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Sample records for radiation-damaged semi-insulating gaas

  1. Semi-insulating GaAs detectors of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagatova, A.; Sedlackova, K.; Necas, V.; Zatko, B.; Dubecky, F.; Bohacek, P.

    2012-01-01

    The present work deals with the technology of HDPE neutron conversion layer application on the surface of semi-insulating (SI) GaAs detectors via developed polypropylene (PP) based glue. The influence of glue deposition on the electric properties of the detectors was studied as well as the ability of the detectors to register the fast neutrons from "2"3"9Pu-Be neutron source. (authors)

  2. Temperature Dependency and Alpha Response of Semi-Insulating GaAs Schottky Radiation Detector at Low Bias Voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sang Mook; Ha, Jang Ho; Park, Se Hwan; Kim, Han Soo; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen a growing interest in semiconductor radiation detectors operated at room or nearly room temperature. Great efforts have been invested in the development of radiation detectors based on semi-insulating (SI) GaAs. The main reasons are as follows: (i) high resistance against radiation damage; (ii) it possesses a good energy resolution, which relates to its active volume; (iii) such a detector also exhibits fast signal rise times, which results from a high mobility and drift velocity of charge carriers; (iv) its large band gap energy allows a SI GaAs detector to operate at room temperature. Other important features are a good technology base and low production and operating costs. An alpha particle monitoring method for the detection of Pu-238 and U-235 is becoming important in homeland security. Alpha measurement in a vacuum is known to provide a good resolution sufficient to separate an isotope abundance in nuclear materials. However, in order to apply it to a high radiation field like a spent fuel treatment facility, a nuclear material loading and unloading process in a vacuum is one of the great disadvantages. Therefore, the main technical issue is to develop a detector for alpha detection at air condition and low power operation for integration type device. In this study we fabricated GaAs Schottky detector by using semi-insulating (SI) wafer and measured current-voltage characteristic curve and alpha response with 5.5 MeV Am-241 source

  3. Terahertz emission from semi-insulating GaAs with octadecanthiol-passivated surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaojun; Xu, Xinlong; Lu, Xinchao; Wang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) emission from octadecanthiol (ODT) passivated (1 0 0) surface of the semi-insulating GaAs was measured, and compared with those from the native oxidized and the fresh surfaces. It was shown that the self-assembled ODT monolayer can stabilize the GaAs (1 0 0) surface, and maintain a THz surface emission 1.4 times as efficient as the native oxidized surface under equal conditions. Surface passivation can reduce the built-in electric field in the depletion region of the GaAs (1 0 0), resulting in the suppression of the THz radiation to a different extent. Oxidation of GaAs surface reduces the THz amplitude mainly in the low-frequency region. These results indicate that GaAs can be made a more effective THz source by choosing molecular passivation technique. Conversely, the THz emission features such as polarity, amplitude, and phase from molecule-passivated surfaces may be used to characterize the attached molecules.

  4. Light controlled prebreakdown characteristics of a semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiangrong; Shi Wei; Ji Weili; Xue Hong

    2011-01-01

    A 4 mm gap semi-insulating (SI) GaAs photoconductive switch (PCSS) was triggered by a pulse laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm and a pulse energy of 0.5 mJ. In the experiment, when the bias field was 4 kV, the switch did not induce self-maintained discharge but worked in nonlinear (lock-on) mode. The phenomenon is analyzed as follows: an exciton effect contributes to photoconduction in the generation and dissociation of excitons. Collision ionization, avalanche multiplication and the exciton effect can supply carrier concentration and energy when an outside light source was removed. Under the combined influence of these factors, the SI-GaAs PCSS develops into self-maintained discharge rather than just in the light-controlled prebreakdown status. The characteristics of the filament affect the degree of damage to the switch. (semiconductor devices)

  5. Light controlled prebreakdown characteristics of a semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangrong, Ma; Wei, Shi; Weili, Ji; Hong, Xue

    2011-12-01

    A 4 mm gap semi-insulating (SI) GaAs photoconductive switch (PCSS) was triggered by a pulse laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm and a pulse energy of 0.5 mJ. In the experiment, when the bias field was 4 kV, the switch did not induce self-maintained discharge but worked in nonlinear (lock-on) mode. The phenomenon is analyzed as follows: an exciton effect contributes to photoconduction in the generation and dissociation of excitons. Collision ionization, avalanche multiplication and the exciton effect can supply carrier concentration and energy when an outside light source was removed. Under the combined influence of these factors, the SI-GaAs PCSS develops into self-maintained discharge rather than just in the light-controlled prebreakdown status. The characteristics of the filament affect the degree of damage to the switch.

  6. Muon track induced current measurements in semi-insulating GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshchenko, D.G., E-mail: dimitry.eshchenko@psi.c [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Laboratory for Muon Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Storchak, V.G. [Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Cottrell, S.P. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 OQX (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    We report on preliminary muon-track-induced current measurements in semi-insulating (SI-) GaAs. At T=70K, after simultaneous treatment of the sample by muon irradiation and a strong electric field (a square wave with |E|>10kV/cm and the polarity changed every 1/(50) s) for approximately 2 h, the sample is transferred to a metastable-like state which is characterized by increased life-times for non-equilibrium electrons and holes. The sample can be returned to the original state by heating up to 250 K. Our results for SI-GaAs suggest a muon-track-induced electric-field-assisted neutralization process for the deep traps.

  7. A comparative study of Mg and Pt contacts on semi-insulating GaAs: electrical and XPS characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubecký, F.; Kindl, Dobroslav; Hubík, Pavel; Mičušík, M.; Dubecký, M.; Boháček, P.; Vanko, G.; Gombia, E.; Nečas, V.; Mudroň, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 395, Feb (2017), s. 131-135 ISSN 0169-4332 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : semi-insulating GaAs * metal -semiconductor contact * interface * work function * electron transport * XPS Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  8. Photocurrent spectra of semi-insulating GaAs M-S-M diodes: role of the contacts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubecký, F.; Oswald, Jiří; Kindl, Dobroslav; Hubík, Pavel; Dubecký, M.; Gombia, E.; Šagátová, A.; Boháček, P.; Sekáčová, M.; Nečas, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 118, Apr (2016), 30-35 ISSN 0038-1101 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photocurrent spectroscopy * semi-insulating GaAs * detectors * contacts Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.580, year: 2016

  9. Imaging performance of a Timepix detector based on semi-insulating GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaťko, B.; Zápražný, Z.; Jakůbek, J.; Šagátová, A.; Boháček, P.; Sekáčová, M.; Korytár, D.; Nečas, V.; Žemlička, J.; Mora, Y.; Pichotka, M.

    2018-01-01

    This work focused on a Timepix chip [1] coupled with a bulk semi-insulating GaAs sensor. The sensor consisted of a matrix of 256 × 256 pixels with a pitch of 55 μm bump-bonded to a Timepix ASIC. The sensor was processed on a 350 μm-thick SI GaAs wafer. We carried out detector adjustment to optimize its performance. This included threshold equalization with setting up parameters of the Timepix chip, such as Ikrum, Pream, Vfbk, and so on. The energy calibration of the GaAs Timepix detector was realized using a 241Am radioisotope in two Timepix detector modes: time-over-threshold and threshold scan. An energy resolution of 4.4 keV in FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum) was observed for 59.5 keV γ-photons using threshold scan mode. The X-ray imaging quality of the GaAs Timepix detector was tested using various samples irradiated by an X-ray source with a focal spot size smaller than 8 μm and accelerating voltage up to 80 kV. A 700 μm × 700 μm gold testing object (X-500-200-16Au with Siemens star) fabricated with high precision was used for the spatial resolution testing at different values of X-ray image magnification (up to 45). The measured spatial resolution of our X-ray imaging system was about 4 μm.

  10. On the modelling of semi-insulating GaAs including surface tension and bulk stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, W.; Duderstadt, F.

    2004-07-01

    Necessary heat treatment of single crystal semi-insulating Gallium Arsenide (GaAs), which is deployed in micro- and opto- electronic devices, generate undesirable liquid precipitates in the solid phase. The appearance of precipitates is influenced by surface tension at the liquid/solid interface and deviatoric stresses in the solid. The central quantity for the description of the various aspects of phase transitions is the chemical potential, which can be additively decomposed into a chemical and a mechanical part. In particular the calculation of the mechanical part of the chemical potential is of crucial importance. We determine the chemical potential in the framework of the St. Venant-Kirchhoff law which gives an appropriate stress/strain relation for many solids in the small strain regime. We establish criteria, which allow the correct replacement of the St. Venant-Kirchhoff law by the simpler Hooke law. The main objectives of this study are: (i) We develop a thermo-mechanical model that describes diffusion and interface motion, which both are strongly influenced by surface tension effects and deviatoric stresses. (ii) We give an overview and outlook on problems that can be posed and solved within the framework of the model. (iii) We calculate non-standard phase diagrams, i.e. those that take into account surface tension and non-deviatoric stresses, for GaAs above 786 C, and we compare the results with classical phase diagrams without these phenomena. (orig.)

  11. Influence of substrate on the performances of semi-insulating GaAs detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Baldini, R; Nava, F; Canali, C; Lanzieri, C

    2000-01-01

    A study of the carrier transport mechanism, the charge collection efficiency and the energy resolution has been carried out on semi-insulating GaAs X-ray detectors realised on substrates with concentrations of acceptor dopants N sub a , varying from 10 sup 1 sup 4 to 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 3. The electron collection efficiency (ECE) and the reverse current were found to decrease with increasing N sub a , while the resistivity of the material was found to increase. At room temperature, the best collection efficiency (95%) and the best energy resolution (13.7 keV FWHM) for 59.5 keV X-rays of the sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am source, have been achieved with the less doped detectors (N sub a approx 10 sup 1 sup 4 cm sup - sup 3). The concentrations of ionised EL2 sup + , determined by optical measurements in IR regions, was shown to increase with N sub a and to be quasi-inversely proportional to the ECE values. This behaviour strongly supports the hypothesis that the EL2 defects play a main role in the compensation o...

  12. Experimental investigation of limit space charge accumulation mode operation in a semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiangrong; Shi Wei; Xiang Mei

    2013-01-01

    Experiments with the limited space-charge accumulation (LSA) mode of oscillation in a large gap semi-insulating (SI) GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) are discussed. It has been observed that growth and drift of a photo-activated charge domain (PACD) are quenched only when the bias voltage is more than twice the threshold voltage. The original negative resistance characteristics are directly utilized in the LSA mode; during LSA operation the spatial average of the electric field varies over a large portion of the negative differential mobility region of the velocity—electric field characteristic. The work efficiency of an SI GaAs PCSS is remarkably enhanced by electric field excursions into the positive resistance region when the total electric field is only below the threshold part of the time. The LSA mode can only operate in the certain conditions that satisfy the quenching of the accumulation layer and the smaller initial domain voltage. (semiconductor devices)

  13. Lateral n-p-n bipolar transistors by ion implantation into semi-insulating GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canfield, P.; Forbes, L.

    1988-01-01

    GaAs bipolar transistors have not seen the major development effort that GaAs MESFETs have due primarily to the short minority carrier lifetimes in GaAs. The short minority carrier lifetimes require that the base region be very thin which, if done by implantation, requires that the doping be high to obtain a well defined base profile. These requirements are very difficult to achieve in GaAs and typically, if high current gain and high speed are desired for a bipolar technology, then heterostructure bipolars are the appropriate technology, although the cost of heterostructure devices will be prohibitive for some time to come. For applications requiring low current gain, more modest fabrication rules can be followed. Lateral bipolars are particularly attractive since they would be easier to fabricate than a planar bipolar or a heterojunction bipolar. Lateral bipolars do not require steps or deep contacts to make contact with the subcollector or highly doped very thin epilayers for the base region and they can draw upon the semi-insulating properties of the GaAs substrates for device isolation. Bipolar transistors are described and shown to work successfully. (author)

  14. Sulfur passivation of semi-insulating GaAs: Transition from Coulomb blockade to weak localization regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagraev, N. T., E-mail: Bagraev@mail.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation); Chaikina, E. I. [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Division de Fisica Aplicada (Mexico); Danilovskii, E. Yu.; Gets, D. S.; Klyachkin, L. E.; L’vova, T. V.; Malyarenko, A. M. [Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-15

    The sulfur passivation of the semi-insulating GaAs bulk (SI GaAs) grown in an excess phase of arsenic is used to observe the transition from the Coulomb blockade to the weak localization regime at room temperature. The I–V characteristics of the SI GaAs device reveal nonlinear behavior that appears to be evidence of the Coulomb blockade process as well as the Coulomb oscillations. The sulfur passivation of the SI GaAs device surface results in enormous transformation of the I–V characteristics that demonstrate the strong increase of the resistance and Coulomb blockade regime is replaced by the electron tunneling processes. The results obtained are analyzed within frameworks of disordering SI GaAs surface that is caused by inhomogeneous distribution of the donor and acceptor anti-site defects which affects the conditions of quantum- mechanical tunneling. Weak localization processes caused by the preservation of the Fermi level pinning are demonstrated by measuring the negative magnetoresistance in weak magnetic fields at room temperature. Finally, the studies of the magnetoresistance at higher magnetic fields reveal the h/2e Aharonov–Altshuler–Spivak oscillations with the complicated behavior due to possible statistical mismatch of the interference paths in the presence of different microdefects.

  15. A comparative study of Mg and Pt contacts on semi-insulating GaAs: Electrical and XPS characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubecký, F., E-mail: elekfdub@savba.sk [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, Bratislava, SK-84104 (Slovakia); Kindl, D.; Hubík, P. [Institute of Physics CAS, v.v.i., Cukrovarnická 10, CZ-16200 Prague (Czech Republic); Mičušík, M. [Polymer Institute, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, Bratislava, SK-84541 (Slovakia); Dubecký, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Ostrava, 30. dubna 22, CZ-70103 Ostrava 1 (Czech Republic); Boháček, P.; Vanko, G. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, Bratislava, SK-84104 (Slovakia); Gombia, E. [IMEM-CNR, Parco area delle Scienze 37/A, Parma, I-43010 (Italy); Nečas, V. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, SUT, Ilkovičova 3, Bratislava, SK-81219 (Slovakia); Mudroň, J. [Department of Electronics, Academy of Armed Forces, Demänová 393, Liptovský Mikuláš, SK-03106 (Slovakia)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Explored were diodes with full-area low/high work function metal contacts on semi-insulating GaAs (S). • The Mg-S-Mg diode is promising for radiation detectors for its low high-field current. • The XPS analysis of Mg-S interface shows presence of MgO instead of Mg metal. - Abstract: We present a comparative study of the symmetric metal-SI GaAs-metal (M-S-M) diodes with full-area contacts on both device sides, in order to demonstrate the effect of contact metal work function in a straightforward way. We compare the conventional high work function Pt contact versus the less explored low work function Mg contact. The Pt-S-Pt, Mg-S-Mg and mixed Mg-S-Pt structures are characterized by the current-voltage measurements, and individual Pt-S and Mg-S contacts are investigated by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The transport measurements of Mg-S-Pt structure show a significant current decrease at low bias while the Mg-S-Mg structure shows saturation current at high voltages more than an order of magnitude lower with respect to the Pt-S-Pt reference. The phenomena observed in Mg-containing samples are explained by the presence of insulating MgO layer at the M-S interface, instead of the elementary Mg, as confirmed by the XPS analysis. Alternative explanations of the influence of MgO layer on the effective resistance of the structures are presented. The reported findings have potential applications in M-S-M sensors and radiation detectors based on SI GaAs.

  16. Effect of the V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect doping on properties of the semi-insulating GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Deming, E-mail: xautmdm@163.com; Qiao, Hongbo; Shi, Wei; Li, Enling [Department of Applied Physics, Xi' an University of Technology, Xi' an 710054 (China)

    2014-04-21

    The different position V{sub As}V{sub Ga} cluster defect doping in semi-insulating (SI) GaAs has been studied by first-principles calculation based on hybrid density functional theory. Our calculated results show that EL6 level is formed due to the V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect, which is very close to the experimental result. It provides the explanation of the absorption of laser with the wavelength beyond in semi-insulating GaAs. The formation energy of V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect is found to decrease from surface to interior gradually. The conduction band minima and valence band maxima of GaAs (001) surface with the V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect are all located at Γ point, and some defect levels are produced in the forbidden band. In contrast, the conduction band minima and valence band maxima of GaAs with the interior V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect are not located at the same k-point, so it might involve the change of momentum in the electron transition process. The research will help strengthen the understanding of photoelectronic properties and effectively guide the preparation of the SI-GaAs materials.

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance of isolated Assub(Ga)+ antisite defect in neutron-transmutation doped semi-insulating GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manasreh, M.O.; McDonald, P.F.; Kivlighn, S.A.; Minton, J.T.; Covington, B.C.

    1988-01-01

    The isolated Assub(Ga) antisite defect produced by the neutron-transmutation doping in semi-insulating GaAs was studied using the electron paramagnetic resonance technique. The results show that the optically induced quenching of the isolated Assub(Ga) + antisite defect is quite different from that of the EL2 center. Illumination with white light seems to always reduce the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum suggesting that depopulation of the EL2 center does not introduce a noticeable change in the Assub(Ga) + antisite concentration. (author)

  18. Effect of H{sup +} implantation on the optical properties of semi-insulating GaAs crystals in the IR spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klyui, N. I.; Lozinskii, V. B., E-mail: lvb@isp.kiev.ua [Jilin University, College of Physics (China); Liptuga, A. I.; Dikusha, V. N. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine); Oksanych, A. P.; Kogdas’, M. G.; Perekhrest, A. L.; Pritchin, S. E. [Kremenchug National University (Ukraine)

    2017-03-15

    The optical properties of semi-insulating GaAs crystals subjected to multienergy hydrogen-ion implantation and treatment in a high-frequency electromagnetic field are studied in the infrared spectral region. It is established that such combined treatment provides a means for substantially increasing the transmittance of GaAs crystals to values characteristic of crystals of high optical quality. On the basis of analysis of the infrared transmittance and reflectance data, Raman spectroscopy data, and atomic-force microscopy data on the surface morphology of the crystals, a physical model is proposed to interpret the effects experimentally observed in the crystals. The model takes into account the interaction of radiation defects with the initial structural defects in the crystals as well as the effect of compensation of defect centers by hydrogen during high-frequency treatment.

  19. Effect of H+ implantation on the optical properties of semi-insulating GaAs crystals in the IR spectral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klyui, N. I.; Lozinskii, V. B.; Liptuga, A. I.; Dikusha, V. N.; Oksanych, A. P.; Kogdas’, M. G.; Perekhrest, A. L.; Pritchin, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    The optical properties of semi-insulating GaAs crystals subjected to multienergy hydrogen-ion implantation and treatment in a high-frequency electromagnetic field are studied in the infrared spectral region. It is established that such combined treatment provides a means for substantially increasing the transmittance of GaAs crystals to values characteristic of crystals of high optical quality. On the basis of analysis of the infrared transmittance and reflectance data, Raman spectroscopy data, and atomic-force microscopy data on the surface morphology of the crystals, a physical model is proposed to interpret the effects experimentally observed in the crystals. The model takes into account the interaction of radiation defects with the initial structural defects in the crystals as well as the effect of compensation of defect centers by hydrogen during high-frequency treatment.

  20. Surface barrier analysis of semi-insulating and n{sup +}-type GaAs(0 0 1) following passivation with n-alkanethiol SAMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Gregory M. [Laboratory for Quantum Semiconductors and Photon-Based BioNanotechnology, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada); Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Bensebaa, Farid [Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Dubowski, Jan J., E-mail: jan.j.dubowski@usherbrooke.ca [Laboratory for Quantum Semiconductors and Photon-Based BioNanotechnology, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

    2011-02-15

    The surface Fermi level of semi-insulating and n{sup +}-type GaAs(0 0 1) was determined before and after passivation with n-alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Fermi level positioning was achieved using Au calibration pads integrated directly onto the GaAs surface, prior to SAM deposition, in order to provide a surface equipotential binding energy reference. Fermi level pinning within 50 meV and surface barrier characteristics according to the Advanced Unified Defect Model were observed. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the Au integration technique for the determination of band-edge referenced Fermi level positions and are relevant to an understanding of emerging technologies based on the molecular-semiconductor junction.

  1. A study on carbon incorporation in semi-insulating GaAs crystals grown by the vapor pressure controlled Czochralski technique (VCz). Pt. I. Experiments and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, K.; Frank, C.; Neubert, M.; Rudolph, P. [Institut fuer Kristallzuechtung im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (IKZ) (Germany); Ulrici, W. [Institut fuer Kristallzuechtung im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (IKZ) (Germany); Paul-Drude-Inst. fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Berlin (Germany); Jurisch, M. [Institut fuer Kristallzuechtung im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (IKZ) (Germany); Freiberger Compound Materials GmbH, Freiberg (Germany); Korb, J. [Institut fuer Kristallzuechtung im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (IKZ) (Germany); GTT Technologies, Freiberg (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    In the past it has been demonstrated that the carbon concentration of large semi-insulating (SI) GaAs single crystals grown by the conventional liquid encapsulation Czochralski (LEC) technique can be controlled by several methods including variations of growth parameters. It was the aim of the present paper to clarify which of the relationships of LEC growth could be used for a carbon control in the VCz-method characterized by the application of an inner chamber made from graphite to avoid selective As evaporation. In detail this comprised a study of the influence of several growth parameters like the water content of the boric oxide, the composition of the working atmosphere, the gas flow, a titanium gettering and additions of gallium oxide. As a result, for the first time carbon concentrations down to {approx} 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} were obtained in 3{sup ''} (75 mm) diameter VCz crystals. (orig.)

  2. Formation of a quasi-neutral region in Schottky diodes based on semi-insulating GaAs and the influence of the compensation mechanism on the particle detector performance

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, M

    1999-01-01

    A model for the electric field distribution beneath the Schottky contact in semi-insulating (SI) GaAs particle detectors is developed. The model is based on a field-enhanced electron capture of the EL2-defect. The influence of the compensation mechanism in SI-GaAs on the field distribution, leakage current density and charge collection properties of the detectors will be discussed. The detailed understanding allows then a device optimization. (author)

  3. Semi-insulating GaAs and Au Schottky barrier photodetectors for near-infrared detection (1280 nm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusir, A. I.; Makableh, Y. F.; Manasreh, O.

    2015-08-01

    Schottky barriers formed between metal (Au) and semiconductor (GaAs) can be used to detect photons with energy lower than the bandgap of the semiconductor. In this study, photodetectors based on Schottky barriers were fabricated and characterized for the detection of light at wavelength of 1280 nm. The device structure consists of three gold fingers with 1.75 mm long and separated by 0.95 mm, creating an E shape while the middle finger is disconnected from the outer frame. When the device is biased, electric field is stretched between the middle finger and the two outermost electrodes. The device was characterized by measuring the current-voltage (I-V) curve at room temperature. This showed low dark current on the order of 10-10 A, while the photocurrent was higher than the dark current by four orders of magnitude. The detectivity of the device at room temperature was extracted from the I-V curve and estimated to be on the order of 5.3x1010 cm.Hz0.5/W at 5 V. The step response of the device was measured from time-resolved photocurrent curve at 5 V bias with multiple on/off cycles. From which the average recovery time was estimated to be 0.63 second when the photocurrent decreases by four orders of magnitude, and the average rise time was measured to be 0.897 second. Furthermore, the spectral response spectrum of the device exhibits a strong peak close to the optical communication wavelength (~1.3 μm), which is attributed to the internal photoemission of electrons above the Schottky barrier formed between Au and GaAs.

  4. Radiation damages and electro-conductive characteristics of Neutron-Transmutation-Doped GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyama, Kazuo; Sato, Masataka; Sakai, Kiyohiro [Hosei Univ., Koganei, Tokyo (Japan). Coll. of Engineering; Okada, Moritami

    1996-04-01

    Neutron Transmutation Doping (NTD) method made it possible to do homogeneous doping of impurities and to easily control the doping level. Thus, the method has been put into practice for some materials such as silicon. Here, the annealing behavior of anti-site defects generated in neutron-irradiated GaAs was studied. Electric activations of NTD-impurities were started around 550degC in P1 and P2 radiation fields, which were coincident with the beginning of extinction of electron trapping which was caused by anti-site defects due to fast neutron radiation. The electric resistivities of GaAs in neutron radiation fields; P1, P2 and P3 changed depending with the annealing temperature. The electric resistivities of GaAs in P1 and P2 fields indicate the presence of hopping conduction through radiation damages. The resistance of GaAs irradiated in P1 was smaller by nearly 2 orders than that of the untreated control. Further, the electric activation process for NTD-impurities was investigated using ESR and Raman spectroscopy. (M.N.)

  5. Performance study of radiation detectors based on semi-insulating GaAs with P+homo- and heterojunction blocking electrode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubecky, F.; Hulicius, Eduard; Frigeri, P.; Perd´ochová-Šagátová, A.; Zat´ko, B.; Hubík, Pavel; Gombia, E.; Boháček, P.; Pangrác, Jiří; Franchi, S.; Nečas, V.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 563, - (2006), s. 159-162 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1010404 Grant - others:Slovak Grant Agency for Science(SK) 2/4151/24 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : GaAs radiation detector * blocking electrode * P + -N homojunction and heterojunction * gamma irradiation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.185, year: 2006

  6. Radiation damage by high-energy electrons in GaAs: DLTS investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, B.

    1991-10-01

    An isothermal variation of the DLTS technique is developed and applied to the study of displacement damage in GaAs, through the determination of threshold energies and displacement cross sections. Its results correspond to those of an LED based method. A pronounced anisotropy is found for the threshold energy. A linearly increasing displacement probability function is shown to properly model the displacement cross section in direction, as compared with the direction which requires only a single step function. Differences in the damage between these two directions are as large as a factor of two. (orig.) [de

  7. Anomalous diffusion of Ga and As from semi-insulating GaAs substrate into MOCVD grown ZnO films as a function of annealing temperature and its effect on charge compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranab Biswas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The diffusion behavior of arsenic (As and gallium (Ga atoms from semi-insulating GaAs (SI-GaAs into ZnO films upon post-growth annealing vis-à-vis the resulting charge compensation was investigated with the help of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The films, annealed at 600 ºC and 700 ºC showed p-type conductivity with a hole concentration of 1.1 × 1018 cm−3 and 2.8 × 1019 cm−3 respectively, whereas those annealed at 800 ºC showed n-type conductivity with a carrier concentration of 6.5 × 1016 cm−3. It is observed that at lower temperatures, large fraction of As atoms diffused from the SI-GaAs substrates into ZnO and formed acceptor related complex, (AsZn–2VZn, by substituting Zn atoms (AsZn and thereby creating two zinc vacancies (VZn. Thus as-grown ZnO which was supposed to be n-type due to nonstoichiometric nature showed p-type behavior. On further increasing the annealing temperature to 800 ºC, Ga atoms diffused more than As atoms and substitute Zn atoms thereby forming shallow donor complex, GaZn. Electrons from donor levels then compensate the p-type carriers and the material reverts back to n-type. Thus the conversion of carrier type took place due to charge compensation between the donors and acceptors in ZnO and this compensation is the possible origin of anomalous conduction in wide band gap materials.

  8. A contribution for the detection of deep defects in semi-insulating GaAs by means of PICTS; Ein Beitrag zum Nachweis tiefer Stoerstellen in halbisolierendem GaAs mittels PICTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zychowitz, G.

    2006-02-03

    The PICTS procedure is one of the most frequently applied methods for the characterization of semi-insulating semiconductors. The methodical progresses in the determination of defect parameters by this proceudure are presented in this thesis. as practicable method for the detection of a temperature-dependent change of the occupation ratio of a trap the normation of the PICTS spectra on the emission rate of the electrons is introduced. It is shown that peaks, in which this normation fails, must not applied for the determination of the defect parameters. The studies prove that for the complete charge-alteration of the defects a suitable excitation intensity must be applied. By PICTS measurements on copper-doped samples a systematic dependence of the peak heights of copper-correlated peaks on the copper content of the samples is detected. By the studies it is proved that copper can be detected by means of PICTS up to a minimal AES copper concentration of [Cu{sub min}]approx5.10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}.

  9. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  10. Radiation damage to mushrooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattler, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    This document contains newspaper cuttings and correspondence with various ministries in Hessen on the subject of radiation damage to mushrooms from the Odenwald area. The reader is given, amongst other things, detailed information on radiation damage to different types of mushroom in 1986. (MG) [de

  11. Evidence for plasma effect on charge collection efficiency in proton irradiated GaAs detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nava, F; Canali, C; Vittone, E; Polesello, P; Biggeri, U; Leroy, C

    1999-01-01

    The radiation damage in 100 mu m thick Schottky diodes made on semi-insulating undoped GaAs materials, were studied using alpha-, beta-, proton- and gamma-spectroscopy as well as I-V measurements. The results have been analysed within the framework of the Hecht model to investigate the influence of the plasma produced by short-range strongly ionising particles on the detector performance after 24 GeV proton irradiation. It has been found that with the mean free drift lengths for electrons and holes determined from alpha-spectra in overdepleted detectors, the charge collection efficiency for beta-particles, cce subbeta, is well predicted in the unirradiated detectors, while in the most irradiated ones, the cce subbeta is underestimated by more than 40%. The observed disagreement can be explained by assuming that the charge carrier recombination in the plasma region of such detectors, becomes significant.

  12. Positron deep-level transient spectroscopy in semi-insulating-GaAs using the positron velocity transient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsia, M.; Fung, S.; Beling, C.D.

    2001-01-01

    Recently a new semiconductor defect spectroscopy, namely positron deep level transient spectroscopy (PDLTS) has been proposed that combines the energy selectivity of deep level transient spectroscopy with the structural sensitivity of positron annihilation spectroscopy. This paper focuses on one variant of PDLTS, namely positron velocity PDLTS, which has no sensitivity towards vacancy defects but nevertheless is useful in studying deep levels in semi-insulators. In the present study the electric field within the depletion region of semi-insulating GaAs is monitored through the measurement of the small Doppler shift in the annihilation radiation that comes from this region as a result of positron drift. The drift is the result of an increasing electric field produced by space charge building up from ionizing deep level defects. Doppler shift transients are measured between 50-300 K. The EL2 level emission transients are clearly seen at temperatures around 300 K that yield E C -0.78±0.08eV for the energy of EL2. The EL2 electron capture rate is found to have an activation energy of 0.61±0.08eV which most probably arises from freeze out of conduction electrons. We find the surprising result that emission and capture transients can be seen at temperatures below 200 K. Possible reasons for these transients are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Radiation damage of nonmetallic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goland, A.N.

    1975-01-01

    A review of data and information on radiation damage in nonmetallic solids is presented. Discussions are included on defects in nonmetals, radiation damage processes in nonmetals, electronic damage processes, physical damage processes, atomic displacement, photochemical damage processes, and ion implantation

  14. Radiation damage of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1966-11-01

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method

  15. Microinhomogeneities in Semi-Insulating Cd(Zn)Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fochuk, P.; Nykoniuk, Y.; Zakharuk, Z.; Kopach, O.; Kovalenko, N.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we investigated the temperature dependences (TDs) in the range of 290-423 K for the Hall constant R H and the Hall carrier mobility μn (σ R H ) in semi-insulating Cd 0.9 Zn 0.1 Te:In (CZT) crystals. As-grown, CZT material has nonequilibrium distributions of native and impurity-related defects. Thus, before taking any measurements, the samples were kept inside the test chamber in the dark at 423 K to reach an equilibrium state at T <; 423 K. For all the tested samples, the R H TD could be described by two activation energies. At the transitional point, the TD of the carrier mobility also changes from “normal” at high temperatures to “exponential” at low temperatures. The latter is a result of the collective effect of drift barriers due to microinhomogeneity. Therefore, only the high-temperature activation energies can be assigned to the ionization energies of the compensated deep donors (ε D ). For different samples, the values for ε D 0 (at absolute zero) were found to be in the range of 0.50-0.78 eV, and the degree of donor compensation [D + ]/[D] is between 0.3 and 0.98. The low-temperature region, where there are strong effects of crystal microinhomogeneities, cannot be used to characterize the ionization energy of donors. Therefore, we describe the activation energy as ε 1 = ε D - αε b , where ε b is the drift barrier height found from the TD of the carrier mobility and α takes a value close to unity. Values of ε b for our studied samples lie within (0.05-0.35) eV.

  16. Specific features of the photoconductivity of semi-insulating cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubyatnikov, V. A.; Grigor’ev, F. I.; Lysenko, A. P., E-mail: aplysenko@hse.ru; Strogankova, N. I.; Shadov, M. B. [National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow Institute of Electronics and Mathematics (Russian Federation); Belov, A. G. [OAO GIREDMET State Research and Design Institute of the Rare-Metal Industry (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    The effect of local illumination providing a high level of free-carrier injection on the conductivity of a sample of semi-insulating cadmium telluride and on the properties of ohmic contacts to the sample is studied. It is found that, irrespective of the illumination region, the contact resistance of ohmic contacts decreases and the concentration of majority carriers in the sample grows in proportion to the illumination intensity. It is shown that inherent heterogeneities in crystals of semi-insulating semiconductors can be studied by scanning with a light probe.

  17. Radiation Damage in Scintillating Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu Ren Yuan

    1998-01-01

    Crystal Calorimetry in future high energy physics experiments faces a new challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper discusses the effects of radiation damage in scintillating crystals, and concludes that the predominant radiation damage effect in crystal scintillators is the radiation induced absorption, or color center formation, not the loss of the scintillation light yield. The importance of maintaining crystal's light response uniformity and the feasibility to build a precision crystal calorimeter under radiation are elaborated. The mechanism of the radiation damage in scintillating crystals is also discussed. While the damage in alkali halides is found to be caused by the oxygen or hydroxyl contamination, it is the structure defects, such as oxygen vacancies, cause damage in oxides. Material analysis methods used to reach these conclusions are presented in details.

  18. Growth of semi-insulating InP through nuclear doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliyev, M.I; Rashidova, Sh.Sh; Huseynli, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text : Semi-insulating semiconductors are widely used in so-called dielectronics. Dielectric devices have quick response, good frequency characteristics, a low noise level, low sensitivity to temperature changes, etc. One of the most promising semiconductor materials is InP. At present annealing and doping are commonly used techniques to grow semi-insulating InP. The aim of this work was to grow semi-insulating InP through nuclear doping (by irradiation with gamma-quanta). InP single crystals were obtained by Czochralski method. Specimens were irradiated with doses of 10kGr at room temperature. Electrical conductivity and Hall effect were measured before and after irradiation in the temperature range 77 to 320K. After irradiation reduction in electrical conductivity was observed. This fact can be associated with formation of M-centers in positively threefold charged states of vacancy and antisite defects. Under irradiation first Ini interstitial atoms and phosphorus vacancies form. Further, the Ini atoms occupy the phosphorus vacancies. As a result there appear InP antiste defects, which along with indium vacancies form V I nI n p + In p + + complexes of the acceptor type. These complexes turn out to be traps for charge carriers and electrical conductivity of irradiated InP are sharply reduced to semi-insulating specimens

  19. Radial space-charge-limited electron flow in semi-insulating GaN:Fe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Jiří J.; Hubík, Pavel; Krištofik, Jozef; Prušáková, Lucie; Uxa, Štěpán; Paskova, T.; Evans, K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 1 (2011), 013723/1-013723/6 ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/0212 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : gallium nitride * semi-insulator * space-charge-limited current Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2011

  20. Radiation damage in biomolecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fuss, Martina Christina

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays and radioactivity, ionizing radiations have been widely applied in medicine both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The risks associated with radiation exposure and handling led to the parallel development of the field of radiation protection. Pioneering experiments done by Sanche and co-workers in 2000 showed that low-energy secondary electrons, which are abundantly generated along radiation tracks, are primarily responsible for radiation damage through successive interactions with the molecular constituents of the medium. Apart from ionizing processes, which are usually related to radiation damage, below the ionization level low-energy electrons can induce molecular fragmentation via dissociative processes such as internal excitation and electron attachment. This prompted collaborative projects between different research groups from European countries together with other specialists from Canada,  the USA and Australia. This book summarizes the advances achieved by these...

  1. Radiation Damage and Dimensional Changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Barbary, A.A.; Lebda, H.I.; Kamel, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The dimensional changes have been modeled in order to be accommodated in the reactor design. This study has major implications for the interpretation of damage in carbon based nuclear fission and fusion plant materials. Radiation damage of graphite leads to self-interstitials and vacancies defects. The aggregation of these defects causes dimensional changes. Vacancies aggregate into lines and disks which heal and contract the basal planes. Interstitials aggregate into interlayer disks which expand the dimension

  2. Electric properties of semi-insulating crystals CdTe:Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkadyeva, E.N.; Matveev, O.A.

    1977-01-01

    Hall effect and conductivity measurement were carried out on chlorine doped semi-insulating CdTe crystals, of p and n electric type. In p type crystals the depth of the dominating level was determined (+0.7eV) as well as the concentration of associated centres (10 13 -10 14 cm -3 ). The mobility values are limited by a process of diffusion on heterogeneities

  3. Radiation damage in plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, S.

    1990-01-01

    Results of radiation damage studies in plastic scintillators are reviewed and critically analyzed from the point of view of applications of plastic scintillators in calorimetric detectors for the SSC. Damage to transmission and to fluorescent yield in different conditions is discussed. New directions in R ampersand D are outlined. Several examples are given of the most recent data on the new scintillating materials made with old and new plastics and fluors, which are exhibiting significantly improved radiation resistance. With a present rate of a vigorous R D programme, the survival limits in the vicinity of 100 MRad seem to be feasible within a couple of years

  4. Radiation damage of structural materials

    CERN Document Server

    Koutsky, Jaroslav

    1994-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of nuclear power plants is critical in the prevention or control of severe accidents. This monograph deals with both basic groups of structural materials used in the design of light-water nuclear reactors, making the primary safety barriers of NPPs. Emphasis is placed on materials used in VVER-type nuclear reactors: Cr-Mo-V and Cr-Ni-Mo-V steel for RPV and Zr-Nb alloys for fuel element cladding. The book is divided into 7 main chapters, with the exception of the opening one and the chapter providing a phenomenological background for the subject of radiation damage. Ch

  5. Radiation damage in silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lindström, G

    2003-01-01

    Radiation damage effects in silicon detectors under severe hadron and gamma-irradiation are surveyed, focusing on bulk effects. Both macroscopic detector properties (reverse current, depletion voltage and charge collection) as also the underlying microscopic defect generation are covered. Basic results are taken from the work done in the CERN-RD48 (ROSE) collaboration updated by results of recent work. Preliminary studies on the use of dimerized float zone and Czochralski silicon as detector material show possible benefits. An essential progress in the understanding of the radiation-induced detector deterioration had recently been achieved in gamma irradiation, directly correlating defect analysis data with the macroscopic detector performance.

  6. Radiation damage of structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutsky, J.; Kocik, J.

    1994-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of nuclear power plants (NPP) is critical in the prevention or control of severe accidents. This monograph deals with both basic groups of structural materials used in the design of light-water nuclear reactors, making the primary safety barriers of NPPs. Emphasis is placed on materials used in VVER-type nuclear reactors: Cr-Mo-V and Cr-Ni-Mo-V steel for reactor pressure vessels (RPV) and Zr-Nb alloys for fuel element cladding. The book is divided into seven main chapters, with the exception of the opening one and the chapter providing phenomenological background for the subject of radiation damage. Chapters 3-6 are devoted to RPV steels and chapters 7-9 to zirconium alloys, analyzing their radiation damage structure, changes of mechanical properties due to neutron irradiation as well as factors influencing the degree of their performance degradation. The recovery of damaged materials is also discussed. Considerable attention is paid to a comparison of VVER-type and western-type light-water materials

  7. Variations in first principles calculated defect energies in GaAs and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Ab initio calculations; semi-insulating GaAs; point defects. ... We are focusing on gallium arsenide. .... gallium vacancy in S & L, P et al and N & Z will exist in triple ... gallium antisite defect that include relaxation, a negative. U-effect is ...

  8. The X-ray sensitivity of semi-insulating polycrystalline CdZnTe thick films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Jae Ho; Kim, Ki Hyun; Suh, Jong Hee; Cho, Shin Hang; Cho, Pyong Kon; Hong, Jin Ki; Kim, Sun Ung

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray sensitivity is one of the important parameters indicating the detector performance. The X-ray sensitivity of semi-insulating polycrystalline CdZnTe:Cl thick films was investigated as a function of electric field, mean photon energy, film thickness, and charge carrier transport parameters and, compared with another promising detector materials. The X-ray sensitivities of the polycrystalline CdZnTe films with 350 μm thickness were about 2.2 and 6.2 μC/cm 2 /R in the ohmic-type and Schottky-type detector at 0.83 V/μm, respectively

  9. Radiation damages in superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, W.; Seibt, E.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation damage investigations of technical superconductors are reported and discussed with respect to their main properties like critical current jsub(c), transition temperature Tsub(c), upper critical field Bsub(c2), pinning and annealing behaviour. Ordered A15 type alloys (like Nb 3 Sn and V 3 Ga) show significant reductions of all critical parameters above a threshold of about 2x10 21 m -2 with 50 MeV deuterons corresponding to 2x10 22 neutrons/m 2 (Esub(n)>0.1 MeV). Pure metals and disordered B1 type alloys (like Nb or NbTi) show only a small linear decrease in critical parameters (except Bsub(c2) of niobium). Experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations. (author)

  10. Radiation damage in lithium orthosilicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, K.; Nakazawa, T.; Ishii, Y.; Fukai, K.; Watanabe, H. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment); Matsui, H.; Vollath, D.

    1993-11-01

    Radiation damage in lithium orthosilicate (Li[sub 4]SiO[sub 4]) and Al-doped Li[sub 4]SiO[sub 4] (Li[sub 3.7]Al[sub 0.1]SiO[sub 4]) irradiated with oxygen ions was studied with ionic conductivity measurements, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared photo-acoustic spectroscopy (FT-IR PAS) and transmission electron microscopy. It was seen from the ionic conductivity measurements that lithium-ion vacancies were introduced as irradiation defects for Li-ions sites in both materials due to the irradiation. By the Raman spectroscopy, oxygen atoms in SiO[sub 4] tetrahedra were considered to be preferentially displaced due to the irradiation for Li[sub 4]SiO[sub 4], although only a decrease of the number of SiO[sub 4] tetrahedra occurred for Li[sub 3.7]Al[sub 0.1]SiO[sub 4] by displacement of both silicon and oxygen atoms. Decomposition of SiO[sub 4] tetrahedra and formation of some new phases having Si-O-Si and Si-O bonds were found to take place for both Li[sub 4]SiO[sub 4] and Li[sub 3.7]Al[sub 0.1]SiO[sub 4] by FT-IR PAS. In the electron microscopy, damage microstructure consisting of many voids or cavities and amorphization were observed for Li[sub 4]SiO[sub 4] irradiated with oxygen ions. The recovery behavior of radiation damage mentioned above was also investigated. (author).

  11. Metamict state radiation damage in crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    Metamict minerals provide an excellent basis for the evaluation of long-term radiation damage effects, particularly such changes in physical and chemical properties as microfracturing, hydrothermal alteration, and solubility. This paper summarizes pertinent literature on metamictization and proposes experiments that are critical to the elucidation of structural controls on radiation damage in crystalline phases

  12. Nature of radiation damage in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunch, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Efforts to determine the equivalence between different sources of radiation damage in ceramics are reviewed. The ways in which ceramics differ from metals are examined and proposed mechanisms for creation and stabilization of defects in insulators are outlined. Work on radiation damage in crystalline oxides is summarized and suggestions for further research are offered

  13. Radiation damages in solids and tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cevc, P.; Kogovsek, F.; Kanduser, A.; Peternelj, M.; Skaleric, U.; Funduk, N.

    1977-01-01

    In submitted research work we have studied radiation damages in ferroelectric crystals and application of ferroelectric crystals. Studying the radiation damages we have introduced new technique of EPR measurements under high hydrostatic pressure, that will enable us to obtain additional data on crystal lattice dynamics. A change of piroelectric coefficient with high radiation doses in dopped TGS has been measured also

  14. Growth and characterization of semi-insulating carbon-doped/undoped GaN multiple-layer buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Seok; Won, Chul-Ho; Kang, Hee-Sung; Kim, Young-Jo; Kang, In Man; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kim, Yong Tae

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed a new semi-insulating GaN buffer layer, which consists of multiple carbon-doped and undoped GaN layer. The buffer layer showed sufficiently good semi-insulating characteristics, attributed to the depletion effect between the carbon-doped GaN and the undoped GaN layers, even though the thickness of the carbon-doped GaN layer in the periodic structure was designed to be very thin to minimize the total carbon incorporation into the buffer layer. The AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure grown on the proposed buffer exhibited much better electrical and structural properties than that grown on the conventional thick carbon-doped semi-insulating GaN buffer layer, confirmed by Hall measurement, x-ray diffraction, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The fabricated device also showed excellent buffer breakdown characteristics. (paper)

  15. Health effects of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasimova, K; Azizova, F; Mehdieva, K.

    2012-01-01

    Full text : A summary of the nature of radiactive contamination would be incomplete without some mention of the human health effects relatied to radioactivity and radioactive materials. Several excellent reviews at the variety of levels of detail have been written and should be consulted by the reader. Internal exposures of alpha and beta particles are important for ingested and inhaled radionuclides. Dosimetry models are used to estimate the dose from internally deposited radioactive particles. As mentioned above weighting parameters that take into account the radiation type, the biological half-life and the tissue or organ at risk are used to convert the physically absorbed dose in units of gray (or red) to the biologically significant committed equivalent dose and effective dose, measured in units of Sv (or rem). There is considerable controversy over the shape of the dose-response curve at the chronic low dose levels important for enviromental contamination. Proposed models include linear models, non-linear models and threshold models. Because risks at low dose must be extrapolated from available date at high doses, the shape of the dose-response curve has important implications for the environmental regulations used to protect the general public. The health effect of radiation damage depends on a combination of events of on the cellular, tissue and systemic levels. These lead to mutations and cellular of the irradiated parent cell. The dose level at which significant damage occurs depends on the cell type. Cells that reproduce rapidily, such as those found in bone marrow or the gastrointestinal tract, will be more sensitive to radiation than those that are longer lived, such as striated muscle or nerve cells. The effects of high radiation doses on an organ depends on the various cell types it contains

  16. Identification of defects in undoped semi-insulating InP by positron lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Weidong; Wang Shaojie; Wang Zhu

    2001-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurements, carried out over the temperature range of 10-300 K, have been used to investigate defects in two undoped semi-insulating InP samples. The positron lifetime spectra were analysed by both PATFIT and MELT techniques. The results at room temperature reveal a positron lifetime of around 273 ps, which is associated with indium vacancies V In or V In -hydrogen complexes. The positron average lifetime is temperature dependent and decreases with increasing temperature at the beginning (≤ 80 K and ≤ 120 K), and then remains unchanged, which is attributed to the influence of negative vacancies and detrapping of the positron from those negative ions of Mg, Zn, Ag and Ca with ionization level (1-)

  17. Analysis and comparison of the breakdown performance of semi- insulator and dielectric passivated Si strip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjan, Kirti; Chatterji, S; Srivastava-Ajay, K; Shivpuri, R K

    2002-01-01

    The harsh radiation environment in future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments like LHC provides a challenging task to the performance of Si microstrip detectors. Normal operating condition for silicon detectors in HEP experiments are in most cases not as favourable as for experiments in nuclear physics. In HEP experiments the detector may be exposed to moisture and other adverse atmospheric environment. It is therefore utmost important to protect the sensitive surfaces against such poisonous effects. These instabilities can be nearly eliminated and the performance of Si detectors can be improved by implementing suitably passivated metal-overhang structures. This paper presents the influence of the relative permittivity of the passivant on the breakdown performance of the Si detectors using computer simulations. The semi-insulator and the dielectric passivated metal-overhang structures are compared under optimal conditions. The influence of various parameters such as passivation layer thickness, junction dep...

  18. LEC- and VGF-growth of SI GaAs single crystals—recent developments and current issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurisch, M.; Börner, F.; Bünger, Th.; Eichler, St.; Flade, T.; Kretzer, U.; Köhler, A.; Stenzenberger, J.; Weinert, B.

    2005-02-01

    The paper reviews the progress made in crystal growth of semi-insulating GaAs by liquid encapsulation Czochralski and vertical gradient freeze techniques during the last few years under the continuous need for cost reduction of the production process.

  19. Radiation damage analysis by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    The application of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) to the characterization and study of defects in metals produced by radiation damage is discussed. The physical basis for the positron annihilation techniques (lifetime, Doppler broadening, angular correlation) is introduced and the techniques briefly described. Some examples of the application of PAS to radiation damage analysis are presented with a view toward elucidating the particular advantages of PAS over more traditional defect characterization techniques

  20. High purity and semi-insulating 4H-SiC crystals grown by physical vapor transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustine, G.; Hobgood, H.McD.; Balakrishna, V.; Dunne, G.T.; Hopkins, R.H.; Thomas, R.N. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center; Doolittle, W.A.; Rohatgi, A. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1998-06-01

    High purity undoped and semi-insulating vanadium doped 4H-SiC single crystals with diameters up to 50 mm were grown by the physical vapor transport method. Undoped crystals exhibiting resistivities in the 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} {Omega}-cm range and photoconductive decay (PCD) lifetimes in the 2 to 9 {mu}s range, were grown from high purity SiC sublimation sources. The crystals were p-type due to the presence of residual acceptor impurities, mainly boron. The semi-insulating behavior of the vanadium doped crystals is attributed to compensation of residual acceptors by the deep level vanadium donor located near the middle of the band gap. (orig.) 6 refs.

  1. The Status of Radiation Damage Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Legore, Virginia L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments have been on-going for about two years to determine the effects that radiation damage have on the physical and chemical properties of candidate titanate ceramics for the immobilization of plutonium. We summarize the results of these experiments in this document

  2. Radiation damage of polymers in ultrasonic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbalagan, Poornnima

    2008-07-01

    Radiation damage has always been a topic of great interest in various fields of sciences. In this work, an attempt is made to probe into the effect of subthreshold ultrasonic waves on the radiation damage created by irradiation of deuterons in polymer samples wherein the polymer samples act as model systems. Two equal volumes of radiation damage were produced in a single polymer sample wherein a standing wave of ultrasound was introduced into one. Three polymers namely, Polycarbonate, Polymethylmethacrylate and Polyvinyl chloride were used in this work. Four independent techniques were used to analyze the irradiated samples and visualize the radiation damage. Interferometric measurements give a measure of the refractive index modulation in the irradiated sample. Polymers, being transparent, do not absorb in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy shows absorption peaks in the visible region in irradiated polymer samples. Ion irradiation causes coloration of polymers. The light microscope is used to measure the absorption of white light by the irradiated polymers. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to obtain a measure of the open volume created by irradiation in polymers. A comparison between the irradiated region and the region exposed to ultrasonic waves simultaneously with irradiation in a polymer sample shows the polymer specific influence of the ultrasonic standing wave. (orig.)

  3. Radiation damage of polymers in ultrasonic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbalagan, Poornnima

    2008-01-01

    Radiation damage has always been a topic of great interest in various fields of sciences. In this work, an attempt is made to probe into the effect of subthreshold ultrasonic waves on the radiation damage created by irradiation of deuterons in polymer samples wherein the polymer samples act as model systems. Two equal volumes of radiation damage were produced in a single polymer sample wherein a standing wave of ultrasound was introduced into one. Three polymers namely, Polycarbonate, Polymethylmethacrylate and Polyvinyl chloride were used in this work. Four independent techniques were used to analyze the irradiated samples and visualize the radiation damage. Interferometric measurements give a measure of the refractive index modulation in the irradiated sample. Polymers, being transparent, do not absorb in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy shows absorption peaks in the visible region in irradiated polymer samples. Ion irradiation causes coloration of polymers. The light microscope is used to measure the absorption of white light by the irradiated polymers. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to obtain a measure of the open volume created by irradiation in polymers. A comparison between the irradiated region and the region exposed to ultrasonic waves simultaneously with irradiation in a polymer sample shows the polymer specific influence of the ultrasonic standing wave. (orig.)

  4. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    In this project the author has proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and has detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. In this years work he has completed several experiments on the role of hydration water on DNA radiation damage, continued the investigation of the localization of the initial charges and their reactions on DNA, investigated protonation reactions in DNA base anions, and employed ab initio molecular orbital theory to gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics evolved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this years work to a consideration of ionization energies of various components of the DNA deoxyribose backbone and resulting neutral sugar radicals. This information has aided the formation of new radiation models for the effect of radiation on DNA. During this fiscal year four articles have been published, four are in press, one is submitted and several more are in preparation. Four papers have been presented at scientific meetings. This years effort will include another review article on the open-quotes Electron Spin Resonance of Radiation Damage to DNAclose quotes

  5. Radiation damage at LHCb, results and expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    Faerber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb Detector is a single-arm spectrometer at the LHC designed to detect new physics through measuring CP violation and rare decays of heavy flavor mesons. The detector consists of vertex detector, tracking system, dipole magnet, 2 RICH detectors, em. calorimeter, hadron calorimeter, muon detector which all use different technologies and suffer differently from radiation damage. These radiation damage results and the investigation methods will be shown. The delivered luminosity till July 2011 was about 450 pb−1. The Vertex detector receives the highest particle flux at LHCb. The currents drawn by the silicon sensors are, as expected, increasing proportional to the integrated luminosity. The highest irradiaton regions of the n-bulk silicon sensors are observed to have recently undergone space charge sign inversion. The Silicon Trackers show increasing leakage currents comparable with earlier predictions. The electromagentic calorimeter and hadron calorimeter suffer under percent-level signal decrease whi...

  6. Radiation Damage in the LHCb VELO

    CERN Multimedia

    Harrison, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The VErtex LOcator (VELO) is a silicon strip detector designed to reconstruct particle tracks and vertices produced by proton-proton interactions near to the LHCb interaction point. The excellent track resolution and decay vertex separation provided by the VELO are essential to all LHCb analyses. For the integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC up to the end of $2011$ the VELO is exposed to higher particle fluences than any other silicon detector of the four major LHC experiments. These proceedings present results from radiation damage studies carried out during the first two years of data taking at the LHC. Radiation damage has been observed in all of the $88$ VELO silicon strip sensors, with many sensors showing evidence of type-inversion in the highest fluence regions. Particular attention has been given to the two \

  7. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1985-07-01

    Radiation damage to DNA results from the direct interaction of radiation with DNA where positive ions, electrons and excited states are formed in the DNA, and the indirect effect where radical species formed in the surrounding medium by the radiation attack the DNA. The primary mechanism proposed for radiation damage, by the direct effect, is that positive and negative ions formed within the DNA strand migrate through the stacked DNA bases. The ions can then recombine, react with the DNA bases most likely to react by protonation of the anion and deprotonation or hydroxylation of the cation or transfer out of the DNA chain to the surrounding histone protein. This work as aimed at understanding the possible reactions of the DNA base ion radicals, as well as their initial distribution in the DNA strand. 31 refs

  8. Radiation damage of uranium; Radijaciono ostecenje urana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarevic, Dj [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1966-11-15

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method.

  9. Radiation damage studies of nuclear structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, P.

    2012-01-01

    Maximum utilization of fuel in nuclear reactors is one of the important aspects for operating them economically. The main hindrance to achieve this higher burnups of nuclear fuel for the nuclear reactors is the possibility of the failure of the metallic core components during their operation. Thus, the study of the cause of the possibility of failure of these metallic structural materials of nuclear reactors during full power operation due to radiation damage, suffered inside the reactor core, is an important field of studies bearing the basic to industrial scientific views.The variation of the microstructure of the metallic core components of the nuclear reactors due to radiation damage causes enormous variation in the structure and mechanical properties. A firm understanding of this variation of the mechanical properties with the variation of microstructure will serve as a guide for creating new, more radiation-tolerant materials. In our centre we have irradiated structural materials of Indian nuclear reactors by charged particles from accelerator to generate radiation damage and studied the some aspects of the variation of microstructure by X-ray diffraction studies. Results achieved in this regards, will be presented. (author)

  10. Radiation damage in barium fluoride detector materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levey, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.; Woody, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To develop radiation hard detectors, particularly for high energy physics studies, radiation damage is being studied in BaF 2 , both undoped and doped with La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd and Tm. Some dopants reduce radiation damage. In La doped BaF 2 they reduce the unwanted long lifetime luminescence which interferes with the short-lived fluorescence used to detect particles. Radiation induced coloring is being studied with facilities for making optical measurements before, during and after irradiation with 60 C0 gamma rays. Doses of 10 6 rad, or less, create only ionization induced charge transfer effects since lattice atom displacement damage is negligible at these doses. All crystals studied exhibit color center formation, between approximately 200 and 800 nm, during irradiation and color center decay after irradiation. Thus only measurements made during irradiation show the total absorption present in a radiation field. Both undoped and La doped BaF 2 develop damage at minimum detectable levels in the UV---which is important for particle detectors. For particle detector applications these studies must be extended to high dose irradiations with particles energetic enough to cause lattice atom displacement damage. In principle, the reduction in damage provided by dopants could apply to other applications requiring radiation damage resistant materials

  11. Radiation damage effect on avalanche photodiodes

    CERN Document Server

    Baccaro, S; Cavallari, F; Da Ponte, V; Deiters, K; Denes, P; Diemoz, M; Kirn, Th; Lintern, A L; Longo, E; Montecchi, M; Musienko, Y; Pansart, J P; Renker, D; Reucroft, S; Rosi, G; Rusack, R; Ruuska, D; Stephenson, R; Torbet, M J

    1999-01-01

    Avalanche Photodiodes have been chosen as photon sensors for the electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at the LHC. These sensors should operate in the 4T magnetic field of the experiment. Because of the high neutron radiation in the detector extensive studies have been done by the CMS collaboration on the APD neutron radiation damage. The characteristics of these devices after irradiation have been analized, with particular attention to the quantum efficiency and the dark current. The recovery of the radiation induced dark current has been studied carefully at room temperature and at slightly lower and higher temperatures. The temperature dependence of the defects decay-time has been evaluated.

  12. Compilation of radiation damage test data. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenbacher, H.; Stolarz-Izycka, A.

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on commercially available organic cable insulation and jacket materials: ethylene-propylene rubber, Hypalon, neoprene rubber, polyethylene, polyurethane, polyvinylchloride, silicone rubber, etc. The materials have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to integrated absorbed doses from 5 X 10 5 to 5 X 10 6 Gy. Mechanical properties, e.g. tensile strength, elongation at break, and hardness, have been tested on irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs, to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (Auth.)

  13. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Several mechanisms are proposed for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry have been used to test the proposed mechanisms. In the past we have concentrated chiefly on investigating irradiated systems of DNA constituents. In this year's effort we have concentrated on radiation effects on DNA itself. In addition studies of radiation effects on lipids and model compounds have been performed which shed light on the only other proposed site for cell kill, the membrane

  14. Radiation damage calculations for the LANSCE degrader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, P.D.; Sommer, W.F.; Dudziak, D.J.; Wechsler, M.S.; Barnett, M.H.; Corzine, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    The A-6 water degrader at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linear proton accelerator has an outer shell of Inconel 718. The degrader was irradiated by 800-MeV protons during 1988--1993 to an exposure of 5.3 ampere-hours (A h). As described in Ref. 1, material from the Inconel is currently being cut into specimens for microhardness, three-point bending, ball punch, microscopy, and corrosion tests. This paper is devoted to calculations of radiation damage, particularly displacement and He production, sustained by the degrader Inconel

  15. Effect of dopant density on contact potential difference across n-type GaAs homojunctions using Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumenou, C. Kameni; Urgessa, Z. N.; Djiokap, S. R. Tankio; Botha, J. R.; Nel, J.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, cross-sectional surface potential imaging of n+/semi-insulating GaAs junctions is investigated by using amplitude mode kelvin probe force microscopy. The measurements have shown two different potential profiles, related to the difference in surface potential between the semi-insulating (SI) substrate and the epilayers. It is shown that the contact potential difference (CPD) between the tip and the sample is higher on the semi-insulating substrate side than on the n-type epilayer side. This change in CPD across the interface has been explained by means of energy band diagrams indicating the relative Fermi level positions. In addition, it has also been found that the CPD values across the interface are much smaller than the calculated values (on average about 25% of the theoretical values) and increase with the electron density. Therefore, the results presented in study are only in qualitative agreement with the theory.

  16. Radiation damage analysis by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) has in recent years become a valuable new tool for investigating defects in metals. The ability of the positron to localize in a trapped state at various defect sites, in which the positron annihilates with unique characteristics, has enabled the positron to be used as a localized probe of these defect sites. Several reviews of the application of PAS to the study of defects in metals have been published, as have more general treatises on the applications of positron annihilation to the study of solids. PAS has made, and has considerably greater potential for, a significant contribution to radiation damage analysis in two areas of importance: (1) the determination of atomic-defect properties, a knowledge of which is necessary for the modeling required to couple the results of model experiments using electron and ion irradiation with the expected irradiation conditions of reactor systems, and (2) the monitoring and characterization of irradiation-induced microstructure development. A unique aspect of PAS for radiation damage analysis is the defect specificity of the annihilation characteristics of a trapped positron. In addition to its value as an independent analytical tool, PAS can be a useful complement to more traditional techniques for defect studies

  17. Radiation damage in nuclear waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jencic, I.

    2000-01-01

    Final disposal of high-level radioactive nuclear waste is usually envisioned in some sort of ceramic material. The physical and chemical properties of host materials for nuclear waste can be altered by internal radiation and consequently their structural integrity can be jeopardized. Assessment of long-term performance of these ceramic materials is therefore vital for a safe and successful disposal. This paper presents an overview of studies on several possible candidate materials for immobilization of fission products and actinides, such as spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ), perovskite (CaTiO 3 ), zircon (ZrSiO 4 ), and pyrochlore (Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 and Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 ). The basic microscopic picture of radiation damage in ceramics consists of atomic displacements and ionization. In many cases these processes result in amorphization (metaminctization) of irradiated material. The evolution of microscopic structure during irradiation leads to various macroscopic radiation effects. The connection between microscopic and macroscopic picture is in most cases at least qualitatively known and studies of radiation induced microscopic changes are therefore an essential step in the design of a reliable nuclear waste host material. The relevance of these technologically important results on our general understanding of radiation damage processes and on current research efforts in Slovenia is also addressed. (author)

  18. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  19. Radiation damage in non-metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoneham, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Work on the problem of radiation damage in non-metals over the past 25 years is reviewed with especial emphasis on the contribution made at AERE, Harwell and in particular by members of the Theoretical Physics Division. In the years between 1954 and the end of the 1960's the main thrust in the radiation damage of non-metals was model-building including devising defect models and mechanisms that were qualitatively acceptable, and compiling systematic data. The early 1970's made greater quantitative demands as computer techniques made theory more powerful. In many cases it was possible to predict defect properties accurately, so that one could distinguish between different defect models which were hard to tell apart by experiment alone. In the late 1970's the most important aspect has moved towards mechanisms of defect processes, especially in cases where experiment by itself is limited by timescale, by complexity, by the unintentional impurities inevitable in real crystals, or by the extreme conditions required. (UK)

  20. Acoustic emission sensor radiation damage threshold experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeson, K.M.; Pepper, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    Determination of the threshold for damage to acoustic emission sensors exposed to radiation is important in their application to leak detection in radioactive waste transport and storage. Proper response to system leaks is necessary to ensure the safe operation of these systems. A radiation impaired sensor could provide ''false negative or false positive'' indication of acoustic signals from leaks within the system. Research was carried out in the Radiochemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the beta/gamma radiation damage threshold for acoustic emission sensor systems. The individual system consisted of an acoustic sensor mounted with a two part epoxy onto a stainless steel waveguide. The systems were placed in an irradiation fixture and exposed to a Cobalt-60 source. After each irradiation, the sensors were recalibrated by Physical Acoustics Corporation. The results were compared to the initial calibrations performed prior to irradiation and a control group, not exposed to radiation, was used to validate the results. This experiment determines the radiation damage threshold of each acoustic sensor system and verifies its life expectancy, usefulness and reliability for many applications in radioactive environments

  1. Radiation damage in CTR magnet components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmaier, H.

    1976-01-01

    Data are reviewed (already existing or to be acquired) which should allow prediction of the behavior of large superconducting coils in the radiation field of a future fusion reactor. The electrical and mechanical stability of such magnets is determined by the irradiation induced deterioration of the magnet components, i.e., (a) changes in critical current, field and temperature of the superconductor (NbTi, A-15 phases), (b) resistivity increase in the stabilizer (Cu, Al), and (c) changes in mechanical and dielectric properties of insulators and spacers. Recent low temperature simulation experiments (with fission neutrons and heavy ions) show that the superconductor will not be the critical component of a fusion magnet--at least as far as radiation damage is concerned. Much more severe is the loss of stability due to the resistivity increase of the stabilizing material. It seems, however, that the magnitude of this effect can be predicted rather reliably and therefore taken into account in the coil design. Almost no data exist about the low temperature behavior of insulator and spacer materials in a radiation field. Furthermore, very little is known about the nature of the radiation damage in non-metals, which makes extrapolations of the few existing data to other materials or to other doses highly speculative. Only future experiments can decide if the insulators will be the limiting component of a CTR magnet or not

  2. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis

  3. Subnanosecond linear GaAs photoconductive switching: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druce, R.L.; Pocha, M.D.; Griffin, K.L.; Hofer, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    We are conducting research in photoconductive switching for the purpose of generating subnanosecond pulses in the 25--50kV range. We are exploiting the very fast recombination rates of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) to explore the potential of GaAs as a closing and opening switch when operating in the linear mode (the linear mode is defined such that one carrier pair is generated for each photon absorbed). The closing time of a linear GaAs switch is theoretically limited by the characteristics of the laser pulse used to activate the switch (the carrier generation time in GaAs is /approximately/10/sup /minus/14/ sec) while the opening time is theoretically limited by the recombination time of the carriers. The recombination time is several ns for commercially available semi-insulating GaAs. Doping or neutron irradiation can reduce the recombination time to less than 100 ps. We have observed switch closing times of less than 200 ps with a 100 ps duration laser pulse and opening times of less than 400 ps with neutron irradiated GaAs at fields of tens of kV/cm. The illumination source was a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.06 /mu/m. 4 refs., 11 figs.

  4. Subnanosecond linear GaAs photoconductive switching, revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, R. L.; Pocha, M. D.; Griffin, K. L.; Hofer, W. W.

    Research was conducted in photoconductive switching for the purpose of generating subnanosecond pulses in the 25 to 50kV range. The very fast recombination rates of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) was exploited to explore the potential of GaAs as a closing and opening switch when operating in the linear mode (the linear mode is defined such that one carrier pair is generated for each photon absorbed). The closing time of a linear GaAs switch is theoretically limited by the characteristics of the laser pulse used to activate the switch (the carrier generation time in GaAs is (approx. 10(-14) sec) while the opening time is theoretically limited by the recombination time of the carriers. The recombination time is several ns for commercially available semi-insulating GaAs. Doping or neutron irradiation can reduce the recombination time to less than 100 ps. Switch closing times of less than 200 ps with a 100 ps duration laser pulse and opening times of less than 400 ps with neutron irradiated GaAs at fields of tens of kV/cm was observed. The illumination source was a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.06 microns.

  5. Measurement of radiation damage on an optical reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, K.C.; Sahu, S.K.; Huang, H.C.; Ueno, K.; Chang, Y.H.; Wang, C.H.; Hou, W.S.

    1997-01-01

    We measured the radiation damage on an optical white fluorocarbon reflector called Goretex, which is to be used for aerogel threshold counters and crystal calorimeters of the BELLE detector of the KEK B-factory. Reflectance of the Goretex surface was monitored to see any effect of the radiation damage. Maximum equivalent dose was 8.6 Mrad. No radiation damage is observed within measurement errors. (orig.)

  6. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danly, C R; Merrill, F E; Barlow, D; Mariam, F G

    2014-08-01

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL's pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  7. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G.

    2014-01-01

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components

  8. Compilation of radiation damage test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenbacher, H.; Tavlet, M.

    1989-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on commercially available organic cable insulation and jacket materials: Ethylene-propylene rubbers, polyethylenes, polyurethanes, silicone rubbers, and copolymers based on polyethylene. The materials have been irradiated either in a nuclear reactor, or with a cobalt-60 source, or in the CERN accelerators, at different dose rates. The absorbed doses were between 10 3 and 5x10 6 Gy. Mechanical properties, e.g. tensile strength, elongation at break, and hardness, have been tested on irradiated and non-irradiated samples, according to the recommendations of the International Electrotechnical Commission. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (orig.)

  9. Compilation of radiation damage test data. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenbacher, H.; Stolarz-Izycka, A.

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on thermosetting and thermoplastic resins, with the main emphasis on epoxy resins used for magnet coil insulations. Also, other materials such as polyesters, phenolics, polyurethanes, silicones, etc., are represented. The materials have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to integrated absorbed doses between 5x10 6 Gy and 1x10 8 Gy. The mechanical properties, e.g. the flexural strength, deflection at break, and tangent modulus of elasticity, have been measured on irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The results are given as variation of these parameters versus absorbed dose and are presented in the form of tables and graphs. The tested materials are catalogued in alphabetical order. (Auth.)

  10. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The overall goal is to understand the relationship between the chemical and structural changes produced by ionizing radiation in DNA and the resulting impairment of biological function expressed as carcinogenesis or cell death. The studies are based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA. These mechanistic explorations should lead to the formulation of testable hypothesis regarding the processes of impairment of regulation of gene expression, alternation in DNA repair, and damage to DNA structure involved in cell death or cancer

  11. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  12. Programmed cellular response to ionizing radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crompton, N.E.A.

    1998-01-01

    Three forms of radiation response were investigated to evaluate the hypothesis that cellular radiation response is the result of active molecular signaling and not simply a passive physicochemical process. The decision whether or not a cell should respond to radiation-induced damage either by induction of rescue systems, e.g. mobilization of repair proteins, or induction of suicide mechanisms, e.g. programmed cell death, appears to be the expression of intricate cellular biochemistry. A cell must recognize damage in its genetic material and then activate the appropriate responses. Cell type is important; the response of a fibroblast to radiation damage is both quantitatively and qualitatively different form that of a lymphocyte. The programmed component of radiation response is significant in radiation oncology and predicted to create unique opportunities for enhanced treatment success. (orig.)

  13. Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J Abrefah, J.; Klinger, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    The radiation-damaged polystyrene material (''polycube'') used in this study was synthesized by mixing a high-density polystyrene (''Dylene Fines No. 100'') with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used on the Hanford Site in the 1960s for criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation during processing of spent nuclear fuel. Upon completion of the studies, two methods were developed to reclaim the transuranic (TRU) oxides from the polymer matrix: (1) burning the polycubes in air at 873 K; and (2) heating the polycubes in the absence of oxygen and scrubbing the released monomer and other volatile organics using carbon tetrachloride. Neither of these methods was satisfactory in separating the TRU oxides from the polystyrene. Consequently, the remaining polycubes were sent to the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for storage. Over time, the high dose of alpha and gamma radiation has resulted in a polystyrene matrix that is highly cross-linked and hydrogen deficient and a stabilization process is being developed in support of Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. Baseline processes involve thermal treatment to pyrolyze the polycubes in a furnace to decompose the polystyrene and separate out the TRU oxides. Thermal decomposition products from this degraded polystyrene matrix were characterized by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide information for determining the environmental impact of the process and for optimizing the process parameters. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal tube furnace was used for the characterization studies. The decomposition studies were performed both in air and helium atmospheres at 773 K, the planned processing temperature. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products identified for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different from those observed for virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the

  14. Subgap time of flight: A spectroscopic study of deep levels in semi-insulating CdTe:Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pousset, J.; Farella, I.; Cola, A., E-mail: adriano.cola@le.imm.cnr.it [Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems—Unit of Lecce, National Council of Research (IMM/CNR), Lecce I-73100 (Italy); Gambino, S. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi,” Università del Salento, Lecce I-73100 (Italy); CNR NANOTEC—Istituto di Nanotecnologia, Polo di Nanotecnologia c/o Campus Ecotekne, via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2016-03-14

    We report on a study of deep levels in semi-insulating CdTe:Cl by means of a time-of-flight spectral approach. By varying the wavelength of a pulsed optical source within the CdTe energy gap, transitions to/from localized levels generate free carriers which are analysed through the induced photocurrent transients. Both acceptor-like centers, related to the A-center, and a midgap level, 0.725 eV from the valence band, have been detected. The midgap level is close to the Fermi level and is possibly a recombination center responsible for the compensation mechanism. When the irradiance is varied, either linear or quadratic dependence of the electron and hole collected charge are observed, depending on the dominant optical transitions. The analysis discloses the potentiality of such a novel approach exploitable in the field of photorefractive materials as well as for deep levels spectroscopy.

  15. Photodetectors based on carbon nanotubes deposited by using a spray technique on semi-insulating gallium arsenide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Melisi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a spray technique is used to perform low temperature deposition of multi-wall carbon nanotubes on semi-insulating gallium arsenide in order to obtain photodectors. A dispersion of nanotube powder in non-polar 1,2-dichloroethane is used as starting material. The morphological properties of the deposited films has been analysed by means of electron microscopy, in scanning and transmission mode. Detectors with different layouts have been prepared and current–voltage characteristics have been recorded in the dark and under irradiation with light in the range from ultraviolet to near infrared. The device spectral efficiency obtained from the electrical characterization is finally reported and an improvement of the photodetector behavior due to the nanotubes is presented and discussed.

  16. Subgap time of flight: A spectroscopic study of deep levels in semi-insulating CdTe:Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pousset, J.; Farella, I.; Cola, A.; Gambino, S.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a study of deep levels in semi-insulating CdTe:Cl by means of a time-of-flight spectral approach. By varying the wavelength of a pulsed optical source within the CdTe energy gap, transitions to/from localized levels generate free carriers which are analysed through the induced photocurrent transients. Both acceptor-like centers, related to the A-center, and a midgap level, 0.725 eV from the valence band, have been detected. The midgap level is close to the Fermi level and is possibly a recombination center responsible for the compensation mechanism. When the irradiance is varied, either linear or quadratic dependence of the electron and hole collected charge are observed, depending on the dominant optical transitions. The analysis discloses the potentiality of such a novel approach exploitable in the field of photorefractive materials as well as for deep levels spectroscopy.

  17. Dielectric properties of semi-insulating Fe-doped InP in the terahertz spectral region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyabyeva, L N; Zhukova, E S; Belkin, M A; Gorshunov, B P

    2017-08-04

    We report the values and the spectral dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric permittivity of semi-insulating Fe-doped InP crystalline wafers in the 2-700 cm -1 (0.06-21 THz) spectral region at room temperature. The data shows a number of absorption bands that are assigned to one- and two-phonon and impurity-related absorption processes. Unlike the previous studies of undoped or low-doped InP material, our data unveil the dielectric properties of InP that are not screened by strong free-carrier absorption and will be useful for designing a wide variety of InP-based electronic and photonic devices operating in the terahertz spectral range.

  18. Computer simulations of radiation damage in protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, M.

    2007-03-01

    The achievable resolution and the quality of the dataset of an intensity data collection for structure analysis of protein crystals with X-rays is limited among other factors by radiation damage. The aim of this work is to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the radiation damage process in proteins. Since radiation damage is unavoidable it was intended to look for the optimum ratio between elastically scattered intensity and radiation damage. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm physical processes after an inelastic photon interaction are studied. The main radiation damage consists of ionizations of the atoms through the electron cascade following any inelastic photon interaction. Results of the method introduced in this investigation and results of an earlier theoretical studies of the influence of Auger-electron transport in diamond are in a good agreement. The dependence of the radiation damage as a function of the energy of the incident photon was studied by computer-aided simulations. The optimum energy range for diffraction experiments on the protein myoglobin is 10-40 keV. Studies of radiation damage as a function of crystal volume and shape revealed that very small plate or rod shaped crystals suffer less damage than crystals formed like a cube with the same volume. Furthermore the influence of a few heavy atoms in the protein molecule on radiation damage was examined. Already two iron atoms in the unit cell of myoglobin increase radiation damage significantly. (orig.)

  19. Radiation Damage Monitoring in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, S

    2013-01-01

    We describe the implementation of radiation damage monitoring using measurement of leakage current in the ATLAS silicon pixel sensors. The dependence of the leakage current upon the integrated luminosity is presented. The measurement of the radiation damage corresponding to integrated luminosity 5.6 fb$^{-1}$ is presented along with a comparison to the theoretical model.

  20. Use of heavy ions to model radiation damage of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirokov, S.V.; Vyshemirskij, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    The methods for modeling radiation damage of metals using heavy ions are reviewed and the results obtained are analyzed. It is shown that irradiation of metals with heavy ion can simulate neutron exposure with the equivalent dose with adequate accuracy and permits a detailed analysis of radiation damage of metals

  1. Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, J.

    1992-08-01

    Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF 4 /iC 4 H 10 gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF 4 -rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF 4 , acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF 4 /iC 4 H 10 gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C 2 H 6 . Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl 3 F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds

  2. Burst annealing of high temperature GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, P. R.; Horne, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    One of the major limitations of solar cells in space power systems is their vulnerability to radiation damage. One solution to this problem is to periodically heat the cells to anneal the radiation damage. Annealing was demonstrated with silicon cells. The obstacle to annealing of GaAs cells was their susceptibility to thermal damage at the temperatures required to completely anneal the radiation damage. GaAs cells with high temperature contacts and encapsulation were developed. The cells tested are designed for concentrator use at 30 suns AMO. The circular active area is 2.5 mm in diameter for an area of 0.05 sq cm. Typical one sun AMO efficiency of these cells is over 18 percent. The cells were demonstrated to be resistant to damage after thermal excursions in excess of 600 C. This high temperature tolerance should allow these cells to survive the annealing of radiation damage. A limited set of experiments were devised to investigate the feasibility of annealing these high temperature cells. The effect of repeated cycles of electron and proton irradiation was tested. The damage mechanisms were analyzed. Limitations in annealing recovery suggested improvements in cell design for more complete recovery. These preliminary experiments also indicate the need for further study to isolate damage mechanisms. The primary objective of the experiments was to demonstrate and quantify the annealing behavior of high temperature GaAs cells. Secondary objectives were to measure the radiation degradation and to determine the effect of repeated irradiation and anneal cycles.

  3. Burst annealing of high temperature GaAs solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brothers, P.R.; Horne, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    One of the major limitations of solar cells in space power systems is their vulnerability to radiation damage. One solution to this problem is to periodically heat the cells to anneal the radiation damage. Annealing was demonstrated with silicon cells. The obstacle to annealing of GaAs cells was their susceptibility to thermal damage at the temperatures required to completely anneal the radiation damage. GaAs cells with high temperature contacts and encapsulation were developed. The cells tested are designed for concentrator use at 30 suns AMO. The circular active area is 2.5 mm in diameter for an area of 0.05 sq cm. Typical one sun AMO efficiency of these cells is over 18 percent. The cells were demonstrated to be resistant to damage after thermal excursions in excess of 600 degree C. This high temperature tolerance should allow these cells to survive the annealing of radiation damage. A limited set of experiments were devised to investigate the feasibility of annealing these high temperature cells. The effect of repeated cycles of electron and proton irradiation was tested. The damage mechanisms were analyzed. Limitations in annealing recovery suggested improvements in cell design for more complete recovery. These preliminary experiments also indicate the need for further study to isolate damage mechanisms. The primary objective of the experiments was to demonstrate and quantify the annealing behavior of high temperature GaAs cells. Secondary objectives were to measure the radiation degradation and to determine the effect of repeated irradiation and anneal cycles

  4. Ion - biomolecule interactions and radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlathoelter, T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The biological effects of ionizing radiation in living cells are not a mere result of the direct impact of high energy quanta of radiation. Secondary particles such as low energy electrons, radicals and (multiply charged) ions are formed within the track. The interaction of these secondary particles with biologically relevant molecules is responsible for a large fraction of biological radiation damage to a cell, as well. Singly and multiply charged ions can be of importance as both, primary and secondary particles, and are known to cause severe biological damage. For instance, in heavy ion therapy and proton therapy the pronounced Bragg peak of fast (typically a few 100 MeV/u) ions in biological tissue is utilized. The Bragg peak is located at a depth, where the ions (mostly C q+ or protons) are slowed down to about 100 keV/u and have their maximum linear energy transfer (LET) to the medium. This depth is reasonably well defined and depends on the initial ion kinetic energy. Since the ions are rapidly stopped in this energy range, penetration beyond the Bragg peak is weak and it is thus possible to 'scan' the Bragg peak through a malignant tumour without excessive damage of the surrounding tissue by mere variation of the ion kinetic energy (i.e. the penetration depth). Severe biological damage is almost only possible, when the track of a primary quantum of ionizing radiation crosses the nucleus of a cell. Particularly the induction of double strand breaks of DNA or clustered DNA lesions is potentially lethal or mutagenic. A primary particle interacting with individual molecules within this environment leads to molecular excitation, ionization and fragmentation. In the process, the primary particle looses energy and slow secondary electrons and ions are formed, which might induce further damage. For a deep understanding of biological radiation damage on the level of individual molecules it is thus important to quantify excitation, ionization and

  5. Radiation damage in the alkali halide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diller, K.M.

    1975-10-01

    A general review is given of the experimental data on radiation damage in the alkali halide crystals. A report is presented of an experimental investigation of irradiation produced interstitial dislocation loops in NaCl. These loops are found to exhibit the usual growth and coarsening behaviour during thermal annealing which operates by a glide and self-climb mechanism. It is shown that the recombination of defects in these crystals is a two stage process, and that the loss of interstitials stabilized at the loops is caused by extrinsic vacancies. The theoretical techniques used in simulating point defects in ionic crystals are described. Shell model potentials are derived for all the alkali halide crystals by fitting to bulk crystal data. The fitting is supplemented by calculations of the repulsive second neighbour interactions using methods based on the simple electron gas model. The properties of intrinsic and substitutional impurity defects are calculated. The HADES computer program is used in all the defect calculations. Finally the report returns to the problems of irradiation produced interstitial defects. The properties of H centres are discussed; their structure, formation energies, trapping at impurities and dimerization. The structure, formation energies and mobility of the intermediate and final molecular defects are then discussed. The thermodynamics of interstitial loop formation is considered for all the alklai halide crystals. The nucleation of interstitial loops in NaCl and NaBr is discussed, and the recombination of interstitial and vacancy defects. The models are found to account for all the main features of the experimental data. (author)

  6. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Remec, Igor [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Rosseel, Thomas M [ORNL; Wall, Dr. James Joseph [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  7. Thermal annealing of natural, radiation-damaged pyrochlore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zietlow, Peter; Beirau, Tobias; Mihailova, Boriana; Groat, Lee A.; Chudy, Thomas; Shelyug, Anna; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Ewing, Rodney C.; Schlüter, Jochen; Škoda, Radek; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Abstract

    Radiation damage in minerals is caused by the α-decay of incorporated radionuclides, such as U and Th and their decay products. The effect of thermal annealing (400–1000 K) on radiation-damaged pyrochlores has been investigated by Raman scattering, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and combined differential scanning calorimetry/thermogravimetry (DSC/TG). The analysis of three natural radiation-damaged pyrochlore samples from Miass/Russia [6.4 wt% Th, 23.1·10

  8. Radiation damage for the spallation target of ADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Sheng; Ye Yanlin; Xu Chuncheng; Chen Tao; Sobolevsky, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    By using SHIELD codes system, the authors investigate the radiation damage, such as radiation damage cross section, displacement atom cross section and the rate of displacement atom, gas production cross section, the rate of gas production and the ratio, R, of the helium and displacement production rates in target, container window and spallation neutron source materials as W and Pb induced from intermediate energy proton and neutron incident. And the study of radiation damage in the thick Pb target with long 60 cm, radius 20 cm is presented

  9. Radiation damage monitoring in the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Sally

    2013-01-01

    We describe the implementation of radiation damage monitoring using measurement of leakage current in the ATLAS silicon pixel sensors. The dependence of the leakage current upon the integrated luminosity is presented. The measurement of the radiation damage corresponding to an integrated luminosity 5.6 fb −1 is presented along with a comparison to a model. -- Highlights: ► Radiation damage monitoring via silicon leakage current is implemented in the ATLAS (LHC) pixel detector. ► Leakage currents measured are consistent with the Hamburg/Dortmund model. ► This information can be used to validate the ATLAS simulation model.

  10. Constructive and critical approach of the radiation damage simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becquart, Ch.

    2002-11-01

    This work deals with the problem of radiation damage in materials for applications in development of fission and nuclear fusion technologies. It is organised in 3 sections. In section 1 are presented the mechanisms of formation and the evolution kinetics of the primary damage. Section 2 is devoted to the study of the sensitivity of the radiation damage at different approximations. Section 3 discusses the contribution of the ab initio calculations to the study of radiation damage and more particularly the point defects in a dilute Fe-Cu ferritic alloy. This work is illustrated by several publications added in each section. (O.M.)

  11. Optical and magnetic resonance signatures of deep levels in semi-insulating 4H SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, W.E.; Glaser, E.R.; Shanabrook, B.V.

    2003-01-01

    We have studied semi-insulating (SI) 4H SiC grown by physical vapor transport (PVT) and by high-temperature chemical vapor deposition (HTCVD) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and infrared photoluminescence (IR-PL) to better understand the defect(s) responsible for the SI behavior. Although intrinsic defects such as the isolated carbon vacancy and in some cases the isolated Si vacancies have previously been observed by EPR in undoped SI SiC, their concentrations are an order of magnitude too low to be responsible for the SI behavior. We are able to observe the EPR signature of the carbon vacancy-carbon antisite pair (V C -C Si ) pair defect in an excited state of its 2+ charge state in all PVT samples and some HTCVD samples. We also establish the IR-PL signature of this EPR center as the UD2 spectrum - a set of four sharp lines between 1.1 and 1.15 eV previously observed by Magnusson et al. in neutron-irradiated 4H-SiC. We also observe the UD1 line, a pair of sharp IR-PL lines at ∼1.06 eV and UD3, a single sharp line at ∼1.36 eV. We propose a simple model for the SI behavior in material in which the (V C -C Si ) pair defect is the dominant deep defect

  12. Activation and radiation damage in the environment of hadron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    A component which suffers radiation damage usually also becomes radioactive, since the source of activation and radiation damage is the interaction of the material with particles from an accelerator or with reaction products. However, the underlying mechanisms of the two phenomena are different. These mechanisms are described here. Activation and radiation damage can have far-reaching consequences. Components such as targets, collimators, and beam dumps are the first candidates for failure as a result of radiation damage. This means that they have to be replaced or repaired. This takes time, during which personnel accumulate dose. If the dose to personnel at work would exceed permitted limits, remote handling becomes necessary. The remaining material has to be disposed of as radioactive waste, for which an elaborate procedure acceptable to the authorities is required. One of the requirements of the authorities is a complete nuclide inventory. The methods used for calculation of such inventories are presented,...

  13. Positron annihilation and perturbed angular correlation studies of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jiazheng; Li Anli; Xu Yongjun; Wang Zhiqiang; Zhou Dongmei; Zheng Yongnan; Zhu Shengyun; Iwata, T.

    2002-01-01

    The positron annihilation and perturbed angular correlation techniques have been employed to study radiation damage in Si and Nb. The results obtained by the positron annihilation are consistent with those given by the perturbed angular correlation

  14. Studies on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hee Yong; Sohn, Young Sook

    1998-04-01

    We studied on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage in animal system. To this end we studied following areas of research (1) mechanisms involved in bone marrow damage after total body irradiation, (2) extraction of components that are useful in protecting hematopoietic system from radiation damage, (3) cell therapy approach in restoring the damaged tissue, (4) development of radioprotective chemical reagent, and (5) epidemiological study on the population that had been exposed to radiation.

  15. Studies on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hee Yong; Sohn, Young Sook

    1998-04-01

    We studied on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage in animal system. To this end we studied following areas of research 1) mechanisms involved in bone marrow damage after total body irradiation, 2) extraction of components that are useful in protecting hematopoietic system from radiation damage, 3) cell therapy approach in restoring the damaged tissue, 4) development of radioprotective chemical reagent, and 5) epidemiological study on the population that had been exposed to radiation

  16. Spallation radiation damage and the radiation damage facility at the LAMPF A-6 target station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Sommer, W.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1984-05-01

    A redesign of the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) A-6 Target Station is underway that will permit materials irradiations to be conducted in the proton beam and in the spallation neutron environment under more controlled conditions than has been possible heretofore. The protons of energy near 800 MeV and beam current approaching one mA are able to produce radiation damage rates (displacement production rates) as high as can be achieved in fission reactors, and the damage is uniform over macroscopic dimensions. The spallation neutrons have a degraded fission spectrum energy distribution, with the important admixture of a high energy tail up to 800 MeV. Irradiations in these radiation environments can be used to address important problems in the development of materials for fusion reactors. The redesign of the A-6 Target Station is described and plans for its use are discussed.

  17. Impact of substrate temperature on the incorporation of carbon-related defects and mechanism for semi-insulating behavior in GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, A.; Poblenz, C.; Green, D.S.; Mishra, U.K.; Speck, J.S.; Ringel, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    The electrical conductivity and deep level spectrum of GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy and codoped with carbon and silicon were investigated for substrate temperatures T s of 650 and 720 deg. C as a function relative carbon and silicon doping levels. With sufficiently high carbon doping, semi-insulating behavior was observed for films grown at both temperatures, and growth at T s =720 deg. C enhanced the carbon compensation ratio. Similar carbon-related band gap states were observed via deep level optical spectroscopy for films grown at both substrate temperatures. Due to the semi-insulating nature of the films, a lighted capacitance-voltage technique was required to determine individual deep level concentrations. Carbon-related band gap states underwent substantial redistribution between deep level and shallow acceptor configurations with change in T s . In light of a T s dependence for the preferential site of carbon incorporation, a model of semi-insulating behavior in terms of carbon impurity state incorporation mediated by substrate temperature is proposed

  18. Investigation of semi-insulating InP co-doped with Ti and various acceptors for use in X-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdansky, K.; Gorodynskyy, V.; Kozak, H.; Pekarek, L.

    2005-01-01

    Semi-insulating InP single crystals co-doped with Zn and Ti and co-doped with Ti and Mn were grown by Czochralski technique. Wafers of these crystals were annealed for a long time at a high temperature and cooled slowly. The samples were characterized by temperature dependent resistivity and Hall coefficient measurements. The binding energies of Ti in semi-insulating InP co-doped with Ti and Zn and co-doped with Ti and Mn were found to differ which shows that Ti may occupy different sites in InP. The curves of Hall coefficient vs. reciprocal temperature deviate from straight lines at low temperatures due to electron and hole mixed conductance. The value of resistivity of the annealed semi-insulating InP co-doped with Ti and Mn reaches high resistivity at a reduced temperature easily achievable by thermo-electric devices which could make this material useable in X-ray detection. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. LO-phonon and plasmon coupling in neutron-transmutation-doped GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriyama, K.; Sakai, K.; Okada, M.

    1996-01-01

    Coupling between the longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon mode and the longitudinal plasma mode in neutron-transmutation-doped (NTD) semi-insulating GaAs was studied using Raman-scattering spectroscopy and a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer. When the electron concentration due to the activation of NTD impurities (Ge Ga and Se As ) approaches ∼8x10 16 cm -3 , the LO-phonon endash plasmon coupling is observed. This behavior is consistent with the free-electron absorption due to the activation of NTD impurities in samples annealed above 600 degree C. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  20. Enhancement of radiation damage in germinating wheat seeds by hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Fangqing; Gu Ruiqi

    1994-01-01

    Enhancement of X-ray induced radiation damage in germinating wheat seeds by heat treatment (44 degree C or 41 degree C, 20 min) has been investigated. The enhancement effect of heat treatment after irradiation was more significant than that of heat treatment before irradiation at dose range of 4.3-8.6 Gy. It was observed that germinating wheat seeds were very sensitive to heat treatment within 15 min after irradiation, which indicated that the repair of radiation damage was very active and rapid in a short period after irradiation. The repair of radiation damage in interval of fractionated irradiation was severely inhibited by heat treatment. The sensitivity of seeds to heat treatment corresponded with the levels of their repair activities. The more active the repairs of the seeds are, the more sensitive to heat treatment the seeds show. It was assumed that the enhancement of radiation damage by heat treatment in germinating wheat seeds was attributed to the inhibition of radiation damage repair by heat treatment, which is similar to the results of animal experiments

  1. Fundamental Technology Development for Radiation Damage in Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Sang Chul; Kwon, J. H.; Kim, E. S. and others

    2005-04-01

    This project was performed to achieve technologies for the evaluation of radiation effects at materials irradiated at HANARO and nuclear power plants, to establish measurement equipment and software for the analysis of radiation defects and to set up facilities for the measurements of radiation damage with non-destructive methods. Major targets were 1) establishment of hot laboratories and remote handling facilities/ technologies for the radioactive material tests, 2) irradiation test for the simulation of nuclear power plant environment and measurement/calculation of physical radiation damage, 3) evaluation and analysis of nano-scale radiation damage, 4) evaluation of radiation embrittlement with ultrasonic resonance spectrum measurement and electromagnetic measurement and 5) basic research of radiation embrittlement and radiation damage mechanism. Through the performance of 3 years, preliminary basics were established for the application research to evaluation of irradiated materials of present nuclear power plants and GEN-IV systems. Particularly the results of SANS, PAS and TEM analyses were the first output in Korea. And computer simulations of radiation damage were tried for the first time in Korea. The technologies will be developed for the design of GEN-IV material

  2. Investigation of radiation damage effects in neutron irradiated CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, James E.; Igonkina, Olga; Potter, Chris T.; Sinev, Nikolai B.

    2005-01-01

    A Charge Coupled Devices (CCD)-based vertex detector is a leading option for vertex detection at the future linear collider. A major issue for this application is the radiation hardness of such devices. Tests of radiation hardness of CCDs used in the SLD vertex detector, VXD3, have been reported earlier. The first measurements of 1998 involved a spare VXD3 CCD that was irradiated with neutrons from a radioactive source (Pu-Be), and from a nuclear reactor. In 2003, we had the opportunity to disassemble the VXD3 detector and study the nature of the radiation damage it incurred during 3 years of operation at SLC. In the preparation for this study, additional experiments with the spare VXD3 CCD were performed. These included measurements of trapping times in neutron irradiated CCDs. Results, reported here, will help us better understand the mechanism of radiation damage effects and develop techniques to minimize performance degradation due to radiation damage

  3. Radiation damage and its repair in non-sporulating bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseley, B.E.B.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given of radiation damage and its repair in non-sporulating bacteria. The identification and measurement of radiation damage in the DNA of the bacteria after exposure to ultraviolet radiation and ionizing radiation is described. Measuring the extent of DNA repair and ways of isolating repair mutants are also described. The DNA repair mechanisms for UV-induced damage are discussed including photoreactivation repair, excision repair, post-replication recombination repair and induced error-prone repair. The DNA repair mechanisms for ionizing radiation damage are also discussed including the repair of both single and double-strand breaks. Other aspects discussed include the effects of growth, irradiation medium and recovery medium on survival, DNA repair in humans, the commercial use of UV and ionizing radiations and the future of ionizing irradiation as a food treatment process. (U.K.)

  4. Radiation Damage in Reactor Materials. Part of the Proceedings of the Symposium on Radiation Damage in Solids and Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-08-15

    Radiation damage has presented a new design parameter for the selection of materials to be used in fuel and cladding elements, moderators, structural components and pressure vessels in nuclear reactors. The severe and novel requirements for certain optimum combinations of physical and nuclear properties have emphasized the need for a better understanding of the basic mechanisms of radiation damage. This knowledge is not only essential for progress in the field of nuclear energy, but has direct applications to space technology and semi-conductor research as well. The IAEA, as part of its programme of promoting nuclear technology, therefore convened the Symposium on Radiation Damage in Solids and Reactor Materials, 7-11 May 1962. At the invitation of, and with generous material assistance from, the Government of Italy, the Symposium was held at Venice. The Symposium was primarily concerned with the investigation of the fundamental processes of radiation that underlie the behaviour of metals, alloys and ceramics that are actually useful or potentially useful reactor materials. Two sessions were devoted to studies of irradiation effects on simple metals, as these effects are easiest to interpret. Other topics included general theory, alloys, fissionable and moderator materials and special experimental techniques for radiation damage studies. The properties influenced by irradiation which were of main concern were those of primary importance to the behaviour of solids as reactor materials (e. g. dimensional stability, phase transformation, radiation hardening, fracture, fission-gas escape from uranium and its compounds). Other properties, such as optical, electrical and magnetic properties, and effects on semiconductors, ionic and other non-metallic crystals are also of interest in that these studies can increase our knowledge of the mechanism of radiation damage in solids and provide a tool for investigation into the physics of the solid state by offering a means of

  5. Radiation Damage in Reactor Materials. Part of the Proceedings of the Symposium on Radiation Damage in Solids and Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    Radiation damage has presented a new design parameter for the selection of materials to be used in fuel and cladding elements, moderators, structural components and pressure vessels in nuclear reactors. The severe and novel requirements for certain optimum combinations of physical and nuclear properties have emphasized the need for a better understanding of the basic mechanisms of radiation damage. This knowledge is not only essential for progress in the field of nuclear energy, but has direct applications to space technology and semi-conductor research as well. The IAEA, as part of its programme of promoting nuclear technology, therefore convened the Symposium on Radiation Damage in Solids and Reactor Materials, 7-11 May 1962. At the invitation of, and with generous material assistance from, the Government of Italy, the Symposium was held at Venice. The Symposium was primarily concerned with the investigation of the fundamental processes of radiation that underlie the behaviour of metals, alloys and ceramics that are actually useful or potentially useful reactor materials. Two sessions were devoted to studies of irradiation effects on simple metals, as these effects are easiest to interpret. Other topics included general theory, alloys, fissionable and moderator materials and special experimental techniques for radiation damage studies. The properties influenced by irradiation which were of main concern were those of primary importance to the behaviour of solids as reactor materials (e. g. dimensional stability, phase transformation, radiation hardening, fracture, fission-gas escape from uranium and its compounds). Other properties, such as optical, electrical and magnetic properties, and effects on semiconductors, ionic and other non-metallic crystals are also of interest in that these studies can increase our knowledge of the mechanism of radiation damage in solids and provide a tool for investigation into the physics of the solid state by offering a means of

  6. Radiation damage of pixelated photon detector by neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Isamu [KEK, 1-1 Oho Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)], E-mail: isamu.nakamura@kek.jp

    2009-10-21

    Radiation Damage of Pixelated Photon Detector by neutron irradiation is reported. MPPC, one of PPD or Geiger-mode APD, developed by Hamamatsu Photonics, is planned to be used in many high energy physics experiments. In such experiments radiation damage is a serious issue. A series of neutron irradiation tests is performed at the Reactor YAYOI of the University of Tokyo. MPPCs were irradiated at the reactor up to 10{sup 12}neutron/cm{sup 2}. In this paper, the effect of neutron irradiation on the basic characteristics of PPD including gain, noise rate, photon detection efficiency is presented.

  7. Multiscale approach to the physics of radiation damage with ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surdutovich, Eugene [Physics Department, Oakland University, 2200 N. Squirrel Rd., Rochester MI 48309 (United States); Solov' yov, Andrey V. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe University, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, Frankfurt am Main 60438 (Germany)

    2013-04-19

    We review a multiscale approach to the physics of ion-beam cancer therapy, an approach suggested in order to understand the interplay of a large number of phenomena involved in radiation damage scenario occurring on a range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. We briefly overview its history and present the current stage of its development. The differences of the multiscale approach from other methods of understanding and assessment of radiation damage are discussed as well as its relationship to other branches of physics, chemistry and biology.

  8. Development of fusion first-wall radiation damage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, R.J.; Atkins, T.

    1986-11-01

    The report describes work performed on the development of fusion-reactor first-wall simulation facilities on the Variable Energy Cyclotron, at Harwell, United Kingdom. Two irradiation facilities have been constructed: i) a device for helium and hydrogen filling up to 1000 ppm for post-irradiation mechanical properties studies, and ii) a helium implantation and damage facility for simultaneous injection of helium and radiation damage into a specimen under stress. These facilities are now fully commissioned and are available for investigations of first-wall radiation damage and for intercorrelation of fission- and fusion -reactor materials behaviour. (U.K.)

  9. Advances in SSTR techniques for dosimetry and radiation damage measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    Solid state track recorders (SSTR) have been applied in the diverse nuclear reactor research. Two recent advances are described which possess outstanding relevance for reactor research, namely the evolvement of SSTR radiation damage monitors and the development of CR-39, a new plastic SSTR of extremely high sensitivity. Results from high fluence irradiations of natural quartz crystal SSTR are used to illustrate the concept of the SSTR radiation damage monitor. Response characteristics of CR-39 are presented with emphasis on the remarkable proton sensitivity of this new SSTR

  10. Nuclear data for radiation damage assessment and related safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherov, N.P.

    1989-12-01

    The IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on Nuclear Data for Radiation Damage Assessment and Related Safety Aspects was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, 19-22 September 1989. This report contains the conclusions and recommendations of this meeting. The papers which the participants prepared for and presented at the meeting will be published as an IAEA Technical Document. (author)

  11. Radiation damage in molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veljkovic, S; Milasin, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Department of Reactor Materials, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-04-15

    The effects of radiation on molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes are presented. The changes induced, particularly defects with a high migration activation energy, are analyzed. The correlation of these changes with the basic concepts of radiation damage in solids is considered. An attempt is made to relate the defects studied with the changes in macroscopic properties (author)

  12. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that were responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The studies were based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA

  13. A review on radiation damage of erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junling; Wang Weidong; Qin Guangyong

    2007-01-01

    Biomembrane has very important biological function. Its damage will seriously disturb the directivity, the orderly nature and coordination of cell metabolism, and finally causes the cell death. This paper reviewed the effects of radiation damage on erythrocyte membrane in membrane composition, membrane function and oxidation resistance system. (authors)

  14. Radiation damage in molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veljkovic, S.; Milasin, N.

    1964-01-01

    The effects of radiation on molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes are presented. The changes induced, particularly defects with a high migration activation energy, are analyzed. The correlation of these changes with the basic concepts of radiation damage in solids is considered. An attempt is made to relate the defects studied with the changes in macroscopic properties (author)

  15. Experimental data available for radiation damage modelling in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberger, H.

    Radiation damage modelling requires rate constants for production, annihilation and trapping of defects. The literature is reviewed with respect to experimental determination of such constants. Useful quantitative information exists only for Cu and Al. Special emphasis is given to the temperature dependence of the rate constants

  16. Radiation damage to nucleoprotein complexes in macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bury, Charles; Garman, Elspeth F.; Ginn, Helen Mary; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Carmichael, Ian; Kneale, Geoff; McGeehan, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray induced radiation damage studies employing a model protein–DNA complex revealed a striking partition of damage sites. The DNA component was observed to be far more resistant to specific damage compared with the protein. Significant progress has been made in macromolecular crystallography over recent years in both the understanding and mitigation of X-ray induced radiation damage when collecting diffraction data from crystalline proteins. In contrast, despite the large field that is productively engaged in the study of radiation chemistry of nucleic acids, particularly of DNA, there are currently very few X-ray crystallographic studies on radiation damage mechanisms in nucleic acids. Quantitative comparison of damage to protein and DNA crystals separately is challenging, but many of the issues are circumvented by studying pre-formed biological nucleoprotein complexes where direct comparison of each component can be made under the same controlled conditions. Here a model protein–DNA complex C.Esp1396I is employed to investigate specific damage mechanisms for protein and DNA in a biologically relevant complex over a large dose range (2.07–44.63 MGy). In order to allow a quantitative analysis of radiation damage sites from a complex series of macromolecular diffraction data, a computational method has been developed that is generally applicable to the field. Typical specific damage was observed for both the protein on particular amino acids and for the DNA on, for example, the cleavage of base-sugar N 1 —C and sugar-phosphate C—O bonds. Strikingly the DNA component was determined to be far more resistant to specific damage than the protein for the investigated dose range. At low doses the protein was observed to be susceptible to radiation damage while the DNA was far more resistant, damage only being observed at significantly higher doses

  17. Radiation damage testing at the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinowsky, W.; Thun, R.

    1990-06-01

    A Task Force on Radiation Damage Testing met at the SSC Laboratory on March 5--6, 1990. This Task Force was asked to assess the availability of appropriate facilities for radiation damage tests of SSC detector materials and components. The Task Force was also instructed to review the techniques and standards for conducting such tests. Semiconductors were considered separately from other detector materials. Radiation damage test of electronic devices generally require exposures to both ionizing radiation and neutrons, whereas non-electric components such as plastic scintillating materials, adhesives, cable insulation, and other organic polymers are adequately tested with ionizing radiation only. Test standards are discussed with respect to irradiation techniques, environmental factors, dosimetry, and mechanisms whereby various materials are damaged. It is emphasized that radiation sources should be chosen to duplicate as much as possible the expected SSC environment and that the effects from ionizing particles and from neutrons be investigated separately. Radiation damage tests at reactors must be designed with particular care complex spectra of neutrons and gamma rays are produced at such facilities. It is also essential to investigate dose-rate effects since they are known to be important in many cases. The required irradiations may last several months and are most easily carried out with dedicated radioactive sources. Environmental factors such as the presence of oxygen when testing plastic scintillators, or temperature when measuring semiconductor annealing effects, must also be taken into account. The importance of reliable dosimetry is stressed and suitable references cited. Finally, it is noted that an understanding of the mechanisms for radiation damage in semiconductor and other materials is important in planning irradiations and evaluating results

  18. Application of GaAs and CdTe photoconductor detectors to x-ray flash radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathy, F.; Cuzin, M.; Gagelin, J.J.; Mermet, R.; Piaget, B.; Rustique, J.; Verger, L.

    1991-01-01

    Semi-insulating GaAs and CdTe:Cl photoconductor probes were qualified on high energy X ray single shot flash generators. The estimated minimum detected dose per flash corresponding to a 230 mrad direct beam attenuated by 200 mm lead was 20 μrad. The dynamic range was about 4 decades in amplitude or charges, with a good linearity. Such detectors, by locating the origin of the parasitic scattered beam, could be used to eliminate this parasitic beam in X ray flash radiography in detonics experiments. Imaging possibilities are mentioned, as well as X ray generator monitoring with such detectors or with neutron preirradiated photoconductors

  19. Application of GaAs and CdTe photoconductor detectors to x-ray flash radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathy, F.; Cuzin, M.; Gagelin, J.J.; Mermet, R.; Piaget, B.; Rustique, J.; Verger, L. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (FR). Direction des Technologies Avancees; Hauducoeur, A.; Nicolas, P.; Le Dain, L.; Hyvernage, M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Vaujours, 77 - Courtry (FR)

    1991-12-31

    Semi-insulating GaAs and CdTe:Cl photoconductor probes were qualified on high energy X ray single shot flash generators. The estimated minimum detected dose per flash corresponding to a 230 mrad direct beam attenuated by 200 mm lead was 20 {mu}rad. The dynamic range was about 4 decades in amplitude or charges, with a good linearity. Such detectors, by locating the origin of the parasitic scattered beam, could be used to eliminate this parasitic beam in X ray flash radiography in detonics experiments. Imaging possibilities are mentioned, as well as X ray generator monitoring with such detectors or with neutron preirradiated photoconductors.

  20. Surface behavior based on ion-induced secondary electron emission from semi-insulating materials in breakdown evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Emrah; Karakoese, Sema [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey); Salamov, Bahtiyar G. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Physics, National Academy of Science, 1143 Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2013-09-15

    This study focuses on analyses of secondary electron emission (SEE) at semiconductor surfaces when the sufficient conditions of space-time distribution occur. Experimental measurements and calculations with the approach of Townsend coefficients, which include the evaluations of ionization coefficient ({alpha}) and SEE coefficient ({gamma}) were performed in high-ohmic InP, GaAs, and Si semiconductor cathodes with argon and air environments in a wide range of E/N (300-10 000 Td). The direct calculations of {gamma} were carried out to determine the behavior of cold-semiconductor cathode current in a wide range of microgaps (45-525 {mu}m). Paschen curves are interpreted in the dependence of large pd range on breakdown voltage through {gamma} and {alpha}/N. Ion-induced secondary electrons exhibit the direct behaviors affecting the timescale of breakdown evolution in the vicinity of the Paschen minimum during the natural bombardment process with ions of semiconductor cathodes. Also, when {alpha}/N rapidly drops and the excitations of gas atoms densely occupy the gas volume, we determined that the photoelectric effect provides a growth for electron emission from semiconductor surfaces at the breakdown stage at the reduced values of E/N. At all pressures, the emission magnitudes of electrons liberated by semiconductor cathodes into vacuum are found as {gamma}{sub InP} > {gamma}{sub GaAs} > {gamma}{sub Si} in breakdown evolution. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Characteristics of withstanding radiation damage of InP crystals and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Ando, Koshi

    1988-01-01

    Recently, the authors discovered that the characteristics of with standing radiation damage of InP crystals and devices (solar cells) are superior to those of Si and GaAs crystals and devices. Also the restoration phenomena at room temperature of radiation deterioration and the accelerated anneal phenomena by light irradiation and the injection of other minority, carriers in InP system devices were found. Such excellent characteristics suggested that InP devices are promising for the use in space. In this paper, taking an example of solar cells, the radiation resistance characteristics and their mechanism of InP crystals and devices are reported, based on the results of analysis by deep level transient spectroscopy and others. In InP solar cells, the high efficiency of photoelectric conversion was maintained even in the high dose irradiation of 1 MeV electron beam. As the carrier concentration in InP crystals is higher, they are stronger against radiation. With the increase of carrier concentration, the rate of anneal of radiation deterioration at room temperature increased. The accelerated anneal effect by minority carrier injection was remarkable in n + -p junction cells. The excellent characteristics of InP crystals are due to the formation of Frenkel defects of P and their instability. (K.I.)

  2. Ion bombardment simulation: a review related to fusion radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    Prime emphasis is given to reviewing the ion bombardment data on the refractory metals molybdenum, niobium and vanadium which have been proposed for use in advanced fusion devices. The temperature and dose dependence of the void parameters are correlated among these metals. The effect of helium and hydrogen gas on the void parameters is also included. The similarities and differences of the response of these materials to high dose, high temperature radiation damage are evaluated. Comparisons are made with results obtained from stainless steel and nickel base alloys. The ion bombardment data is then compared and correlated, as far as possible, with existing neutron data on the refractory metals. The theoretically calculated damage state produced by neutrons and ions is also briefly discussed and compared to experimental data wherever possible. The advantages and limitations of ion simulation in relation to fusion radiation damage are finally summarized

  3. Radiation damage in BaF2 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woody, C.L.; Kierstead, J.A.; Levy, P.W.; Stoll, S.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of radiation damage and recovery have been studied in BaF 2 crystals exposed to 60 Co radiation. The change in optical transmission and scintillation light output have been measured as a function of dose up to 4.7 x 10 6 rad. Although some crystals exhibit a small change in transmission, a greater change in scintillation light output is observed. Several 25 cm long crystals whichhave been irradiated show large changes in both transmission and light output. Recovery from radiation damage has been studied as a function of time and exposure to UV light. A long lived radiation induced phosphorescence has been observed in all irradiated samples which is distinct from the standard fast and slow scintillation emissions. The emission spectrum of the phosphorescence has been measured and shown a peakat ∼330 nm, near the region of the slow scintillation component. Results are given on the dependence of the decay time of the phosphorescence with dose

  4. Radiation damage studies for the D0 silicon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, F.

    2004-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies performed on spare production silicon detector modules for the current D0 silicon detector. The lifetime expectations due to radiation damage effects of the existing silicon detector are reviewed. A new upgrade project was started with the goal of a complete replacement of the existing silicon detector. In that context, several investigations on the radiation hardness of new prototype silicon microstrip detectors were carried out. The irradiation on different detector types was performed with 10 MeV protons up to fluences of 10 14 p/cm 2 at the J.R. Mcdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different normalization techniques. As a result, we observe roughly 40-50% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV p exposure than it is expected by the predicted NIEL scaling

  5. Radiation damage studies for the DOe silicon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, Frank

    2004-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies performed on spare production silicon detector modules for the current DOe silicon detector. The lifetime expectations due to radiation damage effects of the existing silicon detector are reviewed. A new upgrade project was started with the goal of a complete replacement of the existing silicon detector. In that context, several investigations on the radiation hardness of new prototype silicon microstrip detectors were carried out. The irradiation on different detector types was performed with 10 MeV protons up to fluences of 10 14 p/cm 2 at the J.R. Mcdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different normalisation techniques. As a result, we observe roughly 40-50% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV p exposure than it is expected by the predicted NIEL scaling

  6. Temperature effects on radiation damage in plastic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza A, D.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of present work was to study the temperature effect on radiation damage registration in the structure of a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector of the type CR-39. In order to study the radiation damage as a function of irradiation temperature, sheets of CR-39 detectors were irradiated with electron beams, simulating the interaction of positive ions. CR-39 detectors were maintained at a constant temperature from room temperature up to 373 K during irradiation. Two techniques were used from analyzing changes in the detector structure: Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR). It was found by EPR analysis that the amount of free radicals decrease as irradiation temperature increases. The IR spectrums show yield of new functional group identified as an hydroxyl group (OH). A proposed model of interaction of radiation with CR-39 detectors is discussed. (Author)

  7. The dependence of radiation damage analysis on neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goland, A.N.; Parkin, D.M.

    1977-01-01

    The characteristics of defect production in neutron spectra can be determined by utilizing neutron cross section data (e.g. ENDF/B), detailed neutron spectral data and radiation damage models. The combination of neutron cross section and spectral data is a fundamental starting point in applying damage models. Calculations using these data and damage models show that there are significant differences in the way defects are produced in various neutron spectra. Nonelastic events dominate the recoil energy distribution in high-energy neutron sources such as those based upon fusion and deuteron-breakup reactions. Therefore, high-energy neutron cross sections must be measured or calculated to supplement existing data files. Radiation damage models can then be used to further characterize the diverse neutron spectra

  8. Mexamine used to decrease radiation damage to Wistar rat embryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palyga, G.F.; Zakoshchikov, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    In experiments with 330 Wistar rats experiencing their pregnancy and 1430 neonatal rats of the first generation a study was made on the toxicity and radioprotective efficiency of a single subcutaneous injection of 10 mg/kg mexamine on days 3, 11 and 19 pregnancy. The agent caused various abnormalities in pregnancy, delivery and postnatal development of the offspring of nonirradiated animals, and it was almost ineffective when used for the prevention of radiation damages during the anrnatal ontogenesis

  9. Hydration-annealing of chemical radiation damage in calcium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.M.K.; James, C.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the annealing of chemical radiation damage in anhydrous calcium nitrate has been investigated. Rehydration of the anhydrous irradiated nitrate induces direct recovery of the damage. The rehydrated salt is susceptible to thermal annealing but the extent of annealing is small compared to that in the anhydrous salt. The direct recovery of damage on rehydration is due to enhanced lattice mobility. The recovery process is unimolecular. (author)

  10. Effect of radiation damage on the infrared properties of apatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anis Faridah Md Nori; Yusof Mohd Amin; Rosli Mahat; Burhanuddin Kamaluddin

    1991-01-01

    Apatites are known to contain radioactive elements such as uranium and thorium at a few ppm in concentration. These elements decay and produce fission tracks inside the crystals. The presence of such tracks have been known to affect the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of apatites. These fission tracks can be removed by annealing the crystals in air. In this paper we present the result of a preliminary study on the effect of radiation damage on the infrared transmission of apatites

  11. Monitoring the Radiation Damage of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Pixel Detector is the innermost charged particle tracking component employed by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC, now routinely in excess of 5x10^{33} cm^{-2} s^{-1}, results in a rapidly increasing accumulated radiation dose to the detector. Methods based on the sensor depletion properties and leakage current are used to monitor the evolution of the radiation damage, and results from the 2011 run are presented.

  12. Monitoring the radiation damage of the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, M.

    2013-01-01

    The pixel detector is the innermost charged particle tracking component employed by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC, now routinely in excess of 5×10 33 cm −2 s −1 , results in a rapidly increasing accumulated radiation dose to the detector. Methods based on the sensor depletion properties and leakage current are used to monitor the evolution of the radiation damage, and results from the 2011 run are presented

  13. Radiation damage status of the ATLAS silicon strip detectors (SCT)

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, Takahiko; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon microstrip detector system (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment at LHC has been working well for about 7 years since 2010. The innermost layer has already received a few times of 10**13 1-MeV neutron-equivalent fluences/cm2. The evolutions of the radiation damage effects on strip sensors such as leakage current and full depletion voltages will be presented.

  14. Monitoring radiation damage in the ATLAS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Schorlemmer, André Lukas; Quadt, Arnulf; Große-Knetter, Jörn; Rembser, Christoph; Di Girolamo, Beniamino

    2014-11-05

    Radiation hardness is one of the most important features of the ATLAS pixel detector in order to ensure a good performance and a long lifetime. Monitoring of radiation damage is crucial in order to assess and predict the expected performance of the detector. Key values for the assessment of radiation damage in silicon, such as the depletion voltage and depletion depth in the sensors, are measured on a regular basis during operations. This thesis summarises the monitoring program that is conducted in order to assess the impact of radiation damage and compares it to model predictions. In addition, the physics performance of the ATLAS detector highly depends on the amount of disabled modules in the ATLAS pixel detector. A worrying amount of module failures was observed during run I. Thus it was decided to recover repairable modules during the long shutdown (LS1) by extracting the pixel detector. The impact of the module repairs and module failures on the detector performance is analysed in this thesis.

  15. Radiation damage in natural materials: implications for radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    The long-term effect of radiation damage on waste forms, either crystalline or glass, is a factor in the evaluation of the integrity of waste disposal mediums. Natural analogs, such as metamict minerals, provide one approach for the evaluaton of radiation damage effects that might be observed in crystalline waste forms, such as supercalcine or synroc. Metamict minerals are a special class of amorphous materials which were initially crystalline. Although the mechanism for the loss of crystallinity in these minerals (mostly actinide-containing oxides and silicates) is not clearly understood, damage caused by alpha particles and recoil nuclei is critical to the metamictization process. The study of metamict minerals allows the evaluation of long-term radiation damage effects, particularly changes in physical and chemical properties such as microfracturing, hydrothermal alteration, and solubility. In addition, structures susceptible to metamictization share some common properties: (1) complex compositions; (2) some degree of covalent bonding, instead of being ionic close-packed MO/sub x/ structures; and (3) channels or interstitial voids which may accommodate displaced atoms or absorbed water. On the basis of these empirical criteria, minerals such as pollucite, sodalite, nepheline and leucite warrant careful scrutiny as potential waste form phases. Phases with the monazite or fluorite structures are excellent candidates

  16. Raman study of radiation-damaged zircon under hydrostatic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasdala, Lutz; Miletich, Ronald; Ruschel, Katja; Váczi, Tamás

    2008-12-01

    Pressure-induced changes of Raman band parameters of four natural, gem-quality zircon samples with different degrees of self-irradiation damage, and synthetic ZrSiO4 without radiation damage, have been studied under hydrostatic compression in a diamond anvil cell up to ~10 GPa. Radiation-damaged zircon shows similar up-shifts of internal SiO4 stretching modes at elevated pressures as non-damaged ZrSiO4. Only minor changes of band-widths were observed in all cases. This makes it possible to estimate the degree of radiation damage from the width of the ν3(SiO4) band of zircon inclusions in situ, almost independent from potential “fossilized pressures” or compressive strain acting on the inclusions. An application is the non-destructive analysis of gemstones such as corundum or spinel: broadened Raman bands are a reliable indicator of self-irradiation damage in zircon inclusions, whose presence allows one to exclude artificial color enhancement by high-temperature treatment of the specimen.

  17. Laser annealing heals radiation damage in avalanche photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jin Gyu [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Anisimova, Elena; Higgins, Brendon L.; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Jennewein, Thomas [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Quantum Information Science Program, Toronto, ON (Canada); Makarov, Vadim [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2017-12-15

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are a practical option for space-based quantum communications requiring single-photon detection. However, radiation damage to APDs significantly increases their dark count rates and thus reduces their useful lifetimes in orbit. We show that high-power laser annealing of irradiated APDs of three different models (Excelitas C30902SH, Excelitas SLiK, and Laser Components SAP500S2) heals the radiation damage and several APDs are restored to typical pre-radiation dark count rates. Of nine samples we test, six APDs were thermally annealed in a previous experiment as another solution to mitigate the radiation damage. Laser annealing reduces the dark count rates further in all samples with the maximum dark count rate reduction factor varying between 5.3 and 758 when operating at -80 C. This indicates that laser annealing is a more effective method than thermal annealing. The illumination power to reach these reduction factors ranges from 0.8 to 1.6 W. Other photon detection characteristics, such as photon detection efficiency, timing jitter, and afterpulsing probability, fluctuate but the overall performance of quantum communications should be largely unaffected by these variations. These results herald a promising method to extend the lifetime of a quantum satellite equipped with APDs. (orig.)

  18. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-01-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  19. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  20. Thermal annealing of natural, radiation-damaged pyrochlore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zietlow, Peter; Mihailova, Boriana [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Beirau, Tobias [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; and others

    2017-03-01

    Radiation damage in minerals is caused by the α-decay of incorporated radionuclides, such as U and Th and their decay products. The effect of thermal annealing (400-1000 K) on radiation-damaged pyrochlores has been investigated by Raman scattering, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and combined differential scanning calorimetry/thermogravimetry (DSC/TG). The analysis of three natural radiation-damaged pyrochlore samples from Miass/Russia [6.4 wt% Th, 23.1.10{sup 18} α-decay events per gram (dpg)], Panda Hill/Tanzania (1.6 wt% Th, 1.6.10{sup 18} dpg), and Blue River/Canada (10.5 wt% U, 115.4.10{sup 18} dpg), are compared with a crystalline reference pyrochlore from Schelingen (Germany). The type of structural recovery depends on the initial degree of radiation damage (Panda Hill 28%, Blue River 85% and Miass 100% according to XRD), as the recrystallization temperature increases with increasing degree of amorphization. Raman spectra indicate reordering on the local scale during annealing-induced recrystallization. As Raman modes around 800 cm{sup -1} are sensitive to radiation damage (M. T. Vandenborre, E. Husson, Comparison of the force field in various pyrochlore families. I. The A{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxides. J. Solid State Chem. 1983, 50, 362, S. Moll, G. Sattonnay, L. Thome, J. Jagielski, C. Decorse, P. Simon, I. Monnet, W. J. Weber, Irradiation damage in Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} single crystals: Ballistic versus ionization processes. Phys. Rev. 2011, 84, 64115.), the degree of local order was deduced from the ratio of the integrated intensities of the sum of the Raman bands between 605 and 680 cm{sup -1} divided by the sum of the integrated intensities of the bands between 810 and 860 cm{sup -1}. The most radiation damaged pyrochlore (Miass) shows an abrupt recovery of both, its short- (Raman) and long-range order (X-ray) between 800 and 850 K, while the weakly damaged pyrochlore (Panda Hill) begins to recover at considerably lower temperatures (near 500 K

  1. Analysis of high field effects on the steady-state current-voltage response of semi-insulating 4H-SiC for photoconductive switch applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiskumara, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States); Joshi, R. P., E-mail: ravi.joshi@ttu.edu; Mauch, D.; Dickens, J. C.; Neuber, A. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2015-09-07

    A model-based analysis of the steady-state, current-voltage response of semi-insulating 4H-SiC is carried out to probe the internal mechanisms, focusing on electric field driven effects. Relevant physical processes, such as multiple defects, repulsive potential barriers to electron trapping, band-to-trap impact ionization, and field-dependent detrapping, are comprehensively included. Results of our model match the available experimental data fairly well over orders of magnitude variation in the current density. A number of important parameters are also extracted in the process through comparisons with available data. Finally, based on our analysis, the possible presence of holes in the samples can be discounted up to applied fields as high as ∼275 kV/cm.

  2. Evaluation of 320x240 pixel LEC GaAs Schottky barrier X-ray imaging arrays, hybridized to CMOS readout circuit based on charge integration

    CERN Document Server

    Irsigler, R; Alverbro, J; Borglind, J; Froejdh, C; Helander, P; Manolopoulos, S; O'Shea, V; Smith, K

    1999-01-01

    320x240 pixels GaAs Schottky barrier detector arrays were fabricated, hybridized to silicon readout circuits, and subsequently evaluated. The detector chip was based on semi-insulating LEC GaAs material. The square shaped pixel detector elements were of the Schottky barrier type and had a pitch of 38 mu m. The GaAs wafers were thinned down prior to the fabrication of the ohmic back contact. After dicing, the chips were indium bump, flip-chip bonded to CMOS readout circuits based on charge integration, and finally evaluated. A bias voltage between 50 and 100 V was sufficient to operate the detector. Results on I-V characteristics, noise behaviour and response to X-ray radiation are presented. Images of various objects and slit patterns were acquired by using a standard dental imaging X-ray source. The work done was a part of the XIMAGE project financed by the European Community (Brite-Euram). (author)

  3. Design and characterisation of high electron mobility transistors for use in a monolithic GaAs X-ray imaging sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, D.A.; Sellin, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    A new design of monolithic GaAs pixel detector is proposed for medical and synchrotron applications. In this device a semi-insulating GaAs wafer will be used as both the detector element and the substrate for the integrated charge readout matrix. The charge readout matrix consists of High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs), which are grown epitaxially onto the GaAs substrate. Experimental characterisation of HEMTs has been carried out and their suitability for the proposed imaging device is assessed. Temperature measurements on initial devices showed the threshold voltage to be stable from room temperature down to -15 degree sign C. HEMT designs with lower leakage current that operate in enhancement mode have been fabricated and modelled using the Silvaco simulation package. These optimised devices have been fabricated using a gate recess, and exhibit enhancement mode operation and significantly reduced gate leakage currents

  4. High temperature annealing effects on deep-level defects in a high purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Naoya, E-mail: naoya.iwamoto@smn.uio.no; Azarov, Alexander; Svensson, Bengt G. [Department of Physics, Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, 370-1292 Gunma (Japan); Moe, Anne Marie M. [Washington Mills AS, N-7300 Orkanger (Norway)

    2015-07-28

    Effects of high-temperature annealing on deep-level defects in a high-purity semi-insulating 4H silicon carbide substrate have been studied by employing current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, junction spectroscopy, and chemical impurity analysis measurements. Secondary ion mass spectrometry data reveal that the substrate contains boron with concentration in the mid 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −3} range, while other impurities including nitrogen, aluminum, titanium, vanadium and chromium are below their detection limits (typically ∼10{sup 14 }cm{sup −3}). Schottky barrier diodes fabricated on substrates annealed at 1400–1700 °C exhibit metal/p-type semiconductor behavior with a current rectification of up to 8 orders of magnitude at bias voltages of ±3 V. With increasing annealing temperature, the series resistance of the Schottky barrier diodes decreases, and the net acceptor concentration in the substrates increases approaching the chemical boron content. Admittance spectroscopy results unveil the presence of shallow boron acceptors and deep-level defects with levels in lower half of the bandgap. After the 1400 °C annealing, the boron acceptor still remains strongly compensated at room temperature by deep donor-like levels located close to mid-gap. However, the latter decrease in concentration with increasing annealing temperature and after 1700 °C, the boron acceptor is essentially uncompensated. Hence, the deep donors are decisive for the semi-insulating properties of the substrates, and their thermal evolution limits the thermal budget for device processing. The origin of the deep donors is not well-established, but substantial evidence supporting an assignment to carbon vacancies is presented.

  5. Low-energy particle treatment of GaAs surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pincik, E.; Ivanco, J.; Brunner, R.; Jergel, M.; Falcony, C.; Ortega, L.; Kucera, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents results of a complex study of surface properties of high-doped (2x10 18 cm -3 ) and semi-insulating GaAs after an interaction with the particles coming from low-energy ion sources such as RF plasma and ion beams. The virgin samples were mechano-chemically polished liquid-encapsulated Czochralski-grown GaAs (100) oriented wafers. The crystals were mounted on the grounded electrode (holder). The mixture Ar+H 2 as well as O 2 and CF 4 were used as working gases: In addition, a combination of two different in-situ exposures was applied, such as e.g. hydrogen and oxygen. Structural, electrical and optical properties of the exposed surfaces were investigated using X-ray diffraction at grazing incidence, quasi-static and high-frequency C-V curve measurements, deep-level transient spectroscopy, photo-reflectance, and photoluminescence. Plasma and ion beam exposures were performed in a commercial RF capacitively coupled plasma equipment SECON XPL-200P and a commercial LPAI device, respectively. The evolution of surface properties as a function of the pressure of working gas and the duration of exposure was observed. (Authors)

  6. Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

    2009-02-21

    An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

  7. Compilation of radiation damage test data cable insulating materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on commercially available organic cable insulation and jacket materials: ethylene- propylene rubber, Hypalon, neoprene rubber, polyethylene, polyurethane, polyvinylchloride, silicone rubber, etc. The materials have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to integrated absorbed doses from 5*10/sup 5/ to 5*10/sup 6/ Gy. Mechanical properties, e.g. tensile strength, elongation at break, and hardness, have been tested on irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs, to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (13 refs).

  8. Study of radiation damage in metals by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauster, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Positron annihilation is a sensitive technique for probing defects in metals and it has recently been shown to be a valuable tool for the study of radiation damage. After an introduction to the three basic experimental methods (angular correlation, Doppler broadening, and lifetime measurements), the interaction of positrons with lattice defects is reviewed. Results for the annealing of damage after low temperature irradiation are used to show that positron annihilation has provided new information on annealing kinetics. The role of positron techniques in characterizing complex defect structures resulting from high-temperature neutron irradiation is reviewed and the possible utility of positron annihilation as a nondestructive monitor of property changes is pointed out

  9. Effects of radiation damage on the silicon lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Katherine A.; Lowry, Lynn; Russo, O. Louis

    1987-01-01

    Silicon was irradiated with both proton and electron particle beams in order to investigate changes in the structural and optical properties of the lattice as a result of the radiation damage. Lattice expansions occurred when large strain fields (+0.34 percent) developed after 1- and 3-MeV proton bombardment. The strain was a factor of three less after 1-MeV electron irradiation. Average increases of approximately 22 meV in the 3.46-eV interband energy gap and 14 meV in the Lorentz broadening parameter were measured after the electron irradiation.

  10. Radiation damage studies of detector-compatible Si JFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Boscardin, Maurizio; Candelori, Andrea; Pancheri, Lucio; Piemonte, Claudio; Ratti, Lodovico; Zorzi, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    We have largely improved the performance of our detector-compatible Si JFETs by optimizing the fabrication technology. New devices feature thermal noise values close to the theoretical ones, and remarkably low 1/f noise figures. In view of adopting these JFETs for X-ray imaging and HEP applications, bulk and surface radiation damage tests have been carried out by irradiating single transistors and test structures with neutrons and X-rays. Selected results from static and noise characterization of irradiated devices are discussed in this paper, and the impact of radiation effects on the performance of JFET-based circuits is addressed

  11. Radiation damage and induced tetraploidy in mulberry (Morus alba L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, K.

    1976-01-01

    Vigorously growing mulberry shoots were exposed to 5 kR of gamma rays at the rate of 0.2 kR/hr and 5.0 kR/hr and successively pruned three times in two growing seasons. The most radiosensitive part of both the apical and axillary meristems was the second cell layer. The younger axillary bud primordia were more sensitive to radiation then the older ones. Recovery from radiation damage was assumed to be from the flank meristem in the shoot apex. The frequency of mutations was much lower than that of tetraploidy. Among the tetraploids 50% were 2-4-4 chimeras. (author)

  12. Radiation damage in an amorphous Lennard-Jones solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, T.K.; Li, J.C.M.

    1985-01-01

    A molecular-dynamics simulation of radiation damage in an amorphous Lennard-Jones solid has been undertaken. A three-dimensional structure of 685 atoms with periodic boundary conditions was used. An atom was injected inward from the middle of one surface, and as it lost its energy its velocity and position were recorded. The temperature profile around the injection direction was also calculated. The amorphous structure was examined before and after irradiation by calculating the volume distribution of the Voronoi polyhedra and its time evolution. The production of vacancies and interstitials was observed. The interstitials were found to disappear rapidly, and the vacancies slowly. (author)

  13. Radiation damage assessment by digital correlation of images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, J.; Salih, S.M.; Cosslett, V.E.

    1974-01-01

    Structural changes in the electron microscopic specimen due to radiation damage are conveniently studied by electron diffraction. However, two disadvantages of this method are that it does not work for amorphous specimens and that it is not sensitive to structural changes that affect only the phase of the structure factor. It has been proposed that a series of successive images taken under minimum exposure conditions could provide additional information in those cases where the relationship between object function and image intensity can be established. In order to test the proposed method, both lattice images and diffraction patterns of coronene crystals were recorded in separate experiments at controlled levels of exposure. (author)

  14. Investigations into radiation damages of reactor materials by computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronnikov, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Data on the state of works in European countries in the field of computerized simulation of radiation damages of reactor materials under the context of the international projects ITEM (European Database for Multiscale Modelling) and SIRENA (Simulation of Radiation Effects in Zr-Nb alloys) - computerized simulation of stress corrosion when contact of Zr-Nb alloys with iodine are presented. Computer codes for the simulation of radiation effects in reactor materials were developed. European Database for Multiscale Modelling (EDAM) was organized using the results of the investigations provided in the ITEM project [ru

  15. Development and anneal of radiation damage in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Celma, A.; Donker, H.; Soppe, W.J.; Miralles, L.

    1993-12-01

    Laboratory gamma-irradiations at a constant temperature (100 C) were carried out in two sorts of experiments, one at variable and another at approximately constant dose rates. The damage developed during irradiation was analyzed by thermal analysis, microstructural analysis and small angle neutron scattering. The results were compared with the yields of the Jain-Lidiard model for each experiment. Experiments at a constant dose rate were planned to obtain information on radiation damage development and anneal in conditions as near as possible to those of radioactive waste repository concepts. For this reason the dose rates were kept low. (orig./DG)

  16. Introduction of neutron metrology for reactor radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberman, A.; Genthon, J.P.; Schneider, W.; Wright, S.B.; Zijp, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The background of the procedures for determining irradiation parameters which are of interest in radiation damage experiments is described. The first two chapters outline the concept of damage functions and damage models. The next two chapters give information on methods to determine neutron fluences and neutron spectra. The fifth chapter gives a review of correlation data available for graphite and steels. The last chapter gives guidance how to report the relevant irradiation parameters. Attention is given to the role of the neutron spectrum in deriving values for damage fluence, energy transferred to the lattice, and number of displacements

  17. The annealing of radiation damage in type Ia diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Alan T; Kiflawi, Isaac

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of the recovery of radiation damage in type Ia diamond has been investigated using isothermal annealing at 600 deg. C. In diamonds having a reasonably homogeneous distribution of nitrogen the decay of the vacancy concentration with time can be approximately described by a single exponential. Previous investigations have identified 'fast' and 'slow' components in the annealing, and we show that the existence of more than one time constant is associated with inhomogeneous nitrogen concentrations. The measurements show further that, in order to obtain the oscillator strengths of nitrogen-vacancy centres, studies must be restricted to diamonds with moderately high nitrogen concentrations.

  18. Consequential late radiation damage in the skin in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wei; Kong Ling; Zhang Youwang; Hu Chaosu; Wu Yongru

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between early and late radiation damage in skin. Methods: 335 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with radical radiotherapy were evaluated. 240 patients had lymph nodes in the neck at initial diagnosis. The median doses were 70 Gy (55-86 Gy) to the nasopharyngeal region by external beam radiotherapy. The median doses were 64 Gy (46-72 Gy) to the neck with lymph node metastases, 55 Gy (21-67 Gy) to the node-negative neck. 71 patients were treated with facial-neck fields, while 264 patients were treated with pre-auricular fields. Chemotherapy was given in 48 patients. According to the 1995 SOMA scales late radiation damage in the skin was evaluated. Results: The median time from the radiotherapy to follow up was 14 years (range, 5-38 years). 63 patients have grade 0 late radiation reactions in the neck skin, the grade 1,2, 3,4 late radiation reactions in the neck skin were 43.9% (147 patients), 20.9% (70 patients), 13.7% (46 patients) and 2.7% (9 patients), respectively. 44 patients had moist desquamation in the medical records. The grade 1,2,3,4 late radiation reactions in the neck skin were 41%, 23%, 30% and 5%, respectively in patients with moist desquamation, while in patients without moist desquamation, the corresponding rates were 44.3%, 20.6%, 11.3% and 2.4%, respectively. The difference were significant between these two groups by chi-square analysis(χ 2 =17.42, P=0.002). Furthermore, whether patients had positive lymph node in the neck or not, the size of facial-neck fields and higher doses to the neck had more severe late radiation reaction in the neck skin, while age, gender and chemotherapy failed to show any effects on the development of late radiation reactions in the neck skin. Conclusion: The severe early radiation damage in the skin possibly increases the late radiation damage in the neck skin. (authors)

  19. Influence of radiation damage on internal friction background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burbelo, R.M.; Grinik, Eh.U.; Paliokha, M.I.; Orlinskij, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    Influence of radiation damage on internal friction background in samples of polycrystalline nickel and iron irradiated by a fast neutron flux approximately 10 14 neutr/(cm 2 xs) at 350 deg C has been studied using the low-frequency unit of the reverse torsion pendulum type. It has been established experimentally that a high-temperature background of internal friction of iron and nickel samples decreases as accumulating radiation defects occurring under neutron irradiation. Assumptions on a possible mechanism of the effect have been proposed. Simple expression for the background magnitude evaluation has been suggested

  20. Changes in the positron-electron momentum distribution in GaAs brought about by chopped light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.; Fung, S.; Beling, C.D.; Ling, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    We report on an attempt to observe the EL2→ EL2 * transition in semi-insulating GaAs using Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation spectroscopy. Unlike the original observation of this transition using positron annihilation spectroscopy, the present method has sought to observe the production of EL2 * through a light chopping experiment, where on the half cycle of illumination the EL2 * state is formed and on the second half cycle the EL2 * thermally quenches back to EL2. While results are at a preliminary state we have obtained evidence for the production of EL2 * from the broad-band emission of a Xenon lamp. While calculations suggest that we should be able to see the EL2 * from the IR emission (1.3eV) of GaAs light emitting diodes we have not yet been able to achieve this. Reasons why are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15} n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside...

  2. Multiscale approach to the physics of radiation damage with ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdutovich, E.; Solov'yov, A.

    2014-01-01

    The multiscale approach to the assessment of bio-damage resulting upon irradiation of biological media with ions is reviewed, explained and compared to other approaches. The processes of ion propagation in the medium concurrent with ionization and excitation of molecules, transport of secondary products, dynamics of the medium, and biological damage take place on a number of different temporal, spatial and energy scales. The multiscale approach, a physical phenomenon-based analysis of the scenario that leads to radiation damage, has been designed to consider all relevant effects on a variety of scales and develop an approach to the quantitative assessment of biological damage as a result of irradiation with ions. Presently, physical and chemical effects are included in the scenario while the biological effects such as DNA repair are only mentioned. This paper explains the scenario of radiation damage with ions, overviews its major parts, and applies the multiscale approach to different experimental conditions. On the basis of this experience, the recipe for application of the multiscale approach is formulated. The recipe leads to the calculation of relative biological effectiveness. (authors)

  3. Gamma radiation damage in pixelated detector based on carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva, A.; Pinnera, I.; Leyva, D.; Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the possible gamma radiation damage in high pixelated based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes detectors, grown on two different substrata, when it is operating in aggressive radiational environments. The radiation damage in displacements per atom (dpa) terms were calculated using the MCCM algorithm, which takes into account the McKinley-Feshbach approach with the Kinchin-Pease approximation for the damage function. Was observed that with increasing of the gamma energy the displacement total number grows monotonically reaching values of 0.39 displacements for a 10 MeV incident photon. The profiles of point defects distributions inside the carbon nanotube pixel linearly rise with depth, increasing its slope with photon energy. In the 0.1 MeV - 10 MeV studied energy interval the electron contribution to the total displacement number become higher than the positron ones, reaching this last one a maximum value of 12% for the 10 MeV incident photons. Differences between the calculation results for the two used different substrata were not observed. (Author)

  4. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rossini, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm^2 and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current and future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time and considers both planar and 3D sensor designs. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we compare predictions for b...

  5. Radiation damage resistance in mercuric iodide X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B E; Dolin, R C; Devore, T M; Markakis, J M [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA); Iwanczyk, J S; Dorri, N [Xsirius, Inc., Marina del Rey, CA (USA); Trombka, J [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (USA). Goddard Space Flight Center

    1990-12-20

    Mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) radiation detectors show great potential as ambient-temperature solid-state detectors for X-rays, gamma rays and visible light, with parameters that are competitive with existing technologies. In a previous experiment, HgI{sub 2} detectors irradiated with 10 MeV protons/cm{sup 2} exhibited no damage. The 10 MeV protons represent only the low range of the spectrum of energies that are important. An experiment has been conducted at the Saturne accelerator facility at Saclay, France, to determine the susceptibility of these detectors to radiation damage by high-energy (1.5 GeV) protons. The detectors were irradiated to a fluence of 10{sup 8} protons/cm{sup 2}. This fluence is equivalent to the cosmic radiation expected in a one-year period in space. The resolution of the detectors was measured as a function of the integral dose. No degradation in the response of any of the detectors or spectrometers was seen. It is clear from this data that HgI{sub 2} has extremely high radiation-damage resistance, exceeding that of most other semiconductor materials used for radiation detectors. Based on the results shown to date, HgI{sub 2} detectors are suitable for applications in which they may be exposed to high integral dose levels. (orig.).

  6. Modeling radiation damage to pixel sensors in the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside ...

  7. Modeling radiation damage to pixel sensors in the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducourthial, A.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subject to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) [1], the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 1015 neq/cm2 and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is essential in order to make accurate predictions for current and future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects on the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside early studies with LHC Run 2 proton-proton collision data.

  8. Radiation damage in CaF2: Gd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, L.

    1979-01-01

    Calcium fluoride crystals doped with Gd 3+ at four different concentrations were irradiated at room temperature. The damage produced by radiation and the primary and secondary effects as well were studied by optical spectroscopy. The increase in optical absorption (with loss of transparency) varied from sample as a function of concentration and dose. The coloration curves showed an evolution from two to three radiation damage steps when going from a pure to the most Gd 3+ concentrated sample. The obtained spectra were analysed at characteristic wave lenghts of electronic defects (photochromic centers, F and its aggregates) and of Gd 3+ and Gd 2+ defects. As a result of the radiation damage the valence change (Gd 3+ →Gd 2+ ) and its reversible character under thermal activation were directly observed. These effects were correlated with other observed effects such as the room temperature luminescence after the irradiation ceased. The non radiative F centers formation from the interaction of holes and photochromic centers was also observed and analysed. A thermal activation study of the several defects responsible for the different absorption bands was made. Values of activation energies were obtained as expected for the kind of defects involved in these processes [pt

  9. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rossini, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High- Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm2 and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time and considers both planar and 3D sensor designs. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we compare predictions for basic...

  10. PREFACE: Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems (RADAM07)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, Kevin G.

    2008-03-01

    The annual meeting of the COST P9 Action `Radiation damage in biomolecular systems' took place from 19-22 June 2007 in the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, in Dublin. The conference was structured into 5 Working Group sessions: Electrons and biomolecular interactions Ions and biomolecular interactions Radiation in physiological environments Theoretical developments for radiation damage Track structure in cells Each of the five working groups presented two sessions of invited talks. Professor Ron Chesser of Texas Tech University, USA gave a riveting plenary talk on `Mechanisms of Adaptive Radiation Responses in Mammals at Chernobyl' and the implications his work has on the Linear-No Threshold model of radiation damage. In addition, this was the first RADAM meeting to take place after the Alexander Litvenenko affair and we were fortunate to have one of the leading scientists involved in the European response Professor Herwig Paretzke of GSF-Institut für Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg, Germany, available to speak. The remaining contributions were presented in the poster session. A total of 72 scientific contributions (32 oral, 40 poster), presented by 97 participants from 22 different countries, gave an overview on the current progress in the 5 different subfields. A 1-day pre-conference `Early Researcher Tutorial Workshop' on the same topic kicked off on 19 June attended by more than 40 postgrads, postdocs and senior researchers. Twenty papers, based on these reports, are included in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. All the contributions in this volume were fully refereed, and they represent a sample of the courses, invited talks and contributed talks presented during RADAM07. The interdisciplinary RADAM07 conference brought together researchers from a variety of different fields with a common interest in biomolecular radiation damage. This is reflected by the disparate backgrounds of the authors of the papers presented in these proceedings

  11. Properties and recrystallization of radiation damaged pyrochlore and titanite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zietlow, Peter

    2016-11-02

    Radiation damage in minerals is caused by the alpha-decay of incorporated radionuclides, such as U and Th and their decay products. The effect of thermal annealing (400-1400 K) on radiation-damaged pyrochlores has been investigated by Raman scattering, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and combined differential scanning calorimetry/thermogravimetry (DSC/TG) (Zietlow et al., in print). The analysis of three natural radiation-damaged pyrochlore samples from Miass/Russia (6.4 wt% Th, 23.1.10{sup 18} a-decay events per gram (dpg)), Zlatoust/Russia (6.3 wt% Th, 23.1.10{sup 18} dpg), Panda Hill/Tanzania (1.6 wt% Th, 1.6.10{sup 18} dpg), and Blue River/Canada (10.5 wt% U, 115.4.10{sup 18} dpg), are compared with a crystalline reference pyrochlore from Schelingen (Germany). The type of structural recovery depends on the initial degree of radiation damage (Panda Hill 28 %, Blue River 85 %, Zlatoust and Miass 100 % according to XRD), as the recrystallization temperature increases with increasing degree of amorphization. Raman spectra indicate reordering on the local scale during annealing-induced recrystallization. As Raman modes around 800 cm{sup -1} are sensitive to radiation damage (Vandenborre and Husson 1983, Moll et al. 2011), the degree of local order was deduced from the ratio of the integrated intensities of the sum of the Raman bands between 605 and 680 cm{sup -1} devided by the sum of the integrated intensities of the bands between 810 and 860 cm{sup -1}. The most radiation damaged pyrochlores (Miass and Zlatoust) show an abrupt recovery of both, its short- (Raman) and long-range order (X-ray) between 800 and 850 K. The volume decrease upon recrystallization in Zlatoust pyrochlore was large enough to crack the sample repeatedly. In contrast, the weakly damaged pyrochlore (Panda Hill) begins to recover at considerably lower temperatures (near 500 K), extending over a temperature range of ca. 300 K, up to 800 K (Raman). The pyrochlore from Blue River shows in its

  12. Crystal structure of LT GaAs layers before and after annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litiental-Weber, Z.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the structural quality of GaAs layers grown at low temperatures by solid-source and gas-source MBE at different growth conditions is described. Dependence on the growth temperature and concentration of As [expressed at As/Ga beam equivalent pressure (BEP)] used for the growth is discussed. A higher growth temperature is required top obtain the same monocrystalling layer thickness with increased BEP. The annealing of these layers is associated with the formation of As precipitates. Semicoherent precipitates with lowest formation energies are formed in the monocrystalline parts of the layers grown with the lowest BEP. Precipitates with higher formation energies are formed when higher BEP is applied; they are also formed in the vicinity of structural defects. Formation of As precipitates releases strain in the layers. Arsenic precipitates are not formed in annealed ternary (InAlAs) layers despite their semi-insulating properties. The role of As precipitates in semi-insulating properties and the short lifetime of minority carriers in these layers is discussed

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage cascades in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchan, J. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Robinson, M. [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Christie, H. J.; Roach, D. L.; Ross, D. K. [Physics and Materials Research Centre, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Marks, N. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2015-06-28

    Radiation damage cascades in diamond are studied by molecular dynamics simulations employing the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential for carbon. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies up to 2.5 keV are considered and a uniformly distributed set of 25 initial PKA directions provide robust statistics. The simulations reveal the atomistic origins of radiation-resistance in diamond and provide a comprehensive computational analysis of cascade evolution and dynamics. As for the case of graphite, the atomic trajectories are found to have a fractal-like character, thermal spikes are absent and only isolated point defects are generated. Quantitative analysis shows that the instantaneous maximum kinetic energy decays exponentially with time, and that the timescale of the ballistic phase has a power-law dependence on PKA energy. Defect recombination is efficient and independent of PKA energy, with only 50% of displacements resulting in defects, superior to graphite where the same quantity is nearly 75%.

  14. Radiation damage in nonmetallic solids under dense electronic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Noriaki; Tanimura, Katsumi; Nakai, Yasuo

    1992-01-01

    Basic processes of radiation damage of insulators by dense electronic excitation are reviewed. First it is pointed out that electronic excitation of nonmetallic solids produces the self-trapped excitons and defect-related metastable states having relatively long lifetimes, and that the excitation of these metastable states, produces stable defects. The effects of irradiation with heavy ions, including track registration, are surveyed on the basis of the microscopic studies. It is pointed out also that the excitation of the metastable states plays a role in laser-induced damage at relatively low fluences, while the laser damage has been reported to be governed by heating of free electrons produced by multiphoton excitation. Difference in the contributions of the excitation of metastable defects to laser-induced damage of surfaces, or laser ablation, and laser-induced bulk damage is stressed. (orig.)

  15. Radiation damage measurements on CZT drift strip detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    from 2 x 10(8) to 60 x 10(8) p(+)/cm(2). Even for the highest fluences, which had a dramatic effect on the spectroscopic performance, we were able to recover the detectors after an appropriate annealing procedure. The radiation damage was studied as a function of depth inside the detector material...... with the proton dose. The radiation contribution to the electron trapping was found to obey the following relation: (mutau(e)(-1))(rad) = (2.5+/-0.2) x 10(-7) x Phi (V/cm)(2) with the proton fluence, Phi in p(+)/cm(2). The trapping depth dependence, however, did not agree well with the damage profile calculated...

  16. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The overall goal is to understand the relationship between the chemical and structural changes produced by ionizing radiation in DNA and the resulting impairment of biological function expressed as carcinogenesis or cell death. The studies are based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA. These mechanistic explorations should lead to the formulation of testable hypotheses regarding the processes of impairment of regulation of gene expression, alteration in DNA repair, and damage to DNA structure involved in cell death or cancer

  17. Collision density approach of radiation damage in a multispecies medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lux, I.; Pazsit, I.

    1981-01-01

    Space-energy dependent forward type equations for the collision densities of energetic atoms in a multispecies semi-infinite homogeneous medium are formulated. Introduction of the one-dimensional isotropic forward-backward model of Fermi for the scattering and application of the Laplace transform with respect to the lethargy variable will lead to a linear differential equation system with constant coefficients. This equation system is solved for an arbitrary number of species and relations between the collision densities and defect distributions of the different species are given in the Kinchin-Pease model of radiation damage. The case of an alien particle incident on a two-component target is examined in some detail and the sputtering spectra for the three species are given numerically. (author)

  18. Introduction to neutron metrology for reactor radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberman, A.; Genthon, J.P.; Wright, S.B.; Zijp, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    This document, prepared by members of the Irradiation Damage Subgroup of the Euratom Working Group on Reactor Dosimetry (EWGRD) describes the background of the procedures for determining irradiation parameters which are of interest in radiation damage experiments. The first two chapters outline the concept of damage functions and damge models. The next two chapters give information on methods to determine neutron fluences and neutron spectra. The fifth chapter gives a review of correlation data available for graphite and steels. The last chapter gives guidance how to report the relevant irradiation parameters. Attention is given to the role of the neutron spectrum in deriving values for damage fluence, energy transferred to the lattice, and number of displacements. A suggested list to report data relevant to the irradiation, the instrumentation and the testing of material is included

  19. Radiation damage in amorphous solids - a computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, T.K.; Li, J.C.M.

    1984-01-01

    It is known for crystalline materials that injection of high energy atoms introduces point defects. The nature of defects is not known for amorphous solids. So a molecular dynamic simulation of radiation damage in an amorphous metal was carried out. An amorphous structure of 685 atoms with periodic boundary conditions in all 3 dimensions was equilibrated first. Then one atom on the surface was given a high initial velocity so it was injected inward. Radial temperature distribution around the line of injection was calculated as a function of time. Void distribution and its evolution with time in the direction of injection was calculated by counting the atomic centers in thin slabs perpendicular to the line of injection. The swelling of the whole solid was calculated also. Some results are compared with experiments

  20. Sensitization of ultraviolet radiation damage in bacteria and mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, G.J.; Watts, M.E.; Patel, K.B.; Adams, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    Bacteria (Serratia marcescens) and mammalian cells (Chinese hamsters V79-379A) were irradiated in monolayers with ultraviolet light at 254 nm or 365 nm in the presence or absence of radiosensitizing drugs. At 254 nm, killing is very efficient (Dsub(37) approximately equal 1 J m -2 exposure, or approximately equal 6 x 10 4 photons absorbed by DNA per bacterium), and sensitizers have no effect. At 365 nm, cells are not killed in buffer, but are inactivated in the presence of nifurpipone or misonidazole. Lethal exposures (approximately equal 5 x 10 3 J m -2 at 10 nM misonidazole) correspond to about 10 7 photons absorbed by sensitizer molecules per bacterium. Toxicity of stable photoproducts of the drugs is not involved, nor is oxygen required. Hence the transient species formed by photo-excitation of radiosensitizer molecules are capable of killing cells in the absence of other types of radiation damage. (author)

  1. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nachman, Benjamin Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}$ 1 MeV $n_\\mathrm{eq}/\\mathrm{cm}^2$ and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This talk presents a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS Pixel sensors for the first time. After a thorough description of the setup, predictions for basic Pixel cluster properties are presented alongside first validation studies with Run 2 collision data.

  2. Radiation damage and rate limitations in tracking devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilchriese, M.G.D.

    1984-01-01

    In this note the author briefly discusses radiation damage to wire chambers and silicon strip devices and the electronics that may be associated with each of these. Scintillating fibers and CCD's are not discussed although the former appears to be a potentially radiation-resistant detector. In order to calculate radiation levels and rates the author assumed the following: an inelastic cross section of 100 mb at the SSC - six charged particles per unit of rapidity - photons and neutrons do not contribute to the background (photon conversions are negligible with a thin Be beam pipe) - beam gas interactions and beam losses (except during injection when I assume that the detector is ''off'') are negligible. This is discussed in a later section. - 1 Rad = 3.5 x 10 7 minimum ionizing particlescm 2

  3. Collision density approach of radiation damage in a multispecies medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lux, I; Pazsit, I [Koezponti Elelmiszeripari Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary)

    1981-01-01

    Space-energy dependent forward type equations for the collision densities of energetic atoms in a multispecies semi-infinite homogeneous medium are formulated. Introduction of the one-dimensional isotropic forward-backward model of Fermi for the scattering and application of the Laplace transform with respect to the lethargy variable will lead to a linear differential equation system with constant coefficients. This equation system is solved for an arbitrary number of species and relations between the collision densities and defect distributions of the different species are given in the Kinchin-Pease model of radiation damage. The case of an alien particle incident on a two-component target is examined in some detail and the sputtering spectra for the three species are given numerically.

  4. Biological rhythms for rehabilitation of radiation damage of population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharova, T.G.; Vasil'eva, G.S.; Efimov, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Considerable disturbances in biological eurhythmycal structure of redoracu were discovered for people living in Borodulikha area of the Semipalatinsk test site. The deep desynchronise may result in a development of the cardiovascular, bronco-pulmonary, endocrine, oncologic, neuro psychic diseases. A method to correct the biological eurhythmycal structure was developed. Homeopathic doses of melatonin ('rhythm driver' managing the most regenerating and immune systems) and uthynol (promoting production of dehydroepiandrosterone of maternal prehormone of 27 hormones) were used to provide the general correction. The endocrine diseases are not practically subjected to the homeopathic correction. The sub correction was sometimes carried out after 5 months. The developed methods of rehabilitation of the radiation damages are unique, since they allow performing the homeopathic correction using the acupuncture monitoring

  5. The role of radiation damage analysis in the fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of radiation damage analysis is the prediction of the performance of facility components exposed to a radiation environment. The US Magnetic Fusion Energy materials program includes an explicit damage analysis activity within the Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) Program. Many of the papers in these Proceedings report work done directly or indirectly in support of the DAFS program. The emphasis of this program is on developing procedures, based on an understanding of damage mechanisms, for applying data obtained in diverse radiation environments to the prediction of component behavior in fusion devices. It is assumed that the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility will be available in the late 1980s to test (and calibrate where necessary) correlation procedures to the high fluences expected in commercial reactors. (orig.)

  6. Long-term radiation damage to a spaceborne germanium spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kurczynski, P; Hull, E L; Palmer, D; Harris, M J; Seifert, H; Teegarden, B J; Gehrels, N; Cline, T L; Ramaty, R; Sheppard, D; Madden, N W; Luke, P N; Cork, C P; Landis, D A; Malone, D F; Hurley, K

    1999-01-01

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer aboard the Wind spacecraft in deep space has observed gamma-ray bursts and solar events for four years. The germanium detector in the instrument has gradually deteriorated from exposure to the approx 10 sup 8 p/cm sup 2 /yr(>100 MeV) cosmic-ray flux. Low-energy tailing and loss of efficiency, attributed to hole trapping and conversion of the germanium from n- to p-type as a result of crystal damage, were observed. Raising the detector bias voltage ameliorated both difficulties and restored the spectrometer to working operation. Together, these observations extend our understanding of the effects of radiation damage to include the previously unsuccessfully studied regime of long-term operation in space. (author)

  7. Modification of radiation damage by naturally occurring substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, K.N.

    1984-01-01

    The major objectives of studying the modification of radiation sensitivity have been (1) to identify a compound that will produce a differential protection or sensitization of the effect of irradiation on normal and tumor tissue, and (2) to understand more about the mechanisms of radiation damage. In spite of massive research on this particular problem since World War II, the first objective remains elusive. During this period, numerous radioprotective and radiosensitizing agents have been identified. These agents have served as important biologic tools for increasing our understanding of radiation injuries. Most of these substances are synthetic compounds and are very toxic to humans. In addition, very few of the compounds provide differential modifications of the effect of radiation on tumor and normal cells. This chapter presents objectives for identifying naturally occurring substances that modify the effect of x-radiation on mammalian cells and discusses the role of physiologic substances in modifying radiation injuries on mammalian normal and tumor cells

  8. Basic aspects of spallation radiation damage to materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Lin, C. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Sommer, W.F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The nature of radiation effects, as learned from investigations using reactor neutron irradiations, is reviewed, and its relevance to spallation radiation damage to materials in accelerator-driven neutron sources is discussed. Property changes upon irradiation are due to (1) displaced atoms, producing vacancy and interstitial defect clusters, which cause radiation hardening and embrittlement; (2) helium production, the helium then forming bubbles, which engenders high-temperature grain-boundary fracture; and (3) transmutations, which means that impurity concentrations are introduced. Methods for analyzing displacement production are related, and recent calculations of displacement cross sections using SPECTER and LAHET are described, with special reference to tungsten, a major candidate for a target material in accelerator-driven neutron systems.

  9. Radiation damage in A-15 materials: EXAFS studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, G.S.; Kampwirth, R.T.; Georgopoulos, P.; Brown, B.S.

    1980-01-01

    EXAFS measurements are useful in determining the local atomic environment of a particular element in a solid. Since there has been some controversy about the nature of the defects produced in A-15 materials by radiation damage, such studies were carried out on some A-15 compounds, V 3 Ga which was damaged by neutrons, as well as Nb 3 Ge damaged by 2.5 MeV a particles. In the V 3 Ga sample, site exchange disorder seems to be the most important result of the neutron damage with less than 20% of the vanadium atoms on wrong sites. However, in the Nb 3 Ge samples in addition to site exchange disorder, an unusual splitting of the first near-neighbor distance between the Ge and Nb is found. This splitting, approximately 0.2 A, may explain the large Debye Waller factors observed by Burbank et al

  10. Positron annihilation lifetime study of radiation-damaged natural zircons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Gaugliardo, P. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Physics, University of Western Australia (Australia); Farnan, I.; Zhang, M. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Vance, E.R.; Davis, J.; Karatchevtseva, I.; Knott, R.B. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (Australia); Mudie, S. [The Australian Synchrotron, Victoria (Australia); Buckman, S.J. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Institute for Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Sullivan, J.P., E-mail: james.sullivan@anu.edu.au [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2016-04-01

    Zircons are a well-known candidate waste form for actinides and their radiation damage behaviour has been widely studied by a range of techniques. In this study, well-characterised natural single crystal zircons have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). In some, but not all, of the crystals that had incurred at least half of the alpha-event damage of ∼10{sup 19} α/g required to render them structurally amorphous, PALS spectra displayed long lifetimes corresponding to voids of ∼0.5 nm in diameter. The long lifetimes corresponded to expectations from published Small-Angle X-ray Scattering data on similar samples. However, the non-observation by PALS of such voids in some of the heavily damaged samples may reflect large size variations among the voids such that no singular size can be distinguished or. Characterisation of a range of samples was also performed using scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman scattering and X-ray scattering/diffraction, with the degree of alpha damage being inferred mainly from the Raman technique and X-ray diffraction. The observed void diameters and intensities of the long lifetime components were changed somewhat by annealing at 700 °C; annealing at 1200 °C removed the voids entirely. The voids themselves may derive from He gas bubbles or voids created by the inclusion of small quantities of organic and hydrous matter, notwithstanding the observation that no voidage was evidenced by PALS in two samples containing hydrous and organic matter. - Highlights: • Study of a range of naturally occurring zircons damaged by alpha radiation. • Characterised using a range of techniques, including PALS spectroscopy. • Effects on hydrous material appear important, rather than direct radiation damage. • Annealing is shown to remove the observed voids.

  11. Heavy ion linear accelerator for radiation damage studies of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsaev, Sergey V.; Mustapha, Brahim; Ostroumov, Peter N.; Nolen, Jerry; Barcikowski, Albert; Pellin, Michael; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2017-03-01

    A new eXtreme MATerial (XMAT) research facility is being proposed at Argonne National Laboratory to enable rapid in situ mesoscale bulk analysis of ion radiation damage in advanced materials and nuclear fuels. This facility combines a new heavy-ion accelerator with the existing high-energy X-ray analysis capability of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source. The heavy-ion accelerator and target complex will enable experimenters to emulate the environment of a nuclear reactor making possible the study of fission fragment damage in materials. Material scientists will be able to use the measured material parameters to validate computer simulation codes and extrapolate the response of the material in a nuclear reactor environment. Utilizing a new heavy-ion accelerator will provide the appropriate energies and intensities to study these effects with beam intensities which allow experiments to run over hours or days instead of years. The XMAT facility will use a CW heavy-ion accelerator capable of providing beams of any stable isotope with adjustable energy up to 1.2 MeV/u for U-238(50+) and 1.7 MeV for protons. This energy is crucial to the design since it well mimics fission fragments that provide the major portion of the damage in nuclear fuels. The energy also allows damage to be created far from the surface of the material allowing bulk radiation damage effects to be investigated. The XMAT ion linac includes an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, a normal-conducting radio-frequency quadrupole and four normal-conducting multi-gap quarter-wave resonators operating at 60.625 MHz. This paper presents the 3D multi-physics design and analysis of the accelerating structures and beam dynamics studies of the linac.

  12. Radiation damage measurements in room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, L.A.; Olsen, R.W.; James, R.B.; Brunett, B.A.; Walsh, D.S.; Doyle, B.L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Trombka, J.I.

    1998-01-01

    The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) is reviewed and in the case of CZT supplemented by new alpha particle data. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3 MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 10 10 p/cm 2 and significant bulk leakage after 10 12 p/cm 2 . CZT exposed to 200 MeV protons shows a two-fold loss in energy resolution after a fluence of 5 x 10 9 p/cm 2 in thick (3 mm) planar devices but little effect in 2 mm devices. No energy resolution effects were noted from moderated fission spectrum of neutrons after fluences up to 10 10 n/cm 2 , although activation was evident. Exposures of CZT to 5 MeV alpha particle at fluences up to 1.5 x 10 10 α/cm 2 produced a near linear decrease in peak position with fluence and increases in FWHM beginning at about 7.5 x 10 9 α/cm 2 . CT detectors show resolution losses after fluences of 3 x 10 9 p/cm 2 at 33 MeV for chlorine-doped detectors. Indium doped material may be more resistant. Neutron exposures (8 MeV) caused resolution losses after fluences of 2 x 10 10 n/cm 2 . Mercuric iodide has been studied with intermediate energy protons (10 to 33 MeV) at fluences up to 10 12 p/cm 2 and with 1.5 GeV protons at fluences up to 1.2 x 10 8 p/cm 2 . Neutron exposures at 8 MeV have been reported at fluences up to 10 15 n/cm 2 . No radiation damage was reported under these irradiation conditions

  13. Primary radiation damage and disturbance in cell divisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Yun-Jong; Kim, Jae-Hun; Petin, Vladislav G.; Nili, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Survived cells from a homogeneous population exposed to ionizing radiation form various colonies of different sizes and morphology on a solid nutrient medium, which appear at different time intervals after irradiation. Such a phenomenon agrees well with the modern theory of microdosimetry and classical hit-and-target models of radiobiology. According to the hit-principle, individual cells exposed to the same dose of radiation are damaged in different manners. It means that the survived cells can differ in the content of sublethal damage (hits) produced by the energy absorbed into the cell and which is not enough to give rise to effective radiation damage which is responsible for cell killing or inactivation. In diploid yeast cells, the growth rate of cells from 250 colonies of various sizes appeared at different time intervals after irradiation with 600 Gy of gamma radiation from a 60 Co isotopic source was analyzed. The survival rate after irradiation was 20%. Based on the analyses results, it was possible to categorize the clones grown from irradiated cells according to the number of sub-lesions from 1 to 4. The clones with various numbers of sub-lesions were shown to be different in their viability, radiosensitivity, sensitivity to environmental conditions, and the frequency of recombination and respiratory deficient mutations. Cells from unstable clones exhibited an enhanced radiosensitivity, and an increased portion of morphologically changed cells, nonviable cells and respiration mutants, as well. The degree of expression of the foregoing effects was higher if the number of primary sublethal lesions was greater in the originally irradiated cell. Disturbance in cell division can be characterized by cell inactivation or incorrect distribution of mitochondria between daughter cells. Thus, the suggested methodology of identification of cells with a definite number of primary sublethal lesions will promote further elucidation of the nature of primary radiation

  14. Heavy ion linear accelerator for radiation damage studies of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsaev, Sergey V; Mustapha, Brahim; Ostroumov, Peter N; Nolen, Jerry; Barcikowski, Albert; Pellin, Michael; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2017-03-01

    A new eXtreme MATerial (XMAT) research facility is being proposed at Argonne National Laboratory to enable rapid in situ mesoscale bulk analysis of ion radiation damage in advanced materials and nuclear fuels. This facility combines a new heavy-ion accelerator with the existing high-energy X-ray analysis capability of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source. The heavy-ion accelerator and target complex will enable experimenters to emulate the environment of a nuclear reactor making possible the study of fission fragment damage in materials. Material scientists will be able to use the measured material parameters to validate computer simulation codes and extrapolate the response of the material in a nuclear reactor environment. Utilizing a new heavy-ion accelerator will provide the appropriate energies and intensities to study these effects with beam intensities which allow experiments to run over hours or days instead of years. The XMAT facility will use a CW heavy-ion accelerator capable of providing beams of any stable isotope with adjustable energy up to 1.2 MeV/u for 238 U 50+ and 1.7 MeV for protons. This energy is crucial to the design since it well mimics fission fragments that provide the major portion of the damage in nuclear fuels. The energy also allows damage to be created far from the surface of the material allowing bulk radiation damage effects to be investigated. The XMAT ion linac includes an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, a normal-conducting radio-frequency quadrupole and four normal-conducting multi-gap quarter-wave resonators operating at 60.625 MHz. This paper presents the 3D multi-physics design and analysis of the accelerating structures and beam dynamics studies of the linac.

  15. Computer simulations of radiation damage in protein crystals; Simulationsrechnungen zu Strahlenschaeden an Proteinkristallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehnder, M

    2007-03-15

    The achievable resolution and the quality of the dataset of an intensity data collection for structure analysis of protein crystals with X-rays is limited among other factors by radiation damage. The aim of this work is to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the radiation damage process in proteins. Since radiation damage is unavoidable it was intended to look for the optimum ratio between elastically scattered intensity and radiation damage. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm physical processes after an inelastic photon interaction are studied. The main radiation damage consists of ionizations of the atoms through the electron cascade following any inelastic photon interaction. Results of the method introduced in this investigation and results of an earlier theoretical studies of the influence of Auger-electron transport in diamond are in a good agreement. The dependence of the radiation damage as a function of the energy of the incident photon was studied by computer-aided simulations. The optimum energy range for diffraction experiments on the protein myoglobin is 10-40 keV. Studies of radiation damage as a function of crystal volume and shape revealed that very small plate or rod shaped crystals suffer less damage than crystals formed like a cube with the same volume. Furthermore the influence of a few heavy atoms in the protein molecule on radiation damage was examined. Already two iron atoms in the unit cell of myoglobin increase radiation damage significantly. (orig.)

  16. Analysis of radiation damage in on-orbit solar array of Venus explorer Akatsuki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Takanobu; Takahashi, You; Imamura, Takeshi; Hada, Yuko; Ishii, Takako T.; Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi; Shiota, Daikou

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of radiation damage in solar array of Venus explorer Akatsuki observed on orbit. The output voltage of the solar array have shown sudden drops, which are most reasonably associated with radiation damage, three times since its launch. The analysis of these radiation damages is difficult, because no direct observation data of the spectra and the amount of the high-energy particles is available. We calculated the radiation damage using the relative damage coefficient (RDC) method assuming a typical spectral shape of protons. (author)

  17. Diodes based on semi-insulating CdTe crystals with Mo/MoO{sub x} contacts for X- and γ-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslyanchuk, O.; Kulchynsky, V.; Solovan, M. [Chernivtsi National University, Chernivtsi (Ukraine); Gnatyuk, V. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Potiriadis, C. [Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Attiki (Greece); Kaissas, I. [Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Attiki (Greece); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Brus, V. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    This paper reports on the possible applications of molybdenum oxide (Mo/MoO{sub x}) contacts in combination with semi-insulating CdTe crystals. The electrical contacts to p-type Cl-doped CdTe crystals were formed by the deposition of molybdenum oxide and pure molybdenum thin films by the DC reactive magnetron sputtering. Electrical properties of the prepared Mo-MoO{sub x}/p-CdTe/MoO{sub x}-Mo surface-barrier structures were investigated at different temperatures. It is shown that the rapid growth of the reverse current with increasing bias voltage higher than 10 V is caused by the space-charge limited currents. Spectrometric properties of the Mo-MoO{sub x}/p-CdTe/MoO{sub x}-Mo structures have been also analyzed. It is revealed that the developed heterojunction has shown promising characteristics for its practical application in X- and γ-ray radiation detector fabrication. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. The correlation of the results of capacitance mapping and of sheet resistance mapping in semi-insulating 6H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Shenghuang; Chen Zhiming; Liang Peng; Jiang Dong; Xie Huajie; Yang Ying

    2010-01-01

    A combination of complex surface capacitance mapping and sheet resistance mapping is applied to establish the origin of resistance variations on semi-insulating (SI) 6H-SiC substrates. The direct correlation between the capacitance quadrature and the sheet resistance is found in vanadium-doped SI samples. Regions with low capacitance quadrature show high sheet resistance. This indicates, associated with the nonhomogeneity of sheet resistance on the substrate, that the quality of crystallization is not good enough, which also leads to resistivity nonhomogeneity when comparing with different types of deep defects. According to the capacitance mapping, the region with bad crystallization quality has a high radio absorption coefficient. Another correlation is established between the capacitance in-phase and sheet resistance for the vanadium-doped sample. In this sample, the capacitance in-phase map shows not only the surface topography, but also the same distribution trend as the sheet resistance, namely, regions of high capacitance in-phase reveal high sheet resistance.

  19. Characterization of semi-insulating materials by photoinduced current transient spectroscopy: Fe doped INP for micro-optoelectronics and CdZnTe for nuclear detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkaoui, K.

    1998-01-01

    The need of semi-insulating materials, of great quality, concerns various application domains. For instance, the very resistive substrates InP and CdZnTe are respectively adapted to the micro-optoelectronic circuits and to nuclear detectors. These two materials have been characterized by the thermal photoinduced current transient spectroscopy. The first part of this thesis is the defects analysis of annealing InP substrates, to understand the compensation process of this material. Two activation energy levels around 0,2 to 0,4 eV resulting from the thermal treatment have been detected. The iron omnipresence in the substrates, even undoped, has been noticed. It is then necessary to take into account the iron presence to understand the compensation process in these InP annealing substrates. the second part presents the study of the CdZnTe material, elaborated by the Bridgman method, to emphasize the defects leading to the decrease of the detector performances. The presence of three deep levels, near the forbidden band middle, is in relation with the detectors performances. (A.L.B.)

  20. Plasma Deposited SiO2 for Planar Self-Aligned Gate Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors on Semi-Insulating InP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabory, Charles N.; Young, Paul G.; Smith, Edwyn D.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1994-01-01

    Metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) field effect transistors were fabricated on InP substrates using a planar self-aligned gate process. A 700-1000 A gate insulator of Si02 doped with phosphorus was deposited by a direct plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 400 mTorr, 275 C, 5 W, and power density of 8.5 MW/sq cm. High frequency capacitance-voltage measurements were taken on MIS capacitors which have been subjected to a 700 C anneal and an interface state density of lxl0(exp 11)/eV/cq cm was found. Current-voltage measurements of the capacitors show a breakdown voltage of 107 V/cm and a insulator resistivity of 10(exp 14) omega cm. Transistors were fabricated on semi-insulating InP using a standard planar self-aligned gate process in which the gate insulator was subjected to an ion implantation activation anneal of 700 C. MIS field effect transistors gave a maximum extrinsic transconductance of 23 mS/mm for a gate length of 3 microns. The drain current drift saturated at 87.5% of the initial current, while reaching to within 1% of the saturated value after only 1x10(exp 3). This is the first reported viable planar InP self-aligned gate transistor process reported to date.

  1. Room-temperature particle detectors with guard rings based on semi-insulating InP co-doped with Ti and Zn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatskiv, R.; Zdansky, K.; Pekarek, L.

    2009-01-01

    Particle detectors made with a guard-ring (GR) electrode, operating at room temperature, have been studied. The detectors were fabricated on a semi-insulating InP crystal co-doped with Ti and Zn, grown using the Liquid-Encapsulated Czochralski technique. The detection performance of the particle detectors was evaluated using alpha particles emitted from a 241 Am source. Good detector performance has been achieved with measured charge-collection efficiencies of 99.9% and 98.2% and FWHM energy resolutions of 0.9% and 2.1%. The measurements were carried out at 230 K for negative and positive bias voltages of the irradiated electrode. The good performance is due to the SI properties of the material which has been achieved by doping with suitable Ti atoms and co-doping with a low concentration of Zn acceptors, sufficient to fully compensate shallow donors. Electron and hole charge-collection efficiencies (CCEs) were measured at various temperatures. At room temperature, unlike at low temperature (T<250 K), the hole CCE was better than the electron CCE, which can be explained by the presence of electron-trapping centres in InP with a temperature-dependent capture rate.

  2. Evaluation of the quality of semi-insulating CdTe for radiation detectors by measurement of lux-ampere characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franc, J.; Kubat, J.; Grill, R.; Dedic, V.; Hlidek, P.; Moravec, P.; Belas, E.

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of space charge on deep levels represents one of the major problems in fabrication of semi-insulating CdTe and CdZnTe X-ray and gamma-ray detectors, because it influences the applied electric field and can even result in a complete breakdown of the field in part of the sample (polarization and dead layer formation). The goal of the study was to evaluate possibilities of localization of areas of potential space charge accumulation in as grown crystals by steady state measurement of lux-ampere characteristics. All measurements were done at room temperature using He-Ne laser. Voltage was applied parallel to the direction of light propagation in the range 10-100 V. It was observed that all lux-ampere characteristics are sub-linear. Screening effects caused by space charge accumulated on deep levels explain these results. Crystals prepared by Vertical gradient freeze method in our laboratory are compared to a commercially available detector-grade sample prepared by Travelling heater method. Comparison of crystals grown from precursors of different starting purity shows an increase of the slope of lux-ampere characteristics with a decrease of impurity content. A correlation between the slope of lux-ampere characteristics and the mobility-lifetime product of electrons was observed, too.

  3. Evaluation of the quality of semi-insulating CdTe for radiation detectors by measurement of lux-ampere characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franc, J.; Kubát, J.; Grill, R.; Dědič, V.; Hlídek, P.; Moravec, P.; Belas, E.

    2011-05-01

    Accumulation of space charge on deep levels represents one of the major problems in fabrication of semi-insulating CdTe and CdZnTe X-ray and gamma-ray detectors, because it influences the applied electric field and can even result in a complete breakdown of the field in part of the sample (polarization and dead layer formation). The goal of the study was to evaluate possibilities of localization of areas of potential space charge accumulation in as grown crystals by steady state measurement of lux-ampere characteristics. All measurements were done at room temperature using He-Ne laser. Voltage was applied parallel to the direction of light propagation in the range 10-100 V. It was observed that all lux-ampere characteristics are sub-linear. Screening effects caused by space charge accumulated on deep levels explain these results. Crystals prepared by Vertical gradient freeze method in our laboratory are compared to a commercially available detector-grade sample prepared by Travelling heater method. Comparison of crystals grown from precursors of different starting purity shows an increase of the slope of lux-ampere characteristics with a decrease of impurity content. A correlation between the slope of lux-ampere characteristics and the mobility-lifetime product of electrons was observed, too.

  4. Radiation damage: special reference to gas filled radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, Sudha; Joshi, Pankaj Kumar; Rathore, Shakuntla

    2012-01-01

    Radiation damage is a term associated with ionizing radiation. In gas filled particle detectors, radiation damage to gases plays an important role in the device's ageing, especially in devices exposed to high intensity radiation, e.g. detector for the large hadrons collide. Ionization processes require energy above 10 eV, while splitting covalent bond in molecules and generating free radical require only 3-4 eV. The electrical discharges initiated by the ionization event by the particles result in plasma populated by large amount of free radical. The highly reactive free radical can recombine back to original molecules, or initiate a chain of free radical polymerization reaction with other molecules, yielding compounds with increasing molecular weight. These high molecular weight compounds then precipitate from gases phase, forming conductive or non-conductive deposits on the electrodes an insulating surfaces of the detector and distorting it's response. Gases containing hydrocarbon quenchers, e.g. argon-methane, are typically sensitive to ageing by polymerization; addition of oxygen tends to lower the ageing rates. Trace amount of silicon oils, present form out gassing of silicon elastomers and especially from traces of silicon lubricant tend to decompose and form deposits of silicon crystals on the surfaces. Gases mixture of argon (or xenon) with CO 2 and optimally also with 2-3 % of oxygen are highly tolerant to high radiation fluxes. The oxygen is added as noble gas with CO 2 has too high transparency for high energy photons; ozone formed from the oxygen is a strong absorber of ultra violet photons. Carbon tetra fluoride can be used as a component of the gas for high-rate detectors; the fluorine radical produced during the operation however limit the choice of materials for the chambers and electrodes (e.g. gold electrodes are required, as the fluorine radicals attack metals, forming fluorides). Addition of carbon tetra fluoride can however eliminate the

  5. (De)coupled zircon metamictization, radiation damage, and He diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, A. K.; Guenthner, W.; Reiners, P. W.; Moser, A. C.; Miller, G. H.; Refsnider, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    We develop and apply a new protocol for targeting crystals for the zircon (U-Th)/He (He) thermochronometry to maximize effective U (eU) and corresponding closure temperature variability to develop zircon He date-eU correlations observed in some datasets. Our approach exploits visual proxies for radiation damage accumulation (metamictization) during zircon selection. We show that by purposefully targeting a spectrum of zircon textures from pristine to metamict grains, it is possible to generate broad eU variation in suites of zircon from a single sample and zircon He date-eU-metamictization trends that can be exploited to resolve increasingly complex thermal histories. We present plane light photographs, eU concentration, and zircon He results from 59 individual zircons from nine crystalline rock samples. Six of the nine samples come from exposed Proterozoic granitoids on SE Baffin Island, Canada; Boulder Creek, CO; Sandia Mountains, NM; and Mecca Hills, CA. We report data from three Archean Baffin samples to compare with the Proterozoic Baffin sample date-eU-metamictization trend. In each Proterozoic sample, target zircons display a spectrum of metamictization from pristine, transparent crystals to purple-brown, translucent grains. Progressive loss of transparency and increase in discoloration consistently corresponds to an increase in eU in all samples. Individual zircon eU varies from 89-1885 ppm and, within each sample, the total eU spread is 538 ppm to 1374 ppm. For any given eU value, the Archean zircon appear comparatively more metamict than the Proterozoic Baffin grains and samples collectively define a 1681 ppm range in eU, with more restrictive intrasample eU spreads (199-1120 ppm). Proterozoic samples from Baffin, Sandia, and Front Range yield negative zircon He date-eU correlations with intrasample date ranges of 90-783 Ma. Increasing eU and younger dates correspond with increasing metamictization. In contrast, all three Proterozoic Mecca Hills samples

  6. Experimental studies on radiation damages of CsI(Tl) crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jingtang; Mao Yufang; Dong Xiaoli; Chen Duanbao; Li Zuhao

    1997-01-01

    The results of experimental studies on radiation damage of CsI(Tl) crystal were reported. There are radiation damage effects on CsI(Tl) crystal. Experimental studies on recovery of damaged CsI(Tl) crystals were made. It seems that after heating at 200 degree C for 4 hours, the damaged crystals could be recovered completely

  7. Radiation damage of UO{sub 2} fuel; Radijaciono ostecenje UO{sub 2} goriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanovic, M; Sigulinski, F [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1966-11-15

    Radiation damage study of fuel and fuel elements covers: study of radiation damage methods in Sweden; analysis of testing the fuel and fuel elements at the RA reactor; feasibility study of irradiation in the Institute compared to irradiation abroad in respect to the reactor possibilities. Tasks included in this study are relater to testing of irradiated UO{sub 2} and ceramic fuel elements.

  8. Design of offline measuring system for radiation damage effects on linear CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Tang Benqi; Xiao Zhigang; Wang Zujun; Huang Fang; Huang Shaoyan

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses the hardware design of offline measuring system for radiation damage effects on linear CCD. Some credible results were achieved by using this system. The test results indicate that the system is available for the study of the radiation damage effects on linear CCD. (authors)

  9. Radiation damage in natural and synthetic halite. Progress report January 1992 - February 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Celma, A.

    1993-12-01

    This report complements the information presented in the report of December 1992 regarding the research performed at the ECN on radiation damage in salt. It consists of two parts. The first part regards the amount of stored energy which can be developed by gamma-irradiation on different types of halite and considers both the effect of low dose rates in developing radiation damage, and the possible saturation level of radiation damage in natural halite. The second part presents a model to simulate radiation damage development which incorporates some extensions in the Jain-Lidiard model. Due to malfunction of the Small Angle Neutron Scattering installation, neither the previously reported results nor the newly obtained can be trusted and therefore are not reported here. These results regard the shape, size and size distribution of radiation damage defects. (orig.)

  10. Field oxide radiation damage measurements in silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laakso, M [Particle Detector Group, Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States) Research Inst. for High Energy Physics (SEFT), Helsinki (Finland); Singh, P; Shepard, P F [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Surface radiation damage in planar processed silicon detectors is caused by radiation generated holes being trapped in the silicon dioxide layers on the detector wafer. We have studied charge trapping in thick (field) oxide layers on detector wafers by irradiating FOXFET biased strip detectors and MOS test capacitors. Special emphasis was put on studying how a negative bias voltage across the oxide during irradiation affects hole trapping. In addition to FOXFET biased detectors, negatively biased field oxide layers may exist on the n-side of double-sided strip detectors with field plate based n-strip separation. The results indicate that charge trapping occurred both close to the Si-SiO[sub 2] interface and in the bulk of the oxide. The charge trapped in the bulk was found to modify the electric field in the oxide in a way that leads to saturation in the amount of charge trapped in the bulk when the flatband/threshold voltage shift equals the voltage applied over the oxide during irradiation. After irradiation only charge trapped close to the interface is annealed by electrons tunneling to the oxide from the n-type bulk. (orig.).

  11. Nuclear data for analysis of radiation damage processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aruga, Takeo

    1999-01-01

    Parameters needed to analyze radiation damages for neutron irradiations are presented, taking iron samples irradiated with JMTR neutrons for an example. Special interests have been put on a comparison between results obtained by irradiations for one case with a full neutron spectrum and the other with a Cd-shielded neutron spectrum. A possibility is described that although atomic displacement rates for the two case differ only less than 2%, production rates of freely migrating defects can differ appreciably, due to recoiled atoms by (n, γ) reactions. More over, it is also suggested that although the median energy of PKA, defined as a PKA energy above (or below) which one half of the total atomic displacements are to be produced, may differ only slightly between the two cases, final radiation effects can be significantly different. The effects of charged particles emitted with high energies due to nucleon irradiations are stressed in relation to the significance of defects produced by PKAs with lower energies than several keV, especially for the case of irradiations with highly energetic nucleons as anticipated in GeV proton irradiations. (author)

  12. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benko', Klara; Pintye, Eva; Szabo, Boglarka; Geresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benko, Ilona

    2008-01-01

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of γ--irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD 50 values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  13. An approach to modelling radiation damage by fast ionizing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a statistical approach to modelling radiation damage in small biological structures such as enzymes, viruses, and some cells. Irreparable damage is assumed to be caused by the occurrence of ionizations within sensitive regions. For structures containing double-stranded DNA, one or more ionizations occurring within each strand of the DNA will cause inactivation; for simpler structures without double-stranded DNA a single ionization within the structure will be sufficient for inactivation. Damaging ionizations occur along tracks of primary irradiating particles or along tracks of secondary particles released at primary ionizations. An inactivation probability is derived for each damage mechanism, expressed in integral form in terms of the radius of the biological structure (assumed spherical), rate of ionization along primary tracks, and maximum energy for secondary particles. The performance of each model is assessed by comparing results from the model with those derived from data from various experimental studies extracted from the literature. For structures where a single ionization is sufficient for inactivation, the model gives qualitatively promising results; for larger more complex structures containing double-stranded DNA, the model requires further refinements. (author)

  14. Compilation of radiation damage test data. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beynel, P.; Maier, P.; Schoenbacher, H.

    1982-01-01

    This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins. The irradiation have been carried out at various radiation sources and the results of the different tests are reported, sometimes illustrated by tables and graphs to show the variation of the measured property with absorbed radiation dose. For each entry, an appreciation of the radiation resistance is given, based on measurement data, indicating the range of damage (moderate to severe) for doses from 10 to 10 8 Gy. Also included are tables, selected from published reports, of general relative radiation effects for several groups of materials, to which there are systematic cross-references in the alphabetical part. This third and last volume contains cross-references to all the materials presented up to now, so that it can be used as a guide to the three volumes. (orig.)

  15. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkő, Klára; Pintye, Éva; Szabó, Boglárka; Géresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benkő, Ilona

    2008-12-01

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of γ—irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD50 values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  16. Dislocations and radiation damage in α-uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leteurtre, J.

    1969-01-01

    Dislocations in α-uranium were studied by electron microscopy. Electropolishing of thin foils was performed at low temperature (-110 deg. C) to prevent oxidation. Burgers vectors of twins dislocations are defined. Interactions between slip and twinning are studied from both experimental and theoretical point of view. Samples irradiated at several burn-up were examined. In order to explain our micrographic results, and also all information gathered in literature about radiation damage in α-uranium, a coherent model is propound for the fission particles effects. We analyse the influences of parameters: temperature, dislocation density, impurity content. The number of point defects created by one initial fission is determined for pure and annealed metal. The importance of the self-anneal which occurs immediately in each displacement spike, and the anneal due to a new fission on the damage resulting from a previous fission, are estimated. The focussing distance in [100] direction is found to be about 1000 Angstrom, at 4 deg. K. (author) [fr

  17. Simulation of radiation damage in Fe and Fe-Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerstedt, Christina

    2005-11-01

    Steel is an important structural material in nuclear reactors used for example in pressure vessels and fast reactor cladding. In reactor environments it has been observed that ferritic steels are more resistant to swelling than the austenitic steels typically used. Much effort has been put into developing basic models of FeCr alloys which can serve as model alloys for describing ferritic steels. As a result, a number of interatomic potentials for Fe and FeCr alloys exist today. For the work in this thesis, basic material properties coming from experiments or ab initio calculations were used to fit interatomic potentials for Fe, Cr and FeCr implementing both the embedded atom method and the Finnis-Sinclair formalisms. The potentials were then validated by molecular dynamic calculations of material properties such as defect formation energies, migration energies and thermal expansion. Further studies of potential performance were carried out in simulations of radiation damage cascades and thermal aging. The influence of the interatomic potential on the primary defect state in materials under irradiation was analyzed in a study comparing results obtained using four different potentials. The objective of the study was to find correlations between potential properties and the primary damage state produced in simulations of displacement cascades. The defect evolution and clustering during different cascade stages were also investigated to try to gain a better understanding of these processes

  18. Repair of radiation damage caused by cyclotron-produced neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, B.I.

    1979-01-01

    Hall et al. present experimental data on repair of sublethal damage in cultured mammalian cells exposed to 35 MeV neutrons and 60 Co γ rays. Hall and Kraljevic present experimental data on repair of potentially lethal damage in cultured mammalian cells exposed to 35 MeV neutrons and 210 kVp x rays. These results of Hall et al. are very difficult to explain from basic concepts in radiobiology. Contrary to Rossi, these data do not support his thesis that repair of radiation damage is dose-dependent and linear energy transfer independent. Nor do these results meet the expectations of multitarget-single hit theory which would require dose-independent repair equal to n. The observation of the same extrapolation number for neutrons and for x rays is also surprising. From the point of view of radiotherapy, the doses of interest are about 140 rad for neutrons and about 300 rad for x rays. There are no data for repair of potentially lethal damage below 800 rad for x rays and 400 rad for neutrons. The difference in survival between single and split dose is negligible up to a total of about 600 rad of x rays or of neutrons. These data of Hall et al. therefore have little significance to radiotherapists and are an enigma to radiobiologists

  19. Dislocation dynamics modelling of radiation damage in thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferroni, Francesco; Tarleton, Edmund; Fitzgerald, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is a key tool for the extraction of information on radiation damage, the understanding of which is critical for materials development for nuclear fusion and fission reactors. Dislocations in TEM samples are subject to strong image forces, owing to the nanometric sample thicknesses, which may introduce artifacts in the damage analysis. Using dislocation dynamics, we elucidate the roles played by dislocation–surface interactions, dislocation–dislocation interactions and self-interactions due to climb for loop types observed in TEM. Comparisons with analytic solutions for a dislocation loop and an edge dislocation in a half-space are included, and the relationship between glide force and loop tilt examined. The parameters for convergence of the zero-traction boundary conditions are obtained, after which the evolution of dislocation structures in a thin film is studied. It is found that three main length scales govern the physical processes: the image force is governed by the distance of the loop from the surface and scales with the film thickness; the glide force is governed by the image stress as well as the loop–loop interaction stress which is in turn governed by the loop spacing L∼1/√ρ, where ρ is the loop density; finally, the climb force depends on the loop size. The three forces compete and their relative magnitudes define the evolution pathway of the dislocation structure. (paper)

  20. A novel theory of radiation damage at high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, A.; Stuttgart Univ.

    1989-01-01

    Deviations of radiation damage (in the case of metals usually monitored by the residual electrical resistivity) from proportionality with the irradiation dose have so far been analysed almost exclusively in terms of extensions of models originally developed for small doses. The present theory considers the opposite limit i.e. the quasi-saturated state. It is argued that at high doses the Lueck-Sizmann effect may result in a self-organization of clusters of vacancies and self-interstitials, forming a heterogeneous froth. Possible structures of this froth and its effect on the electrical resistivity of metals are discussed. The model is shown to account for the dependence of the ''saturation resistivity'' on the nature of the irradiation as well as for several other hitherto poorly explained observations. Among them are the electrical-resistivity variation induced by high-dose irradiation with heavy ions, the amorphization of certain alloys by high-dose electron irradiation, and the occurrence of ordered arrays of stacking-fault tetrahedra after in-situ irradiations in high-voltage electron microscopes. (author)

  1. Chemical implications of heat and radiation damage to rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, L.R.

    1984-11-01

    Chemical changes induced in Palo Duro and Paradox Basin natural rock salts and in synthetic NaCl by heat and gamma radiation were investigated. Heating of unirradiated natural rock salts to 300 0 C resulted in HCl (most prevalent), SO 2 , CO 2 , and H 2 S evolution, and increased the base content of the remaining salt by not more than 10 microequivalents per gram; whereas, heating of synthetic NaCl gave no product. Gamma irradiation produced sodium colloids and neutral chlorine in amounts similar to the results of Levy and coworkers. When the irradiated salts were heated, three reactions were apparent: (1) radiation-induced defects recombined; (2) neutral chlorine was evolved; and (3) HCl, SO 2 , CO 2 , and H 2 S were evolved, similar to results for unirradiated salts. Because reaction (1) appeared to dominate over reaction (2), it is expected that the influence of radiation damage to salt on the near-field chemical environment will be minor. 4 figures, 1 table

  2. Nuclear data for analysis of radiation damage processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruga, Takeo [Department of Materials Science Research, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Parameters needed to analyze radiation damages for neutron irradiations are presented, taking iron samples irradiated with JMTR neutrons for an example. Special interests have been put on a comparison between results obtained by irradiations for one case with a full neutron spectrum and the other with a Cd-shielded neutron spectrum. A possibility is described that although atomic displacement rates for the two case differ only less than 2%, production rates of freely migrating defects can differ appreciably, due to recoiled atoms by (n, {gamma}) reactions. More over, it is also suggested that although the median energy of PKA, defined as a PKA energy above (or below) which one half of the total atomic displacements are to be produced, may differ only slightly between the two cases, final radiation effects can be significantly different. The effects of charged particles emitted with high energies due to nucleon irradiations are stressed in relation to the significance of defects produced by PKAs with lower energies than several keV, especially for the case of irradiations with highly energetic nucleons as anticipated in GeV proton irradiations. (author)

  3. A new cryostat for 'in situ' radiation damage studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hariharan, Y.; Radhakrishnan, T.S.

    1977-01-01

    Conventional cryostats to study properties of materials between 4deg K and 300deg K base their designs either on continuous flow or bath type. A new cryostat which incorporates the advantages of both these has been designed and fabricated. This essentially has three chambers isolated from each other by poor thermal links. These are enclosed in a vacuum chamber and the whole assembly is immersed in a 4 He bath. The lowermost chamber is kept in good thermal contact with the bath. The second chamber can be maintained between 4deg K and 77deg K by circulation of cold 4 He vapour. The uppermost chamber can be maintained between 77deg K and 300deg K by circulating cold nitrogen vapours. There is a through axial hole in the centre, through which the sample can be moved up and down by means of a thin walled stainless steel tube. This comes out from the top of the cryostat through a Wilson seal. Thus the specimen can be anchored in any of the three chambers. This cryostat can be used to study the radiation damages caused by α-particles the sample being kept at 4.2deg K. There is provision for isolating the sample from the radiation zone. Isothermal and isochronal annealing of the damage caused can also be studied. Provision for taking out electrical leads from both inside and outside the sample chamber are also there. (auth.)

  4. Radiation damage of DNA. Model for direct ionization of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kazuo; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2004-01-01

    Current aspects of radiation damage of DNA, particularly induced by the direct effect of radiation, and author's method of pulse radiolysis are described in relation to behavior of ions formed by radiation and active principles to induce the strand break. In irradiation of DNA solution in water, the direct effect of radiation is derived from ionization of DNA itself and indirect one, from the reaction between DNA and radicals generated from water molecules and the former direct one has been scarcely investigated due to difficulty of experimental approach. Radicals generated in sugar moiety of DNA are shown important in the strand break by recent studies on crystalline DNA irradiated by X-ray, DNA solution by electron and photon beams, hydrated DNA by γ-ray and by high linear energy transfer (LET) ion. Author's pulse radiolysis studies have revealed behaviors of guanine and adenine radical cations in dynamics of DNA oxidation. Since reactions described are the model, the experimental approach is thought necessary for elucidation of the actually occurring DNA damage in living cells. (N.I.)

  5. A hybrid model of primary radiation damage in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarin, S.I.; Dremov, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    The paper offers a hybrid model which combines molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo (MD+MC) methods to describe primary radiation damage in crystals, caused by particles whose energies are no higher than several tens of keV. The particles are tracked in accord with equations of motion with account for pair interaction. The model also considers particle interaction with the mean-field potential (MFP) of the crystal. Only particles involved in cascading are tracked. Equations of motion for these particles include dissipative forces which describe energy exchange between cascade particles and electrons. New particles - the atoms of the crystal in the cascade region - have stochastic parameters (phase coordinates); they are sampled by the Monte Carlo method from the distribution that describes the classic canonical ensemble of non-interacting particles subjected to the external MFP. The introduction of particle interaction with the MFP helps avoid difficulties related to crystal stability and the choice of an adequate interparticle interaction potential in the traditional MD methods. Our technique is many times as fast as the traditional MD methods because we consider only particles which are involved in cascading and apply special methods to speedup the calculation of forces by accounting for the short-range pair potential used

  6. Ascorbic acid (AA) metabolism in protection against radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, R.C.; Koch, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility is considered that AA protects tissues against radiation damage by scavenging free radicals that result from radiolysis of water. A physiologic buffer (pH 6.7) was incubated with 14 C-AA and 1 mM thiourea (to slow spontaneous oxidation of AA). Aliquots were assayed by HPLC and scintillation spectrometry to identify the 14 C-label. Samples exposed to Cobalt-60 radiation had a half time of AA decay of 30 minutes) indicating that AA scavenges radiation-induced free radicals and forms the ascorbate free radical (AFR). Pairs of 14 C-AFR disproportionate, with the net effect of 14 C-dehydroascorbic acid formation from 14 C-AA. Having established that AFR result from ionizing radiation in an aqueous solution, the possibility was evaluated that a tissue factor reduces AFR. Cortical tissue from the kidneys of male rats was minced, homogenized in buffer and centrifuged at 8000 xg. The supernatant was found to slow the rate of radiation-induced AA degradation by > 90% when incubated at 23 0 C in the presence of 15 μM 14 C-AA. Samples of supernatant maintained at 100 0 C for 10 minutes or precipitated with 5% PCA did not prevent radiation-induced AA degradation. AA may have a specific role in scavenging free radicals generated by ionizing radiation and thereby protect body tissues

  7. Radiation damage measurements in room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Franks, L A; Olsen, R W; Walsh, D S; Vizkelethy, G; Trombka, J I; Doyle, B L; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI sub 2) is reviewed and in the case of CZT supplemented by new alpha particle data. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3 MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 10 sup 1 sup 0 p/cm sup 2 and significant bulk leakage after 10 sup 1 sup 2 p/cm sup 2. CZT exposed to 200 MeV protons shows a two-fold loss in energy resolution after a fluence of 5x10 sup 9 p/cm sup 2 in thick (3 mm) planar devices but little effect in 2 mm devices. No energy resolution effects were noted from a moderated fission spectrum of neutrons after fluences up to 10 sup 1 sup 0 n/cm sup 2 , although activation was evident. Exposures of CZT to 5 MeV alpha particles at fluences up to 1.5x10 sup 1 sup 0 alpha/cm sup 2 produced a near linear decrease in peak position with fluence and increases in FWHM beginning at about 7.5x10 sup 9 alpha/cm sup 2. CT detectors show resolution...

  8. Monitoring radiation damage in the LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Graverini, Elena

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of LHCb is to search for indirect evidence of new physics in decays of heavy hadrons. The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer with precise silicon-strip detectors in the regions with highest particle occupancies. The non-uniform exposure of the LHCb sensors makes it an ideal laboratory to study radiation damage effects in silicon detectors. The LHCb Silicon Tracker is composed of an upstream tracker, the TT, and of the inner part of the downstream tracker (IT). Dedicated scans are regularly taken, which allow a precise measurement of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) and the calibration of the operational voltages. The measured evolution of the effective depletion voltage $V_{depl}$ is shown, and compared with the Hamburg model prediction. The magnitudes of the sensor leakage current are also analysed and compared to their expected evolution according to phenomenological models. Our results prove that both the TT and the IT will withstand normal operation until the end of the L...

  9. Study of the radiation damage of silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitschke, Michael; Chmill, Valery; Garutti, Erika; Klanner, Robert; Schwandt, Joern [Institute for Experimental Physics, Hamburg University, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Radiation damage significantly changes the performance of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). In this work, we first have characterized KETEK SiPMs with a pixel size of 15 x 15 μm{sup 2} using I-V (current-voltage), C/G-V/f (capacitance/impedance-voltage/frequency) and Q-V (charge-voltage) measurements with and without illumination with blue light of 470 nm from an LED. The SiPM parameters determined are DCR (dark count rate), relative PDE (photon detection efficiency), G (Gain), XT (cross-talk), Geiger breakdown characteristics, C{sub pix} (pixel capacitance) and R{sub q} (quenching resistance). Following this first characterization, the SiPMs were irradiated using reactor neutrons with fluences of 10{sup 9}, 10{sup 10}, 10{sup 11}, 5 . 10{sup 11}, and 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}. Afterwards, the same measurements were repeated, and the dependence of the SiPM parameters on neutron fluence was determined. The results are used to optimize the radiation tolerance of SiPMs.

  10. Radiation damage in stainless steel under varying temperature neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Naoaki [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1998-03-01

    Microstructural evolution of model alloys of 316SS was examined by neutron irradiation at JMTR under cyclic temperature varying condition. In the case of Fe-16Cr-17Ni, formation of interstitial loops and voids are strongly suppressed by varying the temperature from 473K to 673K. By adding Ti as miner element (0.25wt%), however, abnormal accumulation of vacancies (void swelling of 11%dpa at 0.1dpa) was observed. Theoretical analysis standing on the rate theory of defect clustering and simulation irradiation experiments with heavy ions indicates that the vacancy-rich condition which appears temporally during and after changing the temperature from low to high brings these results. It was also shown that only 1 dpa pre-irradiation at low temperature changes swelling behavior at high temperature above several 10 dpa. The understanding of non-steady-state defect processes under temperature varying irradiation is very important to estimate the radiation damage under fusion environment where short-term and long-term temperature variation is expected. (author)

  11. Simulated and experimental spectroscopic performance of GaAs X-ray pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisogni, M.G.; Cola, A.; Fantacci, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    In pixel detectors, the electrode geometry affects the signal shape and therefore the spectroscopic performance of the device. This effect is enhanced in semiconductors where carrier trapping is relevant. In particular, semi insulating (SI) GaAs crystals present an incomplete charge collection due to a high concentration of deep traps in the bulk. In the last few years, SI GaAs pixel detectors have been developed as soft X-ray detectors for medical imaging applications. In this paper, we present a numerical method to evaluate the local charge collection properties of pixel detectors. A bi-dimensional description has been used to represent the detector geometry. According to recent models, the active region of a reverse biased SI GaAs detector is almost neutral. Therefore, the electrostatic potential inside a full active detector has been evaluated using the Laplace equation. A finite difference method with a fixed step orthogonal mesh has been adopted. The photon interaction point has been generated with a Monte Carlo method according to the attenuation length of a monochromatic X-ray beam in GaAs. The number of photogenerated carriers for each interaction has been extracted using a gaussian distribution. The induced signal on the collecting electrode has been calculated according to the Ramo's theorem and the trapping effect has been modeled introducing electron and hole lifetimes. The noise of the charge preamplifier have been also taken into account. A comparison between simulated and experimental X-ray spectra from a 241 Am source acquired with different GaAs pixel detectors has been carried out

  12. a Positron 2D-ACAR Study of the Silicon-Dioxide Interface and the Point Defects in the Semi-Insulating Gallium Arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jianping

    The SiO_2-Si system has been the subject of extensive study for several decades. Particular interest has been paid to the interface between Si single crystal and the amorphous SiO_2 which determines the properties and performances of devices. This is significant because of the importance of Si technology in the semiconductor industry. The development of the high-intensity slow positron beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory make it possible to study this system for the first time using the positron two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) technique. 2D-ACAR is a well established and is a non-destructive microscopic probe for studying the electronic structure of materials, and for doing the depth-resolved measurements. Some unique information was obtained from the measurements performed on the SiO_2-Si system: Positronium (Ps) atoms formation and trapping in microvoids in both oxide and interface regions; and positron annihilation at vacancy-like defects in the interface region which can be attributed to the famous Pb centers. The discovery of the microvoids in the interface region may have some impact on the fabrication of the next generation electronic devices. Using the conventional 2D-ACAR setup with a ^{22}Na as positron source, we also studied the native arsenic (As) vacancy in the semi -insulating gallium-arsenide (SI-GaAs), coupled with in situ infrared light illumination. The defect spectrum was obtained by comparing the spectrum taken without photo -illumination to the spectrum taken with photo-illumination. The photo-illumination excited electrons from valence band to the defect level so that positrons can become localized in the defects. The two experiments may represent a new direction of the application of positron 2D-ACAR technique on the solid state physics and materials sciences.

  13. Radiation damage on sub-cellular scales: beyond DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, H L; McNamara, A L; Domanova, W; Kuncic, Z; Guatelli, S

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates a model cell as a target for low-dose radiation using Monte Carlo simulations. Mono-energetic electrons and photons are used with initial energies between 10 and 50 keV, relevant to out-of-field radiotherapy scenarios where modern treatment modalities expose relatively large amounts of healthy tissue to low-dose radiation, and also to microbeam cell irradiation studies which show the importance of the cytoplasm as a radiation target. The relative proportions of number of ionizations and total energy deposit in the nucleus and cytoplasm are calculated. We show that for a macroscopic dose of no more than 1 Gy only a few hundred ionizations occur in the nucleus volume whereas the number of ionizations in the cytoplasm is over a magnitude larger. We find that the cell geometry can have an appreciable effect on the energy deposit in the cell and can cause a nonlinear increase in energy deposit with cytoplasm density. We also show that changing the nucleus volume has negligible effect on the total energy deposit but alters the relative proportion deposited in the nucleus and cytoplasm; the nucleus volume must increase to approximately the same volume as the cytoplasm before the energy deposit in the nucleus matches that in the cytoplasm. Additionally we find that energy deposited by electrons is generally insensitive to spatial variations in chemical composition, which can be attributed to negligible differences in electron stopping power for cytoplasm and nucleus materials. On the other hand, we find that chemical composition can affect energy deposited by photons due to non-negligible differences in attenuation coefficients. These results are of relevance in considering radiation effects in healthy cells, which tend to have smaller nuclei. Our results further show that the cytoplasm and organelles residing therein can be important targets for low-dose radiation damage in healthy cells and warrant investigation as much as the conventional focus

  14. Radiation damage calculations for the APT materials test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corzine, R.K.; Wechsler, M.S.; Dudziak, D.J.; Ferguson, P.D.; James, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    A materials irradiation was performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in the fall of 1996 and spring of 1997 in support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program. Testing of the irradiated materials is underway. In the proposed APT design, materials in the target and blanket are to be exposed to protons and neutrons over a wide range of energies. The irradiation and testing program was undertaken to enlarge the very limited direct knowledge presently available of the effects of medium-energy protons (∼1 GeV) on the properties of engineering materials. APT candidate materials were placed in or near the LANSCE accelerator 800-MeV, 1-mA proton beam and received roughly the same proton current density in the center of the beam as would be the case for the APT facility. As a result, the proton fluences achieved in the irradiation were expected to approach the APT prototypic full-power-year values. To predict accurately the performance of materials in APT, radiation damage parameters for the materials experiment must be determined. By modeling the experiment, calculations for atomic displacement, helium and hydrogen cross sections and for proton and neutron fluences were done for representative samples in the 17A, 18A, and 18C areas. The LAHET code system (LCS) was used to model the irradiation program, LAHET 2.82 within LCS transports protons > 1 MeV, and neutrons >20 MeV. A modified version of MCNP for use in LCS, HMCNP 4A, was employed to tally neutrons of energies <20 MeV

  15. Radiation damage in silicon exposed to high-energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Gordon; Hayama, Shusaku; Murin, Leonid; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Bondarenko, Vladimir; Sengupta, Asmita; Davia, Cinzia; Karpenko, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Photoluminescence, infrared absorption, positron annihilation, and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) have been used to investigate the radiation damage produced by 24 GeV/c protons in crystalline silicon. The irradiation doses and the concentrations of carbon and oxygen in the samples have been chosen to monitor the mobility of the damage products. Single vacancies (and self-interstitials) are introduced at the rate of ∼1 cm -1 , and divacancies at 0.5 cm -1 . Stable di-interstitials are formed when two self-interstitials are displaced in one damage event, and they are mobile at room temperature. In the initial stages of annealing the evolution of the point defects can be understood mainly in terms of trapping at the impurities. However, the positron signal shows that about two orders of magnitude more vacancies are produced by the protons than are detected in the point defects. Damage clusters exist, and are largely removed by annealing at 700 to 800 K, when there is an associated loss of broad band emission between 850 and 1000 meV. The well-known W center is generated by restructuring within clusters, with a range of activation energies of about 1.3 to 1.6 eV, reflecting the disordered nature of the clusters. Comparison of the formation of the X centers in oxygenated and oxygen-lean samples suggests that the J defect may be interstitial related rather than vacancy related. To a large extent, the damage and annealing behavior may be factorized into point defects (monitored by sharp-line optical spectra and DLTS) and cluster defects (monitored by positron annihilation and broadband luminescence). Taking this view to the limit, the generation rates for the point defects are as predicted by simply taking the damage generated by the Coulomb interaction of the protons and Si nuclei

  16. Radiation damage of austenitic stainless steels and zirconium alloys; Pregled radijacionog ostecenja austenitnih nerdjajucih celika i legura cirkonijuma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovic, V [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This review contains analyses of available data concerning texture deformations and radiation damage of zirconium and zircaloy-2; radiation damage, influence of neutron radiation on the mechanical properties of austenitic, ferritic and other types of stainless steels.

  17. Radiation damages in chemical components of organic scintillator detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes Neto, Jose Maria

    2003-01-01

    Samples containing PPO (1%, g/ml), diluted in toluene, they were irradiated in a 60 Co irradiator (6.46 kGy/h) at different doses. The PPO concentration decay bi-exponentially with the dose, generating the degradation products: benzoic acid, benzamide and benzilic alcohol. The liquid scintillator system was not sensitive to the radiation damage until 20 kGy. Otherwise, the pulse height analysis showed that dose among 30 to 40 kGy generate significant loss of quality of the sensor (liquid scintillating) and the light yield was reduced in half with the dose of (34.04 ± 0.80) kGy. This value practically was confirmed by the photo peak position analysis that resulted D 1/2 = (31.7 ± 1,4) kGy, The transmittance, at 360 nm, of the irradiated solution decreased exponentially. The compartmental model using five compartments (fast decay PPO, slow decay PPO, benzamide, benzoic acid and benzilic alcohol) it was satisfactory to explain the decay of the PPO in its degradation products in function of the dose. The explanation coefficient r 2 = 0.985636 assures that the model was capable to explain 98.6% of the experimental variations. The Target Theory together with the Compartmental Analysis showed that PPO irradiated in toluene solution presents two sensitive molecular diameters both of them larger than the true PPO diameter. >From this analysis it showed that the radiolytic are generated, comparatively, at four toluene molecules diameter far from PPO molecules. For each one PPO-target it was calculated the G parameter (damage/100 eV). For the target expressed by the fast decay the G value was (418.4 ± 54.1) damages/100 eV, and for the slow decay target the G value was (54.5 ± 8.9) damages/100 eV. The energies involved in the chemical reactions were w (0.239 ± 0.031) eV/damage (fast decay) and w = (1 834 ± 0.301) eV/damage (slow decay). (author)

  18. Radiation Damage and Fission Product Release in Zirconium Nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egeland, Gerald W. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2005-08-29

    Zirconium nitride is a material of interest to the AFCI program due to some of its particular properties, such as its high melting point, strength and thermal conductivity. It is to be used as an inert matrix or diluent with a nuclear fuel based on transuranics. As such, it must sustain not only high temperatures, but also continuous irradiation from fission and decay products. This study addresses the issues of irradiation damage and fission product retention in zirconium nitride through an assessment of defects that are produced, how they react, and how predictions can be made as to the overall lifespan of the complete nuclear fuel package. Ion irradiation experiments are a standard method for producing radiation damage to a surface for observation. Cryogenic irradiations are performed to produce the maximum accumulation of defects, while elevated temperature irradiations may be used to allow defects to migrate and react to form clusters and loops. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and grazing-incidence x-ray diffractometry were used in evaluating the effects that irradiation has on the crystal structure and microstructure of the material. Other techniques were employed to evaluate physical effects, such as nanoindentation and helium release measurements. Results of the irradiations showed that, at cryogenic temperatures, ZrN withstood over 200 displacements per atom without amorphization. No significant change to the lattice or microstructure was observed. At elevated temperatures, the large amount of damage showed mobility, but did not anneal significantly. Defect clustering was possibly observed, yet the size was too small to evaluate, and bubble formation was not observed. Defects, specifically nitrogen vacancies, affect the mechanical behavior of ZrN dramatically. Current and previous work on dislocations shows a distinct change in slip plane, which is evidence of the bonding characteristics. The stacking-fault energy changes dramatically with

  19. Non-Destructive Detection and Separation of Radiation Damaged Cells in Miniaturized, Inexpensive Device, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a clear and well-identified need for rapid, efficient, non-destructive detection and isolation of radiation damaged cells. Available commercial technologies...

  20. Study on radiation damage of electron and γ-rays and mechanism of nuclear hardening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Tao

    2001-01-01

    Radiation damage effects of electrons and γ-rays are presented. The damage defects are studied by experimental methods. On the basis of these studies the damage mechanism and nuclear hardening techniques are studied

  1. Use of high voltage electron microscope to simulate radiation damage by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    The use of the high voltage electron microscope to simulate radiation damage by neutrons is briefly reviewed. This information is important in explaining how alloying affects void formation during neutron irradiation

  2. Account of the effect of nuclear collision cascades in model of radiation damage of RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevorkyan, Yu.R.; Nikolaev, Yu.A.

    1997-01-01

    A kinetic model is proposed for describing the effect of collision cascades in model of radiation damage of reactor pressure vessel steels. This is a closed system of equations which can be solved only by numerical methods in general case

  3. The use of the SRIM code for calculation of radiation damage induced by neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, A.; Hamidi, S.; Asadabad, Mohsen Asadi

    2017-12-01

    Materials subjected to neutron irradiation will being evolve to structural changes by the displacement cascades initiated by nuclear reaction. This study discusses a methodology to compute primary knock-on atoms or PKAs information that lead to radiation damage. A program AMTRACK has been developed for assessing of the PKAs information. This software determines the specifications of recoil atoms (using PTRAC card of MCNPX code) and also the kinematics of interactions. The deterministic method was used for verification of the results of (MCNPX+AMTRACK). The SRIM (formely TRIM) code is capable to compute neutron radiation damage. The PKAs information was extracted by AMTRACK program, which can be used as an input of SRIM codes for systematic analysis of primary radiation damage. Then the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) radiation damage on reactor pressure vessel is calculated.

  4. Radiation damage effects in solids special topic volume with invited peer reviewed papers only

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2013-01-01

    Public interest and concern about radiation damage effects has increased during recent times. Nuclear radiation proved to be a precursor for the study of radiation damage effects in solids. In general, all types of radiation, e.g. X-ray, gamma ray, heavy ions, fission fragments and neutrons produce damage effects in materials. Radiation damage latent tracks in solids find applications in nuclear and elementary particle physics, chemistry, radiobiology, earth sciences, nuclear engineering, and a host of other areas such as nuclear safeguards, virus counting, ion track filters, uranium exploration and archaeology. Radiation dosimetry and reactor shielding also involve concepts based on radiation damage in solids. This special volume consists of ten Chapters, including Review and Research Papers on various topics in this field.Physical scientists known to be investigating the effects of radiation on material were invited to contribute research and review papers on the areas of their specialty. The topics include...

  5. The Future of the South Atlantic Anomaly and Implications for Radiation Damage in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heirtzler, J. R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    South Atlantic Anomaly of the geomagnetic field plays a dominant role in where radiation damage occurs in near Earth orbits. The historic and recent variations of the geomagnetic field in the South Atlantic are used to estimate the extent of the South Atlantic Anomaly until the year 2000. This projection indicates that radiation damage to spacecraft and humans in space will greatly increase and cover a much larger geographic area than present.

  6. Implantation of keV-energy argon clusters and radiation damage in diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai

    2012-01-01

    We show that for impacting argon clusters, both mean projected ranges of the constituents and depths of radiation damage in diamond scale linearly with momentum. The same dependence was earlier found for keV-energy cluster implantation in graphite, thus suggesting the universality of this scaling...... law. For diamond, a good agreement for the value of displacement energy for the case of cluster impact is found by comparing the calculated target sputtering and experimentally measured depth of radiation damage....

  7. Measurement of radiation damage on an epoxy-based optical glue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.C.; Peng, K.C.; Sahu, S.K.; Ueno, K.; Chang, Y.H.; Wang, C.H.; Hou, W.S.

    1997-01-01

    We measured the radiation damage on an optical glue called Eccobond-24, which is a candidate for CsI and BGO crystal calorimeters of the BELLE detector of the KEK B-factory. Absorption spectrophotometry in the range 300-800 nm was used to monitor the radiation damage. The maximum equivalent dose was 1.64 Mrad. The glue shows effects of damage, but is acceptable for the radiation level in the above-mentioned experiment. (orig.)

  8. Involvement of membrane lipids in radiation damage to potassium-ion permeability of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Medical Science; Akamatsu, Y

    1978-02-01

    Radiation damage to K/sup +/ permeability of an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph of E.coli grown with oleate or linolenate was investigated at different temperatures. A remarkable effect of radiation was observed at 0/sup 0/C with cells that had been grown in linolenate at 42/sup 0/C. This indicates that, besides protein, membrane lipids at least are involved in the radiation damage. The damage also seems to be affected by the fluidity of membrane lipids.

  9. Computer simulation of radiation damage in NaCl using a kinetic rate reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soppe, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Sodium chloride and other alkali halides are known to be very susceptible to radiation damage in the halogen sublattice when exposed to ionizing radiation. The formation of radiation damage in NaCl has generated interest because of the relevance of this damage to the disposal of radioactive waste in rock salt formations. In order to estimate the long-term behaviour of a rock salt repository, an accurate theory describing the major processes of radiation damage in NaCl is required. The model presented in this paper is an extended version of the Jain-Lidiard model; its extensions comprise the effect of impurities and the colloid nucleation stage on the formation of radiation damage. The new model has been tested against various experimental data obtained from the literature and accounts for several well known aspects of radiation damage in alkali halides which were not covered by the original Jain-Lidiard model. The new model thus may be expected to provide more reliable predictions for the build-up of radiation damage in a rock salt nuclear waste repository. (Author)

  10. Modelling of OPNMR phenomena using photon energy-dependent 〈Sz〉 in GaAs and InP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Dustin D.; Willmering, Matthew M.; Sesti, Erika L.; Pan, Xingyuan; Saha, Dipta; Stanton, Christopher J.; Hayes, Sophia E.

    2016-12-01

    We have modified the model for optically-pumped NMR (OPNMR) to incorporate a revised expression for the expectation value of the z-projection of the electron spin, 〈Sz 〉 and apply this model to both bulk GaAs and a new material, InP. This expression includes the photon energy dependence of the electron polarization when optically pumping direct-gap semiconductors in excess of the bandgap energy, Eg . Rather than using a fixed value arising from coefficients (the matrix elements) for the optical transitions at the k = 0 bandedge, we define a new parameter, Sopt (Eph) . Incorporating this revised element into the expression for 〈Sz 〉 , we have simulated the photon energy dependence of the OPNMR signals from bulk semi-insulating GaAs and semi-insulating InP. In earlier work, we matched calculations of electron spin polarization (alone) to features in a plot of OPNMR signal intensity versus photon energy for optical pumping (Ramaswamy et al., 2010). By incorporating an electron spin polarization which varies with pump wavelength into the penetration depth model of OPNMR signal, we are able to model features in both III-V semiconductors. The agreement between the OPNMR data and the corresponding model demonstrates that fluctuations in the OPNMR intensity have particular sensitivity to light hole-to-conduction band transitions in bulk systems. We provide detailed plots of the theoretical predictions for optical pumping transition probabilities with circularly-polarized light for both helicities of light, broken down into illustrative plots of optical magnetoabsorption and spin polarization, shown separately for heavy-hole and light-hole transitions. These plots serve as an effective roadmap of transitions, which are helpful to other researchers investigating optical pumping effects.

  11. Modelling of OPNMR phenomena using photon energy-dependent 〈Sz〉 in GaAs and InP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Dustin D; Willmering, Matthew M; Sesti, Erika L; Pan, Xingyuan; Saha, Dipta; Stanton, Christopher J; Hayes, Sophia E

    2016-12-01

    We have modified the model for optically-pumped NMR (OPNMR) to incorporate a revised expression for the expectation value of the z-projection of the electron spin, 〈S z 〉 and apply this model to both bulk GaAs and a new material, InP. This expression includes the photon energy dependence of the electron polarization when optically pumping direct-gap semiconductors in excess of the bandgap energy, E g . Rather than using a fixed value arising from coefficients (the matrix elements) for the optical transitions at the k=0 bandedge, we define a new parameter, S opt (E ph ). Incorporating this revised element into the expression for 〈S z 〉, we have simulated the photon energy dependence of the OPNMR signals from bulk semi-insulating GaAs and semi-insulating InP. In earlier work, we matched calculations of electron spin polarization (alone) to features in a plot of OPNMR signal intensity versus photon energy for optical pumping (Ramaswamy et al., 2010). By incorporating an electron spin polarization which varies with pump wavelength into the penetration depth model of OPNMR signal, we are able to model features in both III-V semiconductors. The agreement between the OPNMR data and the corresponding model demonstrates that fluctuations in the OPNMR intensity have particular sensitivity to light hole-to-conduction band transitions in bulk systems. We provide detailed plots of the theoretical predictions for optical pumping transition probabilities with circularly-polarized light for both helicities of light, broken down into illustrative plots of optical magnetoabsorption and spin polarization, shown separately for heavy-hole and light-hole transitions. These plots serve as an effective roadmap of transitions, which are helpful to other researchers investigating optical pumping effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stability and diffusion of interstitital and substitutional Mn in GaAs of different doping types

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, LMC; Decoster, S; Correia, JG; Amorim, LM; da Silva, MR; Araújo, JP; Vantomme, A

    2012-01-01

    We report on the lattice location of Mn impurities (< 0.05%) in undoped (semi-insulating) and heavily $n$-type doped GaAs, by means of $\\beta^{-}$-emission channeling from the decay of $^{56}$Mn produced at ISOLDE/CERN. In addition to the majority substituting for Ga, we locate up to 30% of the Mn impurites on tetrahedral interstitial sites with As nearest neighbors. In line with the recently reported high thermal stability of interstitial Mn in heavily $p$-type doped GaAs [L. M. C. Pereira et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 98, 201905 (2011)], the interstitial fraction is found to be stable up to 400$^{\\circ}$C, with an activation energy for diffusion of 1.7–2.3 eV. By varying the concentration of potentially trapping defects, without a measurable effect on the migration energy of the interstitial impurities, we conclude that the observed high thermal stability is characteristic of isolated interstitial Mn. Being difficult to reconcile with the general belief that interstitial Mn is the donor defect that out-dif...

  13. X-ray Imaging Using a Hybrid Photon Counting GaAs Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, C; Göppert, R; Heijne, Erik H M; Ludwig, J; Meddeler, G; Mikulec, B; Pernigotti, E; Rogalla, M; Runge, K; Smith, K M; Snoeys, W; Söldner-Rembold, S; Watt, J

    1999-01-01

    The performance of hybrid GaAs pixel detectors as X-ray imaging sensors were investigated at room temperature. These hybrids consist of 300 mu-m thick GaAs pixel detectors, flip-chip bonded to a CMOS Single Photon Counting Chip (PCC). This chip consists of a matrix of 64 x 64 identical square pixels (170 mu-m x 170 mu-m) and covers a total area of 1.2 cm**2. The electronics in each cell comprises a preamplifier, a discriminator with a 3-bit threshold adjust and a 15-bit counter. The detector is realized by an array of Schottky diodes processed on semi-insulating LEC-GaAs bulk material. An IV-charcteristic and a detector bias voltage scan showed that the detector can be operated with voltages around 200 V. Images of various objects were taken by using a standard X-ray tube for dental diagnostics. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) was also determined. The applications of these imaging systems range from medical applications like digital mammography or dental X-ray diagnostics to non destructive material testing (...

  14. Damage related deep electron levels in ion implanted GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allsopp, D.W.E.; Peaker, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been made of the deep electron levels in semi-insulating GaAs implanted with either 78 Se + or 29 Si + ions and rendered n-type by subsequent annealing without encapsulation in partial pressures of arsenic or arsine. Three implantation related deep states were detected with concentration profiles approximating to the type of Gaussian distributions expected for point defects related to ion implantation damage. Further heat treatment of the samples at 500 0 C in a gas ambient of U 2 /H 2 substantially reduced concentration of these deep levels. Two of these states were thought to be related to displacements of the substrate atoms. The third, at Esubc -0.67 eV, was found in only 78 Se + ion implanted GaAs substrates and was thought to be a defect involving both Se and As atoms, rather than intrinsic lattice disorder. It is proposed that the annealing rate of these implantation related deep levels depends crucially on the in-diffusion of arsenic vacancies during heat treatments. (author)

  15. Transparency of Semi-Insulating, n-Type, and p-Type Ammonothermal GaN Substrates in the Near-Infrared, Mid-Infrared, and THz Spectral Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kucharski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available GaN substrates grown by the ammonothermal method are analyzed by Fast Fourier Transformation Spectroscopy in order to study the impact of doping (both n- and p-type on their transparency in the near-infrared, mid-infrared, and terahertz spectral range. It is shown that the introduction of dopants causes a decrease in transparency of GaN substrates in a broad spectral range which is attributed to absorption on free carriers (n-type samples or dopant ionization (p-type samples. In the mid-infrared the transparency cut-off, which for a semi-insulating GaN is at ~7 µm due to an absorption on a second harmonic of optical phonons, shifts towards shorter wavelengths due to an absorption on free carriers up to ~1 µm at n ~ 1020 cm−3 doping level. Moreover, a semi-insulating GaN crystal shows good transparency in the 1–10 THz range, while for n-and p-type crystal, the transparency in this spectral region is significantly quenched below 1%. In addition, it is shown that in the visible spectral region n-type GaN substrates with a carrier concentration below 1018 cm−3 are highly transparent with the absorption coefficient below 3 cm−1 at 450 nm, a satisfactory condition for light emitting diodes and laser diodes operating in this spectral range.

  16. Conformational variation of proteins at room temperature is not dominated by radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russi, Silvia; González, Ana; Kenner, Lillian R.; Keedy, Daniel A.; Fraser, James S.; Bedem, Henry van den

    2017-01-01

    Protein crystallography data collection at synchrotrons is routinely carried out at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate radiation damage. Although damage still takes place at 100 K and below, the immobilization of free radicals increases the lifetime of the crystals by approximately 100-fold. Recent studies have shown that flash-cooling decreases the heterogeneity of the conformational ensemble and can hide important functional mechanisms from observation. These discoveries have motivated increasing numbers of experiments to be carried out at room temperature. However, the trade-offs between increased risk of radiation damage and increased observation of alternative conformations at room temperature relative to cryogenic temperature have not been examined. A considerable amount of effort has previously been spent studying radiation damage at cryo-temperatures, but the relevance of these studies to room temperature diffraction is not well understood. Here, the effects of radiation damage on the conformational landscapes of three different proteins (T. danielli thaumatin, hen egg-white lysozyme and human cyclophilin A) at room (278 K) and cryogenic (100 K) temperatures are investigated. Increasingly damaged datasets were collected at each temperature, up to a maximum dose of the order of 10 7 Gy at 100 K and 10 5 Gy at 278 K. Although it was not possible to discern a clear trend between damage and multiple conformations at either temperature, it was observed that disorder, monitored by B-factor-dependent crystallographic order parameters, increased with higher absorbed dose for the three proteins at 100 K. At 278 K, however, the total increase in this disorder was only statistically significant for thaumatin. A correlation between specific radiation damage affecting side chains and the amount of disorder was not observed. Lastly, this analysis suggests that elevated conformational heterogeneity in crystal structures at room temperature is observed despite radiation

  17. Radiation Damage Observations in the ATLAS Pixel Detector Using the High Voltage Delivery System

    CERN Document Server

    Toms, K

    2011-01-01

    We describe the implementation of radiation damage monitoring using leakage current measurement of the silicon pixel sensors provided by the circuits of the ATLAS Pixel Detector high voltage delivery (HVPP4) system. The dependence of the leakage current upon the integrated luminosity for several temperature scenarios is presented. Based on the analysis we have determined the sensitivity specifications for a Current Measurement System. The status of the system and the first measurement of the radiation damage corresponding to 2--4 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity are presented, as well as the comparison with the theoretical model.

  18. Computer simulation of radiation damage in HTGR elements and structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gann, V.V.; Gurin, V.A.; Konotop, Yu.F.; Shilyaev, B.A.; Yamnitskij, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of mathematical simulation of radiation damages in material and items of HTGR is considered. A system-program complex IMITATOR, intended for imitation of neutron damages by means of charged particle beams, is used. Account of material composite structure and certain geometry of items permits to calculate fields of primary radiation damages and introductions of reaction products in composite fuel elements, microfuel elements, their shells, composite absorbing elements on the base of boron carbide, structural steels and alloys. A good correspondence of calculation and experimental burn-out of absorbing elements is obtained, application of absorbing element as medium for imitation experiments is grounded [ru

  19. Jagiellonian University Radiation Damage in Silicon Particle Detectors in High Luminosity Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Oblakowska-Mucha, A

    2017-01-01

    Radiation damage is nowadays the most serious problem in silicon particle detectors placed in the very harsh radiation environment. This problem will be even more pronounced after the LHC Upgrade because of extremely strong particle fluences never encountered before. In this review, a few aspects of radiation damage in silicon trackers are presented. Among them, the change in the silicon lattice and its influence on the detector performance are discussed. Currently applied solutions and the new ideas for future experiments will be also shown. Most of the results presented in this summary were obtained within the RD50 Collaboration

  20. Radiation damage study in CZT matrix detectors exposed to gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva Fabelo, Antonio; Pinnera Hernandez, Ibrahin; Cruz Inclan, Carlos Manuel; Abreu Alfonso, Yamiel; Dona Lemus, Olga; Diaz Garcia, Angelina; Montanno Zetina, Luis Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Radiation damage in terms of atomic displacements in a typical CZT detector used in medical imaging applications was studied using the Monte Carlo statistical method. All detector structural and geometric features as well as different energies of the photons usually used in the application were taken into account. Considering the Mott McKinley Feshbach classical approach, effective cross sections of the displacements were calculated, including the number of displacements per atom for each atomic species present in the material and each photon energy considered. These results are analyzed and compared. Finally, the radiation damage on CZT detector is compared to that calculated in a similar detector manufactured with other semiconducting materials. (author)

  1. Recent progress of applying mesenchymal stem cells in therapy of urgent radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiangong; Guo Wanlong; Zhang Shuxian; Duan Zhikai

    2010-01-01

    At present, Cytokine therapy is the main strategy capable of preventing and reducing the acute radiation syndrome (ARS). With the problem of difficult match and severe graft versus host disease, haemopoietic stem cells can be used to find some effective approaches to treat acute radiation damage. Mesenchymal stem cells are of great therapeutic potential due to their particular characteristics including secretion of hematopoietic cytokine, reconstruction hemopoietic microenvironment, poor-immunogenicity, ease of reception ectogenic gene transfection and expression. This paper is to summarize the studies of biological characteristics of MSC and its application prospects in urgent radiation damage. (authors)

  2. Spatial distribution of the X- and γ- rays induced energy deposition on semi-insulating GaAs:Cr based pixel radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneses Gonzalez, Annie; Leyva Fabelo, Antonio; Pinnera Hernandez, Ibrahin; Cruz Inclan, Carlos M.; Abreu Alfonso, Yamiel; Chelkov, Georgy; Zhemchugov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Radiation detectors based on Cr compensated GaAs are characterized by high resistivity and good electron transport properties. These characteristics, its high atomic number and good radiation hardness, make GaAs:Cr a promising semiconductor detector within a wide photon energy range. The excellent imaging performance of these detectors for medical and other several applications are already reported in the literature. In this study, the spatial distributions of photon radiation energy deposition on a GaAs:Cr pixel detector with the real device dimensions (900 μm thick, pixels of 45x45 μm 2 and pitch of 55 μm) are presented. The charge carrier distribution profiles generated by the incident photons was additionally determined and discussed. Using the calculated weighting potential for the detector was possible to estimate the percent of charge carriers that shall contribute to the signal generated in the device electrodes. All the calculations were made for the typical photon energies of 241 Am and the energy corresponding to the K α1 characteristic lines of Mo. The MCNPX code system and ARCHIMEDES program were used for mathematical modeling of radiation transport in matter and for semiconductor device simulations respectively. (Author)

  3. ESR study of radiation damage in pyrimidines. Progress report, August 1, 1975--April 1, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, B.W.

    1976-04-01

    The primary objective of this project is to develop general mechanisms for radiation damage to biomolecules using substituted pyrimidines as a model system. Results this year include a single crystal ESR study of 5-ethyl-5-isopropylbarbituric acid, development of the k-band microwave bridge, dose response measurements on methylated barbituric acid derivatives, and synthesis of several specifically deuterated uracil derivatives

  4. Overview of radiation damage in silicon detectors - models and defect engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews recent work in the area of radiation damage in silicon detectors. It is not intended as a comprehensive review, but provides a snapshot guide to current ideas and indicates how the subject is expected to develop in the immediate future. (orig.)

  5. Compilation of radiation damage test data part III: materials used around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Beynel, P; Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1982-01-01

    For pt.II see CERN report 79-08 (1979). This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins.

  6. Use of heavy ion accelerators in fusion reactor-related radiation-damage studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.; Dobson, D.A.

    1974-01-01

    The heavy-ion accelerator has become an important tool in the study of the fundamentals of radiation damage in fission- and fusion-reactor materials. Present facilities for such studies within the Materials Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory are provided by two complementary accelerator systems. Examples of the work carried out are discussed

  7. Evidence of Dopant Type-Inversion and Other Radiation Damage Effects of the CDF Silicon Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Ballarin, Roberto [Univ. of the Basque Country, Leioa (Spain)

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this document is to study the effect of radiation damage on the silicon sensors. The reflection of the effect of radiation can be observed in two fundamental parameters of the detector: the bias current and the bias voltage. The leakage current directly affects the noise, while the bias voltage is required to collect the maximum signal deposited by the charged particle.

  8. Two strategies for the development of mitochondrion-targeted small molecule radiation damage mitigators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rwigema, Jean-Claude M.; Beck, Barbara; Wang, Wei; Doemling, Alexander; Epperly, Michael W.; Shields, Donna; Goff, Julie P.; Franicola, Darcy; Dixon, Tracy; Frantz, Marie-Céline; Wipf, Peter; Tyurina, Yulia; Kagan, Valerian E.; Wang, Hong; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation of acute ionizing radiation damage by mitochondrion-targeted small molecules. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the ability of nitroxide-linked alkene peptide isostere JP4-039, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor-linked alkene peptide esostere

  9. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF RADIATION DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN TUNGSTEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the accumulation of radiation damage created by primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) of various energies, at 300 K and for a dose rate of 10-4 dpa/s in bulk tungsten using the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) method.

  10. Radiation damage relative to transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens at low temperature: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, R.M.; Taylor, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    When biological specimens are irradiated by the electron beam in the electron microscope, the specimen structure is damaged as a result of molecular excitation, ionization, and subsequent chemical reactions. The radiation damage that occurs in the normal process of electron microscopy is known to present severe limitations for imaging high resolution detail in biological specimens. The question of radiation damage at low temperatures has therefore been investigated with the view in mind of reducing somewhat the rate at which damage occurs. The radiation damage protection found for small molecule (anhydrous) organic compounds is generally rather limited or even non-existent. However, large molecule, hydrated materials show as much as a 10-fold reduction at low temperature in the rate at which radiation damage occurs, relative to the damage rate at room temperature. In the case of hydrated specimens, therefore, low temperature electron microscopy offers an important advantage as part of the overall effort required in obtaining high resolution images of complex biological structures. (author)

  11. The effects of illumination on deep levels observed in as-grown and low-energy electron irradiated high-purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, G.; Knoll, L.; Kranz, L.; Sundaramoorthy, V.

    2018-05-01

    High-purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC can find a variety of applications, ranging from power electronics to quantum computing applications. However, data on the electronic properties of deep levels in this material are scarce. For this reason, we present a deep level transient spectroscopy study on HPSI 4H-SiC substrates, both as-grown and irradiated with low-energy electrons (to displace only C-atoms). Our investigation reveals the presence of four deep levels with activation energies in the 0.4-0.9 eV range. The concentrations of three of these levels increase by at least one order of magnitude after irradiation. Furthermore, we analyzed the behavior of these traps under sub- and above-band gap illumination. The nature of the traps is discussed in the light of the present data and results reported in the literature.

  12. High dose radiation damage in nuclear energy structural materials investigated by heavy ion irradiation simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongnan; Xu Yongjun; Yuan Daqing

    2014-01-01

    Structural materials in ITER, ADS and fast reactor suffer high dose irradiations of neutrons and/or protons, that leads to severe displacement damage up to lOO dpa per year. Investigation of radiation damage induced by such a high dose irradiation has attracted great attention along with the development of nuclear energy facilities of new generation. However, it is deeply hampered for the lacking of high dose neutron and proton sources. Irradiation simulation of heavy ions produced by accelerators opens up an effective way for laboratory investigation of high dose irradiation induced radiation damage encountered in the ITER, ADS, etc. Radiation damage is caused mainly by atomic displacement in materials. The displacement rate of heavy ions is about lO 3 ∼10 7 orders higher than those of neutrons and protons. High displacement rate of heavy ions significantly reduces the irradiation time. The heavy ion irradiation simulation technique (HIIS) technique has been developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy and a series of the HIIS experiments have been performed to investigate radiation damage in stainless steels, tungsten and tantalum at irradiation temperatures from room temperature to 800 ℃ and in the irradiation dose region up to 100 dpa. The experimental results show that he radiation swelling peak for the modified stainless steel appears in the temperature region around 580 ℃ and the radiation damage is more sensitive to the temperature, the size of the radiation induced vacancy cluster or void increase with the increasing of the irradiation dose, and among the three materials the home-made modified stainless steel has the best radiation resistant property. (authors)

  13. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    In this project we have proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and have detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. The results from these various techniques have resulted in an understanding of consequences of radiation damage to DNA from the early ionization event to the production of non-radical lesions (discussed in detail in Comprehensive Report). In this year's work we have found the hydroxyl radical in DNA's hydration layer. This is an important result which impacts the hole transfer hypothesis and the understanding of the direct vs. indirect effect in DNA. Further we have found the first ESR evidence for sugar radicals as a result of direct radiation damage to DNA nucleotides in an aqueous environment. This is significant as it impacts the biological endpoint of radiation damage to DNA and suggests future work in DNA. Work with DNA-polypeptides show clear evidence for electron transfer to DNA from the polypeptide which we believe is a radioprotective mechanism. Our work with ab initio molecular orbital theory has gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics involved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this year's work to new, more accurate values for the electron affinities of the DNA bases, understanding of the relative stability of all possible sugar radicals formed by hydrogen abstraction on the deoxyribose group, hydration effects on, thiol radioprotectors, and an ongoing study of radical intermediates formed from initial DNA ion radicals. During this fiscal year five articles have been published, three are in press, two are submitted and several more are in preparation

  14. Determination of deep-level impurities and their effects on the small-single and LF noise properties of ion-implanted GaAs MESFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, S.; Kim, B.; Ghosh, P.K.; Das, M.B.; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park

    1982-01-01

    A large number of deep levels, with energies ranging from Esub(c)-0.19eV to Esub(c)-0.9eV, have been identified and characterized using ion-implanted MESFET's on undoped and Cr-doped LEC-grown semi-insulating GaAs substrates. Measurement techniques used include deep level transient (DLTS) and steady state spectroscopic (DLSS) methods. Large capture cross-section values are obtained for levels below Esub(c)-0.5eV, possibly due to high electric field. Spectral densities of LF noise with distinct bulges have been shown to be related to deep levels. In some samples, natural deep level related oscillations have been observed and their ionization energies have been determined. (author)

  15. Design of a GaAs X-ray imaging sensor with integrated HEMT readout circuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boardman, D

    2002-01-01

    A new monolithic semi-insulating (SI) GaAs sensor design for X-ray imaging applications between 10-100keV has been proposed. Monolithic pixel detectors offer a number of advantages over hybrid bump-bonded detectors, such as high device yield, low costs and are easier to produce large scale arrays. In this thesis, an investigation is made of the use of a SI GaAs wafer as both a detector element and substrate for the epitaxially grown High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). The design of the HEMT transistors, optimised for this application, were produced with the aid of the Silvaco 'Virtual Wafer Fab' simulation package. It was determined that the device characteristics would consist of a small positive threshold voltage, a low off-state drain current and high transconductance. The final HEMT transistor design, that would be integrated to a pixel detector, had a threshold voltage of 0.17V, an off-state leakage current of {approx}1nA and a transconductance of 7.4mS. A number of test detectors were characterised using an ion beam induced charge technique. Charge collection efficiency maps of the test detectors were produced to determine their quality as a X-ray detection material. From the results, the inhomogeneity of SI GaAs, homogeneity of epitaxial GaAs and granular nature of polycrystalline GaAs, were observed. The best of these detectors was used in conjunction with a commercial field effect transistor to produce a hybrid device. The charge switching nature of the hybrid device was shown and a sensitivity of 0.44pC/{mu}Gy mm{sup 2}, for a detector bias of 60V, was found. The functionality of the hybrid sensor was the same to that proposed for the monolithic sensor. The fabrication of the monolithic sensor, with an integrated HEMT transistor and external capacitor, was achieved. To reach the next stage of producing a monolithic sensor that integrates charge, requires further work in the design and the fabrication process. (author)

  16. Design of a GaAs X-ray imaging sensor with integrated HEMT readout circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, D.

    2002-01-01

    A new monolithic semi-insulating (SI) GaAs sensor design for X-ray imaging applications between 10-100keV has been proposed. Monolithic pixel detectors offer a number of advantages over hybrid bump-bonded detectors, such as high device yield, low costs and are easier to produce large scale arrays. In this thesis, an investigation is made of the use of a SI GaAs wafer as both a detector element and substrate for the epitaxially grown High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). The design of the HEMT transistors, optimised for this application, were produced with the aid of the Silvaco 'Virtual Wafer Fab' simulation package. It was determined that the device characteristics would consist of a small positive threshold voltage, a low off-state drain current and high transconductance. The final HEMT transistor design, that would be integrated to a pixel detector, had a threshold voltage of 0.17V, an off-state leakage current of ∼1nA and a transconductance of 7.4mS. A number of test detectors were characterised using an ion beam induced charge technique. Charge collection efficiency maps of the test detectors were produced to determine their quality as a X-ray detection material. From the results, the inhomogeneity of SI GaAs, homogeneity of epitaxial GaAs and granular nature of polycrystalline GaAs, were observed. The best of these detectors was used in conjunction with a commercial field effect transistor to produce a hybrid device. The charge switching nature of the hybrid device was shown and a sensitivity of 0.44pC/μGy mm 2 , for a detector bias of 60V, was found. The functionality of the hybrid sensor was the same to that proposed for the monolithic sensor. The fabrication of the monolithic sensor, with an integrated HEMT transistor and external capacitor, was achieved. To reach the next stage of producing a monolithic sensor that integrates charge, requires further work in the design and the fabrication process. (author)

  17. Effects produced in GaAs by MeV ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wie, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    The first part of this thesis presents work performed on the ionizing energy beam induced adhesion enhancement of thin (approx.500 A) Au films on GaAs substrates. The ionizing beam, employed in the present thesis, is the MeV ions (i.e., 16 O, 19 F, and 35 Cl), with energies between 1 and 20 MeV. Using the Scratch test for adhesion measurement, and ESCA for chemical analysis of the film substrate interface, the native oxide layer at the interface is shown to play an important role in the adhesion enhancement by the ionizing radiation. A model is discussed that explains the experimental data on the dependence of adhesion enhancement on the energy which was deposited into electronic processes at the interface. The second part of the thesis presents research results on the radiation damage in GaAs crystals produced by MeV ions. Lattice parameter dilatation in the surface layers of the GaAs crystals becomes saturated after a high dose bombardment at room temperature. The strain produced by nuclear collisions is shown to relax partially due to electronic excitation (with a functional dependence on the nuclear and electronic stopping power of bombarding ions. Data on the GaAs and GaP crystals suggest that low temperature recovery stage defects produce major crystal distortion

  18. Germanium diffusion with vapor-phase GeAs and oxygen co-incorporation in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Fu; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Hsieh, Kuang-Chien

    2018-01-01

    Vapor-phase germanium diffusion has been demonstrated in Zn-doped and semi-insulating GaAs in sealed ampoules with GeAs powders and excess arsenic. Secondary-ion-mass spectroscopy (SIMS) profiles indicate the presence of unintentional co-incorporation of oxygen in high densities (>1017/cm3) along with diffused germanium donors whose concentration (>>1018/cm3) determined by electro-chemical capacitance-voltage (ECV) profiler shows significant compensation near the surface. The source of oxygen mainly originates from the GeAs powder which contains Ge-O surface oxides. Variable-temperature photoluminescence (PL) shows that in GeAs-diffused samples, a broad peak ranging from 0.86-1.38 eV with the peak position around 1.1 eV predominates at low temperatures while the near band-edge luminescence quenches. The broad band is attributed to the GeGa-VGa self-activated (SA) centers possibly associated with nearby oxygen-related defect complex, and its luminescence persists up to 400 K. The configurational-coordinate modeling finds that the SA defect complex has a thermal activation energy of 150-180 meV and a vibrational energy 26.8 meV. The presence of oxygen does not much affect the SA emission intensity but may have influenced the peak position, vibration frequency and activation energy as compared to other common donor-VGa defects in GaAs.

  19. Germanium diffusion with vapor-phase GeAs and oxygen co-incorporation in GaAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Fu Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vapor-phase germanium diffusion has been demonstrated in Zn-doped and semi-insulating GaAs in sealed ampoules with GeAs powders and excess arsenic. Secondary-ion-mass spectroscopy (SIMS profiles indicate the presence of unintentional co-incorporation of oxygen in high densities (>1017/cm3 along with diffused germanium donors whose concentration (>>1018/cm3 determined by electro-chemical capacitance-voltage (ECV profiler shows significant compensation near the surface. The source of oxygen mainly originates from the GeAs powder which contains Ge-O surface oxides. Variable-temperature photoluminescence (PL shows that in GeAs-diffused samples, a broad peak ranging from 0.86-1.38 eV with the peak position around 1.1 eV predominates at low temperatures while the near band-edge luminescence quenches. The broad band is attributed to the GeGa-VGa self-activated (SA centers possibly associated with nearby oxygen-related defect complex, and its luminescence persists up to 400 K. The configurational-coordinate modeling finds that the SA defect complex has a thermal activation energy of 150-180 meV and a vibrational energy 26.8 meV. The presence of oxygen does not much affect the SA emission intensity but may have influenced the peak position, vibration frequency and activation energy as compared to other common donor-VGa defects in GaAs.

  20. Role of charged particle irradiations in the study of radiation damage correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, S.; Sekimura, N.

    1990-01-01

    Charged particle irradiations were originally expected to provide means to simulate the effect of neutron irradiations. However, it has been recognized that quantitative and sometimes even qualitative simulation of neutron radiation damage is difficult and the role of the charged particle irradiations has shifted to establishing fission-fusion correlation based on fundamental understanding of the radiation damage phenomena. The authors have been studying radiation effects in fusion materials using energetic ions from the latter standpoint. In this paper, the authors review recent results using a heavy-ion/electron microscope link facility together with sets of small heavy ion and light ion accelerators on cascade damage produced by energetic primary recoils and on the effect of helium on microstructural and microchemical evolution. Some of the other applications of the ion accelerators will also be mentioned. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear Reaction Data and Uncertainties for Radiation Damage. Summary Report of the Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P.J.; Sjöstrand, H.; Simakov, S.P.

    2016-08-01

    This Meeting was organized to implement the recommendation of the second Research Coordinated Meeting (RCM) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) “Primary Radiation Damage Cross Sections” to analyse the accuracy and consistency of the radiation damage-relevant nuclear data in the major nuclear data evaluations with the eventual goal of identifying the most reliable data and providing quantitative uncertainty estimates. Participants have considered the status of the primary nuclear data, such as reaction recoils spectra in the latest releases of ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, FENDL, ROSFOND and TENDL nuclear data libraries, and the ways of deriving the damage quantities KERMA, NRT- or arc-dpa and gas production cross sections as well as the recipes for an assessment of their uncertainties. This report contains the contemporary view of the Meeting participants on these issues in the form of a consolidated set of statements, recommendations and individual summaries. (author)

  2. On Monte Carlo estimation of radiation damage in light water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, Edward A.; Oliveira, Cassiano R.E. de

    2010-01-01

    There has been a growing need in recent years for the development of methodologies to calculate damage factors, namely displacements per atom (dpa), of structural components for Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The aim of this paper is discuss and highlight the main issues associated with the calculation of radiation damage factors utilizing the Monte Carlo method. Among these issues are: particle tracking and tallying in complex geometries, dpa calculation methodology, coupled fuel depletion and uncertainty propagation. The capabilities of the Monte Carlo code Serpent such as Woodcock tracking and burnup are assessed for radiation damage calculations and its capability demonstrated and compared to those of the MCNP code for dpa calculations of a typical LWR configuration involving the core vessel and the downcomer. (author)

  3. \\title{Development of Radiation Damage Models for Irradiated Silicon Sensors Using TCAD Tools}

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Lalwani, Kavita; Ranjan, Kirti; Printz, Martin; Ranjeet, Ranjeet; Eber, Robert; Eichhorn, Thomas; Peltola, Timo Hannu Tapani

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. During the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) the CMS tracking system will face a more intense radiation environment than the present system was designed for. In order to design radiation tolerant silicon sensors for the future CMS tracker upgrade it is fundamental to complement the measurement with device simulation. This will help in both the understanding of the device performance and in the optimization of the design parameters. One of the important ingredients of the device simulation is to develop a radiation damage model incorporating both bulk and surface damage. In this paper we will discuss the development of a radiation damage model by using commercial TCAD packages (Silvaco and Synopsys), which successfully reproduce the recent measurements like leakage current, depletion voltage, interstrip capacitance and interstrip resistance, and provides an insight into the performance of irradiated silicon strip sensors.

  4. Silicon P.I.N. Junctions used for studies of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanore, J.

    1964-06-01

    Irradiation of silicon P.I.N. junction has been studied primarily for the purpose of developing a radiation damage dosimeter, but also for the purpose of investigating silicon itself. It is known that the rate of recombination of electrons and holes is a linear function of defects introduced by neutron irradiation. Two methods have been used to measure that rate of recombination: forward characteristic measurements, recovery time measurements. In order to explain how these two parameters depend on recombination rate we have given a theory of the P.I.N. junction. We have also given an idea of the carrier lifetime dependence versus temperature. Annealing effects in the range of 70 to 700 K have also been studied, we found five annealing stages with corresponding activation energies. As an application for these studies, we developed a radiation damage dosimeter with which we made several experiments in facilities such as Naiade or Marias. (author) [fr

  5. Performance characteristics and radiation damage results from the Fermilab E706 silicon microstrip detector system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, E Jr; Mani, S; Orris, D; Shepard, P F; Weerasundara, P D; Choudhary, B C; Joshi, U; Kapoor, V; Shivpuri, R; Baker, W

    1989-07-01

    A charged particle spectrometer containing a 7120-channel silicon microstrip detector system, one component of Fermilab experiment E706 to study direct photon production in hadron-hadron collisions, was utilized in a run in which 6 million events were recorded. We describe the silicon system, provide early results of track and vertex reconstruction, and present data on the radiation damage to the silicon wafers resulting from the narrow high intensity beam. (orig.).

  6. Contribution to knowledge of radiation damage in KCl crystals doped with Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sordi, G.-M.A.A.

    1974-11-01

    The radiation damages in KCl crystals doped with Sr ++ using thermo-ionic technique (ITC) and optical absorption measurements were studied. The variation of the entropy for the dipole jump starting from results reported by several authors was calculated. The irradiation effects with three different exposures were analysed: irradiation with gamma rays; irradiation with fast neutrons added to gamma irradiation; and irradiation with thermal neutrons together with fast neutrons and gamma rays. (Author) [pt

  7. Protection by caffeine against oxic radiation damage and chemical carcinogens : mechanistic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, P.C.

    1992-01-01

    There is little doubt that caffeine administered after exposure to UV light enhances the damage to cells and organisms by inhibiting photoreactivation, excision and/or recombinational repair. However, when already present in the system, it affords remarkable protection not only against O 2 -dependent component of radiation damage, but also against chemical carcinogens that require metabolic activation. Possible mechanistic aspects are discussed briefly. (author). 81 refs

  8. Measurements and TCAD Simulations of Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects

    CERN Document Server

    F. Moscatelli; G. M. Bilei; A. Morozzi; G.-F. Dalla Betta; R. Mendicino; M. Boscardin; N. Zorzi; L. Servoli; P. Maccagnani

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose the application of a radiation damage model based on the introduction of deep level traps/recombination centers suitable for device level numerical simulation of radiation detectors at very high fluences (e.g. 1÷2×1016 1-MeV equivalent neutrons per square centimeter) combined with a surface damage model developed by using experimental parameters extracted from measurements from gamma irradiated p-type dedicated test structures.

  9. Radiation damage of tile/fiber scintillator modules for the SDC calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, L.; Liu, N.; Mao, H.; Tan, Y.; Wang, G.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, X.; Zhou, Y.; Han, S.; Byon, A.; Green, D.; Para, A.; Johnson, K.; Barnes, V.

    1992-02-01

    The measurements of radiation damage of tile/fiber scintillator modules to be used for the SDC calorimeter are described. Four tile/fiber scintillator modules were irradiated up to 6 Mrad with the BEPC 1.1 GeV electron beam. We have studied the light output at different depths in the modules and at different integrated doses, the recovery process and the dependence on the ambient atmosphere

  10. Understanding radiation damage on sub-cellular scale using RADAMOL simulation tool

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Václav; Davídková, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 128, NOV (2016), s. 11-17 ISSN 0969-806X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LD12008 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : charged particles * DNA * proteins * radiation damage * radical attack * water radiolysis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.315, year: 2016

  11. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Final report, June 1, 1986--August 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1996-08-01

    Over the last 10 years significant advances have been made impacting the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The principal objective of this work was the elucidation of the fundamental mechanisms of radiation damage to DNA through the direct and indirect effects. Recently the work concentrated on the direct effect of radiation damage on DNA. The objective was to elucidate the ultimate radiation chemical damage to DNA arising from the direct effect. In this effort the focus was on the application of three techniques. ESR spectroscopic measurement of initial radicals formed in DNA and its hydration layer at low temperatures. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations were employed to give highly accurate theoretical predictions of early events such as electron and hole localization sites which serve to test and to clarify the experimental observations. HPLC and GC-mass spectroscopic assays of DNA base products formation provide the ultimate chemical outcome of the initial radiation events. The bridge between the early ion radical species and the non-radical products is made in ESR studies which follow the chemistry of the early species as they react with water and or other DNA bases. The use of these techniques has resulted in a new and fundamental understanding of the radiation damage to DNA on a molecular scale. From this work, a working model for DNA damage from the initial ionization event to the eventual formation of molecular base damage products and strand breaks has been formulated. Results over the past several years which have led to the formulation of this model are described

  12. PUMN: a radiation damage simulation computer program for the WINERY system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuspa, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The WINERY Radiation Damage Computer Simulation System will attempt to solve the entire radiation damage problem from the incident radiation to the property changes which occur in the material, using a set of interrelated computer programs. Computer simulation may be indispensable to the study of the radiation damage to materials in breeder and fusion reactors. WINERY is introduced with this work, and one portion of the system, the PUMN program, is developed and used to obtain important radiation damage results with Fe 3 Al crystal. PUMN is a program which simulates the response of the atoms in a crystal to a knock-on atom. It yields the damage configuration of the crystal by considering the dynamic interaction of all the atoms of the computational cell, up to 1000 atoms. The trajectories of the atoms are calculated using the Nordsieck Method, which has a prediction step based upon Taylor series expansions of the position and its first five time derivatives, and has a correction sequence which uses coefficients which have been optimized for efficiency and accuracy. Other features, such as restart files, automatic time step control, and crystal extension, make PUMN a versatile program which can simulate cases of relatively high knock-on energy, at least up to 500 eV. The PUMN program provides the WINERY system with results for the number of displacements, N/sub d/, due to knock-on atoms with various energies. This study dealt exclusively with Fe 3 Al. The values of N/sub d/ for Fe 3 Al were obtained at two different energies, 100 eV and 500 eV, for a variety of initial directions

  13. Can radiation damage to protein crystals be reduced using small-molecule compounds?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetko, Jan [Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States); Warkentin, Matthew; Englich, Ulrich; Thorne, Robert E., E-mail: ret6@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Free-radical scavengers that are known to be effective protectors of proteins in solution are found to increase global radiation damage to protein crystals. Protective mechanisms may become deleterious in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. Recent studies have defined a data-collection protocol and a metric that provide a robust measure of global radiation damage to protein crystals. Using this protocol and metric, 19 small-molecule compounds (introduced either by cocrystallization or soaking) were evaluated for their ability to protect lysozyme crystals from radiation damage. The compounds were selected based upon their ability to interact with radiolytic products (e.g. hydrated electrons, hydrogen, hydroxyl and perhydroxyl radicals) and/or their efficacy in protecting biological molecules from radiation damage in dilute aqueous solutions. At room temperature, 12 compounds had no effect and six had a sensitizing effect on global damage. Only one compound, sodium nitrate, appeared to extend crystal lifetimes, but not in all proteins and only by a factor of two or less. No compound provided protection at T = 100 K. Scavengers are ineffective in protecting protein crystals from global damage because a large fraction of primary X-ray-induced excitations are generated in and/or directly attack the protein and because the ratio of scavenger molecules to protein molecules is too small to provide appreciable competitive protection. The same reactivity that makes some scavengers effective radioprotectors in protein solutions may explain their sensitizing effect in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. A more productive focus for future efforts may be to identify and eliminate sensitizing compounds from crystallization solutions.

  14. Can radiation damage to protein crystals be reduced using small-molecule compounds?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kmetko, Jan; Warkentin, Matthew; Englich, Ulrich; Thorne, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Free-radical scavengers that are known to be effective protectors of proteins in solution are found to increase global radiation damage to protein crystals. Protective mechanisms may become deleterious in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. Recent studies have defined a data-collection protocol and a metric that provide a robust measure of global radiation damage to protein crystals. Using this protocol and metric, 19 small-molecule compounds (introduced either by cocrystallization or soaking) were evaluated for their ability to protect lysozyme crystals from radiation damage. The compounds were selected based upon their ability to interact with radiolytic products (e.g. hydrated electrons, hydrogen, hydroxyl and perhydroxyl radicals) and/or their efficacy in protecting biological molecules from radiation damage in dilute aqueous solutions. At room temperature, 12 compounds had no effect and six had a sensitizing effect on global damage. Only one compound, sodium nitrate, appeared to extend crystal lifetimes, but not in all proteins and only by a factor of two or less. No compound provided protection at T = 100 K. Scavengers are ineffective in protecting protein crystals from global damage because a large fraction of primary X-ray-induced excitations are generated in and/or directly attack the protein and because the ratio of scavenger molecules to protein molecules is too small to provide appreciable competitive protection. The same reactivity that makes some scavengers effective radioprotectors in protein solutions may explain their sensitizing effect in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. A more productive focus for future efforts may be to identify and eliminate sensitizing compounds from crystallization solutions

  15. Imperfection and radiation damage in protein crystals studied with coherent radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nave, Colin; Sutton, Geoff; Evans, Gwyndaf; Owen, Robin; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian; Stuart, David Ian

    2016-01-01

    Coherent diffraction observations from polyhedra crystals at cryotemperature are reported. Information is obtained about the lattice strain and the changes with radiation damage. Fringes and speckles occur within diffraction spots when a crystal is illuminated with coherent radiation during X-ray diffraction. The additional information in these features provides insight into the imperfections in the crystal at the sub-micrometre scale. In addition, these features can provide more accurate intensity measurements (e.g. by model-based profile fitting), detwinning (by distinguishing the various components), phasing (by exploiting sampling of the molecular transform) and refinement (by distinguishing regions with different unit-cell parameters). In order to exploit these potential benefits, the features due to coherent diffraction have to be recorded and any change due to radiation damage properly modelled. Initial results from recording coherent diffraction at cryotemperatures from polyhedrin crystals of approximately 2 µm in size are described. These measurements allowed information about the type of crystal imperfections to be obtained at the sub-micrometre level, together with the changes due to radiation damage

  16. Imperfection and radiation damage in protein crystals studied with coherent radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nave, Colin, E-mail: colin.nave@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Sutton, Geoff [Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf; Owen, Robin; Rau, Christoph [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Robinson, Ian [University College London, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Stuart, David Ian [Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-01

    Coherent diffraction observations from polyhedra crystals at cryotemperature are reported. Information is obtained about the lattice strain and the changes with radiation damage. Fringes and speckles occur within diffraction spots when a crystal is illuminated with coherent radiation during X-ray diffraction. The additional information in these features provides insight into the imperfections in the crystal at the sub-micrometre scale. In addition, these features can provide more accurate intensity measurements (e.g. by model-based profile fitting), detwinning (by distinguishing the various components), phasing (by exploiting sampling of the molecular transform) and refinement (by distinguishing regions with different unit-cell parameters). In order to exploit these potential benefits, the features due to coherent diffraction have to be recorded and any change due to radiation damage properly modelled. Initial results from recording coherent diffraction at cryotemperatures from polyhedrin crystals of approximately 2 µm in size are described. These measurements allowed information about the type of crystal imperfections to be obtained at the sub-micrometre level, together with the changes due to radiation damage.

  17. Radiation damage studies of mineral apatite, using fission tracks and thermoluminescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Khalifa, I.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    In a uranium (/thorium)-rich mineral sample which has not suffered a recent geological high-temperature excursion, the fossil fission track density (FFTD) will give a good indication of its natural radiation damage, provided that its U/Th ratio is known. From our studies of FFTD and thermoluminescence (TL) properties of several samples of apatite from different locations, and containing varying degrees of natural-radiation damage, an anti-correlation is observed between FFTD and TL sensitivity. It is also found that an anti-correlation exists between TL sensitivity and the amount of damage produced artificially by bombarding apatite crystals with different fluences of ∼30 MeV α-particles from a cyclotron. These results indicate that the presence of radiation damage in this mineral (viz., fluorapatite) can severely affect its TL sensitivity (i.e. TL output per unit test dose). The effect of crystal composition on the thermoluminescence and fission track annealing properties of mineral apatite is also reported. We have found that fission track annealing sensitivity and TL sensitivity are both significantly lower in samples of chlorapatite than in samples consisting predominantly of fluorapatite. (author)

  18. Characterization and calibration of radiation-damaged double-sided silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, L. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Vogt, A., E-mail: andreas.vogt@ikp.uni-koeln.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Reiter, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Hirsch, R.; Arnswald, K.; Hess, H.; Seidlitz, M.; Steinbach, T.; Warr, N.; Wolf, K. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Stahl, C.; Pietralla, N. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Limböck, T.; Meerholz, K. [Physikalische Chemie, Universität zu Köln, D-50939 Köln (Germany); Lutter, R. [Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-05-21

    Double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSSD) are commonly used for event-by-event identification of charged particles as well as the reconstruction of particle trajectories in nuclear physics experiments with stable and radioactive beams. Intersecting areas of both p- and n-doped front- and back-side segments form individual virtual pixel segments allowing for a high detector granularity. DSSSDs are employed in demanding experimental environments and have to withstand high count rates of impinging nuclei. The illumination of the detector is often not homogeneous. Consequently, radiation damage of the detector is distributed non-uniformly. Position-dependent incomplete charge collection due to radiation damage limits the performance and lifetime of the detectors, the response of different channels may vary drastically. Position-resolved charge-collection losses between front- and back-side segments are investigated in an in-beam experiment and by performing radioactive source measurements. A novel position-resolved calibration method based on mutual consistency of p-side and n-side charges yields a significant enhancement of the energy resolution and the performance of radiation-damaged parts of the detector.

  19. Repair of potentially lethal and sublethal radiation damage in x-irradiated ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, Atsushi; Okamoto, Mieko; Tsuchiya, Takehiko.

    1985-01-01

    The ability of cells to repair cellular radiation damage during the growth of TMT-3 ascites tumor and the effect of host reaction on the repair ability were examined by using an in vitro assay of cell clonogenicity after in situ irradiation of tumor cells. In single-dose experiments, the repair of potentially lethal radiation damage (PLD) was observed in stationary phase cells (12-day tumor) of the unirradiated host, but not in exponential phase cells (3-day tumor) of the unirradiated host animals. However, if previously irradiated host animals were used, even the exponentially growing tumor cells showed repair of PLD. In two-dose experiments, the ability to repair sublethal radiation damage (SLD) in exponential phase tumor cells was less than that of stationary phase cells in the unirradiated host. In the pre-irradiated host, the extent of the repair in exponential phase cells was somewhat enhanced. These results suggest that irradiation of host animals might suppress a factor that inhibits repair, resulting in enhancement of the repair capability of tumor cells. (author)

  20. Protecting the radiation-damaged skin from friction: a mini review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herst, Patries M

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced skin reactions are an unavoidable side effect of external beam radiation therapy, particularly in areas prone to friction and excess moisture such as the axilla, head and neck region, perineum and skin folds. Clinical studies investigating interventions for preventing or managing these reactions have largely focussed on formulations with moisturising, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and wound healing properties. However, none of these interventions has emerged as a consistent candidate for best practice. Much less emphasis has been placed on evaluating ways to protect the radiation-damaged skin from friction and excess moisture. This mini review analyses the clinical evidence for barrier products that form a protective layer by adhering very closely to the skin folds and do not cause further trauma to the radiation-damaged skin upon removal. A database search identified only two types of barrier products that fitted these criteria and these were tested in two case series and six controlled clinical trials. Friction protection was most effective when the interventions were used from the start of treatment and continued for several weeks after completion of treatment. Soft silicone dressings (Mepilex Lite and Mepitel Film) and Cavilon No Sting Barrier Film, but not Cavilon Moisturizing Barrier Cream, decreased skin reaction severity, most likely due to differences in formulation and skin build-up properties. It seems that prophylactic use of friction protection of areas at risk could be a worthwhile addition to routine care of radiation-damaged skin

  1. PUMN: part I of the WINERY radiation damage computer simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuspa, J.P.; Edwards, D.R.; Tsoulfanidis, N.

    1976-01-01

    Results of computer work to simulate the response of crystalline materials to radiation are presented. To organize this and future work into a long range program of investigation, the WINERY Radiation Damage Computer Simulation System is proposed. The WINERY system is designed to solve the entire radiation damage problem from the incident radiation to the property changes which occur in the material, using a set of interrelated computer programs. One portion of the system, the PUMN program, has been used to obtain important radiation damage results with Fe 3 Al crystal. PUMN simulates the response of the atoms in a crystal to a knock-on atom. It yields the damage configuration of the crystal by considering the dynamic interaction of all the atoms of the computational cell, up to 1000 atoms. The PUMN program provides the WINERY system with results for the number of displacements, N/sub d/, due to knock-on atoms with various energies. The values of N/sub d/ for Fe 3 Al were obtained at two different energies, 100 and 500 eV, for a variety of initial directions. These values are to be used to form a table of results for use in WINERY

  2. Breakover mechanism of GaAs photoconductive switch triggering spark gap for high power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Liqiang; Shi, Wei; Feng, Qingqing

    2011-11-01

    A spark gap (SG) triggered by a semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) is presented. Currents as high as 5.6 kA have been generated using the combined switch, which is excited by a laser pulse with energy of 1.8 mJ and under a bias of 4 kV. Based on the transferred-electron effect and gas streamer theory, the breakover characteristics of the combined switch are analyzed. The photoexcited carrier density in the PCSS is calculated. The calculation and analysis indicate that the PCSS breakover is caused by nucleation of the photoactivated avalanching charge domain. It is shown that the high output current is generated by the discharge of a high-energy gas streamer induced by the strong local electric field distortion or by overvoltage of the SG resulting from quenching of the avalanching domain, and periodic oscillation of the current is caused by interaction between the gas streamer and the charge domain. The cycle of the current oscillation is determined by the rise time of the triggering electric pulse generated by the PCSS, the pulse transmission time between the PCSS and the SG, and the streamer transit time in the SG.

  3. Strain buildup in GaAs due to 100 MeV Ag ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Shramana; Bhaumik, Sudipta; Panda, Jaya Kumar [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Ojha, Sunil [Inter-University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Dhar, Achintya [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Kabiraj, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Roy, Anushree, E-mail: anushree@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India)

    2013-12-01

    The formation of strained layers and a non-monotonic evolution of strain in high energy (100 MeV) silver ion (Ag{sup 7+}) irradiated undoped semi-insulating GaAs are observed and analyzed using Raman scattering and high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements. At low fluence, compressively strained layers are formed, whereas, with increase in fluence both compressive and tensile strains appear as observed from HRXRD measurements. Further, at low fluence, the change in compressive strain with increase in fluence is found to be sharper than what is observed at higher fluence, thereby suggesting a critical fluence value, beyond which there is a simultaneous generation and annihilation of vacancy type defects. The initial blue shift and subsequent relative red shift beyond above critical fluence in the Raman peak also qualitatively reveal non-monotonic evolution of strain in this case. Finally, we demonstrate the sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy in detecting the decrease in lattice ordering in the crystal in the low fluence regime, below the detection limit of Rutherford back-scattering channeling (c-RBS) measurements.

  4. The changes of fingernail microcirculation in the patients with hand skin radiation damage caused by β rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guoquan; Qian Jianjun; Wang Zuofa

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To observe the microcirculation changes in the patients with hand skin radiation damage caused by β rays. Methods: The XOX-1A type microcirculation microscope was used in observation of the microcirculation changes of fingernail, in 22 patients with III-IV degree hand skin radiation damage caused by β rays. Results: A series of abnormal signs were observed in all these patients and it was found that the microcirculation abnormality of the fingernail were the most clinical significant sign. Conclusion: The fingernail microcirculation changes can be used as an indicator for prognosis in the hand skin radiation damage patients

  5. Empirical constraints on the effects of radiation damage on helium diffusion in zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alyssa J.; Hodges, Kip V.; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we empirically evaluate the impact of radiation damage on zircon (U-Th)/He closure temperatures for a suite of zircon crystals from the slowly cooled McClure Mountain syenite of south-central Colorado, USA. We present new zircon, titanite, and apatite conventional (U-Th)/He dates, zircon laser ablation (U-Th)/He and U-Pb dates, and zircon Raman spectra for crystals from the syenite. Titanite and apatite (U-Th)/He dates range from 447 to 523 Ma and 88.0 to 138.9 Ma, respectively, and display no clear correlation between (U-Th)/He date and effective uranium concentration. Conventional zircon (U-Th)/He dates range from 230.3 to 474 Ma, while laser ablation zircon (U-Th)/He dates show even greater dispersion, ranging from 5.31 to 520 Ma. Dates from both zircon (U-Th)/He datasets decrease with increasing alpha dose, indicating that most of the dispersion can be attributed to radiation damage. Alpha dose values for the dated zircon crystals range from effectively zero to 2.15 × 1019 α /g, spanning the complete damage spectrum. We use an independently constrained thermal model to empirically assign a closure temperature to each dated zircon grain. If we assume that this thermal model is robust, the zircon radiation damage accumulation and annealing model of Guenthner et al. (2013) does not accurately predict closure temperatures for many of the analyzed zircon crystals. Raman maps of the zircons dated by laser ablation document complex radiation damage zoning, sometimes revealing crystalline zones in grains with alpha dose values suggestive of amorphous material. Such zoning likely resulted in heterogeneous intra-crystalline helium diffusion and may help explain some of the discrepancies between our empirical findings and the Guenthner et al. (2013) model predictions. Because U-Th zoning is a common feature in zircon, radiation damage zoning is likely to be a concern for most ancient, slowly cooled zircon (U-Th)/He datasets. Whenever possible, multiple

  6. Radiation hardness of GaAs sensors against gamma-rays, neutrons and electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šagátová, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.sagatova@stuba.sk [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); University Centre of Electron Accelerators, Slovak Medical University, Ku kyselke 497, 911 06 Trenčín (Slovakia); Zaťko, Bohumír; Dubecký, František [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ly Anh, Tu [Faculty of Applied Science, University of Technology VNU HCM, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet Street, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Nečas, Vladimír; Sedlačková, Katarína; Pavlovič, Márius [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Fülöp, Marko [University Centre of Electron Accelerators, Slovak Medical University, Ku kyselke 497, 911 06 Trenčín (Slovakia)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Radiation hardness of SI GaAs detectors against gamma-rays, neutrons and electrons was compared. • Good agreement was achieved between the experimental results and displacement damage factor of different types of radiation. • CCE and FWHM first slightly improved (by 1–8%) and just then degraded with the cumulative dose. • An increase of detection efficiency with cumulative dose was observed. - Abstract: Radiation hardness of semi-insulating GaAs detectors against {sup 60}Co gamma-rays, fast neutrons and 5 MeV electrons was compared. Slight improvements in charge collection efficiency (CCE) and energy resolution in FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum) were observed at low doses with all kinds of radiation followed by their degradation. The effect occurred at a dose of about 10 Gy of neutrons (CCE improved by 1%, FWHM by 5% on average), at 1 kGy of electrons (FWHM decreased by 3% on average) and at 10 kGy of gamma-rays (CCE raised by 5% and FWHM dropped by 8% on average), which is in agreement with the relative displacement damage of the used types of radiation. Gamma-rays of MeV energies are 1000-times less damaging than similar neutrons and electrons about 10-times more damaging than photons. On irradiating the detectors with neutrons and electrons, we observed a global increase in their detection efficiency, which was caused probably by enlargement of the active detector area as a consequence of created radiation defects in the base material. Detectors were still functional after a dose of 1140 kGy of ∼1 MeV photons, 104 kGy of 5 MeV electrons but only up to 0.576 kGy of fast (∼2 to 30 MeV) neutrons.

  7. Electron Microscopy Study of Stainless Steel Radiation Damage Due to Long-Term Irradation by Alpha Particles Emitted From Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unlu, Kenan [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Rios-Martinez, Carlos [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Saglam, Mehmet [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Hart, Ron R. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shipp, John D. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Rennie, John [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1998-04-16

    Radiation damage and associated surface and microstructural changes produced in stainless steel encapsulation by high-fluence alpha particle irradiations from weapons-grade plutonium of 316-stainless steel are being investigated.

  8. Direct determination of a radiation-damage profile with atomic resolution in ion-irradiated platinum. MSC report No. 5030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pramanik, D.; Seidman, D.N.

    1983-05-01

    The field-ion microscope (FIM) technique has been employed to determine directly a radiation damage profile, with atomic resolution, in a platinum specimen which had been irradiated at 80 0 K with 20-keV Kr + ions to a fluence of 5 x 10 12 cm - 2 . It is shown that the microscopic spatial-vacancy distribution (radiation-damage profile) is directly related to the elastically-deposited-energy profile. The experimentally constructed radiation-damage profile is compared with a theoretical damage profile - calculated employing the TRIM Monte Carlo code - and excellent agreement is obtained between the two, thus demonstrating that it is possible to go directly from a microscopic spatial distribution of vacancies to a continuous radiation-damage profile

  9. THE ROLE OF RADIATION ACCIDENTS AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS OF IONIZING RADIATION SOURCES IN THE PROBLEM OF RADIATION DAMAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Кіхтенко, Ігор Миколайович

    2016-01-01

    Subject of research – the relevance of radiation damage at modern development of industry and medicine. In the world of radiation sources used in different fields of practice and their application in the future will increase, which greatly increases the likelihood of injury in a significant contingent of people.Research topic – the definition of the role of nuclear energy and the industrial use of ionizing radiation sources in the problem of radiation damage. The purpose of research – identif...

  10. Calculation of parameters of the original state of material radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnoshtanov, V.F.; Kevorkyan, Yu.R.; Eremin, Yu.P.; Belousov, G.G.

    1974-01-01

    The program ''Sample'' for evaluating the parameters of the initial state of radiation damage in samples irradiated by neutrons of different energies is described in this paper. Within the framework of this study, a program is elaborated for calculating the spectrum and density of initially knocked-on atoms in cylinder and parallelepiped-shaped samples, as well as in plates of various thickness. The model incorporated into the program is based on the Monte-Carlo method. In considering the neutron-to-atom interaction account is taken of the elastic scattering anisotropy and the process of inelastic scattering. This program is used to study the radiation damage states in iron samples irradiated by neutrons of different energies. A computer handled this program is based on sequential sampling of random values with a predetermined distribution law. The algorithm of the neutron's walk through a medium forms the basis of the ''Sample'' program. This program permits calculating, for a particular sample geometry, the initially knocked-on atom density and spectrum, as well as the density of the displacements due to the monoenergetic neutrons isotropically incident on the sample surface. The program also enables calculation of the static computation error. The block diagram of the ''Sample'' program and its text written in FORTRAN are presented. Also given is the dependence of the displacement density normalized with respect to the unit flux on the neutron energy for a parallelepiped-shaped sample. The neutron flux is determined by the number of collisions. The contribution of various energetic groups of initially knocked-on atoms into the radiation damage of a sample depending on the neutron energy is shown

  11. Surface-structure dependence of healing radiation-damage mechanism in nanoporous tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Guohua; Li, Xiangyan; Sun, Jingjing; Hao, Congyu; Xu, Yichun; Zhang, Yange; Liu, Wei; Liu, C. S.

    2018-01-01

    Under nuclear fusion environments, displacement damage in tungsten (W) is usually caused by neutrons irradiation through producing large quantities of vacancies (Vs) and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs). These defects not only affect the mechanical properties of W, but also act as the trap sites for implanted hydrogen isotopes and helium. Nano-porous (NP) W with a high fraction of free surfaces has been developed to mitigate the radiation damage. However, the mechanism of the surface reducing defects accumulation is not well understood. By using multi-scale simulation methods, we investigated the interaction of the SIA and V with different surfaces on across length and time scales. We found that, at a typical operation temperature of 1000 K, surface (1 1 0) preferentially heals radiation damage of W compared with surface (1 0 0) and boundary (3 1 0). On surface (1 1 0), the diffusion barrier for the SIA is only 0.68 eV. The annihilation of the SIA-V happens via the coupled motion of the V segregation towards the surface from the bulk and the two-dimensional diffusion of the SIA on the surface. Such mechanism makes the surface (1 1 0) owe better healing capability. On surface (1 0 0), the diffusion energy barrier for the SIA is 2.48 eV, higher than the diffusion energy barrier of the V in bulk. The annihilation of the SIA-V occurs via the V segregation and recombination. The SIA was found to migrate one-dimensionally along a boundary (3 1 0) with a barrier of 0.21 eV, leading to a lower healing efficiency in the boundary. This study suggested that the on-surface process plays an important role in healing radiation damage of NP W in addition to surface-enhanced diffusion and annihilation near the surface. A certain surface structure renders nano-structured W more radiation-tolerant.

  12. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Techniques to Monitor Radiation Damage in RPV and Internal Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Laurence [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kim, Jin-Yeon [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Qu, Jisnmin [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wall, Joe [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate that nonlinear ultrasonics (NLU) can be used to directly and quantitatively measure the remaining life in radiation damaged reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and internal components. Specific damage types to be monitored are irradiation embrittlement and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Our vision is to develop a technique that allows operators to assess damage by making a limited number of NLU measurements in strategically selected critical reactor components during regularly scheduled outages. This measured data can then be used to determine the current condition of these key components, from which remaining useful life can be predicted. Methods to unambiguously characterize radiation related damage in reactor internals and RPVs remain elusive. NLU technology has demonstrated great potential to be used as a material sensor – a sensor that can continuously monitor a material’s damage state. The physical effect being monitored by NLU is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave. The degree of nonlinearity is quantified with the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β, which is an absolute, measurable material constant. Recent research has demonstrated that nonlinear ultrasound can be used to characterize material state and changes in microscale characteristics such as internal stress states, precipitate formation and dislocation densities. Radiation damage reduces the fracture toughness of RPV steels and internals, and can leave them susceptible to IASCC, which may in turn limit the lifetimes of some operating reactors. The ability to characterize radiation damage in the RPV and internals will enable nuclear operators to set operation time thresholds for vessels and prescribe and schedule replacement activities for core internals. Such a capability will allow a more clear definition of reactor safety margins. The research consists of three tasks: (1

  13. Modification of radiation damage in CHO cells by hyperthermia at 40 and 450C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henle, K.J.; Leeper, D.B.

    1977-01-01

    Low hyperthermia at 40 0 C either before or after X irradiation did not alter the slope of the radiation dose-cell survival curve but reduced the D/sub q/ from 145 to 41 or to 0 rad for a pre- or postirradiation incubation period of 2 hr at 40 0 C, respectively. In contrast, hyperthermia at 45 0 C increased the slope of the radiation survival curve by a factor of 1.7 for a radiation pretreatment of 10 min at 45 0 C, but only by 1.3 for the same treatment immediately after irradiation. The corresponding D/sub q/'s were 262 and 138 rad, respectively. A combination of 45 and 40 0 C hyperthermia (10 min at 45 0 C + 2 hr at 40 0 C + X) resulted in a superposition of the individual effects of 45 or 40 0 C hyperthermia on the radiation survival curve. In addition, the radiation survival curve was shifted downward by a factor of three due to the potentiation of 45 0 C hyperthermia damage by postincubation at 40 0 C. Repair of sublethal radiation damage was completely suppressed during incubation at 40 following hyperthermia at 45 0 C. However, when cells were returned to 37 0 C, even after 6 hr at 40 following 45 0 C hyperthermia, the capacity to accumulate and repair sublethal radiation damage was immediately restored. These findings imply that the hyperthermia damage from low or high temperatures interacts differentially with radiation damage. Low hyperthermia at 40 0 C may affect principally the radiation repair system, whereas 45 0 C hyperthermia probably alters the radiation target more severely than the repair system

  14. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Techniques to Monitor Radiation Damage in RPV and Internal Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Laurence; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jisnmin; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Wall, Joe

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate that nonlinear ultrasonics (NLU) can be used to directly and quantitatively measure the remaining life in radiation damaged reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and internal components. Specific damage types to be monitored are irradiation embrittlement and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Our vision is to develop a technique that allows operators to assess damage by making a limited number of NLU measurements in strategically selected critical reactor components during regularly scheduled outages. This measured data can then be used to determine the current condition of these key components, from which remaining useful life can be predicted. Methods to unambiguously characterize radiation related damage in reactor internals and RPVs remain elusive. NLU technology has demonstrated great potential to be used as a material sensor - a sensor that can continuously monitor a material's damage state. The physical effect being monitored by NLU is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave. The degree of nonlinearity is quantified with the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β, which is an absolute, measurable material constant. Recent research has demonstrated that nonlinear ultrasound can be used to characterize material state and changes in microscale characteristics such as internal stress states, precipitate formation and dislocation densities. Radiation damage reduces the fracture toughness of RPV steels and internals, and can leave them susceptible to IASCC, which may in turn limit the lifetimes of some operating reactors. The ability to characterize radiation damage in the RPV and internals will enable nuclear operators to set operation time thresholds for vessels and prescribe and schedule replacement activities for core internals. Such a capability will allow a more clear definition of reactor safety margins. The research consists of three tasks

  15. Radiation Damage Modeling for 3D Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wallangen, Veronica; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm2 and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This poster presents the details of a new digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the 3D Pixel sensors for the ATLAS Detector.

  16. Modeling Radiation Damage Effects in 3D Pixel Digitization for the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Giugliarelli, Gilberto; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm2 and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This poster presents the details of a new digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the 3D Pixel sensors for the ATLAS Detector.

  17. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and microdiffraction for radiation damage analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, R.

    1982-01-01

    High resolution TEM techniques have developed to quite a sophisticated level over the past few years. In addition TEM instruments with a scanning capability have become available commercially which permit in particular the formation of a small electron probe at the specimen. Thus direct resolution and microdiffraction investigations of thin specimens are now possible, neither of which have been employed to any great extent in the analysis of radiation damage. Some recent advances which are thought to be relevant to this specific area of research are highlighted

  18. Annealing of natural metamict zircons. I low degree of radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, M

    1998-01-01

    In-situ time dependent high temperature X-ray powder diffraction was used to investigate the ordering process occurring during annealing of natural zircons with a low degree of radiation damage. It was possible to distinguish two stages of this process. Firstly, the diffusion of defects induced by alpha-particles, this stage contributes only to a certain degree of relaxation in the unit cell. In the second stage there is some degree of recrystallization. A hkl-dependence in the variation of the integrated intensity is observed and the increase in the volume of crystalline zircon is therefore related to a process of migration of dislocations.

  19. Surgical intervention for complications caused by late radiation damage of the small bowel; a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halteren, H.K. van; Gortzak, E.; Taal, B.G.; Helmerhorst, Th.J.M.; Aleman, B.M.P.; Hart, A.A.M.; Zoetmulder, F.A.N.

    1993-01-01

    The authors studied the records of 46 patients who had been operated on between 1974 and 1990 in the Netherlands Cancer Institute because of complications due to late radiation damage of the small bowel. The following factors led to an increase in complication-risk: hypalbuminemia. more than one laparotomy prior to irradiation and a short interval (< 12 months) between irradiation and surgical intervention. The following factors related to a poorer survival: incomplete resection of the primary tumor and a short interval (< 12 months) between irradiation and surgical intervention. The type f surgical intervention did not have cumulative prognostic value in relation to complication-risk or survival. (author)

  20. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation: 2016 project annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, Sergei O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-04

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 3, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) the demonstration of the measurement of thermally activated defect-interaction processes by pulsed ion beam techniques and (ii) the demonstration of alternative characterization techniques to study defect dynamics. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  1. 3D imaging of radiation damage in silicon sensor and spatial mapping of charge collection efficiency

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakůbek, M.; Jakůbek, J.; Žemlička, J.; Platkevič, M.; Havránek, Vladimír; Semián, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2013), C03023 ISSN 1748-0221. [14th International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors. Figueira da Foz, Coimbra, 01.07.2012-05.07.2012] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010237; GA ČR(CZ) GA103/09/2101 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 ; RVO:68378297 Keywords : solid media * radiation damage * Pixelated detectors Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics (UTAM-F) Impact factor: 1.526, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-0221/8/03/C03023/pdf/1748-0221_8_03_C03023.pdf

  2. The Fifth International Ural seminar. Radiation damage physics of metals and alloys. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Presented are the abstracts of The Fifth International Ural seminar Damage physics of metals and alloys. General problems of radiation damage physics, radiation effect on change of microstucture and the properties of metals and alloys, as well as materials for nuclear and thermonuclear energetics are considered. The themes of reports are the following: correlation effects in cascades of atom-atomic collisions; radiation-induced strengthening critical current density in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x superconductors; conditions of forming and hydrides growth in irradiated zirconium alloys [ru

  3. Rapid-mixing studies on the time-scale of radiation damage in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, G.E.; Michael, B.D.; Asquith, J.C.; Shenoy, M.A.; Watts, M.E.; Whillans, D.W.

    1975-01-01

    Rapid mixing studies were performed to determine the time scale of radiation damage in cells. There is evidence that the sensitizing effects of oxygen and other chemical dose-modifying agents on the response of cells to ionizing radiation involve fast free-radical processes. Fast response technique studies in bacterial systems have shown that extremely fast processes occur when the bacteria are exposed to oxygen or other dose-modifying agents during irradiation. The time scales observed were consistent with the involvement of fast free-radical reactions in the expression of these effects

  4. Computer simulation of threshold radiation damage in rutile, TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Computer simulation methods have been used to study threshold radiation damage structures in rutile. It was found Ti ions have threshold energies much larger than O ions. Basal plane displacements for oxygen were shown to be complex, and focuson behaviour was only found at energies several times the threshold energy. Oxygen ions do not have simple interstitials or vacancies, but rather a three-ion crowdion and divacancy-interstitial combination were found, respectively. Threshold energies were found to be highly dependent on crystallographic direction, being as low as 10 eV in one instance, but often much higher. Oxygen ions were seen to defocus along the c-axis. (author)

  5. Radiation-damage-assisted ferroelectric domain structuring in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentjens, L.; Peithmann, K.; Maier, K.; Steigerwald, H.; Jungk, T.

    2009-06-01

    Irradiation of 5% magnesium-doped lithium niobate crystals (LiNbO3:Mg) with high-energy, low-mass 3He ions, which are transmitted through the crystal, changes the domain reversal properties of the material. This enables easier domain engineering compared to non-irradiated material and assists the formation of small-sized periodically poled domains in LiNbO3:Mg. Periodic domain structures exhibiting a width of ≈520 nm are obtained in radiation-damaged sections of the crystals. The ferroelectric poling behavior between irradiated and non-treated material is compared.

  6. Calculations of radiation damage in target, container and window materials for spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Mansur, L.K.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation damage in target, container, and window materials for spallation neutron sources is am important factor in the design of target stations for accelerator-driver transmutation technologies. Calculations are described that use the LAHET and SPECTER codes to obtain displacement and helium production rates in tungsten, 316 stainless steel, and Inconel 718, which are major target, container, and window materials, respectively. Results are compared for the three materials, based on neutron spectra for NSNS and ATW spallation neutron sources, where the neutron fluxes are normalized to give the same flux of neutrons of all energies

  7. Modeling Radiation Damage Effects in 3D Pixel Digitization for the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wallangen, Veronica; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10$^{15}$ n$_\\mathrm{eq}$/cm$^2$ and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This work presents the details of a new digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the 3D Pixel sensors for the ATLAS detector.

  8. How the nature of the chemical bond governs resistance to amorphization by radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trachenko, Kostya; Artacho, Emilio; Dove, Martin T.; Pruneda, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss what defines a material's resistance to amorphization by radiation damage. We propose that resistance is generally governed by the competition between the short-range covalent and long-range ionic forces, and we quantify this picture using quantum-mechanical calculations. We calculate the Voronoi deformation density charges and Mulliken overlap populations of 36 materials, representative of different families, including complex oxides. We find that the computed numbers generally follow the trends of experimental resistance in several distinct families of materials: the increase (decrease) of the short-range covalent component in material's total force field decreases (increases) its resistance

  9. Scintillation and radiation damage of doped BaF2 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Zufang; Xu Zizong; Chang Jin

    1992-01-01

    The emission spectra and the radiation damage of BaF 2 crystals doped Ce and Dy have been studied. The results indicate that the doped BaF 2 crystals have the intrinsic spectra of impurity besides the intrinsic spectra of BaF 2 crystals. The crystals colored and the transmissions decrease with the concentration of impurity in BaF 2 crystals after radiation by γ-ray of 60 Co. The doped Ce BaF 2 irradiated by ultraviolet has faster recover of transmissions but for doped Dy the effect is not obvious. The radiation resistance is not good as pure BaF 2 crystals

  10. Chernobyl and its consequences. Analysis of radiation damage. Tschernobyl und die Folgen. Begutachtung von Strahlenschaeden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niklas, K. (Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H. Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz); Boerner, W. (Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin); Holeczke, F.; Messerschmidt, O. (eds.)

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of the conference offer the interested public the opportunity of informing themselves on the circumstances of the Chernobyl accident, the spread of the released radioactive substances in Austria and the Federal Republic of Germany, the measurements of radioactivity in foodstuffs and human beings, and on the medical care for the victims of the accident in the USSR. The second major issue consisted in the assessment of radiation damage from the point of view of forensic medicine. Questions pertaining to the connection between radiation exposure and occupational diseases are discussed. The significance of biological dosimetry including chromosomal analysis is assessed with regard to judicial decisions. (HP) With 35 figs., 48 tabs.

  11. Clinical evaluation of direct and photosensitized ultraviolet radiation damage to the lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hockwin, O.; Lerman, S.

    1982-01-01

    We are reporting a new, objective, and quantitative method for monitoring age-related molecular changes in the human ocular lens in vivo, as expressed by increases in at least two (nontryptophan) fluorescence wavelengths. These fluorescence wavelengths appear to be caused by photochemically induced changes in the lens, and they reflect the ultraviolet (UV) filtering capacity of the patients' ocular lenses. These data correlate with previously reported in vitro lens fluorescence changes that are associated with the aging process. This method will also detect alterations in lenticular fluorescence caused by photosensitized as well as direct UV radiation damage

  12. Complex of electrostatic accelerators for simulation and diagnostics of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antuf'ev, Yu.P.; Belyaev, V.Kh.; Vergunov, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    The installation for simulation and diagnostics of radiation damage of materials is described. The installation consists of two electrostatic accelerators of vertical type for 5 MV and horizontal type for 800 kV. The accelerating complex ensures accelerated ion beam production in the independent operation regime as well as in the two beams target simultaneous irradiation regime, energy range of accelerated single-charged ions is 80 keV ... 5 MeV, homogeneity is better than +-0.05%. Oilless vacuum pumping out system is realized at the accelerating complex

  13. Radiation damage to bull sperm motility. III. Further x-ray studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rikmenspoel, R.

    1975-01-01

    The results of previous radiation experiments, which indicated that the centriole serves as a control center for bull sperm motility, appear to be in conflict with experiments showing that the bull sperm flagellum is an autonomous oscillator. To resolve this conflict experiments were conducted to calibrate absolutely the dose-response curves for the radiation damage, and to measure the force production and the mechanochemical energy conversion after irradiation in bull sperm. The results indicate that the centriole acts as a mechanical anchor for the contractile fibers

  14. Modeling charge collection efficiency degradation in partially depleted GaAs photodiodes using the 1- and 2-carrier Hecht equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auden, E.C.; Vizkelethy, G.; Serkland, D.K.; Bossert, D.J.; Doyle, B.L.

    2017-01-01

    The Hecht equation can be used to model the nonlinear degradation of charge collection efficiency (CCE) in response to radiation-induced displacement damage in both fully and partially depleted GaAs photodiodes. CCE degradation is measured for laser-generated photocurrent as a function of fluence and bias in Al_0_._3Ga_0_._7As/GaAs/Al_0_._2_5Ga_0_._7_5As p-i-n photodiodes which have been irradiated with 12 MeV C and 7.5 MeV Si ions. CCE is observed to degrade more rapidly with fluence in partially depleted photodiodes than in fully depleted photodiodes. When the intrinsic GaAs layer is fully depleted, the 2-carrier Hecht equation describes CCE degradation as photogenerated electrons and holes recombine at defect sites created by radiation damage in the depletion region. If the GaAs layer is partially depleted, CCE degradation is more appropriately modeled as the sum of the 2-carrier Hecht equation applied to electrons and holes generated within the depletion region and the 1-carrier Hecht equation applied to minority carriers that diffuse from the field-free (non-depleted) region into the depletion region. Enhanced CCE degradation is attributed to holes that recombine within the field-free region of the partially depleted intrinsic GaAs layer before they can diffuse into the depletion region.

  15. Modeling charge collection efficiency degradation in partially depleted GaAs photodiodes using the 1- and 2-carrier Hecht equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auden, E.C., E-mail: eauden@sandia.gov; Vizkelethy, G.; Serkland, D.K.; Bossert, D.J.; Doyle, B.L.

    2017-05-15

    The Hecht equation can be used to model the nonlinear degradation of charge collection efficiency (CCE) in response to radiation-induced displacement damage in both fully and partially depleted GaAs photodiodes. CCE degradation is measured for laser-generated photocurrent as a function of fluence and bias in Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/GaAs/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As p-i-n photodiodes which have been irradiated with 12 MeV C and 7.5 MeV Si ions. CCE is observed to degrade more rapidly with fluence in partially depleted photodiodes than in fully depleted photodiodes. When the intrinsic GaAs layer is fully depleted, the 2-carrier Hecht equation describes CCE degradation as photogenerated electrons and holes recombine at defect sites created by radiation damage in the depletion region. If the GaAs layer is partially depleted, CCE degradation is more appropriately modeled as the sum of the 2-carrier Hecht equation applied to electrons and holes generated within the depletion region and the 1-carrier Hecht equation applied to minority carriers that diffuse from the field-free (non-depleted) region into the depletion region. Enhanced CCE degradation is attributed to holes that recombine within the field-free region of the partially depleted intrinsic GaAs layer before they can diffuse into the depletion region.

  16. Effect of laminaria japonica polysaccharides (LJP) on radiation damage of testis tissue in male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Shicheng; Luo Qiong; Yang Mingliang; Yang Jiajuan; Yan Jun; Li Zhuoneng; Wang Lihong; Cui Xiaoyan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of laminaria japonica polysaccharides (LJP) on local radiation damage of testis tissue in male rats. Methods: The Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: the normal group, the model group, positive control group and LJP treatment group (50 mg·kg -1 ·d -1 ). LJP was applied to the treatment group for 10 d before local irradiation with γ-ray (6.0 Gy). The morphological change of the testis, organ index of testis and epididymides, sperm count, motility rate, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malonic aldehyde (MDA) contents were measured. Results: LJP could make the damaged testis recover to near normal, elevate the organ index of testis and epididymides, promote the sperm count and motility rate, increase the activity of SOD and decrease the contents of MDA in testis tissue. Conclusions: LJP could inhibit testis tissue damage induced by local radiation, hence enhance the significant radioprotective effect to testis tissue. LJP has the conspicuous protective effect on radiation damage of testis tissue. (authors)

  17. Influence of Hot Implantation on Residual Radiation Damage in Silicon Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawski, M.; Zuk, J.; Kulik, M.; Drozdziel, A.; Pyszniak, K.; Turek, M.; Lin, L.; Prucnal, S.

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable thermomechanical and electrical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this material very attractive for high-temperature, high-power, and high-frequency applications. Because of very low values of diffusion coefficient of most impurities in SiC, ion implantation is the best method to selectively introduce dopants over well-defined depths in SiC. Aluminium is commonly used for creating p-type regions in SiC. However, post-implantation radiation damage, which strongly deteriorates required electric properties of the implanted layers, is difficult to anneal even at high temperatures because of remaining residual damage. Therefore implantation at elevated target temperatures (hot implantation) is nowadays an accepted method to decrease the level of the residual radiation damage by avoiding ion beam-induced amorphization. The main objective of this study is to compare the results of the Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy with channeling and micro-Raman spectroscopy investigations of room temperature and 500 o C Al + ion implantation-induced damage in 6H-SiC and its removal by high temperature (up to 1600 o C) thermal annealing. (author)

  18. The influence of non-equilibrium fluctuations on radiation damage and recovery of metals under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinko, V.I.; Klepikov, V.F.

    2007-01-01

    In the conventional theory of radiation damage, it is assumed that the main effect of irradiation is due to formation of Frenkel pairs of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and their clusters. The difference in absorption of vacancies and SIAs by primary or radiation-induced extended defects (EDs) is thought to be the main reason of microstructural evolution under irradiation. On the other hand, the recovery of radiation damage is thought to be driven exclusively by thermal fluctuations resulting in the vacancy evaporation from voids (void annealing) or dislocations (thermal creep) and in the fluctuation-driven overcoming of obstacles by gliding dislocations (plastic strain). However, these recovery mechanisms can be efficient only at sufficiently high temperatures. At lower irradiation temperatures, the main driving force of the recovery processes may be due to nonequilibrium fluctuations of energy states of the atoms surrounding EDs arising as a result of scattering of radiation-induced excitations of atomic and electronic structure at EDs. In the present paper, the mechanisms of nonequilibrium fluctuations that result in such phenomena as the void shrinkage under irradiation at low temperatures (or high dose rates), irradiation creep and irradiation-induced increase of plasticity under sub-threshold irradiation was considered

  19. Recovery and permanent radiation damage of plastic scintillators at different dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicken, B.; Holm, U.; Marckmann, T.; Wick, K.; Rhode, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the radiation stability of plastic scintillators and wavelength shifters for the calorimeter of the ZEUS detector by irradiating them with protons, a 60 Co-source, and depleted uranium. Changes in light yield, absorption length and absorption coefficient have been measured for storage in inert and oxygen atmospheres during and after irradiation. Radiation doses up to 40 kGy with dose rates of 30 up to 2000 Gy/h have been applied. The polystyrene based scintillator SCSN-38 and the wavelength shifters Y-7 and K-27 in PMMA show an additional absorption but a recovery in air to a low permanent damage (at 10 kGy) which is proportional to the applied dose. Series investigations on samples of all production cycles of the ZEUS scintillators with high dose rates show only minor differences in radiation hardness. The recovery is described by a simple oxygen diffusion model for high and medium dose rates down to 30 Gy/h. During long term irradiations at low dose rates (<100 Gy/h) of 3 mm thick SCSN-38 in air the radiation damage recovers to a permanent damage which does not depend on the dose rate. On the other hand the radiation damage at very low dose rates (17 Gy/a) seems to be higher than expected for the accumulated dose

  20. Electronic excitations and their effect on the interionic forces in simulations of radiation damage in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Race, C P; Mason, D R; Sutton, A P

    2009-01-01

    Using time-dependent tight-binding simulations of radiation damage cascades in a model metal we directly investigate the nature of the excitations of a system of quantum mechanical electrons in response to the motion of a set of classical ions. We furthermore investigate the effect of these excitations on the attractive electronic forces between the ions. We find that the electronic excitations are well described by a Fermi-Dirac distribution at some elevated temperature, even in the absence of the direct electron-electron interactions that would be required in order to thermalize a non-equilibrium distribution. We explain this result in terms of the spectrum of characteristic frequencies of the ionic motion. Decomposing the electronic force into four well-defined components within the basis of instantaneous electronic eigenstates, we find that the effect of accumulated excitations in weakening the interionic bonds is mostly (95%) accounted for by a thermal model for the electronic excitations. This result justifies the use of the simplifying assumption of a thermalized electron system in simulations of radiation damage with an electronic temperature dependence and in the development of temperature-dependent classical potentials.

  1. Radiation damage of the PCO Pixelfly VGA CCD camera of the BES system on KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Náfrádi, Gábor, E-mail: nafradi@reak.bme.hu [NTI, BME, EURATOM Association, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Kovácsik, Ákos, E-mail: kovacsik.akos@reak.bme.hu [NTI, BME, EURATOM Association, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Pór, Gábor, E-mail: por@reak.bme.hu [NTI, BME, EURATOM Association, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Lampert, Máté, E-mail: lampert.mate@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, RMI, EURATOM Association, POB 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Un Nam, Yong, E-mail: yunam@nfri.re.kr [NFRI, 169-148 Gwahak-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Zoletnik, Sándor, E-mail: zoletnik.sandor@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, RMI, EURATOM Association, POB 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-01-11

    A PCO Pixelfly VGA CCD camera which is part a of the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic system of the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) used for spatial calibrations, suffered from serious radiation damage, white pixel defects have been generated in it. The main goal of this work was to identify the origin of the radiation damage and to give solutions to avoid it. Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) model was built using Monte Carlo Modeling Interface Program (MCAM) and calculations were carried out to predict the neutron and gamma-ray fields in the camera position. Besides the MCNPX calculations pure gamma-ray irradiations of the CCD camera were carried out in the Training Reactor of BME. Before, during and after the irradiations numerous frames were taken with the camera with 5 s long exposure times. The evaluation of these frames showed that with the applied high gamma-ray dose (1.7 Gy) and dose rate levels (up to 2 Gy/h) the number of the white pixels did not increase. We have found that the origin of the white pixel generation was the neutron-induced thermal hopping of the electrons which means that in the future only neutron shielding is necessary around the CCD camera. Another solution could be to replace the CCD camera with a more radiation tolerant one for example with a suitable CMOS camera or apply both solutions simultaneously.

  2. Effect of prior hyperthermia on subsequent thermal enhancement of radiation damage in mouse intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marigold, J.C.L.; Hume, S.P.

    1982-01-01

    Hyperthermia given in conjunction with X-rays results in a greater level of radiation injury than following X-rays alone, giving a thermal enhancement ratio (TER). The effect of prior hyperthermia ('priming') on TER was studied in the small intestine of mouse by giving 42.0 deg C for 1 hour at various times before the combined heat and X-ray treatments. Radiation damage was assessed by measuring crypt survival 4 days after radiation. TER was reduced when 'priming' hyperthermia was given 24-48 hours before the combined treatments. The reduction in effectiveness of the second heat treatment corresponded to a reduction in hyperthermal temperature of approximately 0.5 deg C, a value similar to that previously reported for induced resistance to heat given alone ('thermotolerance') (Hume and Marigold 1980). However, the time courses for development and decay of the TER response were much longer than those for 'thermotolerance', suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in thermal damage following heat alone and thermal enhancement of radiation damage

  3. Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Wall, J. J.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented

  4. Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Wall, J. J.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-02-01

    Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented.

  5. Electronic excitations and their effect on the interionic forces in simulations of radiation damage in metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, C P; Mason, D R; Sutton, A P

    2009-03-18

    Using time-dependent tight-binding simulations of radiation damage cascades in a model metal we directly investigate the nature of the excitations of a system of quantum mechanical electrons in response to the motion of a set of classical ions. We furthermore investigate the effect of these excitations on the attractive electronic forces between the ions. We find that the electronic excitations are well described by a Fermi-Dirac distribution at some elevated temperature, even in the absence of the direct electron-electron interactions that would be required in order to thermalize a non-equilibrium distribution. We explain this result in terms of the spectrum of characteristic frequencies of the ionic motion. Decomposing the electronic force into four well-defined components within the basis of instantaneous electronic eigenstates, we find that the effect of accumulated excitations in weakening the interionic bonds is mostly (95%) accounted for by a thermal model for the electronic excitations. This result justifies the use of the simplifying assumption of a thermalized electron system in simulations of radiation damage with an electronic temperature dependence and in the development of temperature-dependent classical potentials.

  6. Radiation damage in room-temperature data acquisition with the PILATUS 6M pixel detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Chitra; Dworkowski, Florian S N; Wang, Meitian; Schulze-Briese, Clemens

    2011-05-01

    The first study of room-temperature macromolecular crystallography data acquisition with a silicon pixel detector is presented, where the data are collected in continuous sample rotation mode, with millisecond read-out time and no read-out noise. Several successive datasets were collected sequentially from single test crystals of thaumatin and insulin. The dose rate ranged between ∼ 1320 Gy s(-1) and ∼ 8420 Gy s(-1) with corresponding frame rates between 1.565 Hz and 12.5 Hz. The data were analysed for global radiation damage. A previously unreported negative dose-rate effect is observed in the indicators of global radiation damage, which showed an approximately 75% decrease in D(1/2) at sixfold higher dose rate. The integrated intensity decreases in an exponential manner. Sample heating that could give rise to the enhanced radiation sensitivity at higher dose rate is investigated by collecting data between crystal temperatures of 298 K and 353 K. UV-Vis spectroscopy is used to demonstrate that disulfide radicals and trapped electrons do not accumulate at high dose rates in continuous data collection.

  7. Contributions of each isotope in structural material on radiation damage in a hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günay, Mehtap

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the fluids were used in the liquid first-wall, blanket and shield zones of the designed hybrid reactor system. In this study, salt-heavy metal mixtures consisting of 93–85% Li_2_0Sn_8_0 + 5% SFG-PuO_2 and 2-10% UO_2, 93–85% Li_2_0Sn_8_0 + 5% SFG-PuO_2 and 2-10% NpO_2, and 93–85% Li_2_0Sn_8_0 + 5% SFG-PuO_2 and 2-10% UCO were used as fluids. In this study, the effect on the radiation damage of spent fuel-grade (SFG)-PuO_2, UO_2, NpO_2 and UCO contents was investigated in the structural material of a designed fusion–fission hybrid reactor system. In the designed hybrid reactor system were investigated the effect on the radiation damage of the selected fluid according to each isotopes of structural material in the structural material for 30 full power years (FPYs). Three-dimensional analyses were performed using the most recent MCNPX-2.7.0 Monte Carlo radiation transport code and the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library

  8. Dosimetric And Fluence Measurements At Hadron Facilities For LHC Radiation Damage Studies

    CERN Document Server

    León-Florián, E

    2001-01-01

    Dosimetry plays an essential role in experiments assessing radiation damage and hardness for the components of detectors to be operated at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Physics), Geneva, Switzerland. Dosimetry is used both for calibration of the radiation fields and estimate of fluences and doses during the irradiation tests. The LHC environment will result in a complex radiation field composed of hadrons (mainly neutrons, pions and protons) and photons, each having an energy spectrum ranging from a few keV to several hundreds of MeV or several GeV, even. In this thesis, are exposed the results of measurements of particle fluences and doses at different hadron irradiation facilities: SARA, πE1-PSI and ZT7PS used for testing the radiation hardness of materials and equipment to be used in the future experiments at LHC. These measurements are applied to the evaluation of radiation damage inflicted to various semiconductors (such as silicon) and electronics ...

  9. Cytogenetic techniques for biological indications and dosimetry of of radiation damages in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekova, V.

    2003-01-01

    The cytogenetic methods present a proved way for bio-monitoring and bio-dosimetry for persons, submitted to ionising radiation in occupational and emergency conditions. Their application complement and assist the evaluation of the physical dosimetry and takes in account the individual radiosensitivity of the organism. A comparative assessment is made of the cytogenetic markers for radiation damage of humans applied in Bulgaria. It is discussed the sensitivity of the methods and their development in the last years, as well as the basic concept for their application - the causal relationship between the frequency of the observation of cytogenetic markers in peripheral blood lymphocytes and the risk of oncological disease. The conventional analysis of dicentrics is recognised as a 'golden standard' for the quantitative assessment of the radiation damage. The long term persisting translocations reflect properly the cumulative dose burden from chronic exposure. The micronucleus test allows a quick screening of large groups of persons, working in ionising radiation environment. The combined application with centromeric DNA probe improves the sensitivity and presents a modern alternative of the bio-monitoring and bio-dosimetry. It is discussed the advantages of the different cytogenetic techniques and their optimised application for the assessment of the radiation impact on humans

  10. Radiation damage in room-temperature data acquisition with the PILATUS 6M pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, Chitra, E-mail: chitra.rajendran@psi.ch; Dworkowski, Florian S. N.; Wang, Meitian; Schulze-Briese, Clemens [Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-05-01

    Observations of the dose-rate effect in continuous X-ray diffraction data acquisition at room temperature are presented. The first study of room-temperature macromolecular crystallography data acquisition with a silicon pixel detector is presented, where the data are collected in continuous sample rotation mode, with millisecond read-out time and no read-out noise. Several successive datasets were collected sequentially from single test crystals of thaumatin and insulin. The dose rate ranged between ∼1320 Gy s{sup −1} and ∼8420 Gy s{sup −1} with corresponding frame rates between 1.565 Hz and 12.5 Hz. The data were analysed for global radiation damage. A previously unreported negative dose-rate effect is observed in the indicators of global radiation damage, which showed an approximately 75% decrease in D{sub 1/2} at sixfold higher dose rate. The integrated intensity decreases in an exponential manner. Sample heating that could give rise to the enhanced radiation sensitivity at higher dose rate is investigated by collecting data between crystal temperatures of 298 K and 353 K. UV-Vis spectroscopy is used to demonstrate that disulfide radicals and trapped electrons do not accumulate at high dose rates in continuous data collection.

  11. Spatial distribution of radiation damage to crystalline proteins at 25–300 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warkentin, Matthew; Badeau, Ryan; Hopkins, Jesse B.; Thorne, Robert E., E-mail: ret6@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Dose-dependent atomic B factors are used to determine the average spatial distribution of radiation damage to crystalline thaumatin and urease. The spatial distribution of radiation damage (assayed by increases in atomic B factors) to thaumatin and urease crystals at temperatures ranging from 25 to 300 K is reported. The nature of the damage changes dramatically at approximately 180 K. Above this temperature the role of solvent diffusion is apparent in thaumatin crystals, as solvent-exposed turns and loops are especially sensitive. In urease, a flap covering the active site is the most sensitive part of the molecule and nearby loops show enhanced sensitivity. Below 180 K sensitivity is correlated with poor local packing, especially in thaumatin. At all temperatures, the component of the damage that is spatially uniform within the unit cell accounts for more than half of the total increase in the atomic B factors and correlates with changes in mosaicity. This component may arise from lattice-level, rather than local, disorder. The effects of primary structure on radiation sensitivity are small compared with those of tertiary structure, local packing, solvent accessibility and crystal contacts.

  12. Influence of radiation damage evolution on lattice-location, measurements for Yb and Au in iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, C.; Abel, F.; Bruneaux, M.; Thome, L.; Bernas, H.; Chaumont, J.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of radiation damage on lattice-location of heavy impurities (Yb and Au) implanted in iron is studied by channeling experiments. The nature of the impurity-radiation damage interaction has been modified by annealing of room-temperature implanted samples or high temperature implantation. The value of the corrected extinction ratio epsilon measured in several crystallographic directions on room-temperature implanted Yb and Au impurities cannot be interpreted uniquely in terms of different site populations. The annealing and implantation temperature dependences of the ratio epsilon for Yb-implanted Fe are very different. Upon annealing, the value of epsilon is unchanged up to 420 0 C and then drops abruptly. In hot-implant experiments, the extinction ratio starts to fall at approximately 150 0 C when vacancies become mobile. Vacancy-assisted diffusion is suggested to cause the changes of epsilon in both experiments. The temperature dependence of epsilon for the (100) plane is found to differ from that in other directions. This planar effect suggests that Yb impurities move preferentially in the (100) plane, which is the plane of vacancy-loops in Fe. A quantitative analysis of these lattice-location results and of related hyperfne interaction results is presented in a companion paper

  13. Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillpot, Simon; Tulenko, James

    2011-09-08

    The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

  14. Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillpot, Simon; Tulenko, James

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

  15. Role of interfaces i nthe design of ultra-high strength, radiation damage tolerant nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baldwin, Jon K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wei, Qiangmin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Nan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mara, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Xinghang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderoglu, Osman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Hongqi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bhattacharyya, Dhriti [NON LANL

    2010-12-09

    The combination of high strength and high radiation damage tolerance in nanolaminate composites can be achieved when the individual layers in these composites are only a few nanometers thick and contain special interfaces that act both as obstacles to slip, as well as sinks for radiation-induced defects. The morphological and phase stabilities and strength and ductility of these nano-composites under ion irradiation are explored as a function of layer thickness, temperature and interface structure. Magnetron sputtered metallic multilayers such as Cu-Nb and V-Ag with a range of individual layer thickness from approximately 2 nm to 50 nm and the corresponding 1000 nm thick single layer films were implanted with helium ions at room temperature. Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) was used to measure the distribution of helium bubbles and correlated with the helium concentration profile measured vis ion beam analysis techniques to obtain the helium concentration at which bubbles are detected in TEM. It was found that in multilayers the minimum helium concentration to form bubbles (approximately I nm in size) that are easily resolved in through-focus TEM imaging was several atomic %, orders of magnitude higher than that in single layer metal films. This observation is consistent with an increased solubility of helium at interfaces that is predicted by atomistic modeling of the atomic structures of fcc-bcc interfaces. At helium concentrations as high as 7 at.%, a uniform distribution of I nm diameter bubbles results in negligible irradiation hardening and loss of deformability in multi layers with layer thicknesses of a few nanometers. The control of atomic structures of interfaces to produce high helium solubility at interfaces is crucial in the design of nano-composite materials that are radiation damage tolerant. Reduced radiation damage also leads to a reduction in the irradiation hardening, particularly at layer thickness of approximately 5 run

  16. A comparison of ionizing radiation damage in CMOS devices from 60Co gamma rays, electrons and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Baoping; Yao Zhibin; Zhang Fengqi

    2009-01-01

    Radiation hardened CC4007RH and non-radiation hardened CC4011 devices were irradiated using 60 Co gamma rays, 1 MeV electrons and 1-9 MeV protons to compare the ionizing radiation damage of the gamma rays with the charged particles. For all devices examined, with experimental uncertainty, the radiation induced threshold voltage shifts (ΔV th ) generated by 60 Co gamma rays are equal to that of 1 MeV electron and 1-7 MeV proton radiation under 0 gate bias condition. Under 5 V gate bias condition, the distinction of threshold voltage shifts (ΔV th ) generated by 60 Co gamma rays and 1 MeV electrons irradiation are not large, and the radiation damage for protons below 9 MeV is always less than that of 60 Co gamma rays. The lower energy the proton has, the less serious the radiation damage becomes. (authors)

  17. The suppressive effect of etoposide on recovery from sublethal radiation damage in Chinese hamster V 79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Tsutomu; Shimada, Yuji; Kawamori, Jiro; Kamata, Rikisaburo

    1992-01-01

    The combined effect of radiation and etoposide on the survival of cultured Chinese hamster V 79 cells was investigated. Cells in exponential growth phase were treated with various combinations of radiation and etoposide. The surviving fraction was assessed by colony formation. Etoposide significantly reduced so-called shoulder width, as expressed in Dq (quasithreshold dose), of radiation survival curves. The reduction depended on the increase of etoposide concentrations, although steepening of slopes of exponentially regressing portions of the radiation survival curves was slight. Split dose experiments showed that cells did not recover from sublethal radiation damage in the presence of low concentration of etoposide, although they did recover from sublethal radiation damage under a drug free condition. The results show the suppressive effect of etoposide on recovery from sublethal radiation damage. The effect of a sequential combination of radiation and etoposide was also investigated. The effect was more marked when the interval between radiation and etoposide was shorter regardless of the sequence. (author)

  18. Medical treatment of radiation damages and medical emergency planning in case of nuclear power plant incidents and accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlenschlaeger, L.

    1981-03-01

    Medical measures in case of radiation damages are discussed on the basis of five potential categories of radiation incidents and accidents, respectively, viz. contaminations, incorporations, external local and general radiation over-exposures, contaminated wounds, and combinations of radiation damages and conventional injuries. Considerations are made for diagnostic and therapeutic initial measures especially in case of minor and moderate radiation accidents. The medical emergency planning is reviewed by means of definations used in the practical handling of incidents or accidents. The parameters are: extent of the incident or accident, number of persons involved, severity of radiation damage. Based on guiding symptoms the criteria for the classification into minor, moderate or severe radiation accidents are discussed. Reference is made to the Medical Radiation Protection Centers existing in the Federal Republic of Germany and the possibility of getting advices in case of radiation incidents and accidents. (orig.) [de

  19. Modeling Radiation Damage Effects in 3D Pixel Digitization for the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Giugliarelli, Gilberto; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS experiment. They constitute the part of ATLAS closest to the interaction point and for this reason they will be exposed – over their lifetime – to a significant amount of radiation: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence of 10^15 neq/cm2 and their HL–LHC upgrades will have to cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This poster presents the details of a new digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the 3D Pixel sensors for the ATLAS Detector.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in D019 Ti3Al intermetallic compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voskoboinikov, Roman E.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) has been applied to simulate the radiation damage created in displacement cascades in D0 19 Ti 3 Al structural intermetallics. Collision cascades formed by the recoil of either Al or Ti primary knock-on atoms (PKA) with energy E PKA = 5, 10, 15 or 20 keV were considered in Ti 3 Al single crystals at T = 100, 300, 600 and 900 K. At least 24 different cascades for each (E PKA , T, PKA type) set were simulated. A comprehensive treatment of the modelling results has been carried out. We have evaluated the number of Frenkel pairs, fraction of Al and Ti vacancies, self-interstitial atoms and anti-sites as a function of (E PKA ,T, PKA type). Preferred formation of both Al vacancies and self-interstitial atoms in D0 19 Ti 3 Al exposed to irradiation has been detected

  1. Inelastic contribution to the radiation damage of Cu and Ni exposed to charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimov, Sh.Sh.; Ibragimov, R.M.; Kirsanov, V.V.; Reutov, V.F.

    1975-01-01

    The formation of radiation damage through primary knock-on atoms (PKA) in elastic interactions, and heavy nuclear reaction products in irradiation of Cu by 30 MeV protons and of Ni by 50 MeV α-particles is studied. Distributions of the mean free path of bombarding particles, of concentration and average energy of PKA and recoil nuclei are obtained. The characteristic feature of these distributions is a substantial superiority of the PKA concentration while thier average energy is much less than that of recoil nuclei. A comparison of numbers of atoms displaced by elastic and inelastic interactions is made. The contribution of inelastic processes to the total number of displacements per target atom is shown to be small for the (α, Ni) system and notable for the (p, Cu) system within the range of the mean free path where the proton energy is mainly going into ionization

  2. Radiation damage in undoped CsI and CsI(Tl)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woody, C.L.; Kierstead, J.A.; Levy, P.W.; Stoll, S.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation damage has been studied in undoped CsI and CsI(TI) crystals using 60 Co gamma radiation for doses up to ∼ 4.2 x 10 6 . Samples from various manufacturers were measured ranging in size from 2.54 cm long cylinders to a 30 cm long block. Measurements were made on the change in optical transmission and scintillation light output as a function of dose. Although some samples showed a small change in transmission, a significant change in light output was observed for all samples. Recovery from damage was also studied as a function of time and exposure to UV light. A short lived phosphorescence was observed in undoped CsI, similar to the phosphorescence seen in CsI(TI)

  3. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1980-09-01

    In this project several mechanisms are proposed for radiation damage to DNA constituents and DNA, and a series of experiments detailed utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms. Under current investigation are irradiated systems of DNA constituents which may shed light on indirect effects. In addition, studies of radiation effects on lipids have been undertaken which will shed light on the only other proposed site for cell kill, the membrane. Studies completed during the past year are: (1) π cations produced in DNA bases by attack of oxidizing radicals; (2) INDO studies of radicals produced in peptides and carboxylic acid model compounds; (3) electron reactions with carboxylic acids, ketones and aldehydes; and (4) γ-irradiation of esters and triglycerides. Progress has been made this year in a study of radicals generated in model compounds for the sugar-phosphate backbone

  4. Radiation Damage in Nuclear Fuel for Advanced Burner Reactors: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Niels Gronbech; Asta, Mark; Ozolins, Nigel Browning' Vidvuds; de Walle, Axel van; Wolverton, Christopher

    2011-12-29

    The consortium has completed its existence and we are here highlighting work and accomplishments. As outlined in the proposal, the objective of the work was to advance the theoretical understanding of advanced nuclear fuel materials (oxides) toward a comprehensive modeling strategy that incorporates the different relevant scales involved in radiation damage in oxide fuels. Approaching this we set out to investigate and develop a set of directions: 1) Fission fragment and ion trajectory studies through advanced molecular dynamics methods that allow for statistical multi-scale simulations. This work also includes an investigation of appropriate interatomic force fields useful for the energetic multi-scale phenomena of high energy collisions; 2) Studies of defect and gas bubble formation through electronic structure and Monte Carlo simulations; and 3) an experimental component for the characterization of materials such that comparisons can be obtained between theory and experiment.

  5. Electron Beam Induced Radiation Damage of the Semiconductor Radiation Detector based on Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Soo; Kim, Yong Kyun; Park, Se Hwan; Haa, Jang Ho; Kang, Sang Mook; Chung, Chong Eun; Cho, Seung Yeon; Park, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Tae Hyung

    2005-01-01

    A Silicon Surface Barrier (SSB) semiconductor detector which is generally used to detect a charged particle such as an alpha particle was developed. The performance of the developed SSB semiconductor detector was measured with an I-V curve and an alpha spectrum. The response for an alpha particle was measured by Pu-238 sources. A SSB semiconductor detector was irradiated firstly at 30sec, at 30μA and secondly 40sec, 40μA with a 2MeV pulsed electron beam generator in KAERI. And the electron beam induced radiation damage of a homemade SSB detector and the commercially available PIN photodiode were investigated. An annealing effect of the damaged SSB and PIN diode detector were also investigated using a Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA). This data may assist in designing the silicon based semiconductor radiation detector when it is operated in a high radiation field such as space or a nuclear power plant

  6. Compilation of radiation damage test data. Pt. 2. Thermoset and thermoplastic resins, composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavlet, M.; Fontaine, A.; Schoenbacher, H.

    1998-01-01

    This catalogue summarizes radiation damage test data on thermoplastic and thermoset resins and composites. Most of them are epoxy resins used as insulator for magnet coils. Many results are also given for new engineering thermoplastics which can be used either for their electrical properties or for their mechanical properties. The materials have been irradiated either in a 60 Co source, up to integrated absorbed doses between 200 kGy and a few megagrays, at dose rates of the order of 1 Gy/s, or in a nuclear reactor at dose rates of the order of 50 Gy/s, up to doses of 100 MGy. The flexural strength, the deformation and the modulus of elasticity have been measured on irradiated and non-irradiated samples, according to the recommendations of the International Electrotechnical Commissions. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (orig.)

  7. Compilation of radiation damage test data. Pt. 2. Thermoset and thermoplastic resins, composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavlet, M; Fontaine, A; Schoenbacher, H

    1998-05-18

    This catalogue summarizes radiation damage test data on thermoplastic and thermoset resins and composites. Most of them are epoxy resins used as insulator for magnet coils. Many results are also given for new engineering thermoplastics which can be used either for their electrical properties or for their mechanical properties. The materials have been irradiated either in a {sup 60}Co source, up to integrated absorbed doses between 200 kGy and a few megagrays, at dose rates of the order of 1 Gy/s, or in a nuclear reactor at dose rates of the order of 50 Gy/s, up to doses of 100 MGy. The flexural strength, the deformation and the modulus of elasticity have been measured on irradiated and non-irradiated samples, according to the recommendations of the International Electrotechnical Commissions. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (orig.)

  8. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA, Progress report, November 1, 1977--October 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1978-06-01

    In this project we have proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA constituents and DNA, and have detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms. In the past we have concentrated chiefly on the direct affect of radiation on DNA. We are currently investigating systems of DNA constituents and peptides which may shed light on indirect effects. Studies which we have completed during the past year are: π-cation radicals in DNA and dinucleoside phosphates, and conformational effects on the ESR Spectra of amino acids and peptides. Studies of γ-Irradiated Peptide Solutions at 77 0 K, and studies of spin transfer in γ-irradiated nucleoside--peptide solutions were also conducted

  9. An automated single ion hit at JAERI heavy ion microbeam to observe individual radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Tomihiro; Sakai, Takuro; Naitoh, Yutaka; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Hirao, Toshio

    1999-01-01

    Microbeam scanning and a single ion hit technique have been combined to establish an automated beam positioning and single ion hit system at the JAERI Takasaki heavy ion microbeam system. Single ion irradiation on preset points of a sample in various patterns can be performed automatically in a short period. The reliability of the system was demonstrated using CR-39 nuclear track detectors. Single ion hit patterns were achieved with a positioning accuracy of 2 μm or less. In measurement of single event transient current using this system, the reduction of the pulse height by accumulation of radiation damages was observed by single ion injection to the same local areas. This technique showed a possibility to get some quantitative information about the lateral displacement of an individual radiation effect in silicon PIN photodiodes. This paper will give details of the irradiation system and present results from several experiments

  10. Solar wind radiation damage in lunar dust grains and the characteristics of the ancient solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, J.; Chaumont, J.

    1980-01-01

    Current understanding of the exposure history of lunar dust grains to the ancient solar wind is reviewed, the work being based mostly on a Monte Carlo statistical code, describing the 'gardening' effects of the meteorite bombardment in the lunar regolith, and on analytical models, yielding the lifetimes of the grains against various types of destruction processes. Families of lunar dust grains are identified, and evidence is presented showing that lunar dust grains were not partially shielded from solar wind ions. Results of solar wind simulation experiments are used to interpret the thickness distribution of the amorphous coatings of solar wind radiation-damaged material observed on 1-micron lunar dust grains. It is argued that such distributions reflect the speed distribution of the ancient solar wind as averaged over periods of approximately 5000 years in duration, and that the ancient solar wind is less energetic than the present day solar wind

  11. Radiation-damage studies, irradiations and high-dose dosimetry for LHC detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Coninckx, F; León-Florián, E; Leutz, H; Schönbacher, Helmut; Sonderegger, P; Tavlet, Marc; Sopko, B; Henschel, H; Schmidt, H U; Boden, A; Bräunig, D; Wulf, F; Cramariuc, R; Ilie, D; Fattibene, P; Onori, S; Miljanic, S; Paic, G; Razen, B; Razem, D; Rendic, D; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1991-01-01

    The proposal is divided into a main project and special projects. The main project consists of a service similar to the one given in the past to accelerator construction projects at CERN (ISR,SPS,LEP) on high-dose dosimetry, material irradiations, irradiations tests, standardization of test procedures and data compilations. Large experience in this field and numerous radiation damage test data of insulating and structural materials are available. The special projects cover three topics which are of specific interest for LHC detector physicists and engineers at CERN and in other high energy physics institutes, namely: Radiation effects in scintillators; Selection of radiation hard optical fibres for data transmission; and Selection and testing of radiation hard electronic components.

  12. Light ions cyclotron bombardment to simulate fast neutron radiation damage in nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segura, E.; Lucki, G.; Aguiar, D.

    1984-01-01

    The applicability and limitations of the use of cyclotron light ions bombardment to simulate the effects of the neutron irradiation are presented. Light ions with energies of about 10 MeV are capable to produce homogeneous damage in specimens suitable for measuring bulk mechanical properties although their low damage rate of 10 -5 dpa.sec -1 limit the dose range to a few dpa. On the other hand, cyclotron alpha particle implantation provides a fast and convenient way of introducing helium with a minimum of side effects so that we can take advantage of this technique to get better understanding of the mechanism by which this insoluble gas produces high temperature embrittlement. Some experimental details such as dimensions and cooling techniques are described. Finally a description of the infrastructure for cyclotron alpha particle implantation and a creep-test facility of the Division of Radiation Damage at IPEN-CNEN/SP are presented. (Author) [pt

  13. Study of Engraftment of human cord blood cells to rescue the sublethal radiation damage mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Xiangshan; Zou Zhenghui; Yu Fei; Zhang Zhilin; Lin Baojue

    1997-01-01

    To investigate alternative source of hematopoiesis stem cells to rescue the sublethal radiation damage (SRD) casualties. Human-umbilical cord blood hematopoietic cells were transplanted into SRD mice, the survival rate and the hematopoiesis reconstitution of bone marrow were assessed. The survival rate, in the mice transplanted and the untransplanted, were 90% and 10% respectively. Bone marrow and spleen of survival mice showed human leukocytic antigen CD45 + cells. Presence of multilineage engraftment, including myeloid and erythroid lineages, were found indicating that immature human cells home to the mouse bone marrow. conclusion: engraftment of umbilical cord blood cells is very useful to reconstitute hematopoiesis of SRD casualties. As cord blood has many advantages over bone marrow and peripheral blood, it is important in rescuing radiation accidental casualties

  14. The effect of C concentration on radiation damage in Fe–Cr–C alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinander, A., E-mail: andrea.meinander@helsinki.fi [EURATOM-Tekes, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Henriksson, K.O.E. [EURATOM-Tekes, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Björkas, C. [EURATOM-Tekes, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Jülich (Germany); Vörtler, K.; Nordlund, K. [EURATOM-Tekes, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-11-15

    Using a recently developed analytical bond-order potential for the complete ternary system, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the primary radiation damage by displacement cascades in different Fe–Cr–C model alloys. We compared results obtained with this new potential to previous studies employing potentials for the binary Fe–Cr and Fe–C systems. We analysed the effect of C concentration on the number of Frenkel pairs produced by the cascades, as well as on clustering of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs), and on the Cr and C content in the defects. The effect of C concentration on defect production was negligible, except at very high concentrations of over 1 at.% C. The main effect was in the Cr content of clustered SIAs, which increased with increasing C concentration.

  15. Non-linear character of dose dependences of chromosome aberration frequency in radiation-damaged root

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravets, E.A.; Berezhnaya, V.V.; Sakada, V.I.; Rashidov, N.M.; Grodzinskij, D.M.; Kravets, E.A.; Berezhnaya, V.V.; Sakada, V.I.; Rashidov, N.M.; Grodzinskij, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    The dose dependences of the aberrant anaphases in the root meristem in 48 hours after the irradiation have non-linear character and a plateau in the region about 6-8 Gy. The plateau indicates the activation of recovery processes. In the plateau range, the level of damages for this genotype is 33% for aberrant anaphases (FAA), 2.3 aberrations per aberrant anaphase (A/AC), and 0.74 aberrations for the total number of anaphases. At 10 Gy, the dose curve forms the exponential region caused by the involvement of the large number of new cells with unrepaired damages in the mutation process. The increase of A/AC to 1.1 indicate the ''criticality'' of the meristem radiation damage.

  16. Equivalence of displacement radiation damage in superluminescent diodes induced by protons and heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xingji, E-mail: lxj0218@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Chaoming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lan, Mujie; Xiao, Liyi [Center of Micro-electronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Jianchun; Ding, Dongfa [Beijing Aerospace Times Optical-electronic Technology Co.Ltd, Beijing 100854 (China); Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-07-11

    The degradation of optical power for superluminescent diodes is in situ measured under exposures of protons with various energies (170 keV, 3 MeV and 5 MeV), and 25 MeV carbon ions for several irradiation fluences. Experimental results show that the optical power of the SLDs decreases with increasing fluence. The protons with lower energies cause more degradation in the optical power of SLDs than those with higher energies at a given fluence. Compared to the proton irradiation with various energies, the 25 MeV carbon ions induce more severe degradation to the optical power. To characterize the radiation damage of the SLDs, the displacement doses as a function of chip depth in the SLDs are calculated by SRIM code for the protons and carbon ions. Based on the irradiation testing and calculation results, an approach is given to normalize the equivalence of displacement damage induced by various charged particles in SLDs.

  17. Relation of radiation damage of metallic solids to electronic structure. Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaev, A.M.; Adamenko, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of relating a damage in metal solids to the parameters of radiation fluxes and the physical nature of a target is considered. Basing upon experimental and theoretical investigations into the processes of interaction of particle fluxes with solids, the following conclusions have been reached. Threshold energy of ion displacement in the crystal lattice of a metal solid is dependent on the energy of a bombarding particle, which is due to ionization and electroexcitation stimulated by energy transfer from a fast particle to a system of collectivized electrons. The rate of metal solid damage by radiation depends on the state of the crystal lattice, in particular on its defectness. Variations of local electron density in the vicinity of a defect are related with changing thermodynamic characteristics of radiation-induced defect formation. A type of atomic bond in a solid affects the rate of radiation damage. The greatest damage occurs in materials with a covalent bond

  18. Measurement and modelling of the radiation damage of silicon by MeV Ag ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, J.K.N.; Eder, J.; Stritzker, B.

    1999-01-01

    Depth profiles of the radiation damage produced by 4 MeV Ag ions in Si(111) at temperatures of 210--450 K are studied by optical reflectivity depth profiling and TEM for doses between 10 12 and 10 15 Ag/cm 2 . For high implantation temperatures, the depth of maximum damage is shown to be dose dependent. Point defect diffusion is shown to result in long tails of defect depth profiles. High-temperature amorphization is observed to proceed via the formation and bridge-like coalescence of isolated amorphous volumina. The damage at the depth of the maximum in the nuclear stopping power is described as a function of dose and temperature by the Hecking model. The model parameters and a comparison with those obtained for lighter ions reflect the particular properties of heavy ion collision cascades

  19. An Analysis of the Radiation Damage to the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker End-Caps

    CERN Document Server

    Millar, Declan; Moretti, Stefano

    The motivation, theoretical principles and analytical procedure for an assessment of the radiation damage to the ATLAS SCT end-caps is presented. An analysis of the leakage current across end-cap modules is performed for 2011 and 2012 data. A comparison between the observed and expected leakage current is made, with measurements favouring the shape of the theoretical evolution. Measured data is found to be systematically lower than predicted for a large subset of end-cap modules, while the remainder show surface current effects which interfere with bulk current observation. Uniform differences for modules at different radial distances suggest a radial temperature distribution in the end-caps, with absolute silicon sensor temperature to be established in further analysis.

  20. Radiation damage studies on the optical and mechanical properties of plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizue Hamada, Margarida; Roberto Rela, Paulo; Eduardo da Costa, Fabio; Henrique de Mesquita, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the radiation damage studies on a large volume plastic scintillator based in polystyrene doped with PPO and POPOP. The consequences on their mechanical and scintillation properties were evaluated before and after irradiation with different dose rates of 60 Co gamma radiation, in several doses. The optical results show a significant difference in the radiation susceptibility, when the plastic scintillator is irradiated at low rate (0.1 kGy/h) with that irradiated at high dose rate (85 kGy/h). The losses in the optical and mechanical properties increase as the irradiation dose is increased. The damage evaluated by the transmittance, emission intensity, pulse height and tensile strength was normalized as a damage fraction and fitted by a bi-exponential function. It was observed that the damage for irradiation is not permanent and it obeys a bi-exponential function

  1. DGR, GGR; molecular dynamical codes for simulating radiation damages in diamond and graphite crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taji, Yukichi

    1984-06-01

    Development has been made of molecular dynamical codes DGR and GGR to simulate radiation damages yielded in the diamond and graphite structure crystals, respectively. Though the usual molecular dynamical codes deal only with the central forces as the mutual interactions between atoms, the present codes can take account of noncentral forces to represent the effect of the covalent bonds characteristic of diamond or graphite crystals. It is shown that lattice defects yielded in these crystals are stable by themselves in the present method without any supports of virtual surface forces set on the crystallite surfaces. By this effect the behavior of lattice defects has become possible to be simulated in a more realistic manner. Some examples of the simulation with these codes are shown. (author)

  2. Simulating Neutron Radiation Damage of Graphite by In-situ Electron Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, Brindusa E; Freeman, H M; Brydson, R M D; Westwood, A V K; Scott, A J

    2014-01-01

    Radiation damage in nuclear grade graphite has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Changes in the structure on the atomic scale and chemical bonding, and the relationship between each were of particular interest. TEM was used to study damage in nuclear grade graphite on the atomic scale following 1.92×10 8 electrons nm −2 of electron beam exposure. During these experiments EELS spectra were also collected periodically to record changes in chemical bonding and structural disorder, by analysing the changes of the carbon K-edge. Image analysis software from the 'PyroMaN' research group provides further information, based on (002) fringe analysis. The software was applied to the micrographs of electron irradiated virgin 'Pile Grade A' (PGA) graphite to quantify the extent of damage from electron beam exposure

  3. Effect of substrate temperature on the radiation damage from MeV Si implantation in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, X.K.; Shao Lin; Rusakova, Irene; Wang, X.M.; Ma, K.B.; Chen, H.; Liu, Jiarui; Chu, W.-K.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the radiation damage by MeV implantation of Si in Si and its evolution under thermal annealing. Si wafers were implanted with MeV Si at various substrate temperatures. Damages were characterized by Rutherford-backscattering (RBS) channeling and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Defect formation after post-implantation annealing is very sensitive to the substrate temperatures during implantation. When the substrate temperature was decreased to 200 K, TEM revealed two distinct bands of damage after annealing: one around the mean projected ion range and another at half the projected range. Our study indicates that the formation of defects at half range results from the solid phase epitaxy growth of initial buried amorphous layers

  4. Multiwalled carbon nanotube destruction in the radiation damages to electron irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Pinchuk-Rugal’

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Behavior of the X-ray diffraction and vibrational Raman spectra of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT under high-energy electron irradiation (Ee = 1.8 MeV with large doses of absorption to 10 MGy were studied. With increasing dose uptake to 10.0 MGy, the interlayer correlation in the distribution of the individual graphene nanotubes nets not only is maintained, but is even improved. Defective bands D, D' and G band with increasing dose absorption have significant transformation, which show radiation damages of MWCNT. The destruction of nanotubes under electron irradiation is accompanied by increased regulation in the arrangement of individual nanotubes by interlayer cross-links involving interstitial atoms. The severity of degradation and cross-linking of MWCNT depends on the electron absorption dose.

  5. Use of lectin-induced lymphocyte stimulation as a biodosimeter of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shifrine, M.; Taylor, N.J.; DeRock, E.W.; Wiger, N.; Wilson, F.D.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of utilizing an in vitro test to determine whether an individual has suffered radiation damage. It was not our purpose to develop a test capable of detecting low doses but rather to determine possible damage due to a radiation accident at medium to high doses. In a pilot study using the whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (WB/LST), we pretested six dogs weekly for three weeks. One was sham irradiated and is referred to as the control and one each received an acute whole body dose of 10, 25, 50, 75, or 100 R. The dogs were tested one day post-irradiation and then weekly for 56 days. Our data indicate that, using Con-A and PHA in the WB/LST, a biodosimeter can be developed to determine recovery of lymphocyte function after suspected radiation exposure to confirm accidental radiation and estimate the magnitude of the dose

  6. Radiation Damage in Silicon Detectors Caused by Hadronic and Electromagnetic Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fretwurst, E.; Stahl, J.; Pintilie, I.

    2002-01-01

    The report contains various aspects of radiation damage in silicon detectors subjected to high intensity hadron and electromagnetic irradiation. It focuses on improvements for the foreseen LHC applications, employing oxygenation of silicon wafers during detector processing (result from CERN-RD48). An updated survey on hadron induced damage is given in the first article. Several improvements are outlined especially with respect to antiannealing problems associated with detector storage during LHC maintenance periods. Open questions are outlined in the final section, among which are a full understanding of differences found between proton and neutron induced damage, process related effects changing the radiation tolerance in addition to the oxygen content and the lack of understanding the changed detector properties on the basis of damage induced point and cluster defects. In addition to float zone silicon, so far entirely used for detector fabrication,Czochralski silicon was also studied and first promising re...

  7. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF RADIATION DAMAGE IN BULK TUNGSTEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-09-22

    We used our recently developed lattice based OKMC code; KSOME [1] to carryout simulations of radiation damage in bulk W. We study the effect of dimensionality of self interstitial atom (SIA) diffusion i.e. 1D versus 3D on the defect accumulation during irradiation with a primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy of 100 keV at 300 K for the dose rates of 10-5 and 10-6 dpa/s. As expected 3D SIA diffusion significantly reduces damage accumulation due to increased probability of recombination events. In addition, dose rate, over the limited range examined here, appears to have no effect in both cases of SIA diffusion.

  8. Multiscale modeling of radiation damage in Fe-based alloys in the fusion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, B.D.; Odette, G.R.; Marian, J.; Ventelon, L.; Young-Vandersall, J.A.; Zepeda-Ruiz, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferritic alloys represent a technologically important class of candidate materials for fusion first wall and blanket structures. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of defect accumulation and microstructure evolution, and the corresponding effects on mechanical properties is required to predict their in-service structural performance limits. The physical processes involved in radiation damage, and its effects on mechanical properties, are inherently multiscale and hierarchical, spanning length and time scales from the atomic nucleus to meters and picosecond to decades. In this paper, we present a multiscale modeling methodology to describe radiation effects within the fusion energy environment. Selected results from atomic scale investigation are presented, focusing on (i) the mechanisms of self-interstitial dislocation loop formation with Burgers vector of a in iron relative to vanadium, (ii) helium transport and (iii) the interaction between helium and small self-interstitial clusters in iron, and (iv) dislocation-helium bubble interactions in fcc aluminum

  9. Radiation damage evaluation on AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, E.G.; Alcubilla, R.; Prat, L.; Castaner, L.

    1988-01-01

    A piecewise model to evaluate radiation damage on AlGaAs based solar cells has been developed, which gives complete electrical parameters of the cells in the operating temperature range. Different structures, including graded band gap and double heteroface can be analyzed. The cell structure is sliced into layers of constant parameters, allowing the model to take into account nonuniform damage produced by low energy protons without excess computer time. Proton damage coefficients as well as proton damage ratios can be calculated for energies between 30 and 10/sup 4/ keV with only two adjustable parameters. In addition, coirradiation experiments with different energy protons can be simulated, by improving the conventional method of degradation computering

  10. Fast heavy-ion radiation damage of glycine in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Shinji [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Tsuchida, Hidetsugu, E-mail: tsuchida@nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Furuya, Ryosuke [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Majima, Takuya; Itoh, Akio [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Fast heavy-ion radiolysis of biomolecules in aqueous solution is investigated for an atomistic understanding of radiation damage to normal cells during heavy-particle beam therapy. The smallest amino acid glycine was used as a model biomaterial. Microjets of aqueous glycine solutions under vacuum were irradiated with 4.0-MeV carbon ions corresponding to energies in the Bragg peak region. To understand the effects of the water environment on molecular damage, the yield of glycine dissociation was measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The yield was significantly reduced relative to gas-phase glycine targets. This implies that the numerous water molecules surrounding a single glycine molecule act as a buffer that suppresses dissociation. This is an environmental effect similar to that observed for other biomolecular cluster targets.

  11. Refractive-index changes in lithium niobate crystals by radiation damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamani Meymian, Mohammad Reza

    2007-01-01

    For the study in this thesis 3 He 2+ ions with the energy of about 40 MeV were applied. The results of these studies show a timely very stable anisotrope refractive-index change in the range of some 10 -3 . The radiation damages caused by ions cause a decreasement of the ordinary refractive index n o and an increasement of the extra-ordinary refractive index n e . While the absolute values for Δn o and Δn e are nearly equal the birefringence of the material (n e -n o ) smaller. The generated refractive-index change is dose dependent and the curve Δn has at increasing dose a strongly nonlinear slope with a characteristic stage at the radiation dose of about 2 x 10 20 ions/m 2

  12. Investigation of radiation damage to biological specimens at water window wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, G.F.; Buckley, C.J.; Burge, R.E.; Bennett, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    This article reports the continuation of a series of experiments investigating the effects of soft x-ray radiation damage on the contractile elements of mammalian striated muscle (myofibrils), using their ability to contract as a functional assay. The myofibrils were exposed to 385 eV x rays. This energy is within the ''water window'' between the oxygen and carbon K edges, where the x-ray absorption coefficient of biological materials, such as protein, is about an order of magnitude greater than that for water. An exposure of 8x10 5 photons μm -1 was found to prevent contraction in the majority of myofibrils. Preliminary results indicate that it is possible to increase this exposure level by approximately 25% by adding the radioprotective dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), an OH radical scavenger to the myofibril buffer during irradiation. This suggests that OH radicals are important in the inactivation of myofibrils through irradiation

  13. Leaf hairs of Olea europaea protect underlying tissues against ultraviolet-B radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabourniotis, G.; Kyparissis, A.; Manetas, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, as measured by chlorophyll fluorescence induction, was not affected in de-haired olive leaves kept in the dark or intact leaves irradiated with a moderate (3.75 W m-2) ultraviolet-B (UV-B) intensity. In de-haired, UV-B-irradiated leaves, however, the ratio of variable to maximum (F(v)/F(m)) chlorophyll fluorescence declined significantly and irreversibly. Reduction in F(v)/V(m) was associated with an increase in instantaneous and a decrease in maximum (F(m)) fluorescence, indicating perturbation by the UV-B exposure of more than one photosynthetic site. Extensive epidermal browning in de-haired, UV-B irradiated leaves was also observed, indicating possible damage to cell membranes. The results strengthen the hypothesis that leaf hairs protect the underlying tissues against UV-B radiation damage

  14. Gamma-ray escape peak characteristics of radiation-damaged reverse-electrode germanium coaxial detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehl, R.H.; Hull, E.L.; Madden, N.W.; Xing Jingshu; Friesel, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    A comparison of the characteristics of full-energy gamma-ray peaks and their corresponding escape peaks when high energy photons interact in radiation damaged reverse-electrode (n-type) germanium coaxial detectors is presented. Coaxial detector geometry is the dominant factor, causing charge collection to be dramatically better for interactions occurring near the outer periphery of the detector as well as increasing of the probability of escape events occurring in this region. It follows that the resolution of escape peaks is better than that of ordinary gamma-ray peaks. This is experimentally verified. A nearly identical but undamaged detector exhibited significant Doppler broadening of single escape peaks. Because double escape events preferentially occur at outer radii, energy shifts of double escape reflect extremely small amounts of charge trapping in undamaged detectors. (orig.)

  15. Accelerated radiation damage test facility using a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wady, P.T.; Draude, A.; Shubeita, S.M.; Smith, A.D.; Mason, N.; Pimblott, S.M.; Jimenez-Melero, E.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new irradiation facility that allows to perform accelerated damage tests of nuclear reactor materials at temperatures up to 400 °C using the intense proton (<100 μA) and heavy ion (≈10 μA) beams produced by a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator. The dedicated beam line for radiation damage studies comprises: (1) beam diagnosis and focusing optical components, (2) a scanning and slit system that allows uniform irradiation of a sample area of 0.5–6 cm"2, and (3) a sample stage designed to be able to monitor in-situ the sample temperature, current deposited on the sample, and the gamma spectrum of potential radio-active nuclides produced during the sample irradiation. The beam line capabilities have been tested by irradiating a 20Cr–25Ni–Nb stabilised stainless steel with a 3 MeV proton beam to a dose level of 3 dpa. The irradiation temperature was 356 °C, with a maximum range in temperature values of ±6 °C within the first 24 h of continuous irradiation. The sample stage is connected to ground through an electrometer to measure accurately the charge deposited on the sample. The charge can be integrated in hardware during irradiation, and this methodology removes uncertainties due to fluctuations in beam current. The measured gamma spectrum allowed the identification of the main radioactive nuclides produced during the proton bombardment from the lifetimes and gamma emissions. This dedicated radiation damage beam line is hosted by the Dalton Cumbrian Facility of the University of Manchester.

  16. The influence of parotid gland sparing on radiation damages of dental hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Jeremias; Seidel, Johannes; Schweyen, Ramona; Paelecke-Habermann, Yvonne; Vordermark, Dirk; Gernhardt, Christian; Kuhnt, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether radiation damage on dental hard tissue depends on the mean irradiation dose the spared parotid gland is subjected to or on stimulated whole salivary flow rate. Between June 2002 and October 2008, 70 patients with neck and cancer curatively irradiated were included in this study. All patients underwent dental treatment referring to the guidelines and recommendations of the German Society of Dental, Oral and Craniomandibular Sciences prior, during, and after radiotherapy (RT). During the follow-up period of 24 months, damages on dental hard tissues were classified according to the RTOG/EORTC guidelines. The mean doses (D(mean)) during spared parotid gland RT were determined. Stimulated whole saliva secretion flow rates (SFR) were measured before RT and 1, 6, 12, 24 months after RT. Thirty patients showed no carious lesions (group A), 18 patients developed sporadic carious lesions (group B), and 22 patients developed general carious lesions (group C). Group A patients received a D mean of 21.2 ± 11.04 Gy. Group B patients received a D(mean) of 26.5 ± 11.59 Gy and group C patients received a D(mean) of 33.9 ± 9.93 Gy, respectively. The D(mean) of group A was significantly lower than the D(mean) of group C (p dental hard tissue correlates with increased mean irradiation doses as well as decreased salivary flow rates. Parotid gland sparing resulting in a dose below 20 Gy reduces radiation damage on dental hard tissues, and therefore, the dose may act as a predictor for the damage to be expected.

  17. Concurrent Transient Activation of Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway Prevents Radiation Damage to Salivary Glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai Bo; Yang Zhenhua; Shangguan Lei; Zhao Yanqiu; Boyer, Arthur; Liu, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many head and neck cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy suffer from permanent impairment of their salivary gland function, for which few effective prevention or treatment options are available. This study explored the potential of transient activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in preventing radiation damage to salivary glands in a preclinical model. Methods and Materials: Wnt reporter transgenic mice were exposed to 15 Gy single-dose radiation in the head and neck area to evaluate the effects of radiation on Wnt activity in salivary glands. Transient Wnt1 overexpression in basal epithelia was induced in inducible Wnt1 transgenic mice before together with, after, or without local radiation, and then saliva flow rate, histology, apoptosis, proliferation, stem cell activity, and mRNA expression were evaluated. Results: Radiation damage did not significantly affect activity of Wnt/β-catenin pathway as physical damage did. Transient expression of Wnt1 in basal epithelia significantly activated the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in submandibular glands of male mice but not in those of females. Concurrent transient activation of the Wnt pathway prevented chronic salivary gland dysfunction following radiation by suppressing apoptosis and preserving functional salivary stem/progenitor cells. In contrast, Wnt activation 3 days before or after irradiation did not show significant beneficial effects, mainly due to failure to inhibit acute apoptosis after radiation. Excessive Wnt activation before radiation failed to inhibit apoptosis, likely due to extensive induction of mitosis and up-regulation of proapoptosis gene PUMA while that after radiation might miss the critical treatment window. Conclusion: These results suggest that concurrent transient activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway could prevent radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction.

  18. Concurrent Transient Activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin Pathway Prevents Radiation Damage to Salivary Glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hai Bo; Yang Zhenhua; Shangguan Lei; Zhao Yanqiu [Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Scott and White Hospital, Molecular and Cellular Medicine Department, Texas A and M Health Science Center, Temple, Texas (United States); Boyer, Arthur [Department of Radiology, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, Texas (United States); Liu, Fei, E-mail: fliu@medicine.tamhsc.edu [Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Scott and White Hospital, Molecular and Cellular Medicine Department, Texas A and M Health Science Center, Temple, Texas (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Many head and neck cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy suffer from permanent impairment of their salivary gland function, for which few effective prevention or treatment options are available. This study explored the potential of transient activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in preventing radiation damage to salivary glands in a preclinical model. Methods and Materials: Wnt reporter transgenic mice were exposed to 15 Gy single-dose radiation in the head and neck area to evaluate the effects of radiation on Wnt activity in salivary glands. Transient Wnt1 overexpression in basal epithelia was induced in inducible Wnt1 transgenic mice before together with, after, or without local radiation, and then saliva flow rate, histology, apoptosis, proliferation, stem cell activity, and mRNA expression were evaluated. Results: Radiation damage did not significantly affect activity of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway as physical damage did. Transient expression of Wnt1 in basal epithelia significantly activated the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in submandibular glands of male mice but not in those of females. Concurrent transient activation of the Wnt pathway prevented chronic salivary gland dysfunction following radiation by suppressing apoptosis and preserving functional salivary stem/progenitor cells. In contrast, Wnt activation 3 days before or after irradiation did not show significant beneficial effects, mainly due to failure to inhibit acute apoptosis after radiation. Excessive Wnt activation before radiation failed to inhibit apoptosis, likely due to extensive induction of mitosis and up-regulation of proapoptosis gene PUMA while that after radiation might miss the critical treatment window. Conclusion: These results suggest that concurrent transient activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway could prevent radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction.

  19. The effects of radiation damage accumulation and annealing on fission-track dating of titanite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enkelmann, Eva; Jonckheere, Raymond; Ratschbacher, Lothar

    2005-01-01

    Fission-track dating of titanite is hindered by the fact that track etching is anisotropic in fresh titanites and becomes isotropic with increasing radiation damage. Independent age determinations with the population method are problematic due to different track counting efficiencies (Q) for ρ s in unannealed and ρ i in annealed titanite. Independent age determinations with the external detector method depend on correction factors for the track registration geometries (G = 0.5), counting efficiencies (Q) and range deficit (R = 1.38); however, Q is unaffected by annealing. It was attempted to determine GQR through calculation, direct experiment and on the basis of age standards. The direct experiment involves measurements of the ratio of the induced-track densities in titanite and a co-irradiated external detector. The track densities in the internal titanite surfaces could not be measured but the results for the external surfaces confirm that this approach leads to a significant overestimation of GQR, due to prior annealing. The GQR-values determined on the basis of age standards are consistent with that obtained by calculation assuming that Q ∼ 1, although there is no experimental confirmation for this fact apart from their isotropic etching characteristics. The fact that identical GQR-factors were obtained on standards of different age and uranium content suggests that a single GQR-value is appropriate for dating titanites within a broad range of radiation damage. In terms of the ζ-calibration this implies that a single ζ-factor is also suitable for dating different titanites. These findings suggest that other factors besides the accumulation of alpha-recoil damage, such as a phase transition, could be co-responsible for the different etching characteristics of annealed and unannealed titanites

  20. On radiation damage to normal tissues and its treatment. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalowski, A.S.

    1994-01-01

    In addition to transiently inhibiting cell cycle progression and sterilizing those cells capable of proliferation, irradiation disturbs the homeostasis effected by endogenous mediators of intercellular communication (humoral component of tissue response to radiation). Changes in the mediator levels may modulate radiation effects either by a assisting a return to normality (e.g., through a rise in H-type cell lineage-specific growth factors) or by aggravating the damage. The latter mode is illustrated with reports on changes in eicosanoid levels after irradiation and on results of empirical treatment of radiation injuries with anti-inflammatory drugs. Prodromal, acute and chronic effects of radiation are accompanied by excessive production of eicosanoids (prostaglandins, prostacyclin, thromboxanes and leukotrienes). These endogenous mediators of inflammatory reactions may be responsible for the vasodilatation, vasoconstriction, increased microvascular permeability, thrombosis and chemotaxis observed after radiation exposure. Glucocorticoids inhibit eicosanoid synthesis primarily by interfering with phospholipase A 2 whilst non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prevent prostaglandin/thromboxane synthesis by inhibiting cycloxygenase. When administered after irradiation on empirical grounds, drugs belonging to both groups tend to attenuate a range of prodomal, acute and chronic effects of radiation in man and animals. Taken together, these two sets of observations are highly suggestive of a contribution of humoral factors to the adverse responses of normal tissues and organs to radiation. A full account of radiation damage should therefore consist of complementary descriptions of cellular and humoral events. Further studies on anti-inflammatory drug treatment of radiation damage to normal organs are justified and desirable. (orig.)

  1. Influence of complex impurity centres on radiation damage in wide-gap metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lushchik, A., E-mail: aleksandr.lushchik@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Lushchik, Ch. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Popov, A.I. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga 8, Riga LV-1063 (Latvia); Schwartz, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Shablonin, E.; Vasil’chenko, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2016-05-01

    Different mechanisms of radiation damage of wide-gap metal oxides as well as a dual influence of impurity ions on the efficiency of radiation damage have been considered on the example of binary ionic MgO and complex ionic–covalent Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} single crystals. Particular emphasis has been placed on irradiation with ∼2 GeV heavy ions ({sup 197}Au, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 238}U, fluence of 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) providing extremely high density of electronic excitations within ion tracks. Besides knock-out mechanism for Frenkel pair formation, the additional mechanism through the collapse of mobile discrete breathers at certain lattice places (e.g., complex impurity centres) leads to the creation of complex defects that involve a large number of host atoms. The experimental manifestations of the radiation creation of intrinsic and impurity antisite defects (Lu|{sub Al} or Ce|{sub Al} – a heavy ion in a wrong cation site) have been detected in LuAG and LuAG:Ce{sup 3+} single crystals. Light doping of LuAG causes a small enhancement of radiation resistance, while pair impurity centres (for instance, Ce|{sub Lu}–Ce|{sub Al} or Cr{sup 3+}–Cr{sup 3+} in MgO) are formed with a rise of impurity concentration. These complex impurity centres as well as radiation-induced intrinsic antisite defects (Lu|{sub Al} strongly interacting with Lu in a regular site) tentatively serve as the places for breathers collapse, thus decreasing the material resistance against dense irradiation.

  2. Evaluation of local radiation damage in silicon sensor via charge collection mapping with the Timepix read-out chip

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Platkevič, M.; Jakůbek, J.; Havránek, Vladimír; Jakůbek, M.; Pospíšil, S.; Semián, Vladimír; Žemlička, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, April 2013 (2013), C04001 ISSN 1748-0221. [14th International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors. Figueira da Foz, Coimbra, 01.07.2012-05.07.2012] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : solid state detectors * radiation damage evaluation methods * pixelated detectors and associated VLSI eletronics * radiation damage to detector materials Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.526, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-0221/8/04/C04001/pdf/1748-0221_8_04_C04001.pdf

  3. High-energy electron irradiation of NdFeB permanent magnets: Dependence of radiation damage on the electron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizen, Teruhiko; Asano, Yoshihiro; Marechal, Xavier-Marie; Seike, Takamitsu; Aoki, Tsuyoshi; Fukami, Kenji; Hosoda, Naoyasu; Yonehara, Hiroto; Takagi, Tetsuya; Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Takashi; Kitamura, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    High-energy electron-beam bombardment of Nd 2 Fe 14 B-type permanent magnets induces radiation damage characterized by a drop in the magnetic field. Experiments carried out at the SPring-8 booster synchrotron, with 4, 6, and 8 GeV electrons, show that the drop in magnetic field is energy dependent. Electromagnetic shower simulations suggest that most of the radiation damage happens in a small region around the irradiation axis, and that the contribution of neutrons with large scattering angles or with low energies to the magnetic field change is small

  4. High-energy electron irradiation of NdFeB permanent magnets: Dependence of radiation damage on the electron energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizen, Teruhiko [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)]. E-mail: bizen@spring8.or.jp; Asano, Yoshihiro [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Marechal, Xavier-Marie [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Seike, Takamitsu [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Aoki, Tsuyoshi [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukami, Kenji [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hosoda, Naoyasu [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yonehara, Hiroto [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takagi, Tetsuya [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hara, Toru [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Tanaka, Takashi [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kitamura, Hideo [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2007-05-11

    High-energy electron-beam bombardment of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-type permanent magnets induces radiation damage characterized by a drop in the magnetic field. Experiments carried out at the SPring-8 booster synchrotron, with 4, 6, and 8 GeV electrons, show that the drop in magnetic field is energy dependent. Electromagnetic shower simulations suggest that most of the radiation damage happens in a small region around the irradiation axis, and that the contribution of neutrons with large scattering angles or with low energies to the magnetic field change is small.

  5. Radiation damage studies on natural rock salt from various geological localities of interest to the radioactive waste disposal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    As part of a program to investigate radiation damage in geological materials of interest to the radioactive waste disposal program, radiation damage, particularly radiation induced sodium metal colloid formation, has been studied in 14 natural rock salt samples. All measurements were made with equipment for making optical absorption and other measurements on samples, in a temperature controlled irradiation chamber, during and after 0.5 to 3.0 MeV electron irradiation. Samples were chosen for practical and scientific purposes, from localities that are potential repository sites and from different horizons at certain localities

  6. Lithium compensation of GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexiev, D.; Tavendale, A.J.

    1988-08-01

    Defects generated following Li diffusion into GaAs were studied by optical deep level transient spectroscopy (ODLTS) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). In an exploratory series of experiments, the effect of Li diffusion on existing trap spectra, defect generation and as a means for the compensation of GaAs was studied. The variables included diffusion temperature, initial trap spectra of GaAs and annealing periods. Detailed measurements of trap energies were made

  7. Preparation and characterization of 238Pu-ceramics for radiation damage experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DM Strachan; RD Scheele; WC Buchmiller; JD Vienna; RL Sell; RJ Elovich

    2000-01-01

    As a result of treaty agreements between Russia and the US, portions of their respective plutonium and nuclear weapons stockpiles have been declared excess. In support of the US Department of Energy's 1998 decision to pursue immobilization of a portion of the remaining Pu in a titanate-based ceramic, the authors prepared nearly 200 radiation-damage test specimens of five Pu- and 238 Pu-ceramics containing 10 mass% Pu to determine the effects of irradiation from the contained Pu and U on the ceramic. The five Pu-ceramics were (1) phase-pure pyrochlore [ideally, Ca(U, Pu)Ti 2 O 7 ], (2) pyrochlore-rich baseline, (3) pyrochlore-rich baseline with impurities, (4) phase-pure zirconolite [ideally Ca(U, Pu)Ti 2 O 7 ], and (5) a zirconolite-rich baseline. These ceramics were prepared with either normal weapons-grade Pu, which is predominantly 239 Pu, or 238 Pu. The 238 Pu accelerates the radiation damage relative to the 239 Pu because of its much higher specific activity. The authors were unsuccessful in preparing phase-pure (Pu, U) brannerite, which is the third crystalline phase present in the baseline immobilization form. Since these materials will contain ∼10 mass% Pu and about 20 mass% U, radiation damage to the crystalline structure of these materials will occur overtime. As the material becomes damaged from the decay of the Pu and U, it is possible for the material to swell as both the alpha particles and recoiling atoms rupture chemical bonds within the solid. As the material changes density, cracking, perhaps in the form of microcracks, may occur. If cracking occurs in ceramic that has been placed in a repository, the calculated rate of radionuclide release if the can has corroded would increase proportionately to the increase in surface area. To investigate the effects of radiation damage on the five ceramics prepared, the authors are storing the specimens at 20, 125, and 250 C until the 238 Pu specimens become metamict and the damage saturates. They will

  8. Study of defects and radiation damage in solids by field-ion and atom-probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidman, D.N.

    1979-06-01

    A brief review is presented of: the basic physical principles of the field-ion and atom-probe microscopes; the many applications of these instruments to the study of defects and radiation damage in solids; and the application of the atom-probe field-ion microscope to the study of the behavior of implanted 3 He and 4 He in tungsten

  9. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in n -type insulating and metallic GaAs single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J.; Hoch, M. J. R.; Kuhns, P. L.; Moulton, W. G.; Gan, Z.; Reyes, A. P.

    2006-09-01

    The coupling of electron and nuclear spins in n-GaAs changes significantly as the donor concentration n increases through the insulator-metal critical concentration nC˜1.2×1016cm-3 . The present measurements of the Ga71 relaxation rates W made as a function of magnetic field (1-13T) and temperature (1.5-300K) for semi-insulating GaAs and for three doped n-GaAs samples with donor concentrations n=5.9×1015 , 7×1016 , and 2×1018cm-3 , show marked changes in the relaxation behavior with n . Korringa-like relaxation is found in both metallic samples for T30K phonon-induced nuclear quadrupolar relaxation is dominant. The relaxation rate measurements permit determination of the electron probability density at Ga71 sites. A small Knight shift of -3.3ppm was measured on the most metallic (2×1018cm-3) sample using magic-angle spinning at room temperature. For the n=5.9×1015cm-3 sample, a nuclear relaxation model involving the Fermi contact hyperfine interaction, rapid spin diffusion, and exchange coupled local moments is proposed. While the relaxation rate behavior with temperature for the weakly metallic sample, n=7×1016cm-3 , is similar to that found for the just-insulating sample, the magnetic field dependence is quite different. For the 5.9×1015cm-3 sample, increasing the magnetic field leads to a decrease in the relaxation rate, while for the 7×1016cm-3 sample this results in an increase in the relaxation rate ascribed to an increase in the density of states at the Fermi level as the Landau level degeneracy is increased.

  10. ZZ RECOIL/B, Heavy Charged Particle Recoil Spectra Library for Radiation Damage Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Amburgey, J.D.; Greene, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: Format: GAM-II group structure; Number of groups: 104 neutron and Recoil-energy groups; Nuclides: Elements Included in Charged-Particle Recoil Data Base: Al, W, Ti, Pb, V, Mg, Cr, Be, Mn, C, Fe, Au, Co, Si, Ni, B-10, Cu, B-11, Zr, N, Nb, Li-6, Mo, Li-7, Ta (Data for Ta-181,Ta-182), O, Origin: ENDF/B-IV cross-section data. A heavy charged-particle recoil data base (primary knock-on atom (PKA) spectra) and an analysis program have been created to assist experimentalists in studying, evaluating, and correlating radiation-damage effects in different neutron environments. Since experimentally obtained controlled thermo-nuclear-reactor-type neutron spectra are not presently available, the data base can be extremely useful in relating currently obtainable radiation damage to that which is anticipated in future fusion devices. However, the usefulness of the data base is not restricted to just CTR needs. Most of the elements of interest to the radiation-damage community and all neutron reactions of any significance for these elements have been processed, using available ENDF/B-IV cross-section data, and are included in the data base. Calculated data such as primary recoil spectra, displacement rates, and gas-production rates, obtained with the data base, for different radiation environments are presented and compared with previous calculations. Primary neutrons with energies up to 20 MeV have been considered. The elements included in the data base are listed in Table I. All neutron reactions of significance for these elements (i.e., elastic, inelastic, (n,2n), (n,3n), (n,p), (n,sigma), (n,gamma), etc.,) which have cross sections available from ENDF/B-IV have been processed and placed in the data base. Table I - Elements Included in Charged-Particle Recoil Data Base: Al, W, Ti, Pb, V, Mg, Cr, Be, Mn, C, Fe, Au, Co, Si, Ni, 10 B, Cu, 11 B, Zr, N, Nb, 6 Li, Mo, 7 Li, Ta (Data for Ta 181 ,Ta 182 ), O. 2 - Method of solution: The neutron

  11. Investigation of microscopic radiation damage in waste forms using ODNMR and AEM techniques. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, G.

    1998-01-01

    'This project seeks to understand the microscopic effects of radiation damage in nuclear waste forms. The authors approach to this challenge encompasses studies of crystals and glass containing short-lived alpha- and beta-emitting actinides with electron microscopy, laser spectroscopy, and computational modeling and simulation. Much of the initial effort has focused on alpha-decay induced microscopic damage in 17-year old samples of crystalline yttrium and lutetium orthophosphates and thorium dioxide that initially contained ∼1% of the alpha-emitting isotope Cm-244 (18.1 y half life) or the beta-emitting isotope Bk-249 (0.88 y half life). Studies will also be conducted on borosilicate glasses that contain Cm-244 or Am-241, respectively. The goal is to gain clear insight into accumulated radiation damage and the influence of aging on such damage, which are critical factors in the long-term performance of high-level nuclear waste forms. Amorphization previously has been thought to be the most important effect of radiation damage in crystalline and ceramic materials. The studies show that for alpha-emitting actinide ions in certain crystalline phosphates, amorphization is not a significant effect of radiation damage. Instead, formation of microscopic cavities (bubbles) is an important consequence of alpha-decay events. This amorphization-resistant property makes orthophosphates a very attractive high level nuclear waste form. However, aggregation and mobilization of cavities (bubbles) might increase the leach rate of radionuclides and influence the long-term stability of the waste forms. Further research is needed before the authors can draw a final conclusion on the long-term effects of radiation damage in high level waste forms.'

  12. Radiation damage study in montmorillonites. Application to the high-level nuclear waste disposal in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorieul, St.

    2003-11-01

    Smectite is a major component of bentonite, a material considered for engineered barriers in high level nuclear wastes repositories (HLNWR). In order to predict the long-term performance of the bentonite, various physical and chemical factors such as, e.g., thermal gradient, redox potential or mechanical stresses are currently considered. By contrast, little is known about radiation effects in smectite, although it might affect the properties of this mineral through cumulative radiation damages produced by ionizing radiations. The present study focuses on radiation damage in montmorillonite considered herein as a simplified model of bentonite. Two reference clays have been selected, one from Liaoning (China, CHI), containing native radiation-induced defects, and the other (called MX) separated from the MX80 reference bentonite (Wyoming, USA). They are distinguished by layer composition, particularly iron content (1 % and 4 % for CHI and MX, respectively). Radiation effects have been studied by combining X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Moessbauer spectroscopies. Ionizing irradiation induces two main effects. First, several paramagnetic point defects are identified as trapped holes located on oxygen atoms of the smectite structure. These defects are characterized by different thermal stabilities, according to annealing experiments. Their creation is limited by saturation curve with maximum damage around 100 MGy. The response of the two montmorillonites is different in terms of nature and production of point defects, indicating a role of layer composition and structural precursors. Besides, EPR and Moessbauer results show substantial modifications of the oxidation state of structural iron, which are sample and dose-dependent. Irradiation induces reduction and oxidation of iron in CHI and MX samples, respectively. Moreover, physico-chemical treatments show that intensity of redox effects varies

  13. Characterization of radiation damage induced by swift heavy ions in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Christian

    2016-05-15

    Graphite is a classical material in neutron radiation environments, being widely used in nuclear reactors and power plants as a moderator. For high energy particle accelerators, graphite provides ideal material properties because of the low Z of carbon and its corresponding low stopping power, thus when ion projectiles interact with graphite is the energy deposition rather low. This work aims to improve the understanding of how the irradiation with swift heavy ions (SHI) of kinetic energies in the range of MeV to GeV affects the structure of graphite and other carbon-based materials. Special focus of this project is given to beam induced changes of thermo-mechanical properties. For this purpose the Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and glassy carbon (GC) (both serving as model materials), isotropic high density polycrystalline graphite (PG) and other carbon based materials like carbon fiber carbon composites (CFC), chemically expanded graphite (FG) and molybdenum carbide enhanced graphite composites (MoC) were exposed to different ions ranging from {sup 131}Xe to {sup 238}U provided by the UNILAC accelerator at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. To investigate structural changes, various in-situ and off-line measurements were performed including Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. Thermo-mechanical properties were investigated using the laser-flash-analysis method, differential scanning calorimetry, micro/nano-indentation and 4-point electrical resistivity measurements. Beam induced stresses were investigated using profilometry. Obtained results provided clear evidence that ion beam-induced radiation damage leads to structural changes and degradation of thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of graphite. PG transforms towards a disordered sp2 structure, comparable to GC at high fluences. Irradiation-induced embrittlement is strongly reducing the lifetime of most high-dose exposed accelerator components. For

  14. Radiation damage studies on natural and synthetic rock salt utilizing measurements made during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swyler, K.J.; Levy, P.W.

    1977-01-01

    The numerous radiation damage effects which will occur in the rock salt surrounding radioactive waste disposal canisters are being investigated with unique apparatus for making optical and other measurements during 1 to 3 MeV electron irradiation. This equipment, consists of a computer controlled double beam spectrophotometer which simultaneously records 256 point absorption and radioluminescence spectra, in either the 200 to 400 or 400 to 800 nm region, every 40 seconds. Most often the measurements commence as the irradiation is started and continue after it is terminated. This procedure provides information on the kinetics and other details of the damage formation process and, when the irradiation is terminated, on both the transient and stable damage components. The exposure rates may be varied between 10 2 or 10 3 to more than 10 8 rad per hour and the sample temperature maintained between 25 and 800 or 900 0 C. Although this project was started recently, measurements have been made on synthetic NaCl and on natural rock salt from two disposal sites and two mines. Both unstrained and purposely strained samples have been used. Most recently, measurements at temperatures between 25 and 200 0 C have been started. The few measurements completed to date indicate that the damage formation kinetics in natural rock salt are quite different from those observed in synthetic NaCl

  15. Radiation damage studies in nuclear waste storage matrices: a few remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoge, Y.

    1997-01-01

    For safe management of high level nuclear waste (HLNW) we have to predict the behaviour of the storage matrix that will have to sustain irradiation over a long period of 10 4 to 10 5 years. 2 approaches are possible and in fact complementary. The first approach is an experimental one: the selected material is submitted to an acceleration of the damage by using various forms of external or internal radiations delivering a higher flux than the stored wastes themselves. The second approach is a cognitive one that requires the modelling of the radiation damage. The second approach seems to have been less developed than the first one. The second approach is a multi-step one. The first step is to review and model all possible phenomena occurring in irradiated material. The second step is to review the different kinds of defects produced by irradiation, their possible mutual interaction and their elimination modes that are followed by the material to go back to equilibrium. There have been a lot of detailed studies of defect formation under ionizing conditions in silica and simple silica based glass, mainly for electronic industry purposes. Fewer studies have been done on nuclear glasses. This article makes a point about the necessity and need for reliable simulation of long-term irradiation effects on nuclear glasses

  16. Late radiation damage to the rat femur and the NSD formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, M.A.; Hietanen, T.

    1984-01-01

    The extraction of 86 Rb chloride, the red blood cell volume and the mineral content in the rat femur have been studied 7 months after local X-irradiation. Doses were given as 3, 6 and 9 fractions over three weeks. The total doses used were based on NSD value of 1450 and 1900 on the basis of the results from our previous single dose irradiation studies. The reduction in the extraction of 86 Rb chloride was statistically significant for all fractionation schemes and at both NSD levels. In the whole femur, with bone marrow, the extraction was reduced by 33% to 46%. In the hard bone the reduction was less only 18% to 38%. There was no significant difference between the fractionation schemes used at each NSD level. The red blood cell volume was significantly reduced in the whole femur, with bone marrow, with no difference between the fractionation schemes. However, there was no change in the hard bone. The dry bone weight was reduced by 3 to 6% with no significant difference between the different fractionation schemes. The dose levels predicted by the NSD formula produced approximately the same damage to the rat femur 7 months after the irradiation when the dry weight and the extraction of 86 Rb chloride were used as end points for the evaluation of the severity of late radiation damage. (orig.) [de

  17. An edge-TCT setup for the investigation of radiation damaged silicon sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feindt, Finn; Scharf, Christian; Garutti, Erika; Klanner, Robert [Institute for Experimental Physics, Hamburg University, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this work is to measure the electric field, drift velocity and charge collection of electrons and holes in radiation-damaged silicon strip sensors. For this purpose the edge Transient Current Technique (TCT) is employed. In contrast to conventional TCT, this method requires light from a sub-ns pulsed, infrared laser to be focused to a μm-size spot and scanned across the polished edge of a strip sensor. Thus electron-hole pairs are generated at a known depth in the sensor. Electrons and holes drift in the electric field and induce transient currents on the sensor electrodes. The current wave forms are analyzed as a function of the applied voltage and the position of the laser focus in order to determine the electric field, the drift velocities and the charge collection. In this talk the setup and the procedure for polishing the sensor edge are described, and first results, regarding the measurement of the laser light focus are presented.

  18. Accelerated radiation damage test facility using a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wady, P. T.; Draude, A.; Shubeita, S. M.; Smith, A. D.; Mason, N.; Pimblott, S. M.; Jimenez-Melero, E.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new irradiation facility that allows to perform accelerated damage tests of nuclear reactor materials at temperatures up to 400 °C using the intense proton (spectrum of potential radio-active nuclides produced during the sample irradiation. The beam line capabilities have been tested by irradiating a 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stabilised stainless steel with a 3 MeV proton beam to a dose level of 3 dpa. The irradiation temperature was 356 °C, with a maximum range in temperature values of ±6 °C within the first 24 h of continuous irradiation. The sample stage is connected to ground through an electrometer to measure accurately the charge deposited on the sample. The charge can be integrated in hardware during irradiation, and this methodology removes uncertainties due to fluctuations in beam current. The measured gamma spectrum allowed the identification of the main radioactive nuclides produced during the proton bombardment from the lifetimes and gamma emissions. This dedicated radiation damage beam line is hosted by the Dalton Cumbrian Facility of the University of Manchester.

  19. On the validity of empirical potentials for simulating radiation damage in graphite: a benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, C D; McKenna, A J; Trevethan, T P; Heggie, M I; Rayson, M J; Briddon, P R

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the ability of methods based on empirical potentials to simulate the effects of radiation damage in graphite is examined by comparing results for point defects, found using ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), with those given by two state of the art potentials: the Environment-Dependent Interatomic Potential (EDIP) and the Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order potential (AIREBO). Formation energies for the interstitial, the vacancy and the Stone–Wales (5775) defect are all reasonably close to DFT values. Both EDIP and AIREBO can thus be suitable for the prompt defects in a cascade, for example. Both potentials suffer from arefacts. One is the pinch defect, where two α-atoms adopt a fourfold-coordinated sp 3 configuration, that forms a cross-link between neighbouring graphene sheets. Another, for AIREBO only, is that its ground state vacancy structure is close to the transition state found by DFT for migration. The EDIP fails to reproduce the ground state self-interstitial structure given by DFT, but has nearly the same formation energy. Also, for both potentials, the energy barriers that control diffusion and the evolution of a damage cascade, are not well reproduced. In particular the EDIP gives a barrier to removal of the Stone–Wales defect as 0.9 eV against DFT's 4.5 eV. The suite of defect structures used is provided as supplementary information as a benchmark set for future potentials. (paper)

  20. Sonographic diagnostics of subcutaneous fibrosis and its significance in medical expertise of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, D.; Strohmann, G.

    1984-01-01

    In assessing radiation damage of the skin and of underlying tissue - particularly in judging the ability to work of persons with widespread subcutaneous fibrosis in the framework of expertises for invalidity - difficulties are occasionally encountered. One of the reasons for such difficulties is the observed intact state of upper layers of the skin, e.g. after exposure to gamma radiation in telecobalt therapy, which may conceal to the inexperienced doctor the tissue changes present in the deep layers. The experience gained by means of ultrasonic tomography with the purpose of reaching objective findings and determining the exact extent of fibrosis, is reported and examples of expertise are given and demonstrated by figures. The method is easy to handle and, provided by the doctor's expert knowledge, makes possible an exact assessment of the 3-dimensional extension of subcutaneous fibrosis of the squamous cell- and jacket-type, e.g. in the abdominal wall. Thus, sonographic measuring has proved to be a reliable means of expertise in cases of health damage after exposure to ionizing radiation which impairs the person's ability to work. (author)

  1. Intramolecular transfer of radiation damage in γ-irradiated nucleotides: 8,5'-cyclonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuciarelli, A.F.; Raleigh, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The transfer of radiation damage initiated in the sugar phosphate moiety to a nucleotide base as exemplified by 8,5'-cyclonucleotide formation may be important in double-stranded nucleic acids where the bases are shielded to direct hydroxyl attack. With this in mind the authors have renewed a study of the radiation chemistry of cyclonucleotides including further development of an in situ immunochemical assay for their formation in nucleic acids. 8,5'-cycloadenosine 5'-monophosphate has been prepared by radiation chemical synthesis for this purpose. The authors have discovered that the Erlanger and Bieser technique in which the cyclonucleotide hapten is attached to bovine serum albumin (BSA) through the sugar moiety may not be the best approach for preparing cyclonucleotide-containing immunogens as conformational changes may occur in the cyclonucleotide structure during this procedure. The authors are presently using an alternate approach in which the cyclonucleotide hapten is linked to BSA through the phosphate group of the nucleotide. The authors report on these experiments as well as on the basic radiation chemistry of 8,5'-cyclonucleotides

  2. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    In this project we have proposed a mechanism for radiation damage to DNA and detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms. In this past year several investigations have been completed or are nearing completion. These investigations are an ESR study of the N 1 -substituted thymine π-cation radicals; studies of electron reactions with amino acid anhydrides; and ESR and pulse radiolytic studies of electron transfer in dinucleoside phosphate anions. Studies which we have made significant progress on in this past year are positive ion radicals of the dinucleoside phosphates, and reactions of the π-cations of thymine derivatives. In the first study the spin density distribution in the cation radicals of thymidine and thymidine-5 1 -monophosphate have been elucidated. Couplings are found to the ribose group in these radicals. It is believed that these results will aid the identification of cation radicals in DNA. In study 2, the results indicate that these cyclic anhydrides can undergo reductive deamination. In study 3, the results show the order of electron affinities of the DNA bases to be thymine approximately equal to cytosine greater than adenine approximately equal to guanine

  3. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1979-07-01

    Several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA constituents and DNA are proposed, and a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms are detailed. In the past we have concentrated chiefly on the direct affect of radiation on DNA. We are currently investigating systems of DNA constituents and peptides which may shed light on indirect effects. Studies which have been completed during the past year include: (1) studies of γ-irradiated N-acetyl amino acids and peptide solutions at 77 0 K; and (2) studies of barriers to hindered rotation in peptide radicals. Studies in which progress has been made in this past year include: (1) π cations produced in DNA bases by hydroxyl radical attack; and (2) studies of spin transfer in γ-Irradiated nucleoside-peptide solutions. These studies have shown that: (1) frozen aqueous solutions provide a suitable matrix for γ irradiation studies; (2) γ-irradiated peptides in frozen aqueous solutions follow chemistry expected from previous studies; and (3) π cations of DNA base can be produced by hydroxyl radical attack

  4. Artificial ion tracks in volcanic dark mica simulating natural radiation damage: A scanning force microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, M.; Glasmacher, U.A.; Moine, B.; Mueller, C.; Neumann, R.; Wagner, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    A new dating technique uses alpha-recoil tracks (ART), formed by the natural α-decay of U, Th and their daughter products, to determine the formation age of Quaternary volcanic rocks ( 6 a). Visualization of etched ART by scanning force microscopy (SFM) enables to access track densities beyond 10 8 cm -2 and thus extend the new ART-dating technique to an age range >10 6 a. In order to simulate natural radiation damage, samples of phlogopite, originating from Quaternary and Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Eifel (Germany) and Kerguelen Islands (Indian Ocean) were irradiated with U, Ni (11.4 MeV/u), Xe, Cr, Ne (1.4 MeV/u) and Bi (200 keV) ions. After irradiation and etching with HF at various etching times, phlogopite surfaces were visualized by SFM. Hexagonal etch pits are typical of U, Xe and Cr ion tracks, but the etch pits of Ni, Ne and Bi ion tracks are triangular. Surfaces irradiated with U, Xe, Cr and Ni ions do not show any significant difference between etch pit density and irradiation fluence, whereas the Ne-irradiated surface show ∼14 times less etch pit density. The etching rate v H (parallel to cleavage) depends on the chemical composition of the phlogopite. The etching rate v T ' (along the track) increases with energy loss

  5. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, August 1, 1974--July 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1975-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed for radiation damage to DNA and a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanism is described. Investigations completed or nearing completion are: studies of electron transfer reactions in dinucleoside phosphates; studies of the anions of 5-nitropyrimidines and their reactions; and studies of protonation reactions at carbon sites in anion radicals of certain model compounds and aromatic amino acids. In the first study, the relative electron affinities of the DNA bases were determined in a model system of the DNA strand. In addition, study of the reactions of these anions showed that the thymine anion is the most reactive of the DNA bases in this model system. In the second study anisotropic and isotropic spectra of the anion radicals of 5-nitropyrimidines were characterized by newly developed computer simulation programs. Several of the anions were found to react to form iminoxy radicals. The third study showed that protonation reactions at carbon sites in anions are reactions which are general for molecules with unsaturated linkages. Thus, this mechanism is of significance to the radiolysis of many biological molecules, including DNA. (U.S.)

  6. Study of radiation damage in solid materials by simulating physical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnera Hernandez, Ibrahin

    2006-12-01

    Nowadays the damage induced by different types of radiation in advanced materials is widely studied. Especially those materials involved in experiments and developing of new technologies, such as high critical temperature superconductors, semiconductors, metals. These materials are the basis constituents of radiation detectors, particle accelerators, etc. One way of studying this kind of damage is through the determination of the displacements per atom (dpa) induced by the radiation in these materials. This magnitude is one of the measures of the provoked radiation damage. On this direction, the present thesis deals with the study of two types of materials through mathematical simulation of physical processes taking place in the radiation transport. Ceramic superconductor Yba 2 Cu 3 O 7-x and metal Fe are the selected materials. The energy range of the incident gamma radiation goes from a few keV to 15 MeV. The MCNPX version 2.6b is used to determine the physical magnitudes required to calculate the distribution of displacements per atom within these materials, using an algorithm implemented for this purpose. Finally, a comparison between the obtained dpa profiles and the corresponding of energy deposition by radiation in these same materials and the possible linear dependence between both quantities is discussed. (Author)

  7. Study the radiation damage effects in Si microstrip detectors for future HEP experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalwani, Kavita, E-mail: kavita.phy@mnit.ac.in [Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT) Jaipur, Jaipur-302017 (India); Jain, Geetika; Dalal, Ranjeet; Ranjan, Kirti; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh [University of Delhi (DU), Delhi-110007 (India)

    2016-07-15

    Silicon (Si) detectors are playing a key role in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments due to their superior tracking capabilities. In future HEP experiments, like upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, the silicon tracking detectors will be operated in a very intense radiation environment. This leads to both surface and bulk damage in Si detectors, which in turn will affect the operating performance of Si detectors. It is important to complement the measurements of the irradiated Si strip detectors with device simulation, which helps in understanding of both the device behavior and optimizing the design parameters needed for the future Si tracking system. An important ingredient of the device simulation is to develop a radiation damage model incorporating both bulk and surface damage. In this work, a simplified two-trap model is incorporated in device simulation to describe the type-inversion. Further, an extensive simulation of effective doping density as well as electric field profile is carried out at different temperatures for various fluences.

  8. The morphology of radiation damage in copper irradiated with neutrons at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemm, K.R.

    1977-01-01

    This thesis is an investigation of the radiation damage morphology of high purity copper crystals irradiated with fast neutrons at temperatures in the range of 250 to 400 degrees C. At these high temperatures neutron damage is found to accumulate into large 3-dimensional rafts up to 100 μm in size, and the well known homogeneous distribution of black dot damage which is characteristic of irradiations at low temperatures is not observed. The characteristics and composition of the rafts of damage at different temperatures in the range 250 to 400 degrees C have been compared and found to differ to a large extent. It has also been shown that the background areas between rafts contain a rather low density of damage at all temperatures studied. It is therefore concluded that many of the interstitial atoms formed during irradiation migrate over large distances through the crystal lattice to precipitate at the sites of the dislocations forming the large rafts, and so denuded inter-rafts areas are left behind. It is proposed that these large rafts originate from grown-in dislocations present in the crystal before irradiation

  9. The effect of repair inhibitor on radiation damages of pleurotus ostreatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zongqu; Wang Bonan; Li Xuzhao

    1996-01-01

    The growth rate and enzyme activities significantly decreased when dikaryotic hypha of Pleurotus ostreatus were irradiated with γ-rays and subsequently treated with either caffeine or Na 2 -EDTA in comparison with γ-rays treatment alone. The inhibition effect of treatment with either caffeine or Na 2 -EDTA before irradiation was more obvious than that after irradiation. Treatment with either caffeine or Na 2 -EDTA could cause biological damages on hypha when the concentrations of caffeine and Na 2 -EDTA were up to 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml respectively. It is suggested that either caffeine or Na 2 -EDTA be used to suppress the repair of radiation damage in order to increase mutation efficiency of Pleurotus ostreatus and that 0.2 mg/ml caffeine and 0.5 mg/ml Na 2 -EDTA might be the proper concentrations of treatment both before and after irradiation. The effect of caffeine is better than that of Na 2 -EDTA

  10. Gamma Radiation Damage Evaluation Studies on Ferroelectric La and Nb doped PZT Related Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Carlos M.; Pinnera, Ibrahin; Rodriguez, Arturo; Durruti, Ma. Dolores; Hernandez, Moises; Yannez-Limon, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    It is reported the research results of the gamma radiation damage evaluation on La (crystalline sites A) and / or Nb (crystalline sites B) doped ferroelectric PZT ceramics, which were irradiated with 60 Co gamma rays by applying two irradiation regimes: up to 125 lGy (irradiation steps of 25 kGy) and up to 700 kGy (irradiation steps of 100 kGy) exposition doses. The X Ray Diffraction pattern profiles of the irradiated sample were analyzed and the induced crystalline structure changes are reported and correlated with the observed irradiation induced changes on their ferroelectric properties on regard of the irradiation doses. Through the application of the MCCM atom displacements calculations algorithm and code, total dpa profiles were calculated for the studied samples, as well as, the dpa contributions of the different atomics species, where the atom displacements threshold energies were extrapolated from the values calculated by Molecular Dynamic methods for BaTiO 3 system. An evaluation of the reported dpa calculated values on regard of the observed crystal structure and radiation response of the ferroelectric properties is presented. (Author)

  11. Study the radiation damage effects in Si microstrip detectors for future HEP experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalwani, Kavita; Jain, Geetika; Dalal, Ranjeet; Ranjan, Kirti; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) detectors are playing a key role in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments due to their superior tracking capabilities. In future HEP experiments, like upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, the silicon tracking detectors will be operated in a very intense radiation environment. This leads to both surface and bulk damage in Si detectors, which in turn will affect the operating performance of Si detectors. It is important to complement the measurements of the irradiated Si strip detectors with device simulation, which helps in understanding of both the device behavior and optimizing the design parameters needed for the future Si tracking system. An important ingredient of the device simulation is to develop a radiation damage model incorporating both bulk and surface damage. In this work, a simplified two-trap model is incorporated in device simulation to describe the type-inversion. Further, an extensive simulation of effective doping density as well as electric field profile is carried out at different temperatures for various fluences.

  12. Atomic and Molecular Data Needs for Radiation Damage Modeling: Multiscale Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Surdutovich, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the multiscale approach towards understanding of the processes responsible for the radiation damage caused by energetic ions. This knowledge is very important, because it can be utilized in the ion-beam cancer therapy, which is one of the most advanced modern techniques to cure certain type of cancer. The central element of the multiscale approach is the theoretical evaluation and quantification of the DNA damage within cell environment. To achieve this goal one needs a significant amount of data on various atomic and molecular processes involved into the cascade of events starting with the ion entering and propagation in the biological medium and resulting in the DNA damage. The discussion of the follow up biological processes are beyond the scope of this brief overview. We consider different paths of the DNA damage and focus on the the illustration of the thermo-mechanical effects caused by the propagation of ions through the biological environment and in particular on the possibility of the creation of the shock waves in the vicinity of the ion tracks. We demonstrate that at the initial stages after ion's passage the shock wave is so strong that it can contribute to the DNA damage due to large pressure gradients developed at the distances of a few nanometers from the ionic tracks. This novel mechanism of the DNA damage provides an important contribution to the cumulative biodamage caused by low-energy secondary electrons, holes and free radicals.

  13. Absence of storage effects on radiation damage after thermal neutron irradiation of dry rice seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowyama, Y. [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan); Saito, M.; Kawase, T.

    1987-09-15

    Storage effects on dry rice seeds equilibrated to 6.8% moisture content were examined after irradiation with X-rays of 5, 10, 20 and 40 kR and with thermal neutrons of 2.1, 4.2, 6.3 and 8.4×10{sup 13}N{sub th}/cm{sup 2}. Reduction in root growth was estimated from dose response curves after storage periods of 1 hr to 21 days. The longer the storage period, the greater enhancement of radiation damages in X-irradiated seeds. There were two components in the storage effect, i. e., a rapid increase of radiosensitivity within the first 24 hr and a slow increase up to 21 days. An almost complete absence of a storage effect was observed after thermal neutron exposure, in spite of considerably high radioactivities of the induced nuclides, {sup 56}Mn, {sup 42}K and {sup 24}Na, which were detected from gamma-ray spectrometry of the irradiated seeds. The present results suggest that the contributions of gamma-rays from the activated nuclides and of inherent contaminating gamma-rays are little or negligible against the neutron-induced damage, and that the main radiobiological effects of thermal neutrons are ascribed to in situ radiations, i, e., heavy particles resulting from neutron-capture reaction of atom. A mechanism underlying the absence of storage effect after thermal neutron irradiation was briefly discussed on the basis of radical formation and decay. (author)

  14. Evaluation of acute radiation damage of the human brain by 1H-MRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Shigeru; Kinosada, Yasutomi.

    1993-01-01

    Fourteen patients (17 cases) were treated with the whole brain irradiation. Physiological changes in white matter were measured by in vivo 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS). Phantom examination proved the accuracy of our 1 H-MRS method to be valid. The measurement was performed 2 or 3 times in each case at the radiation doses ranging from 0 to 40 Gy with 2 Gy daily fractionation. For the measurement of 1 H-MRS, 1.5 T whole body MR system was used and stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) with chemical shift selective (CHESS) pulse was applied. Volume of the interest (VOI) was 2.5x2.5x2.5 cm 3 , and the repetition time and echo time were 2000 ms and 272 ms, respectively. Acute radiation damage of the brain was evaluated by the change of peak area ratio (PAR) of choline, creatine and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA). 1 H-MRS spectra before irradiation were different from those observed during irradiation. There were statistically significant (p 1 H-MRS is a powerful modality, detecting the subtle physiological change which is difficult to evaluate with conventional images. (author)

  15. A search for a heavy Majorana neutrino and a radiation damage simulation for the HF detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, James William

    A search for heavy Majorana neutrinos is performed using an event signature defined by two same-sign muons accompanied by two jets. This search is an extension of previous searches, (L3, DELPHI, CMS, ATLAS), using 19.7 fb -1 of data from the 2012 Large Hadron Collider experimental run collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment. A mass window of 40-500 GeV/ c2 is explored. No excess events above Standard Model backgrounds is observed, and limits are set on the mixing element squared, |VmuN|2, as a function of Majorana neutFnrino mass. The Hadronic Forward (HF) Detector's performance will degrade as a function of the number of particles delivered to the detector over time, a quantity referred to as integrated luminosity and measured in inverse femtobarns (fb-1). In order to better plan detector upgrades, the CMS Forward Calorimetry Task Force (FCAL) group and the CMS Hadronic Calorimeter (HCAL) group have requested that radiation damage be simulated and the subsequent performance of the HF subdetector be studied. The simulation was implemented into both the CMS FastSim and CMS FullSim simulation packages. Standard calorimetry performance metrics were computed and are reported. The HF detector can expect to perform well through the planned delivery of 3000 fb-1.

  16. Accelerated aging tests of radiation damaged lasers and photodiodes for the CMS tracker optical links

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, K; Batten, J; Cervelli, G; Grabit, R; Jensen, F; Troska, Jan K; Vasey, F

    1999-01-01

    The combined effects of radiation damage and accelerated ageing in COTS lasers and p-i-n photodiodes are presented. Large numbers of these devices are employed in future High Energy Physics experiments and it is vital that these devices are confirmed to be sufficiently robust in terms of both radiation resistance and reliability. Forty 1310 nm InGaAsP edge-emitting lasers (20 irradiated) and 30 InGaAs p- i-n photodiodes (19 irradiated) were aged for 4000 hours at 80 degrees C with periodic measurements made of laser threshold and efficiency, in addition to p-i-n leakage current and photocurrent. There were no sudden failures and there was very little wearout- related degradation in either unirradiated or irradiated sample groups. The results suggest that the tested devices have a sufficiently long lifetime to operate for at least 10 years inside the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment despite being exposed to a harsh radiation environment. (13 refs).

  17. Radiation damage to the normal monkey brain. Experimental study induced by interstitial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Nobuya; Tamiya, Takashi; Matsumoto, Kengo; Furuta, Tomohisa; Ohmoto, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Radiation damage to normal brain tissue induced by interstitial irradiation with iridium-192 seeds was sequentially evaluated by computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and histological examination. This study was carried out in 14 mature Japanese monkeys. The experimental area received more than 200-260 Gy of irradiation developed coagulative necrosis. Infiltration of macrophages to the periphery of the necrotic area was seen. In addition, neovascularization, hyalinization of vascular walls, and gliosis were found in the periphery of the area invaded by the macrophages. All sites at which the vascular walls were found to have acute stage fibrinoid necrosis eventually developed coagulative necrosis. The focus of necrosis was detected by MRI starting 1 week after the end of radiation treatment, and the size of the necrotic area did not change for 6 months. The peripheral areas showed clear ring enhancement with contrast material. Edema surrounding the lesions was the most significant 1 week after radiation and was reduced to a minimum level 1 month later. However, the edema then expanded once again and was sustained for as long as 6 months. CT did not provide as clear of a presentation as MRI, but it did reveal similar findings for the most part, and depicted calcification in the necrotic area. This experimental model is considered useful for conducting basic research on brachytherapy, as well as for achieving a better understanding of delayed radiation necrosis. (author)

  18. Analysis of the transient response of LED-illuminated diodes under heavy radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Passeri, D; Bilei, G M; Casse, G L; Lemeilleur, F

    2000-01-01

    The changes of the electrical properties induced by hadron irradiation on silicon detectors have been studied by using the device level simulator HFIELDS. The model of the radiation damage assumes the introduction of radiation-induced acceptor and donor "deep-levels". The electric field profile and the space charge region extension have been calculated for differently irradiated structures. The simulation has been carried out at different biases in order to study the evolution of the space charge region of irradiated detectors as a function of the applied voltages, below and above the full depletion. The time-dependent current responses and the charge collection properties of the structure illuminated by a red LED light have been calculated. The use of the red light results in a shallow (quasi-surface) generation of e-h pairs in silicon, which has been properly taken into account by the simulation. The results of the simulations have been compared to experimental measurements carried out at CERN on samples ir...

  19. Radiation damage and redeposited-layer formation on plasma facing materials in the TRIAM-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Takeshi; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Yoshida, Naoaki; Itoh, Satoshi

    1997-01-01

    As an aim to obtain some informations of material damage at long time discharge and redeposited-layer formed by scrape off layer (SOL), two collector probe experiments were conducted by using Tokamak of Research Institute for Applied Mechanics (TRIAM-IM). As a result, radiation damage due to charge exchange neutral particles of more than 2 MeV high energy component flying from plasma was observed. And in either experiment, redeposited-layer formation due to deposite of impurity atoms in the plasma could be observed. In the first experiment, a redeposited-layer with fine crystalline particles was observed, which was formed to contain multi-component system of Fe, Cr and Ni and light elements O and C. And, in the second experiment, a redeposited-layer grain-grown in which main component was Mo was observed. Surface modification of plasma facing material such as above-mentioned damage induction, redeposited-layer formation, and so on, was thought to much affect deterioration of materials and recycling of hydrogen. (G.K.)

  20. Very low temperature rise laser annealing of radiation-damaged solar cells in orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulek, V.

    1988-01-01

    Solar cells of all space objects are damaged by radiation in orbit. This damage, however, can be removed by laser annealing. A new in-orbit laser regeneration system for both body- and spin-stabilized space objects is proposed. For successful annealing of solar cells damaged by 10 years' radiation dose in orbit it is necessary for the temperature rise in the incidence point of the laser beam to reach about 400 0 C. By continuous regeneration, however, between two annealing cycles the solar cells are hit by about two orders of magnitude lower radiation dose. This makes it possible to carry out the regeneration at a temperature rise well under 1 0 C! If an optimal laser regeneration system is used, such low temperature rise laser annealing of radiation-damaged solar cells is possible. A semiconductor GaAlAs diode laser with output power up to 10 mW CW was used for annealing. Some results of the very low temperature rise annealing experiment are given in this paper. (author)

  1. Thermal annealing of radiation damage in CMOS ICs in the temperature range -140 C to +375 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchenko, V.; Fang, P. H.; Brashears, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    Annealing of radiation damage was investigated in the commercial, Z- and J-processes of the RCA CD4007A ICs in the temperature range from -140 C to +375 C. Tempering curves were analyzed for activation energies of thermal annealing, following irradiation at -140 C. It was found that at -140 C, the radiation-induced shifts in the threshold potentials were similar for all three processes. The radiation hardness of the Z- and J-process is primarily due to rapid annealing of radiation damage at room temperature. In the region -140 to 20 C, no dopant-dependent charge trapping is seen, similar to that observed at higher temperatures. In the unbiased Z-process n-channels, after 1 MeV electron irradiation, considerable negative charge remains in the gate oxide.

  2. X-ray-excited optical luminescence of protein crystals: a new tool for studying radiation damage during diffraction data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robin L; Yorke, Briony A; Pearson, Arwen R

    2012-05-01

    During X-ray irradiation protein crystals radiate energy in the form of small amounts of visible light. This is known as X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL). The XEOL of several proteins and their constituent amino acids has been characterized using the microspectrophotometers at the Swiss Light Source and Diamond Light Source. XEOL arises primarily from aromatic amino acids, but the effects of local environment and quenching within a crystal mean that the XEOL spectrum of a crystal is not the simple sum of the spectra of its constituent parts. Upon repeated exposure to X-rays XEOL spectra decay non-uniformly, suggesting that XEOL is sensitive to site-specific radiation damage. However, rates of XEOL decay were found not to correlate to decays in diffracting power, making XEOL of limited use as a metric for radiation damage to protein crystals. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  3. Increase of radiation damage to potassium-ion permeability in E. coli cells with decrease in membrane fluidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, S.

    1980-01-01

    Membrane lipids of an auxotroph of E. coli requiring unsaturated fatty acid were manipulated by supplementing the growth medium with unsaturated fatty acids of different chain lengths and/or configurations, and the radiation damage to K + -permeability of the resulting modified cells was investigated in relation with factors influencing membrane fluidity, such as temperature and procaine. Radiation had greater effects on membranes supplemented with unsaturated fatty acids of the trans configuration with a longer chain than on those of the cis configuration with a shorter chain. Radiation damage also increased with decrease in temperature. Furthermore, procaine-treated membranes showed increased resistance to radiation. All these results indicate that the damage was affected by the physical character of membrane lipids and that it was greater in membranes with decreased fluidity. (author)

  4. Influence of the flux density on the radiation damage of bipolar silicon transistors by protons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannikov, Y.; Gorin, B.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Mikhnovich, V.; Gusev, L.

    1981-01-01

    It was found experimentally that the radiation damage of bipolar n-p-n transistors increased by a factor of 8--12 when the proton flux density was reduced from 4.07 x 10 10 to 2.5 x 10 7 cm -2 sec -1 . In the case of p-n-p transistors the effect was opposite: there was a reduction in the radiation damage by a factor of 2--3 when the dose rate was lowered between the same limits. A similar effect was observed for electrons but at dose rates three orders of magnitude greater. The results were attributed to the dependences of the radiation defect-forming reactions on the charge state of defects which was influenced by the formation of disordered regions in the case of proton irradiation

  5. Atomic structure from large-area, low-dose exposures of materials: A new route to circumvent radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.C., E-mail: jannik.meyer@univie.ac.at; Kotakoski, J.; Mangler, C.

    2014-10-15

    Beam-induced structural modifications are a major nuisance in the study of materials by high-resolution electron microscopy. Here, we introduce a new approach to circumvent the radiation damage problem by a statistical treatment of large, noisy, low-dose data sets of non-periodic configurations (e.g. defects) in the material. We distribute the dose over a mixture of different defect structures at random positions and with random orientations, and recover representative model images via a maximum likelihood search. We demonstrate reconstructions from simulated images at such low doses that the location of individual entities is not possible. The approach may open a route to study currently inaccessible beam-sensitive configurations. - Highlights: • A new approach to circumvent radiation damage. • Statistical treatment of large noisy data sets. • Analysis of radiation sensitive material defects.

  6. Optical study of radiation damage in A-SI02 and problems of selective dosimetry of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdukadyrova, I.Kh.

    1991-01-01

    The present work deals with the optical study of the processes of radiation damage and structural phase transitions (PT) accumulation in α-SiO 2 monocrystals undergoing various influences of fast neutrons (F) and with the possibility of dosimetrical utilization of radiation-sensitive characteristics of the oxide. It has been found that when F grows within the limits of 10 18 -10 20 cm -2 the optical activity var-phi of the crystal changes; the influence of flux density, temperature, surroundings, mixed reactor irradiation components, and thickness change. The process of radiation damage of crystals by spectroscopic methods has been studied. In the course of the neutron irradiation of the α-SiO 2 structure transformation phenomena were studied by means of IR-spectrometry

  7. Multi-scale approach to radiation damage induced by ion beams: complex DNA damage and effects of thermal spikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdutovich, E.; Yakubovich, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.; Surdutovich, E.; Yakubovich, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the latest advances of the multi-scale approach to radiation damage caused by irradiation of a tissue with energetic ions and report the calculations of complex DNA damage and the effects of thermal spikes on biomolecules. The multi-scale approach aims to quantify the most important physical, chemical, and biological phenomena taking place during and following irradiation with ions and provide a better means for clinically-necessary calculations with adequate accuracy. We suggest a way of quantifying the complex clustered damage, one of the most important features of the radiation damage caused by ions. This quantification allows the studying of how the clusterization of DNA lesions affects the lethality of damage. We discuss the first results of molecular dynamics simulations of ubiquitin in the environment of thermal spikes, predicted to occur in tissue for a short time after an ion's passage in the vicinity of the ions' tracks. (authors)

  8. Global radiation damage at 300 and 260 K with dose rates approaching 1 MGy s{sup −1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warkentin, Matthew; Badeau, Ryan; Hopkins, Jesse B. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Mulichak, Anne M.; Keefe, Lisa J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Thorne, Robert E., E-mail: ret6@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Approximately half of global radiation damage to thaumatin crystals can be outrun at 260 K if data are collected in less than 1 s. Global radiation damage to 19 thaumatin crystals has been measured using dose rates from 3 to 680 kGy s{sup −1}. At room temperature damage per unit dose appears to be roughly independent of dose rate, suggesting that the timescales for important damage processes are less than ∼1 s. However, at T = 260 K approximately half of the global damage manifested at dose rates of ∼10 kGy s{sup −1} can be outrun by collecting data at 680 kGy s{sup −1}. Appreciable sample-to-sample variability in global radiation sensitivity at fixed dose rate is observed. This variability cannot be accounted for by errors in dose calculation, crystal slippage or the size of the data sets in the assay.

  9. Combined Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects at Very High Fluences in Silicon Detectors: Measurements and TCAD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Moscatelli, F; Morozzi, A; Mendicino, R; Dalla Betta, G F; Bilei, G M

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose a new combined TCAD radiation damage modelling scheme, featuring both bulk and surface radiation damage effects, for the analysis of silicon detectors aimed at the High Luminosity LHC. In particular, a surface damage model has been developed by introducing the relevant parameters (NOX, NIT) extracted from experimental measurements carried out on p-type substrate test structures after gamma irradiations at doses in the range 10-500 Mrad(Si). An extended bulk model, by considering impact ionization and deep-level cross-sections variation, was included as well. The model has been validated through the comparison of the simulation findings with experimental measurements carried out at very high fluences (2×1016 1 MeV equivalent n/cm2) thus fostering the application of this TCAD approach for the design and optimization of the new generation of silicon detectors to be used in future HEP experiments.

  10. Removal of radiation damage by subpopulations of plateau-phase Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.M.; Metting, N.F.; Braby, L.A.; Roesch, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    Specific cellular radiobiology studies are often required to test aspects of the mathematical models developed in the Radiation Dosimetry program. These studies are designed to determine whether specific mathematical expressions, which characterize the expected effect of biochemical mechanisms on observable biological responses, are consistent with the behavior of selected cell lines. Since these tests place stringent requirements on the cellular system, special techniques and culture conditions are required to minimize biological variability. The use of specialized cell populations is providing data on the extent of repair following low doses, and on the changes in the types of damage that can be repaired as the cell progresses toward mitosis. The stationary-phase Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are composed primarily of G(1)-phase cells (83%), with the remainder comprising both G(2) and S phases. Removal of radiation damage by cells was studied in split-dose experiments. To date, we have observed no significant differences in cellular repair rate. This suggests, therefore, that each of the repair processes found in stationary-phase cells is cell-age independent. However, cellular radiation sensitivity does change rapidly and considerably as the cells progress from one phase to the next through the cell cycle. Since the rate of damage removal appears invariant, the change in survival must reflect the efficiency of producing that damage. The experimental data suggest that production of one or another sort of damage probably dominates during specific phases of the cell cycle, while the capacity for removal of all types of damage remains relatively constant

  11. Biodosimetric methods for the evaluation of radiation damage to the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuna, P.; Navratil, L.; Siffnerova, H.; Singer, J.; Havranova, R.; Martinu, P.; Racek, J.; Scheinost, O.; Kantorova, E.; Beranek, L.

    2005-01-01

    The alterations of chromosomes of human lymphocytes are used as a quantitative and specific indicators of radiation injury as a 'biological dosimeter. In this study we applied 4 types of cytogenetic analysis and 5 parameters of oxidation-reduction system in total blood, erythrocytes and blood plasma for the estimation of the radiation damage to the organism in 4 groups of human beings in the region of South Bohemia and especially in the citizens living near to the Temelin nuclear power plant. No statistically significant changes were observed in the compared groups, when the different parameters of the oxidation-reduction system were tested in erythrocytes or blood plasma. The results suggest a consideration that in spite of the fact that the employees did not immediately work in the nuclear power plant control zone, their radiation burden was higher then that in controls. All these employees also resided et distance up to 25 km from the nuclear power plant. Our study demonstrated that changes concerning certain parameters of the oxidation-reduction system after the ionizing radiation action that were still described in experimental studies also occur in man. In future studies it would be desirable to consider their possible changes in the course of radiotherapy, depending on the radiation dose. Changes in employees of the nuclear power plant that show similar nature as those in patients after radiotherapy (SOD, GSHPx, MDA) are of interest. The authors studied changes of selected cytogenetic and oxidation-reduction system parameters in the human plasma and blood elements on three different groups of persons in association with ionizing radiation effects (patients after radiotherapy, employees of the Temelin Nuclear Power Plant, in vitro irradiated blood after taking samples from healthy donors and control group) and the demonstrated changes that justify planning of future studies. (authors)

  12. Proton radiation damage assessment of a CCD for use in a Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gow, J.P.D.; Mason, J.; Leese, M.; Patel, M.; Hathi, B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the radiation environment and radiation damage analysis performed for the Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery (NOMAD) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVIS) channel launched onboard the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) in 2016. The aim of the instrument is to map the temporal and spatial variation of trace gases such as ozone and dust/cloud aerosols in the atmosphere of Mars. The instrument consists of a set of two miniature telescope viewing optics which allow for selective input onto the optical bench, where an e2v technologies CCD30-11 will be used as the detector. A Geometry Description Markup Language model of the spacecraft and instrument box was created and through the use of ESA's SPace ENVironment Information System (SPENVIS) an estimate of the 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence was made at a number of radiation sensitive regions within NOMAD, including that of the CCD30-11 which is the focus of this paper. The end of life 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence at the charge coupled device was estimated to be 4.7 × 10 9 protons.cm −2 ; three devices were irradiated at different levels up a 10 MeV equivalent fluence of 9.4 × 10 9 protons.cm −2 . The dark current, charge transfer inefficiency, charge storage, and cosmetic quality of the devices was investigated pre- and post-irradiation, determining that the devices will continue to provide excellent science throughout the mission.

  13. Primary radiation damage characterization of α-iron under irradiation temperature for various PKA energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahi, Qurat-ul-ain; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2018-04-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced microstructural defects in body-centered cubic (BCC) iron is of major interest to those using advanced steel under extreme conditions in nuclear reactors. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were implemented to examine the primary radiation damage in BCC iron with displacement cascades of energy 1, 5, 10, 20, and 30 keV at temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 K. Statistical analysis of eight MD simulations of collision cascades were carried out along each [110], [112], [111] and a high index [135] direction and the temperature dependence of the surviving number of point defects and the in-cascade clustering of vacancies and interstitials were studied. The peak time and the corresponding number of defects increase with increasing irradiation temperature and primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy. However, the final number of surviving point defects decreases with increasing lattice temperature. This is associated with the increase of thermal spike at high PKA energy and its long timespan at higher temperatures. Defect production efficiency (i.e., surviving MD defects, per Norgett-Robinson-Torrens displacements) also showed a continuous decrease with the increasing irradiation temperature and PKA energy. The number of interstitial clusters increases with both irradiation temperature and PKA energy. However, the increase in the number of vacancy clusters with PKA energy is minimal-to-constant and decreases as the irradiation temperature increases. Similarly, the probability and cluster size distribution for larger interstitials increase with temperature, whereas only smaller size vacancy clusters were observed at higher temperatures.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of radiation damaged DNA. Molecules and repair enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2004-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) studies on several radiation damages to DNA and their recognition by repair enzymes are introduced in order to describe the stepwise description of molecular process observed at radiation lesion sites. MD studies were performed on pyrimidine (thymine dimer, thymine glycol) and purine (8-oxoguanine) lesions using an MD simulation code AMBER 5.0. The force field was modified for each lesion. In all cases the significant structural changes in the DNA double helical structure were observed; a) the breaking of hydrogen bond network between complementary bases and resulting opening of the double helix (8-oxoguanine); b) the sharp bending of the DNA helix centered at the lesion site (thymine dimer, thymine glycol); and c) the flipping-out base on the strand complementary to the lesion (8-oxoguanine). These changes were related to the overall collapsing double helical structure around the lesion and might facilitate the docking of the repair enzyme into the DNA and formation of DNA-enzyme complex. In addition to the structural changes, at lesion sites there were found electrostatic interaction energy values different from those at native sites (thymine dimer -10 kcal/mol, thymine glycol -26 kcal/mol, 8-oxoguanine -48 kcal/mol). These values of electrostatic energy may discriminate lesion from values at native sites (thymine 0 kcal/mol, guanine -37 kcal/mol) and enable a repair enzyme to recognize a lesion during scanning DNA surface. The observed specific structural conformation and energetic properties at the lesions sites are factors that guide a repair enzyme to discriminate lesions from non-damaged native DNA segments. (author)

  15. Oxygen effect on mutagenic ionizing radiation damage in Bacillus subtilis spores of DNA polymerase I-proficient and -deficient strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanooka, H.

    1980-01-01

    The nature of mutagenic ionizing radiation damage modified by the presence of oxygen or water was examined by comparing mutagenic with lethal expression of the damage in Bacillus subtilis spores irradiated with 6-MeV electrons. No specific difference was recognized between oxygen-dependent and -independent damages or between polA + -dependent and -independent damages with this system. The induced mutation frequency for His + mutation per lethal hit was 4.7 x 10 -5 for all tested cases

  16. Assessment of radiation damage behaviour in a large collection of empirically optimized datasets highlights the importance of unmeasured complicating effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krojer, Tobias; Delft, Frank von

    2011-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of radiation damage behaviour in a statistically significant number of real-life datasets is presented, in order to gauge the importance of the complications not yet measured or rigorously evaluated in current experiments, and the challenges that remain before radiation damage can be considered a problem solved in practice. The radiation damage behaviour in 43 datasets of 34 different proteins collected over a year was examined, in order to gauge the reliability of decay metrics in practical situations, and to assess how these datasets, optimized only empirically for decay, would have benefited from the precise and automatic prediction of decay now possible with the programs RADDOSE [Murray, Garman & Ravelli (2004 ▶). J. Appl. Cryst.37, 513–522] and BEST [Bourenkov & Popov (2010 ▶). Acta Cryst. D66, 409–419]. The results indicate that in routine practice the diffraction experiment is not yet characterized well enough to support such precise predictions, as these depend fundamentally on three interrelated variables which cannot yet be determined robustly and practically: the flux density distribution of the beam; the exact crystal volume; the sensitivity of the crystal to dose. The former two are not satisfactorily approximated from typical beamline information such as nominal beam size and transmission, or two-dimensional images of the beam and crystal; the discrepancies are particularly marked when using microfocus beams (<20 µm). Empirically monitoring decay with the dataset scaling B factor (Bourenkov & Popov, 2010 ▶) appears more robust but is complicated by anisotropic and/or low-resolution diffraction. These observations serve to delineate the challenges, scientific and logistic, that remain to be addressed if tools for managing radiation damage in practical data collection are to be conveniently robust enough to be useful in real time

  17. Testing of bulk radiation damage of n-in-p silicon sensors for very high radiation environments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hara, K.; Affolder, A.A.; Allport, P.P.; Bates, R.; Betancourt, C.; Böhm, Jan; Brown, H.; Buttar, C.; Carter, J. R.; Casse, G.; Mikeštíková, Marcela

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 636, č. 1 (2011), "S83"-"S89" ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : p-bulk silicon * microstrip * charge collection * radiation damage Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nima.2010.04.090

  18. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  19. The effect on radiation damage of structural material in a hybrid system by using a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günay, Mehtap; Şarer, Başar; Kasap, Hızır

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of some fluids on gas production rates in structural material were investigated. • The MCNPX-2.7.0 Monte Carlo code was used for three-dimensional calculations. • It was found that biggest contribution to gas production rates comes from Fe isotope of the. • The desirable values for 5% SFG-PuO 2 with respect to radiation damage were specified. - Abstract: In this study, the molten salt-heavy metal mixtures 99–95% Li20Sn80-1-5% SFG-Pu, 99–95% Li20Sn80-1-5% SFG-PuF4, 99-95% Li20Sn80-1-5% SFG-PuO2 were used as fluids. The fluids were used in the liquid first-wall, blanket and shield zones of the designed hybrid reactor system. 9Cr2WVTa ferritic steel with the width of 4 cm was used as the structural material. The parameters of radiation damage are proton, deuterium, tritium, He-3 and He-4 gas production rates. In this study, the effects of the selected fluid on the radiation damage, in terms of individual as well as total isotopes in the structural material, were investigated for 30 full power years (FPYs). Three-dimensional analyses were performed using the most recent version of the MCNPX-2.7.0 Monte Carlo radiation transport code and the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library

  20. Constructive and critical approach of the radiation damage simulation; Approche constructive et critique de la simulation du dommage d'irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becquart, Ch

    2002-11-15

    This work deals with the problem of radiation damage in materials for applications in development of fission and nuclear fusion technologies. It is organised in 3 sections. In section 1 are presented the mechanisms of formation and the evolution kinetics of the primary damage. Section 2 is devoted to the study of the sensitivity of the radiation damage at different approximations. Section 3 discusses the contribution of the ab initio calculations to the study of radiation damage and more particularly the point defects in a dilute Fe-Cu ferritic alloy. This work is illustrated by several publications added in each section. (O.M.)

  1. Charged-particle induced radiation damage of a HPGe gamma-ray detector during spaceflight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Larry G. [Computer Sciences Corporation, Science Programs, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Starr, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Department of Physics, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Brueckner, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Boynton, William V. [University of Arizona, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bailey, S.H. [University of Arizona, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Trombka, J.I. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    1999-02-11

    The Mars Observer spacecraft was launched on September 26, 1992 with a planned arrival at Mars after an 11-month cruise. Among the scientific instruments carried on the spacecraft was a Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) experiment to measure the composition of Mars. The GRS used a passively cooled high-purity germanium detector for measurements in the 0.2-10 MeV region. The sensor was a closed-end co-axial detector, 5.5 cm diameter by 5.5 cm long, and had an efficiency along its axis of 28% at 1332 keV relative to a standard NaI(Tl) detector. The sensor was surrounded by a thin (0.5 cm) plastic charged-particle shield. This was the first planetary mission to use a cooled Ge detector. It was expected that the long duration in space of three years would cause an increase in the energy resolution of the detector due to radiation damage and could affect the expected science return of the GRS. Shortly before arrival, on August 21, 1993, contact was lost with the spacecraft following the pressurization of the propellent tank for the orbital-insertion rocket motor. During much of the cruise to Mars, the GRS was actively collecting background data. The instrument provided over 1200 h of data collection during periods of both quiescent sun and solar flares. From the charged particle interactions in the shield, the total number of cosmic ray hits on the detector could be determined. The average cosmic ray flux at the MO GRS was about 2.5 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The estimated fluence of charged particles during cruise was about 10{sup 8} particles cm{sup -2} with 31% of these occurring during a single solar proton event of approximately 10 days duration. During cruise, the detector energy resolution determined from a background gamma-ray at 1312 keV degraded from 2.4 keV full-width at half-maximum shortly after launch to 6.4 keV 11 months later. This result agrees well with measurements from ground-based accelerator irradiations (at 1.5 GeV) on a similar size detector.

  2. Two Strategies for the Development of Mitochondrion-Targeted Small Molecule Radiation Damage Mitigators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rwigema, Jean-Claude M.; Beck, Barbara; Wang Wei; Doemling, Alexander; Epperly, Michael W.; Shields, Donna; Goff, Julie P.; Franicola, Darcy; Dixon, Tracy; Frantz, Marie-Celine; Wipf, Peter; Tyurina, Yulia; Kagan, Valerian E.; Wang, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation of acute ionizing radiation damage by mitochondrion-targeted small molecules. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the ability of nitroxide-linked alkene peptide isostere JP4-039, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor-linked alkene peptide esostere MCF201-89, and the p53/mdm2/mdm4 protein complex inhibitor BEB55 to mitigate radiation effects by clonogenic survival curves with the murine hematopoietic progenitor cell line 32D cl 3 and the human bone marrow stromal (KM101) and pulmonary epithelial (IB3) cell lines. The p53-dependent mechanism of action was tested with p53 +/+ and p53 -/- murine bone marrow stromal cell lines. C57BL/6 NHsd female mice were injected i.p. with JP4-039, MCF201-89, or BEB55 individually or in combination, after receiving 9.5 Gy total body irradiation (TBI). Results: Each drug, JP4-039, MCF201-89, or BEB55, individually or as a mixture of all three compounds increased the survival of 32D cl 3 (p = 0.0021, p = 0.0011, p = 0.0038, and p = 0.0073, respectively) and IB3 cells (p = 0.0193, p = 0.0452, p = 0.0017, and p = 0.0019, respectively) significantly relative to that of control irradiated cells. KM101 cells were protected by individual drugs (p = 0.0007, p = 0.0235, p = 0.0044, respectively). JP4-039 and MCF201-89 increased irradiation survival of both p53 +/+ (p = 0.0396 and p = 0.0071, respectively) and p53 -/- cells (p = 0.0007 and p = 0.0188, respectively), while BEB55 was ineffective with p53 -/- cells. Drugs administered individually or as a mixtures of all three after TBI significantly increased mouse survival (p = 0.0234, 0.0009, 0.0052, and 0.0167, respectively). Conclusion: Mitochondrial targeting of small molecule radiation mitigators decreases irradiation-induced cell death in vitro and prolongs survival of lethally irradiated mice.

  3. Late radiation damage in bone, bone marrow and brain vasculature, with particular emphasis upon fractionation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, Maunu.

    1986-04-01

    X-ray induced changes in rat and human bone and bone marrow vasculature and in rat brain vasculature were measured as a function of time after irradiation and absorbed dose. The absorbed dose in the organ varied from 5 to 25 Gy for single dose irradiations and from 19 to 58 Gy for fractionated irradiations.The number of fractions varied from 3 to 10 for the rats and from 12 to 25 for the human. Blood flow changes were measured using an ''1''2''5I antipyrine or ''8''6RbCl extraction technique. The red blood cell (RBC) volume was examined by ''5''1Cr labelled red cells. Different fractionation models have been compared. Radiation induced reduction of bone and bone marrow blood flow were both time and dose dependent. Reduced blood flow 3 months after irradiation would seem to be an important factor in the subsequent atrophy of bones. With a single dose of 10 Gy the bone marrow blood flow returned to the control level by 7 months after irradiation. In the irradiated bone the RBC volume was about same as that in the control side but in bone marrow the reduction was from 32 to 59%. The dose levels predicted by the nominal standard dose (NSD) formula produced about the same damage to the rat femur seven months after irradiation when the extraction of ''8''6Rb chloride and the dry weight were concerned as the end points. However, the results suggest that the NSB formula underestimates the late radiation damage in bone marrow when a small number of large fractions are used. In the irradiated brains of the rats the blood flow was on average 20.4% higher compared to that in the control group. There was no significant difference in brain blood flow between different fractionation schemes. The value of 0.42 for the exponent of N corresponds to the average value for central nervous system tolerance in the literature. The model used may be sufficiently accurate for clinical work provided the treatment schemes used do not depart too radically from standard practice

  4. Investigations of p-type signal for ZnO thin films grown on (100)GaAs substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, D.J. [Nanovation SARL, Orsay (France); Univ. de Technologie de Troyes, Troyes (France); Hosseini Teherani, F. [Nanovation SARL, Orsay (France); Monteiro, T.; Soares, M.; Neves, A.; Carmo, M.; Correia, M.R. [Physics Dept., Univ. of Aveiro (Portugal); Pereira, S. [Physics Dept., Univ. of Aveiro (Portugal); Inst. Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem (Portugal); Lusson, A. [Inst. d' Electronique Fondamentale, Orsay Univ. (France); LPSC - CNRS, Meudon (France); Alves, E.; Barradas, N.P. [Inst. Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem (Portugal); Morrod, J.K.; Prior, K.A. [Physics Dept., Heriot Watt Univ., Edinburgh Scotland (United Kingdom); Kung, P.; Yasan, A.; Razeghi, M. [Center for Quantum Devices, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2006-03-15

    In this work we investigated ZnO films grown on semi-insulating (100)GaAs substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Samples were studied using techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, temperature dependent photoluminescence, C-V profiling and temperature dependent Hall measurements. The Hall measurements showed a clear p-type response with a relatively high mobility ({proportional_to}260 cm{sup 2}/Vs) and a carrier concentration of {proportional_to}1.8 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. C-V profiling confirmed a p-type response. XRD and Raman spectroscopy indicated the presence of (0002) oriented wurtzite ZnO plus secondary phase(s) including (101) oriented Zn{sub 2}As{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The results suggest that significant atomic mixing was occurring at the film/substrate interface for films grown at substrate temperatures of 450 C (without post-annealing). (orig.)

  5. Terahertz radiation on the base of accelerated charge carriers in GaAs; Terahertz-Strahlung auf der Basis beschleunigter Ladungstraeger in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyhaupt, Andre

    2008-07-01

    Electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range between about 100 GHz and 5 THz can be used for spectroscopy and microscopy, but it is also promising for security screening and even wireless communication. In the present thesis a planar photoconducting large-area THz radiation source is presented. The device exhibits outstanding properties, in particular high THz field strength and generation efficiency and large spectral bandwidth with short THz pulse length. The THz emission is based on acceleration and deceleration of photoexcited carriers in semiconductor substrates. A metallic interdigitated structure at the surface of semi-insulating GaAs provides the electrodes of an Auston switch. In a biased structure photoexcited charge carriers are accelerated. Hence electromagnetic waves are emitted. An appropriately structured second metallization, electrically isolated from the electrodes, prevents destructive interference of the emitted waves. The structure investigated here combines several advantages of different conventional photoconducting THz sources. First, it provides high electric acceleration fields at moderate voltages owing to the small electrode separation. Second, the large active area in the mm2 range allows excitation by large optical powers of some mW. Optical excitation with near-infrared femtosecond lasers is possible with repetition rates in the GHz range. The presented results point out the excellent characteristics regarding the emitted THz field strength, average power, spectral properties, and easy handling of the interdigitated structure in comparison to various conventional emitter structures. Various modifications of the semiconductor substrate and the optimum excitation conditions were investigated. In the second part of this thesis the dynamic conductivity of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As superlattices in an applied static electric field was investigated with time-resolved THz spectroscopy. The original goal was to explore whether the

  6. TU-CD-BRB-05: Radiation Damage Signature of White Matter Fiber Bundles Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, T; Chapman, C; Lawrence, T; Cao, Y [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Tsien, C [Washington University at St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated and scalable approach and identify temporal, spatial and dosimetric patterns of radiation damage of white matter (WM) fibers following partial brain irradiation. Methods: An automated and scalable approach was developed to extract DTI features of 22 major WM fibers from 33 patients with low-grade/benign tumors treated by radiation therapy (RT). DTI scans of the patients were performed pre-RT, 3- and 6-week during RT, and 1, 6 and 18 months after RT. The automated tractography analysis was applied to 198 datasets as: (1) intra-subject registration of longitudinal DTI, (2) spatial normalization of individual-patient DTI to the Johns Hopkins WM Atlas, (3) automatic fiber tracking regulated by the WM Atlas, and (4) segmentation of WM into 22 major tract profiles. Longitudinal percentage changes in fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean, axial and radial diffusivity (MD/AD/RD) of each tract from pre-RT were quantified and correlated to 95%, 90% and 80% percentiles of doses and mean doses received by the tract. Heatmaps were used to identify clusters of significant correlation and reveal temporal, spatial and dosimetric signatures of WM damage. A multivariate linear regression was further carried out to determine influence of clinical factors. Results: Of 22 tracts, AD/MD changes in 12 tracts had significant correlation with doses, especially at 6 and 18 months post-RT, indicating progressive radiation damage after RT. Most interestingly, the DTI-index changes in the elongated tracts were associated with received maximum doses, suggesting a serial-structure behavior; while short association fibers were affected by mean doses, indicating a parallel-structure response. Conclusion: Using an automated DTI-tractography analysis of whole brain WM fibers, we reveal complex radiation damage patterns of WM fibers. Damage in WM fibers that play an important role in the neural network could be associated with late neurocognitive function declines

  7. Radiation damage evaluation on concrete within a facility for Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES Project), Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomaro, B.; Salomoni, V.A.; Gramegna, F.; Prete, G.; Majorana, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We present the effect of radiation on concrete as shielding material. → The coupling between hydro-thermal-mechanical fields and radiation damage is shown. → Attention is focused on numerical modelling of concrete in 3D domains. → A new estimate of the radiation damage parameter is given. → A risk assessment of concrete-radiation interactions is developed. - Abstract: Concrete is commonly used as a biological shield against nuclear radiation. As long as, in the design of nuclear facilities, its load carrying capacity is required together with its shielding properties, changes in the mechanical properties due to nuclear radiation are of particular significance and may have to be taken into account in such circumstances. The study presented here allows for reaching first evidences on the behavior of concrete when exposed to nuclear radiation in order to evaluate the consequent effect on the mechanical field, by means of a proper definition of the radiation damage, strictly connected with the strength properties of the building material. Experimental evidences on the decay of the mechanical modulus of concrete have allowed for implementing the required damage law within a 3D F.E. research code which accounts for the coupling among moisture, heat transfer and the mechanical field in concrete treated as a fully coupled porous medium. The development of the damage front in a concrete shielding wall is analyzed under neutron radiation and results within the wall thickness are reported for long-term radiation spans and several concrete mixtures in order to discuss the resulting shielding properties.

  8. Gamma-induced positron annihilation spectroscopy and application to radiation-damaged alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, D.P.; Hunt, A.W.; Tchelidze, L.; Kumar, J.; Smith, K.; Thompson, S.; Selim, F.; Williams, J.; Harmon, J.F.; Maloy, S.; Roy, A.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation damage and other defect studies of materials are limited to thin samples because of inherent limitations of well-established techniques such as diffraction methods and traditional positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) [P. Hautojarvi, et al., Positrons in Solids, Springer, Berlin, 1979, K.G. Lynn, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 47 (1985) 239]. This limitation has greatly hampered industrial and in-situ applications. ISU has developed new methods that use pair-production to produce positrons throughout the volume of thick samples [F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 192 (2002) 197, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instru. Meth. A 495 (2002) 154, F.A. Selim, et al., J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 68 (2004) 427, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 241 (2005) 253, A.W. Hunt, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B. 241 (2005) 262]. Unlike prior work at other laboratories that use bremsstrahlung beams to create positron beams (via pair-production) that are then directed at a sample of interest, we produce electron-positron pairs directly in samples of interest, and eliminate the intermediate step of a positron beam and its attendant penetrability limitations. Our methods include accelerator-based bremsstrahlung-induced pair-production in the sample for positron annihilation energy spectroscopy measurements (PAES), coincident proton-capture gamma-rays (where one of the gammas is used for pair-production in the sample) for positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), or photo-nuclear activation of samples for either type of measurement. The positrons subsequently annihilate with sample electrons, emitting coincident 511 keV gamma-rays [F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 192 (2002) 197, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instru. Meth. A 495 (2002) 154, F.A. Selim, et al., J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 68 (2004) 427, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 241 (2005) 253, A.W. Hunt, D

  9. Radiation damage produced by swift heavy ions in rare earth phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanenko, Anton

    2017-02-13

    This work is devoted to the study of radiation damage produced by swift heavy ions in rare earth phosphates, materials that are considered as perspective for radioactive waste storage. Single crystals of rare earth phosphates were exposed to 2.1 GeV gold (Au) and 1.5 GeV xenon (Xe) ions of and analyzed mainly by Raman spectroscopy. All phosphates were found almost completely amorphous after the irradiation by 2.1 GeV Au ions at a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. Radiation-induced changes in the Raman spectra include the intensity decrease of all Raman bands accompanied by the appearance of broad humps and a reduction of the pronounced luminescence present in virgin samples. Analyzing the Raman peak intensities as a function of irradiation fluence allowed the calculation of the track radii for 2.1 GeV Au ions in several rare earth phosphates, which appear to be about 5.0 nm for all studied samples. Series of samples were studied to search for a trend of the track radius depending on the rare earth element (REE) cation. Among the monoclinic phosphates both Raman and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) suggest no significant change of the track radius with increasing REE mass. In contrast, within the tetragonal phosphates Raman spectroscopy data suggests a possible slight decreasing trend of the track radius with the increase of REE atomic number. That finding, however, requires further investigation due to the low reliability of the qualitative Raman analysis. Detailed analysis of Raman spectra in HoPO{sub 4} showed the increase of peak width at the initial stage of the irradiation and subsequent decrease to a steady value at higher fluences. This observation suggested the existence of a defect halo around the amorphous tracks in HoPO{sub 4}. Raman peaks were found to initially shift to lower wavenumbers with reversing this trend at the fluence of 5 x 10{sup 11} for NdPO{sub 4} and 1 x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} for HoPO{sub 4}. At the next fluence steps

  10. Radiation damage produced by swift heavy ions in rare earth phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanenko, Anton

    2017-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of radiation damage produced by swift heavy ions in rare earth phosphates, materials that are considered as perspective for radioactive waste storage. Single crystals of rare earth phosphates were exposed to 2.1 GeV gold (Au) and 1.5 GeV xenon (Xe) ions of and analyzed mainly by Raman spectroscopy. All phosphates were found almost completely amorphous after the irradiation by 2.1 GeV Au ions at a fluence of 1 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . Radiation-induced changes in the Raman spectra include the intensity decrease of all Raman bands accompanied by the appearance of broad humps and a reduction of the pronounced luminescence present in virgin samples. Analyzing the Raman peak intensities as a function of irradiation fluence allowed the calculation of the track radii for 2.1 GeV Au ions in several rare earth phosphates, which appear to be about 5.0 nm for all studied samples. Series of samples were studied to search for a trend of the track radius depending on the rare earth element (REE) cation. Among the monoclinic phosphates both Raman and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) suggest no significant change of the track radius with increasing REE mass. In contrast, within the tetragonal phosphates Raman spectroscopy data suggests a possible slight decreasing trend of the track radius with the increase of REE atomic number. That finding, however, requires further investigation due to the low reliability of the qualitative Raman analysis. Detailed analysis of Raman spectra in HoPO 4 showed the increase of peak width at the initial stage of the irradiation and subsequent decrease to a steady value at higher fluences. This observation suggested the existence of a defect halo around the amorphous tracks in HoPO 4 . Raman peaks were found to initially shift to lower wavenumbers with reversing this trend at the fluence of 5 x 10 11 for NdPO 4 and 1 x 10 12 ions/cm 2 for HoPO 4 . At the next fluence steps peaks moved in the other direction, passed

  11. Site specific X-ray induced changes in organic and metal organic compounds and their influence on global radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintz, Desiree Ellen

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this work was to systematically investigate the effects of specific and global X-ray radiation damage to biological samples and obtain a conclusive model to describe the underlying principles. Based on the systematic studies performed in this work, it was possible to propose two conclusive mechanisms to describe X-ray induced photoreduction and global radiation damage. The influence of chemical composition, temperature and solvent on X-ray induced photoreduction was investigated by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction of two B12 cofactors - cyano- and methylcobalamin - as well as iron(II) and iron(III) complexes. The obtained results revealed that X-ray induced photoreduction is a ligand dependent process, with a redox reaction taking place within the complex. It could further be shown that selective hydrogen abstraction plays an important role in the process of X-ray induced photoreduction. Based on the experimental results of this work, a model to describe X-ray induced photoreduction of metal organic complexes could be proposed. The process of X-ray induced hydrogen abstraction was further investigated in a combined X-ray and neutron diffraction study on the amino acids L-serine and L-alanine, which were used as model compounds for proteins, and the nucleoside deoxythymidine (thymidine) as a model for DNA. A damage mechanism for L-serine could be found. It involves the abstraction of two hydrogen atoms, one from the hydroxyl group and one from the adjacent methylene group. Such a hydrogen abstraction results in the formation of a carbonyl group. X-ray diffraction measurements on cyano- and methylcobalamin as well as on three metal amino acid complexes, containing nickel(II) and copper(II), respectively, were conducted to investigate the contribution of X-ray induced photoreduction to global radiation damage. Results from these measurements combined with the results from L-serine, L-alanine and thymidine allowed

  12. Site specific X-ray induced changes in organic and metal organic compounds and their influence on global radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Desiree Ellen

    2012-07-15

    The aim of this work was to systematically investigate the effects of specific and global X-ray radiation damage to biological samples and obtain a conclusive model to describe the underlying principles. Based on the systematic studies performed in this work, it was possible to propose two conclusive mechanisms to describe X-ray induced photoreduction and global radiation damage. The influence of chemical composition, temperature and solvent on X-ray induced photoreduction was investigated by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction of two B12 cofactors - cyano- and methylcobalamin - as well as iron(II) and iron(III) complexes. The obtained results revealed that X-ray induced photoreduction is a ligand dependent process, with a redox reaction taking place within the complex. It could further be shown that selective hydrogen abstraction plays an important role in the process of X-ray induced photoreduction. Based on the experimental results of this work, a model to describe X-ray induced photoreduction of metal organic complexes could be proposed. The process of X-ray induced hydrogen abstraction was further investigated in a combined X-ray and neutron diffraction study on the amino acids L-serine and L-alanine, which were used as model compounds for proteins, and the nucleoside deoxythymidine (thymidine) as a model for DNA. A damage mechanism for L-serine could be found. It involves the abstraction of two hydrogen atoms, one from the hydroxyl group and one from the adjacent methylene group. Such a hydrogen abstraction results in the formation of a carbonyl group. X-ray diffraction measurements on cyano- and methylcobalamin as well as on three metal amino acid complexes, containing nickel(II) and copper(II), respectively, were conducted to investigate the contribution of X-ray induced photoreduction to global radiation damage. Results from these measurements combined with the results from L-serine, L-alanine and thymidine allowed

  13. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation. 2015 Annual Progress Report for DOE/NE/NEET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, S. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-07

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation processes in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 2, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) measurement of the temperature dependence of defect dynamics in SiC and (ii) the evaluation of the robustness of the pulsed beam method from studies of the defect generation rate. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  14. Model for radiation damage in cells by direct effect and by indirect effect: a radiation chemistry approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, H.B.; Hunt, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    A model is presented to describe the contributions of direct and indirect effects to the radiation damage of cells. The model is derived using principles of radiation chemistry and of pulse radiolysis in particular. From data available in the literature, parameters for cellular composition and values of rate constants for indirect action have been used in preliminary applications of the model. The results obtained in calculations of the protective effect of .OH and .H scavengers are consistent with experimental data. Possible modifications and improvements to the model are suggested, along with proposed future applications of the model in radiobiological studies

  15. Reduction of radiation damage on organic material at very low object temperatures in an electron microscope with supraconductive lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapek, E.

    1981-01-01

    As a result of this study, the increase in structure conservation by cooling the object to very low temperatures (cryoprotection) as compared with the conditions at room temperature was higher than the values at low temperatures reached so far by one to two orders of magnitude. The experiments carried out with an electron microscope with supraconductive lenses (SLEM) showed, depending of the organic substance, that in tests with an electron diffraction of about 4.2 K the reduction of radiation damage as compared with room temperature was by a factor between 30 and 350. (orig./PW) [de

  16. Radiation damage studies on synthetic NaCl crystals and natural rock salt for waste disposal applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaffky, R.W.; Swyler, K.J.; Levy, P.W.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation damage studies are being made on synthetic NaCl and natural rock salt crystals from various localities, including potential repository sites. Measurements are being made with equipment for recording the radiation induced F-center and colloid particle absorption bands during irradiation with 1.5 MeV electrons at various temperatures. A technique has been developed to resolve the overlapping F-center and colloid bands. The resulting spectra and curves of absorption vs. dose provide information on colloid particle size and concentration, activation energies for processes occurring during colloid formation, and additional data suggesting that both strain and radiation induced dislocations contribute to the colloid formation process

  17. Recent studies on radiation damage formation in synthetic NaCl and natural rock salt for radioactive waste disposal applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swyler, K.J.; Klaffky, R.W.; Levy, P.W.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation damage formation in natural rock salt is described as a function of irradiation temperature and plastic deformation. F-center formation decreases with increasing temperature while significant colloidal sodium formation occurs over a restricted temperature range around 150 0 C. Plastic deformation increases colloid formation; it is estimated that colloid concentrations may be increased by a factor of 3 if the rock salt near radioactive waste disposal canisters is heavily deformed. Optical bandshape analysis indicates systematic differences between the colloids formed in synthetic and natural rock salts

  18. The determination of gold depth distribution in semiconductor silicon-potential interferences inherent in NAA by radiation damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, P.; Lange, A.; Flachowsky, J.

    1986-01-01

    Gold is used quite extensively to control the charge storage time of high speed diodes and transistors. Therefore, the diffusion of gold into silicon wafers of finite thickness is important in the design and fabrication of these devices. Therefore it is necessary to estimate exactly concentration and depth distribution of gold formed by gold doping. Usually, gold content and depth distribution has been estimate by neutron activation analysis with step by step etching techniques. But during the irradiation in a nuclear fuel reactor the silicon wafers undergo minute or pronounced radiation damages which may affect the depth profiles of gold concentration. (author)

  19. Radiation damage of multipixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes irradiated with low-energy γ's and electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Y.; Yun, Y. B. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, J. M. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. S.; Yoon, Y. S. [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Eun, J. W. [Namseoul University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    A few types of multipipixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (also referred to as silicon photomultipliers SiPMs) are irradiated with 1 to 2.5 MeV γ's and electrons. We characterize radiation damage effects appearing in the reverse bias current, the dark current and count rate, the pixel gain, and the photon detection efficiency of the devices. An interesting observation on the dark current and count rate is made and linked to the specific damage caused by the irradiation.

  20. Study of defects and radiation damage in solids by field-ion and atom-probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidman, D.N.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to introduce the reader to the basic physical ideas involved in the field-ion and atom-probe field-ion microscope techniques, and to the applications of these techniques to the study of defects and radiation damage in solids. The final section discusses, in precise form, the application of the atom-probe field-ion microscope to the study of the behavior of implanted 3 He and 4 He atoms in tungsten. The paper is heavily referenced so that the reader can pursue his specific research interest in detail