful reference point for the one-point modeling of rotated and stratified shear flows. This analysis provides insights on the stability of stratified homogeneous shear flows that are missed by the standard two-dimensional two-component (2D-2C) treatment of stability issues in these flows.

  1. Inhibition of trihalomethane formation in city water by radiation-ozone treatment and rapid composting of radiation disinfected sewage sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehisa, M.; Arai, H.; Arai, M.; Miyata, T.; Sakumoto, A.; Hashimoto, S.; Nishimura, K.; Watanabe, H.; Kawakami, W.; Kuriyama, I.

    Humic acid and Fulvic acid in natural water are precursors of carcinogenic THM which is formed during chlorine disinfection in city water processing. The radiation-oxidation process in the presence of ozone is effective to remove the precursors. The THM formation was reduced more than the decrease in TOC by the combination treatment. This is mainly due to a change in the chemical structure of the oxidation products. A composting of radiation disinfected sludge cake for agricultural reuse could be achieved within 3 days primary fermentation in a sewage plant. The rapid fermentation with use of radiation is effective to scale down of a fermentor of composting plant and the process reduces a health risk from the workers as well as final users.

  2. Dispersion of rotation of polarization plane and circular dichroism for alkaline atoms in intense radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagodova, Tamara Y.; Kuptsova, Anna V.

    1998-10-01

    The method of computer simulations on nonlinear resonant magneto-optical effects developed for real multi-level atoms in the two laser fields of arbitrary intensity and external magnetic field is applied for the polarization effects of different types calculations and investigations of the dependence of the characteristics of these effects on magnetic field strength, intensities, polarizations and detunings of laser fields for alkaline atoms. The essence of the method consists in simulations and analysis of the plots of dependence of quasienergies on parameters (detunings and intensities of radiation fields, magnetic field strength), which are obtained with the help of sorting subprogram, and selection of suitable algorithms for calculations of characteristics of nonlinear resonant magneto-optical effects. One-photon and two photon resonant effects are investigated for wide range of magnetic field strength from Zeeman to Paschen Back effects. Some new features in the spectra of rotation of plane of polarization and circular dicohroizm of different types are predicted. The results show the agreement with known experiments. Such calculations of nonlinear resonant magneto-optical effects in the intense laser fields resonant to adjacent transitions and magnetic field show the opportunity of investigation the modifications of electronic structure due to intense radiation fields and strong external magnetic field in atomic gases and also may be used for the treatment of new methods of phase-polarization selection of modes of tunable lasers.

  3. Variations in the Rotational Modulation of Saturn Kilometric Radiation and Their Relationship to Magnetic Periodicities Observed Before and Near Equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Groene, J. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR), which is an intense radio emission generated at high latitudes in Saturn's magnetosphere, displays a strong rotationally driven modulation at two rates, one characteristic of radiation from the northern auroral zone, and the other from the southern auroral zone. During the period from about 2007 to 2009, Cassini observations show that the rotation rates were about 816 and 780 deg/day, corresponding to rotational periods of about 10.6 and 10.8 hr. However, as Saturn approached equinox in August 2009, the two rotation rates began to converge, and have since crossed in early 2010. This interchange of the rotational modulation rates of SKR in the two hemispheres potentially provides an important clue as to how angular momentum is transferred from the interior of Saturn to the magnetosphere. Using these measurements a new longitude system has been developed, one for the northern hemisphere and one for the southern hemisphere (SLS4-N and SLS4-S). These longitude systems are used to investigate similar variations in the rotational modulation of Saturn's magnetic field and field-aligned currents.

  4. Rapid development of enhanced atrazine degradation in a Dundee silt loam soil under continuous corn and in rotation with cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotowicz, Robert M; Krutz, L Jason; Reddy, Krishna N; Weaver, Mark A; Koger, Clifford H; Locke, Martin A

    2007-02-07

    Mississippi Delta cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) production in rotation with corn (Zea mays L.) was evaluated in field experiments from 2000 to 2005 at Stoneville, Mississippi. Plots maintained under minimum tillage were established in 2000 on a Dundee silt loam with treatments including continuous cotton or corn and alternate cotton-corn rotations. Mineralization and dissipation of 14C [ring]-labeled atrazine were evaluated in the laboratory on soils collected prior to herbicide application in the first, second, third, and sixth years of the study. In soils collected in 2000, a maximum of 10% of the atrazine was mineralized after 30 days. After 1 year of herbicide application, atrazine-treated soils mineralized 52-57% of the radiolabeled atrazine in 30 days. By the sixth year of the study, greater than 59% of the atrazine was mineralized after 7 days in soils treated with atrazine, while soils from plots with no atrazine treatment mineralized less than 36%. The data also indicated rapid development of enhanced atrazine degradation in soils following 1 year of corn production with atrazine use. Atrazine mineralization was as rapid in soils under a rotation receiving biannual atrazine applications as in soils under continuous corn receiving annual applications of atrazine. Cumulative mineralization kinetics parameters derived from the Gompertz model (k and ti) were highly correlated with a history of atrazine application and total soil carbon content. Changes in the soil microbial community assessed by total fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis indicated significant interactions of cropping system and sampling date, with FAME indicators for soil bacteria responsible for differences in community structure. Autoclaved soil lost all ability to mineralize atrazine, and atrazine-mineralizing bacteria were isolated from these plots, confirming the biological basis for atrazine mineralization. These results indicate that changes in degradative potential of a soil can

  5. The two-dimensional optical pattern of a five inch diagonal white organic light emitting diode by rapid rotating measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Henglong; Cheng, Yu-Hen; Chen, Ming-Hong; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-09-01

    The feasibility of applying a five-inch diagonal white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) as a desk lamp was experimentally investigated by quantitatively comparing its two-dimensional (2D) optical intensity profile to that of a traditional 3M desk lamp equipped with optical diffuser. The 2D optical distribution patterns as the function of vertical distances to a surface of a five-inch diagonal WOLED were obtained by using rapid rotating measurement technique consisted of a sample holder on a rotational stage and a fixed photo detector with optical power meter. The 2D optical intensity profile on a surface can be rapidly established in a relatively small space by recording the reading from the fixed photo detector as rotating the sample holder. This rapid measurement technique is suitable for practical application in quality engineering without larger space. A WOLED is a compact and thin lighting source with planar device structure without additional optical components. Its optical intensity profile on a plane is expected to be different from traditional lighting sources. The optical distribution pattern of a desk lamp requires a relatively large area on a surface with relatively uniformed intensity distribution. The quantitative analysis of the similarity between WOLED and 3M desk lamp was conducted by comparing the optimal zones defined as the area within 75% of the maximum intensity in 2D optical distribution pattern. Our preliminary result showed that the optimal zone of a five-inch diagonal WOLED at 45cm vertical distance is highly similar to that of the 3M desk lamp with optical diffuser.

  6. Clearance Analysis of CTC2 (on ELC4) to S-TRRJ HRS Radiator Rotation Envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Donn

    2014-01-01

    In response to the planned retirement of the Space Shuttle Program, International Space Station (ISS) management began stockpiling spare parts on the ISS. Many of the larger orbital replacement units were stored on the Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Logistics Carriers (ELCs) mounted on the end of the S3 and P3 truss segments, immediately outboard of the Thermal Radiator Rotary Joints (TRRJs) and their attached radiators. In an August 2009 computer-aided design (CAD) assessment, it was determined that mounting the Cargo Transport Container (CTC) 2 on the inboard face of ELC4 as planned would create insufficient clearance between the CTC2 and the rotational envelope of the radiators when the TRRJs were rotated to a gamma angle of 35.0 degrees. The true clearance would depend on how the Unpressurized Cargo Carrier Attachment System (UCCAS) was mounted to the S3 truss and how the ELC4 was attached to it. If the plane of the UCCAS attachment points were tilted even slightly inboard, it would significantly change the clearance between CTC2 and the Starboard TRRJ (S-TRRJ) radiators. Additionally, since CTC2 would be covered in multilayer insulation (MLI), the true outer profile of CTC2 was not captured in the CAD models used for the clearance assessment. It was possible that, even if the S-TRRJ radiators cleared CTC2, they could snag the MLI covering. In the fall of 2010, the Image Science and Analysis Group (ISAG) was asked to perform an on-orbit clearance analysis to determine the location of CTC2 on ELC4 and the S-TRRJ radiators at the angle of closest approach so that a positive clearance could be assured. To provide the measurements as quickly as possible to aid in the assessment, it was decided that the clearance analysis would be broken into two phases. Phase I: The location and orientation of the UCCAS fittings, which support and hold the ELC4 in place, would be measured relative to the ISS Analytical Coordinate System (ISSACS

  7. The GLAaS algorithm for portal dosimetry and quality assurance of RapidArc, an intensity modulated rotational therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To expand and test the dosimetric procedure, known as GLAaS, for amorphous silicon detectors to the RapidArc intensity modulated arc delivery with Varian infrastructures and to test the RapidArc dosimetric reliability between calculation and delivery. Methods The GLAaS algorithm was applied and tested on a set of RapidArc fields at both low (6 MV and high (18 MV beam energies with a PV-aS1000 detector. Pilot tests for short arcs were performed on a 6 MV beam associated to a PV-aS500. RapidArc is a novel planning and delivery method in the category of intensity modulated arc therapies aiming to deliver highly modulated plans with variable MLC shapes, dose rate and gantry speed during rotation. Tests were repeated for entire (360 degrees gantry rotations on composite dose plans and for short partial arcs (of ~6 or 12 degrees to assess GLAaS and RapidArc mutual relationships on global and fine delivery scales. The gamma index concept of Low and the Modulation Index concept of Webb were applied to compare quantitatively TPS dose matrices and dose converted PV images. Results The Gamma Agreement Index computed for a Distance to Agreement of 3 mm and a Dose Difference (ΔD of 3% was, as mean ± 1 SD, 96.7 ± 1.2% at 6 MV and 94.9 ± 1.3% at 18 MV, over the field area. These findings deteriorated slightly is ΔD was reduced to 2% (93.4 ± 3.2% and 90.1 ± 3.1%, respectively and improved with ΔD = 4% (98.3 ± 0.8% and 97.3 ± 0.9%, respectively. For all tests a grid of 1 mm and the AAA photon dose calculation algorithm were applied. The spatial resolution of the PV-aS1000 is 0.392 mm/pxl. The Modulation Index for calculations resulted 17.0 ± 3.2 at 6 MV and 15.3 ± 2.7 at 18 MV while the corresponding data for measurements were: 18.5 ± 3.7 and 17.5 ± 3.7. Partial arcs findings were (for ΔD = 3%: GAI = 96.7 ± 0.9% for 6° rotations and 98.0 ± 1.1% for 12° rotations. Conclusion The GLAaS method can be considered as a valid

  8. Rapid flattening of butterfly pitch angle distributions of radiation belt electrons by whistler-mode chorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Funsten, H. O.

    2016-08-01

    Van Allen radiation belt electrons exhibit complex dynamics during geomagnetically active periods. Investigation of electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) can provide important information on the dominant physical mechanisms controlling radiation belt behaviors. Here we report a storm time radiation belt event where energetic electron PADs changed from butterfly distributions to normal or flattop distributions within several hours. Van Allen Probes observations showed that the flattening of butterfly PADs was closely related to the occurrence of whistler-mode chorus waves. Two-dimensional quasi-linear STEERB simulations demonstrate that the observed chorus can resonantly accelerate the near-equatorially trapped electrons and rapidly flatten the corresponding electron butterfly PADs. These results provide a new insight on how chorus waves affect the dynamic evolution of radiation belt electrons.

  9. The reversal of the rotational modulation rates of the north and south components of Saturn kilometric radiation near equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Groene, J. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Menietti, J. D.; Ye, S.-Y.; Kurth, W. S.; MacDowall, R. J.; Lecacheux, A.

    2010-12-01

    It has been known for many years that Saturn emits intense radio emissions at kilometer wavelengths and that this radiation is modulated by the rotation of the planet at a rate that varies slowly on time scales of years. Recently it has been shown that the radio emission consists of two components that have different rotational modulation rates, one emitted from the northern auroral region and the other emitted from the southern auroral region. In this paper we show using radio measurements from the Cassini spacecraft that the rotational modulation rates of the northern and southern components reversed near Saturn's recent equinox, which occurred on 11 August 2009. We show that a similar reversal was also observed by the Ulysses spacecraft near the previous equinox, which occurred on 19 November 1995. The solar control implied by these reversals has important implications on how Saturn's rotation is coupled into the magnetosphere.

  10. Singularities in radiative heat generation and interaction forces for two rotating nanoparticles caused by the anomalous Doppler effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokitin, A. I.; Dubas, E. V.

    2017-06-01

    The quantum heat generation, interaction force, and friction torque for two rotating spherical nanoparticles with the radius R are calculated. In contrast to a static case where an upper bound in the radiative heat transfer between two particles exists, the quantum heat generation for two rotating particles diverges at distances between particles d material of a particle at the resonance frequency ω0), when the rotation frequency coincides with poles in the excitation generation rate at Ω = 2ω0. These poles are due to the anomalous Doppler effect and the mutual polarization of particles and exist even in the presence of dissipation in particles. The anomalous heat generation is associated with the conversion of mechanical rotation energy into heat mediated by quantum friction. Similar singularities also exist for the interaction force and friction torque. The results can be of significant importance for biomedical applications.

  11. Analytical-HZETRN Model for Rapid Assessment of Active Magnetic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, S. A.; Blattnig, S. R.; Singleterry, R. C.; Westover, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of active radiation shielding designs has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on deep-space missions at a significantly lower mass penalty than designs utilizing only passive shielding. Unfortunately, the determination of the radiation exposure inside these shielded environments often involves lengthy and computationally intensive Monte Carlo analysis. In order to evaluate the large trade space of design parameters associated with a magnetic radiation shield design, an analytical model was developed for the determination of flux inside a solenoid magnetic field due to the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) radiation environment. This analytical model was then coupled with NASA's radiation transport code, HZETRN, to account for the effects of passive/structural shielding mass. The resulting model can rapidly obtain results for a given configuration and can therefore be used to analyze an entire trade space of potential variables in less time than is required for even a single Monte Carlo run. Analyzing this trade space for a solenoid magnetic shield design indicates that active shield bending powers greater than 15 Tm and passive/structural shielding thicknesses greater than 40 g/cm2 have a limited impact on reducing dose equivalent values. Also, it is shown that higher magnetic field strengths are more effective than thicker magnetic fields at reducing dose equivalent.

  12. The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) Mission Using the HISat Conformal Satellite Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathanael

    2015-01-01

    The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) experiment, designed as a quick turnaround mission to make radiation measurements in LEO, will fly as a hosted payload in partnership with NovaWurks using their Hyper-integrated Satlet (HiSat) architecture. The need for the mission arises as the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionization Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model moves from a research effort into an operational radiation assessment tool. The data collected by R3S, in addition to the complementary data from a NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) atmospheric balloon mission entitled Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaDX), will validate exposure prediction capabilities of NAIRAS. This paper discusses the development of the R3S experiment as made possible by use of the HiSat architecture. The system design and operational modes of the experiment are described, as well as the experiment interfaces to the HiSat satellite via the user defined adapter (UDA) provided by NovaWurks. This paper outlines the steps taken by the project to execute the R3S mission in the 4 months of design, build, and test. Finally, description of the engineering process is provided, including the use of facilitated rapid/concurrent engineering sessions, the associated documentation, and the review process employed.

  13. Discovery of a strong magnetic field in the rapidly rotating B2Vn star HR 7355

    CERN Document Server

    Oksala, M E; Marcolino, W L F; Grunhut, J; Bohlender, D A; Manset, N; Townsend, R H D

    2010-01-01

    We report on the detection of a strong, organized magnetic field in the helium-variable early B-type star HR 7355 using spectropolarimetric data obtained with ESPaDOnS on CFHT by the MiMeS large program. We also present results from new V-band differential photometry obtained with the CTIO 0.9m telescope. We investigate the longitudinal field, using a technique called Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD), and the rotational period of HR 7355. These new observations strongly support the proposal that HR 7355 harbors a structured magnetosphere similar to that in the prototypical helium-strong star, sigma Ori E.

  14. [Rapid dicentric assay of human blood lymphocytes after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repin, M V; Repina, L A

    2011-01-01

    The probability of losses of different chromosome aberrations during the dicentric chromosome assay of metaphase cells with incomplete sets of chromosome centromeres was estimated using a mathematical model for low doses of ionizing radiation. A dicentric assay of human blood lymphocytes without determination of the total amount of chromosome centromeres in cells without chromosome aberrations (rapid dicentric assay) has been proposed. The rapid dicentric analysis allows to register chromosome aberrations in full compliance with the conventional classification. The experimental data have shown no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes detected by rapid and classical dicentric chromosome assays of human lymphocytes exposed to 0.5 Gy of 60Co gamma-rays. The rate of the rapid dicentric assay was almost twice as high as that of the classical dicentric assay.

  15. A surprise at the bottom of the main sequence: Rapid rotation and NO H-alpha emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basri, Gibor; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    1995-01-01

    We report Kech Observatory high-resolution echelle spectra from 640-850 nm for eight stars near the faint end of the main sequence. These spectra are the highest resolution spectra of such late-type stars, and clearly resolve the TiO, VO, and atomic lines. The sample includes the field brown-dwarf candidate, BRI 0021-0214 (M9.5+). Very unexpectedly, it shows the most rapid rotation in the entire samples, v sin i approximately 40 km/s, which is 20x faster than typical field nonemission M stars. Equally surprising is that BRI 0021 exhibits no emission or absorptionat H-alpha. We argue that this absence is not simply due to its cool photosphere, but that stellar activity declines in a fundamental way at the end of the main sequence. As it is the first very late M dwarf observed at high spectral resolution, BRI 0021 may be signaling a qualitative change in the angular momentum loss rate among the lowest mass stars. Conventionally, its rapid rotation would have marked BRI 0021 as very young, consistent with the selection effect which arises if the latest-type dwarfs are really brown dwarfs on cooling curves. In any case, it is unprecedented to find no sign of stellar activity in such a rapidly rotating convective star. We also discuss the possible conflict between this observation and the extremely strong H-alpha seen in another very cool star, PC 0025+0447. Extrapolation of M-L relations for BRI 0021 yields M approximately 0.065 solar mass, and the other sample objects have expected masses near the H-burning limit. These include two Pleiades brown-dwarf candidates, four field M6 dwarfs and one late-type T Tauri star. The two Pleiades M6 dwarfs have v sin i of 26 and 37 km/s, H-alpha in emission, and radial velocities consistent with Pleiades M6 dwarfs have v sin i of 26 and 37 km/s, H-alpha in emission, and radial velocities consistent with Pleiades membership. Similarly, the late-type T Tauri star has v sin i approximately 30 km/s and H alpha emission indicate of its

  16. Spread of Matter over a Neutron-Star Surface During Disk Accretion: Deceleration of Rapid Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Sunyaev, R A

    2011-01-01

    The problem of disk accretion onto the surface of a neutron star with a weak magnetic field at a luminosity exceeding several percent of Eddington is reduced to the problem of the braking of a hypersonic flow with a velocity that is 0.4-0.5 of the speed of light above the base of the spreading layer -- a dense atmosphere made up of previously fallen matter. We show that turbulent braking in the Prandtl-Karman model with universally accepted coefficients for terrestrial conditions and laboratory experiments and a ladder of interacting gravity waves in a stratified quasi-exponential atmosphere at standard Richardson numbers lead to a spin-up of the massive zone that extends to the ocean made up of a plasma with degenerate electrons. Turbulent braking in the ocean at the boundary with the outer solid crust reduces the rotation velocity to the solid-body rotation velocity of the star. This situation should lead to strong heating of deep atmospheric layers and to the switch-off of the explosive helium burning mech...

  17. Discrete-ordinate radiative transfer in a stratified medium with first-order rotational Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spurr, Robert [RT Solutions Inc., 9 Channing Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)], E-mail: rtsolutions@verizon.net; Haan, Johan de; Oss, Roeland van [KNMI, de Bilt (Netherlands); Vasilkov, Alexander [SSAI, Lanham, MD (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Rotational Raman scattering (RRS) by air molecules in the Earth's atmosphere is predominantly responsible for the Ring effect: Fraunhofer and absorption-feature filling-in observed in UV/visible backscatter spectra. Accurate determination of RRS effects requires detailed radiative transfer (RT) treatment. In this paper, we demonstrate that the discrete-ordinate RT equations may be solved analytically in a multi-layer multiple scattering atmosphere in the presence of RRS treated as a first-order perturbation. Based on this solution, we develop a generic pseudo-spherical RT model LIDORT-RRS for the determination of backscatter radiances with RRS included; the model will generate output at arbitrary viewing geometry and optical thickness. Model comparisons with measured RRS filling-in effects from OMI observations show very good agreement. We examine telluric RRS filling-in effects for satellite-view backscatter radiances in a spectral range covering the ozone Huggins absorption bands. The model is also used to investigate calcium H and K Fraunhofer filling-in through cloud layers in the atmosphere.

  18. Intensity modulated radiation therapy with field rotation--a time-varying fractionation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dink, Delal; Langer, Mark P; Rardin, Ronald L; Pekny, Joseph F; Reklaitis, Gintaras V; Saka, Behlul

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel mathematical approach to the beam selection problem in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. The approach allows more beams to be used over the course of therapy while limiting the number of beams required in any one session. In the proposed field rotation method, several sets of beams are interchanged throughout the treatment to allow a wider selection of beam angles than would be possible with fixed beam orientations. The choice of beamlet intensities and the number of identical fractions for each set are determined by a mixed integer linear program that controls jointly for the distribution per fraction and the cumulative dose distribution delivered to targets and critical structures. Trials showed the method allowed substantial increases in the dose objective and/or sparing of normal tissues while maintaining cumulative and fraction size limits. Trials for a head and neck site showed gains of 25%-35% in the objective (average tumor dose) and for a thoracic site gains were 7%-13%, depending on how strict the fraction size limits were set. The objective did not rise for a prostate site significantly, but the tolerance limits on normal tissues could be strengthened with the use of multiple beam sets.

  19. The Influence of Radiative Heat Transfer and Hall Current on MHD Flow in a Vertical Rotating Channel with Slip Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Poonia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the effects of Hall current on MHD free convection flow in a vertical rotating channel filled with porous medium have been studied. A uniform magnetic field is applied in the direction normal to the plates. The entire system rotates about an axis normal to the planes of the plates with uniform angular velocity ' . The temperature of one of the plates varies periodically and the temperature difference of the plates is high enough to induce radiative heat transfer. The effects of various parameters on the velocity and temperature field are shown graphically. Also the results on Skin Frication and Nusselt Number are shown in tables.

  20. A large scale dynamo and magnetoturbulence in rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Mösta, Philipp; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F; Schnetter, Erik; Haas, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is of key importance in many high-energy astrophysical systems, including black-hole accretion disks, protoplanetary disks, neutron stars, and stellar interiors. MHD instabilities can amplify local magnetic field strength over very short time scales, but it is an open question whether this can result in the creation of a large scale ordered and dynamically relevant field. Specifically, the magnetorotational instability (MRI) has been suggested as a mechanism to grow magnetar-strength magnetic field ($\\gtrsim 10^{15}\\, \\mathrm{G}$) and magnetorotationally power the explosion of a rotating massive star. Such stars are progenitor candidates for type Ic-bl hypernova explosions that involve relativistic outflows and make up all supernovae connected to long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We have carried out global 3D general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) turbulence simulations that resolve the fastest growing mode (FGM) of the MRI. We show that MRI-driven MHD turbulence in ...

  1. Orbiting Clouds of Material at the Keplerian Co-rotation Radius of Rapidly Rotating Low-mass WTTs in Upper Sco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, John; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Jardine, Moira; David, Trevor J.; Rebull, Luisa; Cody, Ann Marie; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Barrado, David; Wolk, Scott; Davenport, James; Pinsonneault, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Using K2 data, we identified 23 very-low-mass members of the ρ Oph and Upper Scorpius star-forming region as having periodic photometric variability not easily explained by well-established physical mechanisms such as star spots, eclipsing binaries, or pulsation. All of these unusual stars are mid-to-late M dwarfs without evidence of active accretion, and with photometric periods generally flare. For the group of stars with these sudden light-curve morphology shifts, we attribute their flux dips as most probably arising from eclipses of warm coronal gas clouds, analagous to the slingshot prominences postulated to explain transient Hα absorption features in AB Doradus and other rapidly rotating late-type stars. For another group of stars with somewhat longer periods, we find the short-duration flux dips to be highly variable on both short and long timescales, with generally asymmetric flux-dip profiles. We believe that these flux dips are due to particulate clouds possibly associated with a close-in planet or resulting from a recent collisional event.

  2. Rapid Rotation of Low-Mass Red Giants Using APOKASC: A Measure of Interaction Rates on the Post-main-sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Tayar, Jamie; García-Hernández, D A; Troup, Nicholas W; Mathur, Savita; García, Rafael A; Zamora, O; Johnson, Jennifer A; Pinsonneault, Marc H; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Chaplin, William J; Elsworth, Yvonne; Nidever, David L; Salabert, David; Schneider, Donald P; Serenelli, Aldo; Shetrone, Matthew; Stello, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence rate of rapidly rotating ($v\\sin i$$>$10 km s$^{-1}$), low-mass giant stars in the APOGEE-Kepler (APOKASC) fields with asteroseismic mass and surface gravity measurements. Such stars are likely merger products and their frequency places interesting constraints on stellar population models. We also identify anomalous rotators, i.e. stars with 5 km s$^{-1}$$<$$v\\sin i$$<$10 km s$^{-1}$ that are rotating significantly faster than both angular momentum evolution predictions and the measured rates of similar stars. Our data set contains fewer rapid rotators than one would expect given measurements of the Galactic field star population, which likely indicates that asteroseismic detections are less common in rapidly rotating red giants. The number of low-mass moderate (5-10 km s$^{-1}$) rotators in our sample gives a lower limit of 7% for the rate at which low-mass stars interact on the upper red giant branch because single stars in this mass range are expected to rotate slowly. F...

  3. Dynamics of the envelope of a rapidly rotating star or giant planet in gravitational contraction

    CERN Document Server

    Hypolite, Delphine

    2014-01-01

    We wish to understand the processes that control the fluid flows of a gravitationally contracting and rotating star or giant planet. We consider a spherical shell containing an incompressible fluid that is slowly absorbed by the core so as to mimick gravitational contraction. We also consider the effects of a stable stratification that may also modify the dynamics of a pre-main sequence star of intermediate mass. This simple model reveals the importance of both the Stewartson layer attached to the core and the boundary conditions met by the fluid at the surface of the object. In the case of a pre-main sequence star of intermediate mass where the envelope is stably stratified, shortly after the birth line, the spin-up flow driven by contraction overwhelms the baroclinic flow that would take place otherwise.This model also shows that for a contracting envelope, a self-similar flow of growing amplitude controls the dynamics. It suggests that initial conditions on the birth line are most probably forgotten. Final...

  4. Basic parameters and properties of the rapidly rotating magnetic helium strong B star HR7355

    CERN Document Server

    Rivinius, Th; Kochukhov, O; Štefl, S; Baade, D; Barrera, L; Szeifert, Th

    2012-01-01

    The spectral and magnetic properties and variability of the B2Vnp emission-line magnetosphere star HR7355 were analyzed. The object rotates at almost 90% of the critical value, meaning it is a magnetic star for which oblateness and gravity darkening effects cannot be ignored any longer. A detailed modeling of the photospheric parameters indicate that the star is significantly cooler than suggested by the B2 spectral type, with T_eff=17500K atypically cool for a star with a helium enriched surface. The spectroscopic variability of helium and metal lines due to the photospheric abundance pattern is far more complex than a largely dipolar, oblique magnetic field of about 11 to 12kG may suggest. Doppler imaging shows that globally the most He enriched areas coincide with the magnetic poles and metal enriched areas with the magnetic equator. While most of the stellar surface is helium enriched with respect to the solar value, some isolated patches are depleted. The stellar wind in the circumstellar environment is ...

  5. Hawking Radiation from Topological Kerr Anti-de-Sitter Black Hole with One Rotational Parameter via Covariant Anomalies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Kai; ZENG Xiao-Xiong; YANG Shu-Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Using anomalous viewpoint,we study the Hawking radiation from a kind of topological Kerr Anti-de-Sitter(Kerr AdS)black hole with ode rotational parameter.We employ the covariant gauge and gravitational anomalies.The result supports the Robinson-Wilczek opinion and shows that the Hawking temperature can be correctly determined by cancelling covariant gauge and gravitational anomalies at the horizon.

  6. Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D. R.

    2009-03-01

    The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

  7. Discovery and characteristics of the rapidly rotating active asteroid (62412) 2000 SY178 in the main belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, Scott S. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, 5241 Broad Branch Road. NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Trujillo, Chadwick, E-mail: ssheppard@carnegiescience.edu [Gemini Observatory, 670 North A‘ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We report a new active asteroid in the main belt of asteroids between Mars and Jupiter. Object (62412) 2000 SY178 exhibited a tail in images collected during our survey for objects beyond the Kuiper Belt using the Dark Energy Camera on the CTIO 4 m telescope. We obtained broadband colors of 62412 at the Magellan Telescope, which, along with 62412's low albedo, suggests it is a C-type asteroid. 62412's orbital dynamics and color strongly correlate with the Hygiea family in the outer main belt, making it the first active asteroid known in this heavily populated family. We also find 62412 to have a very short rotation period of 3.33 ± 0.01 hours from a double-peaked light curve with a maximum peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.45 ± 0.01 mag. We identify 62412 as the fastest known rotator of the Hygiea family and the nearby Themis family of similar composition, which contains several known main belt comets. The activity on 62412 was seen over one year after perihelion passage in its 5.6 year orbit. 62412 has the highest perihelion and one of the most circular orbits known for any active asteroid. The observed activity is probably linked to 62412's rapid rotation, which is near the critical period for break-up. The fast spin rate may also change the shape and shift material around 62412's surface, possibly exposing buried ice. Assuming 62412 is a strengthless rubble pile, we find the density of 62412 to be around 1500 kg m{sup −3}.

  8. The Effect of the Gravitational Mass on the Electromagnetic Radiation from an Oblique, Relativistically Rotating Dipole (Neutron Star)

    CERN Document Server

    AlMuhammad, Anwar S

    2002-01-01

    Relying on the magnetic dipole model of the pulsar, we use the extension of the work of Haxton-Ruffini [31] for single charges by DePaolis-Ingrosso-Qadir [32] for an obliquely rotating magnetic dipole, to incorporate the effect of the gravitational mass. So, by using the numerical and analytical solutions of the differential equation for the radiation, we construct the energy spectra for different masses of the dipole-NS. These spectra show that, in relatively low angular momentum l, the effect of the gravitational mass is very significant in suppressing the relativistic enhancement factor, which had been found [27, 28, 32], by two to three orders of magnitude, as the mass changes from 0.5 solar mass to 3 solar masses. It is an indication that most of the angular momentum of the NS is retained as rotational kinetic energy instead of being radiated as an electromagnetic energy. Also, the suppressing in radiation energy is more or less independent of the angular momentum, and the high rotational velocity. We al...

  9. CONVECTIVE INSTABILITY IN A RAPIDLY ROTATING FLUID LAYER IN THE PRESENCE OF A NON-UNIFORM MAGNETIC FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈出新; 郭孝城

    2003-01-01

    Magnetoconvective instabilities in a rapidly rotating, electrically conducting fluid layer heated from below in the presence of a non-uniform, horizontal magnetic field are investigated. It was first shown by Chandrasekhar that an overall minimum of the Rayleigh number may be reached at the onset of magnetoconvection when a uniform basic magnetic field is imposed. In this paper, we show that the properties of instability can be quite different when a non-uniform basic magnetic field is applied. It is shown that there is an optimum value of the Elsasser number provided that the basic magnetic field is a monotonically decreasing or increasing function of the vertical coordinate. However,there exist no optimum values of the Elsasser number that can give rise to an overall minimum of the Rayleigh number at the onset of magnetoconvection if the imposed basic magnetic field has an infiexion point.

  10. The asymptotic equivalence of fixed heat flux and fixed temperature thermal boundary conditions for rapidly rotating convection

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Michael A; Julien, Keith; Nieves, David; Driggs, Derek; Marti, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The influence of fixed temperature and fixed heat flux thermal boundary conditions on rapidly rotating convection in the plane layer geometry is investigated for the case of stress-free mechanical boundary conditions. It is shown that whereas the leading order system satisfies fixed temperature boundary conditions implicitly, a double boundary layer structure is necessary to satisfy the fixed heat flux thermal boundary conditions. The boundary layers consist of a classical Ekman layer adjacent to the solid boundaries that adjust viscous stresses to zero, and a layer in thermal wind balance just outside the Ekman layers adjusts the temperature such that the fixed heat flux thermal boundary conditions are satisfied. The influence of these boundary layers on the interior geostrophically balanced convection is shown to be asymptotically weak, however. Upon defining a simple rescaling of the thermal variables, the leading order reduced system of governing equations are therefore equivalent for both boundary condit...

  11. Phylogenomics Reveals Three Sources of Adaptive Variation during a Rapid Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Pease

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Speciation events often occur in rapid bursts of diversification, but the ecological and genetic factors that promote these radiations are still much debated. Using whole transcriptomes from all 13 species in the ecologically and reproductively diverse wild tomato clade (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon, we infer the species phylogeny and patterns of genetic diversity in this group. Despite widespread phylogenetic discordance due to the sorting of ancestral variation, we date the origin of this radiation to approximately 2.5 million years ago and find evidence for at least three sources of adaptive genetic variation that fuel diversification. First, we detect introgression both historically between early-branching lineages and recently between individual populations, at specific loci whose functions indicate likely adaptive benefits. Second, we find evidence of lineage-specific de novo evolution for many genes, including loci involved in the production of red fruit color. Finally, using a "PhyloGWAS" approach, we detect environment-specific sorting of ancestral variation among populations that come from different species but share common environmental conditions. Estimated across the whole clade, small but substantial and approximately equal fractions of the euchromatic portion of the genome are inferred to contribute to each of these three sources of adaptive genetic variation. These results indicate that multiple genetic sources can promote rapid diversification and speciation in response to new ecological opportunity, in agreement with our emerging phylogenomic understanding of the complexity of both ancient and recent species radiations.

  12. The Formation of Rapidly Rotating Black Holes in High-mass X-Ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batta, Aldo; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Fryer, Chris

    2017-09-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXRBs), such as Cygnus X-1, host some of the most rapidly spinning black holes (BHs) known to date, reaching spin parameters a≳ 0.84. However, there are several effects that can severely limit the maximum BH spin parameter that could be obtained from direct collapse, such as tidal synchronization, magnetic core-envelope coupling, and mass loss. Here, we propose an alternative scenario where the BH is produced by a failed supernova (SN) explosion that is unable to unbind the stellar progenitor. A large amount of fallback material ensues, whose interaction with the secondary naturally increases its overall angular momentum content, and therefore the spin of the BH when accreted. Through SPH hydrodynamic simulations, we studied the unsuccessful explosion of an 8 {M}ȯ pre-SN star in a close binary with a 12 {M}ȯ companion with an orbital period of ≈1.2 days, finding that it is possible to obtain a BH with a high spin parameter a≳ 0.8 even when the expected spin parameter from direct collapse is a≲ 0.3. This scenario also naturally explains the atmospheric metal pollution observed in HMXRB stellar companions.

  13. Cylindrical shock waves in rotational axisymmetric non-ideal dusty gas with increasing energy under the action of monochromatic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, P. K.

    2017-08-01

    The propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric non-ideal dusty gas under the action of monochromatic radiation with increasing energy, which has variable azimuthal and axial components of fluid velocity, is investigated. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. Similarity solutions are obtained as well as the effects of the variation of the radiation parameters, the parameter of non-idealness of the gas, the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture, the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas, and the piston velocity index are worked out in detail. The total energy of the shock wave is varying and increases with time. It is observed that the radiation parameter and the piston velocity index have opposite behaviour on the flow variables as well as the shock strength.

  14. Evaluation of Rotational Errors in Treatment Setup of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Liver Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Minsong; Lasley, Foster D.; Das, Indra J.; DesRosiers, Colleen M.; Slessinger, Eric D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Cardenes, Higinia R., E-mail: hcardene@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact of rotational setup errors in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment of liver tumors and to investigate whether translational shifts can compensate for rotation. Methods and Materials: The positioning accuracy in 20 patients with liver malignancies treated with SBRT was reevaluated offline by matching the patients' cone-beam computed tomography (CT) scans (n=75) to the planning CT scans and adjusting the 3 rotational angles (pitch, roll, and yaw). Systematic and random setup errors were calculated. The dosimetric changes caused by rotational setup errors were quantified for both simulated and observed patient rotations. Dose distributions recalculated on the rotated CT scans were compared with the original planned doses. Translational corrections were simulated based on manual translational registration of the rotated images to the original CT scans. The correction efficacy was evaluated by comparing the recalculated plans with the original plans. Results: The systematic rotational setup errors were -0.06 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.68 Degree-Sign , -0.29 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.62 Degree-Sign , and -0.24 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.61 Degree-Sign ; the random setup errors were 0.80 Degree-Sign , 1.05 Degree-Sign , and 0.61 Degree-Sign for pitch, roll, and yaw, respectively. Analysis of CBCT images showed that 56.0%, 14.7%, and 1.3% of treated fractions had rotational errors of >1 Degree-Sign , >2 Degree-Sign , and >3 Degree-Sign , respectively, in any one of the rotational axes. Rotational simulations demonstrated that the reduction of gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage was <2% when rotation was <3 Degree-Sign . Recalculated plans using actual patient roll motions showed similar reduction (<2%) in GTV coverage. Translational corrections improved the GTV coverage to within 3% of the original values. For organs at risk (OAR), the dosimetric impact varied case by case. Conclusion: Actual rotational setup errors in SBRT for liver

  15. Degradation of Teflon(tm) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Jacqueline; Powers, Charles; Viens, Michael; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary; Munoz, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon(R) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(R) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(R) FEP.

  16. Degradation of Teflon(trademark) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Jacqueline; Powers, Charles; Viens, Michael; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary; Munoz, Bruno

    1999-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon(trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(trademark) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(trademark) FEP.

  17. Polarized radiative transfer through terrestrial atmosphere accounting for rotational Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Luca; Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper is devoted to the phenomenological derivation of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) accounting for first-order source terms of rotational Raman scattering (RRS), which is responsible for the in-filling of Fraunhofer and telluric lines by inelastic scattered photons. The implementation of the solution of the VRTE within the framework of the forward-adjoint method is given. For the Ca II and the oxygen A-band (O2 A) spectral windows, values of reflectance, degree of linear polarization (DOLP) and in-filling, in zenith and nadir geometry, are compared with results given in literature. Moreover, the dependence of these quantities on the columnar loading and vertical layering of non-spherical dust aerosols is investigated, together with their changes as function of two habits of ice crystals, modeled as regular icosahedra and severely rough aggregated columns. Bi-directional effects of an underlying polarizing surface are accounted for. The forward simulations are performed for one selected wavelength in the continuum and one in the strong absorption of the O2 A, as their combination can be exploited for the spaceborne retrieval of aerosol and cloud properties. For this reason, we also mimic seasonal maps of reflectance, DOLP and in-filling, that are prototypical measurements of the Ultraviolet-Visible-Near Infrared (UVN) sensor, at a nominal spectral resolution of 0.12 nm. UVN is the core payload of the upcoming European Sentinel-4 mission, that will observe Europe in geostationary orbit for air quality monitoring purposes. In general, in the core of O2 A, depending on the optical thickness and altitude of the scatterers, we find RRS-induced in-filling values ranging from 1.3% to 1.8%, while DOLP decreases by 1%. Conversely, while negligible differences of RRS in-filling are calculated with different ice crystal habits, the severely rough aggregated column model can reduce DOLP by a factor up to 10%. The UVN maps of in-filling show values varying

  18. Vertical advection from oxic or anoxic water from the main pycnocline as a cause of rapid extinction or rapid radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Pat; Quinby-Hunt, Mary S.; Berry, William B. N.

    as a function of the depth and volume of source water, as different organisms have different tolerance limits or preadaptive capabilities. In the geologic record, significant upwelling events would be recorded initially as a general reduction in diversity, followed by mass extinctions in some groups and the possibility of rapid radiation in opportunistic groups. The ecologic requirements of both the extinct taxa and the newly enhanced taxa might be used to identify the type of any given major upwelling event.

  19. Rapid release of mercury from intertidal sediments exposed to solar radiation: a field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canário, João; Vale, Carlos

    2004-07-15

    There is increasing evidence of the primary importance of photochemical reactions and transfer of gaseous mercury to the atmosphere. Although mercury in aquatic sediments is efficiently retained, resuspension and bioturbation in intertidal sediments may expose temporarily anoxic sediments to solar radiation. Field experiments were performed to investigate these processes. Anoxic sediments from two areas in the Tagus estuary with different degrees of Hg contamination (experiments I and II) were homogenized and distributed into two sets of 36 uncovered Petri dishes. The samples were placed on the intertidal sediments and exposed to direct solar radiation and kept under dark (control) for 6-8 h. The decrease rates of acid volatile sulfides (abrupt in the first 3 h) and of pyrite (linear) were the same in sediments under solar radiation and dark. The total Hg concentrations were relatively constant in sediments kept in dark, but decreased from 17.6 to 7.65 and 3.45 to 1.35 nmol g(-1) in experiments I and II, respectively. In those exposed to solar radiation during the period of higher UV intensity. Similar evolutions were found in nonreactive Hg in pore waters (3.00-2.59 and 0.725-0.105 nM). On the contrary, reactive Hg was higher in pore waters of the sediments exposed to solar radiation and increased with time, from 424 to 845 pM and 53 to 193 pM. These results indicate that most mercury released in pore waters was photochemically reduced in a short period of time and escaped rapidly to the atmosphere. Episodes of bottom resuspension and bioturbation in the intertidal sediments enhance the transfer of gaseous mercury to the atmosphere.

  20. Planetary period oscillations in Saturn's magnetosphere: Evidence in magnetic field phase data for rotational modulation of Saturn kilometric radiation emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, D. J.; Cecconi, B.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Dougherty, M. K.; Lamy, L.; Provan, G.; Zarka, P.

    2011-09-01

    Initial Voyager observations of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) indicated that the modulations in emitted power near the ˜11 h planetary rotation period are “strobe like,” varying with a phase independent of observer position, while subsequent Cassini studies of related oscillations in the magnetospheric magnetic field and plasma parameters have shown that these rotate around the planet with a period close to the SKR period. However, analysis of magnetic oscillation data over the interval 2004-2010 reveals the presence of variable secular drifts between the phases of the dominant southern period magnetic oscillations and SKR modulations, which become very marked after Cassini apoapsis moved for the first time into the postdusk sector in mid-2009. Here we use a simple theoretical model to show that such phase drifts arise if the SKR modulation phase also rotates around the auroral oval, combined with a highly restricted view of the SKR sources by the spacecraft due to the conical beaming of the emissions. Strobe-like behavior then occurs in the predawn-to-noon sector where the spacecraft has a near-continuous view of the most intense midmorning SKR sources, in agreement with the Voyager findings, while elsewhere the SKR modulation phase depends strongly on spacecraft local time, being in approximate antiphase with the midmorning sources in the postdusk sector. Supporting evidence for this scenario is provided through an independent determination of the variable rotation period of the southern magnetic field perturbations throughout the 6 year interval.

  1. Dosimetric effect of rotational errors for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Min; Lee, Jae Gi; Kim, Hyun Suk; Kim, Jung In; Kim, Hak Jae; Ye, Sung Joon [Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric effects on target volume and organs at risk (OARs) due to roll rotational errors in treatment setup of SBRT for lung cancer delivered with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique. Roll rotational setup errors in lung SBRT significantly influenced the coverage of target volume using VMAT technique. This could be in part compensated by the translational couch correction. However, in spite of the translational correction, the delivered doses to the spinal cord could be more than the calculated doses. Therefore if rotational setup errors exist during lung SBRT using VMAT technique, the rotational correction would rather be considered to prevent over-irradiation of normal tissues than the translational correction.

  2. An approach for online evaluations of dose consequences caused by small rotational setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Bo; Li, Jonathan; Kahler, Darren; Yan Guanghua; Mittauer, Kathryn; Shi Wenyin; Okunieff, Paul; Liu, Chihray [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida 32607 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to investigate the impact of small rotational errors on the magnitudes and distributions of spatial dose variations for intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) treatment setups, and to assess the feasibility of using the original dose map overlaid with rotated contours (ODMORC) method as a fast, online evaluation tool to estimate dose changes (using DVHs) to clinical target volumes (CTVs) and organs-at-risks (OARs) caused by small rotational setup errors. Methods: Fifteen intracranial SRT cases treated with either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques were chosen for the study. Selected cases have a variety of anatomical dimensions and pathologies. Angles of {+-}3 deg. and {+-}5 deg. in all directions were selected to simulate the rotational errors. Dose variations in different regions of the brain, CTVs, and OARs were evaluated to illustrate the various spatial effects of dose differences before and after rotations. DVHs accounting for rotations that were recomputed by the treatment planning system (TPS) and those generated by the ODMORC method were compared. A framework of a fast algorithm for multicontour rotation implemented by ODMORC is introduced as well. Results: The average values of relative dose variations between original dose and recomputed dose accounting for rotations were greater than 4.0% and 10.0% in absolute mean and in standard deviation, respectively, at the skull and adjacent regions for all cases. They were less than 1.0% and 2.5% in absolute mean and in standard deviation, respectively, for dose points 3 mm away from the skull. The results indicated that spatial dose to any part of the brain organs or tumors separated from the skull or head surface would be relatively stable before and after rotations. Statistical data of CTVs and OARs indicate the lens and cochleas have the large dose variations before and after rotations

  3. Effects of radiation and variable viscosity on unsteady MHD flow of a rotating fluid from stretching surface in porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Rashad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on the study of unsteady magnetohydrodynamics boundary-layer flow and heat transfer for a viscous laminar incompressible electrically conducting and rotating fluid due to a stretching surface embedded in a saturated porous medium with a temperature-dependent viscosity in the presence of a magnetic field and thermal radiation effects. The fluid viscosity is assumed to vary as an inverse linear function of temperature. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. With appropriate transformations, the unsteady MHD boundary layer equations are reduced to local nonsimilarity equations. Numerical solutions of these equations are obtained by using the Runge–Kutta integration scheme as well as the local nonsimilarity method with second order truncation. Comparisons with previously published work have been conducted and the results are found to be in excellent agreement. A parametric study of the physical parameters is conducted and a representative set of numerical results for the velocity in primary and secondary flows as well as the local skin-friction coefficients and the local Nusselt number are illustrated graphically to show interesting features of Darcy number, viscosity-variation, magnetic field, rotation of the fluid, and conduction radiation parameters.

  4. The influence of rotation in radiation driven wind from hot stars: New solutions and disk formation in Be stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cur'e, M

    2004-01-01

    The theory of radiation driven wind including stellar rotation is re-examined. After a suitable change of variables, a new equation for the mass loss rate is derived analytically. The solution of this equation remains within 1% confidence when compared with numerical solutions. Also, a non-linear equation for the position of the critical (singular) point is obtained. This equation shows the existence of an additional critical point, besides the standard m--CAK critical point. For a stellar rotation velocity larger than aprox. 0.7 - 0.8 V_{breakup}, there exists only one critical point, located away from the star's surface. Numerical solutions crossing through this new critical point, are attained. In these cases, the wind has a very low terminal velocity and therefore a higher density wind. Disk formation in Be stars is discussed in the frame of this new line driven stellar wind solution.

  5. Spin-orbit and rotational couplings in radiative association of C(3P) and N(4S) atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, Sergey V; Gustafsson, Magnus; Nyman, Gunnar

    2011-11-14

    The role of spin-orbit and rotational couplings in radiative association of C((3)P) and N((4)S) atoms is investigated. Couplings among doublet electronic states of the CN radical are considered, giving rise to a 6-state model of the process. The solution of the dynamical problem is based on the L(2) method, where a complex absorbing potential is added to the Hamiltonian operator in order to treat continuum and bound levels in the same manner. Comparison of the energy-dependent rate coefficients calculated with and without spin-orbit and rotational couplings shows that the couplings have a strong effect on the resonance structure and low-energy baseline of the rate coefficient.

  6. Anomalous Doppler-effect singularities in radiative heat generation, interaction forces, and frictional torque for two rotating nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokitin, A. I.

    2017-07-01

    We calculate the quantum heat generation, the interaction force, and the frictional torque for two rotating spherical nanoparticles with a radius R . In contrast to the static case, when there is an upper limit in the radiative heat transfer between the particles, for two rotating nanoparticles the quantum heat generation rate diverges when the angular velocity becomes equal to the poles in the photon emission rate. These poles arise for the separation d material at the surface phonon or plasmon polariton frequency ω0] due to the anomalous Doppler effect and the mutual polarization of the particles and they exist even for the particles with losses. Similar singularities exist also for the interaction force and the frictional torque. The obtained results can be important for biomedical applications.

  7. Experimental and theoretical investigation of microwave and millimeter wave radiation from hollow, rotating, electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destler, W. W.; Weiler, R. L.; Striffler, C. D.

    1981-11-01

    During this period this effort has explored the scaling of the negative mass instability to regimes associated with smaller plasmas and short wavelengths for the plasma-produced radiation. An experimental apparatus for these studies is near completion. The nonlinear electromagnetic interaction between the collective/bunches of electrons and the radiation field has been formulated in an attempt to derive the efficiency of the production of radiation. In addition, the Dragon electron beam source is currently being improved for future radiation production experiments based on the negative mass instability. Experimental efforts at high powers have resulted in the enhancement of radiation at a single frequency. This last effort has utilized a "double-magnetron cavity' to enhance the radiation power in Ka band at 26 and 41GHz.

  8. KELT-7b: A hot Jupiter transiting a bright V=8.54 rapidly rotating F-star

    CERN Document Server

    Bieryla, Allyson; Beatty, Thomas G; Eastman, Jason; Siverd, Robert J; Pepper, Joshua; Gaudi, B Scott; Stassun, Keivan G; Canas, Caleb; Latham, David W; Buchhave, Lars A; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N; Jensen, Eric L N; Kielkopf, John F; McLeod, Kim K; Gregorio, Joao; Colon, Knicole D; Street, Rachel; Ross, Rachel; Penny, Matthew; Mellon, Samuel N; Oberst, Thomas E; Fulton, Benjamin J; Wang, Ji; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; DePoy, Darren L; Gould, Andrew; Marshall, Jennifer; Pogge, Richard; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of KELT-7b, a transiting hot Jupiter with a mass of $1.28 \\pm 0.18$ MJ, radius of $1.53_{-0.047}^{+0.046}$ RJ, and an orbital period of $2.7347749 \\pm 0.0000039$ days. The bright host star (HD33643; KELT-7) is an F-star with $V=8.54$, Teff $=6789_{-49}^{+50}$ K, [Fe/H] $=0.139_{-0.081}^{+0.075}$, and $\\log{g}=4.149 \\pm 0.019$. It has a mass of $1.535_{-0.054}^{+0.066}$ Msun, a radius of $1.732_{-0.045}^{+0.043}$ Rsun, and is the fifth most massive, fifth hottest, and the ninth brightest star known to host a transiting planet. It is also the brightest star around which KELT has discovered a transiting planet. Thus, KELT-7b is an ideal target for detailed characterization given its relatively low surface gravity, high equilibrium temperature, and bright host star. The rapid rotation of the star ($73 \\pm 0.5$ km/s) results in a Rossiter-McLaughlin effect with an unusually large amplitude of several hundred m/s. We find that the orbit normal of the planet is likely to be well-aligned with ...

  9. Imaging characterization of the rapid adiabatic passage in a source-rotatable, crossed-beam scattering experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huilin; Mondal, Sohidul; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Liu, Kopin

    2017-07-01

    In order to achieve a more efficient preparation of a specific ro-vibrationally excited reactant state for reactive scattering experiments, we implemented the rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) scheme to our pulsed crossed-beam machine, using a single-mode, continuous-wave mid-infrared laser. The challenge for this source-rotatable apparatus lies in the non-orthogonal geometry between the molecular beam and the laser propagation directions. As such, the velocity spread of the supersonic beam results in a significantly broader Doppler distribution that needs to be activated for RAP to occur than the conventional orthogonal configuration. In this report, we detail our approach to shifting, locking, and stabilizing the absolute mid-infrared frequency. We exploited the imaging detection technique to characterize the RAP process and to quantify the excitation efficiency. We showed that with appropriate focusing of the IR laser, a nearly complete population transfer can still be achieved in favorable cases. Compared to our previous setup—a pulsed optical parametric oscillator/amplifier in combination with a multipass ring reflector for saturated absorption, the present RAP scheme with a single-pass, continuous-wave laser yields noticeably higher population-transfer efficiency.

  10. Rosid radiation and the rapid rise of angiosperm-dominated forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hengchang; Moore, Michael J; Soltis, Pamela S; Bell, Charles D; Brockington, Samuel F; Alexandre, Roolse; Davis, Charles C; Latvis, Maribeth; Manchester, Steven R; Soltis, Douglas E

    2009-03-10

    The rosid clade (70,000 species) contains more than one-fourth of all angiosperm species and includes most lineages of extant temperate and tropical forest trees. Despite progress in elucidating relationships within the angiosperms, rosids remain the largest poorly resolved major clade; deep relationships within the rosids are particularly enigmatic. Based on parsimony and maximum likelihood (ML) analyses of separate and combined 12-gene (10 plastid genes, 2 nuclear; >18,000 bp) and plastid inverted repeat (IR; 24 genes and intervening spacers; >25,000 bp) datasets for >100 rosid species, we provide a greatly improved understanding of rosid phylogeny. Vitaceae are sister to all other rosids, which in turn form 2 large clades, each with a ML bootstrap value of 100%: (i) eurosids I (Fabidae) include the nitrogen-fixing clade, Celastrales, Huaceae, Zygophyllales, Malpighiales, and Oxalidales; and (ii) eurosids II (Malvidae) include Tapisciaceae, Brassicales, Malvales, Sapindales, Geraniales, Myrtales, Crossosomatales, and Picramniaceae. The rosid clade diversified rapidly into these major lineages, possibly over a period of <15 million years, and perhaps in as little as 4 to 5 million years. The timing of the inferred rapid radiation of rosids [108 to 91 million years ago (Mya) and 107-83 Mya for Fabidae and Malvidae, respectively] corresponds with the rapid rise of angiosperm-dominated forests and the concomitant diversification of other clades that inhabit these forests, including amphibians, ants, placental mammals, and ferns.

  11. Why are rapidly rotating M dwarfs in the Pleiades so (infra)red? New period measurements confirm rotation-dependent color offsets from the cluster sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Covey, Kevin R; Law, Nicholas M; Liu, Jiyu; Ahmadi, Aida; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David; Sesar, Branimir; Surface, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Stellar rotation periods measured in open clusters have proved to be extremely useful for studying stars' angular momentum content and rotationally driven magnetic activity, which are both age- and mass-dependent processes. While period measurements have been obtained for hundreds of solar-mass members of the Pleiades, period measurements exist for only a few low-mass ($<$0.5 M$_{\\odot}$) members of this key laboratory for stellar evolution theory. To fill this gap, we report rotation periods for 132 low-mass Pleiades members (including nearly 100 with M $\\leq$ 0.45 M$_{\\odot}$), measured from photometric monitoring of the cluster conducted by the Palomar Transient Factory in late 2011 and early 2012. These periods extend the portrait of stellar rotation at 125 Myr to the lowest-mass stars and re-establish the Pleiades as a key benchmark for models of the transport and evolution of stellar angular momentum. Combining our new rotation periods with precise BVIJHK photometry reported by Stauffer et al. and Ka...

  12. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer Code in Rotating Black Hole Spacetime: {ARTIST}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Rohta; Umemura, Masayuki

    2016-10-01

    We present a general relativistic radiative transfer code, {ARTIST} (Authentic Radiative Transfer In Space-Time), which is a perfectly causal scheme to pursue the propagation of radiation with absorption and scattering around a Kerr black hole. The code explicitly solves the invariant radiation intensity along null geodesics in the Kerr-Schild coordinates, and therefore properly includes light bending, Doppler boosting, frame dragging, and gravitational redshifts. The notable aspect of {ARTIST} is that it conserves the radiative energy with high accuracy, and is not subject to the numerical diffusion, since the transfer is solved on long characteristics along null geodesics. We first solve the wavefront propagation around a Kerr black hole, which was originally explored by Hanni (1977). This demonstrates repeated wavefront collisions, light bending, and causal propagation of radiation with the speed of light. We show that the decay rate of the total energy of wavefronts near a black hole is determined solely by the black hole spin in late phases, in agreement with analytic expectations. As a result, the {ARTIST} turns out to correctly solve the general relativistic radiation fields until late phases as t ˜ 90M. We also explore the effects of absorption and scattering, and apply this code for a photon wall problem and an orbiting hot spot problem. All the simulations in the present study are performed in the equatorial plane around a Kerr black hole. The {ARTIST} is the first step to realize the general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics.

  13. General relativistic radiative transfer code in rotating black hole space-time: ARTIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Rohta; Umemura, Masayuki

    2017-02-01

    We present a general relativistic radiative transfer code, ARTIST (Authentic Radiative Transfer In Space-Time), that is a perfectly causal scheme to pursue the propagation of radiation with absorption and scattering around a Kerr black hole. The code explicitly solves the invariant radiation intensity along null geodesics in the Kerr-Schild coordinates, and therefore properly includes light bending, Doppler boosting, frame dragging, and gravitational redshifts. The notable aspect of ARTIST is that it conserves the radiative energy with high accuracy, and is not subject to the numerical diffusion, since the transfer is solved on long characteristics along null geodesics. We first solve the wavefront propagation around a Kerr black hole that was originally explored by Hanni. This demonstrates repeated wavefront collisions, light bending, and causal propagation of radiation with the speed of light. We show that the decay rate of the total energy of wavefronts near a black hole is determined solely by the black hole spin in late phases, in agreement with analytic expectations. As a result, the ARTIST turns out to correctly solve the general relativistic radiation fields until late phases as t ˜ 90 M. We also explore the effects of absorption and scattering, and apply this code for a photon wall problem and an orbiting hotspot problem. All the simulations in this study are performed in the equatorial plane around a Kerr black hole. The ARTIST is the first step to realize the general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics.

  14. Exploring Rotations Due to Radiation Pressure: 2-D to 3-D Transition Is Interesting!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation pressure is an important topic within a standard physics course (see, in particular, Refs. 1 and 2). The physics of radiation pressure is described, the magnitude of it is derived, both for the case of a perfectly absorbing surface and of a perfect reflector, and various applications of this interesting effect are discussed, such as…

  15. Analytical solutions in rotating linear dilaton black holes: Resonant frequencies, quantization, greybody factor, and Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakalli, I.

    2016-10-01

    Charged massive scalar field perturbations are studied in the gravitational, electromagnetic, dilaton, and axion fields of rotating linear dilaton black holes. In this geometry, we separate the covariant Klein-Gordon equation into radial and angular parts and obtain the exact solutions of both the equations in terms of the confluent Heun functions. Using the radial solution, we study the problems of resonant frequencies, entropy/area quantization, and greybody factor. We also analyze the behavior of the wave solutions near the event horizon of the rotating linear dilaton black hole and derive its Hawking temperature via the Damour-Ruffini-Sannan method.

  16. SU-E-J-165: Dosimetric Impact of Liver Rotations in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnaduwage, D; Paulsson, A; Sudhyadhom, A; Chen, J; Chang, A; Anwar, M; Gottschalk, A; Yom, S S.; Descovich, M [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Often in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy a single fiducial is implanted near the tumor for image-guided treatment delivery. In such cases, rotational corrections are calculated based on the spine. This study quantifies rotational differences between the spine and liver, and investigates the corresponding dosimetric impact. Methods: Seven patients with 3 intrahepatic fiducials and 4DCT scans were identified. The planning CT was separately co-registered with 4 phases of the 4DCT (0%, 50%, 100% inhale and 50% exhale) by 1) rigid registration of the spine, and 2) point-based registration of the 3 fiducials. Rotation vectors were calculated for each registration. Translational differences in fiducial positions between the 2 registrations methods were investigated. Dosimetric impact due to liver rotations and deformations was assessed using critical structures delineated on the 4DCT phases. For dose comparisons, a single fiducial was translationally aligned following spine alignment to represent what is typically done in the clinic. Results: On average, differences between spine and liver rotations during the 0%, 50%, 100% inhale, and 50% exhale phases were 3.23°, 3.27°, 2.26° and 3.11° (pitch), 3.00°, 2.24°, 3.12° and 1.73° (roll), and 1.57°, 1.98°, 2.09° and 1.36° (yaw), respectively. The maximum difference in rotations was 12°, with differences of >3° seen in 14/28 (pitch), 10/28 (roll), and 6/28 (yaw) cases. Average fiducial displacements of 2.73 (craniocaudal), 1.04 (lateral) and 1.82 mm (vertical) were seen. Evaluating percent dose differences for 5 patients at the peaks of the respiratory cycle, the maximum dose to the duodenum, stomach, bowel and esophagus differed on average by 11.4%, 5.3%, 11.2% and 49.1% between the 2 registration methods. Conclusion: Lack of accounting for liver rotation during treatment might Result in clinically significant dose differences to critical structures. Both rotational and translational deviations

  17. Theory of symmetry and of exact solution properties for fast rotating nuclei; Theorie de la symetrie et des proprietes de solutions exactes pour les noyaux en rotation rapide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydon, B.

    1995-07-19

    We propose a study of rotating multi-fermionic systems. The method we developed is based on unitary group theory. The formalism of Gel`fand-Tsetlin is is simplified to binary calculations. With the help of operator of Casimir and physical interpretations using dichotomic symmetries (signature, parity), we show rotating Hamiltonians obey to a new quantum symmetry called P. The study of short range two-body interaction breaking weakly this symmetry, is made by using single j-shell. Nuclear interactions coupling two j-shell are introduced. This study allows us to compare ours results to experimental data for three isotopes of Zirconium. (author). 155 refs.

  18. The Radiative X-ray and Gamma-ray Efficiencies of Rotation-powered Pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.; Bamba, A.; Yamazaki, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the X-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars and their surrounding nebulae using the sample of Kargaltsev & Pavlov, and we complement this with an analysis of the γ -ray emission of Fermi-detected pulsars. We report a strong trend in the efficiency with which

  19. Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices in the f-plane shallow water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko, E-mail: nori@phys-h.keio.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Kouhoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices is investigated numerically in a rotating shallow water system in order to focus on cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry at different values of the Rossby number (Ro). A numerical study is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain to estimate the gravity wave flux with high accuracy. Continuous gravity wave radiation is observed in three stages of vortical flows: co-rotating of the vortices, merging of the vortices, and unsteady motion of the merged vortex. A cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry appears at all stages at smaller Ro (≤20). Gravity waves from anticyclones are always larger than those from cyclones and have a local maximum at smaller Ro (∼2) compared with that for an idealized case of a co-rotating vortex pair with a constant rotation rate. The source originating in the Coriolis acceleration has a key role in cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry in gravity waves. An additional important factor is that at later stages, the merged axisymmetric anticyclone rotates faster than the elliptical cyclone due to the effect of the Rossby deformation radius, since a rotation rate higher than the inertial cutoff frequency is required to radiate gravity waves.

  20. Paleocene emergence of elephant relatives and the rapid radiation of African ungulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheerbrant, Emmanuel

    2009-06-30

    Elephants are the only living representatives of the Proboscidea, a formerly diverse mammalian order whose history began with the 55-million years (mys) old Phosphatherium. Reported here is the discovery from the early late Paleocene of Morocco, ca. 60 mys, of the oldest and most primitive elephant relative, Eritherium azzouzorum n.g., n.sp., which is one of the earliest known representatives of modern placental orders. This well supported stem proboscidean is extraordinarily primitive and condylarth-like. It provides the first dental evidence of a resemblance between the proboscideans and African ungulates (paenungulates) on the one hand and the louisinines and early macroscelideans on the other. Eritherium illustrates the origin of the elephant order at a previously unknown primitive stage among paenungulates and "ungulates." The primitive morphology of Eritherium suggests a recent and rapid paenungulate radiation after the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, probably favoured by early endemic African paleoecosystems. At a broader scale, Eritherium provides a new old calibration point of the placental tree and supports an explosive placental radiation. The Ouled Abdoun basin, which yields the oldest known African placentals, is a key locality for elucidating phylogeny and early evolution of paenungulates and other related endemic African lineages.

  1. The effectiveness of electromagnetic terahertz radiation use in the treatment of patients with rapidly progressive periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelenova A.V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim: to increase the efficiency of treatment of patients with rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP using electromagnetic radiation at terahertz frequencies of molecular spectrum of radiation and absorption of nitric oxide 150,176-150,664 GHz. Material and methods. The study involved 50 patients with RPP, which according to the method of therapy were divided into 2 groups: group 1 included patients receiving conventional therapy, group 2 consisted of patients who, along with traditional therapy received EHF-therapy device "Orbit" YAKUL.941526.001. The control group consisted of 20 healthy subjects with intact periodontium. For the non-invasive study of tissue blood flow in the periodontal tissue Doppler ultrasound was used MiniMax-Doppler-Phono. The study of the microvasculature of periodontitis has been conducted. To determine the reactivity of microvascular periodontal tissue reflex functional tests on the indirect effect of the cold were performed. Results. Reductions achieved values of periodontal indices, especially important index PMA, a significant increase in the linear blood flow indices, decreased pulse pressure gradient and the index followed appropriate reduction to their cold test. Conclusion. The proposed complex therapy can accelerate the relief of inflammation in the periodontal tissues of the complex, to improve the elastic properties of blood vessels, reduce their tone and restore microcirculation in periodontal tissues.

  2. Turbulent convection in rapidly rotating spherical shells: A model for equatorial and high latitude jets on Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2007-04-01

    The origin of zonal jets on the jovian planets has long been a topic of scientific debate. In this paper we show that deep convection in a spherical shell can generate zonal flow comparable to that observed on Jupiter and Saturn, including a broad prograde equatorial jet and multiple alternating jets at higher latitudes. We present fully turbulent, 3D spherical numerical simulations of rapidly rotating convection with different spherical shell geometries. The resulting global flow fields tend to be segregated into three regions (north, equatorial, and south), bounded by the tangent cylinder that circumscribes the inner boundary equator. In all of our simulations a strong prograde equatorial jet forms outside the tangent cylinder, whereas multiple jets form in the northern and southern hemispheres, inside the tangent cylinder. The jet scaling of our numerical models and of Jupiter and Saturn is consistent with the theory of geostrophic turbulence, which we extend to include the effect of spherical shell geometry. Zonal flow in a spherical shell is distinguished from that in a full sphere or a shallow layer by the effect of the tangent cylinder, which marks a reversal in the sign of the planetary β-parameter and a jump in the Rhines length. This jump is manifest in the numerical simulations as a sharp equatorward increase in jet widths—a transition that is also observed on Jupiter and Saturn. The location of this transition gives an estimate of the depth of zonal flow, which seems to be consistent with current models of the jovian and saturnian interiors.

  3. Assessing surface albedo change and its induced radiation budget under rapid urbanization with Landsat and GLASS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yonghong; Jia, Gensuo; Pohl, Christine; Zhang, Xiaoxuan; van Genderen, John

    2016-02-01

    Radiative forcing (RF) induced by land use (mainly surface albedo) change is still not well understood in climate change science, especially the effects of changes in urban albedo due to rapid urbanization on the urban radiation budget. In this study, a modified RF derivation approach based on Landsat images was used to quantify changes in the solar radiation budget induced by variations in surface albedo in Beijing from 2001 to 2009. Field radiation records from a Beijing meteorological station were used to identify changes in RF at the local level. There has been rapid urban expansion over the last decade, with the urban land area increasing at about 3.3 % annually from 2001 to 2009. This has modified three-dimensional urban surface properties, resulting in lower albedo due to complex building configurations of urban centers and higher albedo on flat surfaces of suburban areas and cropland. There was greater solar radiation (6.93 × 108 W) in the urban center in 2009 than in 2001. However, large cropland and urban fringe areas caused less solar radiation absorption. RF increased with distance from the urban center (less than 14 km) and with greater urbanization, with the greatest value being 0.41 W/m2. The solar radiation budget in urban areas was believed to be mainly influenced by urban structural changes in the horizontal and vertical directions. Overall, the results presented herein indicate that cumulative urbanization impacts on the natural radiation budget could evolve into an important driver of local climate change.

  4. Enemy at the gates: Rapid defensive trait diversification in an adaptive radiation of lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeckhoven, Chris; Diedericks, Genevieve; Hui, Cang; Makhubo, Buyisile G; Mouton, P le Fras N

    2016-11-01

    Adaptive radiation (AR), the product of rapid diversification of an ancestral species into novel adaptive zones, has become pivotal in our understanding of biodiversity. Although it has widely been accepted that predators may drive the process of AR by creating ecological opportunity (e.g., enemy-free space), the role of predators as selective agents in defensive trait diversification remains controversial. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we provide evidence for an "early burst" in the diversification of antipredator phenotypes in Cordylinae, a relatively small AR of morphologically diverse southern African lizards. The evolution of body armor appears to have been initially rapid, but slowed down over time, consistent with the ecological niche-filling model. We suggest that the observed "early burst" pattern could be attributed to shifts in vulnerability to different types of predators (i.e., aerial versus terrestrial) associated with thermal habitat partitioning. These results provide empirical evidence supporting the hypothesis that predators or the interaction therewith might be key components of ecological opportunity, although the way in which predators influence morphological diversification requires further study. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  5. ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF RAPIDLY ROTATING SOLAR-MASS STARS: EMISSION-LINE REDSHIFTS AS A TEST OF THE SOLAR-STELLAR CONNECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440UCB Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Bushinsky, Rachel [APS, University of Colorado, 391UCB Boulder, CO 80309-0391 (United States); Ayres, Tom; France, Kevin, E-mail: jlinsky@jilau1.colorado.edu [CASA, University of Colorado, 593UCB Boulder, CO 80309-0593 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    We compare high-resolution ultraviolet spectra of the Sun and thirteen solar-mass main-sequence stars with different rotational periods that serve as proxies for their different ages and magnetic field structures. In this, the second paper in the series, we study the dependence of ultraviolet emission-line centroid velocities on stellar rotation period, as rotation rates decrease from that of the Pleiades star HII314 (P{sub rot} = 1.47 days) to {alpha} Cen A (P{sub rot} = 28 days). Our stellar sample of F9 V to G5 V stars consists of six stars observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and eight stars observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on HST. We find a systematic trend of increasing redshift with more rapid rotation (decreasing rotation period) that is similar to the increase in line redshift between quiet and plage regions on the Sun. The fastest-rotating solar-mass star in our study, HII314, shows significantly enhanced redshifts at all temperatures above log T = 4.6, including the corona, which is very different from the redshift pattern observed in the more slowly rotating stars. This difference in the redshift pattern suggests that a qualitative change in the magnetic-heating process occurs near P{sub rot} = 2 days. We propose that HII314 is an example of a solar-mass star with a magnetic heating rate too large for the physical processes responsible for the redshift pattern to operate in the same way as for the more slowly rotating stars. HII314 may therefore lie above the high activity end of the set of solar-like phenomena that is often called the 'solar-stellar connection'.

  6. Towards the geophysical regime in numerical dynamo models: studies of rapidly-rotating convection driven dynamos with low Pm and constant heat flux boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheyko, A.A.; Finlay, Chris; Marti, P.

    We present a set of numerical dynamo models with the convection strength varied by a factor of 30 and the ratio of magnetic to viscous diffusivities by a factor of 20 at rapid rotation rates (E =nu/(2 Omega d^2 ) = 10-6 and 10-7 ) using a heat flux outer BC. This regime has been little explored...... on the structure of the dynamos and how this changes in relation to the selection of control parameters, a comparison with the proposed rotating convection and dynamo scaling laws, energy spectra of steady solutions and inner core rotation rates. Magnetic field on the CMB. E=2.959*10-7, Ra=6591.0, Pm=0.05, Pr=1....

  7. Optimization of an on-board imaging system for extremely rapid radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry Kemmerling, Erica M.; Wu, Meng, E-mail: mengwu@stanford.edu; Yang, He; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Next-generation extremely rapid radiation therapy systems could mitigate the need for motion management, improve patient comfort during the treatment, and increase patient throughput for cost effectiveness. Such systems require an on-board imaging system that is competitively priced, fast, and of sufficiently high quality to allow good registration between the image taken on the day of treatment and the image taken the day of treatment planning. In this study, three different detectors for a custom on-board CT system were investigated to select the best design for integration with an extremely rapid radiation therapy system. Methods: Three different CT detectors are proposed: low-resolution (all 4 × 4 mm pixels), medium-resolution (a combination of 4 × 4 mm pixels and 2 × 2 mm pixels), and high-resolution (all 1 × 1 mm pixels). An in-house program was used to generate projection images of a numerical anthropomorphic phantom and to reconstruct the projections into CT datasets, henceforth called “realistic” images. Scatter was calculated using a separate Monte Carlo simulation, and the model included an antiscatter grid and bowtie filter. Diagnostic-quality images of the phantom were generated to represent the patient scan at the time of treatment planning. Commercial deformable registration software was used to register the diagnostic-quality scan to images produced by the various on-board detector configurations. The deformation fields were compared against a “gold standard” deformation field generated by registering initial and deformed images of the numerical phantoms that were used to make the diagnostic and treatment-day images. Registrations of on-board imaging system data were judged by the amount their deformation fields differed from the corresponding gold standard deformation fields—the smaller the difference, the better the system. To evaluate the registrations, the pointwise distance between gold standard and realistic registration

  8. Radiative Rotational Lifetimes and State-Resolved Relative Detachment Cross Sections from Photodetachment Thermometry of Molecular Anions in a Cryogenic Storage Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C.; Becker, A.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; von Hahn, R.; Herwig, P.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lion, J.; Lohmann, S.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Vogel, S.; Wolf, A.

    2017-07-01

    Photodetachment thermometry on a beam of OH- in a cryogenic storage ring cooled to below 10 K is carried out using two-dimensional frequency- and time-dependent photodetachment spectroscopy over 20 min of ion storage. In equilibrium with the low-level blackbody field, we find an effective radiative temperature near 15 K with about 90% of all ions in the rotational ground state. We measure the J =1 natural lifetime (about 193 s) and determine the OH- rotational transition dipole moment with 1.5% uncertainty. We also measure rotationally dependent relative near-threshold photodetachment cross sections for photodetachment thermometry.

  9. Photometric and spectroscopic observations of three rapidly rotating late-type stars: EY Dra, V374 Peg and GSC 02038-00293

    CERN Document Server

    Korhonen, H; Husarik, M; Mahajan, S; Szczygiel, D; Olah, K

    2010-01-01

    Here, BV(RI)c broad band photometry and intermediate resolution spectroscopy in Halpha region are presented for two rapidly rotating late-type stars: EY Dra and V374 Peg. For a third rapid rotator, GSC 02038-00293, intermediate resolution Halpha spectroscopy and low resolution spectroscopy are used for spectral classification and stellar parameter investigation of this poorly known object. The low resolution spectrum of GSC 02038-00293 clearly indicates that it is a K-type star. Its intermediate resolution spectrum can be best fitted with a model with Teff=4750K and vsini=90km/s, indicating a very rapidly rotating mid-K star. The Halpha line strength is variable, indicating changing chromospheric emission on GSC 02038-00293. In the case of EY Dra and V374 Peg, the stellar activity in the photosphere is investigated from the photometric observations, and in the chromosphere from the Halpha line. The enhanced chromospheric emission in EY Dra correlates well with the location of the photospheric active regions, ...

  10. Effects of Hall current, radiation and rotation on natural convection heat and mass transfer flow past a moving vertical plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Seth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the effects of Hall current and rotation on unsteady hydromagnetic natural convection flow with heat and mass transfer of an electrically conducting, viscous, incompressible and optically thick radiating fluid past an impulsively moving vertical plate embedded in a fluid saturated porous medium, when temperature of the plate has a temporarily ramped profile, is carried out. Exact solution of the governing equations is obtained in closed form by Laplace transform technique. Exact solution is also obtained in case of unit Schmidt number. Expressions for skin friction due to primary and secondary flows and Nusselt number are derived for both ramped temperature and isothermal plates. Expression for Sherwood number is also derived. The numerical values of primary and secondary fluid velocities, fluid temperature and species concentration are displayed graphically whereas those of skin friction are presented in tabular form for various values of pertinent flow parameters.

  11. Rapid induction of omega-3 fatty acids (EPA) in Nannochloropsis sp. by UV-C radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kalpesh; Schenk, Peer M

    2015-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), provide substantial health benefits. As global fish stocks are declining and in some cases are contaminated with heavy metals, there is a need to find more sustainable land-based sources of these essential fatty acids. The oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis sp. has been identified as a highly efficient producer of omega-3 fatty acids. In this study, we present a new process to rapidly induce biosynthesis of essential fatty acids, including EPA in Nannochloropsis sp. BR2. Short exposure to UV-C at a dose of 100 or 250 mJ/cm(2) led to a significant increase in total cellular lipid contents when compared to mock-treated controls. A low dosage of 100 mJ/cm(2) also led to a twofold increase in total EPA content within 24 h that constituted 30% of total fatty acids and up to 12% of total dry weight at higher dosages. UV-C radiation may find uses as an easily applicable external inducer for large-scale production of omega-3 production from microalgae.

  12. 21 cm maps of Jupiter's radiation belts from all rotational aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pater, I.

    1980-01-01

    Two-dimensional maps of the radio emission from Jupiter were made in December 1977 at a frequency of 1,412 MHz using the Westerbork telescope. Pictures in all four Stokes parameters have been obtained every 15 deg in longitude, each smeared over 15 deg of the planet's rotation. The maps have an E-W resolution of about 1/3 of the diameter of the disk and a N-S resolution 3 times less. The total intensity and linear polarization maps are accurate to 0.5% and the circularly polarized maps to 0.1% of the maximum intensities in I. The whole set of maps clearly shows the existence of higher order terms in the magnetic field of Jupiter.

  13. Gravitational Radiation from Rotational Core Collapse: Effects of Magnetic Fields and Realistic Equation of States

    CERN Document Server

    Kotake, K; Sato, K; Sumiyoshi, K; Ono, H; Suzuki, H; Kotake, Kei; Yamada, Shoichi; Sato, Katsuhiko; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Ono, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2004-01-01

    We perform a series of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the rotational collapse of a supernova core. In order to calculate the waveforms of the gravitational wave, we derive the quadrupole formula including the contributions from the electromagnetic fields. Recent stellar evolution calculations imply that the magnetic fields of the toroidal components are much stronger than those of the poloidal ones at the presupernova stage. Thus, we systematically investigate the effects of the toroidal magnetic fields on the amplitudes and waveforms. Furthermore, we employ the two kinds of the realistic equation of states, which are often used in the supernova simulations. Then, we investigate the effects of the equation of states on the gravitational wave signals. With these computations, we find that the peak amplitudes are lowered by an order of 10% for the models with the strongest toroidal magnetic fields. However, the peak amplitudes are mostly within sensitivity range of laser inter...

  14. A complete model of CH+ rotational excitation including radiative and chemical pumping processes

    CERN Document Server

    Godard, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Aims. Excitation of far-infrared and submillimetric molecular lines may originate from nonreactive collisions, chemical formation, or far infrared, near-infrared, and optical fluorescences. As a template, we investigate the impact of each of these processes on the excitation of the methylidyne cation CH+ and on the intensities of its rotational transitions recently detected in emission in dense photodissociation regions (PDRs) and in planetary nebulae. Methods. We have developed a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) excitation model that includes the entire energy structure of CH+, i.e. taking into account the pumping of its vibrational and bound and unbound electronic states by near-infrared and optical photons. The model includes the theoretical cross-sections of nonreactive collisions with H, H2, He, and e-, and a Boltzmann distribution is used to describe the probability of populating the excited levels of CH+ during its chemical formation by hydrogenation of C+. To confirm our results we also pe...

  15. Technical progress report: Completion of spectral rotating shadowband radiometers and analysis of atmospheric radiation measurement spectral shortwave data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Our goal in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the improvement of radiation models used in general circulation models (GCMs), especially in the shortwave, (1) by providing improved shortwave radiometric measurements for the testing of models and (2) by developing methods for retrieving climatologically sensitive parameters that serve as input to shortwave and longwave models. At the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) in Albany, New York, we are acquiring downwelling direct and diffuse spectral irradiance, at six wavelengths, plus downwelling broadband longwave, and upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave irradiances that we combine with National Weather Service surface and upper air data from the Albany airport as a test data set for ARM modelers. We have also developed algorithms to improve shortwave measurements made at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) ARM site by standard thermopile instruments and by the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) based on these Albany data sets. Much time has been spent developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from the direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had success in calculating shortwave surface albedo and aerosol optical depth from the ratio of direct to diffuse spectral reflectance.

  16. Similarity solution for a cylindrical shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, J. P.; Nath, G.

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of shock waves in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux, which has a variable azimuthally fluid velocity together with a variable axial fluid velocity, is investigated. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-condition is maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston (or inner expanding surface). The fluid velocities in the ambient medium are assume to be vary and obey power laws. The density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant, the heat conduction is express in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. In order to obtain the similarity solutions the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assume to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. The effects of the variation of the heat transfer parameter and non-idealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. The effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are also investigated.

  17. Propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a rotating dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, J. P.; Nath, G.

    2010-04-01

    A self-similar solution for the propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux, which is rotating about the axis of symmetry, is investigated. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a piston (an inner expanding surface) and the dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles. The density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and radiation is considered to be of diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. Similarity solutions are obtained, and the effects of variation of the parameter of non-idealness of the gas in the mixture, the mass concentration of solid particles and the ratio of density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas are investigated.

  18. The Performance Assessment of the Detector for the Portable Environmental Radiation Distribution Monitoring System with Rapid Nuclide Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Uk Jae; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The environment radiation distribution monitoring system measures the radiation using a portable detector and display the overall radiation distribution. Bluetooth and RS-232 communications are used for constructing monitoring system. However RS-232 serial communication is known to be more stable than Bluetooth and also it can use the detector's raw data which will be used for getting the activity of each artificial nuclide. In the present study, the detection and communication performance of the developed detector with RS-232 method is assessed by using standard sources for the real application to the urban or rural environment. Assessment of the detector for the portable environmental radiation distribution monitoring system with rapid nuclide recognition was carried out. It was understood that the raw data of detector could be effectively treated by using RS-232 method and the measurement showed a good agreement with the calculation within the relative error of 0.4 % in maximum.

  19. Rotation-Vibration Spectra of Malonaldehyde Obtained with Far-Infrared Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokaryk, D. W.; Ross, S. C.; Forthomme, D.; Prescott, J. E.; Yamada, K. M. T.; Ito, F.

    2011-06-01

    Malonaldehyde is an open 5-membered ring molecule which exhibits interesting quantum-mechancial effects due to tunnelling of one of its protons. This results in a 21 Cm-1 tunnelling-splitting in the ground vibrational state, which has been well-studied by microwave spectroscopy. We have taken far-infrared Fourier transform spectra of malonaldehyde at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron, and have recorded a number of rotation-vibration fundamental bands between 100-1000 Cm-1 at 0.00096 Cm-1 resolution. The data permit us to determine with high precision the changes in the tunnelling-splitting induced by vibrational excitation. We have also observed spectra at 240 and 219 Cm-1 that appear to be transitions from the two components of the ground vibrational state to a common upper state that is not mentioned in conventional vibrational analyses of malonaldehyde. We will offer suggestions as to the nature of the newly-observed state. P. Turner, S. L. Baughcum, S. L. Coy and Z. Smith, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 106 (1984) 2265-2267 T. Baba, T. Tanaka, I. Morino, K. M. T. Yamada and K. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys. 110 (1999) 4131-4133. A. Alparone and S. Millefiori, Chem. Phys. 290 (2003) 15-25.

  20. First Results from the CHARA Array VII: Long-Baseline Interferometric Measurements of Vega Consistent with a Pole-On, Rapidly Rotating Star

    CERN Document Server

    Aufdenberg, J P; Berger, D H; Brummelaar, T A; Folco, E D; Foresto, V C; Kervella, P; McAlister, H A; Merand, A; Ridgway, S T; Sturmann, J; Sturmann, L; Turner, N H

    2006-01-01

    We have obtained high-precision interferometric measurements of Vega with the CHARA Array and FLUOR beam combiner in the K' band at projected baselines between 103m and 273m. The measured visibility amplitudes beyond the first lobe are significantly weaker than expected for a slowly rotating star characterized by a single effective temperature and surface gravity. Our measurements, when compared to synthetic visibilities and synthetic spectrophotometry from a Roche-von Zeipel gravity-darkened model atmosphere, provide strong evidence for the model of Vega as a rapidly rotating star viewed very nearly pole-on. Our best fitting model indicates that Vega is rotating at ~91% of its angular break-up rate with an equatorial velocity of 275 km/s. Together with the measured vsin(i), this velocity yields an inclination for the rotation axis of 5 degrees. For this model the pole-to-equator effective temperature difference is 2250 K, a value much larger than previously derived from spectral line analyses. The derived eq...

  1. Extremal energy shifts of radiation from a ring near a rotating black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Karas, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Radiation from a narrow circular ring shows a characteristic double-horn profile dominated by photons having energy around the maximum or minimum of the allowed range, i.e. near the extremal values of the energy shift. The energy span of a spectral line is a function of the ring radius, black hole spin, and observer's view angle. We describe a useful approach to calculate the extremal energy shifts in the regime of strong gravity. Then we consider an accretion disk consisting of a number of separate nested annuli in the equatorial plane of Kerr black hole, above the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO). We suggest that the radial structure of the disk emission could be reconstructed using the extremal energy shifts of the individual rings deduced from the broad wings of a relativistic spectral line.

  2. Multilocus phylogeny and recent rapid radiation of the viviparous sea snakes (Elapidae: Hydrophiinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kate L; Lee, Michael S Y; Mumpuni; Bertozzi, Terry; Rasmussen, Arne R

    2013-03-01

    The viviparous sea snakes (Hydrophiinae: Hydrophiini) comprise a young but morphologically and ecologically diverse clade distributed throughout the Indo-Pacific. Despite presenting a very promising model for marine diversification studies, many relationships among the 62 species and 16 genera in Hydrophiini remain unresolved. Here, we extend previous taxonomic and genomic sampling for Hydrophiini using three mitochondrial fragments and five nuclear loci for multiple individuals of 39 species in 15 genera. Our results highlight many of the impediments to inferring phylogenies in recent rapid radiations, including low variation at all five nuclear markers, and conflicting relationships supported by mitochondrial and nuclear trees. However, concatenated Bayesian and likelihood analyses, and a multilocus coalescent tree, recovered concordant support for primary clades and several previously unresolved inter-specific groupings. The Aipysurus group is monophyletic, with egg-eating specialists forming separate, early-diverging lineages. All three monotypic semi-aquatic genera (Ephalophis, Parahydrophis and Hydrelaps) are robustly placed as early diverging lineages along the branch leading to the Hydrophis group, with Ephalophis recovered as sister to Parahydrophis. The molecular phylogeny implies extensive evolutionary convergence in feeding adaptations within the Hydrophis group, especially the repeated evolution of small-headed (microcephalic) forms. Microcephalophis (Hydrophis) gracilis is robustly recovered as a relatively distant sister lineage to all other sampled Hydrophis group species, here termed the 'core Hydrophis group'. Within the 'core Hydrophis group', Hydrophis is recovered as broadly paraphyletic, with several other genera nested within it (Pelamis, Enhydrina, Astrotia, Thalassophina, Acalyptophis, Kerilia, Lapemis, Disteira). Instead of erecting multiple new genera, we recommend dismantling the latter (mostly monotypic) genera and recognising a single

  3. Seismic evidence for a rapidly rotating core in a lower-giant-branch star observed with Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Deheuvels, S; Chaplin, W J; Basu, S; Antia, H M; Appourchaux, T; Benomar, O; Davies, G R; Elsworth, Y; Gizon, L; Goupil, M J; Reese, D R; Regulo, C; Schou, J; Stahn, T; Casagrande, L; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Fischer, D; Hekker, S; Kjeldsen, H; Mathur, S; Mosser, B; Pinsonneault, M; Valenti, J; Christiansen, J L; Kinemuchi, K; Mullally, F

    2012-01-01

    Rotation is expected to have an important influence on the structure and the evolution of stars. However, the mechanisms of angular momentum transport in stars remain theoretically uncertain and very complex to take into account in stellar models. To achieve a better understanding of these processes, we desperately need observational constraints on the internal rotation of stars, which until very recently were restricted to the Sun. In this paper, we report the detection of mixed modes - i.e. modes that behave both as g modes in the core and as p modes in the envelope - in the spectrum of the early red giant KIC7341231, which was observed during one year with the Kepler spacecraft. By performing an analysis of the oscillation spectrum of the star, we show that its non-radial modes are clearly split by stellar rotation and we are able to determine precisely the rotational splittings of 18 modes. We then find a stellar model that reproduces very well the observed atmospheric and seismic properties of the star. ...

  4. Natural Convection Heat and Mass Transfer Flow with Hall Current, Rotation, Radiation and Heat Absorption Past an Accelerated Moving Vertical Plate with Ramped Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Shanker Seth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of unsteady hydromagnetic natural convection heat and mass trans fer flow with Hall current of a viscous, incompressible, electrically conducting, heat absorbing and optically thin radiating fluid past an accelerated moving vertical plate through fluid saturated porous medium in a rotating environment is carried out when temperature of the plate has a temporarily ramped profile. The exact solutions of momentum, energy and concentration equations are obtained in closed form by Laplace transform technique. The expressions of skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are also derived. For both ramped temperature and isothermal plates, Hall current tends to accelerate primary and secondary fluid velocities whereas heat absorption and radiation have reverse effect on it. Rotation tends to retard primary fluid velocity whereas it has a reverse effect on secondary fluid velocity. Heat absorption and radiation have tendency to enhance rate of heat transfer at the plate.

  5. A rapid magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging sequence for ultrasonic refocusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Engler, Steven; Waspe, Adam; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Drake, James M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance guided acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is being used to correct for aberrations induced by tissue heterogeneities when using high intensity focusing ultrasound (HIFU). A compromise between published MR-ARFI adaptive solutions is proposed to achieve efficient refocusing of the ultrasound beam in under 10 min. In addition, an ARFI sequence based on an EPI gradient echo sequence was used to simultaneously monitor displacement and temperature with a large SNR and low distortion. This study was conducted inside an Achieva 3T clinical MRI using a Philips Sonalleve MR-HIFU system to emit a 1 ms pulsed sonication with duty cycle of 2.3% at 300 Wac inside a polymer phantom. Virtual elements defined by a Hadamard array with sonication patterns composed of 6 phase steps were used to characterize 64 groups of 4 elements to find the optimal phase of the 256 elements of the transducer. The 384 sonication patterns were acquired in 580 s to identify the set of phases that maximize the displacement at the focal point. Three aberrators (neonatal skull, 8 year old skull and a checkered pattern) were added to each sonication pattern to evaluate the performance of this refocusing algorithm (n  =  4). These aberrators reduced the relative intensities to 95.3%, 69.6% and 25.5% for the neonatal skull, 8 year old skull, and checkered pattern virtual aberrators respectively. Using a 10 min refocusing algorithm, relative intensities of 101.6%, 91.3% and 93.3% were obtained. Better relative intensities of 103.9%, 94.3% and 101% were achieved using a 25 min refocusing algorithm. An average temperature increase of 4.2 °C per refocusing test was induced for the 10 min refocusing algorithm, resulting in a negligible thermal dose of 2 EM. A rapid refocusing of the beam can be achieved while keeping thermal effects to a minimum.

  6. Emission from Pair-Instability Supernovae with Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Wheeler, J Craig; Whalen, Daniel J; Smidt, Joseph; Wiggins, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Pair Instability Supernovae have been suggested as candidates for some Super Luminous Supernovae, such as SN 2007bi, and as one of the dominant types of explosion occurring in the early Universe from massive, zero-metallicity Population III stars. The progenitors of such events can be rapidly rotating, therefore exhibiting different evolutionary properties due to the effects of rotationally-induced mixing and mass-loss. Proper identification of such events requires rigorous radiation hydrodynamics and radiative transfer calculations that capture not only the behavior of the light curve but also the spectral evolution of these events. We present radiation hydrodynamics and radiation transport calculations for 90-300 Msun rotating pair-instability supernovae covering both the shock break-out and late light curve phases. We also investigate cases of different initial metallicity and rotation rate to determine the impact of these parameters on the detailed spectral characteristics of these events. In agreement wi...

  7. Rapid deamination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts at TCG sites in a translationally and rotationally positioned nucleosome in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannistraro, Vincent J; Pondugula, Santhi; Song, Qian; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2015-10-30

    Sunlight-induced C to T mutation hot spots in skin cancers occur primarily at methylated CpG sites that coincide with sites of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation. The C and 5-methyl-C in CPDs are not stable and deaminate to U and T, respectively, which leads to the insertion of A by the DNA damage bypass polymerase η, thereby defining a probable mechanism for the origin of UV-induced C to T mutations. Deamination rates for T(m)CG CPDs have been found to vary 12-fold with rotational position in a nucleosome in vitro. To determine the influence of nucleosome structure on deamination rates in vivo, we determined the deamination rates of CPDs at TCG sites in a stably positioned nucleosome within the FOS promoter in HeLa cells. A procedure for in vivo hydroxyl radical footprinting with Fe-EDTA was developed, and, together with results from a cytosine methylation protection assay, we determined the translational and rotational positions of the TCG sites. Consistent with the in vitro observations, deamination was slower for one CPD located at an intermediate rotational position compared with two other sites located at outside positions, and all were much faster than for CPDs at non-TCG sites. Photoproduct formation was also highly suppressed at one site, possibly due to its interaction with a histone tail. Thus, it was shown that CPDs of TCG sites deaminate the fastest in vivo and that nucleosomes can modulate both their formation and deamination, which could contribute to the UV mutation hot spots and cold spots.

  8. The Super Lithium-Rich Red Giant Rapid Rotator G0928+73.2600: A Case for Planet Accretion?

    CERN Document Server

    Carlberg, Joleen K; Cunha, Katia; Majewski, Steven R; Rood, Robert T; 10.1088/2041-8205/723/1/L103

    2010-01-01

    We present the discovery of a super lithium-rich K giant star, G0928+73.2600. This red giant (T_eff = 4885 K and log g = 2.65) is a fast rotator with a projected rotational velocity of 8.4 km/s and an unusually high lithium abundance of A(Li) = 3.30 dex. Although the lack of a measured parallax precludes knowing the exact evolutionary phase, an isochrone-derived estimate of its luminosity places the star on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram in a location that is not consistent with either the red bump on the first ascent of the red giant branch or with the second ascent on the asymptotic giant branch, the two evolutionary stages where lithium-rich giant stars tend to cluster. Thus, even among the already unusual group of lithium-rich giant stars, G0928+73.2600 is peculiar. Using 12C/13C as a tracer for mixing---more mixing leads to lower 12C/13C---we find 12C/13C = 28, which is near the expected value for standard first dredge-up mixing. We can therefore conclude that "extra" deep mixing has not occurred. Regar...

  9. A rapid three-dimensional vortex micromixer utilizing self-rotation effects under low Reynolds number conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Che Hsin, Lin; Lung Ming, Fu; 10.1088/0960-1317/15/5/006

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel three-dimensional (3D) vortex micromixer for micro-total-analysis-systems ( mu TAS) applications which utilizes self-rotation effects to mix fluids in a circular chamber at low Reynolds numbers (Re). The microfluidic mixer is fabricated in a three-layer glass structure for delivering fluid samples in parallel. The fluids are driven into the circular mixing chamber by means of hydrodynamic pumps from two fluid inlet ports. The two inlet channels divide into eight individual channels tangent to a 3D circular chamber for the purpose of mixing. Numerical simulation of the microfluidic dynamics is employed to predict the self-rotation phenomenon and to estimate the mixing performance under various Reynolds number conditions. Experimental flow visualization by mixing dye samples is performed in order to verify the numerical simulation results. A good agreement is found to exist between the two sets of results. The numerical results indicate that the mixing performance can be as high as 9...

  10. Influence of gravitation on the propagation of electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1975-01-01

    The existence of a general helicity-rotation coupling is demonstrated for electromagnetic waves propagating in the field of a slowly rotating body and in the Goedel universe. This coupling leads to differential focusing of circularly polarized radiation by a gravitational field which is detectable for a rapidly rotating collapsed body. The electromagnetic perturbations and their frequency spectrum are given for the Goedel universe. The spectrum of frequencies is bounded from below by the characteristic rotation frequency of the Goedel universe. If the universe were rotating, the differential focusing effect would be extremely small due to the present upper limit on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation.

  11. Properties of relativistically rotating quark stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Enping

    2017-06-01

    In this work, quasi-equilibrium models of rapidly rotating triaxially deformed quark stars are computed in general relativistic gravity, assuming a conformally flat spatial geometry (Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews formulation) and a polynomial equation of state. Especially, since we are using a full 3-D numerical relativity initial data code, we are able to consider the triaxially deformed rotating quark stars at very high spins. Such triaxially deformed stars are possible gravitational radiation sources detectable by ground based gravitational wave observatories. Additionally, the bifurcation from axisymmetric rotating sequence to triaxially rotating sequence hints a more realistic spin up limit for rotating compact stars compared with the mass-shedding limit. With future observations such as sub-millisecond pulsars, we could possibly distinguish between equation of states of compact stars, thus better understanding strong interaction in the low energy regime.

  12. SU-E-T-335: Dosimetric Investigation of An Advanced Rotating Gamma Ray System for Imaged Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Eldib, A; Chibani, O; Li, J; Chen, L [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li, C [Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Mora, G [Universidade de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Co-60 beams have unique dosimetric properties for cranial treatments and thoracic cancers. The conventional concern about the high surface dose is overcome by modern system designs with rotational treatment techniques. This work investigates a novel rotational Gamma ray system for image-guided, external beam radiotherapy. Methods: The CybeRT system (Cyber Medical Corp., China) consists of a ring gantry with either one or two treatment heads containing a Gamma source and a multileaf collimator (MLC). The MLC has 60 paired leaves, and the maximum field size is either 40cmx40cm (40 pairs of 0.5cm central leaves, 20 pairs of 1cm outer leaves), or 22cmx40cm (32 pairs of 0.25cm central leaves, 28 pairs of 0.5cm outer leaves). The treatment head(s) can swing 35° superiorly and 8° inferiorly, allowing a total of 43° non-coplanar beam incident. The treatment couch provides 6-degrees-of-freedom motion compensation and the kV cone-beam CT system has a spatial resolution of 0.4mm. Monte Carlo simulations were used to compute dose distributions and compare with measurements. A retrospective study of 98 previously treated patients was performed to compare CybeRT with existing RT systems. Results: Monte Carlo results confirmed the CybeRT design parameters including output factors and 3D dose distributions. Its beam penumbra/dose gradient was similar to or better than that of 6MV photon beams and its isocenter accuracy is 0.3mm. Co-60 beams produce lower-energy secondary electrons that exhibit better dose properties in low-density lung tissues. Because of their rapid depth dose falloff, Co-60 beams are favorable for peripheral lung tumors with half-arc arrangements to spare the opposite lung and critical structures. Superior dose distributions were obtained for head and neck, breast, spine and lung tumors. Conclusion: Because of its accurate dose delivery and unique dosimetric properties of C-60 sources, CybeRT is ideally suited for advanced SBRT as well as

  13. The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) Mission Using the HiSat Conformal Satellite Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathanael A.; Norman, Ryan B.; Soto, Hector L.; Stewart, Victor A.; Jones, Mark L.; Kowalski, Matthew C.; Ben Shabat, Adam; Gough, Kerry M.; Stavely, Rebecca L.; Shim, Alex C.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) experiment, designed as a quick turnaround mission to make radiation measurements in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), will fly as a hosted payload in partnership with NovaWurks using their Hyper-integrated Satlet (HISat) architecture. The need for the mission arises as the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionization Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model moves from a research effort into an operational radiation assessment tool. Currently, airline professionals are the second largest demographic of radiation workers and to date their radiation exposure is undocumented in the USA. The NAIRAS model seeks to fill this information gap. The data collected by R3S, in addition to the complementary data from a NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) atmospheric balloon mission entitled Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X), will validate exposure prediction capabilities of NAIRAS. The R3S mission collects total dose and radiation spectrum measurements using a Teledyne µDosimeter and a Liulin-6SA2 LED spectrometer. These two radiation sensors provide a cross correlated radiometric measurement in combination with the Honeywell HMR2300 Smart Digital Magnetometer. The magnetometer assesses the Earth's magnetic field in the LEO environment and allows radiation dose to be mapped as a function of the Earth's magnetic shielding. R3S is also unique in that the radiation sensors will be exposed on the outer surface of the spacecraft, possibly making this the first measurements of the LEO radiation environment with bare sensors. Viability of R3S as an extremely fast turnaround mission is due, in part, to the nature of the robust, well-defined interfaces of the conformal satellite HiSat Architecture. The HiSat architecture, which was developed with the support of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA's) Phoenix Program, enabled the R3S system to advance from the first concept to delivery of preliminary design review (PDR) level documents in

  14. Rapid phenotypic evolution during incipient speciation in a continental avian radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Leonardo; Benites, Pilar; Lougheed, Stephen C; Lijtmaer, Darío A; Di Giacomo, Adrián S; Eaton, Muir D; Tubaro, Pablo L

    2012-05-01

    Adaptive radiations have helped shape how we view animal speciation, particularly classic examples such as Darwin's finches, Hawaiian fruitflies and African Great Lakes cichlids. These 'island' radiations are comparatively recent, making them particularly interesting because the mechanisms that caused diversification are still in motion. Here, we identify a new case of a recent bird radiation within a continentally distributed species group; the capuchino seedeaters comprise 11 Sporophila species originally described on the basis of differences in plumage colour and pattern in adult males. We use molecular data together with analyses of male plumage and vocalizations to understand species limits of the group. We find marked phenotypic variation despite lack of mitochondrial DNA monophyly and few differences in other putatively neutral nuclear markers. This finding is consistent with the group having undergone a recent radiation beginning in the Pleistocene, leaving genetic signatures of incomplete lineage sorting, introgressive hybridization and demographic expansions. We argue that this apparent uncoupling between neutral DNA homogeneity and phenotypic diversity is expected for a recent group within the framework of coalescent theory. Finally, we discuss how the ecology of open habitats in South America during the Pleistocene could have helped promote this unique and ongoing radiation.

  15. Laser flow microphotometry for rapid analysis and sorting of mammalian cells. [X and gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullaney, P.F.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.; Cram, L.S.; Crowell, J.M.; Salzman, G.C.; Martin, J.C.; Price, B.

    1976-01-01

    Quantitative precision measurements can be made of the optical properties of individual mammalian cells using flow microphotometry. Suspended cells pass through a special flow chamber where they are lined up for exposure to blue light from an argon-ion laser. As each cell crosses the laser beam, it produces one or more optical pulses of a duration equal to cell transit time across the beam. These pulses are detected, amplified, and analyzed using the techniques of gamma ray spectroscopy. Quantitative DNA distributions made it possible to distinguish tumor cells from normal cells as well as to assay for radiation effects on tumor cells subjected to x and gamma radiation. (HLW)

  16. Chlorophyll fluorescence in vivo as a probe for rapid measurement of tolerance to ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smillie, R.M. (Macquarie Univ., North Ryde (Australia). School of Biological Sciences)

    1983-02-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence in vivo was progressively lost in pea leaves irradiated with either short or long-wave light. The changes were consistent with the development in the intact leaves of an inhibitory site on the photooxidizing side of photosystem II. In contrast, leaves of two species of Agave, plants regarded as more resistant to UV radiation, showed only minor changes in chlorophyll fluorescence. Agave americana was affected less than A. attenuata. The application of measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence in vivo to screening for tolerance to UV radiation is discussed.

  17. Evidence of resonant mode coupling and the relationship between low and high frequencies in a rapidly rotating A star

    CERN Document Server

    Breger, Michel

    2014-01-01

    In the theory of resonant mode coupling, the parent and child modes are directly related in frequency and phase. The oscillations present in the fast rotating Delta Scuti star KIC 8054146 allow us to test the most general and generic aspects of such a theory. The only direct way to separate the parent and coupled (child) modes is to examine the correlations in amplitude variability between the different frequencies. For the dominant family of related frequencies, only a single mode and a triplet are the origins of nine dominant frequency peaks ranging from 2.93 to 66.30 cycles per day (as well as dozens of small-amplitude combination modes and a predicted and detected third high-frequency triplet). The mode-coupling model correctly predicts the large amplitude variations of the coupled modes as a product of the amplitudes of the parent modes, while the phase changes are also correctly modeled. This differs from the behavior of 'normal' combination frequencies in that the amplitudes are three orders of magnitu...

  18. Flame Propagation on the Surfaces of Rapidly Rotating Neutron Stars during Type I X-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Cavecchi, Yuri; Braithwaite, Jonathan; Levin, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    We present the first vertically resolved hydrodynamic simulations of a laterally propagating, deflagrating flame in the thin helium ocean of a rotating accreting neutron star. We use a new hydrodynamics solver tailored to deal with the large discrepancy in horizontal and vertical length scales typical of neutron star oceans, and which filters out sound waves that would otherwise limit our timesteps. We find that the flame moves horizontally with velocities of order $10^5$ cm s$^{-1}$, crossing the ocean in few seconds, broadly consistent with the rise times of Type I X-ray bursts. We address the open question of what drives flame propagation, and find that heat is transported from burning to unburnt fuel by a combination of top-to-bottom conduction and mixing driven by a baroclinic instability. The speed of the flame propagation is therefore a sensitive function of the ocean conductivity and spin: we explore this dependence for an astrophysically relevant range of parameters and find that in general flame pro...

  19. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH FREQUENCIES IN {delta} SCUTI STARS: PHOTOMETRIC KEPLER AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF THE RAPID ROTATOR KIC 8054146

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breger, M.; Robertson, P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Fossati, L. [Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Balona, L. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Kurtz, D. W. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Bohlender, D. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Lenz, P. [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); Mueller, I.; Lueftinger, Th. [Institut fuer Astronphysik der Universitaet Wien, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria); Clarke, Bruce D. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Hall, Jennifer R.; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A. [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Two years of Kepler data of KIC 8054146 ({delta} Sct/{gamma} Dor hybrid) revealed 349 statistically significant frequencies between 0.54 and 191.36 cycles day{sup -1} (6.3 {mu}Hz to 2.21 mHz). The 117 low frequencies cluster in specific frequency bands, but do not show the equidistant period spacings predicted for gravity modes of successive radial order, n, and reported for at least one other hybrid pulsator. The four dominant low frequencies in the 2.8-3.0 cycles day{sup -1} (32-35 {mu}Hz) range show strong amplitude variability with timescales of months and years. These four low frequencies also determine the spacing of the higher frequencies in and beyond the {delta} Sct pressure-mode frequency domain. In fact, most of the higher frequencies belong to one of three families with spacings linked to a specific dominant low frequency. In the Fourier spectrum, these family regularities show up as triplets, high-frequency sequences with absolutely equidistant frequency spacings, side lobes (amplitude modulations), and other regularities in frequency spacings. Furthermore, within two families the amplitude variations between the low and high frequencies are related. We conclude that the low frequencies (gravity modes, rotation) and observed high frequencies (mostly pressure modes) are physically connected. This unusual behavior may be related to the very rapid rotation of the star: from a combination of high- and low-resolution spectroscopy we determined that KIC 8054146 is a very fast rotator ({upsilon} sin i = 300 {+-} 20 km s{sup -1}) with an effective temperature of 7600 {+-} 200 K and a surface gravity log g of 3.9 {+-} 0.3. Several astrophysical ideas explaining the origin of the relationship between the low and high frequencies are explored.

  20. Magnetogasdynamics shock waves in a rotational axisymmetric non-ideal gas with increasing energy and conductive and radiative heat-fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Gorakh

    2016-07-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional adiabatic flow behind a magnetogasdynamics cylindrical shock wave propagating in a rotational axisymmetric non ideal gas with increasing energy and conductive and radiative heat fluxes in presence of an azimuthal magnetic field. The fluid velocities and the azimuthal magnetic field in the ambient medium are assume to be varying and obeying power laws. In order to find the similarity solutions the angular velocity of the ambient medium is taken to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity and the absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The effects of the presence of radiation and conduction, the non-idealness of the gas and the magnetic field on the shock propagation and the flow behind the shock are investigated.

  1. Near infrared spectroscopy of M dwarfs. III. Carbon and oxygen abundances in late M dwarfs including the dusty rapid rotator 2MASSI J1835379+325954

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen abundances of eight late M dwarfs are determined based on the near IR spectra of medium resolution. Seven objects with T_eff above 2600K are analyzed with the dust-free models. The M8.5 dwarf 2MASSI J1835379+325954 whose T_eff is 2275K is analyzed by the dusty model, in which the surface temperature is higher by about 600K due to the blanketing effect of the dust, and C and O abundances are higher by 0.25 and 0.15dex, respectively, compared to the analysis by the dust-free model. Once dust forms in the photosphere, the dust works as a kind of thermostat and temperatures of the surface layers remain nearly the same as the condensation temperatures of the dust grains. For this reason, the temperatures of the surface layers of the dusty dwarfs are not sensitive to the fundamental parameters including T_eff. Also, 2MASS J1835379 +325954 is a rapid rotator, for which its EWs are thought to remain unchanged by the rotational broadening. This is, however, true only when the true continuum is well d...

  2. Evidence of resonant mode coupling and the relationship between low and high frequencies in a rapidly rotating a star

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breger, M.; Montgomery, M. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    In the theory of resonant mode coupling, the parent and child modes are directly related in frequency and phase. The oscillations present in the fast rotating δ Sct star KIC 8054146 allow us to test the most general and generic aspects of such a theory. The only direct way to separate the parent and coupled (child) modes is to examine the correlations in amplitude variability between the different frequencies. For the dominant family of related frequencies, only a single mode and a triplet are the origins of nine dominant frequency peaks ranging from 2.93 to 66.30 cycles day{sup –1} (as well as dozens of small-amplitude combination modes and a predicted and detected third high-frequency triplet). The mode-coupling model correctly predicts the large amplitude variations of the coupled modes as a product of the amplitudes of the parent modes, while the phase changes are also correctly modeled. This differs from the behavior of 'normal' combination frequencies in that the amplitudes are three orders of magnitude larger and may exceed even the amplitudes of the parent modes. We show that two dominant low frequencies at 5.86 and 2.93 cycles day{sup –1} in the gravity-mode region are not harmonics of each other, and their properties follow those of the almost equidistant high-frequency triplet. We note that the previously puzzling situation of finding two strong peaks in the low-frequency region related by nearly a factor of two in frequency has been seen in other δ Sct stars as well.

  3. Recent and rapid radiation of the lichen genus Sticta in the Western Indian Ocean islands

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Antoine; Magain, Nicolas; Goffinet, Bernard; Sérusiaux, Emmanuël

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of a global project on the phylogeny of the lichen genus Sticta (Lobariaceae), extensive sampling was performed on the islands of Reunion and Mauritius as well as in several parts of Madagascar (mainly in two National Parks : Marojejy and Amber Mountain). The aim of this study is to provide the first comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the genus in the Western Indian Ocean islands (and more specifically of a presumably local endemic lineage), and to date its local radiation....

  4. Radiation-induced decomposition of U(VI) phases to nanocrystals of UO"2 [rapid communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Ewing, Rodney C.; Wang, Lu-Min

    2005-12-01

    U 6+-phases are common alteration products, under oxidizing conditions, of uraninite and the UO 2 in spent nuclear fuel. These U 6+-phases are subjected to a radiation field caused by the α-decay of U, or in the case of spent nuclear fuel, incorporated actinides, such as 239Pu and 237Np. In order to evaluate the effects of α-decay events on the stability of the U 6+-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr 2+) of U 6+-phases. The heavy-particle irradiations are used to simulate the ballistic interactions of the recoil-nucleus of an α-decay event with the surrounding structure. The Kr 2+-irradiation decomposed the U 6+-phases to UO 2 nanocrystals at doses as low as 0.006 displacements per atom (dpa). U 6+-phases accumulate substantial radiation doses (˜1.0 displacement per atom) within 100,000 yr if the concentration of incorporated 239Pu is as high as 1 wt.%. Similar nanocrystals of UO 2 were observed in samples from the natural fission reactors at Oklo, Gabon. Multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO 2 followed by alteration to U 6+-phases provide a mechanism for the remobilization of incorporated radionuclides.

  5. A mitogenomic perspective on the ancient, rapid radiation in the Galliformes with an emphasis on the Phasianidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yan-Bo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Galliformes is a well-known and widely distributed Order in Aves. The phylogenetic relationships of galliform birds, especially the turkeys, grouse, chickens, quails, and pheasants, have been studied intensively, likely because of their close association with humans. Despite extensive studies, convergent morphological evolution and rapid radiation have resulted in conflicting hypotheses of phylogenetic relationships. Many internal nodes have remained ambiguous. Results We analyzed the complete mitochondrial (mt genomes from 34 galliform species, including 14 new mt genomes and 20 published mt genomes, and obtained a single, robust tree. Most of the internal branches were relatively short and the terminal branches long suggesting an ancient, rapid radiation. The Megapodiidae formed the sister group to all other galliforms, followed in sequence by the Cracidae, Odontophoridae and Numididae. The remaining clade included the Phasianidae, Tetraonidae and Meleagrididae. The genus Arborophila was the sister group of the remaining taxa followed by Polyplectron. This was followed by two major clades: ((((Gallus, Bambusicola Francolinus (Coturnix, Alectoris Pavo and (((((((Chrysolophus, Phasianus Lophura Syrmaticus Perdix Pucrasia (Meleagris, Bonasa ((Lophophorus, Tetraophasis Tragopan. Conclusions The traditional hypothesis of monophyletic lineages of pheasants, partridges, peafowls and tragopans was not supported in this study. Mitogenomic analyses recovered robust phylogenetic relationships and suggested that the Galliformes formed a model group for the study of morphological and behavioral evolution.

  6. Analysis of a Rapid Evolutionary Radiation Using Ultraconserved Elements: Evidence for a Bias in Some Multispecies Coalescent Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiklejohn, Kelly A; Faircloth, Brant C; Glenn, Travis C; Kimball, Rebecca T; Braun, Edward L

    2016-07-01

    Rapid evolutionary radiations are expected to require large amounts of sequence data to resolve. To resolve these types of relationships many systematists believe that it will be necessary to collect data by next-generation sequencing (NGS) and use multispecies coalescent ("species tree") methods. Ultraconserved element (UCE) sequence capture is becoming a popular method to leverage the high throughput of NGS to address problems in vertebrate phylogenetics. Here we examine the performance of UCE data for gallopheasants (true pheasants and allies), a clade that underwent a rapid radiation 10-15 Ma. Relationships among gallopheasant genera have been difficult to establish. We used this rapid radiation to assess the performance of species tree methods, using ∼600 kilobases of DNA sequence data from ∼1500 UCEs. We also integrated information from traditional markers (nuclear intron data from 15 loci and three mitochondrial gene regions). Species tree methods exhibited troubling behavior. Two methods [Maximum Pseudolikelihood for Estimating Species Trees (MP-EST) and Accurate Species TRee ALgorithm (ASTRAL)] appeared to perform optimally when the set of input gene trees was limited to the most variable UCEs, though ASTRAL appeared to be more robust than MP-EST to input trees generated using less variable UCEs. In contrast, the rooted triplet consensus method implemented in Triplec performed better when the largest set of input gene trees was used. We also found that all three species tree methods exhibited a surprising degree of dependence on the program used to estimate input gene trees, suggesting that the details of likelihood calculations (e.g., numerical optimization) are important for loci with limited phylogenetic information. As an alternative to summary species tree methods we explored the performance of SuperMatrix Rooted Triple - Maximum Likelihood (SMRT-ML), a concatenation method that is consistent even when gene trees exhibit topological differences

  7. Does more sequence data improve estimates of galliform phylogeny? Analyses of a rapid radiation using a complete data matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca T. Kimball

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The resolution of rapid evolutionary radiations or “bushes” in the tree of life has been one of the most difficult and interesting problems in phylogenetics. The avian order Galliformes appears to have undergone several rapid radiations that have limited the resolution of prior studies and obscured the position of taxa important both agriculturally and as model systems (chicken, turkey, Japanese quail. Here we present analyses of a multi-locus data matrix comprising over 15,000 sites, primarily from nuclear introns but also including three mitochondrial regions, from 46 galliform taxa with all gene regions sampled for all taxa. The increased sampling of unlinked nuclear genes provided strong bootstrap support for all but a small number of relationships. Coalescent-based methods to combine individual gene trees and analyses of datasets that are independent of published data indicated that this well-supported topology is likely to reflect the galliform species tree. The inclusion or exclusion of mitochondrial data had a limited impact upon analyses upon analyses using either concatenated data or multispecies coalescent methods. Some of the key phylogenetic findings include support for a second major clade within the core phasianids that includes the chicken and Japanese quail and clarification of the phylogenetic relationships of turkey. Jackknifed datasets suggested that there is an advantage to sampling many independent regions across the genome rather than obtaining long sequences for a small number of loci, possibly reflecting the differences among gene trees that differ due to incomplete lineage sorting. Despite the novel insights we obtained using this increased sampling of gene regions, some nodes remain unresolved, likely due to periods of rapid diversification. Resolving these remaining groups will likely require sequencing a very large number of gene regions, but our analyses now appear to support a robust backbone for this order.

  8. Molecular phylogeny and divergence dates for Australasian elapids and sea snakes (hydrophiinae): evidence from seven genes for rapid evolutionary radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, K L; Lee, M S Y; Leys, R; Foster, R; Keogh, J Scott

    2008-05-01

    One of the most prolific radiations of venomous snakes, the Australo-Melanesian Hydrophiinae includes approximately 100 species of Australasian terrestrial elapids plus all approximately 60 species of viviparous sea snakes. Here, we estimate hydrophiine relationships based on a large data set comprising 5800 bp drawn from seven genes (mitochondrial: ND4, cytb, 12S, 16S; nuclear: rag1, cmos, myh). These data were analysed using parsimony, likelihood and Bayesian methods to better resolve hydrophiine phylogeny and provide a timescale for the terrestrial and marine radiations. Among oviparous forms, Cacophis, Furina and Demansia are basal to other Australian elapids (core oxyuranines). The Melanesian Toxicocalamus and Aspidomorphus group with Demansia, indicating multiple dispersal events between New Guinea and Australia. Oxyuranus and Pseudonaja form a robust clade. The small burrowing taxa form two separate clades, one consisting of Vermicella and Neelaps calanotus, and the other including Simoselaps, Brachyurophis and Neelaps bimaculatus. The viviparous terrestrial elapids form three separate groups: Acanthophis, the Rhinoplocephalus group and the Notechis-Hemiaspis group. True sea snakes (Hydrophiini) are robustly united with the Notechis-Hemiaspis group. Many of the retrieved groupings are consistent with previous molecular and morphological analyses, but the polyphyly of the viviparous and burrowing groups, and of Neelaps, are novel results. Bayesian relaxed clock analyses indicate very recent divergences: the approximately 160 species of the core Australian radiation (including sea snakes) arose within the last 10 Myr, with most inter-generic splits dating to between 10 and 6 Ma. The Hydrophis sea snake lineage is an exceptionally rapid radiation, with > 40 species evolving within the last 5 Myr.

  9. HD 164492C: a rapidly rotating, Hα-bright, magnetic early B star associated with a 12.5 d spectroscopic binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, G. A.; Shultz, M.; Sikora, J.; Bernier, M.-É.; Rivinius, Th.; Alecian, E.; Petit, V.; Grunhut, J. H.; BinaMIcS Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We employ high-resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry to derive the physical properties and magnetic characteristics of the multiple system HD 164492C, located in the young open cluster M20. The spectrum reveals evidence of three components: a broad-lined early B star (HD 164492C1), a narrow-lined early B star (HD 164492C2) and a late B star (HD 164492C3). Components C2 and C3 exhibit significant (>100 km s-1) bulk radial velocity variations with a period of 12.5351(7) d that we attribute to eccentric binary motion around a common centre-of-mass. Component C1 exhibits no detectable radial velocity variations. Using constraints derived from modelling the orbit of the C2+C3 binary and from synthesis of the combined spectrum, we determine the approximate physical characteristics of the components. We conclude that a coherent evolutionary solution consistent with the published age of M20 implies a distance to M20 of 0.9 ± 0.2 kpc, corresponding to the smallest published values. We confirm the detection of a strong magnetic field in the combined spectrum. The field is clearly associated with the broad-lined C1 component of the system. Repeated measurement of the longitudinal magnetic field allows the derivation of the rotation period of the magnetic star, Prot = 1.369 86(6) d. We derive the star's magnetic geometry, finding i=63± 6°, β =33± 6° and a dipole polar strength B_d=7.9^{+1.2}_{-1.0} kG. Strong emission - varying according to the magnetic period - is detected in the Hα profile. This is consistent with the presence of a centrifugal magnetosphere surrounding the rapidly rotating magnetic C1 component.

  10. Strong Dependence of the Inner Edge of the Habitable Zone on Planetary Rotation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jun; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Abbot, Dorian S

    2014-01-01

    Planetary rotation rate is a key parameter in determining atmospheric circulation and hence the spatial pattern of clouds. Since clouds can exert a dominant control on planetary radiation balance, rotation rate could be critical for determining mean planetary climate. Here we investigate this idea using a three-dimensional general circulation model with a sophisticated cloud scheme. We find that slowly rotating planets (like Venus) can maintain an Earth-like climate at nearly twice the stellar flux as rapidly rotating planets (like Earth). This suggests that many exoplanets previously believed to be too hot may actually be habitable, depending on their rotation rate. The explanation for this behavior is that slowly rotating planets have a weak Coriolis force and long daytime illumination, which promotes strong convergence and convection in the substellar region. This produces a large area of optically thick clouds, which greatly increases the planetary albedo. In contrast, on rapidly rotating planets a much n...

  11. Whale phylogeny and rapid radiation events revealed using novel retroposed elements and their flanking sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kaiya

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A diversity of hypotheses have been proposed based on both morphological and molecular data to reveal phylogenetic relationships within the order Cetacea (dolphins, porpoises, and whales, and great progress has been made in the past two decades. However, there is still some controversy concerning relationships among certain cetacean taxa such as river dolphins and delphinoid species, which needs to be further addressed with more markers in an effort to address unresolved portions of the phylogeny. Results An analysis of additional SINE insertions and SINE-flanking sequences supported the monophyly of the order Cetacea as well as Odontocete, Delphinoidea (Delphinidae + Phocoenidae + Mondontidae, and Delphinidae. A sister relationship between Delphinidae and Phocoenidae + Mondontidae was supported, and members of classical river dolphins and the genera Tursiops and Stenella were found to be paraphyletic. Estimates of divergence times revealed rapid divergences of basal Odontocete lineages in the Oligocene and Early Miocene, and a recent rapid diversification of Delphinidae in the Middle-Late Miocene and Pliocene within a narrow time frame. Conclusions Several novel SINEs were found to differentiate Delphinidae from the other two families (Monodontidae and Phocoenidae, whereas the sister grouping of the latter two families with exclusion of Delphinidae was further revealed using the SINE-flanking sequences. Interestingly, some anomalous PCR amplification patterns of SINE insertions were detected, which can be explained as the result of potential ancestral SINE polymorphisms and incomplete lineage sorting. Although a few loci were potentially anomalous, this study demonstrated that the SINE-based approach is a powerful tool in phylogenetic studies. Identifying additional SINE elements that resolve the relationships in the superfamily Delphinoidea and family Delphinidae will be important steps forward in completely resolving

  12. Whale phylogeny and rapid radiation events revealed using novel retroposed elements and their flanking sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Xu, Shixia; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2011-10-27

    A diversity of hypotheses have been proposed based on both morphological and molecular data to reveal phylogenetic relationships within the order Cetacea (dolphins, porpoises, and whales), and great progress has been made in the past two decades. However, there is still some controversy concerning relationships among certain cetacean taxa such as river dolphins and delphinoid species, which needs to be further addressed with more markers in an effort to address unresolved portions of the phylogeny. An analysis of additional SINE insertions and SINE-flanking sequences supported the monophyly of the order Cetacea as well as Odontocete, Delphinoidea (Delphinidae + Phocoenidae + Mondontidae), and Delphinidae. A sister relationship between Delphinidae and Phocoenidae + Mondontidae was supported, and members of classical river dolphins and the genera Tursiops and Stenella were found to be paraphyletic. Estimates of divergence times revealed rapid divergences of basal Odontocete lineages in the Oligocene and Early Miocene, and a recent rapid diversification of Delphinidae in the Middle-Late Miocene and Pliocene within a narrow time frame. Several novel SINEs were found to differentiate Delphinidae from the other two families (Monodontidae and Phocoenidae), whereas the sister grouping of the latter two families with exclusion of Delphinidae was further revealed using the SINE-flanking sequences. Interestingly, some anomalous PCR amplification patterns of SINE insertions were detected, which can be explained as the result of potential ancestral SINE polymorphisms and incomplete lineage sorting. Although a few loci were potentially anomalous, this study demonstrated that the SINE-based approach is a powerful tool in phylogenetic studies. Identifying additional SINE elements that resolve the relationships in the superfamily Delphinoidea and family Delphinidae will be important steps forward in completely resolving cetacean phylogenetic relationships in the future.

  13. A high-resolution optical measurement system for rapid acquisition of radiation flux density maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Martin; Raeder, Christian; Willsch, Christian; Dibowski, Gerd

    2017-06-01

    To identify the power and flux density of concentrated solar radiation the Institute of Solar Research at the German Aerospace Center (DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt e. V.) has used the camera-based measurement system FATMES (Flux and Temperature Measurement System) since 1995. The disadvantages of low resolution, difficult handling and poor computing power required a revision of the existing measurement system. The measurement system FMAS (Flux Mapping Acquisition system) is equipped with state-of-the-art-hardware, is compatible with computers off-the-shelf and is programmed in LabView. The expenditure of time for an image evaluation is reduced by the factor 60 compared to FATMES. The new measurement system is no longer associated with the facilities Solar Furnace and High Flux Solar Simulator at the DLR in Cologne but is also applicable as a mobile system. The data and the algorithms are transparent throughout the complete process. The measurement accuracy of FMAS is determined to at most ±3 % until now. The error of measurement of FATMES is at least 2 % higher according to the conducted comparison tests.

  14. Rapid modulation of ultraviolet shielding in plants is influenced by solar ultraviolet radiation and linked to alterations in flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Paul W; Tobler, Mark A; Keefover-Ring, Ken; Flint, Stephan D; Barkley, Anne E; Ryel, Ronald J; Lindroth, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing compounds (flavonoids and related phenylpropanoids) and the resultant decrease in epidermal UV transmittance (TUV ) are primary protective mechanisms employed by plants against potentially damaging solar UV radiation and are critical components of the overall acclimation response of plants to changing solar UV environments. Whether plants can adjust this UV sunscreen protection in response to rapid changes in UV, as occurs on a diurnal basis, is largely unexplored. Here, we use a combination of approaches to demonstrate that plants can modulate their UV-screening properties within minutes to hours, and these changes are driven, in part, by UV radiation. For the cultivated species Abelmoschus esculentus, large (30-50%) and reversible changes in TUV occurred on a diurnal basis, and these adjustments were associated with changes in the concentrations of whole-leaf UV-absorbing compounds and several quercetin glycosides. Similar results were found for two other species (Vicia faba and Solanum lycopersicum), but no such changes were detected in Zea mays. These findings reveal a much more dynamic UV-protection mechanism than previously recognized, raise important questions concerning the costs and benefits of UV-protection strategies in plants and have practical implications for employing UV to enhance crop vigor and quality in controlled environments.

  15. Second-generation stars in globular clusters from rapid radiative cooling of pre-supernova massive star winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochhaas, Cassandra; Thompson, Todd A.

    2017-09-01

    Following work by Wünsch and collaborators, we investigate a self-enrichment scenario for second-generation star formation in globular clusters wherein wind material from the first-generation massive stars rapidly radiatively cools. Radiative energy loss allows retention of fast winds within the central regions of clusters, where it fuels star formation. Secondary star formation occurs in ∼3-5 Myr, before supernovae, producing uniform iron abundances in both populations. We derive the critical criteria for radiative cooling of massive star winds and the second-generation mass as a function of cluster mass, radius and metallicity. We derive a critical condition on M/R, above which second-generation star formation can occur. We speculate that above this threshold the strong decrease in the cluster wind energy and momentum allows ambient gas to remain from the cluster formation process. We reproduce large observed second-generation fractions of ∼30-80 per cent if wind material mixes with ambient gas. Importantly, the mass of ambient gas required is only of order the first generation's stellar mass. Second-generation helium enrichment ΔY is inversely proportional to mass fraction in the second generation; a large second generation can form with ΔY ∼ 0.001-0.02, while a small second generation can reach ΔY ∼ 0.16. Like other self-enrichment models for the second generation, we are not able to simultaneously account for both the full range of the Na-O anticorrelation and the second-generation fraction.

  16. Multiple ITS copies reveal extensive hybridization within Rheum (Polygonaceae, a genus that has undergone rapid radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongshi Wan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During adaptive radiation events, characters can arise multiple times due to parallel evolution, but transfer of traits through hybridization provides an alternative explanation for the same character appearing in apparently non-sister lineages. The signature of hybridization can be detected in incongruence between phylogenies derived from different markers, or from the presence of two divergent versions of a nuclear marker such as ITS within one individual. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we cloned and sequenced ITS regions for 30 species of the genus Rheum, and compared them with a cpDNA phylogeny. Seven species contained two divergent copies of ITS that resolved in different clades from one another in each case, indicating hybridization events too recent for concerted evolution to have homogenised the ITS sequences. Hybridization was also indicated in at least two further species via incongruence in their position between ITS and cpDNA phylogenies. None of the ITS sequences present in these nine species matched those detected in any other species, which provides tentative evidence against recent introgression as an explanation. Rheum globulosum, previously indicated by cpDNA to represent an independent origin of decumbent habit, is indicated by ITS to be part of clade of decumbent species, which acquired cpDNA of another clade via hybridization. However decumbent and glasshouse morphology are confirmed to have arisen three and two times, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggested that hybridization among QTP species of Rheum has been extensive, and that a role of hybridization in diversification of Rheum requires investigation.

  17. Oscillatory MHD Convective Flow of Second Order Fluid Through Porous Medium in a Vertical Rotating Channel in Slip-Flow Regime with Heat Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg B.P.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of an oscillatory magnetohydrodynamic (MHD convective flow of a second order (viscoelastic, incompressible, and electrically conducting fluid through a porous medium bounded by two infinite vertical parallel porous plates is presented. The two porous plates with slip-flow condition and the no-slip condition are subjected respectively to a constant injection and suction velocity. The pressure gradient in the channel varies periodically with time. A magnetic field of uniform strength is applied in the direction perpendicular to the planes of the plates. The induced magnetic field is neglected due to the assumption of a small magnetic Reynolds number. The temperature of the plate with no-slip condition is non-uniform and oscillates periodically with time and the temperature difference of the two plates is assumed high enough to induce heat radiation. The entire system rotates in unison about the axis perpendicular to the planes of the plates. Adopting complex variable notations, a closed form solution of the problem is obtained. The analytical results are evaluated numerically and then presented graphically to discuss in detail the effects of different parameters of the problem. The velocity, temperature and the skin-friction in terms of its amplitude and phase angle have been shown graphically to observe the effects of the viscoelastic parameter γ, rotation parameter Ω, suction parameter λ , Grashof number Gr, Hartmann number M, the pressure A, Prandtl number Pr, radiation parameter N and the frequency of oscillation ω .

  18. Discovery of a magnetic field in the rapidly-rotating O-type secondary of the colliding-wind binary HD 47129 (Plaskett's star)

    CERN Document Server

    Grunhut, J H; Leutenegger, M; Petit, V; Rauw, G; Neiner, C; Martins, F; Cohen, D H; Gagné, M; Ignace, R; Mathis, S; de Mink, S E; Moffat, A F J; Owocki, S; Shultz, M; Sundqvist, J

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of a strong, organized magnetic field in the secondary component of the massive O8III/I+O7.5V/III double-lined spectroscopic binary system HD 47129 (Plaskett's star), in the context of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) survey. Eight independent Stokes $V$ observations were acquired using the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the Narval spectropolarimeter at the T\\'elescope Bernard Lyot. Using Least-Squares Deconvolution we obtain definite detections of signal in Stokes $V$ in 3 observations. No significant signal is detected in the diagnostic null ($N$) spectra. The Zeeman signatures are broad and track the radial velocity of the secondary component; we therefore conclude that the rapidly-rotating secondary component is the magnetized star. Correcting the polarized spectra for the line and continuum of the (sharp-lined) primary, we measured the longitudinal magnetic field from each observation. The longitudinal field of the secondary is variable...

  19. On the Coupling between Helium Settling and Rotation-Induced Mixing in Stellar Radiative Zones II- Application to light elements in population I main-sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Théado, S; Theado, Sylvie; Vauclair, Sylvie

    2003-01-01

    In the two previous papers of this series, we have discussed the importance of t he $\\mu$-gradients due to helium settling on rotation-induced mixing, first in a n approximate analytical way, second in a 2D numerical simulation. We have found that, for slowly rotating low mass stars, a process of ``creeping paralysis" in which the circulation and the diffusion are nearly frozen may take place below the convective zone. Here we apply this theory to the case of lithium and beryll ium in galactic clusters and specially the Hyades. We take into account the rota tional braking with rotation velocities adjusted to the present observations. We find that two different cells of meridional circulation appear on the hot side of the "lithium dip" and that the "creeping paralysis" process occurs, not dir ectly below the convective zone, but deeper inside the radiative zone, at the to p of the second cell. As a consequence, the two cells are disconnected, which ma y be the basic reason for the lithium increase with effecti...

  20. Intrafraction Prostate Translations and Rotations During Hypofractionated Robotic Radiation Surgery: Dosimetric Impact of Correction Strategies and Margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Water, Steven van de, E-mail: s.vandewater@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Valli, Lorella [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Alma Mater Studiorum, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bologna University, Bologna (Italy); Aluwini, Shafak [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lanconelli, Nico [Alma Mater Studiorum, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bologna University, Bologna (Italy); Heijmen, Ben; Hoogeman, Mischa [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric impact of intrafraction prostate motion and the effect of robot correction strategies for hypofractionated CyberKnife treatments with a simultaneously integrated boost. Methods and Materials: A total of 548 real-time prostate motion tracks from 17 patients were available for dosimetric simulations of CyberKnife treatments, in which various correction strategies were included. Fixed time intervals between imaging/correction (15, 60, 180, and 360 seconds) were simulated, as well as adaptive timing (ie, the time interval reduced from 60 to 15 seconds in case prostate motion exceeded 3 mm or 2° in consecutive images). The simulated extent of robot corrections was also varied: no corrections, translational corrections only, and translational corrections combined with rotational corrections up to 5°, 10°, and perfect rotational correction. The correction strategies were evaluated for treatment plans with a 0-mm or 3-mm margin around the clinical target volume (CTV). We recorded CTV coverage (V{sub 100%}) and dose-volume parameters of the peripheral zone (boost), rectum, bladder, and urethra. Results: Planned dose parameters were increasingly preserved with larger extents of robot corrections. A time interval between corrections of 60 to 180 seconds provided optimal preservation of CTV coverage. To achieve 98% CTV coverage in 98% of the treatments, translational and rotational corrections up to 10° were required for the 0-mm margin plans, whereas translational and rotational corrections up to 5° were required for the 3-mm margin plans. Rectum and bladder were spared considerably better in the 0-mm margin plans. Adaptive timing did not improve delivered dose. Conclusions: Intrafraction prostate motion substantially affected the delivered dose but was compensated for effectively by robot corrections using a time interval of 60 to 180 seconds. A 0-mm margin required larger extents of additional rotational corrections than a 3

  1. Similarity Solution for a Cylindrical Shock Wave in a Self-gravitating, Rotating Axisymmetric Dusty Gas with Heat Conduction and Radiation Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Bajargaan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Similarity solutions are obtained for unsteady adiabatic propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a self gravitating, rotating, axisymmetric dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux in which variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The dusty gas is taken to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles. Azimuthal fluid velocity and axial fluid velocity in the ambient medium are taken to be variable. The equilibrium flow conditions are assumed to be maintained. The initial density is assumed to be constant. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier’s law and the radiation is taken to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity and the absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The effects of the variation of the gravitational parameter and the heat transfer parameters on the shock strength and the flow variables such as radial velocity, azimuthal velocity, axial velocity, density, pressure, total heat flux, mass behind the shock front, azimuthal vorticity vector, axial vorticity vector, isothermal speed of sound and adiabatic compressibility are studied. It is found that the presence of gravitation effect in the medium modify the radiation and conduction effect on the flow variables.

  2. Group classification of the characteristic initial value equations for a radiating axisymmetric, non-rotating, vacuum spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibragimov, Nail H [Research Centre ALGA: Advances in Lie Group Analysis, Blekinge Institute of Technology, SE-37179 Karlskrona (Sweden); Wessels, Ewald J H [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Cape Town (South Africa); Ellis, George F R [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2007-12-07

    We carry out a Lie group analysis of the Sachs equations for a time-dependent axisymmetric non-rotating spacetime in which the Ricci tensor vanishes. These equations, which are the first two members of the set of Newman-Penrose equations, define the characteristic initial-value problem for the spacetime. We find that the equations admit a five-dimensional equivalence Lie algebra. The initial value function that allows the equations to admit a non-trivial Lie symmetry separates into three disjoint equivalence classes.

  3. Group classification of the Sachs equations for a radiating axisymmetric, non-rotating, vacuum space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Ibragimov, N H; Wessels, E J H; Ellis, George F. R.; Ibragimov, Nail H.; Wessels, Ewald J. H.

    2006-01-01

    We carry out a Lie group analysis of the Sachs equations for a time-dependent axisymmetric non-rotating space-time in which the Ricci tensor vanishes. These equations, which are the first two members of the set of Newman-Penrose equations, define the characteristic initial-value problem for the space-time. We find a particular form for the initial data such that these equations admit a Lie symmetry, and so defines a geometrically special class of such spacetimes. These should additionally be of particular physical interest because of this special geometric feature.

  4. Direct Plan Comparison of RapidArc and CyberKnife for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Young Eun; Song, Si Yeol; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Cho, Byungchul

    2015-01-01

    We compared the treatment planning performance of RapidArc (RA) vs. CyberKnife (CK) for spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Ten patients with spinal lesions who had been treated with CK were re-planned with RA, which consisted of two complete arcs. Computed tomography (CT) and volumetric dose data of CK, generated using the Multiplan (Accuray) treatment planning system (TPS) and the Ray-Trace algorithm, were imported to Varian Eclipse TPS in Dicom format, and the data were compared with the RA plan using analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) dose calculation. The optimized dose priorities for both CK and RA plans were similar for all patients. The highest priority was to provide enough dose coverage to the planned target volume (PTV) while limiting the maximum dose to the spinal cord. Plan quality was evaluated with respect to PTV coverage, conformity index (CI), high-dose spillage, intermediate-dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), and maximum dose to the spinal cord, which are criteria recommended ...

  5. Chronic graft-versus-host disease in the rat radiation chimera. III. Immunology and immunopathology in rapidly induced models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beschorner, W.E.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.

    1983-03-01

    Although chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) frequently develops in the long-term rat radiation chimera, we present three additional models in which a histologically similar disease is rapidly induced. These include adoptive transfer of spleen and bone marrow from rats with spontaneous chronic GVHD into lethally irradiated rats of the primary host strain; sublethal irradiation of stable chimeras followed by a booster transplant; and transfer of spleen cells of chimeras recovering from acute GVHD into second-party (primary recipient strain) or third-party hosts. Some immunopathologic and immune abnormalities associated with spontaneous chronic GVHD were not observed in one or more of the induced models. Thus, IgM deposition in the skin, antinuclear antibodies, and vasculitis appear to be paraphenomena. On the other hand, lymphoid hypocellularity of the thymic medulla, immaturity of splenic follicles, and nonspecific suppressor cells were consistently present in the long term chimeras, and in all models. These abnormalities therefore may be pathogenetically important, or closely related to the development of chronic GVHD.

  6. Rapid radiation events in the family Ursidae indicated by likelihood phylogenetic estimation from multiple fragments of mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waits, L P; Sullivan, J; O'Brien, S J; Ward, R H

    1999-10-01

    The bear family (Ursidae) presents a number of phylogenetic ambiguities as the evolutionary relationships of the six youngest members (ursine bears) are largely unresolved. Recent mitochondrial DNA analyses have produced conflicting results with respect to the phylogeny of ursine bears. In an attempt to resolve these issues, we obtained 1916 nucleotides of mitochondrial DNA sequence data from six gene segments for all eight bear species and conducted maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony analyses on all fragments separately and combined. All six single-region gene trees gave different phylogenetic estimates; however, only for control region data was this significantly incongruent with the results from the combined data. The optimal phylogeny for the combined data set suggests that the giant panda is most basal followed by the spectacled bear. The sloth bear is the basal ursine bear, and there is weak support for a sister taxon relationship of the American and Asiatic black bears. The sun bear is sister taxon to the youngest clade containing brown bears and polar bears. Statistical analyses of alternate hypotheses revealed a lack of strong support for many of the relationships. We suggest that the difficulties surrounding the resolution of the evolutionary relationships of the Ursidae are linked to the existence of sequential rapid radiation events in bear evolution. Thus, unresolved branching orders during these time periods may represent an accurate representation of the evolutionary history of bear species.

  7. 128-slice CT angiography of the aorta without ECG-gating: efficacy of faster gantry rotation time and iterative reconstruction in terms of image quality and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Vincenzo; Garattoni, Monica; Buia, Francesco; Attina, Domenico; Lovato, Luigi; Zompatori, Maurizio [University Hospital ' ' S.Orsola' ' , Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, Cardio-Thoracic Radiology Unit, Bologna (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of non ECG-gated 128-slice CT angiography of the aorta (CTAA) with fast gantry rotation time and iterative reconstruction. Four hundred and eighty patients underwent non ECG-gated CTAA. Qualitative and quantitative image quality assessments were performed. Radiation dose was assessed and compared with the dose of patients who underwent ECG-gated CTAA (n = 126) and the dose of previous CTAA performed with another CT (n = 339). Image quality (aortic root-ascending portion) was average-to-excellent in more than 94 % of cases, without any non-diagnostic scan. For proximal coronaries, image quality was average-to-excellent in more than 50 %, with only 21.5 % of non-diagnostic cases. Quantitative analysis results were also good. Mean radiation dose for thoracic CTAA was 5.6 mSv versus 20.6 mSv of ECG-gated protocol and 20.6 mSv of 16-slice CTAA scans, with an average dose reduction of 72.8 % (p < 0.001). Mean radiation dose for thoracic-abdominal CTAA was 9.7 mSv, versus 20.9 mSv of 16-slice CTAA scans, with an average dose reduction of 53.6 % (p < 0.001). Non ECG-gated 128-slice CTAA is feasible and able to provide high quality visualization of the entire aorta without significant motion artefacts, together with a considerable dose and contrast media volume reduction. (orig.)

  8. A multisite photometric study of two unusual Beta Cep stars: the magnetic V2052 Oph and the massive rapid rotator V986 Oph

    CERN Document Server

    Handler, G; Uytterhoeven, K; Briquet, M; Neiner, C; Tshenye, T; Ngwato, B; van Winckel, H; Guggenberger, E; Raskin, G; Rodriguez, E; Mazumdar, A; Barban, C; Lorenz, D; Vandenbussche, B; Sahin, T; Medupe, R; Aerts, C

    2012-01-01

    We report a multisite photometric campaign for the Beta Cep stars V2052 Oph and V986 Oph. 670 hours of high-quality differential photoelectric Stromgren, Johnson and Geneva time-series photometry were obtained with eight telescopes on five continents during 182 nights. Frequency analyses of the V2052 Oph data enabled the detection of three pulsation frequencies, the first harmonic of the strongest signal, and the rotation frequency with its first harmonic. Pulsational mode identification from analysing the colour amplitude ratios confirms the dominant mode as being radial, whereas the other two oscillations are most likely l=4. Combining seismic constraints on the inclination of the rotation axis with published magnetic field analyses we conclude that the radial mode must be the fundamental. The rotational light modulation is in phase with published spectroscopic variability, and consistent with an oblique rotator for which both magnetic poles pass through the line of sight. The inclination of the rotation ax...

  9. Effect of hall current on MHD flow of a nanofluid with variable properties due to a rotating disk with viscous dissipation and nonlinear thermal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahed, Mohamed; Akl, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of the MHD Nanofluid boundary layer flow over a rotating disk with a constant velocity in the presence of hall current and non-linear thermal radiation has been covered in this work. The variation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of the fluid due to temperature and nanoparticles concentration and size is considered. The problem described by a system of P.D.E that converted to a system of ordinary differential equations by the similarity transformation technique, the obtained system solved analytically using Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM) with association of mathematica program. The velocity profiles and temperature profiles of the boundary layer over the disk are plotted and investigated in details. Moreover, the surface shear stress, rate of heat transfer explained in details.

  10. Cylindrical shock waves in rotational axisymmetric non-ideal dusty gas with increasing energy in presence of conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nath

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric non-ideal dusty gas in the presence of conductive and radiative heat fluxes with increasing energy, which has variable azimuthal and axial fluid velocities, is investigated. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. Similarity solutions are obtained and the effects of the variation of the heat transfer parameters, the parameter of non-idealness of the gas, the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas are investigated. It is shown that the heat transfer parameters and the parameter of non-idealness of the gas, both, decrease the compressibility of the gas and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength.

  11. EMISSION FROM PAIR-INSTABILITY SUPERNOVAE WITH ROTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Van Rossum, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Craig, Wheeler J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Whalen, Daniel J. [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Smidt, Joseph [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wiggins, Brandon, E-mail: manolis@flash.uchicago.edu [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    Pair-instability supernovae (PISNe) have been suggested as candidates for some superluminous supernovae, such as SN 2007bi, and as one of the dominant types of explosion occurring in the early universe from massive, zero-metallicity Population III stars. The progenitors of such events can be rapidly rotating, therefore exhibiting different evolutionary properties due to the effects of rotationally induced mixing and mass-loss. Proper identification of such events requires rigorous radiation hydrodynamics and radiative transfer calculations that capture not only the behavior of the light curve but also the spectral evolution of these events. We present radiation hydrodynamics and radiation transport calculations for 90-300 M {sub ☉} rotating PISNe covering both the shock breakout and late light curve phases. We also investigate cases of different initial metallicity and rotation rate to determine the impact of these parameters on the detailed spectral characteristics of these events. In agreement with recent results on non-rotating PISNe, we find that for a range of progenitor masses and rotation rates these events have intrinsically red colors in contradiction with observations of superluminous supernovae. The spectroscopic properties of rotating PISNe are similar to those of non-rotating events with stripped hydrogen and helium envelopes. We find that the progenitor metallicity and rotation rate properties are erased after the explosion and cannot be identified in the resulting model spectra. It is the combined effects of pre-supernova mass-loss and the basic properties of the supernova ejecta such as mass, temperature, and velocity that have the most direct impact in the model spectra of PISNe.

  12. Influence of collimator rotation on dose distribution and delivery in intensity modulated radiation therapy for parotid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the influence of collimator rotation in IMRT planning with respect to the target coverage and dose to critical structures. In addition, the delivery efficiency of desired fluence with collimator rotation is assessed.Methods: The computed tomography (CT datasets of 5 patients with parotid cancer were employed for this study. Dynamic IMRT plans were generated with a dose prescription of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. IMRT plans were generated with five unilateral fields using 6MV X-rays. Four different plans were generated for each patient by keeping the collimator angle at 0, 30, 60, and 90 degree. All plans were analyzed using dose volume histogram. Conformity index (CI and heterogeneity index (HI were calculated. The total monitor units (MU required to deliver one fraction were noted and compared. To verify the delivery efficiency; the measured fluence on IBA I’mRT MatriXX ionization chamber array detector was compared with the TPS dose plan with 2D gamma evaluation.Results: There is not much difference in the PTV Dmax and Dmean with respect to the different collimator angles. The PTV coverage is best at collimator angle of 0 degree. A slight reduction in CI was observed with plans at other collimator angles as compared to 0 degree. The HI values were almost similar for plans with collimator angle 0, 30, and 60 degree. The plan with 90 degree collimator showed a slightly higher heterogeneity for the PTV. A slight reduction in the average Dmax to spinal cord was observed for the plan with collimator angle 30 degree as compared to other angles whereas maximum value of Dmax to spinal cord was at collimator angle 60 degree. No clinically relevant difference was observed among the plans with respect to brainstem and mandible Dmax. An increase in average of oral cavity Dmax and Dmean was observed for collimator angle 60 and 90 degree as compared to collimator angle 0 and 30 degree. Not much difference was observed with respect to Dmax

  13. Rapid and High-Throughput Detection and Quantitation of Radiation Biomarkers in Human and Nonhuman Primates by Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhidan; Coy, Stephen L.; Pannkuk, Evan L.; Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Hall, Adam B.; Fornace, Albert J.; Vouros, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Radiation exposure is an important public health issue due to a range of accidental and intentional threats. Prompt and effective large-scale screening and appropriate use of medical countermeasures (MCM) to mitigate radiation injury requires rapid methods for determining the radiation dose. In a number of studies, metabolomics has identified small-molecule biomarkers responding to the radiation dose. Differential mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) has been used for similar compounds for high-throughput small-molecule detection and quantitation. In this study, we show that DMS-MS can detect and quantify two radiation biomarkers, trimethyl-L-lysine (TML) and hypoxanthine. Hypoxanthine is a human and nonhuman primate (NHP) radiation biomarker and metabolic intermediate, whereas TML is a radiation biomarker in humans but not in NHP, which is involved in carnitine synthesis. They have been analyzed by DMS-MS from urine samples after a simple strong cation exchange-solid phase extraction (SCX-SPE). The dramatic suppression of background and chemical noise provided by DMS-MS results in an approximately 10-fold reduction in time, including sample pretreatment time, compared with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). DMS-MS quantitation accuracy has been verified by validation testing for each biomarker. Human samples are not yet available, but for hypoxanthine, selected NHP urine samples (pre- and 7-d-post 10 Gy exposure) were analyzed, resulting in a mean change in concentration essentially identical to that obtained by LC-MS (fold-change 2.76 versus 2.59). These results confirm the potential of DMS-MS for field or clinical first-level rapid screening for radiation exposure.

  14. HAT-P-57b: A Short-period Giant Planet Transiting a Bright Rapidly Rotating A8V Star Confirmed Via Doppler Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Buchhave, L. A.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, G.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Penev, K.; Huang, C. X.; Béky, B.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S. N.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Isaacson, H.; Fischer, D. A.; Noyes, R. W.; Falco, E.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Knox, R. P.; Hinz, P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-12-01

    We present the discovery of HAT-P-57b, a P = 2.4653 day transiting planet around a V=10.465+/- 0.029 mag, {T}{{eff}}=7500+/- 250 K main sequence A8V star with a projected rotation velocity of v{sin}i=102.1+/- 1.3 {km} {{{s}}}-1. We measure the radius of the planet to be R=1.413+/- 0.054 {R}{{J}} and, based on RV observations, place a 95% confidence upper limit on its mass of M\\lt 1.85 {M}{{J}}. Based on theoretical stellar evolution models, the host star has a mass and radius of 1.47+/- 0.12 {M}⊙ and 1.500+/- 0.050 {R}⊙ , respectively. Spectroscopic observations made with Keck-I/HIRES during a partial transit event show the Doppler shadow of HAT-P-57b moving across the average spectral line profile of HAT-P-57, confirming the object as a planetary system. We use these observations, together with analytic formulae that we derive for the line profile distortions, to determine the projected angle between the spin axis of HAT-P-57 and the orbital axis of HAT-P-57b. The data permit two possible solutions, with -16\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 7\\lt λ \\lt 3\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 3 or 27\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 6\\lt λ \\lt 57\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 4 at 95% confidence, and with relative probabilities for the two modes of 26% and 74%, respectively. Adaptive optics imaging with MMT/Clio2 reveals an object located 2\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 7 from HAT-P-57 consisting of two point sources separated in turn from each other by 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 22. The H- and {L}\\prime -band magnitudes of the companion stars are consistent with their being physically associated with HAT-P-57, in which case they are stars of mass 0.61+/- 0.10 {M}⊙ and 0.53+/- 0.08 {M}⊙ . HAT-P-57 is the most rapidly rotating star, and only the fourth main sequence A star, known to host a transiting planet. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based in part on observations made with the Keck-I telescope at Mauna

  15. Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Rick E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

    2013-10-01

    A new heterogeneity analysis approach to discern radiation-induced lung damage was tested on CT images of irradiated rats. The method, combining octree decomposition with variogram analysis, demonstrated a significant correlation with radiation exposure levels, whereas conventional measurements and pulmonary function tests did not. The results suggest the new approach may be highly sensitive for assessing even subtle radiation-induced changes

  16. Short-rotation plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip E. Pope; Jeffery O. Dawson

    1989-01-01

    Short-rotation plantations offer several advantages over longer, more traditional rotations. They enhance the natural productivity of better sites and of tree species with rapid juvenile growth. Returns on investment are realized in a shorter period and the risk of loss is reduced compared with long term investments. Production of wood and fiber can be maximized by...

  17. Self-similar flow of a rotating dusty gas behind the shock wave with increasing energy, conduction and radiation heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.

    2012-01-01

    A self-similar solution is obtained for one dimensional adiabatic flow behind a cylindrical shock wave propagating in a rotating dusty gas in presence of heat conduction and radiation heat flux with increasing energy. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-condition is maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston (or inner expanding surface). The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature only. In order to obtain the similarity solutions the initial density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant and the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assumed to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. The effects of the variation of the heat transfer parameters and non-idealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. The effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are also investigated.

  18. Direct plan comparison of RapidArc and CyberKnife for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Eun; Kwak, Jungwon; Song, Si Yeol; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Cho, Byungchul

    2015-07-01

    We compared the treatment planning performance of RapidArc (RA) vs. CyberKnife (CK) for spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Ten patients with spinal lesions who had been treated with CK were re-planned with RA, which consisted of two complete arcs. Computed tomography (CT) and volumetric dose data of CK, generated using the Multiplan (Accuray) treatment planning system (TPS) and the Ray-trace algorithm, were imported to Varian Eclipse TPS in Dicom format, and the data were compared with the RA plan by using an analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) dose calculation. The optimized dose priorities for both the CK and the RA plans were similar for all patients. The highest priority was to provide enough dose coverage to the planned target volume (PTV) while limiting the maximum dose to the spinal cord. Plan quality was evaluated with respect to PTV coverage, conformity index (CI), high-dose spillage, intermediate-dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), and maximum dose to the spinal cord, which are criteria recommended by the RTOG 0631 spine and 0915 lung SBRT protocols. The mean CI' SD values of the PTV were 1.11' 0.03 and 1.17' 0.10 for RA and CK ( p = 0.02), respectively. On average, the maximum dose delivered to the spinal cord in CK plans was approximately 11.6% higher than that in RA plans, and this difference was statistically significant ( p systems can create highly conformal volumetric dose distributions, the current study shows that RA demonstrates lower high- and intermediate-dose spillages than CK. Therefore, RA plans for spinal SBRT may be superior to CK plans.

  19. Non-LTR R2 element evolutionary patterns: phylogenetic incongruences, rapid radiation and the maintenance of multiple lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Luchetti

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons of the R2 superclade specifically insert within the 28S ribosomal gene. They have been isolated from a variety of metazoan genomes and were found vertically inherited even if their phylogeny does not always agree with that of the host species. This was explained with the diversification/extinction of paralogous lineages, being proved the absence of horizontal transfer. We here analyze the widest available collection of R2 sequences, either newly isolated from recently sequenced genomes or drawn from public databases, in a phylogenetic framework. Results are congruent with previous analyses, but new important issues emerge. First, the N-terminal end of the R2-B clade protein, so far unknown, presents a new zinc fingers configuration. Second, the phylogenetic pattern is consistent with an ancient, rapid radiation of R2 lineages: being the estimated time of R2 origin (850-600 Million years ago placed just before the metazoan Cambrian explosion, the wide element diversity and the incongruence with the host phylogeny could be attributable to the sudden expansion of available niches represented by host's 28S ribosomal genes. Finally, we detect instances of coexisting multiple R2 lineages showing a non-random phylogenetic pattern, strongly similar to that of the "library" model known for tandem repeats: a collection of R2s were present in the ancestral genome and then differentially activated/repressed in the derived species. Models for activation/repression as well as mechanisms for sequence maintenance are also discussed within this framework.

  20. Diversification of Angraecum (Orchidaceae, Vandeae) in Madagascar: Revised Phylogeny Reveals Species Accumulation through Time Rather than Rapid Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriananjamanantsoa, Herinandrianina N; Engberg, Shannon; Louis, Edward E; Brouillet, Luc

    Angraecum. The macroevolutionary model-based phylogeny failed to detect shifts in diversification that could be associated directly with morphological diversification. Diversification in Angraecum resulted from gradual species accumulation through time rather than from rapid radiation, a diversification pattern often encountered in tropical rain forests.

  1. Beam’s-eye-view dosimetrics (BEVD) guided rotational station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT) planning based on reweighted total-variation minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojin; Li, Ruijiang; Lee, Rena; Xing, Lei

    2015-03-01

    Conventional VMAT optimizes aperture shapes and weights at uniformly sampled stations, which is a generalization of the concept of a control point. Recently, rotational station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT) has been proposed to improve the plan quality by inserting beams to the regions that demand additional intensity modulations, thus formulating non-uniform beam sampling. This work presents a new rotational SPORT planning strategy based on reweighted total-variation (TV) minimization (min.), using beam’s-eye-view dosimetrics (BEVD) guided beam selection. The convex programming based reweighted TV min. assures the simplified fluence-map, which facilitates single-aperture selection at each station for single-arc delivery. For the rotational arc treatment planning and non-uniform beam angle setting, the mathematical model needs to be modified by additional penalty term describing the fluence-map similarity and by determination of appropriate angular weighting factors. The proposed algorithm with additional penalty term is capable of achieving more efficient and deliverable plans adaptive to the conventional VMAT and SPORT planning schemes by reducing the dose delivery time about 5 to 10 s in three clinical cases (one prostate and two head-and-neck (HN) cases with a single and multiple targets). The BEVD guided beam selection provides effective and yet easy calculating methodology to select angles for denser, non-uniform angular sampling in SPORT planning. Our BEVD guided SPORT treatment schemes improve the dose sparing to femoral heads in the prostate and brainstem, parotid glands and oral cavity in the two HN cases, where the mean dose reduction of those organs ranges from 0.5 to 2.5 Gy. Also, it increases the conformation number assessing the dose conformity to the target from 0.84, 0.75 and 0.74 to 0.86, 0.79 and 0.80 in the prostate and two HN cases, while preserving the delivery efficiency, relative to conventional single-arc VMAT plans.

  2. A short rotation cultivation for a long-term yield. Energy wood from rapidly growing trees; Kurzer Umtrieb fuer langfristigen Ertrag. Energieholz aus schnell wachsenden Baumsorten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, Frank [KWB Biomasseheizungen, Mertingen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Wood becomes popular ever more. The demand of wood grows while the areas of forest globally shrink at the same time. Therefore, the cultivation of energy wood in short rotation is an important and long-term source of income for surface owners apart from environmental protection and valuable contribution to the sustainable power supply.

  3. STRONG DEPENDENCE OF THE INNER EDGE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE ON PLANETARY ROTATION RATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S. [Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Boué, Gwenaël; Fabrycky, Daniel C., E-mail: abbot@uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Planetary rotation rate is a key parameter in determining atmospheric circulation and hence the spatial pattern of clouds. Since clouds can exert a dominant control on planetary radiation balance, rotation rate could be critical for determining the mean planetary climate. Here we investigate this idea using a three-dimensional general circulation model with a sophisticated cloud scheme. We find that slowly rotating planets (like Venus) can maintain an Earth-like climate at nearly twice the stellar flux as rapidly rotating planets (like Earth). This suggests that many exoplanets previously believed to be too hot may actually be habitable, depending on their rotation rate. The explanation for this behavior is that slowly rotating planets have a weak Coriolis force and long daytime illumination, which promotes strong convergence and convection in the substellar region. This produces a large area of optically thick clouds, which greatly increases the planetary albedo. In contrast, on rapidly rotating planets a much narrower belt of clouds form in the deep tropics, leading to a relatively low albedo. A particularly striking example of the importance of rotation rate suggested by our simulations is that a planet with modern Earth's atmosphere, in Venus' orbit, and with modern Venus' (slow) rotation rate would be habitable. This would imply that if Venus went through a runaway greenhouse, it had a higher rotation rate at that time.

  4. Saturn's gravitational field, internal rotation, and interior structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D; Schubert, Gerald

    2007-09-07

    Saturn's internal rotation period is unknown, though it must be less than 10 hours, 39 minutes, and 22 seconds, as derived from magnetic field plus kilometric radiation data. By using the Cassini spacecraft's gravitational data, along with Pioneer and Voyager radio occultation and wind data, we obtain a rotation period of 10 hours, 32 minutes, and 35 +/- 13 seconds. This more rapid spin implies slower equatorial wind speeds on Saturn than previously assumed, and the winds at higher latitudes flow both east and west, as on Jupiter. Our related Saturn interior model has a molecular-to-metallic hydrogen transition about halfway to the planet's center.

  5. Minimal skin dose increase in longitudinal rotating biplanar linac-MR systems: examination of radiation energy and flattening filter design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvanloo, A.; Burke, B.; St. Aubin, J.; Baillie, D.; Wachowicz, K.; Warkentin, B.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic fields of linac-MR systems modify the path of contaminant electrons in photon beams, which alters patient entrance skin dose. Also, the increased SSD of linac-MR systems reduces the maximum achievable dose rate. To accurately quantify the changes in entrance skin dose, the authors use EGSnrc Monte Carlo calculations that incorporate 3D magnetic field of the Alberta 0.5 T longitudinal linac-MR system. The Varian 600C linac head geometry assembled on the MRI components is used in the BEAMnrc simulations for 6 MV and 10 MV beam models and skin doses are calculated at an average depth of 70 μm using DOSXYZnrc. 3D modeling shows that magnetic fringe fields decay rapidly and are small at the linac head. SSDs between 100 and 120 cm result in skin-dose increases of between ~6%-19% and ~1%-9% for the 6 and 10 MV beams, respectively. For 6 MV, skin dose increases from ~10.5% to ~1.5% for field-size increases of 5  ×  5 cm2 to 20  ×  20 cm2. For 10 MV, skin dose increases by ~6% for a 5  ×  5 cm2 field, and decreases by ~1.5% for a 20  ×  20 cm2 field. Furthermore, the proposed reshaped flattening filter increases the dose rate from the current 355 MU min-1 to 529 MU min-1 (6 MV) or 604 MU min-1 (10 MV), while the skin-dose increases by only an additional ~2.6% (all percent increases in skin dose are relative to D max). This study suggests that there is minimal increase in the entrance skin dose and minimal/no decrease in the dose rate of the Alberta longitudinal linac-MR system. The even lower skin dose increase at 10 MV offers further advantages in future designs of linac-MR prototypes.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope Proper Motion (HSTPROMO) Catalogs of Galactic Globular Clusters. V. The Rapid Rotation of 47 Tuc Traced and Modeled in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, A.; Bianchini, P.; Varri, A. L.; Anderson, J.; Piotto, G.; van der Marel, R. P.; Vesperini, E.; Watkins, L. L.

    2017-08-01

    High-precision proper motions of the globular cluster 47 Tuc have allowed us to measure for the first time the cluster rotation in the plane of the sky and the velocity anisotropy profile from the cluster core out to about 13‧. These profiles are coupled with prior measurements along the line of sight (LOS) and the surface brightness profile and fit all together with self-consistent models specifically constructed to describe quasi-relaxed stellar systems with realistic differential rotation, axisymmetry, and pressure anisotropy. The best-fit model provides an inclination angle i between the rotation axis and the LOS direction of 30° and is able to simultaneously reproduce the full three-dimensional kinematics and structure of the cluster, while preserving a good agreement with the projected morphology. Literature models based solely on LOS measurements imply a significantly different inclination angle (i = 45°), demonstrating that proper motions play a key role in constraining the intrinsic structure of 47 Tuc. Our best-fit global dynamical model implies an internal rotation higher than previous studies have shown and suggests a peak of the intrinsic V/σ ratio of ∼0.9 at around two half-light radii, with a nonmonotonic intrinsic ellipticity profile reaching values up to 0.45. Our study unveils a new degree of dynamical complexity in 47 Tuc, which may be leveraged to provide new insights into the formation and evolution of globular clusters. Based on archival observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  7. Photometric Observations Constraining the Size, Shape, and Albedo of 2003 El61, a Rapidly Rotating, Pluto-Sized Object in the Kuiper Belt

    CERN Document Server

    Rabinowitz, D L; Brown, M E; Roe, H; Schwartz, M; Tourtellotte, S; Trujillo, C; Rabinowitz, David L.; Barkume, Kristina; Brown, Michael E.; Roe, Henry; Schwartz, Michael; Tourtellotte, Suzanne; Trujillo, Chad

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements at optical wavelengths of the spectral reflectance, the rotational light curve, and the solar phase curve of 2003 EL61,. With apparent visual magnitude 17.5 at 51 AU from the sun, this newly discovered member of the classical Kuiper Belt is now the third brightest KBO after Pluto and 2005 FY9. Our observations reveal an unambiguous, double-peaked rotational light curve with period 3.9154 +/- 0.0002 hours and peak to peak amplitude 0.28 +/- 0.04 mag. This is the fastest rotation period reliably determined for any body in the solar system larger than 100 km. Assuming the body has relaxed over time to the shape taken by a homogenous fluid body, our observations tightly constrain the shape and density. Given the mass we recently determined for 2003 EL61 from the orbit of a small satellite, we also constrain the size and albedo. We find a total length of 1960 to 2500 km, a mean density of 2600 to 3340 kg m-3, and a visual albedo greater than 0.6. We also measure a neutral reflectance at vis...

  8. Clinical application of RapidArc volumetric modulated arc therapy as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, four or more multiple brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Heon; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jin Ho; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Seok Ho; Sung, Ki Hoon; Kim, Yun Mi [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To determine feasibility of RapidArc in sequential or simultaneous integrated tumor boost in whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for poor prognostic patients with four or more brain metastases. Nine patients with multiple ({>=}4) brain metastases were analyzed. Three patients were classified as class II in recursive partitioning analysis and 6 were class III. The class III patients presented with hemiparesis, cognitive deficit, or apraxia. The ratio of tumor to whole brain volume was 0.8-7.9%. Six patients received 2-dimensional bilateral WBRT, (30 Gy/10- 12 fractions), followed by sequential RapidArc tumor boost (15-30 Gy/4-10 fractions). Three patients received RapidArc WBRT with simultaneous integrated boost to tumors (48-50 Gy) in 10-20 fractions. The median biologically effective dose to metastatic tumors was 68.1 Gy10 and 67.2 Gy10 and the median brain volume irradiated more than 100 Gy3 were 1.9% (24 cm3) and 0.8% (13 cm3) for each group. With less than 3 minutes of treatment time, RapidArc was easily applied to the patients with poor performance status. The follow-up period was 0.3-16.5 months. Tumor responses among the 6 patients who underwent follow-up magnetic resonance imaging were partial and stable in 3 and 3, respectively. Overall survival at 6 and 12 months were 66.7% and 41.7%, respectively. The local progression-free survival at 6 and 12 months were 100% and 62.5%, respectively. RapidArc as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, multiple brain metastases is an effective and safe modality with easy application.

  9. Rotation-induced nonlinear wavepackets in internal waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitfield, A. J., E-mail: ashley.whitfield.12@ucl.ac.uk; Johnson, E. R., E-mail: e.johnson@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    The long time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual formation of a localised wavepacket. Here this initial value problem is considered within the context of the Ostrovsky, or the rotation-modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation and a numerical method for obtaining accurate wavepacket solutions is presented. The flow evolutions are described in the regimes of relatively-strong and relatively-weak rotational effects. When rotational effects are relatively strong a second-order soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation accurately predicts the shape, and phase and group velocities of the numerically determined wavepackets. It is suggested that these solitons may form from a local Benjamin-Feir instability in the inertia-gravity wave-train radiated when a KdV solitary wave rapidly adjusts to the presence of strong rotation. When rotational effects are relatively weak the initial KdV solitary wave remains coherent longer, decaying only slowly due to weak radiation and modulational instability is no longer relevant. Wavepacket solutions in this regime appear to consist of a modulated KdV soliton wavetrain propagating on a slowly varying background of finite extent.

  10. Rotation-induced nonlinear wavepackets in internal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, A. J.; Johnson, E. R.

    2014-05-01

    The long time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual formation of a localised wavepacket. Here this initial value problem is considered within the context of the Ostrovsky, or the rotation-modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation and a numerical method for obtaining accurate wavepacket solutions is presented. The flow evolutions are described in the regimes of relatively-strong and relatively-weak rotational effects. When rotational effects are relatively strong a second-order soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation accurately predicts the shape, and phase and group velocities of the numerically determined wavepackets. It is suggested that these solitons may form from a local Benjamin-Feir instability in the inertia-gravity wave-train radiated when a KdV solitary wave rapidly adjusts to the presence of strong rotation. When rotational effects are relatively weak the initial KdV solitary wave remains coherent longer, decaying only slowly due to weak radiation and modulational instability is no longer relevant. Wavepacket solutions in this regime appear to consist of a modulated KdV soliton wavetrain propagating on a slowly varying background of finite extent.

  11. Comparison of rapidArc and fixed field intensity-modulated radiation therapies for advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma%晚期鼻咽癌RapidArc与固定野调强放疗的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄名赞; 张拓丹; 彭逊; 陈志坚; 林志雄; 李德锐

    2013-01-01

      目的:近年RapidArc的临床应用已引起越来越多的关注,本研究比较RapidArc与固定野调强放射治疗(IMRT)两种放疗技术在晚期鼻咽癌治疗计划中的差异.方法:随机选取10例晚期鼻咽癌患者,采用RapidArc与IMRT两种技术进行计划设计与剂量验证,比较计划的靶区剂量、危及器官与正常组织剂量、机器跳数、治疗时间与剂量验证结果.结果:两种计划的剂量分布基本一致,均能提供足够的靶区剂量.RapidArc的PTVnx最小剂量,PTVnd、PTV60、喉、腮腺的平均剂量低于IMRT,PTV60的HI值高于 IMRT,机器跳数比 IMRT 减少约58%,治疗时间减少约70%.以3%/3mm 为界,RapidArc 验证的γ指数通过率为(98.75±0.50)%,IMRT的通过率为(98.86±0.67)%.结论:两种放疗技术均能够满足临床治疗需要,剂量验证结果能够较好的符合计划计算结果.RapidArc比IMRT有着更多的优势,不仅可以减少机器跳数,缩短治疗时间,而且可以减少喉、腮腺的受照剂量.%Objective: This study compares volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) and fixed field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: Ten advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients were randomly selected for this study. Two treatment plans were completed for each patient, i.e., the RapidArc and IMRT schemes. Dosimetric verification was conducted for each scheme. The doses for the planning target volumes (PTVs), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissues were compared. The technical delivery parameters, including monitor units (MUs), time of therapy, and results of dosimetric verification, were analyzed. Results: No significant differences were found in dose distribution between the two schemes. Both techniques delivered adequate doses for the PTVs. For RapidArc planning, the minimal dose of PTVnx, mean dose of PTVnd, PTV60, larynx, and parotid were lower compared with those of IMRT schemes, whereas the

  12. Equipment and methods for rapid analysis of PWO full size scintillation crystals radiation hardness at mass production

    CERN Document Server

    Annenkov, A N; Drobychev, G Yu; Fedorov, A; Ivankin, P; Korzhik, M V; Lecoq, P; Ligun, V; Lopatik, A; Matveev, L; Missevitch, O V; Zouevski, R F; Peigneux, J P; Sigovski, A

    2000-01-01

    This year an extensive R&D on lead tungstate crystals has entered into the pre-production phase at the Bogoroditsk Techno-Chemical Plant (BTCP). Laboratory small-scale PWO crystal growth technology, which has been tuned and optimised over the last years, is transforming now into an industrial technology of mass production. This mass production technology is based on a set of methods and instrumentation for crystal growth, machining, crystal quality control and certification. According to the specification on lead tungstate pre-production crystals, one of the most important categories of tolerance is the radiation hardness. Control of the PWO radiation hardness at the pre-production phase requires reliability and an easy to use measuring tool with a high productivity. A semi- automatic spectrometric setup for PWO radiation hardness monitoring has been developed and tested at the X5 CERN irradiation facility. After final crosschecks the setup was set into operation at the BTCP. Together with several other m...

  13. Liver transplant-related anastomotic biliary strictures: a novel, rapid, safe, radiation-sparing, and cost-effective management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Monique T; Huang, Robert J; Thosani, Nirav C; Choudhary, Abhishek; Girotra, Mohit; Banerjee, Subhas

    2017-07-27

    Biliary strictures after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) are typically managed by sequential ERCP procedures, with incremental dilation of the stricture and stent exchange (IDSE) and placement of new stents. This approach resolves >80% of strictures after 12 months, but requires costly, lengthy ERCPs with significant patient radiation exposure. Increasing awareness of the harmful effects of radiation, escalating health care costs, and decreasing reimbursement for procedures mandate maximal efficiency in performing ERCP. We compared the traditional IDSE protocol with a sequential stent addition (SSA) protocol, in which additional stents are placed across the stricture during sequential ERCPs, without stent removal/exchange or stricture dilation. Patients undergoing ERCP for OLT-related anastomotic strictures from 2010-2016 were identified from a prospectively maintained endoscopy database. Procedure duration, fluoroscopy time, stricture resolution rates, adverse events, materials fees, and facility fees were analyzed for IDSE and SSA procedures. Seventy-seven patients underwent 277 IDSE and 132 SSA procedures. Mean fluoroscopy time was 64.5% shorter (p95% and low adverse event rates did not significantly differ. Sequential stent addition results in shorter, cost-effective procedures requiring fewer accessory devices and exposing patients to less radiation. Stricture resolution rates are equivalent to incremental dilation and stent exchange and adverse events do not differ significantly, even in this immunocompromised population. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. SU-E-J-170: Dosimetric Consequences of Uncorrected Rotational Setup Errors During Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Treatment of Pancreatic Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Maso, L [Chicago, IL (United States); Forbang, R Teboh; Zhang, Y; Herman, J; Lee, J [John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the dosimetric consequences of uncorrected rotational setup errors during SBRT for pancreatic cancer patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study utilizing data from ten (n=10) previously treated SBRT pancreas patients. For each original planning CT, we applied rotational transformations to derive additional CT images representative of possible rotational setup errors. This resulted in 6 different sets of rotational combinations, creating a total of 60 CT planning images. The patients’ clinical dosimetric plans were then applied to their corresponding rotated CT images. The 6 rotation sets encompassed a 3, 2 and 1-degree rotation in each rotational direction and a 3-degree in just the pitch, a 3-degree in just the yaw and a 3-degree in just the roll. After the dosimetric plan was applied to the rotated CT images, the resulting plan was then evaluated and compared with the clinical plan for tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: PTV coverage, defined here by V33 throughout all of the patients’ clinical plans, ranged from 92–98%. After an n degree rotation in each rotational direction that range decreased to 68–87%, 85–92%, and 88– 94% for n=3, 2 and 1 respectively. Normal tissue sparing defined here by the proximal stomach V15 throughout all of the patients’ clinical plans ranged from 0–8.9 cc. After an n degree rotation in each rotational direction that range increased to 0–17 cc, 0–12 cc, and 0–10 cc for n=3, 2, and 1 respectively. Conclusion: For pancreatic SBRT, small rotational setup errors in the pitch, yaw and roll direction on average caused under dosage to PTV and over dosage to proximal normal tissue. The 1-degree rotation was on average the least detrimental to the normal tissue and the coverage of the PTV. The 3-degree yaw created on average the lowest increase in volume coverage to normal tissue. This research was sponsored by the AAPM Education Council through the AAPM Education and Research

  15. Gamma-H2AX biodosimetry for use in large scale radiation incidents: comparison of a rapid ‘96 well lyse/fix’ protocol with a routine method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne Moquet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Following a radiation incident, preliminary dose estimates made by γ-H2AX foci analysis can supplement the early triage of casualties based on clinical symptoms. Sample processing time is important when many individuals need to be rapidly assessed. A protocol was therefore developed for high sample throughput that requires less than 0.1 ml blood, thus potentially enabling finger prick sampling. The technique combines red blood cell lysis and leukocyte fixation in one step on a 96 well plate, in contrast to the routine protocol, where lymphocytes in larger blood volumes are typically separated by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation with subsequent washing and fixation steps. The rapid ‘96 well lyse/fix’ method reduced the estimated sample processing time for 96 samples to about 4 h compared to 15 h using the routine protocol. However, scoring 20 cells in 96 samples prepared by the rapid protocol took longer than for the routine method (3.1 versus 1.5 h at zero dose; 7.0 versus 6.1 h for irradiated samples. Similar foci yields were scored for both protocols and consistent dose estimates were obtained for samples exposed to 0, 0.2, 0.6, 1.1, 1.2, 2.1 and 4.3 Gy of 250 kVp X-rays at 0.5 Gy/min and incubated for 2 h. Linear regression coefficients were 0.87 ± 0.06 (R2 = 97.6% and 0.85 ± 0.05 (R2 = 98.3% for estimated versus actual doses for the routine and lyse/fix method, respectively. The lyse/fix protocol can therefore facilitate high throughput processing for γ-H2AX biodosimetry for use in large scale radiation incidents, at the cost of somewhat longer foci scoring times.

  16. HAT-P-57b: A Short-Period Giant Planet Transiting A Bright Rapidly Rotating A8V Star Confirmed Via Doppler Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, J D; Buchhave, L A; Torres, G; Latham, D W; Kovács, G; Bhatti, W; Csubry, Z; de Val-Borro, M; Penev, K; Huang, C X; Béky, B; Bieryla, A; Quinn, S N; Howard, A W; Marcy, G W; Johnson, J A; Isaacson, H; Fischer, D A; Noyes, R W; Falco, E; Esquerdo, G A; Knox, R P; Hinz, P; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of HAT-P-57b, a P = 2.4653 day transiting planet around a V = 10.465 +- 0.029 mag, Teff = 7500 +- 250 K main sequence A8V star with a projected rotation velocity of v sin i = 102.1 +- 1.3 km s^-1. We measure the radius of the planet to be R = 1.413 +- 0.054 R_J and, based on RV observations, place a 95% confidence upper limit on its mass of M < 1.85 M_J . Based on theoretical stellar evolution models, the host star has a mass and radius of 1.47 +- 0.12 M_sun, and 1.500 +- 0.050 R_sun, respectively. Spectroscopic observations made with Keck-I/HIRES during a partial transit event show the Doppler shadow of HAT-P-57b moving across the average spectral line profile of HAT-P- 57, confirming the object as a planetary system. We use these observations, together with analytic formulae that we derive for the line profile distortions, to determine the projected angle between the spin axis of HAT-P-57 and the orbital axis of HAT-P-57b. The data permit two possible solutions, with -16.7 deg &l...

  17. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramadhar, Timothy R. [Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts, 02115 (United States); Zheng, Shao-Liang [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02138 (United States); Chen, Yu-Sheng [ChemMatCARS, Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, The University of Chicago c/o Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States); Clardy, Jon, E-mail: jon-clardy@hms.harvard.edu [Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts, 02115 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This report describes complete practical guidelines and insights for the crystalline sponge method, which have been derived through the first use of synchrotron radiation on these systems, and includes a procedure for faster synthesis of the sponges. These guidelines will be applicable to crystal sponge data collected at synchrotrons or in-house facilities, and will allow researchers to obtain reliable high-quality data and construct chemically and physically sensible models for guest structural determination. A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collection times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine

  18. Triaxial rotation in atomic nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-Shou; GAO Zao-Chun

    2009-01-01

    The Projected Shell Model has been developed to include the spontaneously broken axial symmetry so that the rapidly rotating triaxial nuclei can be described microscopically. The theory provides an useful tool to gain an insight into how a triaxial nucleus rotates, a fundamental question in nuclear structure. We shall address some current interests that are strongly associated with the triaxial rotation. A feasible method to explore the problem has been suggested.

  19. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission XIV. CoRoT-11b: a transiting massive "hot-Jupiter" in a prograde orbit around a rapidly rotating F-type star

    CERN Document Server

    Gandolfi, D; Alonso, R; Deleuil, M; Guenther, E W; Fridlund, M; Endl, M; Eigmüller, P; Csizmadia, Sz; Havel, M; Aigrain, S; Auvergne, M; Baglin, A; Barge, P; Bonomo, A S; Bordé, P; Bouchy, F; Bruntt, H; Cabrera, J; Carpano, S; Carone, L; Cochran, W D; Deeg, H J; Dvorak, R; Eislöffel, J; Erikson, A; Ferraz-Mello, S; Gazzano, J -C; Gibson, N P; Gillon, M; Gondoin, P; Guillot, T; Hartmann, M; Hatzes, A; Jorda, L; Kabath, P; Léger, A; Llebaria, A; Lammer, H; MacQueen, P J; Mayor, M; Mazeh, T; Moutou, C; Ollivier, M; Pätzold, M; Pepe, F; Queloz, D; Rauer, H; Rouan, D; Samuel, B; Schneider, J; Stecklum, B; Tingley, B; Udry, S; Wuchterl, G; 10.1051/0004-6361/201015132

    2010-01-01

    The CoRoT exoplanet science team announces the discovery of CoRoT-11b, a fairly massive hot-Jupiter transiting a V=12.9 mag F6 dwarf star (M*=1.27 +/- 0.05 Msun, R*=1.37 +/- 0.03 Rsun, Teff=6440 +/- 120 K), with an orbital period of P=2.994329 +/- 0.000011 days and semi-major axis a=0.0436 +/- 0.005 AU. The detection of part of the radial velocity anomaly caused by the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect shows that the transit-like events detected by CoRoT are caused by a planet-sized transiting object in a prograde orbit. The relatively high projected rotational velocity of the star (vsini=40+/-5 km/s) places CoRoT-11 among the most rapidly rotating planet host stars discovered so far. With a planetary mass of mp=2.33+/-0.34 Mjup and radius rp=1.43+/-0.03 Rjup, the resulting mean density of CoRoT-11b (rho=0.99+/-0.15 g/cm^3) can be explained with a model for an inflated hydrogen-planet with a solar composition and a high level of energy dissipation in its interior.

  20. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhar, Timothy R.; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Clardy, Jon

    2015-01-01

    A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collection times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine occupancies, discussion of the proper use of geometric and anisotropic displacement parameter restraints and constraints, and whether to perform solvent squeezing/masking. The single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation process for the crystal sponges is also discussed. The presented general guidelines will be invaluable for researchers interested in using the crystalline sponge method at in-house diffraction or synchrotron facilities, will facilitate the collection and analysis of reliable high

  1. Geography shapes the phylogeny of frailejones (Espeletiinae Cuatrec., Asteraceae): a remarkable example of recent rapid radiation in sky islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Janet C.

    2017-01-01

    Background The páramo ecosystem, located above the timberline in the tropical Andes, has been the setting for some of the most dramatic plant radiations, and it is one of the world’s fastest evolving and most diverse high-altitude ecosystems. Today 144+ species of frailejones (subtribe Espeletiinae Cuatrec., Asteraceae) dominate the páramo. Frailejones have intrigued naturalists and botanists, not just for their appealing beauty and impressive morphological diversity, but also for their remarkable adaptations to the extremely harsh environmental conditions of the páramo. Previous attempts to reconstruct the evolutionary history of this group failed to resolve relationships among genera and species, and there is no agreement regarding the classification of the group. Thus, our goal was to reconstruct the phylogeny of the frailejones and to test the influence of the geography on it as a first step to understanding the patterns of radiation of these plants. Methods Field expeditions in 70 páramos of Colombia and Venezuela resulted in 555 collected samples from 110 species. Additional material was obtained from herbarium specimens. Sequence data included nrDNA (ITS and ETS) and cpDNA (rpl16), for an aligned total of 2,954 bp. Fragment analysis was performed with AFLP data using 28 primer combinations and yielding 1,665 fragments. Phylogenies based on sequence data were reconstructed under maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. The AFLP dataset employed minimum evolution analyses. A Monte Carlo permutation test was used to infer the influence of the geography on the phylogeny. Results Phylogenies reconstructed suggest that most genera are paraphyletic, but the phylogenetic signal may be misled by hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting. A tree with all the available molecular data shows two large clades: one of primarily Venezuelan species that includes a few neighboring Colombian species; and a second clade of only Colombian species

  2. WE-AB-303-09: Rapid Projection Computations for On-Board Digital Tomosynthesis in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliopoulos, AS; Sun, X [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Pitsianis, N [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Yin, FF; Ren, L [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To facilitate fast and accurate iterative volumetric image reconstruction from limited-angle on-board projections. Methods: Intrafraction motion hinders the clinical applicability of modern radiotherapy techniques, such as lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The LIVE system may impact clinical practice by recovering volumetric information via Digital Tomosynthesis (DTS), thus entailing low time and radiation dose for image acquisition during treatment. The DTS is estimated as a deformation of prior CT via iterative registration with on-board images; this shifts the challenge to the computational domain, owing largely to repeated projection computations across iterations. We address this issue by composing efficient digital projection operators from their constituent parts. This allows us to separate the static (projection geometry) and dynamic (volume/image data) parts of projection operations by means of pre-computations, enabling fast on-board processing, while also relaxing constraints on underlying numerical models (e.g. regridding interpolation kernels). Further decoupling the projectors into simpler ones ensures the incurred memory overhead remains low, within the capacity of a single GPU. These operators depend only on the treatment plan and may be reused across iterations and patients. The dynamic processing load is kept to a minimum and maps well to the GPU computational model. Results: We have integrated efficient, pre-computable modules for volumetric ray-casting and FDK-based back-projection with the LIVE processing pipeline. Our results show a 60x acceleration of the DTS computations, compared to the previous version, using a single GPU; presently, reconstruction is attained within a couple of minutes. The present implementation allows for significant flexibility in terms of the numerical and operational projection model; we are investigating the benefit of further optimizations and accurate digital projection sub

  3. Rotating flow

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, Peter R N

    2010-01-01

    Rotating flow is critically important across a wide range of scientific, engineering and product applications, providing design and modeling capability for diverse products such as jet engines, pumps and vacuum cleaners, as well as geophysical flows. Developed over the course of 20 years' research into rotating fluids and associated heat transfer at the University of Sussex Thermo-Fluid Mechanics Research Centre (TFMRC), Rotating Flow is an indispensable reference and resource for all those working within the gas turbine and rotating machinery industries. Traditional fluid and flow dynamics

  4. Rapid precipitation of radiation belt electrons induced by EMIC rising tone emissions localized in longitude inside and outside the plasmapause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yuko; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2017-01-01

    By performing test particle simulations of relativistic electrons scattered by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) rising tone emissions, we find a nonlinear scattering process named SLPA (Scattering at Low Pitch Angle) totally different from the nonlinear wave trapping. The nonlinear wave trapping, occurring for high pitch angles away from the loss cone, scatters some of resonant electrons to lower pitch angles, and a fraction of the electrons is further transported into the loss cone by SLPA after being released from the wave trapping. SLPA as well as the nonlinear wave trapping can work in any cases with proton band or helium band and inside or outside the plasmapause. We clarify that the combined scattering process causes significant depletion of the outer radiation belt. In the time evolution of an electron distribution observed locally in longitude, we find echoes of the electron depletion by the localized EMIC emissions. Monitoring fluxes of electrons being lost into the atmosphere in the wave generation region, we also find that efficient relativistic electron precipitation in several seconds. The characteristics of the precipitating electron flux as a function of kinetic energy vary significantly depending on the wave frequency range and the plasma density.

  5. Rapid Radiations and the Race to Redundancy: An Investigation of the Evolution of Australian Elapid Snake Venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Timothy N W; Koludarov, Ivan; Ali, Syed A; Dobson, James; Zdenek, Christina N; Dashevsky, Daniel; Op den Brouw, Bianca; Masci, Paul P; Nouwens, Amanda; Josh, Peter; Goldenberg, Jonathan; Cipriani, Vittoria; Hay, Chris; Hendrikx, Iwan; Dunstan, Nathan; Allen, Luke; Fry, Bryan G

    2016-10-26

    Australia is the stronghold of the front-fanged venomous snake family Elapidae. The Australasian elapid snake radiation, which includes approximately 100 terrestrial species in Australia, as well as Melanesian species and all the world's sea snakes, is less than 12 million years old. The incredible phenotypic and ecological diversity of the clade is matched by considerable diversity in venom composition. The clade's evolutionary youth and dynamic evolution should make it of particular interest to toxinologists, however, the majority of species, which are small, typically inoffensive, and seldom encountered by non-herpetologists, have been almost completely neglected by researchers. The present study investigates the venom composition of 28 species proteomically, revealing several interesting trends in venom composition, and reports, for the first time in elapid snakes, the existence of an ontogenetic shift in the venom composition and activity of brown snakes (Pseudonaja sp.). Trends in venom composition are compared to the snakes' feeding ecology and the paper concludes with an extended discussion of the selection pressures shaping the evolution of snake venom.

  6. Coilin is rapidly recruited to UVA-induced DNA lesions and γ-radiation affects localized movement of Cajal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártová, Eva; Foltánková, Veronika; Legartová, Soňa; Sehnalová, Petra; Sorokin, Dmitry V; Suchánková, Jana; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Cajal bodies are important nuclear structures containing proteins that preferentially regulate RNA-related metabolism. We investigated the cell-type specific nuclear distribution of Cajal bodies and the level of coilin, a protein of Cajal bodies, in non-irradiated and irradiated human tumor cell lines and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Cajal bodies were localized in different nuclear compartments, including DAPI-poor regions, in the proximity of chromocenters, and adjacent to nucleoli. The number of Cajal bodies per nucleus was cell cycle-dependent, with higher numbers occurring during G2 phase. Human ES cells contained a high coilin level in the nucleoplasm, but coilin-positive Cajal bodies were also identified in nuclei of mouse and human ES cells. Coilin, but not SMN, recognized UVA-induced DNA lesions, which was cell cycle-independent. Treatment with γ-radiation reduced the localized movement of Cajal bodies in many cell types and GFP-coilin fluorescence recovery after photobleaching was very fast in nucleoplasm in comparison with GFP-coilin recovery in DNA lesions. By contrast, nucleolus-localized coilin displayed very slow fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, which indicates very slow rates of protein diffusion, especially in nucleoli of mouse ES cells.

  7. Rapid Radiations and the Race to Redundancy: An Investigation of the Evolution of Australian Elapid Snake Venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy N. W. Jackson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Australia is the stronghold of the front-fanged venomous snake family Elapidae. The Australasian elapid snake radiation, which includes approximately 100 terrestrial species in Australia, as well as Melanesian species and all the world's true sea snakes, may be less than 12 million years old.. The incredible phenotypic and ecological diversity of the clade is matched by considerable diversity in venom composition. The clade’s evolutionary youth and dynamic evolution should make it of particular interest to toxinologists, however, the majority of species, which are small, typically inoffensive, and seldom encountered by non-herpetologists, have been almost completely neglected by researchers. The present study investigates the venom composition of 28 species proteomically, revealing several interesting trends in venom composition, and reports, for the first time in elapid snakes, the existence of an ontogenetic shift in the venom composition and activity of brown snakes (Pseudonaja sp.. Trends in venom composition are compared to the snakes’ feeding ecology and the paper concludes with an extended discussion of the selection pressures shaping the evolution of snake venom.

  8. Rapid Radiations and the Race to Redundancy: An Investigation of the Evolution of Australian Elapid Snake Venoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Timothy N. W.; Koludarov, Ivan; Ali, Syed A.; Dobson, James; Zdenek, Christina N.; Dashevsky, Daniel; op den Brouw, Bianca; Masci, Paul P.; Nouwens, Amanda; Josh, Peter; Goldenberg, Jonathan; Cipriani, Vittoria; Hay, Chris; Hendrikx, Iwan; Dunstan, Nathan; Allen, Luke; Fry, Bryan G.

    2016-01-01

    Australia is the stronghold of the front-fanged venomous snake family Elapidae. The Australasian elapid snake radiation, which includes approximately 100 terrestrial species in Australia, as well as Melanesian species and all the world’s true sea snakes, may be less than 12 million years old. The incredible phenotypic and ecological diversity of the clade is matched by considerable diversity in venom composition. The clade’s evolutionary youth and dynamic evolution should make it of particular interest to toxinologists, however, the majority of species, which are small, typically inoffensive, and seldom encountered by non-herpetologists, have been almost completely neglected by researchers. The present study investigates the venom composition of 28 species proteomically, revealing several interesting trends in venom composition, and reports, for the first time in elapid snakes, the existence of an ontogenetic shift in the venom composition and activity of brown snakes (Pseudonaja sp.). Trends in venom composition are compared to the snakes’ feeding ecology and the paper concludes with an extended discussion of the selection pressures shaping the evolution of snake venom. PMID:27792190

  9. Rapid assessment of high-dose radiation exposures through scoring of cell-fusion-induced premature chromosome condensation and ring chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamadrid Boada, A I; Romero Aguilera, I; Terzoudi, G I; González Mesa, J E; Pantelias, G; García, O

    2013-09-18

    Analysis of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) mediated by fusion of G0-lymphocytes with mitotic CHO cells in combination with rapid visualization and quantification of rings (PCC-Rf) is proposed as an alternative technique for dose assessment of radiation-exposed individuals. Isolated lymphocytes or whole blood from six individuals were γ-irradiated with 5, 10, 15 and 20Gy at a dose rate of 0.5Gy/min. Following either 8- or 24-h post-exposure incubation of irradiated samples at 37°C, chromosome spreads were prepared by standard PCC cytogenetic procedures. The protocol for PCC fusion proved to be effective at doses as high as 20Gy, enabling the analysis of ring chromosomes and excess PCC fragments. The ring frequencies remained constant during the 8-24-h repair time; the pooled dose relationship between ring frequency (Y) and dose (D) was linear: Y=(0.088±0.005)×D. During the repair time, excess fragments decreased from 0.91 to 0.59 chromatid pieces per Gy, revealing the importance of information about the exact time of exposure for dose assessment on the basis of fragments. Compared with other cytogenetic assays to estimate radiation dose, the PCC-Rf method has the following benefits: a 48-h culture time is not required, allowing a much faster assessment of dose in comparison with conventional scoring of dicentrics and rings in assays for chemically-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC-Rch), and it allows the analysis of heavily irradiated lymphocytes that are delayed or never reach mitosis, thus avoiding the problem of saturation at high doses. In conclusion, the use of the PCC fusion assay in conjunction with scoring of rings in G0-lymphocytes offers a suitable alternative for fast dose estimation following accidental exposure to high radiation doses.

  10. Rapid high-performance sample digestion of base metal ores using high-intensity infrared radiation with determination by nitrogen-based microwave plasma optical spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Infrared sample digestion technology has been rapidly developed in recent years and its application and digestion performance on a variety of ores of base metals was assessed in this study, using a 6-channel infrared digester. Digestion times of 10 min or less were achieved for all base metal ores investigated, including oxides, sulfides, and silicates of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Ti, W, and Zn. Performance criteria for all samples were excellent, reflected in z values of less than 2 in all cases. Various acid digestion methods were developed for the selected ore samples under high intensity infrared radiation and delivered virtually complete recoveries of all of the elements of interest. Chromite, the notoriously refractory chromium ore was digested within 10 min and gave 100% recovery of chromium. These digestions were accomplished without resorting to perchloric acid and, for most sample types, without hydrofluoric acid, significantly improving the workplace safety for analysts. Between-channel variation of the analyte recoveries from the 6-channel unit were generally below 2%, suggesting that the digestion methods developed with this platform provide reproducible results to meet various sample preparation demands. The high speed and analyte recovery of these digestions makes this methodology especially attractive for prospectors and developers who demand rapid and reliable results from exploration samples.

  11. Rotating Wavepackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  12. Can RNA-Seq Resolve the Rapid Radiation of Advanced Moths and Butterflies (Hexapoda: Lepidoptera: Apoditrysia)? An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazinet, Adam L.; Cummings, Michael P.; Mitter, Kim T.; Mitter, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Recent molecular phylogenetic studies of the insect order Lepidoptera have robustly resolved family-level divergences within most superfamilies, and most divergences among the relatively species-poor early-arising superfamilies. In sharp contrast, relationships among the superfamilies of more advanced moths and butterflies that comprise the mega-diverse clade Apoditrysia (ca. 145,000 spp.) remain mostly poorly supported. This uncertainty, in turn, limits our ability to discern the origins, ages and evolutionary consequences of traits hypothesized to promote the spectacular diversification of Apoditrysia. Low support along the apoditrysian “backbone” probably reflects rapid diversification. If so, it may be feasible to strengthen resolution by radically increasing the gene sample, but case studies have been few. We explored the potential of next-generation sequencing to conclusively resolve apoditrysian relationships. We used transcriptome RNA-Seq to generate 1579 putatively orthologous gene sequences across a broad sample of 40 apoditrysians plus four outgroups, to which we added two taxa from previously published data. Phylogenetic analysis of a 46-taxon, 741-gene matrix, resulting from a strict filter that eliminated ortholog groups containing any apparent paralogs, yielded dramatic overall increase in bootstrap support for deeper nodes within Apoditrysia as compared to results from previous and concurrent 19-gene analyses. High support was restricted mainly to the huge subclade Obtectomera broadly defined, in which 11 of 12 nodes subtending multiple superfamilies had bootstrap support of 100%. The strongly supported nodes showed little conflict with groupings from previous studies, and were little affected by changes in taxon sampling, suggesting that they reflect true signal rather than artifacts of massive gene sampling. In contrast, strong support was seen at only 2 of 11 deeper nodes among the “lower”, non-obtectomeran apoditrysians. These represent

  13. Rotational elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    We consider an infinite three-dimensional elastic continuum whose material points experience no displacements, only rotations. This framework is a special case of the Cosserat theory of elasticity. Rotations of material points are described mathematically by attaching to each geometric point an orthonormal basis that gives a field of orthonormal bases called the coframe. As the dynamical variables (unknowns) of our theory, we choose the coframe and a density. We write down the general dynamic variational functional for our rotational theory of elasticity, assuming our material to be physically linear but the kinematic model geometrically nonlinear. Allowing geometric nonlinearity is natural when dealing with rotations because rotations in dimension three are inherently nonlinear (rotations about different axes do not commute) and because there is no reason to exclude from our study large rotations such as full turns. The main result of the talk is an explicit construction of a class of time-dependent solutions that we call plane wave solutions; these are travelling waves of rotations. The existence of such explicit closed-form solutions is a non-trivial fact given that our system of Euler-Lagrange equations is highly nonlinear. We also consider a special case of our rotational theory of elasticity which in the stationary setting (harmonic time dependence and arbitrary dependence on spatial coordinates) turns out to be equivalent to a pair of massless Dirac equations. The talk is based on the paper [1]. [1] C.G.Boehmer, R.J.Downes and D.Vassiliev, Rotational elasticity, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 2011, vol. 64, p. 415-439. The paper is a heavily revised version of preprint https://arxiv.org/abs/1008.3833

  14. A further 'degree of freedom' in the rotational evolution of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Holzwarth, V R

    2005-01-01

    Observational and theoretical investigations provide evidence for non-uniform spot and magnetic flux distributions on rapidly rotating stars, which have a significant impact on their angular momentum loss rate through magnetised winds. Supplementing the formalism of MacGregor & Brenner (1991) with a latitude-dependent magnetised wind model, we analyse the effect of analytically prescribed surface distributions of open magnetic flux with different shapes and degrees of non-uniformity on the rotational evolution of a solar-like star. The angular momentum redistribution inside the star is treated in a qualitative way, assuming an angular momentum transfer between the rigidly-rotating radiative and convective zones on a constant coupling timescale of 15 Myr; for the sake of simplicity we disregard interactions with circumstellar disks. We find that non-uniform flux distributions entail rotational histories which differ significantly from those of classical approaches, with differences cumulating up to 200% du...

  15. Seismology of Rapidly Rotating Accreting White Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Townsley, Dean M; Bildsten, Lars

    2016-01-01

    A number of White Dwarfs (WDs) in cataclysmic binaries have shown brightness variations consistent with non-radial oscillations as observed in isolated WDs. A few objects have been well-characterized with photometric campaigns in the hopes of gleaning information about the mass, spin, and possibly internal structural characteristics. The novel aspect of this work is the possiblity to measure or constrain the interior structure and spin rate of WDs which have spent gigayears accreting material from their companion, undergoing thousands of nova outbursts in the process. In addition, variations in the surface temperature affect the site of mode driving, and provide unique and challenging tests for mode driving theories previously applied to isolated WD's. Having undergone long-term accretion, these WDs are expected to have been spun up. Spin periods in the range 60-100 seconds have been measured by other means for two objects, GW Lib and V455 And. Compared to typical mode frequencies, the spin frequency may be s...

  16. Transient Instability of Rapidly Rotating Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gralla, Samuel E; Zimmerman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We analytically study the linear response of a near-extremal Kerr black hole to external scalar, electromagnetic, and gravitational field perturbations. We show that the energy density, electromagnetic field strength, and tidal force experienced by infalling observers exhibit transient growth near the horizon. The growth lasts arbitrarily long in the extremal limit, reproducing the horizon instability of extremal Kerr. We explain these results in terms of near-horizon geometry and discuss potential astrophysical implications.

  17. Rotational superradiance in fluid laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Vitor; Richartz, Mauricio; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Rotational superradiance has been predicted theoretically decades ago, and is the chief responsible for a number of important effects and phenomenology in black hole physics. However, rotational superradiance has never been observed experimentally. Here, with the aim of probing superradiance in the lab, we investigate the behaviour of sound and surface waves in fluids resting in a circular basin at the center of which a rotating cylinder is placed. We show that with a suitable choice for the material of the cylinder, surface and sound waves are amplified. By confining the superradiant modes near the rotating cylinder, an instability sets in. Our findings are experimentally testable in existing fluid laboratories and hence offer experimental exploration and comparison of dynamical instabilities arising from rapidly rotating boundary layers in astrophysical as well as in fluid dynamical systems.

  18. Quasars a supermassive rotating toroidal black hole interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Spivey, R J

    2000-01-01

    A supermassive rotating toroidal black hole (TBH) is proposed as the fundamental structure of quasars and other jet-producing active galactic nuclei. Rotating protogalaxies gather matter from the central gaseous region leading to the birth of massive toroidal stars whose internal nuclear reactions proceed very rapidly. Once the nuclear fuel is spent, gravitational collapse produces a slender ring-shaped TBH remnant. These events are typically the first supernovae of the host galaxies. Given time the TBH mass increases through continued accretion by several orders of magnitude, the event horizon swells whilst the central aperture shrinks. The difference in angular velocities between the accreting matter and the TBH induces a magnetic field that is strongest in the region of the central aperture and innermost ergoregion. Due to the presence of negative energy states when such a gravitational vortex is immersed in an electromagnetic field, circumstances are near ideal for energy extraction via non-thermal radiat...

  19. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for abdominal targets using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc: Feasibility and clinical preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scorsetti, Marta; Bignardi, Mario; Alongi, Filippo; Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Castiglioni, Simona; Pentimalli, Sara; Tozzi, Angelo (IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano (Italy)), e-mail: pietro.mancosu@humanitas.it; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca (Oncology Inst. of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland))

    2011-05-15

    Purpose. To report early clinical experience in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc (RA) in patients with primary or metastatic tumours at abdominal sites. Material and methods. Thirty-seven consecutive patients were treated using RA. Of these, 16 had primary or metastatic liver tumours, nine had pancreatic cancer and 12 a nodal metastasis in the retro-peritoneum. Dose prescription varied from 45 to 75 Gy to the Clinical Target Volume in 3 to 6 fractions. The median follow-up was 12 months (6-22). Early local control and toxicity were investigated and reported. Results. Planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk were met in most cases. Delivery time ranged from 2.8 +- 0.3 to 9.2 +- 2.4 minutes and pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index from 95.3 +- 3.8 to 98.3 +- 1.7%. At the time of analysis, local control (freedom from progression) at six months, was assessable in 24 of 37 patients and was achieved in 19 patients with a crude rate of 79.2%. Seven patients experienced treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced a mild and transient G1 enteritis and two showed a transient G1 liver damage. Two had late toxicity: one developed chronic enteritis causing G1 diarrhoea and G1 abdominal pain and one suffered at three months a G3 gastric bleeding. No patients experienced G4 acute toxicity. Conclusions. SBRT for abdominal targets delivered by means of RA resulted to be feasible with good early clinical results in terms of local control rate and acute toxicity profile. RA allowed to achieve required target coverage as well as to keep within normal tissue dose/volume constraints

  20. Rotating samples in FT-RAMAN spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paepe, A. T. G.; Dyke, J. M.; Hendra, P. J.; Langkilde, F. W.

    1997-11-01

    It is customary to rotate samples in Raman spectroscopy to avoid absorption or sample heating. In FT-Raman experiments the rotation is always shown (typically 30-60 rpm) because higher speeds are thought to generate noise in the spectra. In this article we show that more rapid rotation is possible. A tablet containing maleic acid and one made up of sub-millimetre silica particles with metoprolol succinate as active ingredient were rotated at different speeds, up to 6760 rpm. The FT-Raman spectra were recorded and studied. We conclude that it is perfectly acceptable to rotate samples up to 1500 rpm.

  1. Radiation Hardened Structured ASIC Platform for Rapid Chip Development for Very High Speed System on a Chip (SoC) and Complex Digital Logic Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation Hardened Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) provide for the highest performance, lowest power and size for Space Missions. In order to...

  2. Rapid degradation of azo dye Direct Black BN by magnetic MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC under microwave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jia; Yang, Shaogui, E-mail: yangsg@nju.edu.cn; Li, Na; Meng, Lingjun; Wang, Fei; He, Huan; Sun, Cheng

    2016-08-30

    of DB BN demonstrated that the C-S, C-N and azo bonds in the DB BN molecule were destroyed gradually. MW-induced ·OH and holes could be responsible for the efficient removal involved in the system. These findings make MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC become an excellent MW absorbent as well as an effective MW catalyst with rapid degradation of DB BN. Therefore, it may be promising for MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiC under MW radiation to deal with various dyestuffs and other toxic organic pollutants.

  3. Rapid Arc, helical tomotherapy, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy and three dimensional conformal radiation for localized prostate cancer: A dosimetric comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh A Kinhikar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of RapidArc (RA compared with helical tomotherapy (HT, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SW IMRT and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT for localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Prescription doses ranged from 60 Gy to planning target volume (PTV and 66.25 Gy for clinical target volume prostate (CTV-P over 25-30 fractions. PTV and CTV-P coverage were evaluated by conformity index (CI and homogeneity index (HI. Organ sparing comparison was done with mean doses to rectum and bladder. Results: CI 95 were 1.0 ± 0.01 (RA, 0.99 ± 0.01 (HT, 0.97 ± 0.02 (IMRT, 0.98 ± 0.02 (3D CRT for PTV and 1.0 ± 0.00 (RA, HT, SW IMRT and 3D CRT for CTV-P. HI was 0.11 ± 0.03 (RA, 0.16 ± 0.08 (HT, 0.12 ± 0.03 (IMRT, 0.06 ± 0.01 (3D CRT for PTV and 0.03 ± 0.00 (RA, 0.05 ± 0.01 (HT, 0.03 ± 0.01 (SW IMRT and 3D CRT for CTV-P. Mean dose to bladder were 23.68 ± 13.23 Gy (RA, 24.55 ± 12.51 Gy (HT, 19.82 ± 11.61 Gy (IMRT and 23.56 ± 12.81 Gy (3D CRT, whereas mean dose to rectum was 36.85 ± 12.92 Gy (RA, 33.18 ± 11.12 Gy (HT, IMRT and 38.67 ± 12.84 Gy (3D CRT. Conclusion: All studied intensity-modulated techniques yield treatment plans of significantly improved quality when compared with 3D CRT, with HT providing best organs at risk sparing and RA being the most efficient treatment option, reducing treatment time to 1.45-3.7 min and monitor unit to <400 for a 2 Gy fraction.

  4. Rapid degradation of azo dye Direct Black BN by magnetic MgFe2O4-SiC under microwave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jia; Yang, Shaogui; Li, Na; Meng, Lingjun; Wang, Fei; He, Huan; Sun, Cheng

    2016-08-01

    A novel microwave (MW) catalyst, MgFe2O4 loaded on SiC (MgFe2O4-SiC), was successfully synthesized by sol-gel method, and pure MgFe2O4 was used as reference. The MgFe2O4 and MgFe2O4-SiC catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption analyzer (BET specific surface area), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electromagnetic parameters of the prepared catalysts were measured by vector network analyzer. The reflection loss (RL) based on the electromagnetic parameters calculated in Matlab showed MgFe2O4-SiC attained the maximum absorbing value of 13.32 dB at 2.57 GHz, which reached extremely high RL value at low frequency range, revealing the excellent MW absorption property of MgFe2O4-SiC. MW-induced degradation of Direct Black BN (DB BN) over as-synthesized MgFe2O4-SiC indicated that degradation efficiency of DB BN (20 mg L-1) in 5 min reached 96.5%, the corresponding TOC removal was 65%, and the toxicity of DB BN after degradation by MgFe2O4-SiC obviously decreased. The good stability and applicability of MgFe2O4-SiC on the degradation process were also discovered. Moreover, the ionic chromatogram during degradation of DB BN demonstrated that the C-S, C-N and azo bonds in the DB BN molecule were destroyed gradually. MW-induced rad OH and holes could be responsible for the efficient removal involved in the system. These findings make MgFe2O4-SiC become an excellent MW absorbent as well as an effective MW catalyst with rapid degradation of DB BN. Therefore, it may be promising for MgFe2O4-SiC under MW radiation to deal with various dyestuffs and other toxic organic pollutants.

  5. Control of molecular rotation in the limit of extreme rotational excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Milner, V

    2015-01-01

    Laser control of molecular rotation is an area of active research. A number of recent studies has aimed at expanding the reach of rotational control to extreme, previously inaccessible rotational states, as well as controlling the directionality of molecular rotation. Dense ensembles of molecules undergoing ultrafast uni-directional rotation, known as molecular superrotors, are anticipated to exhibit unique properties, from spatially anisotropic diffusion and vortex formation to the creation of powerful acoustic waves and tuneable THz radiation. Here we describe our recent progress in controlling molecular rotation in the regime of high rotational excitation. We review two experimental techniques of producing uni-directional rotational wave packets with a "chiral train" of femtosecond pulses and an "optical centrifuge". Three complementary detection methods, enabling the direct observation, characterization and control of the superrotor states, are outlined: the one based on coherent Raman scattering, and two...

  6. Stellar rotation effects in polarimetric microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the polarization signal in microlensing events of hot stars is larger than that of main-sequence stars. Most hot stars rapidly rotate around their stellar axes. The stellar rotation makes ellipticity and gravity-darkening effects which break the spherical symmetry of the source shape and the circular symmetry of the source surface brightness respectively. Hence, it causes a net polarization signal for the source star. This polarization signal should be considered in polarimetry microlensing of fast rotating stars. For moderate rotating stars, lensing can magnify or even characterize small polarization signals due to the stellar rotation through polarimetry observations. The gravity-darkening effect due to a rotating source star makes asymmetric perturbations in polarimetry and photometry microlensing curves whose maximum happens when the lens trajectory crosses the projected position of the rotation pole on the sky plane. The stellar ellipticity makes a time shift (i) in the position of ...

  7. Effect of the Quadrupole Moment of a Rotating Massive Object on the Gravitational Faraday Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈贻汉; 邵常贵

    2002-01-01

    We study the rotation of the polarization plane for a ray of electromagnetic radiation propagating in the grav-itoelectromagnetic field caused by a rotating massive object with the quadrupole moment. The effect of thequadrupole moment on the gravitational Faraday rotation is investigated. It is found that the gravitational Fara-day effect of the quadrupole moment is negligible for Kerr black holes, but this effect is important for rapidlyrotating neutron stars.

  8. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

    2013-09-11

    Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  9. Full Rotational Control of Levitated Silicon Nanorods

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhn, Stefan; Stickler, Benjamin A; Patolsky, Fernando; Hornberger, Klaus; Arndt, Markus; Millen, James

    2016-01-01

    We study a nanofabricated silicon rod levitated in an optical trap. By manipulating the polarization of the light we gain full control over the ro-translational dynamics of the rod. We are able to trap both its centre-of-mass and align it along the linear polarization of the laser field. The rod can be set into rotation at a tuned frequency by exploiting the radiation pressure exerted by elliptically polarized light. The rotational motion of the rod dynamically modifies the optical potential, which allows tuning of the rotational frequency over hundreds of Kilohertz. This ability to trap and control the motion and alignment of nanoparticles opens up the field of rotational optomechanics, rotational ground state cooling and the study of rotational thermodynamics in the underdamped regime.

  10. Alignment of suprathermally rotating grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarian, A.

    1995-12-01

    It is shown that mechanical alignment can be efficient for suprathermally rotating grains, provided that they drift with supersonic velocities. Such a drift should be widely spread due to both Alfvenic waves and ambipolar diffusion. Moreover, if suprathermal rotation is caused by grain interaction with a radiative flux, it is shown that mechanical alignment may be present even in the absence of supersonic drift. This means that the range of applicability of mechanical alignment is wider than generally accepted and that it can rival the paramagnetic one. We also study the latter mechanism and re-examine the interplay between poisoning of active sites and desorption of molecules blocking the access to the active sites of H_2 formation, in order to explain the observed poor alignment of small grains and good alignment of large grains. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of alignment, we briefly discuss the alignment by radiation fluxes and by grain magnetic moments.

  11. Wormhole shadows in rotating dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Takayuki; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    As an extension of our previous work, which investigated the shadows of the Ellis wormhole surrounded by nonrotating dust, in this paper we study wormhole shadows in a rotating dust flow. First, we derive steady-state solutions of slowly rotating dust surrounding the wormhole by solving relativistic Euler equations. Solving null geodesic equations and radiation transfer equations, we investigate the images of the wormhole surrounded by dust for the above steady-state solutions. Because the Ellis wormhole spacetime possesses unstable circular orbits of photons, a bright ring appears in the image, just as in Schwarzschild spacetime. The bright ring looks distorted due to rotation. Aside from the bright ring, there appear weakly luminous complex patterns by the emission from the other side of the throat. These structure could be detected by high-resolution very-long-baseline-interferometry observations in the near future.

  12. Rotator cuff exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000357.htm Rotator cuff exercises To use the sharing features on this ... gov/pubmed/25560729 . Read More Frozen shoulder Rotator cuff problems Rotator cuff repair Shoulder arthroscopy Shoulder CT scan Shoulder ...

  13. Confirmation of bistable stellar differential rotation profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Käpylä, P J; Brandenburg, A

    2014-01-01

    (abridged) Context: Solar-like differential rotation is characterized by a rapidly rotating equator and slower poles. However, theoretical models and numerical simulations can also result in a slower equator and faster poles when the overall rotation is slow. Aims: We study the critical rotational influence under which differential rotation flips from solar-like (fast equator, slow poles) to an anti-solar one (slow equator, fast poles). We also estimate the non-diffusive ($\\Lambda$-effect) and diffusive (turbulent viscosity) contributions to the Reynolds stress. Methods: We perform three-dimensional numerical simulations of mildly turbulent convection in spherical wedge geometry. We regulate the convective velocities by varying the amount of heat transported by thermal conduction, turbulent diffusion, and resolved convection. Results: Increasing the efficiency of resolved convection leads to a reduction of the rotational influence on the flow and a sharp transition from solar-like to anti-solar differential r...

  14. Rotating Cavitation Supression Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a rotating cavitation (RC) suppressor for liquid rocket engine turbopump inducers. Cavitation instabilities, such as rotating...

  15. Clinical utility of RapidArcTM radiotherapy technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Infusino E

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Erminia Infusino Department of Radiotherapy, Campus Bio-Medico University Hospital, Rome, Italy Abstract: RapidArcTM is a radiation technique that delivers highly conformal dose distributions through the complete rotation (360° and speed variation of the linear accelerator gantry. This technique, called volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT, compared with conventional radiotherapy techniques, can achieve high-target volume coverage and sparing damage to normal tissues. RapidArc delivers precise dose distribution and conformity similar to or greater than intensity-modulated radiation therapy in a short time, generally a few minutes, to which image-guided radiation therapy is added. RapidArc has become a currently used technology in many centers, which use RapidArc technology to treat a large number of patients. Large and small hospitals use it to treat the most challenging cases, but more and more frequently for the most common cancers. The clinical use of RapidArc and VMAT technology is constantly growing. At present, a limited number of clinical data are published, mostly concerning planning and feasibility studies. Clinical outcome data are increasing for a few tumor sites, even if only a little. The purpose of this work is to discuss the current status of VMAT techniques in clinical use through a review of the published data of planning systems and clinical outcomes in several tumor sites. The study consisted of a systematic review based on analysis of manuscripts retrieved from the PubMed, BioMed Central, and Scopus databases by searching for the keywords "RapidArc", "Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy", and "Intensity-modulated radiotherapy". Keywords: IMRT, VMAT, SBRT, SRS, treatment planning software 

  16. Patient QA systems for rotational radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredh, Anna; Scherman, J.B.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per Martin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of commercial patient quality assurance (QA) systems to detect linear accelerator-related errors.......The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of commercial patient quality assurance (QA) systems to detect linear accelerator-related errors....

  17. Rapid Analysis of 239,238Pu, 241Am, and 90Sr for Nasal Smear Samples in Radiation Emergency and Evaluation of Intake Retention Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seokwon; Ha, Wi-Ho; Park, Sunhoo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Jin, Young-Woo

    2017-05-01

    The efficiency of the nasal smear method was reviewed to perform a method of sample collection, analysis and initial dose estimation. The screening method of alpha-emitting radionuclides using chemical separation and alpha spectrometry was also studied. To rapidly conduct the appropriate response to victims, special monitoring for Pu, Am, and Sr using sequential analysis was established, and the method was successfully validated through participation in an international inter-comparison program. The duration of the analysis method was evaluated with regard to application in emergency situations because of its relatively rapid treatment and counting time. The intake retention fraction was calculated and evaluated to review the characteristics of each radionuclide in the anterior nasal passage of the extra-thoracic region. No large difference was observed among the four radionuclides. However, the values of the intake retention fraction were affected by age groups because of the different respiratory rates. The effects of the Y ingrowth and particle size were also discussed.

  18. Molecular line study of the very young protostar IRAM 04191 in Taurus Infall, rotation, and outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Belloche, A; Despois, D; Blinder, S M

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed millimeter line study of the circumstellar environment of the low-luminosity Class 0 protostar IRAM 04191+1522 in the Taurus molecular cloud. New line observations demonstrate that the ~14000 AU radius protostellar envelope is undergoing both extended infall and fast, differential rotation. Radiative transfer modeling of multitransition CS and C34S maps indicate an infall velocity v_inf ~ 0.15 km/s at r ~ 1500 AU and v_inf ~ 0.1 km/s up to r ~ 11000 AU, as well as a rotational angular velocity Omega ~ 3.9 x 10^{-13} rad/s, strongly decreasing with radius beyond 3500 AU down to a value Omega ~ 1.5-3 x 10^{-14} rad/s at ~ 11000 AU. Two distinct regions, which differ in both their infall and their rotation properties, therefore seem to stand out: the inner part of the envelope (r ~< 2000-4000 AU) is rapidly collapsing and rotating, while the outer part undergoes only moderate infall/contraction and slower rotation. These contrasted features suggest that angular momentum is conserved in t...

  19. Safety and feasibility of STAT RAD: Improvement of a novel rapid tomotherapy-based radiation therapy workflow by failure mode and effects analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan T; Handsfield, Lydia; Read, Paul W; Wilson, David D; Van Ausdal, Ray; Schlesinger, David J; Siebers, Jeffrey V; Chen, Quan

    2015-01-01

    The clinical challenge of radiation therapy (RT) for painful bone metastases requires clinicians to consider both treatment efficacy and patient prognosis when selecting a radiation therapy regimen. The traditional RT workflow requires several weeks for common palliative RT schedules of 30 Gy in 10 fractions or 20 Gy in 5 fractions. At our institution, we have created a new RT workflow termed "STAT RAD" that allows clinicians to perform computed tomographic (CT) simulation, planning, and highly conformal single fraction treatment delivery within 2 hours. In this study, we evaluate the safety and feasibility of the STAT RAD workflow. A failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) was performed on the STAT RAD workflow, including development of a process map, identification of potential failure modes, description of the cause and effect, temporal occurrence, and team member involvement in each failure mode, and examination of existing safety controls. A risk probability number (RPN) was calculated for each failure mode. As necessary, workflow adjustments were then made to safeguard failure modes of significant RPN values. After workflow alterations, RPN numbers were again recomputed. A total of 72 potential failure modes were identified in the pre-FMEA STAT RAD workflow, of which 22 met the RPN threshold for clinical significance. Workflow adjustments included the addition of a team member checklist, changing simulation from megavoltage CT to kilovoltage CT, alteration of patient-specific quality assurance testing, and allocating increased time for critical workflow steps. After these modifications, only 1 failure mode maintained RPN significance; patient motion after alignment or during treatment. Performing the FMEA for the STAT RAD workflow before clinical implementation has significantly strengthened the safety and feasibility of STAT RAD. The FMEA proved a valuable evaluation tool, identifying potential problem areas so that we could create a safer workflow

  20. Effects of Successive Rotation Regimes on Carbon Stocks in Eucalyptus Plantations in Subtropical China Measured over a Full Rotation

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoqiong Li; Duo Ye; Hongwen Liang; Hongguang Zhu; Lin Qin; Yuling Zhu; Yuanguang Wen

    2015-01-01

    Plantations play an important role in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle. However, there is a dilemma in that most plantations are managed on short rotations, and the carbon sequestration capacities of these short-rotation plantations remain understudied. Eucalyptus has been widely planted in the tropics and subtropics due to its rapid growth, high adaptability, and large economic return. Eucalyptus plantations are primarily planted in successive rotations with a short rotation ...

  1. Differential Rotation in Solar Convective Dynamo Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuhong

    2015-01-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan & Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  2. Differential rotation in solar convective dynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuhong; Fang, Fang

    2016-10-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan and Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  3. Rotational radiotherapy for prostate cancer in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Marianne; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2010-01-01

    at risk, requiring less than 2min of beam-on time per treatment fraction. Materials and methods We report herein our experience from the first 46 patients treated for prostate cancer, clinical stage T1–3 with rotational therapy (“RapidArc®”, Varian Medical systems) (RA). This patient group is compared...... to a group of 50 patients treated with a 5-field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) technique over the same period. The comparison parameters include target coverage, dose to OAR, treatment time and number of monitor units. Daily-IGRT using implanted gold markers is used before and after treatment...... to investigate intra-fractional prostate displacement. Results RA results in improved sparing of the rectum and achieves desired dose distributions with fewer monitor units and a shorter treatment time (

  4. Gamma Imaging using Rotational Modulation Collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    in detection probabilities over traditional gamma detection, especially when the radiation source was shielded . Within DSTO the gamma imaging program...container Figure A2: Experimental setup used to measure radiation source stored in its lead and steel shielding transport container 16 UNCLASSIFIED...characterise the performance of two rotating modulation collimator (RMC) gamma imagers built by DSTO. The ability of these devices to image shielded and

  5. Detecting Rotational Superradiance in Fluid Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Coutant, Antonin; Richartz, Mauricio; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2016-12-01

    Rotational superradiance was predicted theoretically decades ago, and is chiefly responsible for a number of important effects and phenomenology in black-hole physics. However, rotational superradiance has never been observed experimentally. Here, with the aim of probing superradiance in the lab, we investigate the behavior of sound and surface waves in fluids resting in a circular basin at the center of which a rotating cylinder is placed. We show that with a suitable choice for the material of the cylinder, surface and sound waves are amplified. Two types of instabilities are studied: one sets in whenever superradiant modes are confined near the rotating cylinder and the other, which does not rely on confinement, corresponds to a local excitation of the cylinder. Our findings are experimentally testable in existing fluid laboratories and, hence, offer experimental exploration and comparison of dynamical instabilities arising from rapidly rotating boundary layers in astrophysical as well as in fluid dynamical systems.

  6. Detecting Rotational Superradiance in Fluid Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Coutant, Antonin; Richartz, Mauricio; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2016-12-30

    Rotational superradiance was predicted theoretically decades ago, and is chiefly responsible for a number of important effects and phenomenology in black-hole physics. However, rotational superradiance has never been observed experimentally. Here, with the aim of probing superradiance in the lab, we investigate the behavior of sound and surface waves in fluids resting in a circular basin at the center of which a rotating cylinder is placed. We show that with a suitable choice for the material of the cylinder, surface and sound waves are amplified. Two types of instabilities are studied: one sets in whenever superradiant modes are confined near the rotating cylinder and the other, which does not rely on confinement, corresponds to a local excitation of the cylinder. Our findings are experimentally testable in existing fluid laboratories and, hence, offer experimental exploration and comparison of dynamical instabilities arising from rapidly rotating boundary layers in astrophysical as well as in fluid dynamical systems.

  7. Rotating saddle trap as Foucault's pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, Oleg N.; Levi, Mark

    2016-01-01

    One of the many surprising results found in the mechanics of rotating systems is the stabilization of a particle in a rapidly rotating planar saddle potential. Besides the counterintuitive stabilization, an unexpected precessional motion is observed. In this note, we show that this precession is due to a Coriolis-like force caused by the rotation of the potential. To our knowledge, this is the first example where such a force arises in an inertial reference frame. We also propose a simple mechanical demonstration of this effect.

  8. Alpha Channeling in a Rotating Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2008-09-23

    The wave-particle α-channeling effect is generalized to include rotating plasma. Specifically, radio frequency waves can resonate with α particles in a mirror machine with E × B rotation to diffuse the α particles along constrained paths in phase space. Of major interest is that the α-particle energy, in addition to amplifying the RF waves, can directly enhance the rotation energy which in turn provides additional plasma confinement in centrifugal fusion reactors. An ancillary benefit is the rapid removal of alpha particles, which increases the fusion reactivity.

  9. Perfect Single-Sided Radiation and Absorption without Mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Hengyun; Hsu, Chia Wei; Miller, Owen D; Johnson, Steven G; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin

    2016-01-01

    Highly directional radiation from photonic structures is important for many applications, including high power photonic crystal surface emitting lasers, grating couplers, and light detection and ranging devices. However, previous dielectric, few-layer designs only achieved moderate asymmetry ratios, and a fundamental understanding of bounds on asymmetric radiation from arbitrary structures is still lacking. Here, we show that breaking the 180$^\\circ$ rotational symmetry of the structure is crucial for achieving highly asymmetric radiation. We develop a general temporal coupled-mode theory formalism to derive bounds on the asymmetric decay rates to the top and bottom of a photonic crystal slab for a resonance with arbitrary in-plane wavevector. Guided by this formalism, we show that infinite asymmetry is still achievable even without the need of back-reflection mirrors, and we provide numerical examples of designs that achieve asymmetry ratios exceeding $10^4$. The emission direction can also be rapidly switch...

  10. Patterns of genic diversity and structure in a species undergoing rapid chromosomal radiation: an allozyme analysis of house mice from the Madeira archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton-Davidian, J; Catalan, J; Lopez, J; Ganem, G; Nunes, A C; Ramalhinho, M G; Auffray, J C; Searle, J B; Mathias, M L

    2007-10-01

    The chromosomal radiation of the house mouse in the island of Madeira most likely involved a human-mediated colonization event followed by within-island geographical isolation and recurrent episodes of genetic drift. The genetic signature of such processes was assessed by an allozyme analysis of the chromosomal races from Madeira. No trace of a decrease in diversity was observed suggesting the possibility of large founder or bottleneck sizes, multiple introductions and/or a high post-colonization expansion rate. The Madeira populations were more closely related to those of Portugal than to other continental regions, in agreement with the documented human colonization of the island. Such a Portuguese origin contrasts with a study indicating a north European source of the mitochondrial haplotypes present in the Madeira mice. This apparent discrepancy may be resolved if not one but two colonization events took place, an initial north European introduction followed by a later one from Portugal. Asymmetrical reproduction between these mice would have resulted in a maternal north European signature with a nuclear Portuguese genome. The extensive chromosomal divergence of the races in Madeira is expected to contribute to their genic divergence. However, there was no significant correlation between chromosomal and allozyme distances. This low apparent chromosomal impact on genic differentiation may be related to the short time since the onset of karyotypic divergence, as the strength of the chromosomal barrier will become significant only at later stages.

  11. A Diagnostic for Localizing Red Giant Differential Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Klion, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple diagnostic that can be used to constrain the location of the differential rotation in red giants with measured mixed mode rotational splittings. Specifically, in red giants with radii $\\sim 4R_\\odot$, the splittings of p-dominated modes (sound wave dominated) relative to those of g-dominated modes (internal gravity wave dominated) are sensitive to how much of the differential rotation resides in the outer convection zone versus the radiative interior of the red giant. An independently measured surface rotation rate significantly aids breaking degeneracies in interpreting the measured splittings. We apply our results to existing observations of red giants, particularly those of Kepler-56, and find that most of the differential rotation resides in the radiative region rather than in the convection zone. This conclusion is consistent with results in the literature from rotational inversions, but our results are insensitive to some of the uncertainties in the inversion process and can be readi...

  12. Rotator cuff repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100229.htm Rotator cuff repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that ...

  13. Shell Model for Warm Rotating Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuo, M; Vigezzi, E; Broglia, R A; Yoshida, K

    1997-01-01

    In order to provide a microscopic description of levels and E2 transitions in rapidly rotating nuclei with internal excitation energy up to a few MeV, use is made of a shell model which combines the cranked Nilsson mean-field and the residual surface delta two-body force. The damping of collective rotational motion is investigated in the case of a typical rare-earth nucleus, namely \\Yb. It is found that rotational damping sets in at around 0.8 MeV above the yrast line, and the levels which form rotational band structures are thus limited. We predict at a given rotational frequency existence of about 30 rotational bands of various lengths, in overall agreement with the experimental findings. The onset of the rotational damping proceeds quite gradually as a function of the internal excitation energy. The transition region extends up to around 2 MeV above yrast and it is characterized by the presence of scars of discrete rotational bands which extend over few spin values and stand out among the damped transition...

  14. Rotationally Vibrating Electric-Field Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Harold

    2008-01-01

    A proposed instrument for measuring a static electric field would be based partly on a conventional rotating-split-cylinder or rotating-split-sphere electric-field mill. However, the design of the proposed instrument would overcome the difficulty, encountered in conventional rotational field mills, of transferring measurement signals and power via either electrical or fiber-optic rotary couplings that must be aligned and installed in conjunction with rotary bearings. Instead of being made to rotate in one direction at a steady speed as in a conventional rotational field mill, a split-cylinder or split-sphere electrode assembly in the proposed instrument would be set into rotational vibration like that of a metronome. The rotational vibration, synchronized with appropriate rapid electronic switching of electrical connections between electric-current-measuring circuitry and the split-cylinder or split-sphere electrodes, would result in an electrical measurement effect equivalent to that of a conventional rotational field mill. A version of the proposed instrument is described.

  15. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  16. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    1999-01-01

    In this article two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very offten the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...... approximations to the Riemannian metric, and that the subsequent corrections are inherient in the least squares estimation. Keywords: averaging rotations, Riemannian metric, matrix, quaternion...

  17. Radiative transfer dynamo effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirov, Vadim R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  18. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  19. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    2001-01-01

    In this paper two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very often the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...

  20. Galactic rotation curves and brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Rahaman, F; De Benedictis, A; Usmani, A A; Ray, Saibal

    2008-01-01

    In the present investigation flat rotational curves of the galaxies are considered under the framework of brane-world models where the 4d effective Einstein equation has extra terms which arise from the embedding of the 3-brane in the $5d$ bulk. It has been shown here that these long range bulk gravitational degrees of freedom can act as a mechanism to yield the observed galactic rotation curves without the need for dark matter. The present model has the advantage that the observed rotation curves result solely from well-established non-local effects of gravitation, such as dark radiation and dark pressure under a direct use of the condition of flat rotation curves and does not invoke any exotic matter field.

  1. Rotation and Magnetism in Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Potter, Adrian T

    2012-01-01

    Rotation has a number of important effects on the evolution of stars. It decreases the surface gravity, causes enhanced mass loss and leads to surface abundance anomalies of various chemical isotopes. We have adapted the Cambridge stellar evolution code to incorporate a number of different physical models for rotation. We compare detailed grids of stellar evolution models along with simulated stellar populations to identify the key differences between them. Models of rotationally-driven dynamos in stellar radiative zones have suggested that magnetohydrodynamic transport of angular momentum and chemical composition can dominate over the otherwise purely hydrodynamic processes. We have adapted our purely hydrodynamic model to include the evolution of the magnetic field. We consider what effects this has on our populations of rotating stars and how these relate to observational data. Strong magnetic fields are also observed at the end of the stellar lifetime. The surface magnetic field strength of white dwarfs i...

  2. Rotational Laser Cooling of MgH+ Ions and Rotational Rate Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Kragh; Staanum, Peter; Højbjerre, Klaus

    A method of laser cooling vibrationally and translationally cold trapped MgH+ ions to the rotational ground state using optical pumping was recently demonstrated in our group [1]. This method relies on the 293 K blackbody radiation to redistribute population among the rotational states, while...... chemists making electronic structure calculations, since the electric dipole moments that can be extracted from the results will provide information not present in pectroscopic data. [1] P. F. Staanum, K. Højbjerre, P. S. Skyt, A. K. Hansen, and M. Drewsen. Rotational laser cooling of vibrationally...... exciting a single rovibrational transition within the X1Σ+ electronic ground state for optical pumping into the rovibrational ground state. To model the expected rotational state distributions after the application of the laser beam, one has to know the various rotational transitions rates in the present...

  3. Rapid radiation in spiny lobsters (Palinurus spp as revealed by classic and ABC methods using mtDNA and microsatellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macpherson Enrique

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular tools may help to uncover closely related and still diverging species from a wide variety of taxa and provide insight into the mechanisms, pace and geography of marine speciation. There is a certain controversy on the phylogeography and speciation modes of species-groups with an Eastern Atlantic-Western Indian Ocean distribution, with previous studies suggesting that older events (Miocene and/or more recent (Pleistocene oceanographic processes could have influenced the phylogeny of marine taxa. The spiny lobster genus Palinurus allows for testing among speciation hypotheses, since it has a particular distribution with two groups of three species each in the Northeastern Atlantic (P. elephas, P. mauritanicus and P. charlestoni and Southeastern Atlantic and Southwestern Indian Oceans (P. gilchristi, P. delagoae and P. barbarae. In the present study, we obtain a more complete understanding of the phylogenetic relationships among these species through a combined dataset with both nuclear and mitochondrial markers, by testing alternative hypotheses on both the mutation rate and tree topology under the recently developed approximate Bayesian computation (ABC methods. Results Our analyses support a North-to-South speciation pattern in Palinurus with all the South-African species forming a monophyletic clade nested within the Northern Hemisphere species. Coalescent-based ABC methods allowed us to reject the previously proposed hypothesis of a Middle Miocene speciation event related with the closure of the Tethyan Seaway. Instead, divergence times obtained for Palinurus species using the combined mtDNA-microsatellite dataset and standard mutation rates for mtDNA agree with known glaciation-related processes occurring during the last 2 my. Conclusion The Palinurus speciation pattern is a typical example of a series of rapid speciation events occurring within a group, with very short branches separating different species. Our

  4. SU-E-T-625: Potential for Reduced Radiation Induced Toxicity for the Treatment of Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using RapidArc Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Sood, S; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Saleh, H; Wang, F [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using RapidArc (RA) treatment planning to reduce irradiation volume of normal lung and other organs at risk (OARs) in the treatment of inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods: A retrospective treatment planning and delivery study was performed to compare target coverage and the volumes of the normal lung, spinal cord, heart and esophagus on 4D-CT scan above their dose tolerances delivered by RA vs. IMRT for ten inoperable NSCLC patients (Stage I-IIIB). RA plans consisted of either one-full or two-partial co-planar arcs used to treat 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) with 6MV beam to a prescription of 66Gy in 33 fractions. IMRT plans were generated using 5–7 co-planar fields with 6MV beam. PTV coverage, dose-volume histograms, homogeneity/conformity indices (CI), total number of monitor units(MUs), beam-on time and delivery accuracy were compared between the two treatment plans. Results: Similar target coverage was obtained between the two techniques. RA (CI=1.02) provided more conformal plans without loss of homogeneity compared to IMRT plans (CI=1.12). Compared to IMRT, RA achieved a significant median dose reduction in V10 (3%), V20 (8%), and mean lung dose (3%) on average, respectively. On average, V5 was comparable between the two treatment plans. RA reduced mean esophagus (6%), mean heart (18%), and maximum spinal cord dose (7%), on average, respectively. Total number of MUs and beam-on time were each reduced almost by a factor of 2 when compared to IMRT-patient comfort, reduced intra-fraction-motion and leakage dose. The average IMRT and RA QA pass rate was about 98% for both types of plans for 3%/3mm criterion. Conclusion: Compared to IMRT plans, RA provided not only comparable target coverage, but also improved conformity, treatment time, and significant reduction in irradiation of OARs. This may potentially allow for target dose escalation without increase in normal tissue toxicity.

  5. Slowly rotating neutron stars with small differential rotation: equilibrium models and oscillations in the Cowling approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Chirenti, Cecilia; Yoshida, Shin'ichirou

    2013-01-01

    Newly born neutron stars can present differential rotation, even if later it should be suppressed by viscosity or a sufficiently strong magnetic field. And in this early stage of its life, a neutron star is expected to have a strong emission of gravitational waves, which could be influenced by the differential rotation. We present here a new formalism for modelling differentially rotating neutron stars: working on the slow rotation approximation and assuming a small degree of differential rotation, we show that it is possible to separate variables in the Einstein field equations. The dragging of inertial frames is determined by solving three decoupled ODEs. After we establish our equilibrium model, we explore the influence of the differential rotation on the f and r-modes of oscillation of the neutron star in the Cowling approximation, and we also analyze an effect of the differential rotation on the emission of gravitational radiation from the f-modes. We see that the gravitational radiation from the f-modes...

  6. Kick velocity induced by magnetic dipole and quadrupole radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Yasufumi

    2010-01-01

    We examine the recoil velocity induced by the superposition of the magnetic dipole and quadrupole radiation from a pulsar/magnetar born with rapid rotation. The resultant velocity depends on not the magnitude, but rather the ratio of the two moments and their geometrical configuration. The model does not necessarily lead to high spatial velocity for a magnetar with a strong magnetic field, which is consistent with the recent observational upper bound. The maximum velocity predicted with this model is slightly smaller than that of observed fast-moving pulsars.

  7. Surface rotation of Kepler red giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceillier, T.; Tayar, J.; Mathur, S.; Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Stello, D.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; van Saders, J.; Beck, P. G.; Bloemen, S.

    2017-09-01

    Kepler allows the measurement of starspot variability in a large sample of field red giants for the first time. With a new method that combines autocorrelation and wavelet decomposition, we measure 361 rotation periods from the full set of 17 377 oscillating red giants in our sample. This represents 2.08% of the stars, consistent with the fraction of spectroscopically detected rapidly rotating giants in the field. The remaining stars do not show enough variability to allow us to measure a reliable surface rotation period. Because the stars with detected rotation periods have measured oscillations, we can infer their global properties, e.g. mass and radius, and quantitatively evaluate the predictions of standard stellar evolution models as a function of mass. Consistent with results for cluster giants when we consider only the 4881 intermediate-mass stars, M > 2.0 M⊙ from our full red giant sample, we do not find the enhanced rates of rapid rotation expected from angular momentum conservation. We therefore suggest that either enhanced angular momentum loss or radial differential rotation must be occurring in these stars. Finally, when we examine the 575 low-mass (Mhttp://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/605/A111

  8. Predictors of human rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  9. The spatial rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan; Hahn, Ute; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2013-01-01

    to identify the specific tissue region under study. In order to use the spatial rotator in practice, however, it is necessary to be able to identify intersection points between cell boundaries and test rays in a series of parallel focal planes, also at the peripheral parts of the cell boundaries. In cases......This paper presents a new local volume estimator, the spatial rotator, which is based on measurements on a virtual 3D probe, using computer assisted microscopy. The basic design of the probe builds upon the rotator principle which requires only a few manual intersection markings, thus making...... the spatial rotator fast to use. Since a 3D probe is involved, it is expected that the spatial rotator will be more efficient than the the nucleator and the planar rotator, which are based on measurements in a single plane. An extensive simulation study shows that the spatial rotator may be more efficient...

  10. 河南省小麦-玉米轮作系统光能利用率时空分布及其变化原因分析%Tempo-spatial Characteristics and Impact Factors of Radiation Use Efficiency of Wheat-maize Rotation System in Henan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常清; 王靖; 余卫东; 王娜; 谈美秀

    2016-01-01

    利用河南省19个农业气象试验站的气象和小麦、玉米观测资料,计算1981-2007年作物生长季辐射和年总辐射量、小麦、玉米生长季和轮作系统的作物产能及光能利用率(Radiation Use Efficiency, RUE),分析总辐射和作物产能变化对 RUE 变化的贡献、小麦和玉米产能变化分别对轮作系统产能变化的贡献。结果表明,河南省小麦-玉米轮作系统RUE为0.75%~1.61%,北部的汤阴和西部的卢氏是高值区,西北、东部偏东和南部地区较低。小麦生长季RUE为0.65%~1.63%,北部的汤阴和西部的卢氏最高,东部偏中大部分地区次之,而西北和东部部分地区最低,玉米生长季RUE为0.85%~1.81%,除西部的三门峡RUE在全区最低外,北部和西部大部分地区较高,而西北和东部、南部地区较低。1981-2007年,卢氏、汝州、西平、新乡和驻马店5个站点小麦-玉米轮作系统RUE呈显著升高趋势(P<0.05)。在轮作系统RUE变化显著的站点中,除卢氏站点因年总辐射升高对RUE变化呈负贡献外,其余站点的贡献率为4%~31%,系统作物产能变化对RUE变化的贡献率为69%~96%。卢氏和汝州站点小麦产能变化对系统作物产能变化的贡献率(65%和90%)大于玉米(35%和10%),而西平、新乡和驻马店站点小麦产能变化对系统作物产能变化的贡献率(49%、28%和35%)小于玉米(51%、72%和65%)。未来提高单位面积的作物产能仍是提高区域RUE的有效方法,且不同地区应着重提高不同作物的产能。%The tempo-spatial characteristics in radiation use efficiency (RUE) of wheat, maize and wheat-maize rotation system were analyzed based on crop production energy, total solar radiation during crop growing season and annual global radiation from the observed meteorological and crop data during 1981 to 2007 at 19 stations in Henan province. Subsequently, the contribution rates

  11. Three-Dimensional General Relativistic Radiation Magnetohydrodynamical Simulation of Super-Eddington Accretion, using a new code HARMRAD with M1 Closure

    CERN Document Server

    McKinney, Jonathan C; Sadowski, Aleksander; Narayan, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Black hole (BH) accretion flows and jets are dynamic hot relativistic magnetized plasma flows whose radiative opacity can significantly affect flow structure and behavior. We describe a numerical scheme, tests, and an astrophysically relevant application using the M1 radiation closure within a new three-dimensional (3D) general relativistic (GR) radiation (R) magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) massively parallel code called HARMRAD. Our 3D GRRMHD simulation of super-Eddington accretion (about $20$ times Eddington) onto a rapidly rotating BH (dimensionless spin $j=0.9375$) shows sustained non-axisymmemtric disk turbulence, a persistent electromagnetic jet driven by the Blandford-Znajek effect, and a total radiative output consistently near the Eddington rate. The total accretion efficiency is of order $20\\%$, the large-scale electromagnetic jet efficiency is of order $10\\%$, and the total radiative efficiency that reaches large distances remains low at only order $1\\%$. However, the radiation jet and the electromagnet...

  12. On the fast magnetic rotator regime of stellar winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We study the acceleration of the stellar winds of rapidly rotating low mass stars and the transition between the slow magnetic rotator and fast magnetic rotator regimes. We aim to understand the properties of stellar winds in the fast magnetic rotator regime and the effects of magneto-centrifugal forces on wind speeds and mass loss rates. Methods: We extend a solar wind model to 1D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the winds of rotating stars. We test two assumptions for how to scale the wind temperature to other stars and assume the mass loss rate scales as dot{M_star ∝ R_star2 Ω_star1.33 M_star-3.36}, in the unsaturated regime, as estimated from observed rotational evolution. Results: For 1.0 M⊙ stars, the winds can be accelerated to several thousand km s-1, and the effects of magneto-centrifugal forces are much weaker for lower mass stars. We find that the different assumptions for how to scale the wind temperature to other stars lead to significantly different mass loss rates for the rapid rotators. If we assume a constant temperature, the mass loss rates of solar mass stars do not saturate at rapid rotation, which we show to be inconsistent with observed rotational evolution. If we assume the wind temperatures scale positively with rotation, the mass loss rates are only influenced significantly at rotation rates above 75 Ω⊙. We suggest that models with increasing wind speed for more rapid rotators are preferable to those that assume a constant wind speed. If this conclusion is confirmed by more sophisticated wind modelling. it might provide an interesting observational constraint on the properties of stellar winds. All of the codes and output data used in this paper can be downloaded from http://https://zenodo.org/record/160052#.V_y6drWkVC1 or obtained by contacting the author.

  13. Galaxy cluster's rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Manolopoulou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We study the possible rotation of cluster galaxies, developing, testing and applying a novel algorithm which identifies rotation, if such does exits, as well as its rotational centre, its axis orientation, rotational velocity amplitude and, finally, the clockwise or counterclockwise direction of rotation on the plane of the sky. To validate our algorithms we construct realistic Monte-Carlo mock rotating clusters and confirm that our method provides robust indications of rotation. We then apply our methodology on a sample of Abell clusters with z<~0.1 with member galaxies selected from the SDSS DR10 spectroscopic database. We find that ~35% of our clusters are rotating when using a set of strict criteria, while loosening the criteria we find this fraction increasing to ~48%. We correlate our rotation indicators with the cluster dynamical state, provided either by their Bautz-Morgan type or by their X-ray isophotal shape and find for those clusters showing rotation that the significance and strength of their...

  14. Multidimensional Simulations of Rotating Pair Instability Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzopoulos, E; Couch, S M

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of rotation on the dynamics, energetics and Ni-56 production of Pair Instability Supernova explosions by performing rotating two-dimensional ("2.5-D") hydrodynamics simulations. We calculate the evolution of eight low metallicity (Z = 10^-3, 10^-4 Zsun) massive (135-245 Msun) PISN progenitors with initial surface rotational velocities 50% that of the critical Keplerian value using the stellar evolution code MESA. We allow for both the inclusion and the omission of the effects of magnetic fields in the angular momentum transport and in chemical mixing, resulting in slowly-rotating and rapidly-rotating final carbon-oxygen cores, respectively. Increased rotation for carbon-oxygen cores of the same mass and chemical stratification leads to less energetic PISN explosions that produce smaller amounts of Ni-56 due to the effect of the angular momentum barrier that develops and slows the dynamical collapse. We find a non-monotonic dependence of Ni-56 production on rotational velocity in situation...

  15. Rotation Profiles of Solar-like Stars with Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the rotation profile of solar-like stars with magnetic fields. A diffu-sion coefficient of magnetic angular momentum transport is deduced. Rotating stellar models with different mass incorporating the coefficient are computed to give the rotation profiles. The total angular momentum of a solar model with only hydrodynamic instabilities is about 13 times larger than that of the Sun at the age of the Sun, and this model can not reproduce quasi-solid rotation in the radiative region. However, the solar model with magnetic fields not only can reproduce an almost uniform rotation in the radiative region, but also a total angular momentum that is consistent with the helioseismic result at the 3 σ level at the age of the Sun. The rotation of solar-like stars with magnetic fields is almost uniform in the radiative region, but for models of 1.2-1.5 M⊙, there is an obvious transition region between the convective core and the radiative region, where angular velocity has a sharp radial gradient, which is different from the rotation profile of the Sun and of massive stars with magnetic fields. The change of angular velocity in the transition region increases with increasing age and mass.

  16. The evolution of rotating very massive stars with LMC composition

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, K; de Koter, A; de Mink, S E; Crowther, P A; Evans, C J; Gräfener, G; Sana, H; Sanyal, D; Schneider, F R N; Vink, J S

    2015-01-01

    We present a dense model grid with tailored input chemical composition appropriate for the Large Magellanic Cloud. We use a one-dimensional hydrodynamic stellar evolution code, which accounts for rotation, transport of angular momentum by magnetic fields, and stellar wind mass loss to compute our detailed models. We calculate stellar evolution models with initial masses of 70-500 Msun and with initial surface rotational velocities of 0-550 km/s, covering the core-hydrogen burning phase of evolution. We find our rapid rotators to be strongly influenced by rotationally induced mixing of helium, with quasi-chemically homogeneous evolution occurring for the fastest rotating models. Above 160 Msun, homogeneous evolution is also established through mass loss, producing pure helium stars at core hydrogen exhaustion independent of the initial rotation rate. Surface nitrogen enrichment is also found for slower rotators, even for stars that lose only a small fraction of their initial mass. For models above 150 MZAMS, a...

  17. Relativistic Rotating Vector Model

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    The direction of polarization produced by a moving source rotates with the respect to the rest frame. We show that this effect, induced by pulsar rotation, leads to an important correction to polarization swings within the framework of rotating vector model (RVM); this effect has been missed by previous works. We construct relativistic RVM taking into account finite heights of the emission region that lead to aberration, time-of-travel effects and relativistic rotation of polarization. Polarizations swings at different frequencies can be used, within the assumption of the radius-to-frequency mapping, to infer emission radii and geometry of pulsars.

  18. Differential rotation of main-sequence dwarfs and its dynamo-efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchatinov, L L

    2010-01-01

    A new version of a numerical model of stellar differential rotation based on mean-field hydrodynamics is presented and tested by computing the differential rotation of the Sun. The model is then applied to four individual stars including two moderate and two fast rotators to reproduce their observed differential rotation quite closely. A series of models for rapidly rotating ($P_{rot} = 1$~day) stars of different masses and compositions is generated. The effective temperature is found convenient to parameterize the differential rotation: variations with metallicity, that are quite pronounced when the differential rotation is considered as a function of the stellar mass, almost disappear in the dependence of differential rotation on temperature. The differential rotation increases steadily with surface temperature to exceed the largest differential rotation observed to date for the hottest F-stars we considered. This strong differential rotation is, however, found not to be efficient for dynamos when the effic...

  19. From solar-like to anti-solar differential rotation in cool stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gastine, T; Morin, J; Reiners, A; Wicht, J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar differential rotation can be separated into two main regimes: solar-like when the equator rotates faster than the poles and anti-solar when the polar regions rotate faster than the equator. We investigate the transition between these two regimes with 3-D numerical simulations of rotating spherical shells. We conduct a systematic parameter study which also includes models from different research groups. We find that the direction of the differential rotation is governed by the contribution of the Coriolis force in the force balance, independently of the model setup (presence of a magnetic field, thickness of the convective layer, density stratification). Rapidly-rotating cases with a small Rossby number yield solar-like differential rotation, while weakly-rotating models sustain anti-solar differential rotation. Close to the transition, the two kinds of differential rotation are two possible bistable states. This study provides theoretical support for the existence of anti-solar differential rotation i...

  20. Cassini RPWS Observation of Saturn's Radio Rotation Rates After Equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, S.; Fischer, G.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Saturn's radio rotation rate, originally thought to be constant, was found to vary with time by comparing the Voyager and Ulysses observation of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR). Later on, Cassini RPWS observation of SKR revealed that the two hemispheres of Saturn are rotating at two different rotational periods, and it was proposed that the two periods are subject to seasonal change. The topic we would like to focus on resolving is whether the north and south rotational periods actually crossed after equinox. The almost continuous observation of SKR, Saturn narrowband emission, and auroral hiss by RPWS provide a good method of tracking the radio rotation periods of the planet. SKR power from the northern and southern hemispheres can be separated by the polarization of the radiation. Based on the evolution of SKR phase in the northern and southern hemispheres, we show that the rotation rate of the northern SKR is slower than that of the southern SKR starting from late 2014. Auroral hiss provides another unambiguous method of isolating the rotation signals from one hemisphere because the whistler mode plasma wave cannot cross the equator. Rotational modulation rates of auroral hiss are shown to agree with those of SKR during Cassini's high inclination orbits. Hemispherical origins of the narrowband emission are not distinguishable due to its unique generation mechanism. However, Lomb-Scargle periodogram of the 5 kHz narrowband emissions indicates that the two separate radio rotation periods of Saturn's magnetosphere reappeared after a long break since equinox.

  1. Differential rotation of the unstable nonlinear r -modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, John L.; Lindblom, Lee; Lockitch, Keith H.

    2016-01-01

    At second order in perturbation theory, the r -modes of uniformly rotating stars include an axisymmetric part that can be identified with differential rotation of the background star. If one does not include radiation reaction, the differential rotation is constant in time and has been computed by Sá. It has a gauge dependence associated with the family of time-independent perturbations that add differential rotation to the unperturbed equilibrium star: For stars with a barotropic equation of state, one can add to the time-independent second-order solution arbitrary differential rotation that is stratified on cylinders (that is a function of distance ϖ to the axis of rotation). We show here that the gravitational radiation-reaction force that drives the r -mode instability removes this gauge freedom; the exponentially growing differential rotation of the unstable second-order r -mode is unique. We derive a general expression for this rotation law for Newtonian models and evaluate it explicitly for slowly rotating models with polytropic equations of state.

  2. Rotational Laser Cooling of MgH+ Ions and Rotational Rate Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Kragh; Staanum, Peter; Højbjerre, Klaus;

    blackbody radiation field. To undertake such modelling, we will carry out measurements of a series of transition rates between rotational states in the vibronic ground state at room temperature. The measurements will be performed by the same Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Dissociation (REMPD) process used...... in the recent rotational cooling experiments to evaluate the population in a given rotational state. Since we from these experiments know that we can essentially empty any of the thermally populated rotational states selectively by two ns-pulses (one resonant and one non-resonant) fired simultaneously, we can...... and translationally cold molecular ions. Nat. Phys., DOI 10.1038/NPHYS1604 (2010). http://www.nature.com/nphys/journal/vaop/ncurrent/pdf/nphys1604.pdf...

  3. Deconstructing Mental Rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Axel

    2014-01-01

    A random walk model of the classical mental rotation task is explored in two experiments. By assuming that a mental rotation is repeated until sufficient evidence for a match/mismatch is obtained, the model accounts for the approximately linearly increasing reaction times (RTs) on positive trials...... alignment take place during fixations at very high speed....

  4. Faraday rotation measure synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brentjens, MA; de Bruyn, AG

    2005-01-01

    We extend the rotation measure work of Burn ( 1966, MNRAS, 133, 67) to the cases of limited sampling of lambda(2) space and non-constant emission spectra. We introduce the rotation measure transfer function (RMTF), which is an excellent predictor of n pi ambiguity problems with the lambda(2) coverag

  5. SMAP Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    Faraday rotation is a change in the polarization as signal propagates through the ionosphere. At L-band it is necessary to correct for this change and measurements are made on the spacecraft of the rotation angle. These figures show that there is good agreement between the SMAP measurements (blue) and predictions based on models (red).

  6. ON THE DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION OF MASSIVE MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, T. M. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastle University (United Kingdom); Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-12-20

    To date, asteroseismology has provided core-to-surface differential rotation measurements in eight main-sequence stars. These stars, ranging in mass from ∼1.5–9 M{sub ⊙}, show rotation profiles ranging from uniform to counter-rotation. Although they have a variety of masses, these stars all have convective cores and overlying radiative regions, conducive to angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves (IGWs). Using two-dimensional numerical simulations, we show that angular momentum transport by IGWs can explain all of these rotation profiles. We further predict that, should high mass, faster rotating stars be observed, the core-to-envelope differential rotation will be positive, but less than one.

  7. A Rotating Quantum Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    De Lorenci, V A

    1996-01-01

    We investigate which mapping we have to use to compare measurements made in a rotating frame to those made in an inertial frame. Using a "Lorentz-like" coordinate transformation we obtain that creation-anihilation operators of a massless scalar field in the rotating frame are not the same as those of an inertial observer. This leads to a new vacuum state (a rotating vacuum) which is a superposition of positive and negative frequency Minkowski particles. After this, introducing an apparatus device coupled linearly with the field we obtain that there is a strong correlation between number of rotating particles (in a given state) obtained via canonical quantization and via response function of the rotating detector. Finally, we analyse polarization effects in circular accelerators in the proper frame of the electron making a connection with the inertial frame point of view.

  8. Uniformly rotating neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Boshkayev, Kuantay

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we review the recent results on the equilibrium configurations of static and uniformly rotating neutron stars within the Hartle formalism. We start from the Einstein-Maxwell-Thomas-Fermi equations formulated and extended by Belvedere et al. (2012, 2014). We demonstrate how to conduct numerical integration of these equations for different central densities ${\\it \\rho}_c$ and angular velocities $\\Omega$ and compute the static $M^{stat}$ and rotating $M^{rot}$ masses, polar $R_p$ and equatorial $R_{\\rm eq}$ radii, eccentricity $\\epsilon$, moment of inertia $I$, angular momentum $J$, as well as the quadrupole moment $Q$ of the rotating configurations. In order to fulfill the stability criteria of rotating neutron stars we take into considerations the Keplerian mass-shedding limit and the axisymmetric secular instability. Furthermore, we construct the novel mass-radius relations, calculate the maximum mass and minimum rotation periods (maximum frequencies) of neutron stars. Eventually, we compare a...

  9. Theory and simulations of rotating convection

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, Adrian J; Lithwick, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    We study thermal convection in a rotating fluid, with the ultimate goal of explaining the structure of convection zones in rotating stars and planets. We first derive mixing-length theory for rapidly-rotating convection, arriving at the results of Stevenson (1979) via simple physical arguments. The theory predicts the properties of convection as a function of the imposed heat flux and rotation rate, independent of microscopic diffusivities. In particular, it predicts the mean temperature gradient; the rms velocity and temperature fluctuations; and the size of the eddies that dominate heat transport. We test all of these predictions with high resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. The results agree remarkably well with the theory across more than two orders of magnitude in rotation rate. For example, the temperature gradient is predicted to scale as the rotation rate to the 4/5th power at fixed flux, and the simulations yield $0.75\\pm 0.06$. We conclude that the mixing length theory is a soli...

  10. Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Radiation Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Radiation Protection Document Library View and download EPA radiation ...

  11. The Nano-X Linear Accelerator: A Compact and Economical Cancer Radiotherapy System Incorporating Patient Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslick, Enid M; Keall, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Rapid technological improvements in radiotherapy delivery results in improved outcomes to patients, yet current commercial systems with these technologies on board are costly. The aim of this study was to develop a state-of-the-art cancer radiotherapy system that is economical and space efficient fitting with current world demands. The Nano-X system is a compact design that is light weight combining a patient rotation system with a vertical 6 MV fixed beam. In this paper, we present the Nano-X system design configuration, an estimate of the system dimensions and its potential impact on shielding cost reductions. We provide an assessment of implementing such a radiotherapy system clinically, its advantages and disadvantages compared to a compact conventional gantry rotating linac. The Nano-X system has several differentiating features from current radiotherapy systems, it is [1] compact and therefore can fit into small vaults, [2] light weight, and [3] engineering efficient, i.e., it rotates a relatively light component and the main treatment delivery components are not under rotation (e.g., DMLCs). All these features can have an impact on reducing the costs of the system. In terms of shielding requirements, leakage radiation was found to be the dominant contributor to the Nano-X vault and as such no primary shielding was necessary. For a low leakage design, the Nano-X vault footprint and concrete volume required is 17 m2 and 35 m3 respectively, compared to 54 m2 and 102 m3 for a conventional compact linac vault, resulting in decreased costs in shielding. Key issues to be investigated in future work are the possible patient comfort concerns associated with the patient rotation system, as well as the magnitude of deformation and subsequent adaptation requirements.

  12. National Trends in Surgery for Rotator Cuff Disease in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young Hoon; Lee, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Sung Jae; Kim, Jaedong; Lee, Bong Gun

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the national trends in rotator cuff surgery in Korea and analyze hospital type-specific trends. We analyzed a nationwide database acquired from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) from 2007 to 2015. International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) codes, procedure codes, and arthroscopic device code were used to identify patients who underwent surgical treatment for rotator cuff disease. A total of 383,719 cases of rotator cuff surgeries were performed from 2007 to 2015. The mean annual percentage change in the age-adjusted rate of rotator cuff surgery per population of 100,000 persons rapidly increased from 2007 to 2012 (53.3%, P rotator cuff surgeries steadily rose from 89.9% in 2007 to 96.8% in 2015 (P rotator cuff surgery increased to the greatest degree in hospitals with 30-100 inpatient beds, and isolated acromioplasty procedure accounted for a larger proportion of the rotator cuff surgeries in small hospitals and clinics compared to large hospitals. Overall, our findings indicate that cases of rotator cuff surgery have increased rapidly recently in Korea, of which arthroscopic surgeries account for the greatest proportion. While rotator cuff surgery is a popular procedure that is commonly performed even in small hospitals, there was a difference in the component ratio of the procedure code in accordance with hospital type.

  13. A nonsingular rotating black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Sushant G. [Jamia Millia Islamia, Centre for Theoretical Physics, New Delhi (India); University of KwaZulu-Natal, Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Durban (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    The spacetime singularities in classical general relativity are inevitable, as predicated by the celebrated singularity theorems. However, it is a general belief that singularities do not exist in Nature and that they are the limitations of the general relativity. In the absence of a welldefined quantum gravity, models of regular black holes have been studied. We employ a probability distribution inspired mass function m(r) to replace the Kerr black hole mass M to represent a nonsingular rotating black hole that is identified asymptotically (r >> k, k > 0 constant) exactly as the Kerr-Newman black hole, and as the Kerr black hole when k = 0. The radiating counterpart renders a nonsingular generalization of Carmeli's spacetime as well as Vaidya's spacetime, in the appropriate limits. The exponential correction factor changing the geometry of the classical black hole to remove the curvature singularity can also be motivated by quantum arguments. The regular rotating spacetime can also be understood as a black hole of general relativity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics. (orig.)

  14. Furnace for rapid thermal processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozeboom, F.; Duine, P.A.; Sluis, P. van der

    2001-01-01

    A Method (1) for Rapid Thermal Processing of a wafer (7), wherein the wafer (7) is heated by lamps (9), and the heat radiation is reflected by an optical switching device (15,17) which is in the reflecting state during the heating stage. During the cooling stage of the wafer (7), the heat is absorbe

  15. Chaotic rotation of Hyperion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binzel, R. P.; Green, J. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Thomas et al. (1984) analyzed 14 Voyager 2 images of Saturn's satellite Hyperion and interpreted them to be consistent with a coherent (nonchaotic) rotation period of 13.1 days. This interpretation was criticized by Peale and Wisdom (1984), who argued that the low sampling frequency of Voyager data does not allow chaotic or nonchaotic rotation to be distinguished. New observations obtained with a higher sampling frequency are reported here which conclusively show that the 13.1 day period found by Thomas et al. was not due to coherent rotation.

  16. A rotating quantum vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenci, V.A. de; Svaiter, N.F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1996-11-01

    It was investigated which mapping has to be used to compare measurements made in a rotating frame to those made in an inertial frame. Using a non-Galilean coordinate transformation, the creation-annihilation operators of a massive scalar field in the rotating frame are not the same as those of an inertial observer. This leads to a new vacuum state(a rotating vacuum) which is a superposition of positive and negative frequency Minkowski particles. Polarization effects in circular accelerators in the proper frame of the electron making a connection with the inertial frame point of view were analysed. 65 refs.

  17. Differential rotation of the unstable nonlinear r-modes

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, John L; Lockitch, Keith H

    2016-01-01

    At second order in perturbation theory, the $r$-modes of uniformly rotating stars include an axisymmetric part that can be identified with differential rotation of the background star. If one does not include radiation-reaction, the differential rotation is constant in time and has been computed by S\\'a. It has a gauge dependence associated with the family of time-independent perturbations that add differential rotation to the unperturbed equilibrium star: For stars with a barotropic equation of state, one can add to the time-independent second-order solution arbitrary differential rotation that is stratified on cylinders (that is a function of distance $\\varpi$ to the axis of rotation). We show here that the gravitational radiation-reaction force that drives the $r$-mode instability removes this gauge freedom: The expontially growing differential rotation of the unstable second-order $r$-mode is unique. We derive a general expression for this rotation law for Newtonian models and evaluate it explicitly for s...

  18. Differential Rotation and Magnetism in Simulations of Fully Convective Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Browning, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Stars of sufficiently low mass are convective throughout their interiors, and so do not possess an internal boundary layer akin to the solar tachocline. Because that interface figures so prominently in many theories of the solar magnetic dynamo, a widespread expectation had been that fully convective stars would exhibit surface magnetic behavior very different from that realized in more massive stars. Here I describe how recent observations and theoretical models of dynamo action in low-mass stars are partly confirming, and partly confounding, this basic expectation. In particular, I present the results of 3--D MHD simulations of dynamo action by convection in rotating spherical shells that approximate the interiors of 0.3 solar-mass stars at a range of rotation rates. The simulated stars can establish latitudinal differential rotation at their surfaces which is solar-like at ``rapid'' rotation rates (defined within) and anti-solar at slower rotation rates; the differential rotation is greatly reduced by feed...

  19. The Activity and Rotation Limit in the Hyades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, U.; Reiners, A.; Seifahrt, A.; Kürster, M.

    2011-12-01

    We conduct a study of K to M type stars to investigate the activity and the rotation limit in the Hyades. We use a sample of 40 stars in this intermediate-age cluster (≍625 Myr) to probe stellar rotation in the threshold region where stellar activity becomes prevalent. Here we present projected equatorial velocities (vrotsin i) and chromospheric activity measurements (Hα) that indicate the existence of fast rotators in the Hyades at spectral types where also the fraction of stars with Hα emission shows a rapid increase ("Hα limit"). The locus of enhanced rotation (and activity) thus seems to be shifted to earlier types in contrast to what is seen as the rotation limit in field stars. The relation between activity and rotation appears to be similar to the one observed in field stars.

  20. The activity and rotation limit in the Hyades

    CERN Document Server

    Seemann, U; Seifahrt, A; Kürster, M

    2010-01-01

    We conduct a study of K to M type stars to investigate the activity and the rotation limit in the Hyades. We use a sample of 40 stars in this intermediate-age cluster (~625 Myr) to probe stellar rotation in the threshold region where stellar activity becomes prevalent. Here we present projected equatorial velocities (vsin i) and chromospheric activity measurements (H{\\alpha}) that indicate the existence of fast rotators in the Hyades at spectral types where also the fraction of stars with H{\\alpha} emission shows a rapid increase ("H{\\alpha} limit"). The locus of enhanced rotation (and activity) thus seems to be shifted to earlier types in contrast to what is seen as the rotation limit in field stars. The relation between activity and rotation appears to be similar to the one observed in fields stars.

  1. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the area is stitched shut. Another treatment, called proton-beam radiation therapy , focuses the radiation on the ... after radiation treatment ends. Sore mouth and tooth decay. If you received radiation therapy to the head ...

  2. Radiation sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation. There are two basic types of radiation: ionizing and nonionizing. Nonionizing radiation comes in the form of light, radio waves, microwaves and radar. This kind of radiation usually ...

  3. The main-sequence rotation-colour relation in the Coma Berenices open cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, A Collier; Hebb, L; Skinner, G; Anderson, D R; Christian, D J; Clarkson, W I; Enoch, B; Irwin, J; Joshi, Y; Haswell, C A; Hellier, C; Horne, K D; Kane, S R; Lister, T A; Maxted, P F L; Norton, A J; Parley, N; Pollacco, D; Ryans, R; Scholz, A; Skillen, I; Smalley, B; Street, R A; West, R G; Wilson, D M; Wheatley, P J

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a photometric survey of rotation rates in the Coma Berenices (Melotte 111) open cluster, using data obtained as part of the SuperWASP exoplanetary transit-search programme. The goal of the Coma survey was to measure precise rotation periods for main-sequence F, G and K dwarfs in this intermediate-age (~600 Myr) cluster, and to determine the extent to which magnetic braking has caused the stellar spin periods to converge. We find a tight, almost linear relationship between rotation period and J-K colour with a root-mean square scatter of only 2 percent. The relation is similar to that seen among F, G and K stars in the Hyades. Such strong convergence can only be explained if angular momentum is not at present being transferred from a reservoir in the deep stellar interiors to the surface layers. We conclude that the coupling timescale for angular momentum transport from a rapidly-spinning radiative core to the outer convective zone must be substantially shorter than the cluster age, a...

  4. Diamagnetic pumping in a rotating convection zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchatinov, L. L.; Nepomnyashchikh, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Solar dynamo models require some mechanism for magnetic field concentration near the base of the convection zone in order to generate super-kilogauss toroidal fields with sufficiently large (∼ 1024 Mx) magnetic flux. We consider the downward diamagnetic pumping near the base of the convection zone as a possible concentration mechanism and derive the pumping velocities with allowance for the effect of rotation. Transport velocities for poloidal and toroidal fields differ in rotating fluid. The toroidal field is transported downward along the radius only but the pumping velocity for the poloidal field has an equatorward meridional component also. Previous results for cases of slow and rapid rotation are reproduced and the diamagnetic pumping expressions adapted for use in dynamo models are presented.

  5. Diamagnetic pumping in a rotating convection zone

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchatinov, L

    2016-01-01

    Solar dynamo models require some mechanism for magnetic field concentration near the base of the convection zone in order to generate super-kilogauss toroidal fields with sufficiently large (~10^{24} Mx) magnetic flux. We consider the downward diamagnetic pumping near the base of the convection zone as a possible concentration mechanism and derive the pumping velocities with allowance for the effect of rotation. Transport velocities for poloidal and toroidal fields differ in rotating fluid. The toroidal field is transported downward along the radius only but the pumping velocity for the poloidal field has an equatorward meridional component also. Previous results for cases of slow and rapid rotation are reproduced and the diamagnetic pumping expressions adapted for use in dynamo models are presented.

  6. A Rotative Electrical Impedance Tomography Reconstruction System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, F-M [St. John' s and St. Mary' s Institute of Technology, Department of computer science and information Engineering, 499, Sec. 4, Tam King Road Tamsui, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, C-N [National Central University, Department of Electrical Engineering, No.300, Jungda Rd, Jhongli City, 320 Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, F-W [National Central University, Department of Electrical Engineering, No.300, Jungda Rd, Jhongli City, 320 Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chung, H-Y [National Central University, Department of Electrical Engineering, No.300, Jungda Rd, Jhongli City, 320 Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2006-10-15

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a powerful tool for mapping the conductivity distribution of estimated objects. The EIT system is entirely implemented by electrical technique, so it is a relatively cheap system and data can be collected very rapidly. But it has few commercially medical EIT systems available. This is because impedance image unable to achieve the essential spatial resolution and this technique has an intrinsically poor signal to noise ratio. In this paper, we have developed a high performance rotative EIT system (REIT) for expanding the independent measurements. By rotate the electrodes successive, REIT could change the position of electrodes and acquire more measurement data. This rotative measurement method not only can increase the resolution of impedance images, but also reduce the complexity of measurement system. We hope the improvement of REIT will bring some help in electrical impedance tomography.

  7. Radiation dosimetry.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists.

  8. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  9. Fractal Aggregation Under Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Feng-Min; WU Li-Li; LU Hang-Jun; LI Qiao-Wen; YE Gao-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    By means of the Monte Carlo simulation, a fractal growth model is introduced to describe diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) under rotation. Patterns which are different from the classical DLA model are observed and the fractal dimension of such clusters is calculated. It is found that the pattern of the clusters and their fractal dimension depend strongly on the rotation velocity of the diffusing particle. Our results indicate the transition from fractal to non-fractal behavior of growing cluster with increasing rotation velocity, i.e. for small enough angular velocity ω the fractal dimension decreases with increasing ω, but then, with increasing rotation velocity, the fractal dimension increases and the cluster becomes compact and tends to non-fractal.

  10. Fractal Aggregation Under Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUFeng-Min; WULi-Li; LUHang-Jun; LIQiao-Wen; YEGao-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    By means of the Monte Carlo simulation, a fractal growth model is introduced to describe diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) under rotation. Patterns which are different from the classical DLA model are observed and the fractal dimension of such clusters is calculated. It is found that the pattern of the clusters and their fractal dimension depend strongly on the rotation velocity of the diffusing particle. Our results indicate the transition from fractal to non-fractal behavior of growing cluster with increasing rotation velocity, i.e. for small enough angular velocity ω; thefractal dimension decreases with increasing ω;, but then, with increasing rotation velocity, the fractal dimension increases and the cluster becomes compact and tends to non-fractal.

  11. Solar rotation gravitational moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ajabshirizadeh

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available   Gravitational multipole moments of the Sun are still poorly known. Theoretically, the difficulty is mainly due to the differential rotation for which the velocity rate varies both on the surface and with the depth. From an observational point of view, the multipole moments cannot be directly measured. However, recent progresses have been made proving the existence of a strong radial differential rotation in a thin layer near the solar surface (the leptocline. Applying the theory of rotating stars, we will first compute values of J2 and J4 taking into account the radial gradient of rotation, then we will compare these values with the existing ones, giving a more complete review. We will explain some astrophysical outcomes, mainly on the relativistic Post Newtonian parameters. Finally we will conclude by indicating how space experiments (balloon SDS flights, Golf NG, Beppi-Colombo, Gaia... will be essential to unambiguously determine these parameters.

  12. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  13. Rotational spectrum of phenylglycinol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Alcides; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-11-01

    Solid samples of phenylglycinol were vaporized by laser ablation and investigated through rotational spectroscopy in a supersonic expansion using two different techniques: chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and narrow band molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. One conformer, bearing an O-H···N and an N-H···π intramolecular hydrogen bonds, could be successfully identified by comparison of the experimental rotational and 14N nuclear quadruple coupling constants with those predicted theoretically.

  14. Earth rotation and geodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bogusz Janusz; Brzezinski Aleksander; Kosek Wieslaw; Nastula Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the summary of research activities carried out in Poland in 2011-2014 in the field of Earth rotation and geodynamics by several Polish research institutions. It contains a summary of works on Earth rotation, including evaluation and prediction of its parameters and analysis of the related excitation data as well as research on associated geodynamic phenomena such as geocentre motion, global sea level change and hydrological processes. The second part of the paper deals wit...

  15. Spacecraft motion analysis about rapid rotating small body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史雪岩; 崔祜涛; 崔平远; 栾恩杰

    2003-01-01

    The orbital dynamics equation of a spacecraft around an irregular sphere small body is established based on the small body' s gravitational potential approximated with a tri-axial ellipsoid. According to the Jacobi integral constant, the spacecraft zero-velocity curves in the vicinity of the small body is described and feasible motion region is analyzed. The limited condition and the periapsis radius corresponding to different eccentricity against impact surface are presented. The stability of direct and retrograde equator orbits is analyzed based on the perturbation solutions of mean orbit elements.

  16. The formation of massive primordial stars in rapidly rotating disks

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, M A

    2014-01-01

    Massive primordial halos exposed to moderate UV backgrounds are the potential birthplaces of very massive stars or even supermassive black holes. In such a halo, an initially isothermal collapse will occur, leading to high accretion rates of $\\sim0.1$~M$_\\odot$~yr$^{-1}$. During the collapse, the gas in the interior will turn into a molecular state, and form an accretion disk due to the conservation of angular momentum. We consider here the structure of such an accretion disk and the role of viscous heating in the presence of high accretion rates for a central star of $10$, $100$ and $10^4$~M$_\\odot$. Our results show that the temperature in the disk increases considerably due to viscous heating, leading to a transition from the molecular to the atomic cooling phase. We found that the atomic cooling regime may extend out to several $100$~AU for a $10^4$~M$_\\odot$ central star and provides substantial support to stabilize the disk. It therefore favors the formation of a massive central object. The comparison o...

  17. The formation of supermassive black holes in rapidly rotating disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.

    2015-06-01

    Massive primordial halos exposed to moderate UV backgrounds are the potential birthplaces of supermassive black holes. In these halos, an initially isothermal collapse will occur, leading to high accretion rates of ~0.1 M⊙ yr-1. During the collapse, the gas in the interior will turn into a molecular state, and will form accretion disk in order to conserve angular momentum. We consider here the structure of such an accretion disk and the role of viscous heating in the presence of high accretion rates for a central star of 10, 100, and 104 M⊙. Our results show that the temperature in the disk increases considerably due to viscous heating, leading to a transition from the molecular to the atomic cooling phase. We found that the atomic cooling regime may extend out to several 100 AU for a 104 M⊙ central star and that it provides substantial support to stabilize the disk. It therefore favors the formation of a massive central object. The comparison of clump migration and contraction time scales shows that stellar feedback from these clumps may occur during the later stages of the evolution. Overall, viscous heating provides an important pathway to obtain an atomic gas phase within the center of the halo, and helps in the formation of very massive objects. The massive object may collapse to form a massive black hole of about ≥104 M⊙.

  18. Differential rotation of geomagnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Zigang; XU Wenyao

    2003-01-01

    The latitudinal dependence of the westward drift in the main geomagnetic field is examined by using the correlation analysis of moving random pattern. The study reveals the characteristics in the differential rotation of the main field. The results show that the global geomagnetic field drifts westward with an average speed of 0.18°/a during 1900-2000. The westward drift rate is not symmetrical with respect to the equator. The maximum westward drift rate, 0.31°/a, occurs at the latitude --= -15°, forming a Rapid Westward Drift Belt (RDB) around this latitude. Going northward and southward from this belt, the drift rate decreases and reaches the minimum (0.12°/a) at --= 50° and the minimum (0.14°/a) at --= -56°, forming a Northern Hemisphere Slow Westward Drift Belt (N-SDB) and a Southern Hemisphere Slow Westward Drift Belt (S-SDB). Three phases can be detected in the evolution of the westward drift. In the first phase (1900-1940), the RDB dominates the global drift pattern. The westward drifts in this belt are much faster than those in other areas. In the second phase (1940-1960), the drift rates in the RDB are less than those in the first phase, while the drifts in the N-SDB and S-SDB are relatively large. In this phase, the differential rotation becomes less obvious. In the third phase (1960-2000), the westward drift in the RDB increases again and the differential rotation gradually becomes apparent.

  19. Differential rotation in K, G, F and A stars

    CERN Document Server

    Balona, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Rotational light modulation in Kepler photometry of K - A stars is used to estimate the absolute rotational shear. The rotation frequency spread in 2562 carefully selected stars with known rotation periods is measured using time-frequency diagrams. The variation of rotational shear as a function of effective temperature in restricted ranges of rotation period is determined. The shear increases to a maximum in F stars, but decreases somewhat in the A stars. Theoretical models reproduce the temperature variation quite well. The dependence of rotation shear on rotation rate in restricted temperature ranges is also determined. The dependence of the shear on the rotation rate is weak in K and G stars, increases rapidly for F stars and is strongest in A stars. For stars earlier than type K, a discrepancy exists between the predicted and observed variation of shear with rotation rate. There is a strong increase in the fraction of stars with zero frequency spread with increasing effective temperature. The time-freque...

  20. Extremely efficient Zevatron in rotating AGN magnetospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Osmanov, Zaza; Machabeli, George; Chkheidze, Nino

    2014-01-01

    A novel model of particle acceleration in the magnetospheres of rotating Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is constructed.The particle energies may be boosted up to 10^{21}eV in a two step mechanism: In the first stage, the Langmuir waves are centrifugally excited and amplified by means of a parametric process that efficiently pumps rotational energy to excite electrostatic fields. In the second stage, the electrostatic energy is transferred to particle kinetic energy via Landau damping made possible by rapid "Langmuir collapse". The time scale for parametric pumping of Langmuir waves turns out to be small compared to the kinematic timescale, indicating high efficiency of the first process. The second process of "Langmuir collapse" - the creation of caverns or low density regions - also happens rapidly for the characteristic parameters of the AGN magnetosphere. The Langmuir collapse creates appropriate conditions for transferring electric energy to boost up already high particle energies to much higher values. It ...

  1. Classical limits of boot-rotation symmetric spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Kofron, David

    2010-01-01

    Boost-rotation symmetric spacetimes are exceptional as they are the only exact asymptotically flat solutions to the Einstein equations describing spatially bounded sources ("point-like" particles, black holes) undergoing non-trivial motion ("uniform acceleration") with radiation. We construct the Newtonian limit of these spacetimes: it yields fields of uniformly accelerated sources in classical mechanics. We also study the special-relativistic limit of the charged rotating C-metric and so find accelerating electromagnetic magic field.

  2. Simulating the Outer Radiation Belt During the Rising Phase of Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Kanekal, Shri; Nagai, Tsungunobu; Albert, Jay

    2011-01-01

    After prolonged period of solar minimum, there has been an increase in solar activity and its terrestrial consequences. We are in the midst of the rising phase of solar cycle 24, which began in January 2008. During the initial portion of the cycle, moderate geomagnetic storms occurred follow the 27 day solar rotation. Most of the storms were accompanied by increases in electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. These enhancements were often preceded with rapid dropout at high L shells. We seek to understand the similarities and differences in radiation belt behavior during the active times observed during the of this solar cycle. This study includes extensive data and simulations our Radiation Belt Environment Model. We identify the processes, transport and wave-particle interactions, that are responsible for the flux dropout and the enhancement and recovery.

  3. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  4. Radiative Magnetic Reconnection in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2015-01-01

    I review a new rapidly growing area of high-energy plasma astrophysics --- radiative magnetic reconnection, i.e., a reconnection regime where radiation reaction influences reconnection dynamics, energetics, and nonthermal particle acceleration. This influence be may be manifested via a number of astrophysically important radiative effects, such as radiation-reaction limits on particle acceleration, radiative cooling, radiative resistivity, braking of reconnection outflows by radiation drag, radiation pressure, viscosity, and even pair creation at highest energy densities. Self-consistent inclusion of these effects in magnetic reconnection theory and modeling calls for serious modifications to our overall theoretical approach to the problem. In addition, prompt reconnection-powered radiation often represents our only observational diagnostic tool for studying remote astrophysical systems; this underscores the importance of developing predictive modeling capabilities to connect the underlying physical condition...

  5. Effects of rotation in AGB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Luciano, Piersanti; Oscar, Straniero

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the effects induced by rotation on low mass Asymptotic Giant Branch stars. We compute two sets of models, M=2.0 Msun at [Fe/H]=0 and M=1.5 Msun at [Fe/H]=-1.7, respectively, by adopting Main Sequence rotation velocities in the range 0 - 120 km/s. At high metallicity, we find that the Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability, active at the interface between the convective envelope and the rapid rotating core, contaminates the 13C-pocket (the major neutron source) with 14N (the major neutron poison), thus reducing the neutron flux available for the synthesis of heavy elements. As a consequence, the yields of heavy-s elements (Ba, La, Nd, Sm) and, to a less extent, those of light-s elements (Sr, Y, Zr) decrease with increasing rotation velocities up to 60 km/s. However, for larger initial rotation velocities, the production of light-s and, to a less extent, that of heavy-s begins again to increase, due to mixing induced by meridional circulations. At low metallicity, the effects of meridion...

  6. 2D Multi-Angle, Multi-Group Neutrino Radiation-Hydrodynamic Simulations of Postbounce Supernova Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Christian D; Dessart, Luc; Livne, Eli

    2008-01-01

    We perform axisymmetric (2D) multi-angle, multi-group neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the postbounce phase of core-collapse supernovae using a genuinely 2D discrete-ordinate (S_n) method. We follow the long-term postbounce evolution of the cores of one nonrotating and one rapidly-rotating 20-solar-mass stellar model for ~400 milliseconds from 160 ms to ~550 ms after bounce. We present a multi-D analysis of the multi-angle neutrino radiation fields and compare in detail with counterpart simulations carried out in the 2D multi-group flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD) approximation to neutrino transport. We find that 2D multi-angle transport is superior in capturing the global and local radiation-field variations associated with rotation-induced and SASI-induced aspherical hydrodynamic configurations. In the rotating model, multi-angle transport predicts much larger asymptotic neutrino flux asymmetries with pole to equator ratios of up to ~2.5, while MGFLD tends to sphericize the radiation fields al...

  7. Gaining confidence on general relativity with cosmic polarization rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Alighieri, Sperello di Serego

    2016-01-01

    The theory of general relativity, for which we celebrate the centennial at this Symposium, is based on the Einstein equivalence principle. This principle could be violated through a pseudoscalar-photon interaction, which would also produce a rotation of the polarization angle for radiation traveling over very long distances. Therefore, if we could show that this cosmic polarization rotation does not exist, our confindence in general relativity would be greatly increased. We review here the astrophysical searches for cosmic polarization rotation, which have been made in the past 26 years using the polarization of radio galaxies and of the cosmic microwave background. So far no rotation has been detected within about 1 degree. We discuss current problems and future prospects for cosmic polarization rotation measurements.

  8. Rotational equilibria by Lagrangian variational principle: towards multidimensional stellar evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Fujisawa, Kotaro; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a new formulation to obtain self-gravitating, axisymmetric configurations in permanent rotation. The formulation is based on the Lagrangian variational principle with a triangulated mesh. It treats not only barotropic but also baroclinic equations of state. We compare the various stellar equilibria obtained by our new scheme with those by Hachisu's self-consistent field scheme for the barotropic case, and those by Fujisawa's self-consistent field scheme for the baroclinic case. Included in these rotational configurations are those with shellular-type rotations, which are commonly assumed in the evolution calculation of rotating stars. Although radiation processes, convections and meridional flows have not been taken into account in this study, we have in mind the application of this method to the two-dimensional evolution calculations of rotating stars, for which the Lagrangian formulation is best suited.

  9. Vibrations of rotating machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Osami; Kanki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Keogh, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This book opens with an explanation of the vibrations of a single degree-of-freedom (dof) system for all beginners. Subsequently, vibration analysis of multi-dof systems is explained by modal analysis. Mode synthesis modeling is then introduced for system reduction, which aids understanding in a simplified manner of how complicated rotors behave. Rotor balancing techniques are offered for rigid and flexible rotors through several examples. Consideration of gyroscopic influences on the rotordynamics is then provided and vibration evaluation of a rotor-bearing system is emphasized in terms of forward and backward whirl rotor motions through eigenvalue (natural frequency and damping ratio) analysis. In addition to these rotordynamics concerning rotating shaft vibration measured in a stationary reference frame, blade vibrations are analyzed with Coriolis forces expressed in a rotating reference frame. Other phenomena that may be assessed in stationary and rotating reference frames include stability characteristic...

  10. Chiral Rotational Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Robert P; Barnett, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    We introduce chiral rotational spectroscopy: a new technique that enables the determination of the individual optical activity polarisability components $G_{XX}'$, $G_{YY}'$, $G_{ZZ}'$, $A_{X,YZ}$, $A_{Y,ZX}$ and $A_{Z,XY}$ of chiral molecules, in a manner that reveals the enantiomeric constitution of a sample whilst yielding an incisive signal even for a racemate. Chiral rotational spectroscopy could find particular use in the analysis of molecules that are chiral by virtue of their isotopic constitution and molecules with multiple chiral centres. The principles that underpin chiral rotational spectroscopy can also be exploited in the search for molecular chirality in space, which, if found, may add weight to hypotheses that biological homochirality and indeed life itself are of cosmic origin.

  11. Chiral rotational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robert P.; Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2016-09-01

    We introduce chiral rotational spectroscopy, a technique that enables the determination of the orientated optical activity pseudotensor components BX X, BY Y, and BZ Z of chiral molecules, in a manner that reveals the enantiomeric constitution of a sample and provides an incisive signal even for a racemate. Chiral rotational spectroscopy could find particular use in the analysis of molecules that are chiral solely by virtue of their isotopic constitution and molecules with multiple chiral centers. A basic design for a chiral rotational spectrometer together with a model of its functionality is given. Our proposed technique offers the more familiar polarizability components αX X, αY Y, and αZ Z as by-products, which could see it find use even for achiral molecules.

  12. Rotating ice blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  13. The optical rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tandrup, T; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb; Jensen, Eva B. Vedel

    1997-01-01

    The optical rotator is an unbiased, local stereological principle for estimation of cell volume and cell surface area in thick, transparent slabs, The underlying principle was first described in 1993 by Kieu Jensen (T. Microsc. 170, 45-51) who also derived an estimator of length, In this study we...... further discuss the methods derived from this principle and present two new local volume estimators. The optical rotator benefits from information obtained in all three dimensions in thick sections but avoids over-/ underprojection problems at the extremes of the cell. Using computer-assisted microscopes...... the extra measurements demand minimal extra effort and make this estimator even more efficient when it comes to estimation of individual cell size than many of the previous local estimators, We demonstrate the principle of the optical rotator in an example (the cells in the dorsal root ganglion of the rat...

  14. Rotation of cometary meteoroids

    CERN Document Server

    Capek, David

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the rotational characteristics of meteoroids after their release from a comet during normal activity. The results can serve as initial conditions for further analyses of subsequent evolution of rotation in the interplanetary space. A sophisticated numerical model was applied to meteoroids ejected from 2P/Encke comet. The meteoroid shapes were approximated by polyhedrons with several thousands of surface elements, which have been determined by 3D laser scanning method of 36 terrestrial rock samples. These samples came from three distinct sets with different origin and shape characteristics. Two types of gas-meteoroid interactions (diffuse and specular reflection of gas molecules from the surface of meteoroid) and three gas ejection models (leading to very different ejection velocities) were assumed. The rotational characteristics of ejected meteoroid population were obtained by numerical integration of equations of motion with random initial conditions and random shape sele...

  15. Iron Kα Emission Lines in Seyfert(-Like) Active Galactic Nuclei: Revelation of a Rapidly Spinning Central Black Hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马振国

    2002-01-01

    Fe Kα lines are superimposed upon the x-ray continuum in most Seyfert(-like) active galactic nuclei (AGNs).By a data-fitting study, previous authors have claimed that the central black hole (BH) is either rotating ornon-rotating according to the thin disc model. We develop the disc model to the torus model to determine thereal spin of the BH. With formulations of the motion of both torus particles and photons near a BH in Kerrmetric, we simulate iron emission linesfrom a thin luminous torus. It is found that only spinning BH galaxiescan radiate observable profiles. The data-fitting to Fe lines of four AGNs observed by ASCA predicts that thecentral BH is spinning rapidly with the dimensionless specific angular momentum approaching the maximalvalueof 1.

  16. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission. PMID:27596746

  17. Millimetre Wave with Rotational Orbital Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Lu

    2016-09-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been widely studied in fibre and short-range communications. The implementation of millimetre waves with OAM is expected to increase the communication capacity. Most experiments demonstrate the distinction of OAM modes by receiving all of the energy in the surface vertical to the radiation axis in space. However, the reception of OAM is difficult in free space due to the non-zero beam angle and divergence of energy. The reception of OAM in the space domain in a manner similar to that in optical fibres (i.e., receiving all of the energy rings vertical to the radiation axis) is impractical, especially for long-distance transmission. Here, we fabricate a prototype of the antenna and demonstrate that rather than in the space domain, the OAM can be well received in the time domain via a single antenna by rotating the OAM wave at the transmitter, i.e., the radio wave with rotational OAM. The phase and frequency measured in the experiment reveal that for different OAM modes, the received signals act as a commonly used orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in the time domain. This phase rotation has promising prospects for use in the practical reception of different OAMs of millimetre waves in long-distance transmission.

  18. Synergic effects of 10°/s constant rotation and rotating background on visual cognitive processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Siyang; Cao, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Tan, Cheng; Niu, Dongbin

    accelerated the early process of visual cognition. There is a synergic effect between the effects of constant low-speed rotation and rotating speed of the background. Under certain conditions, they both served to facilitate the visual cognitive processing, and it had been started at the stage when extrastriate cortex perceiving the visual signal. Under the condition of constant low-speed rotation in higher cognitive load tasks, the rapid rotation of the background enhanced the magnitude of the signal transmission in the visual path, making signal to noise ratio increased and a higher signal to noise ratio is clearly in favor of target perception and recognition. This gave rise to the hypothesis that higher cognitive load tasks with higher top-down control had more power in counteracting the inhibition effect of higher velocity rotation background. Acknowledgements: This project was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 30670715) and National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No.2007AA04Z254).

  19. Effect of rotation on a rotating hot-wire sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, C.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to discern the effects of centrifugal and Coriolis forces on a rotating hot-wire. The probe was calibrated in a wind tunnel as well as in a rotating mode. The effect of rotation was found to be negligibly small. A small change in cold resistance (1.5%) was observed in the rotating wire. The rotation seems to have a negligible effect on the fluid mechanics, heat transfer and material characteristics of the wire. This is a significant conclusion in view of the potential application of the hot-wire probe in a rotating passage (such as turbomachinery).

  20. Properties of hyperon stars rotating at Keplerian frequency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen De-Hua; Chen Wei

    2011-01-01

    The structure and properties of a Keplerian rotating hyperon star with an equation of state (BOS) investigated using the relativistic σ-ω-ρ model are examined by employing an accurate numerical scheme. It is shown that there is a clear rotating effect on the structure and properties, and that hyperon star matter cannot support a star with a mass larger than 1.9 M☉, even a star rotating at the fastest allowed frequency. The constraints of the two known fastest rotating frequencies (716 Hz and 1122 Hz) on the mass and radius of a hyperon star are also explored. Furthermore, our results indicate that the imprint of the rapid rotation of a hyperon star on the moment of inertia is clear; the backward equatorial redshift, the forward equatorial redshift and the polar redshift can be distinguished clearly, the forward equatorial redshift is always negative; and its figuration is far from a spherical symmetric shape.

  1. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  2. Energy crops in rotation. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zegada-Lizarazu, Walter; Monti, Andrea [Department of Agroenvironmental Science and Technology, University of Bologna, Viale G. Fanin, 44 - 40127, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    The area under energy crops has increased tenfold over the last 10 years, and there is large consensus that the demand for energy crops will further increase rapidly to cover several millions of hectares in the near future. Information about rotational systems and effects of energy crops should be therefore given top priority. Literature is poor and fragmentary on this topic, especially about rotations in which all crops are exclusively dedicated to energy end uses. Well-planned crop rotations, as compared to continuous monoculture systems, can be expected to reduce the dependence on external inputs through promoting nutrient cycling efficiency, effective use of natural resources, especially water, maintenance of the long-term productivity of the land, control of diseases and pests, and consequently increasing crop yields and sustainability of production systems. The result of all these advantages is widely known as crop sequencing effect, which is due to the additional and positive consequences on soil physical-chemical and biological properties arising from specific crops grown in the same field year after year. In this context, the present review discusses the potential of several rotations with energy crops and their possibilities of being included alongside traditional agriculture systems across different agro-climatic zones within the European Union. Possible rotations dedicated exclusively to the production of biomass for bioenergy are also discussed, as rotations including only energy crops could become common around bio-refineries or power plants. Such rotations, however, show some limitations related to the control of diseases and to the narrow range of available species with high production potential that could be included in a rotation of such characteristics. The information on best-known energy crops such as rapeseed (Brassica napus) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus) suggests that conventional crops can benefit from the introduction of energy crops in

  3. Making a Be star: the role of rotation and pulsations

    CERN Document Server

    Neiner, C

    2013-01-01

    The Be phenomenon, i.e. the ejection of matter from Be stars into a circumstellar disk, has been a long lasting mystery. In the last few years, the CoRoT satellite brought clear evidence that Be outbursts are directly correlated to pulsations and rapid rotation. In particular the stochastic excitation of gravito-inertial modes, such as those detected by CoRoT in the hot Be star HD 51452, is enhanced thanks to rapid rotation. These waves increase the transport of angular momentum and help to bring the already rapid stellar rotation to its critical value at the surface, allowing the star to eject material. Below we summarize the recent observational and theoretical findings and describe the new picture of the Be phenomenon which arose from these results.

  4. Making a Be star: the role of rotation and pulsations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiner, Coralie; Mathis, Stéphane

    2014-02-01

    The Be phenomenon, i.e. the ejection of matter from Be stars into a circumstellar disk, has been a long lasting mystery. In the last few years, the CoRoT satellite brought clear evidence that Be outbursts are directly correlated to pulsations and rapid rotation. In particular the stochastic excitation of gravito-inertial modes, such as those detected by CoRoT in the hot Be star HD 51452, is enhanced thanks to rapid rotation. These waves increase the transport of angular momentum and help to bring the already rapid stellar rotation to its critical value at the surface, allowing the star to eject material. Below we summarize the recent observational and theoretical findings and describe the new picture of the Be phenomenon which arose from these results.

  5. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process. A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D90 for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and (192)Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D2cc of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α∕β = 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively. For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes∕fraction (min∕fx) assuming a 10 Ci(192)Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D90 was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D90 of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min∕fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min∕fx more. If an additional 20 min∕fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D90 above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively. For cervical cancer patients, D-RSBT can boost HR-CTV D90

  6. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  7. The Spatiale Rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan

    2009-01-01

    The inherent demand for unbiasedness for some stereological estimators imposes a demand of not only positional uniform randomness but also isotropic randomness, i.e. directional uniform randomness. In order to comply with isotropy, one must perform a random rotation of the object of interest befo...

  8. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  9. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  10. Compact rotating cup anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, J. B.

    1968-01-01

    Compact, collapsible rotating cup anemometer is used in remote locations where portability and durability are factors in the choice of equipment. This lightweight instrument has a low wind-velocity threshold, is capable of withstanding large mechanical shocks while in its stowed configuration, and has fast response to wind fluctuations.

  11. The rotating quantum vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Paul Charles William; Manogue, C A; Davies, Paul C W; Dray, Tevian; Manogue, Corinne A

    1996-01-01

    We derive conditions for rotating particle detectors to respond in a variety of bounded spacetimes and compare the results with the folklore that particle detectors do not respond in the vacuum state appropriate to their motion. Applications involving possible violations of the second law of thermodynamics are briefly addressed.

  12. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  13. Magnetic dipole oscillations and radiation damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Daniel R.; Pollack, Gerald L.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the problem of radiation damping for a magnetic dipole oscillating in a magnetic field. An equation for the radiation reaction torque is derived, and the damping of the oscillations is described. Also discussed are runaway solutions for a rotating magnetic dipole moving under the influence of the reaction torque, with no external torque.

  14. Image rotation-elimination based on a retina-like sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fengmei; Lin, Yabin; Bai, Tingzhu; Wang, Fan

    2015-12-01

    The pixels of a retina-like sensor are arranged in concentric rings, and the output image is given in log-polar coordinates. Thus, additional residual errors will not be produced when the output image is rotated. Therefore, retina-like sensors have obvious advantages and many prospects for applications in the fields of image rotation and rapid image rotation-elimination. In this study, a theory concerning the image rotation of a retina-like sensor is proposed, and a solution based on the theory is presented and realized for eliminating image rotation caused by camera rotation. The camera rotation angle is obtained using a microelectromechanical systems digital accelerometer and gyroscope; only the readout sequence of each row from static random-access memory must be changed to achieve image rotation-elimination. Several image rotation-elimination experiments have been performed which show that the proposed solution is simple, accurate, and rapid. This rapid image rotation-elimination method can be used in fields that require higher image rotation-elimination processing speeds.

  15. Strongly magnetized rotating dipole in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Petri, J

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic waves arise in many area of physics. Solutions are difficult to find in the general case. In this paper, we numerically integrate Maxwell equations in a 3D spherical polar coordinate system. Straightforward finite difference methods would lead to a coordinate singularity along the polar axis. Spectral methods are better suited to deal with such artificial singularities related to the choice of a coordinate system. When the radiating object is rotating like for instance a star, special classes of solutions to Maxwell equations are worthwhile to study such as quasi-stationary regimes. Moreover, in high-energy astrophysics, strong gravitational and magnetic fields are present especially around rotating neutron stars. In order to study such systems, we designed an algorithm to solve the time-dependent Maxwell equations in spherical polar coordinates including general relativity as well as quantum electrodynamical corrections to leading order. As a diagnostic, we compute the spindown luminosity exp...

  16. The rotation-activity relation in M dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Berlind, Perry L.; Calkins, Michael L.; Mink, Jessica D.

    2017-01-01

    Main sequence stars with masses below approximately 0.35 solar masses are fully-convective, and are expected to have a different type of magnetic dynamo than solar-type stars. Observationally, the dynamo mechanism can be probed through the relationship between rotation and magnetic activity, and the evolution of these properties. Though M dwarfs are the most common type of star in the galaxy, a lack of observational constraints at ages beyond 1 Gyr has hampered studies of the rotation-activity relation. To address this, we have made new measurements of rotation and magnetic activity in nearby, field-age M dwarfs. Combining our 386 rotation period measurements and 247 new optical spectra with data from the literature, we are able to probe the rotation-activity in M dwarfs with masses from 0.1 to 0.6 solar masses. We observe a threshold in the mass--period plane that separates active and inactive M dwarfs. The threshold coincides with the fast-period edge of the slowly rotating population, at approximately the rotation period at which an era of rapid rotational evolution appears to cease. We confirm that the activity of rapidly rotating M dwarfs maintains a saturated value. We have measured rotation periods as long as 140 days, allowing us to probe the unsaturated regime in detail. Our data show a clear power-law decay in relative H-alpha luminosity as a function Rossby number. We discuss implications for the magnetic dynamo mechanism.We acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship for Science and Engineering, and the John Templeton Foundation. E.R.N. acknowledges support from the NSF through a Graduate Research Fellowship and an Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship.

  17. Revealing Saturn's Rotation Period from its Gravitational Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helled, Ravit; Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the rotation period of a giant planet is fundamental for constraining its internal structure and atmosphere dynamics. Until the arrival of the Cassini spacecraft to Saturn, Saturn's rotation period was set to the Voyager 2 radio period, 10h 39m 22.4s that was derived from the periodicity in Saturn's kilometric radiation (SKR). Surprisingly, Cassini's SKR measured a rotation period of 10h 47m 6s using the exact same method. It was then realized that Saturn's rotation period is unknown to within a few minutes. We show that Saturn's rotation period can be determined from its measured gravitational field. We find that without imposing any constraints on the planetary shape and internal density profile the rotation rate can be determined to within several minutes, and is 10h 43m 10s ± 4m. If we include limits based on the observed shape and possible internal density profiles, the rotation period is found to be 10h 32m 45s ± 46s. The success of our method is confirmed by applying it for Jupiter and reproducing exactly its measured rotation period that is well constrained.

  18. Effects of Successive Rotation Regimes on Carbon Stocks in Eucalyptus Plantations in Subtropical China Measured over a Full Rotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiong Li

    Full Text Available Plantations play an important role in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle. However, there is a dilemma in that most plantations are managed on short rotations, and the carbon sequestration capacities of these short-rotation plantations remain understudied. Eucalyptus has been widely planted in the tropics and subtropics due to its rapid growth, high adaptability, and large economic return. Eucalyptus plantations are primarily planted in successive rotations with a short rotation length of 6~8 years. In order to estimate the carbon-stock potential of eucalyptus plantations over successive rotations, we chose a first rotation (FR and a second rotation (SR stand and monitored the carbon stock dynamics over a full rotation from 1998 to 2005. Our results showed that carbon stock in eucalyptus trees (TC did not significantly differ between rotations, while understory vegetation (UC and soil organic matter (SOC stored less carbon in the SR (1.01 vs. 2.76 Mg.ha(-1 and 70.68 vs. 81.08 Mg. ha(-1, respectively and forest floor carbon (FFC conversely stored more (2.80 vs. 2.34 Mg. ha(-1. The lower UC and SOC stocks in the SR stand resulted in 1.13 times lower overall ecosystem carbon stock. Mineral soils and overstory trees were the two dominant carbon pools in eucalyptus plantations, accounting for 73.77%~75.06% and 20.50%~22.39%, respectively, of the ecosystem carbon pool. However, the relative contribution (to the ecosystem pool of FFC stocks increased 1.38 times and that of UC decreased 2.30 times in the SR versus FR stand. These carbon pool changes over successive rotations were attributed to intensive successive rotation regimes of eucalyptus plantations. Our eight year study suggests that for the sustainable development of short-rotation plantations, a sound silvicultural strategy is required to achieve the best combination of high wood yield and carbon stock potential.

  19. Effects of Successive Rotation Regimes on Carbon Stocks in Eucalyptus Plantations in Subtropical China Measured over a Full Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoqiong; Ye, Duo; Liang, Hongwen; Zhu, Hongguang; Qin, Lin; Zhu, Yuling; Wen, Yuanguang

    2015-01-01

    Plantations play an important role in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle. However, there is a dilemma in that most plantations are managed on short rotations, and the carbon sequestration capacities of these short-rotation plantations remain understudied. Eucalyptus has been widely planted in the tropics and subtropics due to its rapid growth, high adaptability, and large economic return. Eucalyptus plantations are primarily planted in successive rotations with a short rotation length of 6~8 years. In order to estimate the carbon-stock potential of eucalyptus plantations over successive rotations, we chose a first rotation (FR) and a second rotation (SR) stand and monitored the carbon stock dynamics over a full rotation from 1998 to 2005. Our results showed that carbon stock in eucalyptus trees (TC) did not significantly differ between rotations, while understory vegetation (UC) and soil organic matter (SOC) stored less carbon in the SR (1.01 vs. 2.76 Mg.ha(-1) and 70.68 vs. 81.08 Mg. ha(-1), respectively) and forest floor carbon (FFC) conversely stored more (2.80 vs. 2.34 Mg. ha(-1)). The lower UC and SOC stocks in the SR stand resulted in 1.13 times lower overall ecosystem carbon stock. Mineral soils and overstory trees were the two dominant carbon pools in eucalyptus plantations, accounting for 73.77%~75.06% and 20.50%~22.39%, respectively, of the ecosystem carbon pool. However, the relative contribution (to the ecosystem pool) of FFC stocks increased 1.38 times and that of UC decreased 2.30 times in the SR versus FR stand. These carbon pool changes over successive rotations were attributed to intensive successive rotation regimes of eucalyptus plantations. Our eight year study suggests that for the sustainable development of short-rotation plantations, a sound silvicultural strategy is required to achieve the best combination of high wood yield and carbon stock potential.

  20. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.