WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiation-based quantitative bioimaging

  1. Radiation-based quantitative bioimaging at the national institute of standards and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Building on a long history of providing physical measurements and standards for medical x rays and nuclear medicine radionuclides, the laboratory has expanded its focus to better support the extensive use of medical physics in the United States today, providing confidence in key results needed for drug and device development and marketing, therapy planning and efficacy and disease screening. In particular, to support more quantitative medical imaging, this laboratory has implemented a program to provide key measurement infrastructure to support radiation-based imaging through developing standard, benchmark phantoms, which contain radioactive sources calibrated to national measurement standards, to allow more quantitative imaging through traceable instrument calibration for clinical trials or patient management. Working closely with colleagues at the National Institutes of Health, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the Food and Drug Administration and Cornell University, this laboratory has taken the initial steps in developing phantoms, and the protocols to use them, for more accurate calibration of positron emission tomography (PET or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT cameras, including recently standardizing 68 Ge. X-ray measurements of the laboratory′s recently developed small, resilient and inexpensive length standard phantom have shown the potential usefulness of such a "pocket" phantom for patient-based calibration of computed tomography (alone or with PET systems. The ability to calibrate diagnostic imaging tools in a way that is traceable to national standards will lead to a more quantitative approach; both physician and patient benefit from increased accuracy in treatment planning, as well as increased safety for the patient.

  2. Supramolecular assembly affording a ratiometric two-photon fluorescent nanoprobe for quantitative detection and bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Hong-Wen; Xiong, Mengyi; Yin, Sheng-Yan; Yang, Yue; Hu, Xiao-Xiao; Yin, Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence quantitative analyses for vital biomolecules are in great demand in biomedical science owing to their unique detection advantages with rapid, sensitive, non-damaging and specific identification. However, available fluorescence strategies for quantitative detection are usually hard to design and achieve. Inspired by supramolecular chemistry, a two-photon-excited fluorescent supramolecular nanoplatform ( TPSNP ) was designed for quantitative analysis with three parts: host molecules (β-CD polymers), a guest fluorophore of sensing probes (Np-Ad) and a guest internal reference (NpRh-Ad). In this strategy, the TPSNP possesses the merits of (i) improved water-solubility and biocompatibility; (ii) increased tissue penetration depth for bioimaging by two-photon excitation; (iii) quantitative and tunable assembly of functional guest molecules to obtain optimized detection conditions; (iv) a common approach to avoid the limitation of complicated design by adjustment of sensing probes; and (v) accurate quantitative analysis by virtue of reference molecules. As a proof-of-concept, we utilized the two-photon fluorescent probe NHS-Ad-based TPSNP-1 to realize accurate quantitative analysis of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), with high sensitivity and good selectivity in live cells, deep tissues and ex vivo -dissected organs, suggesting that the TPSNP is an ideal quantitative indicator for clinical samples. What's more, TPSNP will pave the way for designing and preparing advanced supramolecular sensors for biosensing and biomedicine.

  3. Isotropic differential phase contrast microscopy for quantitative phase bio-imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Hsun; Lin, Yu-Zi; Luo, Yuan

    2018-05-16

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) has been investigated to retrieve optical phase information of an object and applied to biological microscopy and related medical studies. In recent examples, differential phase contrast (DPC) microscopy can recover phase image of thin sample under multi-axis intensity measurements in wide-field scheme. Unlike conventional DPC, based on theoretical approach under partially coherent condition, we propose a new method to achieve isotropic differential phase contrast (iDPC) with high accuracy and stability for phase recovery in simple and high-speed fashion. The iDPC is simply implemented with a partially coherent microscopy and a programmable thin-film transistor (TFT) shield to digitally modulate structured illumination patterns for QPI. In this article, simulation results show consistency of our theoretical approach for iDPC under partial coherence. In addition, we further demonstrate experiments of quantitative phase images of a standard micro-lens array, as well as label-free live human cell samples. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Chapter 17: bioimage informatics for systems pharmacology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuhai Li

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in automated high-resolution fluorescence microscopy and robotic handling have made the systematic and cost effective study of diverse morphological changes within a large population of cells possible under a variety of perturbations, e.g., drugs, compounds, metal catalysts, RNA interference (RNAi. Cell population-based studies deviate from conventional microscopy studies on a few cells, and could provide stronger statistical power for drawing experimental observations and conclusions. However, it is challenging to manually extract and quantify phenotypic changes from the large amounts of complex image data generated. Thus, bioimage informatics approaches are needed to rapidly and objectively quantify and analyze the image data. This paper provides an overview of the bioimage informatics challenges and approaches in image-based studies for drug and target discovery. The concepts and capabilities of image-based screening are first illustrated by a few practical examples investigating different kinds of phenotypic changes caEditorsused by drugs, compounds, or RNAi. The bioimage analysis approaches, including object detection, segmentation, and tracking, are then described. Subsequently, the quantitative features, phenotype identification, and multidimensional profile analysis for profiling the effects of drugs and targets are summarized. Moreover, a number of publicly available software packages for bioimage informatics are listed for further reference. It is expected that this review will help readers, including those without bioimage informatics expertise, understand the capabilities, approaches, and tools of bioimage informatics and apply them to advance their own studies.

  5. A Computational Framework for Bioimaging Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Masaki; Arjunan, Satya N. V.; Fukushima, Seiya; Iwamoto, Kazunari; Kozuka, Jun; Matsuoka, Satomi; Shindo, Yuki; Ueda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Using bioimaging technology, biologists have attempted to identify and document analytical interpretations that underlie biological phenomena in biological cells. Theoretical biology aims at distilling those interpretations into knowledge in the mathematical form of biochemical reaction networks and understanding how higher level functions emerge from the combined action of biomolecules. However, there still remain formidable challenges in bridging the gap between bioimaging and mathematical modeling. Generally, measurements using fluorescence microscopy systems are influenced by systematic effects that arise from stochastic nature of biological cells, the imaging apparatus, and optical physics. Such systematic effects are always present in all bioimaging systems and hinder quantitative comparison between the cell model and bioimages. Computational tools for such a comparison are still unavailable. Thus, in this work, we present a computational framework for handling the parameters of the cell models and the optical physics governing bioimaging systems. Simulation using this framework can generate digital images of cell simulation results after accounting for the systematic effects. We then demonstrate that such a framework enables comparison at the level of photon-counting units. PMID:26147508

  6. A Computational Framework for Bioimaging Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Masaki; Arjunan, Satya N V; Fukushima, Seiya; Iwamoto, Kazunari; Kozuka, Jun; Matsuoka, Satomi; Shindo, Yuki; Ueda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Using bioimaging technology, biologists have attempted to identify and document analytical interpretations that underlie biological phenomena in biological cells. Theoretical biology aims at distilling those interpretations into knowledge in the mathematical form of biochemical reaction networks and understanding how higher level functions emerge from the combined action of biomolecules. However, there still remain formidable challenges in bridging the gap between bioimaging and mathematical modeling. Generally, measurements using fluorescence microscopy systems are influenced by systematic effects that arise from stochastic nature of biological cells, the imaging apparatus, and optical physics. Such systematic effects are always present in all bioimaging systems and hinder quantitative comparison between the cell model and bioimages. Computational tools for such a comparison are still unavailable. Thus, in this work, we present a computational framework for handling the parameters of the cell models and the optical physics governing bioimaging systems. Simulation using this framework can generate digital images of cell simulation results after accounting for the systematic effects. We then demonstrate that such a framework enables comparison at the level of photon-counting units.

  7. A Computational Framework for Bioimaging Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Watabe

    Full Text Available Using bioimaging technology, biologists have attempted to identify and document analytical interpretations that underlie biological phenomena in biological cells. Theoretical biology aims at distilling those interpretations into knowledge in the mathematical form of biochemical reaction networks and understanding how higher level functions emerge from the combined action of biomolecules. However, there still remain formidable challenges in bridging the gap between bioimaging and mathematical modeling. Generally, measurements using fluorescence microscopy systems are influenced by systematic effects that arise from stochastic nature of biological cells, the imaging apparatus, and optical physics. Such systematic effects are always present in all bioimaging systems and hinder quantitative comparison between the cell model and bioimages. Computational tools for such a comparison are still unavailable. Thus, in this work, we present a computational framework for handling the parameters of the cell models and the optical physics governing bioimaging systems. Simulation using this framework can generate digital images of cell simulation results after accounting for the systematic effects. We then demonstrate that such a framework enables comparison at the level of photon-counting units.

  8. Nanodiamonds for optical bioimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui, Yuen Yung; Chang, Huan-Cheng [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Chia-Liang, E-mail: yyhui@pub.iams.sinica.edu.t, E-mail: clcheng@mail.ndhu.edu.t, E-mail: hchang@gate.sinica.edu.t [Department of Physics, National Dong-Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China)

    2010-09-22

    Diamond has received increasing attention for its promising biomedical applications. The material is highly biocompatible and can be easily conjugated with bioactive molecules. Recently, nanoscale diamond has been applied as light scattering labels and luminescent optical markers. The luminescence, arising from photoexcitation of colour centres, can be substantially enhanced when type Ib diamond nanocrystals are bombarded by a high-energy particle beam and then annealed to form negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centres. The centre absorbs strongly at 560 nm, fluoresces efficiently in the far-red region and is exceptionally photostable (without photoblinking and photobleaching). It is an ideal candidate for long-term imaging and tracking in complex cellular environments. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of fluorescent nanodiamonds for optical bioimaging with single particle sensitivity and nanometric resolution.

  9. Nanodiamonds for optical bioimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, Yuen Yung; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Cheng, Chia-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Diamond has received increasing attention for its promising biomedical applications. The material is highly biocompatible and can be easily conjugated with bioactive molecules. Recently, nanoscale diamond has been applied as light scattering labels and luminescent optical markers. The luminescence, arising from photoexcitation of colour centres, can be substantially enhanced when type Ib diamond nanocrystals are bombarded by a high-energy particle beam and then annealed to form negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centres. The centre absorbs strongly at 560 nm, fluoresces efficiently in the far-red region and is exceptionally photostable (without photoblinking and photobleaching). It is an ideal candidate for long-term imaging and tracking in complex cellular environments. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of fluorescent nanodiamonds for optical bioimaging with single particle sensitivity and nanometric resolution.

  10. Upconverting nanophosphors for bioimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Shuang Fang; Zhuo Rui [Department of MAE, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Riehn, Robert [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Tung, Chih-kuan; Dalland, Joanna; Austin, Robert H [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Ryu, William S [Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) when excited in the near-infrared (NIR) region display anti-Stokes emission whereby the emitted photon is higher in energy than the excitation energy. The material system achieves that by converting two or more infrared photons into visible photons. The use of the infrared confers benefits to bioimaging because of its deeper penetrating power in biological tissues and the lack of autofluorescence. We demonstrate here sub-10 nm, upconverting rare earth oxide UCNPs synthesized by a combustion method that can be stably suspended in water when amine modified. The amine modified UCNPs show specific surface immobilization onto patterned gold surfaces. Finally, the low toxicity of the UCNPs is verified by testing on the multi-cellular C. elegans nematode.

  11. Bioimage Informatics in the context of Drosophila research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jug, Florian; Pietzsch, Tobias; Preibisch, Stephan; Tomancak, Pavel

    2014-06-15

    Modern biological research relies heavily on microscopic imaging. The advanced genetic toolkit of Drosophila makes it possible to label molecular and cellular components with unprecedented level of specificity necessitating the application of the most sophisticated imaging technologies. Imaging in Drosophila spans all scales from single molecules to the entire populations of adult organisms, from electron microscopy to live imaging of developmental processes. As the imaging approaches become more complex and ambitious, there is an increasing need for quantitative, computer-mediated image processing and analysis to make sense of the imagery. Bioimage Informatics is an emerging research field that covers all aspects of biological image analysis from data handling, through processing, to quantitative measurements, analysis and data presentation. Some of the most advanced, large scale projects, combining cutting edge imaging with complex bioimage informatics pipelines, are realized in the Drosophila research community. In this review, we discuss the current research in biological image analysis specifically relevant to the type of systems level image datasets that are uniquely available for the Drosophila model system. We focus on how state-of-the-art computer vision algorithms are impacting the ability of Drosophila researchers to analyze biological systems in space and time. We pay particular attention to how these algorithmic advances from computer science are made usable to practicing biologists through open source platforms and how biologists can themselves participate in their further development. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. New horizons in biomagnetics and bioimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Shogo; Sekino, Masaki

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews recently developed techniques in biomagnetics and bioimaging such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cancer therapy based on magnetic stimulation. The technique of localized and vectorial TMS has made it possible to obtain non-invasive functional mapping of the human brain, and the development of new bioimaging technologies such as current distribution MRI and conductivity MRI may make it possible to understand the dynamics of brain functions, which include millisecond-level changes in functional regions and dynamic relations between brain neuronal networks. These techniques are leading medicine and biology toward new horizons through novel applications of magnetism. (author)

  13. Biomagnetics and bioimaging for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Shoogo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)]. E-mail: ueno@medes.m.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Sekino, Masaki [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    This paper reviews medical applications of the recently developed techniques in biomagnetics and bioimaging such as transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnetoencephalography, magnetic resonance imaging, cancer therapy based on magnetic stimulation, and magnetic control of cell orientation and cell growth. These techniques are leading medicine and biology into a new horizon through the novel applications of magnetism.

  14. Biomagnetics and bioimaging for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Shoogo; Sekino, Masaki

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews medical applications of the recently developed techniques in biomagnetics and bioimaging such as transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnetoencephalography, magnetic resonance imaging, cancer therapy based on magnetic stimulation, and magnetic control of cell orientation and cell growth. These techniques are leading medicine and biology into a new horizon through the novel applications of magnetism

  15. [Gender equality activity in the Bioimaging Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzaki, Etsuko

    2013-09-01

    Gender equality activity in the Bioimaging Society was initiated in 2005 when it joined the Japan Inter-Society Liaison Association Committee for Promoting Equal Participation of Men and Women in Science and Engineering (EPMEWSE). The Gender Equality Committee of the Bioimaging Society is acting on this issue by following the policy of the EPMEWSE, and has also been planning and conducting lectures at annual meetings of the society to gain the understanding, consents, and cooperation of the members of the society to become conscious of gender equality. Women's participation in the society has been promoted through the activities of the Gender Equality Committee, and the number of women officers in the society has since increased from two women out of 40 members in 2005 to five out of 44 in 2013. The activities of the Gender Equality Committee of the Japanese Association of Anatomists (JAA) have just started. There are more than 400 women belonging to the JAA. When these women members join together and collaborate, women's participation in the JAA will increase.

  16. An Overview of data science uses in bioimage informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessel, Anatole

    2017-02-15

    This review aims at providing a practical overview of the use of statistical features and associated data science methods in bioimage informatics. To achieve a quantitative link between images and biological concepts, one typically replaces an object coming from an image (a segmented cell or intracellular object, a pattern of expression or localisation, even a whole image) by a vector of numbers. They range from carefully crafted biologically relevant measurements to features learnt through deep neural networks. This replacement allows for the use of practical algorithms for visualisation, comparison and inference, such as the ones from machine learning or multivariate statistics. While originating mainly, for biology, in high content screening, those methods are integral to the use of data science for the quantitative analysis of microscopy images to gain biological insight, and they are sure to gather more interest as the need to make sense of the increasing amount of acquired imaging data grows more pressing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Semantic segmentation of bioimages using convolutional neural networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wiehman, S

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Convolutional neural networks have shown great promise in both general image segmentation problems as well as bioimage segmentation. In this paper, the application of different convolutional network architectures is explored on the C. elegans live...

  18. Nanostructure materials for biosensing and bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Wing Cheung

    In the first part of the thesis our work on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor will be presented. It will begin with understanding the working principle of SPR sensing technology and the basic concept of SPR biosensing. In SPR technology, there are different coupling schemes to excite surface plasmons such as prism coupler, grating coupler and waveguide coupler. Our setup will be based on the attenuated total reflection (ATR) prism coupling configuration. A gold sensing film is attached to one face of the prism. The samples are flowing over the gold surface and the light source is directed to the prism side. The reflected beam containing SPR information is collected and analyzed. SPR biosensors have become powerful tools in biological and chemical sensing application because of their capability of real-time monitoring and label-free sensing. Quantitative measurements such as the binding kinetics and the binding affinity between two biomolecules can be readily calculated from the SPR sensorgram. In our design, SPR phase will be monitored using photoelastic modulation (PEM) technique. The PEM is used to produce a modulation signal so that the phase quantity can be extracted by measuring the relative amplitudes of the harmonic signals. Since this system contains no moving component and only single beam and single detector are used, precise component alignment, which may be troublesome in making the setup compact and robust, can be eliminated. In order to demonstrate the operation of the proposed approach, two experiments were performed. The first one was to measure the refractive index change caused by varying the concentration of glycerin-water mixtures. The second one was to monitor the binding reactions between biotin and streptavidin--BSA complex at the sensor surface. Recently, the use of metallic nanoparticle on SPR platform has received great attention due to the capability of sensitivity enhancement. Although the mechanism of the enhancement is still

  19. Fluorescent magnetic hybrid nanoprobe for multimodal bioimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koktysh, Dmitry [Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Station B 351822, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bright, Vanessa; Pham, Wellington, E-mail: dmitry.koktysh@vanderbilt.edu, E-mail: wellington.pham@vanderbilt.edu [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, 1161 21st Avenue South AA, 1105 MCN, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2011-07-08

    A fluorescent magnetic hybrid imaging nanoprobe (HINP) was fabricated by the conjugation of superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and visible light emitting ({approx}600 nm) fluorescent CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QDs). The assembly strategy used the covalent linking of the oxidized dextran shell of magnetic particles to the glutathione ligands of QDs. The synthesized HINP formed stable water-soluble colloidal dispersions. The structure and properties of the particles were characterized by transmission electron and atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering analysis, optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and fluorescent imaging. The luminescence imaging region of the nanoprobe was extended to the near-infrared (NIR) ({approx}800 nm) by conjugation of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles with synthesized CdHgTe/CdS QDs. Cadmium, mercury based QDs in HINP can be easily replaced by novel water-soluble glutathione stabilized AgInS{sub 2}/ZnS QDs to present a new class of cadmium-free multimodal imaging agents. The observed NIR photoluminescence of fluorescent magnetic nanocomposites supports their use for bioimaging. The developed HINP provides dual-imaging channels for simultaneous optical and magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. Metal and Complementary Molecular Bioimaging in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nady eBraidy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. AD represents a complex neurological disorder which is best understood as the consequence of a number of interconnected genetic and lifestyle variables, which culminate in multiple changes to brain structure and function. At a molecular level, metal dyshomeostasis is frequently observed in AD due to anomalous binding of metals such as Iron (Fe, Copper (Cu and Zinc (Zn, or impaired regulation of redox-active metals which can induce the formation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species and neuronal damage. Neuroimaging of metals in a variety of intact brain cells and tissues is emerging as an important tool for increasing our understanding of the role of metal dysregulation in AD. Several imaging techniques have been used to study the cerebral metallo-architecture in biological specimens to obtain spatially resolved data on chemical elements present in a sample. Hyperspectral techniques, such as particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM, synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS, and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS can reveal relative intensities and even semi-quantitative concentrations of a large set of elements with differing spatial resolution and detection sensitivities. Other mass spectrometric and spectroscopy imaging techniques such as laser ablation electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (LA ESI-MS, MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR can be used to correlate changes in elemental distribution with the underlying pathology in AD brain specimens. The current review aims to discuss the advantages and challenges of using these emerging elemental and molecular imaging techniques, and highlight clinical achievements in AD research using bioimaging techniques.

  1. Functional mesoporous silica nanoparticles for bio-imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Bong Geun; Kim, Jaeyun

    2018-03-22

    Biomedical investigations using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have received significant attention because of their unique properties including controllable mesoporous structure, high specific surface area, large pore volume, and tunable particle size. These unique features make MSNs suitable for simultaneous diagnosis and therapy with unique advantages to encapsulate and load a variety of therapeutic agents, deliver these agents to the desired location, and release the drugs in a controlled manner. Among various clinical areas, nanomaterials-based bio-imaging techniques have advanced rapidly with the development of diverse functional nanoparticles. Due to the unique features of MSNs, an imaging agent supported by MSNs can be a promising system for developing targeted bio-imaging contrast agents with high structural stability and enhanced functionality that enable imaging of various modalities. Here, we review the recent achievements on the development of functional MSNs for bio-imaging applications, including optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT), ultrasound imaging, and multimodal imaging for early diagnosis. With further improvement in noninvasive bio-imaging techniques, the MSN-supported imaging agent systems are expected to contribute to clinical applications in the future. This article is categorized under: Diagnostic Tools > In vivo Nanodiagnostics and Imaging Nanotechnology Approaches to Biology > Nanoscale Systems in Biology. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A biosegmentation benchmark for evaluation of bioimage analysis methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvilekval Kristian

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a biosegmentation benchmark that includes infrastructure, datasets with associated ground truth, and validation methods for biological image analysis. The primary motivation for creating this resource comes from the fact that it is very difficult, if not impossible, for an end-user to choose from a wide range of segmentation methods available in the literature for a particular bioimaging problem. No single algorithm is likely to be equally effective on diverse set of images and each method has its own strengths and limitations. We hope that our benchmark resource would be of considerable help to both the bioimaging researchers looking for novel image processing methods and image processing researchers exploring application of their methods to biology. Results Our benchmark consists of different classes of images and ground truth data, ranging in scale from subcellular, cellular to tissue level, each of which pose their own set of challenges to image analysis. The associated ground truth data can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of different methods, to improve methods and to compare results. Standard evaluation methods and some analysis tools are integrated into a database framework that is available online at http://bioimage.ucsb.edu/biosegmentation/. Conclusion This online benchmark will facilitate integration and comparison of image analysis methods for bioimages. While the primary focus is on biological images, we believe that the dataset and infrastructure will be of interest to researchers and developers working with biological image analysis, image segmentation and object tracking in general.

  3. Bioimaging of teeth and their surrounding tissues and biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Kraft, David Christian Evar

    At the Department of Dentistry and Oral Health, bioimaging is a central part of our research of dental tissues and diseases in the oral cavity. We conduct research in the understanding, preventing, and treating of such diseases and there has been a strategic focus on the image-based investigation...... of clinical problems. For example, because of the etiological role of biofilms in many diseases including dental caries and periodontitis, we have investigated biofilm ecology combining newer molecular techniques such as Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) and fluorescence techniques. These methods...

  4. Photon upconversion towards applications in energy conversion and bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi-C.; Ding, Yuchen C.; Sagar, Dodderi M.; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-12-01

    The field of plasmonics can play an important role in developing novel devices for application in energy and healthcare. In this review article, we consider the progress made in design and fabrication of upconverting nanoparticles and metal nanostructures for precisely manipulating light photons, with a wavelength of several hundred nanometers, at nanometer length scales, and describe how to tailor their interactions with molecules and surfaces so that two or more lower energy photons can be used to generate a single higher energy photon in a process called photon upconversion. This review begins by introducing the current state-of-the-art in upconverting nanoparticle synthesis and achievements in color tuning and upconversion enhancement. Through understanding and tailoring physical processes, color tuning and strong upconversion enhancement have been demonstrated by coupling with surface plasmon polariton waves, especially for low intensity or diffuse infrared radiation. Since more than 30% of incident sunlight is not utilized in most photovoltaic cells, this photon upconversion is one of the promising approaches to break the so-called Shockley-Queisser thermodynamic limit for a single junction solar cell. Furthermore, since the low energy photons typically cover the biological window of optical transparency, this approach can also be particularly beneficial for novel biosensing and bioimaging techniques. Taken together, the recent research boosts the applications of photon upconversion using designed metal nanostructures and nanoparticles for green energy, bioimaging, and therapy.

  5. Status of radiation-based measurement technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, B. S.; Lee, J. W.; Chung, C. E.; Hong, S. B.; Kim, J. T.; Park, W. M.; Kim, J. Y.

    1999-03-01

    This report describes the status of measurement equipment using radiation source and new technologies in this field. This report includes the development status in Korea together with a brief description of the technology development and application status in ten countries including France, America, and Japan. Also this report describes technical factors related to radiation-based measurement and trends of new technologies. Measurement principles are also described for the equipment that is widely used among radiation-based measurement, such as level measurement, density measurement, basis weight measurement, moisture measurement, and thickness measurement. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 21 figs

  6. Silicon nanomaterials platform for bioimaging, biosensing, and cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Su, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Yiling; Fan, Chunhai; Lee, Shuit-Tong; He, Yao

    2014-02-18

    Silicon nanomaterials are an important class of nanomaterials with great potential for technologies including energy, catalysis, and biotechnology, because of their many unique properties, including biocompatibility, abundance, and unique electronic, optical, and mechanical properties, among others. Silicon nanomaterials are known to have little or no toxicity due to favorable biocompatibility of silicon, which is an important precondition for biological and biomedical applications. In addition, huge surface-to-volume ratios of silicon nanomaterials are responsible for their unique optical, mechanical, or electronic properties, which offer exciting opportunities for design of high-performance silicon-based functional nanoprobes, nanosensors, and nanoagents for biological analysis and detection and disease treatment. Moreover, silicon is the second most abundant element (after oxygen) on earth, providing plentiful and inexpensive resources for large-scale and low-cost preparation of silicon nanomaterials for practical applications. Because of these attractive traits, and in parallel with a growing interest in their design and synthesis, silicon nanomaterials are extensively investigated for wide-ranging applications, including energy, catalysis, optoelectronics, and biology. Among them, bioapplications of silicon nanomaterials are of particular interest. In the past decade, scientists have made an extensive effort to construct a silicon nanomaterials platform for various biological and biomedical applications, such as biosensors, bioimaging, and cancer treatment, as new and powerful tools for disease diagnosis and therapy. Nonetheless, there are few review articles covering these important and promising achievements to promote the awareness of development of silicon nanobiotechnology. In this Account, we summarize recent representative works to highlight the recent developments of silicon functional nanomaterials for a new, powerful platform for biological and

  7. Bio-imaging and visualization for patient-customized simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Xiongbiao; Li, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    This book contains the full papers presented at the MICCAI 2013 workshop Bio-Imaging and Visualization for Patient-Customized Simulations (MWBIVPCS 2013). MWBIVPCS 2013 brought together researchers representing several fields, such as Biomechanics, Engineering, Medicine, Mathematics, Physics and Statistic. The contributions included in this book present and discuss new trends in those fields, using several methods and techniques, including the finite element method, similarity metrics, optimization processes, graphs, hidden Markov models, sensor calibration, fuzzy logic, data mining, cellular automation, active shape models, template matching and level sets. These serve as tools to address more efficiently different and timely applications involving signal and image acquisition, image processing and analysis, image segmentation, image registration and fusion, computer simulation, image based modelling, simulation and surgical planning, image guided robot assisted surgical and image based diagnosis.  This boo...

  8. Quantum dots in bio-imaging: Revolution by the small

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, Harinder; Kaul, Zeenia; Wadhwa, Renu; Taira, Kazunari; Hirano, Takashi; Kaul, Sunil C.

    2005-01-01

    Visual analysis of biomolecules is an integral avenue of basic and applied biological research. It has been widely carried out by tagging of nucleotides and proteins with traditional fluorophores that are limited in their application by features such as photobleaching, spectral overlaps, and operational difficulties. Quantum dots (QDs) are emerging as a superior alternative and are poised to change the world of bio-imaging and further its applications in basic and applied biology. The interdisciplinary field of nanobiotechnology is experiencing a revolution and QDs as an enabling technology have become a harbinger of this hybrid field. Within a decade, research on QDs has evolved from being a pure science subject to the one with high-end commercial applications

  9. Advanced bioimaging technologies in assessment of the quality of bone and scaffold materials. Techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Ling; Leung, Kwok Sui; Griffith, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a perspective on the current status of bioimaging technologies developed to assess the quality of musculoskeletal tissue with an emphasis on bone and cartilage. It offers evaluations of scaffold biomaterials developed for enhancing the repair of musculoskeletal tissues. These bioimaging techniques include micro-CT, nano-CT, pQCT/QCT, MRI, and ultrasound, which provide not only 2-D and 3-D images of the related organs or tissues, but also quantifications of the relevant parameters. The advance bioimaging technologies developed for the above applications are also extended by incorporating imaging contrast-enhancement materials. Thus, this book will provide a unique platform for multidisciplinary collaborations in education and joint R and D among various professions, including biomedical engineering, biomaterials, and basic and clinical medicine. (orig.)

  10. A bio-image sensor for simultaneous detection of multi-neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, You-Na; Okumura, Koichi; Horio, Tomoko; Iwata, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Hattori, Toshiaki; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2018-03-01

    We report here a new bio-image sensor for simultaneous detection of spatial and temporal distribution of multi-neurotransmitters. It consists of multiple enzyme-immobilized membranes on a 128 × 128 pixel array with read-out circuit. Apyrase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), as selective elements, are used to recognize adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and acetylcholine (ACh), respectively. To enhance the spatial resolution, hydrogen ion (H + ) diffusion barrier layers are deposited on top of the bio-image sensor and demonstrated their prevention capability. The results are used to design the space among enzyme-immobilized pixels and the null H + sensor to minimize the undesired signal overlap by H + diffusion. Using this bio-image sensor, we can obtain H + diffusion-independent imaging of concentration gradients of ATP and ACh in real-time. The sensing characteristics, such as sensitivity and detection of limit, are determined experimentally. With the proposed bio-image sensor the possibility exists for customizable monitoring of the activities of various neurochemicals by using different kinds of proton-consuming or generating enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Digital liver biopsy: Bio-imaging of fatty liver for translational and clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Marcello; Summers, Paul; Faita, Francesco; Brunetto, Maurizia R; Callea, Francesco; De Nicola, Andrea; Di Lascio, Nicole; Farinati, Fabio; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Gridelli, Bruno; Mirabelli, Peppino; Neri, Emanuele; Salvadori, Piero A; Rebelos, Eleni; Tiribelli, Claudio; Valenti, Luca; Salvatore, Marco; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2018-02-27

    The rapidly growing field of functional, molecular and structural bio-imaging is providing an extraordinary new opportunity to overcome the limits of invasive liver biopsy and introduce a "digital biopsy" for in vivo study of liver pathophysiology. To foster the application of bio-imaging in clinical and translational research, there is a need to standardize the methods of both acquisition and the storage of the bio-images of the liver. It can be hoped that the combination of digital, liquid and histologic liver biopsies will provide an innovative synergistic tri-dimensional approach to identifying new aetiologies, diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the optimization of personalized therapy of liver diseases and liver cancer. A group of experts of different disciplines (Special Interest Group for Personalized Hepatology of the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, Institute for Biostructures and Bio-imaging of the National Research Council and Bio-banking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure) discussed criteria, methods and guidelines for facilitating the requisite application of data collection. This manuscript provides a multi-Author review of the issue with special focus on fatty liver.

  12. Yb3+,Er3+,Eu3+-codoped YVO4 material for bioimaging with dual mode excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thao, Chu Thi Bich; Huy, Bui The; Sharipov, Mirkomil; Kim, Jin-Ik.; Dao, Van-Duong; Moon, Ja-Young; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2017-01-01

    We propose an efficient bioimaging strategy using Yb 3+ ,Er 3+ ,Eu 3+ -triplet doped YVO 4 nanoparticles which were synthesized with polymer as a template. The obtained particles possess nanoscale, uniform, and flexible excitation. The effect of Eu 3+ ions on the luminescence properties of YVO 4 :Yb 3+ ,Er 3+ ,Eu 3+ was investigated. The upconversion mechanism of the prepared material was also discussed. The structure and optical properties of the prepared material were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform IR spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) upconversion and photoluminescence spectra. The Commission International de I′Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates was investigated to confirm the performance of color luminescent emission. The prepared YVO 4 :Yb 3+ ,Er 3+ ,Eu 3+ nanoparticles could be easily dispersed in water by surface modification with cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH). The aqueous dispersion of the modified YVO 4 :Yb 3+ ,Er 3+ ,Eu 3+ exhibits bright upconversion and downconversion luminescence and has been applied for bioimaging of HeLa cells. Our developed material with dual excitation offers a promising advance in bioimaging. - Highlights: • Prepared particles possess nanoscale size, uniform, and larger scale. • The material exhibits strong emission under dual mode excitations. • The surface material has been applied for bioimaging of HeLa cell. • Low cytotoxicity, no auto-fluorescence

  13. Ratiometric Afterglow Nanothermometer for Simultaneous in Situ Bioimaging and Local Tissue Temperature Sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, J.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Gong, Z.; Zhang, M.; Yan, D.; Zhu, H.; Liu, C.; Xu, C.; Zhang, H.

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous in situ bioimage tracing and temperature sensing have been two of the foci of modern biomedicine that have given birth to designing novel luminescent nanothermometers with dual functions. To minimize the disadvantages of existing approaches, like the surface effect of nanoparticles,

  14. CMEIAS bioimage informatics that define the landscape ecology of immature microbial biofilms developed on plant rhizoplane surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank B Dazzo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Colonization of the rhizoplane habitat is an important activity that enables certain microorganisms to promote plant growth. Here we describe various types of computer-assisted microscopy that reveal important ecological insights of early microbial colonization behavior within biofilms on plant root surfaces grown in soil. Examples of the primary data are obtained by analysis of processed images of rhizoplane biofilm landscapes analyzed at single-cell resolution using the emerging technology of CMEIAS bioimage informatics software. Included are various quantitative analyses of the in situ biofilm landscape ecology of microbes during their pioneer colonization of white clover roots, and of a rhizobial biofertilizer strain colonized on rice roots where it significantly enhances the productivity of this important crop plant. The results show that spatial patterns of immature biofilms developed on rhizoplanes that interface rhizosphere soil are highly structured (rather than distributed randomly when analyzed at the appropriate spatial scale, indicating that regionalized microbial cell-cell interactions and the local environment can significantly affect their cooperative and competitive colonization behaviors.

  15. Phase shifting white light interferometry using colour CCD for optical metrology and bio-imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit

    2018-02-01

    Phase shifting white light interferometry (PSWLI) has been widely used for optical metrology applications because of their precision, reliability, and versatility. White light interferometry using monochrome CCD makes the measurement process slow for metrology applications. WLI integrated with Red-Green-Blue (RGB) CCD camera is finding imaging applications in the fields optical metrology and bio-imaging. Wavelength dependent refractive index profiles of biological samples were computed from colour white light interferograms. In recent years, whole-filed refractive index profiles of red blood cells (RBCs), onion skin, fish cornea, etc. were measured from RGB interferograms. In this paper, we discuss the bio-imaging applications of colour CCD based white light interferometry. The approach makes the measurement faster, easier, cost-effective, and even dynamic by using single fringe analysis methods, for industrial applications.

  16. Neodymium-doped nanoparticles for infrared fluorescence bioimaging: The role of the host

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosal, Blanca del; Pérez-Delgado, Alberto; Rocha, Ueslen; Martín Rodríguez, Emma; Jaque, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.jaque@uam.es [Fluorescence Imaging Group, Dpto. de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Misiak, Małgorzata; Bednarkiewicz, Artur [Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, ul. Stabłowicka 147, 54-066 Wrocław (Poland); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, 14c Ravila Str., 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Vanetsev, Alexander S. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, PAS, ul. Okólna 2, 50-422 Wrocław (Poland); Orlovskii, Yurii [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, PAS, ul. Okólna 2, 50-422 Wrocław (Poland); Prokhorov General Physics Institute RAS, 38 Vavilov Str., 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Jovanović, Dragana J.; Dramićanin, Miroslav D. [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia); Upendra Kumar, K.; Jacinto, Carlos [Grupo de Fotônica e Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió-AL (Brazil); Navarro, Elizabeth [Depto. de Química, Eco Catálisis, UAM-Iztapalapa, Sn. Rafael Atlixco 186, México 09340, D.F (Mexico); and others

    2015-10-14

    The spectroscopic properties of different infrared-emitting neodymium-doped nanoparticles (LaF{sub 3}:Nd{sup 3+}, SrF{sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+}, NaGdF{sub 4}: Nd{sup 3+}, NaYF{sub 4}: Nd{sup 3+}, KYF{sub 4}: Nd{sup 3+}, GdVO{sub 4}: Nd{sup 3+}, and Nd:YAG) have been systematically analyzed. A comparison of the spectral shapes of both emission and absorption spectra is presented, from which the relevant role played by the host matrix is evidenced. The lack of a “universal” optimum system for infrared bioimaging is discussed, as the specific bioimaging application and the experimental setup for infrared imaging determine the neodymium-doped nanoparticle to be preferentially used in each case.

  17. Upconverting and NIR emitting rare earth based nanostructures for NIR-bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, Eva; Venkatachalam, Nallusamy; Hyodo, Hiroshi; Hattori, Akito; Ebina, Yoshie; Kishimoto, Hidehiro; Soga, Kohei

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, significant progress was achieved in the field of nanomedicine and bioimaging, but the development of new biomarkers for reliable detection of diseases at an early stage, molecular imaging, targeting and therapy remains crucial. The disadvantages of commonly used organic dyes include photobleaching, autofluorescence, phototoxicity and scattering when UV (ultraviolet) or visible light is used for excitation. The limited penetration depth of the excitation light and the visible emission into and from the biological tissue is a further drawback with regard to in vivo bioimaging. Lanthanide containing inorganic nanostructures emitting in the near-infrared (NIR) range under NIR excitation may overcome those problems. Due to the outstanding optical and magnetic properties of lanthanide ions (Ln3+), nanoscopic host materials doped with Ln3+, e.g. Y2O3:Er3+,Yb3+, are promising candidates for NIR-NIR bioimaging. Ln3+-doped gadolinium-based inorganic nanostructures, such as Gd2O3:Er3+,Yb3+, have a high potential as opto-magnetic markers allowing the combination of time-resolved optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of high spatial resolution. Recent progress in our research on over-1000 nm NIR fluorescent nanoprobes for in vivo NIR-NIR bioimaging will be discussed in this review.In recent years, significant progress was achieved in the field of nanomedicine and bioimaging, but the development of new biomarkers for reliable detection of diseases at an early stage, molecular imaging, targeting and therapy remains crucial. The disadvantages of commonly used organic dyes include photobleaching, autofluorescence, phototoxicity and scattering when UV (ultraviolet) or visible light is used for excitation. The limited penetration depth of the excitation light and the visible emission into and from the biological tissue is a further drawback with regard to in vivo bioimaging. Lanthanide containing inorganic nanostructures emitting in the near

  18. Alexa Fluor-labeled Fluorescent Cellulose Nanocrystals for Bioimaging Solid Cellulose in Spatially Structured Microenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Mo, Kai-For; Shin, Yongsoon; Vasdekis, Andreas; Warner, Marvin G.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Dehoff, Karl J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2015-03-18

    Cellulose nanocrystal materials have been labeled with modern Alexa Fluor dyes in a process that first links the dye to a cyanuric chloride molecule. Subsequent reaction with cellulose nanocrystals provides dyed solid microcrystalline cellulose material that can be used for bioimaging and suitable for deposition in films and spatially structured microenvironments. It is demonstrated with single molecular fluorescence microscopy that these films are subject to hydrolysis by cellulose enzymes.

  19. Nanodiamonds and silicon quantum dots: ultrastable and biocompatible luminescent nanoprobes for long-term bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalti, M; Cantelli, A; Battistelli, G

    2015-07-21

    Fluorescence bioimaging is a powerful, versatile, method for investigating, both in vivo and in vitro, the complex structures and functions of living organisms in real time and space, also using super-resolution techniques. Being poorly invasive, fluorescence bioimaging is suitable for long-term observation of biological processes. Long-term detection is partially prevented by photobleaching of organic fluorescent probes. Semiconductor quantum dots, in contrast, are ultrastable, fluorescent contrast agents detectable even at the single nanoparticle level. Emission color of quantum dots is size dependent and nanoprobes emitting in the near infrared (NIR) region are ideal for low back-ground in vivo imaging. Biocompatibility of nanoparticles, containing toxic elements, is debated. Recent safety concerns enforced the search for alternative ultrastable luminescent nanoprobes. Most recent results demonstrated that optimized silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) and fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) show almost no photobleaching in a physiological environment. Moreover in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies demonstrated their unique biocompatibility. Si QDs and FNDs are hence ideal diagnostic tools and promising non-toxic vectors for the delivery of therapeutic cargos. Most relevant examples of applications of Si QDs and FNDs to long-term bioimaging are discussed in this review comparing the toxicity and the stability of different nanoprobes.

  20. The Intersection of CMOS Microsystems and Upconversion Nanoparticles for Luminescence Bioimaging and Bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Wei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Organic fluorophores and quantum dots are ubiquitous as contrast agents for bio-imaging and as labels in bioassays to enable the detection of biological targets and processes. Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs offer a different set of opportunities as labels in bioassays and for bioimaging. UCNPs are excited at near-infrared (NIR wavelengths where biological molecules are optically transparent, and their luminesce in the visible and ultraviolet (UV wavelength range is suitable for detection using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology. These nanoparticles provide multiple sharp emission bands, long lifetimes, tunable emission, high photostability, and low cytotoxicity, which render them particularly useful for bio-imaging applications and multiplexed bioassays. This paper surveys several key concepts surrounding upconversion nanoparticles and the systems that detect and process the corresponding luminescence signals. The principle of photon upconversion, tuning of emission wavelengths, UCNP bioassays, and UCNP time-resolved techniques are described. Electronic readout systems for signal detection and processing suitable for UCNP luminescence using CMOS technology are discussed. This includes recent progress in miniaturized detectors, integrated spectral sensing, and high-precision time-domain circuits. Emphasis is placed on the physical attributes of UCNPs that map strongly to the technical features that CMOS devices excel in delivering, exploring the interoperability between the two technologies.

  1. Advances in Bio-Imaging From Physics to Signal Understanding Issues State-of-the-Art and Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Racoceanu, Daniel; Gouaillard, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Advances in Imaging Devices and Image processing stem from cross-fertilization between many fields of research such as Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics and Computer Sciences. This BioImaging Community feel the urge to integrate more intensively its various results, discoveries and innovation into ready to use tools that can address all the new exciting challenges that Life Scientists (Biologists, Medical doctors, ...) keep providing, almost on a daily basis. Devising innovative chemical probes, for example, is an archetypal goal in which image quality improvement must be driven by the physics of acquisition, the image processing and analysis algorithms and the chemical skills in order to design an optimal bioprobe. This book offers an overview of the current advances in many research fields related to bioimaging and highlights the current limitations that would need to be addressed in the next decade to design fully integrated BioImaging Device.

  2. Bio-imaging of colorectal cancer models using near infrared labeled epidermal growth factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadi Cohen

    Full Text Available Novel strategies that target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR have led to the clinical development of monoclonal antibodies, which treat metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC but only subgroups of patients with increased wild type KRAS and EGFR gene copy, respond to these agents. Furthermore, resistance to EGFR blockade inevitably occurred, making future therapy difficult. Novel bio-imaging (BOI methods may assist in quantization of EGFR in mCRC tissue thus complementing the immunohistochemistry methodology, in guiding the future treatment of these patients. The aim of the present study was to explore the usefulness of near infrared-labeled EGF (EGF-NIR for bio-imaging of CRC using in vitro and in vivo orthotopic tumor CRC models and ex vivo human CRC tissues. We describe the preparation and characterization of EGF-NIR and investigate binding, using BOI of a panel of CRC cell culture models resembling heterogeneity of human CRC tissues. EGF-NIR was specifically and selectively bound by EGFR expressing CRC cells, the intensity of EGF-NIR signal to background ratio (SBR reflected EGFR levels, dose-response and time course imaging experiments provided optimal conditions for quantization of EGFR levels by BOI. EGF-NIR imaging of mice with HT-29 orthotopic CRC tumor indicated that EGF-NIR is more slowly cleared from the tumor and the highest SBR between tumor and normal adjacent tissue was achieved two days post-injection. Furthermore, images of dissected tissues demonstrated accumulation of EGF-NIR in the tumor and liver. EGF-NIR specifically and strongly labeled EGFR positive human CRC tissues while adjacent CRC tissue and EGFR negative tissues expressed weak NIR signals. This study emphasizes the use of EGF-NIR for preclinical studies. Combined with other methods, EGF-NIR could provide an additional bio-imaging specific tool in the standardization of measurements of EGFR expression in CRC tissues.

  3. Synchrotron radiation based analytical techniques (XAS and XRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Shambhu Nath

    2014-01-01

    A brief description of the principles of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques is given in this article with emphasis on the advantages of using synchrotron radiation-based instrumentation/beamline. XAS technique is described in more detail to emphasize the strength of the technique as a local structural probe. (author)

  4. Three-photon-excited luminescence from unsymmetrical cyanostilbene aggregates: morphology tuning and targeted bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Amal Kumar; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; He, Tingchao; Maji, Swarup Kumar; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Ong, Shi Li; Joseph, James; Sun, Handong; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-05-26

    We report an experimental observation of aggregation-induced enhanced luminescence upon three-photon excitation in aggregates formed from a class of unsymmetrical cyanostilbene derivatives. Changing side chains (-CH3, -C6H13, -C7H15O3, and folic acid) attached to the cyanostilbene core leads to instantaneous formation of aggregates with sizes ranging from micrometer to nanometer scale in aqueous conditions. The crystal structure of a derivative with a methyl side chain reveals the planarization in the unsymmetrical cyanostilbene core, causing luminescence from corresponding aggregates upon three-photon excitation. Furthermore, folic acid attached cyanostilbene forms well-dispersed spherical nanoaggregates that show a high three-photon cross-section of 6.0 × 10(-80) cm(6) s(2) photon(-2) and high luminescence quantum yield in water. In order to demonstrate the targeted bioimaging capability of the nanoaggregates, three cell lines (HEK293 healthy cell line, MCF7 cancerous cell line, and HeLa cancerous cell line) were employed for the investigations on the basis of their different folate receptor expression level. Two kinds of nanoaggregates with and without the folic acid targeting ligand were chosen for three-photon bioimaging studies. The cell viability of three types of cells incubated with high concentration of nanoaggregates still remained above 70% after 24 h. It was observed that the nanoaggregates without the folic acid unit could not undergo the endocytosis by both healthy and cancerous cell lines. No obvious endocytosis of folic acid attached nanoaggregates was observed from the HEK293 and MCF7 cell lines having a low expression of the folate receptor. Interestingly, a significant amount of endocytosis and internalization of folic acid attached nanoaggregates was observed from HeLa cells with a high expression of the folate receptor under three-photon excitation, indicating targeted bioimaging of folic acid attached nanoaggregates to the cancer cell line

  5. Size effects in the quantum yield of Cd Te quantum dots for optimum fluorescence bioimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacinto, C.; Rocha, U.S.; Maestro, L.M.; Garcia-Sole, J.; Jaque, D.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Semiconductor nano-crystals, usually referred as Quantum Dots (QDs) are nowadays regarded as one of the building-blocks in modern photonics. They constitute bright and photostable fluorescence sources whose emission and absorption properties can be adequately tailored through their size. Recent advances on the controlled modification of their surface has made possible the development of water soluble QDs, without causing any deterioration in their fluorescence properties. This has made them excellent optical selective markers to be used in fluorescence bio-imaging experiments. The suitability of colloidal QDs for bio-imaging is pushed forward by their large two-photon absorption cross section so that their visible luminescence (associated to the recombination of electro-hole pairs) can be also efficiently excited under infrared excitation (two-photon excitation). This, in turns, allows for large penetration depths in tissues, minimization of auto-fluorescence and achievement of superior spatial imaging resolution. In addition, recent works have demonstrated the ability of QDs to act as nano-thermometers based on the thermal sensitivity of their fluorescence bands. Based on all these outstanding properties, QDs have been successfully used to mark individual receptors in cell membranes, to intracellular temperature measurements and to label living embryos at different stages. Most of the QD based bio-images reported up to now were obtained by using whether CdSe or CdTe QDs since both are currently commercial available with a high degree of quality. They show similar fluorescence properties and optical performance when used in bio-imaging. Nevertheless, CdTe-QDs have very recently attracted much attention since the hyper-thermal sensitivity of their fluorescence bands was discovered. Based on this, it has been postulated that intracellular thermal sensing with resolutions as large as 0.25 deg C can be achieved based on CdTe-QDs, three times better than

  6. Multi-element bioimaging of Arabidopsis thaliana roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Daniel Olof; Chen, Anle; Aarts, Mark G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Better understanding of root function is central for the development of plants with more efficient nutrient uptake and translocation. We here present a method for multielement bioimaging at the cellular level in roots of the genetic model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using conventio......Better understanding of root function is central for the development of plants with more efficient nutrient uptake and translocation. We here present a method for multielement bioimaging at the cellular level in roots of the genetic model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using...... omics techniques. To demonstrate the potential of the method, we analyzed a mutant of Arabidopsis unable to synthesize the metal chelator nicotianamine. The mutant accumulated substantially more zinc and manganese than the wild type in the tissues surrounding the vascular cylinder. For iron, the images...... looked completely different, with iron bound mainly in the epidermis of the wild-type plants but confined to the cortical cell walls of the mutant. The method offers the power of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to be fully employed, thereby providing a basis for detailed studies of ion...

  7. Single-pulse CARS based multimodal nonlinear optical microscope for bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Kamali, Tschackad; Levitte, Jonathan M; Katz, Ori; Hermann, Boris; Werkmeister, Rene; Považay, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Unterhuber, Angelika; Silberberg, Yaron

    2015-05-18

    Noninvasive label-free imaging of biological systems raises demand not only for high-speed three-dimensional prescreening of morphology over a wide-field of view but also it seeks to extract the microscopic functional and molecular details within. Capitalizing on the unique advantages brought out by different nonlinear optical effects, a multimodal nonlinear optical microscope can be a powerful tool for bioimaging. Bringing together the intensity-dependent contrast mechanisms via second harmonic generation, third harmonic generation and four-wave mixing for structural-sensitive imaging, and single-beam/single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering technique for chemical sensitive imaging in the finger-print region, we have developed a simple and nearly alignment-free multimodal nonlinear optical microscope that is based on a single wide-band Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse laser source. Successful imaging tests have been realized on two exemplary biological samples, a canine femur bone and collagen fibrils harvested from a rat tail. Since the ultra-broad band-width femtosecond laser is a suitable source for performing high-resolution optical coherence tomography, a wide-field optical coherence tomography arm can be easily incorporated into the presented multimodal microscope making it a versatile optical imaging tool for noninvasive label-free bioimaging.

  8. Hybridization chain reaction: a versatile molecular tool for biosensing, bioimaging, and biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Sai; Yue, Shuzhen; Zhang, Shusheng

    2017-07-17

    Developing powerful, simple and low-cost DNA amplification techniques is of great significance to bioanalysis and biomedical research. Thus far, many signal amplification strategies have been developed, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), rolling circle amplification (RCA), and DNA strand displacement amplification (SDA). In particular, hybridization chain reaction (HCR), a type of toehold-mediated strand displacement (TMSD) reaction, has attracted great interest because of its enzyme-free nature, isothermal conditions, simple protocols, and excellent amplification efficiency. In a typical HCR, an analyte initiates the cross-opening of two DNA hairpins, yielding nicked double helices that are analogous to alternating copolymers. As an efficient amplification platform, HCR has been utilized for the sensitive detection of a wide variety of analytes, including nucleic acids, proteins, small molecules, and cells. In recent years, more complicated sets of monomers have been designed to develop nonlinear HCR, such as branched HCR and even dendritic systems, achieving quadratic and exponential growth mechanisms. In addition, HCR has attracted enormous attention in the fields of bioimaging and biomedicine, including applications in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging, live cell imaging, and targeted drug delivery. In this review, we introduce the fundamentals of HCR and examine the visualization and analysis techniques for HCR products in detail. The most recent HCR developments in biosensing, bioimaging, and biomedicine are subsequently discussed with selected examples. Finally, the review provides insight into the challenges and future perspectives of HCR.

  9. Star polymer-based unimolecular micelles and their application in bio-imaging and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xin; Sun, Pei; Tong, Gangsheng; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2018-02-03

    As a novel kind of polymer with covalently linked core-shell structure, star polymers behave in nanostructure in aqueous medium at all concentration range, as unimolecular micelles at high dilution condition and multi-micelle aggregates in other situations. The unique morphologies endow star polymers with excellent stability and functions, making them a promising platform for bio-application. A variety of functions including imaging and therapeutics can be achieved through rational structure design of star polymers, and the existence of plentiful end-groups on shell offers the opportunity for further modification. In the last decades, star polymers have become an attracting platform on fabrication of novel nano-systems for bio-imaging and diagnosis. Focusing on the specific topology and physicochemical properties of star polymers, we have reviewed recent development of star polymer-based unimolecular micelles and their bio-application in imaging and diagnosis. The main content of this review summarizes the synthesis of integrated architecture of star polymers and their self-assembly behavior in aqueous medium, focusing especially on the recent advances on their bio-imaging application and diagnosis use. Finally, we conclude with remarks and give some outlooks for further exploration in this field. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A special issue on reviews in biomedical applications of nanomaterials, tissue engineering, stem cells, bioimaging, and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2014-10-01

    This second special issue of the Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology in a series contains another 30 state-of-the-art reviews focused on the biomedical applications of nanomaterials, biosensors, bone tissue engineering, MRI and bioimaging, single-cell detection, stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, toxicity and biosafety of nanodrugs, nanoparticle-based new therapeutic approaches for cancer, hepatic and cardiovascular disease.

  11. Rapid colorimetric sensing of gadolinium by EGCG-derived AgNPs: the development of a nanohybrid bioimaging probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rohit Kumar; Mishra, Sourav; Jena, Satyapriya; Panigrahi, Bijayananda; Das, Bhaskar; Jayabalan, Rasu; Parhi, Pankaj Kumar; Mandal, Dindyal

    2018-04-17

    Polyphenol functionalized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been developed and demonstrated as colorimetric sensors for the selective detection of gadolinium. The newly obtained AgNP-Gd3+ conjugates exhibit high aqueous dispersibility and excitation dependent fluorescence emission. The conjugates offer multicolor bioimaging potential owing to their excellent luminescence properties.

  12. Discriminating electromagnetic radiation based on angle of incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamam, Rafif E.; Bermel, Peter; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Yeng, Adrian Y. X.; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Joannopoulos, John D.

    2015-06-16

    The present invention provides systems, articles, and methods for discriminating electromagnetic radiation based upon the angle of incidence of the electromagnetic radiation. In some cases, the materials and systems described herein can be capable of inhibiting reflection of electromagnetic radiation (e.g., the materials and systems can be capable of transmitting and/or absorbing electromagnetic radiation) within a given range of angles of incidence at a first incident surface, while substantially reflecting electromagnetic radiation outside the range of angles of incidence at a second incident surface (which can be the same as or different from the first incident surface). A photonic material comprising a plurality of periodically occurring separate domains can be used, in some cases, to selectively transmit and/or selectively absorb one portion of incoming electromagnetic radiation while reflecting another portion of incoming electromagnetic radiation, based upon the angle of incidence. In some embodiments, one domain of the photonic material can include an isotropic dielectric function, while another domain of the photonic material can include an anisotropic dielectric function. In some instances, one domain of the photonic material can include an isotropic magnetic permeability, while another domain of the photonic material can include an anisotropic magnetic permeability. In some embodiments, non-photonic materials (e.g., materials with relatively large scale features) can be used to selectively absorb incoming electromagnetic radiation based on angle of incidence.

  13. Microwave assisted synthesis of luminescent carbonaceous nanoparticles from silk fibroin for bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongzhi; Teng, Choon Peng; Huang, Donghong; Xu, Wanqing; Zheng, Chaohui; Chen, Yisong; Liu, Minghuan; Yang, Da-Peng; Lin, Ming; Li, Zibiao; Ye, Enyi

    2017-11-01

    Bombyx mori silk as a natural protein based biopolymer with high nitrogen content, is abundant and sustainable because of its mass product all over the world per year. In this study, we developed a facile and fast microwave-assisted synthesis of luminescent carbonaceous nanoparticles using Bombyx mori silk fibroin and silk solution as the precursors. As a result, the obtained carbonaceous nanoparticles exhibit a photoluminescence quantum yield of ~20%, high stability, low cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility. Most importantly, we successfully demonstrated bioimaging using these luminescent carbonaceous nanoparticles with excitation dependent luminescence. In addition, the microwave-assisted hydrothermal method can be extended to convert other biomass into functional nanomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Folate receptor targeting silica nanoparticle probe for two-photon fluorescence bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuhua; Yao, Sheng; Ahn, Hyo-Yang; Zhang, Yuanwei; Bondar, Mykhailo V.; Torres, Joseph A.; Belfield, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Narrow dispersity organically modified silica nanoparticles (SiNPs), diameter ~30 nm, entrapping a hydrophobic two-photon absorbing fluorenyl dye, were synthesized by hydrolysis of triethoxyvinylsilane and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane in the nonpolar core of Aerosol-OT micelles. The surface of the SiNPs were functionalized with folic acid, to specifically deliver the probe to folate receptor (FR) over-expressing Hela cells, making these folate two-photon dye-doped SiNPs potential candidates as probes for two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) bioimaging. In vitro studies using FR over-expressing Hela cells and low FR expressing MG63 cells demonstrated specific cellular uptake of the functionalized nanoparticles. One-photon fluorescence microscopy (1PFM) imaging, 2PFM imaging, and two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscopy (2P-FLIM) imaging of Hela cells incubated with folate-modified two-photon dye-doped SiNPs were demonstrated. PMID:21258480

  15. Bis-pyridinium quadrupolar derivatives. High Stokes shift selective probes for bio-imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salice, Patrizio; Versari, Silvia; Bradamante, Silvia; Meinardi, Francesco; Macchi, Giorgio; Pagani, Giorgio A.; Beverina, Luca

    2013-11-01

    We describe the design, synthesis and characterization of five high Stokes shift quadrupolar heteroaryl compounds suitable as fluorescent probes in bio-imaging. In particular, we characterize the photophysical properties and the intracellular localization in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (HMSCs) for each dye. We show that, amongst all of the investigated derivatives, the 2,5-bis[1-(4-N-methylpyridinium)ethen-2-yl)]- N-methylpyrrole salt is the best candidates as selective mitochondrial tracker. Finally, we recorded the full emission spectrum of the most performing - exclusively mitochondrial selective - fluorescent probe directly from HUVEC stained cells. The emission spectrum collected from the stained mitochondria shows a remarkably more pronounced vibronic structure with respect to the emission of the free fluorophore in solution.

  16. Carnegie Mellon University bioimaging day 2014: Challenges and opportunities in digital pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Gustavo K; Ozolek, John A; Parwani, Anil V; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in digital imaging is impacting the practice of pathology. One of the key enabling technologies that is leading the way towards this transformation is the use of whole slide imaging (WSI) which allows glass slides to be converted into large image files that can be shared, stored, and analyzed rapidly. Many applications around this novel technology have evolved in the last decade including education, research and clinical applications. This publication highlights a collection of abstracts, each corresponding to a talk given at Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU) Bioimaging Day 2014 co-sponsored by the Biomedical Engineering and Lane Center for Computational Biology Departments at CMU. Topics related specifically to digital pathology are presented in this collection of abstracts. These include topics related to digital workflow implementation, imaging and artifacts, storage demands, and automated image analysis algorithms.

  17. Nitrogen-Vacancy color center in diamond-emerging nanoscale applications in bioimaging and biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Lazariev, Andrii; Arumugam, Sri Ranjini; Duan, De-Wen

    2014-06-01

    Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) color center in diamond is a flourishing research area that, in recent years, has displayed remarkable progress. The system offers great potential for realizing futuristic applications in nanoscience, benefiting a range of fields from bioimaging to quantum-sensing. The ability to image single NV color centers in a nanodiamond and manipulate NV electron spin optically under ambient condition is the main driving force behind developments in nanoscale sensing and novel imaging techniques. In this article we discuss current status on the applications of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FND) for optical super resolution nanoscopy, magneto-optical (spin-assisted) sub-wavelength localization and imaging. We present emerging applications such as single molecule spin imaging, nanoscale imaging of biomagnetic fields, sensing molecular fluctuations and temperatures in live cellular environments. We summarize other current advances and future prospects of NV diamond for imaging and sensing pertaining to bio-medical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Quick synthesis of 2-propanol derived fluorescent carbon dots for bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angamuthu, Raja; Palanisamy, Priya; Vasudevan, Vasanthakumar; Nagarajan, Sedhu; Rajendran, Ramesh; Vairamuthu, Raj

    2018-04-01

    Herein, for the first time, we present a one-pot ingenious preparative method for fluorescent carbon dots from 2-propanol (2P-CDs) without external treatments. Structure, morphology, chemical composition and fluorescence properties of the 2P-CDs were examined. These results confirm that the as-synthesized 2P-CDs are amorphous, monodispersed, spherical and the average particle size is 2.5 ± 0.7 nm. Most importantly, excitation-dependent emission properties were observed, which suggest that these 2P-CDs may be used in multicolor bioimaging applications. When incubated with HeLa cells, the 2P-CDs exhibit low cytotoxicity, and positive biocompatibility. Confocal microscopy image shows the uptake of 2P-CDs by HeLa cells and the application of probable biomarker is demonstrated.

  19. Carnegie Mellon University bioimaging day 2014: Challenges and opportunities in digital pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo K Rohde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in digital imaging is impacting the practice of pathology. One of the key enabling technologies that is leading the way towards this transformation is the use of whole slide imaging (WSI which allows glass slides to be converted into large image files that can be shared, stored, and analyzed rapidly. Many applications around this novel technology have evolved in the last decade including education, research and clinical applications. This publication highlights a collection of abstracts, each corresponding to a talk given at Carnegie Mellon University′s (CMU Bioimaging Day 2014 co-sponsored by the Biomedical Engineering and Lane Center for Computational Biology Departments at CMU. Topics related specifically to digital pathology are presented in this collection of abstracts. These include topics related to digital workflow implementation, imaging and artifacts, storage demands, and automated image analysis algorithms.

  20. Gadolinia nanofibers as a multimodal bioimaging and potential radiation therapy agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, A. M.; Jalalian, A.; Tsindlekht, M. I.

    2015-05-01

    Continuous bead-free C-type cubic gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanofibers 20-30 μm long and 40-100 nm in diameter were sintered by sol-gel calcination assisted electrospinning technique. Dipole-dipole interaction of neighboring Gd3+ ions in nanofibers with large length-to-diameter aspect ratio results in some kind of superparamagnetic behavior: fibers are magnetized twice stronger than Gd2O3 powder. Being compared with commercial Gd-DTPA/Magnevist®, Gd2O3 diethyleneglycol-coated (Gd2O3-DEG) fibers show high 1/T1 and 1/T2 proton relaxivities. Intense room temperature photoluminescence, high NMR relaxivity and high neutron scattering cross-section of 157Gd nucleus promise to integrate Gd2O3 fibers for multimodal bioimaging and neutron capture therapy.

  1. Gadolinia nanofibers as a multimodal bioimaging and potential radiation therapy agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Grishin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuous bead-free C-type cubic gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3 nanofibers 20-30 μm long and 40-100 nm in diameter were sintered by sol-gel calcination assisted electrospinning technique. Dipole-dipole interaction of neighboring Gd3+ ions in nanofibers with large length-to-diameter aspect ratio results in some kind of superparamagnetic behavior: fibers are magnetized twice stronger than Gd2O3 powder. Being compared with commercial Gd-DTPA/Magnevist®, Gd2O3 diethyleneglycol-coated (Gd2O3-DEG fibers show high 1/T1 and 1/T2 proton relaxivities. Intense room temperature photoluminescence, high NMR relaxivity and high neutron scattering cross-section of 157Gd nucleus promise to integrate Gd2O3 fibers for multimodal bioimaging and neutron capture therapy.

  2. Biochemistry and biomedicine of quantum dots: from biodetection to bioimaging, drug discovery, diagnostics, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Li, Pingfan; Li, Lin; Yang, Mei

    2018-07-01

    According to recent research, nanotechnology based on quantum dots (QDs) has been widely applied in the field of bioimaging, drug delivery, and drug analysis. Therefore, it has become one of the major forces driving basic and applied research. The application of nanotechnology in bioimaging has been of concern. Through in vitro labeling, it was found that luminescent QDs possess many properties such as narrow emission, broad UV excitation, bright fluorescence, and high photostability. The QDs also show great potential in whole-body imaging. The QDs can be combined with biomolecules, and hence, they can be used for targeted drug delivery and diagnosis. The characteristics of QDs make them useful for application in pharmacy and pharmacology. This review focuses on various applications of QDs, especially in imaging, drug delivery, pharmaceutical analysis, photothermal therapy, biochips, and targeted surgery. Finally, conclusions are made by providing some critical challenges and a perspective of how this field can be expected to develop in the future. Quantum dots (QDs) is an emerging field of interdisciplinary subject that involves physics, chemistry, materialogy, biology, medicine, and so on. In addition, nanotechnology based on QDs has been applied in depth in biochemistry and biomedicine. Some forward-looking fields emphatically reflected in some extremely vital areas that possess inspiring potential applicable prospects, such as immunoassay, DNA analysis, biological monitoring, drug discovery, in vitro labelling, in vivo imaging, and tumor target are closely connected to human life and health and has been the top and forefront in science and technology to date. Furthermore, this review has not only involved the traditional biochemical detection but also particularly emphasized its potential applications in life science and biomedicine. Copyright © 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles derived from natural materials of mango fruit for bio-imaging probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chan Jin; Roy, Arup Kumer; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Jung-Eun; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2014-11-01

    Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials.Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04805a

  4. Confinement of carbon dots localizing to the ultrathin layered double hydroxides toward simultaneous triple-mode bioimaging and photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yangziwan; Guan, Shanyue; Lu, Heng; Meng, Xiangmin; Kaassis, Abdessamad Y; Ren, Xiaoxue; Qu, Xiaozhong; Sun, Chenghua; Xie, Zheng; Zhou, Shuyun

    2018-07-01

    It is a great challenge to develop multifunctional nanocarriers for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Herein, versatile CDs/ICG-uLDHs nanovehicles for triple-modal fluorescence/photoacoustic/two-photon bioimaging and effective photothermal therapy were prepared via a facile self-assembly of red emission carbon dots (CDs), indocyanine green (ICG) with the ultrathin layered double hydroxides (uLDHs). Due to the J-aggregates of ICG constructed in the self-assembly process, CDs/ICG-uLDHs was able to stabilize the photothermal agent ICG and enhanced its photothermal efficiency. Furthermore, the unique confinement effect of uLDHs has extended the fluorescence lifetime of CDs in favor of bioimaging. Considering the excellent in vitro and in vivo phototherapeutics and multimodal imaging effects, this work provides a promising platform for the construction of multifunctional theranostic nanocarrier system for the cancer treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel fluorescence probe based on triphenylamine Schiff base for bioimaging and responding to pH and Fe3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Xiaodong; Chen, Xiuli; Zhou, Yuping; Lu, Xiaodan; Yan, Chenggong; Xu, Yikai; Liu, Ruiyuan; Qu, Jinqing

    2017-01-01

    A novel fluorescence probe 1 based on triphenylamine was synthesized and characterized by NMR, IR, high resolution mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. Its fluorescence was quenched when pH below 2. There was a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and pH value ranged from 2 to 7. And its fluorescence emission was reversibility in acidic and alkaline solution. Furthermore, it exhibited remarkable selectivity and high sensitivity to Fe 3+ and was able to detect Fe 3+ in aqueous solution with low detection limit of 0.511 μM. Job plot showed that the binding stoichiometry of 1 with Fe 3+ was 1:1. Further observations of 1 H NMR titration suggested that coordination interaction between Fe 3+ and nitrogen atom on C =N bond promoted the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) or energy transfer process causing fluorescence quenching. Additionally, 1 was also able to be applied for detecting Fe 3+ in living cell and bioimaging. - Graphical abstract: Triphenylamine based fluorescence probe can detect pH and Fe 3+ simultaneously in aqueous solution and be applied for detecting Fe 3+ in living cell and bioimaging. - Highlights: • The fluorescence probe is sensitive to pH in strong acid conditions. • The fluorescence chemosensor can detect pH and Fe 3+ simultaneously. • The recognition is able to carry out in aqueous solution. • The probe can also be applied for detecting Fe 3+ in living cell and bioimaging. • The sensor is synthesized easily with one step.

  6. Chemical reactions on platinum-group metal surfaces studied by synchrotron-radiation-based spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Hiroshi; Nakai, Ikuyo; Nagasaka, Masanari; Amemiya, Kenta; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    A new version of synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray spectroscopy, wave-length-dispersive near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (dispersive-NEXAFS), and fast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been applied to mechanistic studies on several surface catalytic reactions on platinum-group-metal surfaces. In this review, our approach using above techniques to understand the reaction mechanism and actual application studies on three well-known catalytic surface reactions, CO oxidation on Pt(111) and Pd(111), NO reduction on Rh(111), and H 2 O formation on Pt(111), are introduced. Spectroscopic monitoring of the progress of the surface reactions enabled us to detect reaction intermediates and analyze the reaction kinetics quantitatively which provides information on reaction order, rate constant, pre-exponential factor, activation energy and etc. Such quantitative analyses combined with scanning tunneling microscopy and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations revealed significant contribution of the adsorbate configurations and their dynamic changes to the reaction mechanisms of the above fundamental catalytic surface reactions. (author)

  7. Automatic DNA Diagnosis for 1D Gel Electrophoresis Images using Bio-image Processing Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarapanich, Apichart; Kaewkamnerd, Saowaluck; Shaw, Philip J; Ukosakit, Kittipat; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tongsima, Sissades

    2015-01-01

    DNA gel electrophoresis is a molecular biology technique for separating different sizes of DNA fragments. Applications of DNA gel electrophoresis include DNA fingerprinting (genetic diagnosis), size estimation of DNA, and DNA separation for Southern blotting. Accurate interpretation of DNA banding patterns from electrophoretic images can be laborious and error prone when a large number of bands are interrogated manually. Although many bio-imaging techniques have been proposed, none of them can fully automate the typing of DNA owing to the complexities of migration patterns typically obtained. We developed an image-processing tool that automatically calls genotypes from DNA gel electrophoresis images. The image processing workflow comprises three main steps: 1) lane segmentation, 2) extraction of DNA bands and 3) band genotyping classification. The tool was originally intended to facilitate large-scale genotyping analysis of sugarcane cultivars. We tested the proposed tool on 10 gel images (433 cultivars) obtained from polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of PCR amplicons for detecting intron length polymorphisms (ILP) on one locus of the sugarcanes. These gel images demonstrated many challenges in automated lane/band segmentation in image processing including lane distortion, band deformity, high degree of noise in the background, and bands that are very close together (doublets). Using the proposed bio-imaging workflow, lanes and DNA bands contained within are properly segmented, even for adjacent bands with aberrant migration that cannot be separated by conventional techniques. The software, called GELect, automatically performs genotype calling on each lane by comparing with an all-banding reference, which was created by clustering the existing bands into the non-redundant set of reference bands. The automated genotype calling results were verified by independent manual typing by molecular biologists. This work presents an automated genotyping tool from DNA

  8. Automatic DNA Diagnosis for 1D Gel Electrophoresis Images using Bio-image Processing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background DNA gel electrophoresis is a molecular biology technique for separating different sizes of DNA fragments. Applications of DNA gel electrophoresis include DNA fingerprinting (genetic diagnosis), size estimation of DNA, and DNA separation for Southern blotting. Accurate interpretation of DNA banding patterns from electrophoretic images can be laborious and error prone when a large number of bands are interrogated manually. Although many bio-imaging techniques have been proposed, none of them can fully automate the typing of DNA owing to the complexities of migration patterns typically obtained. Results We developed an image-processing tool that automatically calls genotypes from DNA gel electrophoresis images. The image processing workflow comprises three main steps: 1) lane segmentation, 2) extraction of DNA bands and 3) band genotyping classification. The tool was originally intended to facilitate large-scale genotyping analysis of sugarcane cultivars. We tested the proposed tool on 10 gel images (433 cultivars) obtained from polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of PCR amplicons for detecting intron length polymorphisms (ILP) on one locus of the sugarcanes. These gel images demonstrated many challenges in automated lane/band segmentation in image processing including lane distortion, band deformity, high degree of noise in the background, and bands that are very close together (doublets). Using the proposed bio-imaging workflow, lanes and DNA bands contained within are properly segmented, even for adjacent bands with aberrant migration that cannot be separated by conventional techniques. The software, called GELect, automatically performs genotype calling on each lane by comparing with an all-banding reference, which was created by clustering the existing bands into the non-redundant set of reference bands. The automated genotype calling results were verified by independent manual typing by molecular biologists. Conclusions This work presents an

  9. Multifunctional nanocomposite based on halloysite nanotubes for efficient luminescent bioimaging and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Jia, Lei; Luo, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun; Chen, Ru-Hua; Ge, Zhi-Jun; Ma, Tie-Liang; Chen, Hong; Zhu, Tao-Feng

    A novel multifunctional halloysite nanotube (HNT)-based Fe 3 O 4 @HNT-polyethyleneimine-Tip-Eu(dibenzoylmethane) 3 nanocomposite (Fe-HNT-Eu NC) with both photoluminescent and magnetic properties was fabricated by a simple one-step hydrothermal process combined with the coupling grafting method, which exhibited high suspension stability and excellent photophysical behavior. The as-prepared multifunctional Fe-HNT-Eu NC was characterized using various techniques. The results of cell viability assay, cell morphological observation, and in vivo toxicity assay indicated that the NC exhibited excellent biocompatibility over the studied concentration range, suggesting that the obtained Fe-HNT-Eu NC was a suitable material for bioimaging and biological applications in human hepatic adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, the biocompatible Fe-HNT-Eu NC displayed superparamagnetic behavior with high saturation magnetization and also functioned as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vitro and in vivo. The results of the MRI tests indicated that the Fe-HNT-Eu NC can significantly decrease the T 2 signal intensity values of the normal liver tissue and thus make the boundary between the normal liver and transplanted cancer more distinct, thus effectively improving the diagnosis effect of cancers.

  10. Fluorescent probe based on heteroatom containing styrylcyanine: pH-sensitive properties and bioimaging in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Gao, Ya; Huang, Zhibing; Chen, Xiaohui; Ke, Zhiyong; Zhao, Peiliang; Yan, Yichen; Liu, Ruiyuan; Qu, Jinqing

    2015-01-01

    A novel fluorescent probe based on heteroatom containing styrylcyanine is synthesized. The fluorescence of probe is bright green in basic and neutral media but dark orange in strong acidic environments, which could be reversibly switched. Such behavior enables it to work as a fluorescent pH sensor in the solution state and a chemosensor for detecting acidic and basic volatile organic compounds. Analyses by NMR spectroscopy confirm that the protonation or deprotonation of pyridinyl moiety is responsible for the sensing process. In addition, the fluorescent microscopic images of probe in live cells and zebrafish are achieved successfully, suggesting that the probe has good cell membrane permeability and low cytotoxicity. - Graphical abstract: A novel styrylcyanine-based fluorescent pH probe was designed and synthesized, the fluorescence of which is bright green in basic and neutral media but dark orange in strong acidic environments. Such behavior enables it to work as a fluorescent pH sensor in solution states, and a chemosensor for detecting volatile organic compounds with high acidity and basicity in solid state. In addition, it can be used for fluorescent imaging in living cell and living organism. - Highlights: • Bright green fluorescence was observed in basic and neutral media. • Dark orange fluorescence was found in strong acidic environments. • Volatile organic compounds with high acidity and basicity could be detected. • Bioimaging in living cell and living organism was achieved successfully

  11. Molecular engineering of two-photon fluorescent probes for bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Wen; Liu, Yongchao; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2017-03-01

    During the past two decades, two-photon microscopy (TPM), which utilizes two near-infrared photons as the excitation source, has emerged as a novel, attractive imaging tool for biological research. Compared with one-photon microscopy, TPM offers several advantages, such as lowering background fluorescence in living cells and tissues, reducing photodamage to biosamples, and a photobleaching phenomenon, offering better 3D spatial localization, and increasing penetration depth. Small-molecule-based two-photon fluorescent probes have been well developed for the detection and imaging of various analytes in biological systems. In this review, we will give a general introduction of molecular engineering of two-photon fluorescent probes based on different fluorescence response mechanisms for bioimaging applications during the past decade. Inspired by the desired advantages of small-molecule two-photon fluorescent probes in biological imaging applications, we expect that more attention will be devoted to the development of new two-photon fluorophores and applications of TPM in areas of bioanalysis and disease diagnosis.

  12. Gadolinia nanofibers as a multimodal bioimaging and potential radiation therapy agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishin, A. M., E-mail: grishin@kth.se, E-mail: grishin@inmatech.com [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-164 40 Stockholm-Kista (Sweden); INMATECH Intelligent Materials Technology, SE-127 45 Skärholmen (Sweden); Petrozavodsk State University, 185910 Petrozavodsk, Karelian Republic (Russian Federation); Jalalian, A. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-164 40 Stockholm-Kista (Sweden); INMATECH Intelligent Materials Technology, SE-127 45 Skärholmen (Sweden); Tsindlekht, M. I. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-05-15

    Continuous bead-free C-type cubic gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanofibers 20-30 μm long and 40-100 nm in diameter were sintered by sol-gel calcination assisted electrospinning technique. Dipole-dipole interaction of neighboring Gd{sup 3+} ions in nanofibers with large length-to-diameter aspect ratio results in some kind of superparamagnetic behavior: fibers are magnetized twice stronger than Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. Being compared with commercial Gd-DTPA/Magnevist{sup ®}, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} diethyleneglycol-coated (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-DEG) fibers show high 1/T{sub 1} and 1/T{sub 2} proton relaxivities. Intense room temperature photoluminescence, high NMR relaxivity and high neutron scattering cross-section of {sup 157}Gd nucleus promise to integrate Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} fibers for multimodal bioimaging and neutron capture therapy.

  13. Oleyl-hyaluronan micelles loaded with upconverting nanoparticles for bio-imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospisilova, Martina, E-mail: martina.pospisilova@contipro.com; Mrazek, Jiri; Matuska, Vit; Kettou, Sofiane; Dusikova, Monika; Svozil, Vit; Nesporova, Kristina; Huerta-Angeles, Gloria; Vagnerova, Hana; Velebny, Vladimir [Contipro Biotech (Czech Republic)

    2015-09-15

    Hyaluronan (HA) represents an interesting polymer for nanoparticle coating due to its biocompatibility and enhanced cell interaction via CD44 receptor. Here, we describe incorporation of oleate-capped β–NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} nanoparticles (UCNP-OA) into amphiphilic HA by microemulsion method. Resulting structures have a spherical, micelle-like appearance with a hydrodynamic diameter of 180 nm. UCNP-OA-loaded HA micelles show a good stability in PBS buffer and cell culture media. The intensity of green emission of UCNP-OA-loaded HA micelles in water is about five times higher than that of ligand-free UCNP, indicating that amphiphilic HA effectively protects UCNP luminescence from quenching by water molecules. We found that UCNP-OA-loaded HA micelles in concentrations up to 50 μg mL{sup −1} increase cell viability of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF), while viability of human breast adenocarcinoma cells MDA–MB–231 is reduced at these concentrations. The utility of UCNP-OA-loaded HA micelles as a bio-imaging probe was demonstrated in vitro by successful labelling of NHDF and MDA–MB–231 cells overexpressing the CD44 receptor.

  14. Surface chemistry manipulation of gold nanorods preserves optical properties for bio-imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polito, Anthony B.; Maurer-Gardner, Elizabeth I.; Hussain, Saber M., E-mail: saber.hussain@us.af.mil [Air Force Research Laboratory, Molecular Bioeffects Branch, Bioeffects Division, Human Effectiveness Directorate (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Due to their anisotropic shape, gold nanorods (GNRs) possess a number of advantages for biosystem use including, enhanced surface area and tunable optical properties within the near-infrared (NIR) region. However, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide-related cytotoxicity, overall poor cellular uptake following surface chemistry modifications, and loss of NIR optical properties due to material intracellular aggregation in combination remain as obstacles for nanobased biomedical GNR applications. In this article, we report that tannic acid-coated 11-mercaptoundecyl trimethylammonium bromide (MTAB) GNRs (MTAB-TA) show no significant decrease in either in vitro cell viability or stress activation after exposures to A549 human alveolar epithelial cells. In addition, MTAB-TA GNRs demonstrate a substantial level of cellular uptake while displaying a unique intracellular clustering pattern. This clustering pattern significantly reduces intracellular aggregation, preserving the GNRs NIR optical properties, vital for biomedical imaging applications. These results demonstrate how surface chemistry modifications enhance biocompatibility, allow for higher rate of internalization with low intracellular aggregation of MTAB-TA GNRs, and identify them as prime candidates for use in nanobased bio-imaging applications.Graphical Abstract.

  15. Mechanochemistry of Chitosan-Coated Zinc Sulfide (ZnS) Nanocrystals for Bio-imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujňáková, Zdenka; Dutková, Erika; Kello, Martin; Mojžiš, Ján; Baláž, Matej; Baláž, Peter; Shpotyuk, Oleh

    2017-05-01

    The ZnS nanocrystals were prepared in chitosan solution (0.1 wt.%) using a wet ultra-fine milling. The obtained suspension was stable and reached high value of zeta potential (+57 mV). The changes in FTIR spectrum confirmed the successful surface coating of ZnS nanoparticles by chitosan. The prepared ZnS nanocrystals possessed interesting optical properties verified in vitro. Four cancer cells were selected (CaCo-2, HCT116, HeLa, and MCF-7), and after their treatment with the nanosuspension, the distribution of ZnS in the cells was studied using a fluorescence microscope. The particles were clearly seen; they passed through the cell membrane and accumulated in cytosol. The biological activity of the cells was not influenced by nanoparticles, they did not cause cell death, and only the granularity of cells was increased as a consequence of cellular uptake. These results confirm the potential of ZnS nanocrystals using in bio-imaging applications.

  16. [Quantitative data analysis for live imaging of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seno, Shigeto

    Bone tissue is a hard tissue, it was difficult to observe the interior of the bone tissue alive. With the progress of microscopic technology and fluorescent probe technology in recent years, it becomes possible to observe various activities of various cells forming bone society. On the other hand, the quantitative increase in data and the diversification and complexity of the images makes it difficult to perform quantitative analysis by visual inspection. It has been expected to develop a methodology for processing microscopic images and data analysis. In this article, we introduce the research field of bioimage informatics which is the boundary area of biology and information science, and then outline the basic image processing technology for quantitative analysis of live imaging data of bone.

  17. Functionalized Nanolipobubbles Embedded Within a Nanocomposite Hydrogel: a Molecular Bio-imaging and Biomechanical Analysis of the System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufamadi, Maluta S; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Modi, Girish; Naidoo, Dinesh; Iyuke, Sunny E; Pillay, Viness

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of molecular bio-imaging systems and biomechanical dynamics to elucidate the fate of a nanocomposite hydrogel system prepared by merging FITC-labeled nanolipobubbles within a cross-linked hydrogel network. The nanocomposite hydrogel system was characterized by size distribution analysis and zeta potential as well as shears thinning behavior, elastic modulus (G'), viscous loss moduli (G"), TEM, and FTIR. In addition, molecular bio-imaging via Vevo ultrasound and Cell-viZio techniques evaluated the stability and distribution of the nanolipobubbles within the cross-linked hydrogel. FITC-labeled and functionalized nanolipobubbles had particle sizes between 135 and 158 nm (PdI = 0.129 and 0.190) and a zeta potential of -34 mV. TEM and ultrasound imaging revealed the uniformity and dimensional stability of the functionalized nanolipobubbles pre- and post-embedment into the cross-linked hydrogel. Biomechanical characterization of the hydrogel by shear thinning behavior was governed by the polymer concentration and the cross-linker, glutaraldehyde. Ultrasound analysis and Cell-viZio bio-imaging were highly suitable to visualize the fluorescent image-guided nanolipobubbles and their morphology post-embedment into the hydrogel to form the NanoComposite system. Since the nanocomposite is intended for targeted treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, the distribution of the functionalized nanolipobubbles into PC12 neuronal cells was also ascertained via confocal microscopy. Results demonstrated effective release and localization of the nanolipobubbles within PC12 neuronal cells. The molecular structure of the synthetic surface peptide remained intact for an extended period to ensure potency for targeted delivery from the hydrogel ex vivo. These findings provide further insight into the properties of nanocomposite hydrogels for specialized drug delivery.

  18. Multifunctional nanocomposite based on halloysite nanotubes for efficient luminescent bioimaging and magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tao Zhou,1 Lei Jia,1 Yi-Feng Luo,2 Jun Xu,1 Ru-Hua Chen,2 Zhi-Jun Ge,2 Tie-Liang Ma,2 Hong Chen,2 Tao-Feng Zhu2 1Department of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo, Henan, 2The Affiliated Yixing Hospital of Jiangsu University, Yixing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China Abstract: A novel multifunctional halloysite nanotube (HNT-based Fe3O4@HNT-polyethyleneimine-Tip-Eu(dibenzoylmethane3 nanocomposite (Fe-HNT-Eu NC with both photoluminescent and magnetic properties was fabricated by a simple one-step hydrothermal process combined with the coupling grafting method, which exhibited high suspension stability and excellent photophysical behavior. The as-prepared multifunctional Fe-HNT-Eu NC was characterized using various techniques. The results of cell viability assay, cell morphological observation, and in vivo toxicity assay indicated that the NC exhibited excellent biocompatibility over the studied concentration range, suggesting that the obtained Fe-HNT-Eu NC was a suitable material for bioimaging and biological applications in human hepatic adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, the biocompatible Fe-HNT-Eu NC displayed superparamagnetic behavior with high saturation magnetization and also functioned as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent in vitro and in vivo. The results of the MRI tests indicated that the Fe-HNT-Eu NC can significantly decrease the T2 signal intensity values of the normal liver tissue and thus make the boundary between the normal liver and transplanted cancer more distinct, thus effectively improving the diagnosis effect of cancers. Keywords: halloysite nanotube, lanthanide complex, iron oxide, luminescence, contrast agent

  19. Multimodal Theranostic Nanoformulations Permit Magnetic Resonance Bioimaging of Antiretroviral Drug Particle Tissue-Cell Biodistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevadiya, Bhavesh D.; Woldstad, Christopher; Ottemann, Brendan M.; Dash, Prasanta; Sajja, Balasrinivasa R.; Lamberty, Benjamin; Morsey, Brenda; Kocher, Ted; Dutta, Rinku; Bade, Aditya N.; Liu, Yutong; Callen, Shannon E.; Fox, Howard S.; Byrareddy, Siddappa N.; McMillan, JoEllyn M.; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Edagwa, Benson J.; Boska, Michael D.; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2018-01-01

    RATIONALE: Long-acting slow effective release antiretroviral therapy (LASER ART) was developed to improve patient regimen adherence, prevent new infections, and facilitate drug delivery to human immunodeficiency virus cell and tissue reservoirs. In an effort to facilitate LASER ART development, “multimodal imaging theranostic nanoprobes” were created. These allow combined bioimaging, drug pharmacokinetics and tissue biodistribution tests in animal models. METHODS: Europium (Eu3+)- doped cobalt ferrite (CF) dolutegravir (DTG)- loaded (EuCF-DTG) nanoparticles were synthesized then fully characterized based on their size, shape and stability. These were then used as platforms for nanoformulated drug biodistribution. RESULTS: Folic acid (FA) decoration of EuCF-DTG (FA-EuCF-DTG) nanoparticles facilitated macrophage targeting and sped drug entry across cell barriers. Macrophage uptake was higher for FA-EuCF-DTG than EuCF-DTG nanoparticles with relaxivities of r2 = 546 mM-1s-1 and r2 = 564 mM-1s-1 in saline, and r2 = 850 mM-1s-1 and r2 = 876 mM-1s-1 in cells, respectively. The values were ten or more times higher than what was observed for ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (r2 = 31.15 mM-1s-1 in saline) using identical iron concentrations. Drug particles were detected in macrophage Rab compartments by dual fluorescence labeling. Replicate particles elicited sustained antiretroviral responses. After parenteral injection of FA-EuCF-DTG and EuCF-DTG into rats and rhesus macaques, drug, iron and cobalt levels, measured by LC-MS/MS, magnetic resonance imaging, and ICP-MS were coordinate. CONCLUSION: We posit that these theranostic nanoprobes can assess LASER ART drug delivery and be used as part of a precision nanomedicine therapeutic strategy. PMID:29290806

  20. Nanostructures Derived from Starch and Chitosan for Fluorescence Bio-Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Yinxue; Bi, Jingran; Yan, Huiping; Wang, Haitao; Song, Yukun; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Tan, Mingqian

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent nanostructures (NSs) derived from polysaccharides have drawn great attention as novel fluorescent probes for potential bio-imaging applications. Herein, we reported a facile alkali-assisted hydrothermal method to fabricate polysaccharide NSs using starch and chitosan as raw materials. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the average particle sizes are 14 nm and 75 nm for starch and chitosan NSs, respectively. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy analysis showed that there are a large number of hydroxyl or amino groups on the surface of these polysaccharide-based NSs. Strong fluorescence with an excitation-dependent emission behaviour was observed under ultraviolet excitation. Interestingly, the photostability of the NSs was found to be superior to fluorescein and rhodamine B. The quantum yield of starch NSs could reach 11.12% under the excitation of 360 nm. The oxidative metal ions including Cu(II), Hg(II)and Fe(III) exhibited a quench effect on the fluorescence intensity of the prepared NSs. Both of the two kinds of the multicoloured NSs showed a maximum fluorescence intensity at pH 7, while the fluorescence intensity decreased dramatically when they were put in an either acidic or basic environment (at pH 3 or 11). The cytotoxicity study of starch NSs showed that low cell cytotoxicity and 80% viability was found after 24 h incubation, when their concentration was less than 10 mg/mL. The study also showed the possibility of using the multicoloured starch NSs for mouse melanoma cells and guppy fish imaging. PMID:28335258

  1. Optimization of a dedicated bio-imaging beamline at the European X-ray FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    We recently proposed a basic concept for design and layout of the undulator source for a dedicated bio-imaging beamline at the European XFEL. The goal of the optimized scheme proposed here is to enable experimental simplification and performance improvement. The core of the scheme is composed by soft and hard X-ray self-seeding setups. Based on the use of an improved design for both monochromators it is possible to increase the design electron energy up to 17.5 GeV in photon energy range between 2 keV and 13 keV, which is the most preferable for life science experiments. An advantage of operating at such high electron energy is the increase of the X-ray output peak power. Another advantage is that 17.5 GeV is the preferred operation energy for SASE1 and SASE2 beamline users. Since it will be necessary to run all the XFEL lines at the same electron energy, this choice will reduce the interference with other undulator lines and increase the total amount of scheduled beam time. In this work we also propose a study of the performance of the self-seeding scheme accounting for spatiotemporal coupling caused by the use of a single crystal monochromator. Our analysis indicates that this distortion is easily suppressed by the right choice of diamond crystal planes and that the proposed undulator source yields about the same performance as in the case for a X-ray seed pulse with no coupling. Simulations show that the FEL power reaches 2 TW in the 3 keV-5 keV photon energy range, which is the most preferable for single biomolecule imaging.

  2. Optimization of a dedicated bio-imaging beamline at the European X-ray FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2012-09-01

    We recently proposed a basic concept for design and layout of the undulator source for a dedicated bio-imaging beamline at the European XFEL. The goal of the optimized scheme proposed here is to enable experimental simplification and performance improvement. The core of the scheme is composed by soft and hard X-ray self-seeding setups. Based on the use of an improved design for both monochromators it is possible to increase the design electron energy up to 17.5 GeV in photon energy range between 2 keV and 13 keV, which is the most preferable for life science experiments. An advantage of operating at such high electron energy is the increase of the X-ray output peak power. Another advantage is that 17.5 GeV is the preferred operation energy for SASE1 and SASE2 beamline users. Since it will be necessary to run all the XFEL lines at the same electron energy, this choice will reduce the interference with other undulator lines and increase the total amount of scheduled beam time. In this work we also propose a study of the performance of the self-seeding scheme accounting for spatiotemporal coupling caused by the use of a single crystal monochromator. Our analysis indicates that this distortion is easily suppressed by the right choice of diamond crystal planes and that the proposed undulator source yields about the same performance as in the case for a X-ray seed pulse with no coupling. Simulations show that the FEL power reaches 2 TW in the 3 keV-5 keV photon energy range, which is the most preferable for single biomolecule imaging.

  3. A microwave-assisted solution combustion synthesis to produce europium-doped calcium phosphate nanowhiskers for bioimaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Darcy E; Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea L; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2013-09-01

    Biocompatible nanoparticles possessing fluorescent properties offer attractive possibilities for multifunctional bioimaging and/or drug and gene delivery applications. Many of the limitations with current imaging systems center on the properties of the optical probes in relation to equipment technical capabilities. Here we introduce a novel high aspect ratio and highly crystalline europium-doped calcium phosphate nanowhisker produced using a simple microwave-assisted solution combustion synthesis method for use as a multifunctional bioimaging probe. X-ray diffraction confirmed the material phase as europium-doped hydroxyapatite. Fluorescence emission and excitation spectra and their corresponding peaks were identified using spectrofluorimetry and validated with fluorescence, confocal and multiphoton microscopy. The nanowhiskers were found to exhibit red and far red wavelength fluorescence under ultraviolet excitation with an optimal peak emission of 696 nm achieved with a 350 nm excitation. Relatively narrow emission bands were observed, which may permit their use in multicolor imaging applications. Confocal and multiphoton microscopy confirmed that the nanoparticles provide sufficient intensity to be utilized in imaging applications. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Bioengineered II-VI semiconductor quantum dot-carboxymethylcellulose nanoconjugates as multifunctional fluorescent nanoprobes for bioimaging live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Alexandra A. P.; Mansur, Herman S.; Mansur, Rafael L.; de Carvalho, Fernanda G.; Carvalho, Sandhra M.

    2018-01-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are light-emitting ultra-small nanoparticles, which have emerged as a new class of nanoprobes with unique optical properties for bioimaging and biomedical diagnostic. However, to be used for most biomedical applications the biocompatibility and water-solubility are mandatory that can achieved through surface modification forming QD-nanoconjugates. In this study, semiconductor II-VI quantum dots of type MX (M = Cd, Pb, Zn, X = S) were directly synthesized in aqueous media and at room temperature using carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt (CMC) behaving simultaneously as stabilizing and surface biofunctional ligand. These nanoconjugates were extensively characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential. The results demonstrated that the biopolymer was effective on nucleating and stabilizing the colloidal nanocrystals of CdS, ZnS, and PbS with the average diameter ranging from 2.0 to 5.0 nm depending on the composition of the semiconductor core, which showed quantum-size confinement effect. These QD/polysaccharide conjugates showed luminescent activity from UV-visible to near-infrared range of the spectra under violet laser excitation. Moreover, the bioassays performed proved that these novel nanoconjugates were biocompatible and behaved as composition-dependent fluorescent nanoprobes for in vitro live cell bioimaging with very promising perspectives to be used in numerous biomedical applications and nanomedicine.

  5. Bioimaging of M1 cells using ceramic nanophosphors: Synthesis and toxicity assay of Y2O3 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatachalam, N; Soga, K; Tsuji, T; Okumura, Y; Fukuda, R

    2009-01-01

    Er 3+ doped Y 2 O 3 nanoparticles were synthesized by enzymatic and polymer-assisted homogeneous co-precipitation methods. Resultant particle size is about 30-40 nm with narrow size distribution whereas the particle size is smaller than those acquired by conventional homogeneous and alkali precipitation methods. The particles shows bright green (550 nm) and red (660 nm) upconversion (UC) as well as near infrared (NIR) fluorescence (1550 nm) under 980 nm excitation. Bioimaging of M1 cells using the nanoparticles were successfully attempted. It is observed that 0.5 mg/ml of nanoparticles is the nominal concentration for bioimaging of M1 cells under the physiological conditions. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles is evidenced from bright field, UC and NIR fluorescence images of live M1 cells. Our studies suggest that lower concentration of nanoparticles is sufficient for imaging when the particles are taken in the M1 cells and also the concentration can keep the cells alive. Further it was demonstrated that under the physiological conditions, Y 2 O 3 nanoparticles emit UC and NIR fluorescence in M1 cells even after the surface modification with PEG-b-PAAc polymer. Moreover, surface modified nanoparticles shows lower toxic effect in M1 cells while compare to bare nanoparticles.

  6. A way toward analyzing high-content bioimage data by means of semantic annotation and visual data mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Julia; Abouna, Sylvie; Zhou, Luxian; Pelengaris, Stella; Epstein, David B. A.; Khan, Michael; Nattkemper, Tim W.

    2009-02-01

    In the last years, bioimaging has turned from qualitative measurements towards a high-throughput and highcontent modality, providing multiple variables for each biological sample analyzed. We present a system which combines machine learning based semantic image annotation and visual data mining to analyze such new multivariate bioimage data. Machine learning is employed for automatic semantic annotation of regions of interest. The annotation is the prerequisite for a biological object-oriented exploration of the feature space derived from the image variables. With the aid of visual data mining, the obtained data can be explored simultaneously in the image as well as in the feature domain. Especially when little is known of the underlying data, for example in the case of exploring the effects of a drug treatment, visual data mining can greatly aid the process of data evaluation. We demonstrate how our system is used for image evaluation to obtain information relevant to diabetes study and screening of new anti-diabetes treatments. Cells of the Islet of Langerhans and whole pancreas in pancreas tissue samples are annotated and object specific molecular features are extracted from aligned multichannel fluorescence images. These are interactively evaluated for cell type classification in order to determine the cell number and mass. Only few parameters need to be specified which makes it usable also for non computer experts and allows for high-throughput analysis.

  7. The BioImage Study: novel approaches to risk assessment in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease--study design and objectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntendam, Pieter; McCall, Carol; Sanz, Javier; Falk, Erling; Fuster, Valentin; Badimon, Juan José; Botnar, René M.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Garcia, Mario; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Hazen, Stanley L.; King, Spencer B.; Moreno, Pedro R.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Rudd, James H. F.; Shah, Predimon K.; Sillesen, Henrik; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Yacoub, Magdi H.; Yuan, Chun; Bui, James T.; Chen, Christopher J.; Seow, Albert; Plump, Andrew; Raichlen, Joel; Smit, Paul; Stolzenbach, James C.; Urquhart, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The identification of asymptomatic individuals at risk for near-term atherothrombotic events to ensure optimal preventive treatment remains a challenging goal. In the BioImage Study, novel approaches are tested in a typical health-plan population. Based on certain demographic and risk

  8. Persistent Luminescence Nanophosphor Involved Near-Infrared Optical Bioimaging for Investigation of Foodborne Probiotics Biodistribution in Vivo: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaoyao; Liu, Jing-Min; Zhang, Dongdong; Ge, Kun; Wang, Peihua; Liu, Huilin; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Shuo

    2017-09-20

    Probiotics has attracted great attention in food nutrition and safety research field, but thus far there are limited analytical techniques for visualized and real-time monitoring of the probiotics when they are ingested in vivo. Herein, the optical bioimaging technique has been introduced for investigation of foodborne probiotics biodistribution in vivo, employing the near-infrared (NIR) emitting persistent luminescence nanophosphors (PLNPs) of Cr 3+ -doped zinc gallogermanate (ZGGO) as the contrast nanoprobes. The ultrabrightness, super long afterglow, polydispersed size, low toxicity, and excellent photostability and biocompatibility of PLNPs were demonstrated to be qualified as a tracer for labeling probiotics via antibody (anti-Gram positive bacteria LTA antibody) recognition as well as contrast agent for long-term bioimaging the probiotics. In vivo optical bioimaging assay showed that the LTA antibody functionalized ZGGO nanoprobes that could be efficiently tagged to the probiobics were successfully applied for real-time monitoring and nondamaged probing of the biodistribution of probiotics inside the living body after oral administration. This work presents a proof-of-concept that exploited the bioimaging methodology for real-time and nondamaged researching the foodborne probiotics behaviors in vivo, which would open up a novel way of food safety detection and nutrition investigation.

  9. Carbon Nanodots: Dual‐Color‐Emitting Carbon Nanodots for Multicolor Bioimaging and Optogenetic Control of Ion Channels (Adv. Sci. 11/2017)

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyemin; Park, Yoonsang; Beack, Songeun; Han, Seulgi; Jung, Dooyup; Cha, Hyung Joon; Kwon, Woosung; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanodots (CNDs) have been widely investigated for theranostic applications including fluorescence imaging, photoacoustic imaging, photothermal therapy, and photodynamic therapy. In article number 1700325, Sei Kwang Hahn, Woosung Kwon, and co‐workers develop dual‐color‐emitting CNDs uniquely designed by the electronic structure engineering for both futuristic multi‐color bioimaging and optogenetic control of ion channels.

  10. Quantitative analysis of macro-ARG using IP system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Eiichi; Kawai, Kenji; Furuta, Yoshitake

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in imaging plate (IP) system allow us to analyze autoradiographic images quantitatively. In the 'whole-body autoradiography', a method clarify the distribution of radioisotope or labeled compounds in the tissues and organs in a freeze-dried whole-body section of small animals such as rats and mice, the sections are pressed against a IP for exposure and the IP is scanned by Bio-Imaging Analyzer (Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd) and a digital autoradiographic image is given. Quantitative data concerning the activity in different tissues can be obtained using an isotope scale as a reference source. Fading effect, application of IP system for distribution of receptor binding ARG, analysis of radio-spots on TLC and radioactive concentration in liquid such as blood are also discussed. (author)

  11. A new simple phthalimide-based fluorescent probe for highly selective cysteine and bioimaging for living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Youming; Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Youyu; Zhang, Chunxiang; Jin, Junling; Li, Haitao

    2017-10-01

    A new turn-on phthalimide fluorescent probe has designed and synthesized for sensing cysteine (Cys) based on excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) process. It is consisted of a 3-hydroxyphthalimide derivative moiety as the fluorophore and an acrylic ester group as a recognition receptor. The acrylic ester acts as an ESIPT blocking agent. Upon addition of cystein, intermolecular nucleophilic attack of cysteine on acrylic ester releases the fluorescent 3-hydroxyphthalimide derivative, thereby enabling the ESIPT process and leading to enhancement of fluorescence. The probe displays high sensitivity, excellent selectivity and with large Stokes shift toward cysteine. The linear interval range of the fluorescence titration ranged from 0 to 1.0 × 10- 5 M and detection limit is low (6 × 10- 8 M). In addition, the probe could be used for bio-imaging in living cells.

  12. Thermal, optical and vibrational studies of tyrosine doped LaF3:Ce nanoparticles for bioimaging and biotagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit T.

    2018-05-01

    Upconversion quantum dots of tyrosine doped LaF3:Ce nanoparticles have been synthesized by wet chemical route. The thermal studies (TGA/DTA) confirm the crystallinity and stability of different phases of synthesized nanoparticles. The UV-Visible spectra show multiple absorption edges at 215.60 nm and 243.10 nm indicating quantum dot nature of the synthesized nanoparticles. The PL spectra showed upconversion with sharp emission peak at 615 nm (red colour). The FT-RAMAN spectra of the synthesized nanoparticles show the modification of the surface of the nanoparticles in the form of functional groups and skeletal groups. Upconversion nature of the synthesized nanoparticles indicates their potential application in bioimaging and biotagging.

  13. Bioimaging mass spectrometry of trace elements – recent advance and applications of LA-ICP-MS: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J.Sabine, E-mail: s.becker@fz-juelich.de [Central Institute for Engineering, Electronics and Analytics (ZEA-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Matusch, Andreas, E-mail: a.matusch@fz-juelich.de [Institute for Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-2), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Wu, Bei, E-mail: b.wu@fz-juelich.de [Central Institute for Engineering, Electronics and Analytics (ZEA-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich D-52425 (Germany)

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • Bioimaging LA-ICP-MS is established for trace metals within biomedical specimens. • Trace metal imaging allows to study brain function and neurodegenerative diseases. • Laser microdissection ICP-MS was applied to mouse brain hippocampus and wheat root. - Abstract: Bioimaging using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) offers the capability to quantify trace elements and isotopes within tissue sections with a spatial resolution ranging about 10–100 μm. Distribution analysis adds to clarifying basic questions of biomedical research and enables bioaccumulation and bioavailability studies for ecological and toxicological risk assessment in humans, animals and plants. Major application fields of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and metallomics have been in brain and cancer research, animal model validation, drug development and plant science. Here we give an overview of latest achievements in methods and applications. Recent improvements in ablation systems, operation and cell design enabled progressively better spatial resolutions down to 1 μm. Meanwhile, a body of research has accumulated covering basic principles of the element architecture in animals and plants that could consistently be reproduced by several laboratories such as the distribution of Fe, Cu, Zn in rodent brain. Several studies investigated the distribution and delivery of metallo-drugs in animals. Hyper-accumulating plants and pollution indicator organisms have been the key topics in environmental science. Increasingly, larger series of samples are analyzed, may it be in the frame of comparisons between intervention and control groups, of time kinetics or of three-dimensional atlas approaches.

  14. Yb{sup 3+},Er{sup 3+},Eu{sup 3+}-codoped YVO{sub 4} material for bioimaging with dual mode excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thao, Chu Thi Bich [Department of Chemistry, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Huy, Bui The [Department of Chemistry, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, K7/25 Quang Trung, Da Nang (Viet Nam); Sharipov, Mirkomil [Department of Chemistry, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin-Ik. [Department of Biochemistry and Health Science, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Dao, Van-Duong [Department of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Ja-Young [Department of Biochemistry and Health Science, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong-Ill, E-mail: yilee@changwon.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-01

    We propose an efficient bioimaging strategy using Yb{sup 3+},Er{sup 3+},Eu{sup 3+}-triplet doped YVO{sub 4} nanoparticles which were synthesized with polymer as a template. The obtained particles possess nanoscale, uniform, and flexible excitation. The effect of Eu{sup 3+} ions on the luminescence properties of YVO{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+},Er{sup 3+},Eu{sup 3+} was investigated. The upconversion mechanism of the prepared material was also discussed. The structure and optical properties of the prepared material were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform IR spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) upconversion and photoluminescence spectra. The Commission International de I′Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates was investigated to confirm the performance of color luminescent emission. The prepared YVO{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+},Er{sup 3+},Eu{sup 3+} nanoparticles could be easily dispersed in water by surface modification with cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH). The aqueous dispersion of the modified YVO{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+},Er{sup 3+},Eu{sup 3+} exhibits bright upconversion and downconversion luminescence and has been applied for bioimaging of HeLa cells. Our developed material with dual excitation offers a promising advance in bioimaging. - Highlights: • Prepared particles possess nanoscale size, uniform, and larger scale. • The material exhibits strong emission under dual mode excitations. • The surface material has been applied for bioimaging of HeLa cell. • Low cytotoxicity, no auto-fluorescence.

  15. Comparative studies of upconversion luminescence characteristics and cell bioimaging based on one-step synthesized upconversion nanoparticles capped with different functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, Ming-Kiu [Department of Applied Physics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Chan, Chi-Fai; Wong, Ka-Leung [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University (Hong Kong); Hao, Jianhua, E-mail: jh.hao@polyu.edu.hk [Department of Applied Physics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-01-15

    Herein, three types of upconverting NaGdF{sub 4}:Yb/Er nanoparticles (UCNPs) have been synthesized via one-step hydrothermal synthesis with polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyethylenimine (PEI) and 6-aminocapronic acid (6AA) functionalization. To evident the presence of these groups, FTIR spectra and ζ-potentials were measured to support the successful capping of PEG, PEI and 6AA on the UCNPs. The regular morphology and cubic phase of these functionalized UCNPs were attributed to the capping effect of the surfactants. Tunable upconversion luminescence (UCL) from red to green were observed under 980 nm laser excitation and the UCL tuning was attributed to the presence of various surface ligands. Moreover, surface group dependent UCL bioimaging was performed in HeLa cells. The enhanced UCL bioimaging demonstrated by PEI functionalized UCNPs evident high cell uptake. The significant cell uptake is explained by the electrostatic attraction between the amino groups (–NH{sub 2}) and the cell membrane. Moreover, the functionalized UCNPs demonstrated low cytotoxicity in MTT assay. Additional, paramagnetic property was presented by these UCNPs under magnetic field. - Highlights: • Tunable upconversion emission by capped functional groups under fixed composition. • Surface dependent upconversion luminescence bioimaging in HeLa cells. • Low cytotoxicity. • Additional paramagnetic property due to Gd{sup 3+} ions.

  16. Surface-confined fluorescence enhancement of Au nanoclusters anchoring to a two-dimensional ultrathin nanosheet toward bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Rui; Yan, Dongpeng; Li, Chunyang; Xu, Simin; Liang, Ruizheng; Guo, Lingyan; Wei, Min; Evans, David G.; Duan, Xue

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) as ultrasmall fluorescent nanomaterials possess discrete electronic energy and unique physicochemical properties, but suffer from relatively low quantum yield (QY) which severely affects their application in displays and imaging. To solve this conundrum and obtain highly-efficient fluorescent emission, 2D exfoliated layered double hydroxide (ELDH) nanosheets were employed to localize Au NCs with a density as high as 5.44 × 1013 cm-2, by virtue of the surface confinement effect of ELDH. Both experimental studies and computational simulations testify that the excited electrons of Au NCs are strongly confined by MgAl-ELDH nanosheets, which results in a largely promoted QY as well as prolonged fluorescence lifetime (both ~7 times enhancement). In addition, the as-fabricated Au NC/ELDH hybrid material exhibits excellent imaging properties with good stability and biocompatibility in the intracellular environment. Therefore, this work provides a facile strategy to achieve highly luminescent Au NCs via surface-confined emission enhancement imposed by ultrathin inorganic nanosheets, which can be potentially used in bio-imaging and cell labelling.Gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) as ultrasmall fluorescent nanomaterials possess discrete electronic energy and unique physicochemical properties, but suffer from relatively low quantum yield (QY) which severely affects their application in displays and imaging. To solve this conundrum and obtain highly-efficient fluorescent emission, 2D exfoliated layered double hydroxide (ELDH) nanosheets were employed to localize Au NCs with a density as high as 5.44 × 1013 cm-2, by virtue of the surface confinement effect of ELDH. Both experimental studies and computational simulations testify that the excited electrons of Au NCs are strongly confined by MgAl-ELDH nanosheets, which results in a largely promoted QY as well as prolonged fluorescence lifetime (both ~7 times enhancement). In addition, the as-fabricated Au NC

  17. A Novel Type of Aqueous Dispersible Ultrathin-Layered Double Hydroxide Nanosheets for in Vivo Bioimaging and Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Zhou, Mengjiao; Zhang, Xiujuan; Huang, Longbiao; Chen, Wei; Roy, Vellaisamy A L; Zhang, Wenjun; Chen, Xianfeng

    2017-10-04

    Layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles have been widely used for various biomedical applications. However, because of the difficulty of surface functionalization of LDH nanoparticles, the systemic administration of these nanomaterials for in vivo therapy remains a bottleneck. In this work, we develop a novel type of aqueous dispersible two-dimensional ultrathin LDH nanosheets with a size of about 50 nm and a thickness of about 1.4 to 4 nm. We are able to covalently attach positively charged rhodamine B fluorescent molecules to the nanosheets, and the nanohybrid retains strong fluorescence in liquid and even dry powder form. Therefore, it is available for bioimaging. Beyond this, it is convenient to modify the nanosheets with neutral poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), so the nanohybrid is suitable for drug delivery through systemic administration. Indeed, in the test of using these nanostructures for delivery of a negatively charged anticancer drug, methotrexate (MTX), in a mouse model, dramatically improved therapeutic efficacy is achieved, indicated by the effective inhibition of tumor growth. Furthermore, our systematic in vivo safety investigation including measuring body weight, determining biodistribution in major organs, hematology analysis, blood biochemical assay, and hematoxylin and eosin stain demonstrates that the new material is biocompatible. Overall, this work represents a major development in the path of modifying functional LDH nanomaterials for clinical applications.

  18. Interfacial synthesis of polyethyleneimine-protected copper nanoclusters: Size-dependent tunable photoluminescence, pH sensor and bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chan; Yao, Yagang; Song, Qijun

    2016-04-01

    The copper nanoclusters (CuNCs) offer excellent potential as functional biological probes due to their unique photoluminescence (PL) properties. Herein, CuNCs capped with hyperbranched polyethylenimine (PEI) were prepared by the interfacial etching approach. The resultant PEI-CuNCs exhibited good dispersion and strong fluorescence with high quantum yields (QYs, up to 7.5%), which would be endowed for bioimaging system. By changing the reaction temperatures from 25 to 150 °C, the size of PEI-CuNCs changed from 1.8 to 3.5 nm, and thus tunable PL were achieved, which was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imagings and PL spectra. Besides, PEI-CuNCs had smart absorption characteristics that the color changes from colorless to blue with changing the pH value from 2.0 to 13.2, and thus they could be used as color indicator for pH detection. In addition, the PEI-CuNCs exhibited good biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity to 293T cells through MTT assay. Owing to the positively charged of PEI-CuNCs surface, they had the ability to capture DNA, and the PEI-CuNCs/DNA complexes could get access to cells for efficient gene expression. Armed with these attractive properties, the synthesized PEI-CuNCs are quite promising in biological applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A chromogenic and fluorogenic rhodol-based chemosensor for hydrazine detection and its application in live cell bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiensomjitr, Khomsan; Noorat, Rattha; Chomngam, Sinchai; Wechakorn, Kanokorn; Prabpai, Samran; Kanjanasirirat, Phongthon; Pewkliang, Yongyut; Borwornpinyo, Suparerk; Kongsaeree, Palangpon

    2018-04-01

    A rhodol-based fluorescent probe has been developed as a selective hydrazine chemosensor using levulinate as a recognition site. The rhodol levulinate probe (RL) demonstrated high selectivity and sensitivity toward hydrazine among other molecules. The chromogenic response of RL solution to hydrazine from colorless to pink could be readily observed by the naked eye, while strong fluorescence emission could be monitored upon excitation at 525 nm. The detection process occurred via a ring-opening process of the spirolactone initiated by hydrazinolysis, triggering the fluorescence emission with a 53-fold enhancement. The probe rapidly reacted with hydrazine in aqueous medium with the detection limit of 26 nM (0.83 ppb), lower than the threshold limit value (TLV) of 10 ppb suggested by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Furthermore, RL-impregnated paper strips could detect hydrazine vapor. For biological applicability of RL, its membrane-permeable property led to bioimaging of hydrazine in live HepG2 cells by confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  20. Core-shell designs of photoluminescent nanodiamonds with porous silica coatings for bioimaging and drug delivery II: application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Neeraj; Näreoja, Tuomas; von Haartman, Eva; Karaman, Didem Şen; Jiang, Hua; Koho, Sami; Dolenko, Tatiana A; Hänninen, Pekka E; Vlasov, Denis I; Ralchenko, Victor G; Hosomi, Satoru; Vlasov, Igor I; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Rosenholm, Jessica M

    2013-05-07

    Recent advances within materials science and its interdisciplinary applications in biomedicine have emphasized the potential of using a single multifunctional composite material for concurrent drug delivery and biomedical imaging. Here we present a novel composite material consisting of a photoluminescent nanodiamond (ND) core with a porous silica (SiO2) shell. This novel multifunctional probe serves as an alternative nanomaterial to address the existing problems with delivery and subsequent tracing of the particles. Whereas the unique optical properties of ND allows for long-term live cell imaging and tracking of cellular processes, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have proven to be efficient drug carriers. The advantages of both ND and MSNs were hereby integrated in the new composite material, ND@MSN. The optical properties provided by the ND core rendered the nanocomposite suitable for microscopy imaging in fluorescence and reflectance mode, as well as super-resolution microscopy as a STED label; whereas the porous silica coating provided efficient intracellular delivery capacity, especially in surface-functionalized form. This study serves as a demonstration how this novel nanomaterial can be exploited for both bioimaging and drug delivery for future theranostic applications.

  1. Antibiotic Conjugated Fluorescent Carbon Dots as a Theranostic Agent for Controlled Drug Release, Bioimaging, and Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukeshchand Thakur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel report on microwave assisted synthesis of bright carbon dots (C-dots using gum arabic (GA and its use as molecular vehicle to ferry ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, a broad spectrum antibiotic, is reported in the present work. Density gradient centrifugation (DGC was used to separate different types of C-dots. After careful analysis of the fractions obtained after centrifugation, ciprofloxacin was attached to synthesize ciprofloxacin conjugated with C-dots (Cipro@C-dots conjugate. Release of ciprofloxacin was found to be extremely regulated under physiological conditions. Cipro@C-dots were found to be biocompatible on Vero cells as compared to free ciprofloxacin (1.2 mM even at very high concentrations. Bare C-dots (∼13 mg mL−1 were used for microbial imaging of the simplest eukaryotic model—Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast. Bright green fluorescent was obtained when live imaging was performed to view yeast cells under fluorescent microscope suggesting C-dots incorporation inside the cells. Cipro@C-dots conjugate also showed enhanced antimicrobial activity against both model gram positive and gram negative microorganisms. Thus, the Cipro@C-dots conjugate paves not only a way for bioimaging but also an efficient new nanocarrier for controlled drug release with high antimicrobial activity, thereby serving potential tool for theranostics.

  2. Fluorescent pH-Sensing Probe Based on Biorefinery Wood Lignosulfonate and Its Application in Human Cancer Cell Bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuyuan; Liang, Wanshan; Li, Yuan; Wu, Ying; Peng, Xinwen; Qiu, Xueqing; Liu, Jinbin; Sun, Runcang

    2016-12-28

    A water-soluble, ratiometric fluorescent pH probe, L-SRhB, was synthesized via grafting spirolactam Rhodamine B (SRhB) to lignosulfonate (LS). As the ring-opening product of L-SRhB, FL-SRhB was also prepared. The pH-response experiment indicated that L-SRhB showed a rapid response to pH changes from 4.60 to 6.20 with a pK a of 5.35, which indicated that L-SRhB has the potential for pH detection of acidic organelle. In addition, the two probes were internalized successfully by living cells through the endocytosis pathway and could distinguish normal cells from cancer cells by different cell staining rates. In addition, L-SRhB showed obvious cytotoxicity to cancer cells, whereas it was nontoxic to normal cells in the same condition. L-SRhB might have potential in cancer therapy. L-SRhB might be a promising ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor and bioimaging dye for the recognition of cancer cells. The results also provided a new perspective to the high-value utilization of lignin.

  3. Meso-ester and carboxylic acid substituted BODIPYs with far-red and near-infrared emission for bioimaging applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ni, Yong

    2014-01-21

    A series of meso-ester-substituted BODIPY derivatives 1-6 are synthesized and characterized. In particular, dyes functionalized with oligo(ethylene glycol) ether styryl or naphthalene vinylene groups at the α positions of the BODIPY core (3-6) become partially soluble in water, and their absorptions and emissions are located in the far-red or near-infrared region. Three synthetic approaches are attempted to access the meso-carboxylic acid (COOH)-substituted BODIPYs 7 and 8 from the meso-ester-substituted BODIPYs. Two feasible synthetic routes are developed successfully, including one short route with only three steps. The meso-COOH-substituted BODIPY 7 is completely soluble in pure water, and its fluorescence maximum reaches around 650 nm with a fluorescence quantum yield of up to 15 %. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are conducted to understand the structure-optical properties relationship, and it is revealed that the Stokes shift is dependent mainly on the geometric change from the ground state to the first excited singlet state. Furthermore, cell staining tests demonstrate that the meso-ester-substituted BODIPYs (1 and 3-6) and one of the meso-COOH-substituted BODIPYs (8) are very membrane-permeable. These features make these meso-ester- and meso-COOH-substituted BODIPY dyes attractive for bioimaging and biolabeling applications in living cells. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roger

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the basic tenets of quantitative research. The concepts of dependent and independent variables are addressed and the concept of measurement and its associated issues, such as error, reliability and validity, are explored. Experiments and surveys – the principal research designs in quantitative research – are described and key features explained. The importance of the double-blind randomised controlled trial is emphasised, alongside the importance of longitudinal surveys, as opposed to cross-sectional surveys. Essential features of data storage are covered, with an emphasis on safe, anonymous storage. Finally, the article explores the analysis of quantitative data, considering what may be analysed and the main uses of statistics in analysis.

  5. Quantitative habitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, Everett L; Holland, Melanie E

    2007-12-01

    A framework is proposed for a quantitative approach to studying habitability. Considerations of environmental supply and organismal demand of energy lead to the conclusions that power units are most appropriate and that the units for habitability become watts per organism. Extreme and plush environments are revealed to be on a habitability continuum, and extreme environments can be quantified as those where power supply only barely exceeds demand. Strategies for laboratory and field experiments are outlined that would quantify power supplies, power demands, and habitability. An example involving a comparison of various metabolisms pursued by halophiles is shown to be well on the way to a quantitative habitability analysis.

  6. Numerical methods for characterization of synchrotron radiation based on the Wigner function method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tanaka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerical characterization of synchrotron radiation based on the Wigner function method is explored in order to accurately evaluate the light source performance. A number of numerical methods to compute the Wigner functions for typical synchrotron radiation sources such as bending magnets, undulators and wigglers, are presented, which significantly improve the computation efficiency and reduce the total computation time. As a practical example of the numerical characterization, optimization of betatron functions to maximize the brilliance of undulator radiation is discussed.

  7. A novel fluorescence probe based on triphenylamine Schiff base for bioimaging and responding to pH and Fe{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Xiaodong; Chen, Xiuli [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhou, Yuping [Guangdong Provincial key Laboratory of New Drug Screening, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Lu, Xiaodan; Yan, Chenggong; Xu, Yikai [Medical Imaging Center, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Liu, Ruiyuan, E-mail: ruiyliu@smu.edu.cn [Guangdong Provincial key Laboratory of New Drug Screening, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Qu, Jinqing, E-mail: cejqqu@scut.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2017-03-01

    A novel fluorescence probe 1 based on triphenylamine was synthesized and characterized by NMR, IR, high resolution mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. Its fluorescence was quenched when pH below 2. There was a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and pH value ranged from 2 to 7. And its fluorescence emission was reversibility in acidic and alkaline solution. Furthermore, it exhibited remarkable selectivity and high sensitivity to Fe{sup 3+} and was able to detect Fe{sup 3+} in aqueous solution with low detection limit of 0.511 μM. Job plot showed that the binding stoichiometry of 1 with Fe{sup 3+} was 1:1. Further observations of {sup 1}H NMR titration suggested that coordination interaction between Fe{sup 3+} and nitrogen atom on C =N bond promoted the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) or energy transfer process causing fluorescence quenching. Additionally, 1 was also able to be applied for detecting Fe{sup 3+} in living cell and bioimaging. - Graphical abstract: Triphenylamine based fluorescence probe can detect pH and Fe{sup 3+} simultaneously in aqueous solution and be applied for detecting Fe{sup 3+} in living cell and bioimaging. - Highlights: • The fluorescence probe is sensitive to pH in strong acid conditions. • The fluorescence chemosensor can detect pH and Fe{sup 3+} simultaneously. • The recognition is able to carry out in aqueous solution. • The probe can also be applied for detecting Fe{sup 3+} in living cell and bioimaging. • The sensor is synthesized easily with one step.

  8. Conceptual design of an undulator system for a dedicated bio-imaging beamline at the European X-ray FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    We describe a future possible upgrade of the European XFEL consisting in the construction of an undulator beamline dedicated to life science experiments. The availability of free undulator tunnels at the European XFEL facility offers a unique opportunity to build a beamline optimized for coherent diffraction imaging of complex molecules, like proteins and other biologically interesting structures. Crucial parameters for such bio-imaging beamline are photon energy range, peak power, and pulse duration. Key component of the setup is the undulator source. The peak power is maximized in the photon energy range between 3 keV and 13 keV by the use of a very efficient combination of self-seeding, fresh bunch and tapered undulator techniques. The unique combination of ultra-high peak power of 1 TW in the entire energy range, and ultrashort pulse duration tunable from 2 fs to 10 fs, would allow for single shot coherent imaging of protein molecules with size larger than 10 nm. Also, the new beamline would enable imaging of large biological structures in the water window, between 0.3 keV and 0.4 keV. In order to make use of standardized components, at present we favor the use of SASE3-type undulator segments. The number segments, 40, is determined by the tapered length for the design output power of 1 TW. The present plan assumes the use of a nominal electron bunch with charge of 0.1 nC. Experiments will be performed without interference with the other three undulator beamlines. Therefore, the total amount of scheduled beam time per year is expected to be up to 4000 hours.

  9. Bioimaging of metallothioneins in ocular tissue sections by laser ablation-ICP-MS using bioconjugated gold nanoclusters as specific tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Alonso, María; Fernandez, Beatriz; Álvarez, Lydia; González-Iglesias, Héctor; Traub, Heike; Jakubowski, Norbert; Pereiro, Rosario

    2017-12-18

    An immunohistochemical method is described to visualize the distribution of metallothioneins 1/2 (MT 1/2) and metallothionein 3 (MT 3) in human ocular tissue. It is making use of (a) antibodies conjugated to gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) acting as labels, and (b) laser ablation (LA) coupled to inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Water-soluble fluorescent AuNCs (with an average size of 2.7 nm) were synthesized and then conjugated to antibody by carbodiimide coupling. The surface of the modified AuNCs was then blocked with hydroxylamine to avoid nonspecific interactions with biological tissue. Immunoassays for MT 1/2 and MT 3 in ocular tissue sections (5 μm thick) from two post mortem human donors were performed. Imaging studies were then performed by fluorescence using confocal microscopy, and LA-ICP-MS was performed in the retina to measure the signal for gold. Signal amplification by the >500 gold atoms in each nanocluster allowed the antigens (MT 1/2 and MT 3) to be imaged by LA-ICP-MS using a laser spot size as small as 4 μm. The image patterns found in retina are in good agreement with those obtained by conventional fluorescence immunohistochemistry which was used as an established reference method. Graphical abstract Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) conjugated to a primary specific antibody serve as a label for amplified bioimaging of metallothioneins (MTs) by laser ablation coupled to inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in human ocular tissue sections.

  10. BIRD: Bio-Image Referral Database. Design and implementation of a new web based and patient multimedia data focused system for effective medical diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinciroli, Francesco; Masseroli, Marco; Acerbo, Livio A; Bonacina, Stefano; Ferrari, Roberto; Marchente, Mario

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a low cost software platform prototype supporting health care personnel in retrieving patient referral multimedia data. These information are centralized in a server machine and structured by using a flexible eXtensible Markup Language (XML) Bio-Image Referral Database (BIRD). Data are distributed on demand to requesting client in an Intranet network and transformed via eXtensible Stylesheet Language (XSL) to be visualized in an uniform way on market browsers. The core server operation software has been developed in PHP Hypertext Preprocessor scripting language, which is very versatile and useful for crafting a dynamic Web environment.

  11. Ultra-bright emission from hexagonal boron nitride defects as a new platform for bio-imaging and bio-labelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbadawi, Christopher; Tran, Trong Toan; Shimoni, Olga; Totonjian, Daniel; Lobo, Charlene J.; Grosso, Gabriele; Moon, Hyowan; Englund, Dirk R.; Ford, Michael J.; Aharonovich, Igor; Toth, Milos

    2016-12-01

    Bio-imaging requires robust ultra-bright probes without causing any toxicity to the cellular environment, maintain their stability and are chemically inert. In this work we present hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) nanoflakes which exhibit narrowband ultra-bright single photon emitters1. The emitters are optically stable at room temperature and under ambient environment. hBN has also been noted to be noncytotoxic and seen significant advances in functionalization with biomolecules2,3. We further demonstrate two methods of engineering this new range of extremely robust multicolour emitters across the visible and near infrared spectral ranges for large scale sensing and biolabeling applications.

  12. Quantitative Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative finance is a field that has risen to prominence over the last few decades. It encompasses the complex models and calculations that value financial contracts, particularly those which reference events in the future, and apply probabilities to these events. While adding greatly to the flexibility of the market available to corporations and investors, it has also been blamed for worsening the impact of financial crises. But what exactly does quantitative finance encompass, and where did these ideas and models originate? We show that the mathematics behind finance and behind games of chance have tracked each other closely over the centuries and that many well-known physicists and mathematicians have contributed to the field.

  13. Study Of Soot Growth And Nucleation By A Time-Resolved Synchrotron Radiation Based X-Ray Absorption Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Judith I

    2001-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking University of Rennes I as follows: The contractor will perform a study of soot growth and nucleation by a time-resolved synchrotron radiation based x-ray absorption method...

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis of NaLuF4:153Sm,Yb,Tm nanoparticles and their application in dual-modality upconversion luminescence and SPECT bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Sun, Yun; Cao, Tianye; Peng, Juanjuan; Liu, Ying; Wu, Yongquan; Feng, Wei; Zhang, Yingjian; Li, Fuyou

    2013-01-01

    Upconversion luminescence (UCL) properties and radioactivity have been integrated into NaLuF(4):(153)Sm,Yb,Tm nanoparticles by a facile one-step hydrothermal method, making these nanoparticles potential candidates for UCL and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) dual-modal bioimaging in vivo. The introduction of small amount of radioactive (153)Sm(3+) can hardly vary the upconversion luminescence properties of the nanoparticles. The as-designed nanoparticles showed very low cytotoxicity, no obvious tissue damage in 7 days, and excellent in vitro and in vivo performances in dual-modal bioimaging. By means of a combination of UCL and SPECT imaging in vivo, the distribution of the nanoparticles in living animals has been studied, and the results indicated that these particles were mainly accumulated in the liver and spleen. Therefore, the concept of (153)Sm(3+)/Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) co-doped NaLuF(4) nanoparticles for UCL and SPECT dual-modality imaging in vivo of whole-body animals may serve as a platform for next-generation probes for ultra-sensitive molecular imaging from the cellular scale to whole-body evaluation. It also introduces an easy methodology to quantify in vivo biodistribution of nanomaterials which still needs further understanding as a community. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fabrication of transferrin functionalized gold nanoclusters/graphene oxide nanocomposite for turn-on near-infrared fluorescent bioimaging of cancer cells and small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Chen, Jia-Tong; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2013-02-19

    Transferrin (Tf)-functionalized gold nanoclusters (Tf-AuNCs)/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite (Tf-AuNCs/GO) was fabricated as a turn-on near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probe for bioimaging cancer cells and small animals. A one-step approach was developed to prepare Tf-AuNCs via a biomineralization process with Tf as the template. Tf acted not only as a stabilizer and a reducer but also as a functional ligand for targeting the transferrin receptor (TfR). The prepared Tf-AuNCs gave intense NIR fluorescence that can avoid interference from biological media such as tissue autofluorescence and scattering light. The assembly of Tf-AuNCs and GO gave the Tf-AuNCs/GO nanocomposite, a turn-on NIR fluorescent probe with negligible background fluorescence due to the super fluorescence quenching property of GO. The NIR fluorescence of the Tf-AuNCs/GO nanocomposite was effectively restored in the presence of TfR, due to the specific interaction between Tf and TfR and the competition of TfR with the GO for the Tf in Tf-AuNCs/GO composite. The developed turn-on NIR fluorescence probe offered excellent water solubility, stability, and biocompatibility, and exhibited high specificity to TfR with negligible cytotoxicity. The probe was successfully applied for turn-on fluorescent bioimaging of cancer cells and small animals.

  16. Computer simulation for synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescent microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Biao; Yu Xiaohan; Xu Hongjie

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation based fluorescent microtomography (SR-XFMT) is a nondestructive technique for detecting elemental composition and distribution inside a specimen with high spatial resolution and sensitivity, and will be an optional experimental technique at SSRF hard X-ray micro-focusing beamline now under construction. In this paper, the principles and developments of SR-XFMT are briefly introduced. Computer simulation of SR-XFMT experiment is performed. The image of the simulated sample is reconstructed using Filtered Back Projection (FBP), Algebraic Reconstruction Techniques (ART) and modified FBP with absorption correction. The qualities of the reconstructed images are analyzed and compared. The validity of these reconstruction techniques is discussed. (authors)

  17. Application of Synchrotron Radiation-based Methods for Environmental Biogeochemistry: Introduction to the Special Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettiarachchi, Ganga M.; Donner, Erica; Doelsch, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    To understand the biogeochemistry of nutrients and contaminants in environmental media, their speciation and behavior under different conditions and at multiple scales must be determined. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray techniques allow scientists to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for nutrient and contaminant mobility, bioavailability, and behavior. The continuous improvement of synchrotron light sources and X-ray beamlines around the world has led to a profound transformation in the field of environmental biogeochemistry and, subsequently, to significant scientific breakthroughs. Following this introductory paper, this special collection includes 10 papers that either present targeted reviews of recent advancements in spectroscopic methods that are applicable to environmental biogeochemistry or describe original research studies conducted on complex environmental samples that have been significantly enhanced by incorporating synchrotron radiation-based X-ray technique(s). We believe that the current focus on improving the speciation of ultra-dilute elements in environmental media through the ongoing optimization of synchrotron technologies (e.g., brighter light sources, improved monochromators, more efficient detectors) will help to significantly push back the frontiers of environmental biogeochemistry research. As many of the relevant techniques produce extremely large datasets, we also identify ongoing improvements in data processing and analysis (e.g., software improvements and harmonization of analytical methods) as a significant requirement for environmental biogeochemists to maximize the information that can be gained using these powerful tools.

  18. Quantitative radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brase, J.M.; Martz, H.E.; Waltjen, K.E.; Hurd, R.L.; Wieting, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    Radiographic techniques have been used in nondestructive evaluation primarily to develop qualitative information (i.e., defect detection). This project applies and extends the techniques developed in medical x-ray imaging, particularly computed tomography (CT), to develop quantitative information (both spatial dimensions and material quantities) on the three-dimensional (3D) structure of solids. Accomplishments in FY 86 include (1) improvements in experimental equipment - an improved microfocus system that will give 20-μm resolution and has potential for increased imaging speed, and (2) development of a simple new technique for displaying 3D images so as to clearly show the structure of the object. Image reconstruction and data analysis for a series of synchrotron CT experiments conducted by LLNL's Chemistry Department has begun

  19. Quantitative lymphography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostbeck, A.; Lofferer, O.; Kahn, P.; Partsch, H.; Koehn, H.; Bialonczyk, Ch.; Koenig, B.

    1984-01-01

    Labelled colloids and macromolecules are removed lymphatically. The uptake of tracer in the regional lymphnodes is a parameter of lymphatic flow. Due to great variations in patient shape - obesity, cachexia - and accompanying variations in counting efficiencies quantitative measurements with reasonable accuracy have not been reported to date. A new approach to regional absorption correction is based on the combination of transmission and emission scans for each patient. The transmission scan is used for calculation of an absorption correction matrix. Accurate superposition of the correction matrix and the emission scan is achieved by computing the centers of gravity of point sources and - in the case of aligning opposite views - by cross correlation of binary images. In phantom studies the recovery was high (98.3%) and the coefficient of variation of repeated measurement below 1%. In patient studies a standardized stress is a prerequisite for reliable and comparable results. Discrimination between normals (14.3 +- 4.2D%) and patients with lymphedema (2.05 +- 2.5D%) was highly significant using praefascial lymphography and sc injection. Clearence curve analysis of the activities at the injection site, however, gave no reliable data for this purpose. In normals, the uptake in lymphnodes after im injection is by one order of magnitude lower then the uptake after sc injection. The discrimination between normals and patients with postthromboic syndrome was significant. Lymphography after ic injection was in the normal range in 2/3 of the patients with lymphedema and is therefore of no diagnostic value. The difference in uptake after ic and sc injection demonstrated for the first time by our quantitative method provides new insights into the pathophysiology of lymphedema and needs further investigation. (Author)

  20. Quantitative Thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Jean; van der Beek, Peter; Batt, Geoffrey

    2006-05-01

    Thermochronology, the study of the thermal history of rocks, enables us to quantify the nature and timing of tectonic processes. Quantitative Thermochronology is a robust review of isotopic ages, and presents a range of numerical modeling techniques to allow the physical implications of isotopic age data to be explored. The authors provide analytical, semi-analytical, and numerical solutions to the heat transfer equation in a range of tectonic settings and under varying boundary conditions. They then illustrate their modeling approach built around a large number of case studies. The benefits of different thermochronological techniques are also described. Computer programs on an accompanying website at www.cambridge.org/9780521830577 are introduced through the text and provide a means of solving the heat transport equation in the deforming Earth to predict the ages of rocks and compare them directly to geological and geochronological data. Several short tutorials, with hints and solutions, are also included. Numerous case studies help geologists to interpret age data and relate it to Earth processes Essential background material to aid understanding and using thermochronological data Provides a thorough treatise on numerical modeling of heat transport in the Earth's crust Supported by a website hosting relevant computer programs and colour slides of figures from the book for use in teaching

  1. The quantitative Morse theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Loi, Ta Le; Phien, Phan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we give a proof of the quantitative Morse theorem stated by {Y. Yomdin} in \\cite{Y1}. The proof is based on the quantitative Sard theorem, the quantitative inverse function theorem and the quantitative Morse lemma.

  2. Turn-off fluorescence sensor for the detection of ferric ion in water using green synthesized N-doped carbon dots and its bio-imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Atchudan, Raji; Shim, Jae-Jin; Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Lee, Yong Rok

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports turn-off fluorescence sensor for Fe(3+) ion in water using fluorescent N-doped carbon dots as a probe. A simple and efficient hydrothermal carbonization of Prunus avium fruit extract for the synthesis of fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) is described. This green approach proceeds quickly and provides good quality N-CDs. The mean size of synthesized N-CDs was approximately 7nm calculated from the high-resolution transmission electron microscopic images. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the presence of -OH, -NH2, -COOH, and -CO functional groups over the surface of CDs. The N-CDs showed excellent fluorescent properties, and emitted blue fluorescence at 411nm upon excitation at 310nm. The calculated quantum yield of the synthesized N-CDs is 13% against quinine sulfate as a reference fluorophore. The synthesized N-CDs were used as a fluorescent probe towards the selective and sensitive detection of biologically important Fe(3+) ions in water by fluorescence spectroscopy and for bio-imaging of MDA-MB-231 cells. The limit of detection (LOD) and the Stern-Volmer quenching constant for the synthesized N-CDs were 0.96μM and 2.0958×10(3)M of Fe(3+) ions. The green synthesized N-CDs are efficiently used as a promising candidate for the detection of Fe(3+) ions and bio-imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of Styrene-Grafted Polyurethane by Radiation-Based Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Oh Jeong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane (PU is the fifth most common polymer in the general consumer market, following Polypropylene (PP, Polyethylene (PE, Polyvinyl chloride (PVC, and Polystyrene (PS, and the most common polymer for thermosetting resins. In particular, polyurethane has excellent hardness and heat resistance, is a widely used material for electronic products and automotive parts, and can be used to create products of various physical properties, including rigid and flexible foams, films, and fibers. However, the use of polar polymer polyurethane as an impact modifier of non-polar polymers is limited due to poor combustion resistance and impact resistance. In this study, we used gamma irradiation at 25 and 50 kGy to introduce the styrene of hydrophobic monomer on the polyurethane as an impact modifier of the non-polar polymer. To verify grafted styrene, we confirmed the phenyl group of styrene at 690 cm−1 by Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR and at 6.4–6.8 ppm by 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA and contact angle analysis were also used to confirm styrene introduction. This study has confirmed the possibility of applying high-functional composite through radiation-based techniques.

  4. Derived limits for radiological protection against ionizing radiation based on ICRP-60 recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Si Young; Lee, Byung Soo

    2000-01-01

    In Korea the dose limits are reduced and are set at the ICRP-60 limits. However, derived limits tabulated as MPC in air and water are sill specified in Notice Nol 98-12. There are some discrepancies between the primary dose limits and MPCs in air and water. Therefore, in order to accept ICRP-60 recommendations fully, derived limits such as ALI, DAC, ECL for radiological protection against ionizing radiation based on ICRP-60 recommendations were calculated using modified methods of those of 10 CFR part 20, dose limits and committed effective dose coefficients of the Basic Safety Standards of the IAEA. The derived limits in this study were also compared with those prescribed in 10 CFR part 20 as well as MPCs of Notice No.98-12 in order to analyze the impact of implementing derived limits on nuclear facilities. ECLs in air and water for the control of radioactive discharge into the environment in this study are shown to have lower values (i.e. more conservative), for most part, than those in Notice No. 98-12. Especially, for uranium elements, ECLs in water are approximately a magnitude in the order of two lower than those in Notice No. 98-12. (author)

  5. Fluorescent carbon dot-gated multifunctional mesoporous silica nanocarriers for redox/enzyme dual-responsive targeted and controlled drug delivery and real-time bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Cui, Yu; Zhao, Yating; He, Bing; Shi, Xiaoli; Di, Donghua; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Siling

    2017-08-01

    A distinctive and personalized nanocarrier is described here for controlled and targeted antitumor drug delivery and real-time bioimaging by combining a redox/enzyme dual-responsive disulfide-conjugated carbon dot with mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-SS-CD HA ). The carbon dot with controlling and targeting abilities was prepared through a polymerizing reaction by applying citric acid and HA as starting materials (named CD HA ). The as-prepared MSN-SS-CD HA exhibited not only superior photostability and excellent biocompatibility, but also the ability to target A549 cells with overexpression of CD44 receptors. Upon loading the antitumor drug, doxorubicin (DOX), into the mesoporous channels of MSN nanoparticles, CD HA with a diameter size of 3nm completely blocked the pore entrance of DOX-encapsulated MSN nanoparticles with a pore size of about 3nm, thus preventing the premature leakage of DOX and increasing the antitumor activity until being triggered by specific stimuli in the tumor environment. The results of the cell imaging and cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that the redox/enzyme dual-responsive DOX-encapsulated MSN-SS-CD HA nanoparticles can selectively deliver and control the release of DOX into tumor cells. Ex vivo fluorescence images showed a much stronger fluorescence of MSN-SS-CD HA -DOX in the tumor site than in normal tissues, greatly facilitating the accumulation of DOX in the target tissue. However, its counterpart, MSN-SH-DOX exhibited no or much lower tumor cytotoxicity and drug accumulation in tumor tissue. In addition, MSN-SS-CD was also used as a control to investigate the ability of MSN-SS-CD HA to target A549 cells. The results obtained indicated that MSN-SS-CD HA possessed a higher cellular uptake through the CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis compared with MSN-SS-CD in the A549 cells. Such specific redox/enzyme dual-responsive targeted nanocarriers are a useful strategy achieving selective controlled and targeted delivery of

  6. Hydration induced material transfer in membranes of osmotic pump tablets measured by synchrotron radiation based FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Yin, Xianzhen; Guo, Zhen; Tong, Yajun; Feng, Jing; York, Peter; Xiao, Tiqiao; Chen, Min; Gu, Jingkai; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-03-10

    Osmotic pump tablets are reliable oral controlled drug delivery systems based on their semipermeable membrane coating. This research used synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy and imaging to investigate the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets. SR-FTIR was applied to record and map the chemical information of a micro-region of the membranes, composed of cellulose acetate (CA, as the water insoluble matrix) and polyethylene glycol (PEG, as the soluble pore forming agent and plasticizing agent). The microstructure and chemical change of membranes hydrated for 0, 5, 10 and 30min were measured using SR-FTIR, combined with scanning electronic microscopy and atom force microscopy. The SR-FTIR microspectroscopy results indicated that there was a major change at the absorption range of 2700-3100cm(-1) in the membranes after different periods of hydration time. The absorption bands at 2870-2880cm(-1) and 2950-2960cm(-1) were assigned to represent CA and PEG, respectively. The chemical group signal distribution illustrated by the ratio of PEG to CA demonstrated that the trigger of drug release in the preliminary stage was due to the rapid transfer of PEG into liquid medium with a sharp decrease of PEG in the membranes. The SR-FTIR mapping results have demonstrated the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets and enabled reassessment of the drug release mechanism of membrane controlled osmotic pump systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A new "off-on" fluorescent probe for Al(3+) in aqueous solution based on rhodamine B and its application to bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qi; Zhang, Qingyou; Wang, Enze; Zhou, Yanmei; Qiao, Han; Pang, Lanfang; Yu, Fang

    2016-01-05

    In this paper, a new fluorescent probe has been synthesized and applied as "off-on" sensor for the detection of Al(3+) with a high sensitivity and excellent selectivity in aqueous media. The sensor was easily prepared by one step reaction between rhodamine B hydrazide and pyridoxal hydrochloride named RBP. The structure of the sensor has been characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry. The fluorescence intensity and absorbance for the sensor showed a good linearity with the concentration of Al(3+) in the range of 0-12.5μM and 8-44μM, respectively, with detection limits of 0.23μM and 1.90μM. The sensor RBP was preliminarily applied to the determination of Al(3+) in water samples from the lake of Henan University and tap water with satisfying results. Moreover, it can be used as a bioimaging reagent for imaging of Al(3+) in living cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis of Au NP@MoS2 Quantum Dots Core@Shell Nanocomposites for SERS Bio-Analysis and Label-Free Bio-Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Fei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report a facile method using MoS2 quantum dots (QDs as reducers to directly react with HAuCl4 for the synthesis of Au nanoparticle@MoS2 quantum dots (Au NP@MoS2 QDs core@shell nanocomposites with an ultrathin shell of ca. 1 nm. The prepared Au NP@MoS2 QDs reveal high surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS performance regarding sensitivity as well as the satisfactory SERS reproducibility and stability. The limit of detection of the hybrids for crystal violet can reach 0.5 nM with a reasonable linear response range from 0.5 μM to 0.5 nM (R2 ≈ 0.974. Furthermore, the near-infrared SERS detection based on Au NP@MoS2 QDs in living cells is achieved with distinct Raman signals which are clearly assigned to the various cellular components. Meanwhile, the distinguishable SERS images are acquired from the 4T1 cells with the incubation of Au NP@MoS2 QDs. Consequently, the straightforward strategy of using Au NP@MoS2 QDs exhibits great potential as a superior SERS substrate for chemical and biological detection as well as bio-imaging.

  9. Elemental bioimaging of nanosilver-coated prostheses using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaske, Franziska; Reifschneider, Olga; Gosheger, Georg; Wehe, Christoph A; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe; Hauschild, Gregor; Höll, Steffen

    2014-01-07

    The distribution of different chemical elements from a nanosilver-coated bone implant was visualized, combining the benefits of two complementary methods for elemental bioimaging, the nondestructive micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Challenges caused by the physically inhomogeneous materials including bone and soft tissues were addressed by polymer embedding. With the use of μ-XRF, fast sample mapping was achieved obtaining titanium and vanadium signals from the metal implant as well as phosphorus and calcium signals representing hard bone tissue and sulfur distribution representing soft tissues. Only by the use of LA-ICP-MS, the required high sensitivity and low detection limits for the determination of silver were obtained. Metal distribution within the part of cancellous bone was revealed for silver as well as for the implant constituents titanium, vanadium, and aluminum. Furthermore, the detection of coinciding high local zirconium and aluminum signals at the implant surface indicates remaining blasting abrasive from preoperative surface treatment of the nanosilver-coated device.

  10. Development of derived limits for radiological protection against ionizing radiation based on ICRP-60 recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S. Y.; Lee, B. S.

    1999-01-01

    Derived limits such as the Annual Limit on Intake (ALI), Derived Air Concentration (DAC) and Effluent Concentration Limit (ECL) for radiological protection against ionizing radiation based on ICRP-60 recommendations were calculated using dose limits and committed effective dose coefficients of the basic Safety Standards of IAEA (i.e. safety series 115; BSS-96). Derived limits regarding occupational exposure were derived using methodologies of ICRP-61 and dose limit stated in ICRP -60. ECL in air and water for the control of radioactive discharge into the environment were derived using methodologies of 10 CFR part 20 and dose limit stated in ICRP-60. In order to analyze the impact of implementing derived limits on nuclear facilities, the derived values in this study were compared with those prescribed in 10 CFR part 20 as well as the Maximum Permissible Concentrations (MPC) of Notice No. 98-12 of the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST). According to the comparison results, ECLs in air and water for the control of radioactive discharge into the environment in this study are shown to have lower values (i.e. more conservative), for most part, than those in Notice No. 98-12. These differences are due to the reduction of dose limit, adoption of a weighting factor for age-dependency in dose coefficients, and application of new respiratory tract model and bio-kinetics model. Especially, for uranium elements (i.e., 235 U, 238 U, etc.), which are governing ones in the nuclear fuel industries, ECLs in water are approximately a magnitude in the order of two lower than those in Notice No. 98-12. These are attributable to the adoption of a weighting factor for age-dependency in dose coefficients, newly recommended dose coefficients for ingestion pathway, and reduction of dose limit. It was found out that the differences in ECLs in water for uranium elements originated mostly from ingestion dose coefficients recommended by BSS-96. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  11. Quantitative investment analysis

    CERN Document Server

    DeFusco, Richard

    2007-01-01

    In the "Second Edition" of "Quantitative Investment Analysis," financial experts Richard DeFusco, Dennis McLeavey, Jerald Pinto, and David Runkle outline the tools and techniques needed to understand and apply quantitative methods to today's investment process.

  12. Rigour in quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, Leica Sarah

    2015-07-22

    This article which forms part of the research series addresses scientific rigour in quantitative research. It explores the basis and use of quantitative research and the nature of scientific rigour. It examines how the reader may determine whether quantitative research results are accurate, the questions that should be asked to determine accuracy and the checklists that may be used in this process. Quantitative research has advantages in nursing, since it can provide numerical data to help answer questions encountered in everyday practice.

  13. Quantitation: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    Single photon emission tomography may be used quantitatively if its limitations are recognized and quantitation is made in relation to some reference area on the image. Relative quantitation is discussed in outline in relation to the liver, brain and pituitary, thyroid, adrenals, and heart. (U.K.)

  14. β-Ga2O3:Cr(3+) nanoparticle: A new platform with near infrared photoluminescence for drug targeting delivery and bio-imaging simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Shi; Situ, Jun-Qing; Ying, Xiao-Ying; Chen, Hui; Pan, Hua-fei; Jin, Yi; Du, Yong-Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles which integrate the therapeutic agents and bio-imaging agents into one carrier are emerging as a promising therapeutic platform. Herein, GaOOH:Cr(3+) was firstly synthesized using improved hydrothermal method (atmospheric pressure, 95 °C), and by manipulating the pH of the reaction medium, GaOOH:Cr(3+) with different sizes (125.70 nm, 200.60 nm and 313.90 nm) were synthesized. Then β-Ga2O3:Cr(3+) nanoparticles with porous structures were developed as a result of the calcination of GaOOH:Cr(3+). The fabricated, porous β-Ga2O3:Cr(3+) nanoparticles could effectively absorb doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) (loading rate: 8% approximately) and had near infrared photoluminescence with a 695 nm emission. Furthermore, β-Ga2O3:Cr(3+) nanoparticles were coated with l-Cys modified hyaluronic acid (HA-Cys) by exploiting the electrostatic interaction and the cross-link effect of disulfide bond to improve the stability. The DOX loaded HA-Cys coated β-Ga2O3:Cr(3+) nanoparticles (HA/β-Ga2O3:Cr(3+)/DOX) showed an oxidation-reduction sensitive drug release behavior. The HA-Cys coated β-Ga2O3:Cr(3+) nanoparticles showed a low cytotoxicity on MCF-7 and Hela cell lines. The cellular uptake of HA/β-Ga2O3:Cr(3+)/DOX using the near infrared photoluminescence of β-Ga2O3:Cr(3+) nanoparticles and the fluorescence of DOX demonstrated the HA/β-Ga2O3:Cr(3+)/DOX could internalize into tumor cells quickly, which was affected by the size and shape of β-Ga2O3:Cr(3+)nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancement of the photo-electric effect with pharmacological agents in synchrotron radiation based anti-cancer radiotherapy: a methodological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corde, Stephanie

    2002-01-01

    Anti-cancer therapy rests on three main principles: 1) anatomic confinement of irradiation; 2) temporal fractioning of treatment; 3) treatment of tissues that are more sensitive to radiation than surrounding healthy tissue. Under those principles hides the goal of radiotherapy: to deposit more of the X-ray energy in the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. This goal is hard to reach since one of the causes of the failures in radiotherapy is the continuing evolution of the tumor. Could synchrotron radiation be more effective as an X-ray source for radiotherapy? The variation of the radiation-matter interaction cross-sections as a function of X-ray energy and atomic number of the medium show that certain energies and certain elements are more suitable to obtain the largest number of interactions and the largest amount of deposited energy. Synchrotron radiation allows to select precisely those energies because of its high spectral intensity. Its spectral characteristics (energy of the photons between 10 and 100 keV) allow to trigger the photoelectric effect with a maximum of probability on heavy elements introduced close to cancerous cells. It has been shown that: 1) synchrotron radiation based tomodensitometry is a quantitative imaging technique, potentially powerful for radiotherapy since it insures in-vivo the measurement of intra-tumoral concentration of contrast agent (I or Gd); 2) in the presence of iodinated contrast agent the lethal effect of X-rays on cell survival is increased and the gain in radio sensitivity depends on X-ray energy; 3) at the cellular scale the lethality of irradiation can be optimised again by transporting heavy atoms (I, Pt) inside the DNA, which is the biological target of the irradiation. This reinforcement of the killing efficiency of low energy X-rays using a physical mechanism aimed at a pharmacological agent is an original concept in anti-cancer radiotherapy. (author) [fr

  16. Nuclear materials control technology in the post-cold war world: Radiation-based methods and information management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tape, J.W.; Eccleston, G.W.; Ensslin, N.; Markin, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    The end of the cold war is providing both opportunities and requirements for improving the control of nuclear materials around the world. The dismantlement of nuclear weapons and the growth of nuclear power, including the use of plutonium in light water reactors and breeder reactor programs, coupled with enhanced proliferation concerns, drive the need for improved nuclear materials control. We describe nuclear materials control and the role of technology in making controls more effective and efficient. The current use and anticipated development in selected radiation-based methods and related information management systems am described briefly

  17. Photoconductive detector of circularly polarized radiation based on a MIS structure with a CoPt layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrin, A. V.; Dorokhin, M. V.; Zdoroveishchev, A. V.; Demina, P. B.; Vikhrova, O. V.; Kalent'eva, I. L.; Ved', M. V.

    2017-11-01

    A photoconductive detector of circularly polarized radiation based on the metal-insulator-semiconductor structure of CoPt/(Al2O3/SiO2/Al2O3)/InGaAs/GaAs is created. The efficiency of detection of circularly polarized radiation is 0.75% at room temperature. The operation of the detector is based on the manifestation of the effect of magnetic circular dichroism in the CoPt layer, that is, the dependence of the CoPt transmission coefficient on the sign of the circular polarization of light and magnetization.

  18. Quantitative analysis chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Wansuk; Lee, Choongyoung; Jun, Kwangsik; Hwang, Taeksung

    1995-02-01

    This book is about quantitative analysis chemistry. It is divided into ten chapters, which deal with the basic conception of material with the meaning of analysis chemistry and SI units, chemical equilibrium, basic preparation for quantitative analysis, introduction of volumetric analysis, acid-base titration of outline and experiment examples, chelate titration, oxidation-reduction titration with introduction, titration curve, and diazotization titration, precipitation titration, electrometric titration and quantitative analysis.

  19. Quantitative Algebraic Reasoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardare, Radu Iulian; Panangaden, Prakash; Plotkin, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantitative analogue of equational reasoning which we call quantitative algebra. We define an equality relation indexed by rationals: a =ε b which we think of as saying that “a is approximately equal to b up to an error of ε”. We have 4 interesting examples where we have a quantitative...... equational theory whose free algebras correspond to well known structures. In each case we have finitary and continuous versions. The four cases are: Hausdorff metrics from quantitive semilattices; pWasserstein metrics (hence also the Kantorovich metric) from barycentric algebras and also from pointed...

  20. Quantitative autoradiography of neurochemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, T.C.; Biegon, A.; Bleisch, W.V.

    1982-01-01

    Several new methods have been developed that apply quantitative autoradiography to neurochemistry. These methods are derived from the 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) technique of Sokoloff (1), which uses quantitative autoradiography to measure the rate of glucose utilization in brain structures. The new methods allow the measurement of the rate of cerbral protein synthesis and the levels of particular neurotransmitter receptors by quantitative autoradiography. As with the 2DG method, the new techniques can measure molecular levels in micron-sized brain structures; and can be used in conjunction with computerized systems of image processing. It is possible that many neurochemical measurements could be made by computerized analysis of quantitative autoradiograms

  1. Mechanistic insights into nanotoxicity determined by synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared imaging and multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riding, Matthew J; Trevisan, Júlio; Hirschmugl, Carol J; Jones, Kevin C; Semple, Kirk T; Martin, Francis L

    2012-12-01

    Our ability to identify the mechanisms by which carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) exert toxicity in cells is constrained by the lack of standardized methodologies to assay endpoint effects. Herein we describe a method of mechanistically identifying the effects of various CBN types in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells using multi-beam synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared imaging (SR-FTIRI) at diffraction-limited resolution. This technique overcomes many of the inherent difficulties of assaying nanotoxicity and demonstrates exceptional sensitivity in identifying the effects of CBNs in cells at environmentally-relevant concentrations. We identify key mechanisms of nanotoxicity as the alteration of Amide and lipid biomolecules, but propose more specific bioactivity of CBNs occurs as a result of specific interactions between CBN structural conformation and cellular characteristics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative film radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, G.; Dobie, D.; Fugina, J.; Hernandez, J.; Logan, C.; Mohr, P.; Moss, R.; Schumacher, B.; Updike, E.; Weirup, D.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernible by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudo-color images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. This report discusses: the method; film processor monitoring and control; verifying film and processor performance; and correction of scatter effects

  3. An organic dye with very large Stokes-shift and broad tunability of fluorescence: Potential two-photon probe for bioimaging and ultra-sensitive solid-state gas sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Tingchao; Tian, Xiaoqing; Lin, Xiaodong, E-mail: linxd@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg [College of Physics Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Wang, Yue; Zhao, Xin; Sun, Handong, E-mail: linxd@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, and Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies (CDPT), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Gao, Yang; Grimsdale, Andrew C. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2016-01-04

    Light-emitting nonlinear optical molecules, especially those with large Stokes shifts and broad tunability of their emission wavelength, have attracted considerable attention for various applications including biomedical imaging and fluorescent sensors. However, most fluorescent chromophores have only limited potential for such applications due to small Stokes shifts, narrow tunability of fluorescence emissions, and small optical nonlinearity in highly polar solvents. In this work, we demonstrate that a two-photon absorbing stilbene chromophore exhibits a large two-photon absorption action cross-section (ηδ = 320 GM) in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and shows broad fluorescence tunability (125 nm) by manipulating the polarity of the surrounding medium. Importantly, a very large Stokes shift of up to 227 nm is achieved in DMSO. Thanks to these features, this chromophore can be utilized as a two-photon probe for bioimaging applications and in an ultrasensitive solid-state gas detector.

  4. Quantitative secondary electron detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Jyoti; Joy, David C.; Nayak, Subuhadarshi

    2018-05-08

    Quantitative Secondary Electron Detection (QSED) using the array of solid state devices (SSD) based electron-counters enable critical dimension metrology measurements in materials such as semiconductors, nanomaterials, and biological samples (FIG. 3). Methods and devices effect a quantitative detection of secondary electrons with the array of solid state detectors comprising a number of solid state detectors. An array senses the number of secondary electrons with a plurality of solid state detectors, counting the number of secondary electrons with a time to digital converter circuit in counter mode.

  5. [Methods of quantitative proteomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylov, A T; Zgoda, V G

    2007-01-01

    In modern science proteomic analysis is inseparable from other fields of systemic biology. Possessing huge resources quantitative proteomics operates colossal information on molecular mechanisms of life. Advances in proteomics help researchers to solve complex problems of cell signaling, posttranslational modification, structure and functional homology of proteins, molecular diagnostics etc. More than 40 various methods have been developed in proteomics for quantitative analysis of proteins. Although each method is unique and has certain advantages and disadvantages all these use various isotope labels (tags). In this review we will consider the most popular and effective methods employing both chemical modifications of proteins and also metabolic and enzymatic methods of isotope labeling.

  6. Quantitative Decision Support Requires Quantitative User Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Is it conceivable that models run on 2007 computer hardware could provide robust and credible probabilistic information for decision support and user guidance at the ZIP code level for sub-daily meteorological events in 2060? In 2090? Retrospectively, how informative would output from today’s models have proven in 2003? or the 1930’s? Consultancies in the United Kingdom, including the Met Office, are offering services to “future-proof” their customers from climate change. How is a US or European based user or policy maker to determine the extent to which exciting new Bayesian methods are relevant here? or when a commercial supplier is vastly overselling the insights of today’s climate science? How are policy makers and academic economists to make the closely related decisions facing them? How can we communicate deep uncertainty in the future at small length-scales without undermining the firm foundation established by climate science regarding global trends? Three distinct aspects of the communication of the uses of climate model output targeting users and policy makers, as well as other specialist adaptation scientists, are discussed. First, a brief scientific evaluation of the length and time scales at which climate model output is likely to become uninformative is provided, including a note on the applicability the latest Bayesian methodology to current state-of-the-art general circulation models output. Second, a critical evaluation of the language often employed in communication of climate model output, a language which accurately states that models are “better”, have “improved” and now “include” and “simulate” relevant meteorological processed, without clearly identifying where the current information is thought to be uninformative and misleads, both for the current climate and as a function of the state of the (each) climate simulation. And thirdly, a general approach for evaluating the relevance of quantitative climate model output

  7. Insights into metals in individual fine particles from municipal solid waste using synchrotron radiation-based micro-analytical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yumin; Zhang, Hua; Shao, Liming; He, Pinjing

    2015-01-01

    Excessive inter-contamination with heavy metals hampers the application of biological treatment products derived from mixed or mechanically-sorted municipal solid waste (MSW). In this study, we investigated fine particles of heavy metal content, using bulk detection techniques. A total of 17 individual fine particles were evaluated using synchrotron radiation-based micro-X-ray fluorescence and micro-X-ray diffraction. We also discussed the association, speciation and source apportionment of heavy metals. Metals were found to exist in a diffuse distribution with heterogeneous intensities and intense hot-spots of metals revealed the potential sources of fine particles from size-reduced waste fractions (such as scraps of organic wastes or ceramics) or from the importation of other particles. The diverse sources of heavy metal pollutants within the fine particles suggested that separate collection and treatment of the biodegradable waste fraction (such as food waste) is a preferable means of facilitating the beneficial utilization of the stabilized products. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Insights into metals in individual fine particles from municipal solid waste using synchrotron radiation-based micro-analytical techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yumin Zhu; Hua Zhang; Liming Shao; Pinjing He

    2015-01-01

    Excessive inter-contamination with heavy metals hampers the application of biological treatment products derived from mixed or mechanically-sorted municipal solid waste (MSW).In this study,we investigated fine particles of <2 mm,which are small fractions in MSW but constitute a significant component of the total heavy metal content,using bulk detection techniques.A total of 17 individual fine particles were evaluated using synchrotron radiation-based micro-X-ray fluorescence and micro-X-ray diffraction.We also discussed the association,speciation and source apportionment of heavy metals.Metals were found to exist in a diffuse distribution with heterogeneous intensities and intense hot-spots of <10 μm within the fine particles.Zn-Cu,Pb-Fe and Fe-Mn-Cr had significant correlations in terms of spatial distribution.The overlapped enrichment,spatial association,and the mineral phases of metals revealed the potential sources of fine particles from size-reduced waste fractions (such as scraps of organic wastes or ceramics) or from the importation of other particles.The diverse sources of heavy metal pollutants within the fine particles suggested that separate collection and treatment of the biodegradable waste fraction (such as food waste) is a preferable means of facilitating the beneficial utilization of the stabilized products.

  9. Eco-friendly and simple radiation-based preparation of graphene and its application to organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chan-Hee; Park, Yong-Woon; Hwang, In-Tae; Choi, Jae-Hak; Go, Yeong-Jin; Na, Seok-In; Shin, Kwanwoo; Lee, Jae-Suk

    2014-01-01

    We report the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) through an eco-friendly and simple radiation-based method and the practical application of the resulting radiation-reduced GO (RRGO) as a solution-processable hole-transporting layer (HTL) for organic solar cells. GO dispersed in N, N′-dimethylformamide (DMF) was irradiated by γ-rays at various absorbed doses. The analytical results revealed that GO in DMF was effectively reduced to RRGO by γ-ray irradiation-induced deoxygenation, and that the reduction degree was dependent on the absorbed dose. The electrical conductivity of RRGO increased up to 12.7 S cm −1 with an increase in the absorbed dose, whereas the work function decreased to 4.34 eV. An organic solar cell device with RRGO prepared at 50 kGy as an HTL exhibited the best performance, with a power conversion efficiency of 2.72%, which is a better cell efficiency than is possible in devices with conventional GO and solvothermally-reduced GO. (paper)

  10. Controlling Aedes aegypti population as DHF vector with radiation based-sterile insect technique in Banjarnegara Regency, Central Java

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Nurhayati; Bambang Yunianto; Tri Ramadhani; Bina Ikawati; Budi Santoso; Ali Rahayu

    2013-01-01

    The control program of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) in Indonesia is still a problem due to the incomplete integrated handling. Sterile insect technique (SIT) for Aedes aegypti as DHF vector was considered as a potential strategy for controlling the DHF. A preliminary survey was carried out to determine the characteristic of A aegypti population in the study site before the implementation of SIT. The implementation of radiation based-SIT was carried out in Krandegan and Kutabanjar Villages of Banjarnegara Regency, Central Java which involved 99 houses. One hundred gamma rays irradiated male mosquitoes were released to each house up to five times. The eggs, larvae and adult mosquitoes were collected using ovitrap and weekly observed. The initial population density of A. aegypti in the studied area was obtained to be 6 mosquitoes per house with the mean index of house was 15.86% and the mean sterility of sterilized mosquitoes was 79.16%. The SIT effectively reduced A. aegypti population after the fifth release of irradiated mosquitoes into the houses. It can be assumed that the SIT was effective in controlling DHF vector in the studied area, nevertheless, it will be more effective if it is combined with other handling techniques. (author)

  11. Quantitative X-ray microtomography with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donath, T.

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron-radiation-based computed microtomography (SR μ CT) is an established method for the examination of volume structures. It allows to measure the x-ray attenuation coefficient of a specimen three-dimensionally with a spatial resolution of about one micrometer. In contrast to conventional x-ray sources (x-ray tubes), the unique properties of synchrotron radiation enable quantitative measurements that do not suffer from beam-hardening artifacts. During this work the capabilities for quantitative SR μ CT measurements have been further improved by enhancements that were made to the SR μ CT apparatus and to the reconstruction chain. For high-resolution SR μ CT an x-ray camera consisting of luminescent screen (x-ray phosphor), lens system, and CCD camera was used. A significant suppression of blur that is caused by reflections inside the luminescent screen could be achieved by application of an absorbing optical coating to the screen surface. It is shown that blur and ring artifacts in the tomographic reconstructions are thereby drastically reduced. Furthermore, a robust and objective method for the determination of the center of rotation in projection data (sinograms) is presented that achieves sub-pixel precision. By implementation of this method into the reconstruction chain, complete automation of the reconstruction process has been achieved. Examples of quantitative SR μ CT studies conducted at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY are presented and used for the demonstration of the achieved enhancements. (orig.)

  12. Extending Quantitative Easing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallett, Andrew Hughes; Fiedler, Salomon; Kooths, Stefan

    The notes in this compilation address the pros and cons associated with the extension of ECB quantitative easing programme of asset purchases. The notes have been requested by the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs as an input for the February 2017 session of the Monetary Dialogue....

  13. Quantitative Moessbauer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of Moessbauer data, as in the measurement of Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ concentration, has not been possible because of the different mean square velocities (x 2 ) of Moessbauer nuclei at chemically different sites. A method is now described which, based on Moessbauer data at several temperatures, permits the comparison of absorption areas at (x 2 )=0. (Auth.)

  14. Critical Quantitative Inquiry in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Frances K.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter briefly traces the development of the concept of critical quantitative inquiry, provides an expanded conceptualization of the tasks of critical quantitative research, offers theoretical explanation and justification for critical research using quantitative methods, and previews the work of quantitative criticalists presented in this…

  15. Histology and synchrotron radiation-based microtomography of the inner ear in a molecularly confirmed case of CHARGE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueckert, Rudolf; Rask-Andersen, Helge; Sergi, Consolato; Schmutzhard, Joachim; Mueller, Bert; Beckmann, Felix; Rittinger, Olaf; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese; Janecke, Andreas R

    2010-03-01

    CHARGE (Coloboma of the iris or retina, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retardation of growth and/or development, genital anomalies, ear anomalies) syndrome (OMIM #214800) affects about 1 in 10,000 children and is most often caused by chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein-7 (CHD7) mutations. Inner ear defects and vestibular abnormalities are particularly common. Specifically, semicircular canal (SCC) hypoplasia/aplasia and the presence of a Mondini malformation can be considered pathognomonic in the context of congenital malformations of the CHARGE syndrome. We obtained a temporal bone (TB) of a patient with CHARGE syndrome who died from bacteremia at 3 months of age. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed in the patient by direct DNA sequencing and the detection of a de novo, truncating CHD7 mutation, c.6169dup (p.R2057fs). We assessed changes of the TB and the degree of neural preservation, which may influence the potential benefit of cochlear implantation. The TB was analyzed using synchrotron radiation-based micro computed tomography, and by light microscopy. The vestibular partition consisted of a rudimentary vestibule with agenesis of the SCCs. The cochlea was hypoplastic with poor or deficient interscaling and shortened (Mondini dysplasia). The organ of Corti had near normal structure and innervation. Modiolus and Rosenthal's canal were hypoplastic with perikarya displaced along the axon bundles into the internal acoustic meatus, which may be explained by the arrest or limited migration and translocation of the cell nuclei into the cochlear tube during development. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Internal structures of scaffold-free 3D cell cultures visualized by synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldamli, Belma; Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix; Tübel, Jutta; Schauwecker, Johannes; Burgkart, Rainer; Jürgens, Philipp; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian; Sader, Robert; Müller, Bert

    2008-08-01

    Recently the importance of the third dimension in cell biology has been better understood, resulting in a re-orientation towards three-dimensional (3D) cultivation. Yet adequate tools for their morphological characterization have to be established. Synchrotron radiation-based micro computed tomography (SRμCT) allows visualizing such biological systems with almost isotropic micrometer resolution, non-destructively. We have applied SRμCT for studying the internal morphology of human osteoblast-derived, scaffold-free 3D cultures, termed histoids. Primary human osteoblasts, isolated from femoral neck spongy bone, were grown as 2D culture in non-mineralizing osteogenic medium until a rather thick, multi-cellular membrane was formed. This delicate system was intentionally released to randomly fold itself. The folded cell cultures were grown to histoids of cubic milli- or centimeter size in various combinations of mineralizing and non-mineralizing osteogenic medium for a total period of minimum 56 weeks. The SRμCT-measurements were performed in the absorption contrast mode at the beamlines BW 2 and W 2 (HASYLAB at DESY, Hamburg, Germany), operated by the GKSS-Research Center. To investigate the entire volume of interest several scans were performed under identical conditions and registered to obtain one single dataset of each sample. The histoids grown under different conditions exhibit similar external morphology of globular or ovoid shape. The SRμCT-examination revealed the distinctly different morphological structures inside the histoids. One obtains details of the histoids that permit to identify and select the most promising slices for subsequent histological characterization.

  17. Applied quantitative finance

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Cathy; Overbeck, Ludger

    2017-01-01

    This volume provides practical solutions and introduces recent theoretical developments in risk management, pricing of credit derivatives, quantification of volatility and copula modeling. This third edition is devoted to modern risk analysis based on quantitative methods and textual analytics to meet the current challenges in banking and finance. It includes 14 new contributions and presents a comprehensive, state-of-the-art treatment of cutting-edge methods and topics, such as collateralized debt obligations, the high-frequency analysis of market liquidity, and realized volatility. The book is divided into three parts: Part 1 revisits important market risk issues, while Part 2 introduces novel concepts in credit risk and its management along with updated quantitative methods. The third part discusses the dynamics of risk management and includes risk analysis of energy markets and for cryptocurrencies. Digital assets, such as blockchain-based currencies, have become popular b ut are theoretically challenging...

  18. Quantitative skeletal scintiscanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haushofer, R.

    1982-01-01

    330 patients were examined by skeletal scintiscanning with sup(99m)Tc pyrophosphate and sup(99m)methylene diphosphonate in the years between 1977 and 1979. Course control examinations were carried out in 12 patients. The collective of patients presented with primary skeletal tumours, metastases, inflammatory and degenerative skeletal diseases. Bone scintiscanning combined with the ''region of interest'' technique was found to be an objective and reproducible technique for quantitative measurement of skeletal radioactivity concentrations. The validity of nuclear skeletal examinations can thus be enhanced as far as diagnosis, course control, and differential diagnosis are concerned. Quantitative skeletal scintiscanning by means of the ''region of interest'' technique has opened up a new era in skeletal diagnosis by nuclear methods. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Quantitative FDG in depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chua, P.; O`Keefe, G.J.; Egan, G.F.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Mckay, W.J.; Morris, P.L.P.; Burrows, G.D. [Austin Hospital, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Dept of Psychiatry and Centre for PET

    1998-03-01

    Full text: Studies of regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRGlu) using positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with affective disorders have consistently demonstrated reduced metabolism in the frontal regions. Different quantitative and semi-quantitative rCMRGlu regions of interest (ROI) comparisons, e.g. absolute metabolic rates, ratios of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to ipsilateral hemisphere cortex, have been reported. These studies suffered from the use of a standard brain atlas to define ROls, whereas in this case study, the individual``s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan was registered with the PET scan to enable accurate neuroanatomical ROI definition for the subject. The patient is a 36-year-old female with a six-week history of major depression (HAM-D = 34, MMSE = 28). A quantitative FDG PET study and an MRI scan were performed. Six MRI-guided ROls (DLPFC, PFC, whole hemisphere) were defined. The average rCMRGlu in the DLPFC (left = 28.8 + 5.8 mol/100g/min; right = 25.6 7.0 mol/100g/min) were slightly reduced compared to the ipsilateral hemispherical rate (left = 30.4 6.8 mol/100g/min; right = 29.5 7.2 mol/100g/min). The ratios of DLPFC to ipsilateral hemispheric rate were close to unity (left = 0.95 0.29; right 0.87 0.32). The right to left DLPFC ratio did not show any significant asymmetry (0.91 0.30). These results do not correlate with earlier published results reporting decreased left DLPFC rates compared to right DLPFC, although our results will need to be replicated with a group of depressed patients. Registration of PET and MRI studies is necessary in ROI-based quantitative FDG PET studies to allow for the normal anatomical variation among individuals, and thus is essential for accurate comparison of rCMRGlu between individuals.

  20. Quantitative FDG in depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, P.; O'Keefe, G.J.; Egan, G.F.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Mckay, W.J.; Morris, P.L.P.; Burrows, G.D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Studies of regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRGlu) using positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with affective disorders have consistently demonstrated reduced metabolism in the frontal regions. Different quantitative and semi-quantitative rCMRGlu regions of interest (ROI) comparisons, e.g. absolute metabolic rates, ratios of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to ipsilateral hemisphere cortex, have been reported. These studies suffered from the use of a standard brain atlas to define ROls, whereas in this case study, the individual''s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan was registered with the PET scan to enable accurate neuroanatomical ROI definition for the subject. The patient is a 36-year-old female with a six-week history of major depression (HAM-D = 34, MMSE = 28). A quantitative FDG PET study and an MRI scan were performed. Six MRI-guided ROls (DLPFC, PFC, whole hemisphere) were defined. The average rCMRGlu in the DLPFC (left = 28.8 + 5.8 mol/100g/min; right = 25.6 7.0 mol/100g/min) were slightly reduced compared to the ipsilateral hemispherical rate (left = 30.4 6.8 mol/100g/min; right = 29.5 7.2 mol/100g/min). The ratios of DLPFC to ipsilateral hemispheric rate were close to unity (left = 0.95 0.29; right 0.87 0.32). The right to left DLPFC ratio did not show any significant asymmetry (0.91 0.30). These results do not correlate with earlier published results reporting decreased left DLPFC rates compared to right DLPFC, although our results will need to be replicated with a group of depressed patients. Registration of PET and MRI studies is necessary in ROI-based quantitative FDG PET studies to allow for the normal anatomical variation among individuals, and thus is essential for accurate comparison of rCMRGlu between individuals

  1. Quantitative traits and diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzJohn, Richard G

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative traits have long been hypothesized to affect speciation and extinction rates. For example, smaller body size or increased specialization may be associated with increased rates of diversification. Here, I present a phylogenetic likelihood-based method (quantitative state speciation and extinction [QuaSSE]) that can be used to test such hypotheses using extant character distributions. This approach assumes that diversification follows a birth-death process where speciation and extinction rates may vary with one or more traits that evolve under a diffusion model. Speciation and extinction rates may be arbitrary functions of the character state, allowing much flexibility in testing models of trait-dependent diversification. I test the approach using simulated phylogenies and show that a known relationship between speciation and a quantitative character could be recovered in up to 80% of the cases on large trees (500 species). Consistent with other approaches, detecting shifts in diversification due to differences in extinction rates was harder than when due to differences in speciation rates. Finally, I demonstrate the application of QuaSSE to investigate the correlation between body size and diversification in primates, concluding that clade-specific differences in diversification may be more important than size-dependent diversification in shaping the patterns of diversity within this group.

  2. Quantitative ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gries, W.H.

    1976-06-01

    This is a report of the study of the implantation of heavy ions at medium keV-energies into electrically conducting mono-elemental solids, at ion doses too small to cause significant loss of the implanted ions by resputtering. The study has been undertaken to investigate the possibility of accurate portioning of matter in submicrogram quantities, with some specific applications in mind. The problem is extensively investigated both on a theoretical level and in practice. A mathematical model is developed for calculating the loss of implanted ions by resputtering as a function of the implanted ion dose and the sputtering yield. Numerical data are produced therefrom which permit a good order-of-magnitude estimate of the loss for any ion/solid combination in which the ions are heavier than the solid atoms, and for any ion energy from 10 to 300 keV. The implanted ion dose is measured by integration of the ion beam current, and equipment and techniques are described which make possible the accurate integration of an ion current in an electromagnetic isotope separator. The methods are applied to two sample cases, one being a stable isotope, the other a radioisotope. In both cases independent methods are used to show that the implantation is indeed quantitative, as predicted. At the same time the sample cases are used to demonstrate two possible applications for quantitative ion implantation, viz. firstly for the manufacture of calibration standards for instrumental micromethods of elemental trace analysis in metals, and secondly for the determination of the half-lives of long-lived radioisotopes by a specific activity method. It is concluded that the present study has advanced quantitative ion implantation to the state where it can be successfully applied to the solution of problems in other fields

  3. Quantitative cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, M.; Dueber, C.; Wolff, P.; Erbel, R.; Hoffmann, T.

    1985-06-01

    The scope and limitations of quantitative cardiac CT have been evaluated in a series of experimental and clinical studies. The left ventricular muscle mass was estimated by computed tomography in 19 dogs (using volumetric methods, measurements in two axes and planes and reference volume). There was good correlation with anatomical findings. The enddiastolic volume of the left ventricle was estimated in 22 patients with cardiomyopathies; using angiography as a reference, CT led to systematic under-estimation. It is also shown that ECG-triggered magnetic resonance tomography results in improved visualisation and may be expected to improve measurements of cardiac morphology.

  4. F# for quantitative finance

    CERN Document Server

    Astborg, Johan

    2013-01-01

    To develop your confidence in F#, this tutorial will first introduce you to simpler tasks such as curve fitting. You will then advance to more complex tasks such as implementing algorithms for trading semi-automation in a practical scenario-based format.If you are a data analyst or a practitioner in quantitative finance, economics, or mathematics and wish to learn how to use F# as a functional programming language, this book is for you. You should have a basic conceptual understanding of financial concepts and models. Elementary knowledge of the .NET framework would also be helpful.

  5. Quantitative performance monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    In the recently published update of NUREG/CR 3883, it was shown that Japanese plants of size and design similar to those in the US have significantly fewer trips in a given year of operation. One way to reduce such imbalance is the efficient use of available plant data. Since plant data are recorded and monitored continuously for management feedback and timely resolution of problems, this data should be actively used to increase the efficiency of operations and, ultimately, for a reduction of plant trips in power plants. A great deal of information is lost, however, if the analytical tools available for the data evaluation are misapplied or not adopted at all. This paper deals with a program developed to use quantitative techniques to monitor personnel performance in an operating power plant. Visual comparisons of ongoing performance with predetermined quantitative performance goals are made. A continuous feedback is provided to management for early detection of adverse trends and timely resolution of problems. Ultimately, costs are reduced through effective resource management and timely decision making

  6. Quantitative clinical radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentzen, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Based on a series of recent papers, a status is given of our current ability to quantify the radiobiology of human tumors and normal tissues. Progress has been made in the methods of analysis. This includes the introduction of 'direct' (maximum likelihood) analysis, incorporation of latent-time in the analyses, and statistical approaches to allow for the many factors of importance in predicting tumor-control probability of normal-tissue complications. Quantitative clinical radiobiology of normal tissues is reviewed with emphasis on fractionation sensitivity, repair kinetics, regeneration, latency, and the steepness of dose-response curves. In addition, combined modality treatment, functional endpoints, and the search for a correlation between the occurrence of different endpoints in the same individual are discussed. For tumors, quantitative analyses of fractionation sensitivity, repair kinetics, reoxygenation, and regeneration are reviewed. Other factors influencing local control are: Tumor volume, histopathologic differentiation and hemoglobin concentration. Also, the steepness of the dose-response curve for tumors is discussed. Radiobiological strategies for improving radiotherapy are discussed with emphasis on non-standard fractionation and individualization of treatment schedules. (orig.)

  7. Automatic quantitative metallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcelos, E.J.B.V.; Ambrozio Filho, F.; Cunha, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The quantitative determination of metallographic parameters is analysed through the description of Micro-Videomat automatic image analysis system and volumetric percentage of perlite in nodular cast irons, porosity and average grain size in high-density sintered pellets of UO 2 , and grain size of ferritic steel. Techniques adopted are described and results obtained are compared with the corresponding ones by the direct counting process: counting of systematic points (grid) to measure volume and intersections method, by utilizing a circunference of known radius for the average grain size. The adopted technique for nodular cast iron resulted from the small difference of optical reflectivity of graphite and perlite. Porosity evaluation of sintered UO 2 pellets is also analyzed [pt

  8. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  9. Quantitative X-ray microtomography with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donath, T. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2007-07-01

    Synchrotron-radiation-based computed microtomography (SR{sub {mu}}CT) is an established method for the examination of volume structures. It allows to measure the x-ray attenuation coefficient of a specimen three-dimensionally with a spatial resolution of about one micrometer. In contrast to conventional x-ray sources (x-ray tubes), the unique properties of synchrotron radiation enable quantitative measurements that do not suffer from beam-hardening artifacts. During this work the capabilities for quantitative SR{sub {mu}}CT measurements have been further improved by enhancements that were made to the SR{sub {mu}}CT apparatus and to the reconstruction chain. For high-resolution SR{sub {mu}}CT an x-ray camera consisting of luminescent screen (x-ray phosphor), lens system, and CCD camera was used. A significant suppression of blur that is caused by reflections inside the luminescent screen could be achieved by application of an absorbing optical coating to the screen surface. It is shown that blur and ring artifacts in the tomographic reconstructions are thereby drastically reduced. Furthermore, a robust and objective method for the determination of the center of rotation in projection data (sinograms) is presented that achieves sub-pixel precision. By implementation of this method into the reconstruction chain, complete automation of the reconstruction process has been achieved. Examples of quantitative SR{sub {mu}}CT studies conducted at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY are presented and used for the demonstration of the achieved enhancements. (orig.)

  10. Exploring the interactions and binding sites between Cd and functional groups in soil using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation based spectromicroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Fusheng [Jiangsu Provincial Key Lab for Organic Solid Waste Utilization and National Engineering Research Center for Organic-Based Fertilizers, College of Resources & Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Department of Soil Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Polizzotto, Matthew L. [Department of Soil Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Guan, Dongxing [Key Laboratory of Surficial Geochemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210026 (China); Wu, Jun [College of Environment, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei [Jiangsu Provincial Key Lab for Organic Solid Waste Utilization and National Engineering Research Center for Organic-Based Fertilizers, College of Resources & Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Wang, Boren [Institute of Agricultural Resources and Regional Planning, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081 (China); Yu, Guanghui, E-mail: yuguanghui@njau.edu.cn [Jiangsu Provincial Key Lab for Organic Solid Waste Utilization and National Engineering Research Center for Organic-Based Fertilizers, College of Resources & Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • The interactions and binding between Cd and functional groups are essential for their fates. • Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy can identify Cd binding to functional groups in soils. • Synchrotron radiation based spectromicroscopy shows the micro-scale distribution of Cd in soils. • Soil functional groups controlling Cd binding can be modified by fertilization treatments. - Abstract: Understanding how heavy metals bind and interact in soils is essential for predicting their distributions, reactions and fates in the environment. Here we propose a novel strategy, i.e., combining two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D COS) and synchrotron radiation based spectromicroscopies, for identifying heavy metal binding to functional groups in soils. The results showed that although long-term (23 yrs) organic fertilization treatment caused the accumulation of Cd (over 3 times) in soils when compared to no fertilization and chemical fertilization treatments, it significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the Cd concentration in wheat grain. The 2D COS analyses demonstrated that soil functional groups controlling Cd binding were modified by fertilization treatments, providing implications for the reduced bioavailability of heavy metals in organic fertilized soils. Furthermore, correlative micro X-ray fluorescence spectromicroscopy, electron probe micro-analyzer mapping, and synchrotron-radiation-based FTIR spectromicroscopy analysis showed that Cd, minerals, and organic functional groups were heterogeneously distributed at the micro-scale in soil colloids. Only minerals, rather than organic groups, had a similar distribution pattern with Cd. Together, this strategy has a potential to explore the interactions and binding sites among heavy metals, minerals and organic components in soil.

  11. Quantitative sexing (Q-Sexing) and relative quantitative sexing (RQ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    samer

    Key words: Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), quantitative sexing, Siberian tiger. INTRODUCTION. Animal molecular sexing .... 43:3-12. Ellegren H (1996). First gene on the avian W chromosome (CHD) provides a tag for universal sexing of non-ratite birds. Proc.

  12. Deterministic quantitative risk assessment development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Jane; Colquhoun, Iain [PII Pipeline Solutions Business of GE Oil and Gas, Cramlington Northumberland (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Current risk assessment practice in pipeline integrity management is to use a semi-quantitative index-based or model based methodology. This approach has been found to be very flexible and provide useful results for identifying high risk areas and for prioritizing physical integrity assessments. However, as pipeline operators progressively adopt an operating strategy of continual risk reduction with a view to minimizing total expenditures within safety, environmental, and reliability constraints, the need for quantitative assessments of risk levels is becoming evident. Whereas reliability based quantitative risk assessments can be and are routinely carried out on a site-specific basis, they require significant amounts of quantitative data for the results to be meaningful. This need for detailed and reliable data tends to make these methods unwieldy for system-wide risk k assessment applications. This paper describes methods for estimating risk quantitatively through the calibration of semi-quantitative estimates to failure rates for peer pipeline systems. The methods involve the analysis of the failure rate distribution, and techniques for mapping the rate to the distribution of likelihoods available from currently available semi-quantitative programs. By applying point value probabilities to the failure rates, deterministic quantitative risk assessment (QRA) provides greater rigor and objectivity than can usually be achieved through the implementation of semi-quantitative risk assessment results. The method permits a fully quantitative approach or a mixture of QRA and semi-QRA to suit the operator's data availability and quality, and analysis needs. For example, consequence analysis can be quantitative or can address qualitative ranges for consequence categories. Likewise, failure likelihoods can be output as classical probabilities or as expected failure frequencies as required. (author)

  13. Quantitative Nuclear Medicine. Chapter 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, J.; El Fakhri, G. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Planar imaging is still used in clinical practice although tomographic imaging (single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)) is becoming more established. In this chapter, quantitative methods for both imaging techniques are presented. Planar imaging is limited to single photon. For both SPECT and PET, the focus is on the quantitative methods that can be applied to reconstructed images.

  14. Mastering R for quantitative finance

    CERN Document Server

    Berlinger, Edina; Badics, Milán; Banai, Ádám; Daróczi, Gergely; Dömötör, Barbara; Gabler, Gergely; Havran, Dániel; Juhász, Péter; Margitai, István; Márkus, Balázs; Medvegyev, Péter; Molnár, Julia; Szucs, Balázs Árpád; Tuza, Ágnes; Vadász, Tamás; Váradi, Kata; Vidovics-Dancs, Ágnes

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for those who want to learn how to use R's capabilities to build models in quantitative finance at a more advanced level. If you wish to perfectly take up the rhythm of the chapters, you need to be at an intermediate level in quantitative finance and you also need to have a reasonable knowledge of R.

  15. Quantitative analysis of receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhanli; Wang Rongfu

    2004-01-01

    Model-based methods for quantitative analysis of receptor imaging, including kinetic, graphical and equilibrium methods, are introduced in detail. Some technical problem facing quantitative analysis of receptor imaging, such as the correction for in vivo metabolism of the tracer and the radioactivity contribution from blood volume within ROI, and the estimation of the nondisplaceable ligand concentration, is also reviewed briefly

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Renogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Keun Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1969-03-15

    value are useful for the differentiation of various renal diseases, however, qualitative analysis of the renogram with one or two parameters is not accurate. 3) In bilateral non-functioning kidney groups, a positive correlation between anemia and nitrogen retention was observed, although the quantitative assessment of the degree of non-functioning was impossible.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Renogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Keun Chul

    1969-01-01

    are useful for the differentiation of various renal diseases, however, qualitative analysis of the renogram with one or two parameters is not accurate. 3) In bilateral non-functioning kidney groups, a positive correlation between anemia and nitrogen retention was observed, although the quantitative assessment of the degree of non-functioning was impossible.

  18. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectromicroscopy for characterization of the protein/peptide distribution in single microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manli Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study establishes a visualization method for the measurement of the distribution and localization of protein/peptide constituents within a single poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA microsphere using synchrotron radiation–based Fourier-transform infrared spectromicroscopy (SR-FTIR. The representative infrared wavenumbers specific for protein/peptide (Exenatide and excipient (PLGA were identified and chemical maps at the single microsphere level were generated by measuring and plotting the intensity of these specific bands. For quantitative analysis of the distribution within microspheres, Matlab software was used to transform the map file into a 3D matrix and the matrix values specific for the drug and excipient were extracted. Comparison of the normalized SR-FTIR maps of PLGA and Exenatide indicated that PLGA was uniformly distributed, while Exenatide was relatively non-uniformly distributed in the microspheres. In conclusion, SR-FTIR is a rapid, nondestructive and sensitive detection technology to provide the distribution of chemical constituents and functional groups in microparticles and microspheres.

  19. Mixing quantitative with qualitative methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ann; Viller, Stephen; Heck, Tamara

    2017-01-01

    with or are considering, researching, or working with both quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods (in academia or industry), join us in this workshop. In particular, we look at adding quantitative to qualitative methods to build a whole picture of user experience. We see a need to discuss both quantitative...... and qualitative research because there is often a perceived lack of understanding of the rigor involved in each. The workshop will result in a White Paper on the latest developments in this field, within Australia and comparative with international work. We anticipate sharing submissions and workshop outcomes...

  20. Understanding quantitative research: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoe, Juanita; Hoare, Zoë

    This article, which is the first in a two-part series, provides an introduction to understanding quantitative research, basic statistics and terminology used in research articles. Critical appraisal of research articles is essential to ensure that nurses remain up to date with evidence-based practice to provide consistent and high-quality nursing care. This article focuses on developing critical appraisal skills and understanding the use and implications of different quantitative approaches to research. Part two of this article will focus on explaining common statistical terms and the presentation of statistical data in quantitative research.

  1. Quantitative EPR A Practitioners Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Eaton, Gareth R; Barr, David P; Weber, Ralph T

    2010-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive yet practical guide for people who perform quantitative EPR measurements. No existing book provides this level of practical guidance to ensure the successful use of EPR. There is a growing need in both industrial and academic research to provide meaningful and accurate quantitative EPR results. This text discusses the various sample, instrument and software related aspects required for EPR quantitation. Specific topics include: choosing a reference standard, resonator considerations (Q, B1, Bm), power saturation characteristics, sample positioning, and finally, putting all the factors together to obtain an accurate spin concentration of a sample.

  2. Application of synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray microprobe techniques for the analysis of recombination activity of metals precipitated at Si/SiGe misfit dislocations

    CERN Document Server

    Vyvenko, O F; Istratov, A A; Weber, E R; Kittler, M; Seifert, W

    2002-01-01

    In this study we report application of synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray microprobe techniques (the x-ray-beam-induced current (XBIC) and x-ray fluorescence (mu-XRF) methods) to the analysis of the recombination activity and space distribution of copper and iron in the vicinity of dislocations in silicon/silicon-germanium structures. A combination of these two techniques enables one to study the chemical nature of the defects and impurities and their recombination activity in situ and to map metal clusters with a micron-scale resolution. XRF analysis revealed that copper formed clearly distinguishable precipitates along the misfit dislocations. A proportional dependence between the XBIC contrast and the number of copper atoms in the precipitates was established. In hydrogen-passivated iron-contaminated samples we observed clusters of iron precipitates which had no recombination activity detectable by the XBIC technique as well as iron clusters which were not completely passivated.

  3. Quantitative mass spectrometry: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Pawel L.

    2016-10-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a mainstream chemical analysis technique in the twenty-first century. It has contributed to numerous discoveries in chemistry, physics and biochemistry. Hundreds of research laboratories scattered all over the world use MS every day to investigate fundamental phenomena on the molecular level. MS is also widely used by industry-especially in drug discovery, quality control and food safety protocols. In some cases, mass spectrometers are indispensable and irreplaceable by any other metrological tools. The uniqueness of MS is due to the fact that it enables direct identification of molecules based on the mass-to-charge ratios as well as fragmentation patterns. Thus, for several decades now, MS has been used in qualitative chemical analysis. To address the pressing need for quantitative molecular measurements, a number of laboratories focused on technological and methodological improvements that could render MS a fully quantitative metrological platform. In this theme issue, the experts working for some of those laboratories share their knowledge and enthusiasm about quantitative MS. I hope this theme issue will benefit readers, and foster fundamental and applied research based on quantitative MS measurements. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  4. Quantitative imaging methods in osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, Ling; Koromani, Fjorda; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Zillikens, M Carola; Oei, Edwin H G

    2016-12-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by a decreased bone mass and quality resulting in an increased fracture risk. Quantitative imaging methods are critical in the diagnosis and follow-up of treatment effects in osteoporosis. Prior radiographic vertebral fractures and bone mineral density (BMD) as a quantitative parameter derived from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) are among the strongest known predictors of future osteoporotic fractures. Therefore, current clinical decision making relies heavily on accurate assessment of these imaging features. Further, novel quantitative techniques are being developed to appraise additional characteristics of osteoporosis including three-dimensional bone architecture with quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Dedicated high-resolution (HR) CT equipment is available to enhance image quality. At the other end of the spectrum, by utilizing post-processing techniques such as the trabecular bone score (TBS) information on three-dimensional architecture can be derived from DXA images. Further developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seem promising to not only capture bone micro-architecture but also characterize processes at the molecular level. This review provides an overview of various quantitative imaging techniques based on different radiological modalities utilized in clinical osteoporosis care and research.

  5. Quantitative densitometry of neurotransmitter receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, T.C.; Bleisch, W.V.; Biegon, A.; McEwen, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    An autoradiographic procedure is described that allows the quantitative measurement of neurotransmitter receptors by optical density readings. Frozen brain sections are labeled in vitro with [ 3 H]ligands under conditions that maximize specific binding to neurotransmitter receptors. The labeled sections are then placed against the 3 H-sensitive LKB Ultrofilm to produce the autoradiograms. These autoradiograms resemble those produced by [ 14 C]deoxyglucose autoradiography and are suitable for quantitative analysis with a densitometer. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat and zebra finch brain and 5-HT receptors in rat brain were visualized by this method. When the proper combination of ligand concentration and exposure time are used, the method provides quantitative information about the amount and affinity of neurotransmitter receptors in brain sections. This was established by comparisons of densitometric readings with parallel measurements made by scintillation counting of sections. (Auth.)

  6. Energy Education: The Quantitative Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Richard

    2010-02-01

    A serious study of energy use and its consequences has to be quantitative. It makes little sense to push your favorite renewable energy source if it can't provide enough energy to make a dent in humankind's prodigious energy consumption. Conversely, it makes no sense to dismiss alternatives---solar in particular---that supply Earth with energy at some 10,000 times our human energy consumption rate. But being quantitative---especially with nonscience students or the general public---is a delicate business. This talk draws on the speaker's experience presenting energy issues to diverse audiences through single lectures, entire courses, and a textbook. The emphasis is on developing a quick, ``back-of-the-envelope'' approach to quantitative understanding of energy issues. )

  7. Quantitative nature of overexpression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression experiments are sometimes considered as qualitative experiments designed to identify novel proteins and study their function. However, in order to draw conclusions regarding protein overexpression through association analyses using large-scale biological data sets, we need to recognize the quantitative nature of overexpression experiments. Here I discuss the quantitative features of two different types of overexpression experiment: absolute and relative. I also introduce the four primary mechanisms involved in growth defects caused by protein overexpression: resource overload, stoichiometric imbalance, promiscuous interactions, and pathway modulation associated with the degree of overexpression. PMID:26543202

  8. Time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verano-Braga, Thiago; Schwämmle, Veit; Sylvester, Marc

    2012-01-01

    proteins involved in the Ang-(1-7) signaling, we performed a mass spectrometry-based time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteome study of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) treated with Ang-(1-7). We identified 1288 unique phosphosites on 699 different proteins with 99% certainty of correct peptide...

  9. Quantitative Characterisation of Surface Texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Lonardo, P.M.; Trumpold, H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the different methods used to give a quantitative characterisation of surface texture. The paper contains a review of conventional 2D as well as 3D roughness parameters, with particular emphasis on recent international standards and developments. It presents new texture...

  10. GPC and quantitative phase imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Banas, Andrew Rafael; Villangca, Mark Jayson

    2016-01-01

    shaper followed by the potential of GPC for biomedical and multispectral applications where we experimentally demonstrate the active light shaping of a supercontinuum laser over most of the visible wavelength range. Finally, we discuss how GPC can be advantageously applied for Quantitative Phase Imaging...

  11. Compositional and Quantitative Model Checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a survey of a composition model checking methodology and its succesfull instantiation to the model checking of networks of finite-state, timed, hybrid and probabilistic systems with respect; to suitable quantitative versions of the modal mu-calculus [Koz82]. The method is based...

  12. La quantite en islandais modern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnús Pétursson

    1978-12-01

    Full Text Available La réalisation phonétique de la quantité en syllabe accentuée dans la lecture de deux textes continus. Le problème de la quantité est un des problèmes les plus étudiés dans la phonologie de l'islandais moderne. Du point de vue phonologique il semble qu'on ne peut pas espérer apporter du nouveau, les possibilités théoriques ayant été pratiquement épuisées comme nous 1'avons rappelé dans notre étude récente (Pétursson 1978, pp. 76-78. Le résultat le plus inattendu des recherches des dernières années est sans doute la découverte d'une différenciation quantitative entre le Nord et le Sud de l'Islande (Pétursson 1976a. Il est pourtant encore prématuré de parler de véritables zones quantitatives puisqu'on n' en connaît ni les limites ni l' étendue sur le plan géographique.

  13. Quantitative Reasoning in Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramful, Ajay; Ho, Siew Yin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Ajay Ramful and Siew Yin Ho explain the meaning of quantitative reasoning, describing how it is used in the to solve mathematical problems. They also describe a diagrammatic approach to represent relationships among quantities and provide examples of problems and their solutions.

  14. Quantitative reactive modeling and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzinger, Thomas A

    Formal verification aims to improve the quality of software by detecting errors before they do harm. At the basis of formal verification is the logical notion of correctness , which purports to capture whether or not a program behaves as desired. We suggest that the boolean partition of software into correct and incorrect programs falls short of the practical need to assess the behavior of software in a more nuanced fashion against multiple criteria. We therefore propose to introduce quantitative fitness measures for programs, specifically for measuring the function, performance, and robustness of reactive programs such as concurrent processes. This article describes the goals of the ERC Advanced Investigator Project QUAREM. The project aims to build and evaluate a theory of quantitative fitness measures for reactive models. Such a theory must strive to obtain quantitative generalizations of the paradigms that have been success stories in qualitative reactive modeling, such as compositionality, property-preserving abstraction and abstraction refinement, model checking, and synthesis. The theory will be evaluated not only in the context of software and hardware engineering, but also in the context of systems biology. In particular, we will use the quantitative reactive models and fitness measures developed in this project for testing hypotheses about the mechanisms behind data from biological experiments.

  15. Reconciling Anti-essentialism and Quantitative Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mathias Fjællegaard

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative methodology has a contested role in feminist scholarship which remains almost exclusively qualitative. Considering Irigaray’s notion of mimicry, Spivak’s strategic essentialism, and Butler’s contingent foundations, the essentialising implications of quantitative methodology may prove...... the potential to reconcile anti-essentialism and quantitative methodology, and thus, to make peace in the quantitative/qualitative Paradigm Wars....

  16. Preliminary studies of the effects of psychological stress on circulating lymphocytes analyzed by synchrotron radiation based-Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Caraveo, Alejandra; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Mejia-Carmona, Gloria Erika; Pérez-Ishiwara, David Guillermo; Cotte, Marine; Martínez-Martínez, Alejandro

    2014-07-01

    Psychological stress is a condition that not only generates behavioral disorders but also disrupts homeostasis and immune activity that can exacerbate or lead to inflammatory diseases. The aim of this work was to study biochemical changes in circulating immune cells from rats under psychological stress by using vibrational spectroscopy. A stress model was used, where exposure to a stressor was repeated for 5 days. Subsequently, circulating lymphocytes were examined for their biomolecular vibrational fingerprints with synchrotron radiation based-Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. The results showed an increased absorption at the ester lipid region (1720-1755 cm-1) in lymphocytes from stressed rats, suggesting lipid peroxidation. Statistical significant changes in wavenumber peak position and absorbance in the nucleic acid region were also observed (915-950 cm-1 Z-DNA, 1090-1150 cm-1 symmetric stretching of Psbnd Osbnd C, 1200-1260 cm-1 asymmetric PO2 and 1570-1510 cm-1 methylated nucleotides) which suggest a reduction of transcriptional activity in lymphocytes from stressed rat. These results unravel part of the mechanisms by which psychological stress may affect the immune system leading to systemic consequences.

  17. Feasibility of a Mobile Application to Enhance Swallowing Therapy for Patients Undergoing Radiation-Based Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starmer, Heather M; Abrams, Rina; Webster, Kimberly; Kizner, Jennifer; Beadle, Beth; Holsinger, F Christopher; Quon, Harry; Richmon, Jeremy

    2018-04-01

    Dysphagia following treatment for head and neck cancer is one of the most significant morbidities impacting quality of life. Despite the value of prophylactic exercises to mitigate the impact of radiation on long-term swallowing function, adherence to treatment is limited. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the feasibility of a mobile health application to support patient adherence to swallowing therapy during radiation-based treatment. 36 patients undergoing radiation therapy were provided with the Vibrent™ mobile application as an adjunct to standard swallowing therapy. The application included exercise videos, written instructions, reminders, exercise logging, and educational content. 80% of participants used the app during treatment and logged an average of 102 exercise sessions over the course of treatment. 25% of participants logged at least two exercise sessions per day over the 7-week treatment period, and 53% recorded at least one session per day. Exit interviews regarding the patient experience with the Vibrent™ mobile application were largely positive, but also provided actionable strategies to improve future versions of the application. The Vibrent™ mobile application appears to be a tool that can be feasibly integrated into existing patient care practices and may assist patients in adhering to treatment recommendations and facilitate communication between patients and providers between encounters.

  18. Sponge budding is a spatiotemporal morphological patterning process: Insights from synchrotron radiation-based x-ray microtomography into the asexual reproduction of Tethya wilhelma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickel Michael

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary agametic-asexual reproduction mechanisms such as budding and fission are present in all non-bilaterian and many bilaterian animal taxa and are likely to be metazoan ground pattern characters. Cnidarians display highly organized and regulated budding processes. In contrast, budding in poriferans was thought to be less specific and related to the general ability of this group to reorganize their tissues. Here we test the hypothesis of morphological pattern formation during sponge budding. Results We investigated the budding process in Tethya wilhelma (Demospongiae by applying 3D morphometrics to high resolution synchrotron radiation-based x-ray microtomography (SR-μCT image data. We followed the morphogenesis of characteristic body structures and identified distinct morphological states which indeed reveal characteristic spatiotemporal morphological patterns in sponge bud development. We discovered the distribution of skeletal elements, canal system and sponge tissue to be based on a sequential series of distinct morphological states. Based on morphometric data we defined four typical bud stages. Once they have reached the final stage buds are released as fully functional juvenile sponges which are morphologically and functionally equivalent to adult specimens. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that budding in demosponges is considerably more highly organized and regulated than previously assumed. Morphological pattern formation in asexual reproduction with underlying genetic regulation seems to have evolved early in metazoans and was likely part of the developmental program of the last common ancestor of all Metazoa (LCAM.

  19. Sponge budding is a spatiotemporal morphological patterning process: Insights from synchrotron radiation-based x-ray microtomography into the asexual reproduction of Tethya wilhelma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, Jörg U; Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix; Nickel, Michael

    2009-09-08

    Primary agametic-asexual reproduction mechanisms such as budding and fission are present in all non-bilaterian and many bilaterian animal taxa and are likely to be metazoan ground pattern characters. Cnidarians display highly organized and regulated budding processes. In contrast, budding in poriferans was thought to be less specific and related to the general ability of this group to reorganize their tissues. Here we test the hypothesis of morphological pattern formation during sponge budding. We investigated the budding process in Tethya wilhelma (Demospongiae) by applying 3D morphometrics to high resolution synchrotron radiation-based x-ray microtomography (SR-muCT) image data. We followed the morphogenesis of characteristic body structures and identified distinct morphological states which indeed reveal characteristic spatiotemporal morphological patterns in sponge bud development. We discovered the distribution of skeletal elements, canal system and sponge tissue to be based on a sequential series of distinct morphological states. Based on morphometric data we defined four typical bud stages. Once they have reached the final stage buds are released as fully functional juvenile sponges which are morphologically and functionally equivalent to adult specimens. Our results demonstrate that budding in demosponges is considerably more highly organized and regulated than previously assumed. Morphological pattern formation in asexual reproduction with underlying genetic regulation seems to have evolved early in metazoans and was likely part of the developmental program of the last common ancestor of all Metazoa (LCAM).

  20. Quantitative (real-time) PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, S.E.; McSweeney, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Many nucleic acid-based probe and PCR assays have been developed for the detection tracking of specific microbes within the rumen ecosystem. Conventional PCR assays detect PCR products at the end stage of each PCR reaction, where exponential amplification is no longer being achieved. This approach can result in different end product (amplicon) quantities being generated. In contrast, using quantitative, or real-time PCR, quantification of the amplicon is performed not at the end of the reaction, but rather during exponential amplification, where theoretically each cycle will result in a doubling of product being created. For real-time PCR, the cycle at which fluorescence is deemed to be detectable above the background during the exponential phase is termed the cycle threshold (Ct). The Ct values obtained are then used for quantitation, which will be discussed later

  1. QUANTITATIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Krog Raarup

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent advances in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM for imaging of 3D structure as well as quantitative characterization of biomolecular interactions and diffusion behaviour by means of one- and two-photon excitation. The use of CLSM for improved stereological length estimation in thick (up to 0.5 mm tissue is proposed. The techniques of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, FCS (Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching are introduced and their applicability for quantitative imaging of biomolecular (co-localization and trafficking in live cells described. The advantage of two-photon versus one-photon excitation in relation to these techniques is discussed.

  2. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy.

  3. Qualitative discussion of quantitative radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.; Motz, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    Since radiography yields an image that can be easily related to the tested object, it is superior to many nondestructive testing techniques in revealing the size, shape, and location of certain types of discontinuities. The discussion is limited to a description of the radiographic process, examination of some of the quantitative aspects of radiography, and an outline of some of the new ideas emerging in radiography. The advantages of monoenergetic x-ray radiography and neutron radiography are noted

  4. Quantitative inspection by computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, R.T.; Assis, J.T. de; Jesus, E.F.O. de

    1989-01-01

    The computerized Tomography (CT) is a method of nondestructive testing, that furnish quantitative information, that permit the detection and accurate localization of defects, internal dimension measurement, and, measurement and chart of the density distribution. The CT technology is much versatile, not presenting restriction in relation to form, size or composition of the object. A tomographic system, projected and constructed in our laboratory is presented. The applications and limitation of this system, illustrated by tomographyc images, are shown. (V.R.B.)

  5. Quantitative analysis of coupler tuning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Shuxin; Cui Yupeng; Chen Huaibi; Xiao Liling

    2001-01-01

    The author deduces the equation of coupler frequency deviation Δf and coupling coefficient β instead of only giving the adjusting direction in the process of matching coupler, on the basis of coupling-cavity chain equivalent circuits model. According to this equation, automatic measurement and quantitative display are realized on a measuring system. It contributes to industrialization of traveling-wave accelerators for large container inspection systems

  6. Quantitative Methods for Teaching Review

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Milnikova; Tamara Shioshvili

    2011-01-01

    A new method of quantitative evaluation of teaching processes is elaborated. On the base of scores data, the method permits to evaluate efficiency of teaching within one group of students and comparative teaching efficiency in two or more groups. As basic characteristics of teaching efficiency heterogeneity, stability and total variability indices both for only one group and for comparing different groups are used. The method is easy to use and permits to rank results of teaching review which...

  7. Computational complexity a quantitative perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Zimand, Marius

    2004-01-01

    There has been a common perception that computational complexity is a theory of "bad news" because its most typical results assert that various real-world and innocent-looking tasks are infeasible. In fact, "bad news" is a relative term, and, indeed, in some situations (e.g., in cryptography), we want an adversary to not be able to perform a certain task. However, a "bad news" result does not automatically become useful in such a scenario. For this to happen, its hardness features have to be quantitatively evaluated and shown to manifest extensively. The book undertakes a quantitative analysis of some of the major results in complexity that regard either classes of problems or individual concrete problems. The size of some important classes are studied using resource-bounded topological and measure-theoretical tools. In the case of individual problems, the book studies relevant quantitative attributes such as approximation properties or the number of hard inputs at each length. One chapter is dedicated to abs...

  8. In-vivo quantitative measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    So far by positron CT, the quantitative analyses of oxygen consumption rate, blood flow distribution, glucose metabolic rate and so on have been carried out. The largest merit of using the positron CT is the observation and verification of mankind have become easy. Recently, accompanying the rapid development of the mapping tracers for central nervous receptors, the observation of many central nervous receptors by the positron CT has become feasible, and must expectation has been placed on the elucidation of brain functions. The conditions required for in vitro processes cannot be realized in strict sense in vivo. The quantitative measurement of in vivo tracer method is carried out by measuring the accumulation and movement of a tracer after its administration. The movement model of the mapping tracer for central nervous receptors is discussed. The quantitative analysis using a steady movement model, the measurement of dopamine receptors by reference method, the measurement of D 2 receptors using 11C-Racloprode by direct method, and the possibility of measuring dynamics bio-reaction are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Colour thresholding and objective quantification in bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermin, C. D.; Gerber, M. A.; Torre-Bueno, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Computer imaging is rapidly becoming an indispensable tool for the quantification of variables in research and medicine. Whilst its use in medicine has largely been limited to qualitative observations, imaging in applied basic sciences, medical research and biotechnology demands objective quantification of the variables in question. In black and white densitometry (0-256 levels of intensity) the separation of subtle differences between closely related hues from stains is sometimes very difficult. True-colour and real-time video microscopy analysis offer choices not previously available with monochrome systems. In this paper we demonstrate the usefulness of colour thresholding, which has so far proven indispensable for proper objective quantification of the products of histochemical reactions and/or subtle differences in tissue and cells. In addition, we provide interested, but untrained readers with basic information that may assist decisions regarding the most suitable set-up for a project under consideration. Data from projects in progress at Tulane are shown to illustrate the advantage of colour thresholding over monochrome densitometry and for objective quantification of subtle colour differences between experimental and control samples.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekolla, S.G.; Bengel, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of myocardial SPECT images is a powerful tool to extract the highly specific radio tracer uptake in these studies. If compared to normal data bases, the uptake values can be calibrated on an individual basis. Doing so increases the reproducibility of the analysis substantially. Based on the development over the last three decades starting from planar scinitigraphy, this paper discusses the methods used today incorporating the changes due to tomographic image acquisitions. Finally, the limitations of these approaches as well as consequences from most recent hardware developments, commercial analysis packages and a wider view of the description of the left ventricle are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Quantitative Trait Loci in Inbred Lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative traits result from the influence of multiple genes (quantitative trait loci) and environmental factors. Detecting and mapping the individual genes underlying such 'complex' traits is a difficult task. Fortunately, populations obtained from crosses between inbred lines are relatively

  12. A quantitative framework for assessing ecological resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantitative approaches to measure and assess resilience are needed to bridge gaps between science, policy, and management. In this paper, we suggest a quantitative framework for assessing ecological resilience. Ecological resilience as an emergent ecosystem phenomenon can be de...

  13. Operations management research methodologies using quantitative modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertrand, J.W.M.; Fransoo, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Gives an overview of quantitative model-based research in operations management, focusing on research methodology. Distinguishes between empirical and axiomatic research, and furthermore between descriptive and normative research. Presents guidelines for doing quantitative model-based research in

  14. Quantitative graph theory mathematical foundations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dehmer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The first book devoted exclusively to quantitative graph theory, Quantitative Graph Theory: Mathematical Foundations and Applications presents and demonstrates existing and novel methods for analyzing graphs quantitatively. Incorporating interdisciplinary knowledge from graph theory, information theory, measurement theory, and statistical techniques, this book covers a wide range of quantitative-graph theoretical concepts and methods, including those pertaining to real and random graphs such as:Comparative approaches (graph similarity or distance)Graph measures to characterize graphs quantitat

  15. Methods for Quantitative Creatinine Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John F; Sharer, J Daniel

    2017-04-06

    Reliable measurement of creatinine is necessary to assess kidney function, and also to quantitate drug levels and diagnostic compounds in urine samples. The most commonly used methods are based on the Jaffe principal of alkaline creatinine-picric acid complex color formation. However, other compounds commonly found in serum and urine may interfere with Jaffe creatinine measurements. Therefore, many laboratories have made modifications to the basic method to remove or account for these interfering substances. This appendix will summarize the basic Jaffe method, as well as a modified, automated version. Also described is a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method that separates creatinine from contaminants prior to direct quantification by UV absorption. Lastly, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method is described that uses stable isotope dilution to reliably quantify creatinine in any sample. This last approach has been recommended by experts in the field as a means to standardize all quantitative creatinine methods against an accepted reference. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Quantitative risk assessment system (QRAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Robert M (Inventor); Smidts, Carol S (Inventor); Mosleh, Ali (Inventor); Chang, Yung-Hsien (Inventor); Swaminathan, Sankaran (Inventor); Groen, Francisco J (Inventor); Tan, Zhibin (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative risk assessment system (QRAS) builds a risk model of a system for which risk of failure is being assessed, then analyzes the risk of the system corresponding to the risk model. The QRAS performs sensitivity analysis of the risk model by altering fundamental components and quantifications built into the risk model, then re-analyzes the risk of the system using the modifications. More particularly, the risk model is built by building a hierarchy, creating a mission timeline, quantifying failure modes, and building/editing event sequence diagrams. Multiplicities, dependencies, and redundancies of the system are included in the risk model. For analysis runs, a fixed baseline is first constructed and stored. This baseline contains the lowest level scenarios, preserved in event tree structure. The analysis runs, at any level of the hierarchy and below, access this baseline for risk quantitative computation as well as ranking of particular risks. A standalone Tool Box capability exists, allowing the user to store application programs within QRAS.

  17. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  18. Quantitative information in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deconinck, F.

    1985-01-01

    When developing new imaging or image processing techniques, one constantly has in mind that the new technique should provide a better, or more optimal answer to medical tasks than existing techniques do 'Better' or 'more optimal' imply some kind of standard by which one can measure imaging or image processing performance. The choice of a particular imaging modality to answer a diagnostic task, such as the detection of coronary artery stenosis is also based on an implicit optimalisation of performance criteria. Performance is measured by the ability to provide information about an object (patient) to the person (referring doctor) who ordered a particular task. In medical imaging the task is generally to find quantitative information on bodily function (biochemistry, physiology) and structure (histology, anatomy). In medical imaging, a wide range of techniques is available. Each technique has it's own characteristics. The techniques discussed in this paper are: nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray fluorescence, scintigraphy, positron emission tomography, applied potential tomography, computerized tomography, and compton tomography. This paper provides a framework for the comparison of imaging performance, based on the way the quantitative information flow is altered by the characteristics of the modality

  19. Digital radiography: a quantitative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retraint, F.

    2004-01-01

    'Full-text:' In a radiograph the value of each pixel is related to the material thickness crossed by the x-rays. Using this relationship, an object can be characterized by parameters such as depth, surface and volume. Assuming a locally linear detector response and using a radiograph of reference object, the quantitative thickness map of object can be obtained by applying offset and gain corrections. However, for an acquisition system composed of cooled CCD camera optically coupled to a scintillator screen, the radiographic image formation process generates some bias which prevent from obtaining the quantitative information: non uniformity of the x-ray source, beam hardening, Compton scattering, scintillator screen, optical system response. In a first section, we propose a complete model of the radiographic image formation process taking account of these biases. In a second section, we present an inversion scheme of this model for a single material object, which enables to obtain the thickness map of the object crossed by the x-rays. (author)

  20. Infrared thermography quantitative image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouroliakou, A.; Kalatzis, I.; Kalyvas, N.; Grivas, TB

    2017-11-01

    Infrared thermography is an imaging technique that has the ability to provide a map of temperature distribution of an object’s surface. It is considered for a wide range of applications in medicine as well as in non-destructive testing procedures. One of its promising medical applications is in orthopaedics and diseases of the musculoskeletal system where temperature distribution of the body’s surface can contribute to the diagnosis and follow up of certain disorders. Although the thermographic image can give a fairly good visual estimation of distribution homogeneity and temperature pattern differences between two symmetric body parts, it is important to extract a quantitative measurement characterising temperature. Certain approaches use temperature of enantiomorphic anatomical points, or parameters extracted from a Region of Interest (ROI). A number of indices have been developed by researchers to that end. In this study a quantitative approach in thermographic image processing is attempted based on extracting different indices for symmetric ROIs on thermograms of the lower back area of scoliotic patients. The indices are based on first order statistical parameters describing temperature distribution. Analysis and comparison of these indices result in evaluating the temperature distribution pattern of the back trunk expected in healthy, regarding spinal problems, subjects.

  1. Magnetoresistive biosensors for quantitative proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiahan; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Hall, Drew A.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative proteomics, as a developing method for study of proteins and identification of diseases, reveals more comprehensive and accurate information of an organism than traditional genomics. A variety of platforms, such as mass spectrometry, optical sensors, electrochemical sensors, magnetic sensors, etc., have been developed for detecting proteins quantitatively. The sandwich immunoassay is widely used as a labeled detection method due to its high specificity and flexibility allowing multiple different types of labels. While optical sensors use enzyme and fluorophore labels to detect proteins with high sensitivity, they often suffer from high background signal and challenges in miniaturization. Magnetic biosensors, including nuclear magnetic resonance sensors, oscillator-based sensors, Hall-effect sensors, and magnetoresistive sensors, use the specific binding events between magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and target proteins to measure the analyte concentration. Compared with other biosensing techniques, magnetic sensors take advantage of the intrinsic lack of magnetic signatures in biological samples to achieve high sensitivity and high specificity, and are compatible with semiconductor-based fabrication process to have low-cost and small-size for point-of-care (POC) applications. Although still in the development stage, magnetic biosensing is a promising technique for in-home testing and portable disease monitoring.

  2. Quantitative criticism of literary relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Joseph P; Katz, Theodore; Tripuraneni, Nilesh; Dasgupta, Tathagata; Kannan, Ajay; Brofos, James A; Bonilla Lopez, Jorge A; Schroeder, Lea A; Casarez, Adriana; Rabinovich, Maxim; Haimson Lushkov, Ayelet; Chaudhuri, Pramit

    2017-04-18

    Authors often convey meaning by referring to or imitating prior works of literature, a process that creates complex networks of literary relationships ("intertextuality") and contributes to cultural evolution. In this paper, we use techniques from stylometry and machine learning to address subjective literary critical questions about Latin literature, a corpus marked by an extraordinary concentration of intertextuality. Our work, which we term "quantitative criticism," focuses on case studies involving two influential Roman authors, the playwright Seneca and the historian Livy. We find that four plays related to but distinct from Seneca's main writings are differentiated from the rest of the corpus by subtle but important stylistic features. We offer literary interpretations of the significance of these anomalies, providing quantitative data in support of hypotheses about the use of unusual formal features and the interplay between sound and meaning. The second part of the paper describes a machine-learning approach to the identification and analysis of citational material that Livy loosely appropriated from earlier sources. We extend our approach to map the stylistic topography of Latin prose, identifying the writings of Caesar and his near-contemporary Livy as an inflection point in the development of Latin prose style. In total, our results reflect the integration of computational and humanistic methods to investigate a diverse range of literary questions.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of dermatological antiseptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, C S; Leitch, A E; Tidman, M J

    2015-12-01

    Topical antiseptics are frequently used in dermatological management, yet evidence for the efficacy of traditional generic formulations is often largely anecdotal. We tested the in vitro bactericidal activity of four commonly used topical antiseptics against Staphylococcus aureus, using a modified version of the European Standard EN 1276, a quantitative suspension test for evaluation of the bactericidal activity of chemical disinfectants and antiseptics. To meet the standard for antiseptic effectiveness of EN 1276, at least a 5 log10 reduction in bacterial count within 5 minutes of exposure is required. While 1% benzalkonium chloride and 6% hydrogen peroxide both achieved a 5 log10 reduction in S. aureus count, neither 2% aqueous eosin nor 1 : 10 000 potassium permanganate showed significant bactericidal activity compared with control at exposure periods of up to 1 h. Aqueous eosin and potassium permanganate may have desirable astringent properties, but these results suggest they lack effective antiseptic activity, at least against S. aureus. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  4. Quantitative genetics of disease traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, N R; Visscher, P M

    2015-04-01

    John James authored two key papers on the theory of risk to relatives for binary disease traits and the relationship between parameters on the observed binary scale and an unobserved scale of liability (James Annals of Human Genetics, 1971; 35: 47; Reich, James and Morris Annals of Human Genetics, 1972; 36: 163). These two papers are John James' most cited papers (198 and 328 citations, November 2014). They have been influential in human genetics and have recently gained renewed popularity because of their relevance to the estimation of quantitative genetics parameters for disease traits using SNP data. In this review, we summarize the two early papers and put them into context. We show recent extensions of the theory for ascertained case-control data and review recent applications in human genetics. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Quantitative Activities for Introductory Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Jonathan W.; Bartlett, J. L.; Foy, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a collection of short lecture-tutorial (or homework) activities, designed to be both quantitative and accessible to the introductory astronomy student. Each of these involves interpreting some real data, solving a problem using ratios and proportionalities, and making a conclusion based on the calculation. Selected titles include: "The Mass of Neptune” "The Temperature on Titan” "Rocks in the Early Solar System” "Comets Hitting Planets” "Ages of Meteorites” "How Flat are Saturn's Rings?” "Tides of the Sun and Moon on the Earth” "The Gliese 581 Solar System"; "Buckets in the Rain” "How Hot, Bright and Big is Betelgeuse?” "Bombs and the Sun” "What Forms Stars?” "Lifetimes of Cars and Stars” "The Mass of the Milky” "How Old is the Universe?” "Is The Universe Speeding up or Slowing Down?"

  6. Quantitative patterns in drone wars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bernardo, Javier; Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Johnson, Neil F.

    2016-02-01

    Attacks by drones (i.e., unmanned combat air vehicles) continue to generate heated political and ethical debates. Here we examine the quantitative nature of drone attacks, focusing on how their intensity and frequency compare with that of other forms of human conflict. Instead of the power-law distribution found recently for insurgent and terrorist attacks, the severity of attacks is more akin to lognormal and exponential distributions, suggesting that the dynamics underlying drone attacks lie beyond these other forms of human conflict. We find that the pattern in the timing of attacks is consistent with one side having almost complete control, an important if expected result. We show that these novel features can be reproduced and understood using a generative mathematical model in which resource allocation to the dominant side is regulated through a feedback loop.

  7. Computer architecture a quantitative approach

    CERN Document Server

    Hennessy, John L

    2019-01-01

    Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach, Sixth Edition has been considered essential reading by instructors, students and practitioners of computer design for over 20 years. The sixth edition of this classic textbook is fully revised with the latest developments in processor and system architecture. It now features examples from the RISC-V (RISC Five) instruction set architecture, a modern RISC instruction set developed and designed to be a free and openly adoptable standard. It also includes a new chapter on domain-specific architectures and an updated chapter on warehouse-scale computing that features the first public information on Google's newest WSC. True to its original mission of demystifying computer architecture, this edition continues the longstanding tradition of focusing on areas where the most exciting computing innovation is happening, while always keeping an emphasis on good engineering design.

  8. Quantitative variation in natural populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, P.A.

    1975-01-01

    Quantitative variation is considered in natural populations using Drosophila as the example. A knowledge of such variation enables its rapid exploitation in directional selection experiments as shown for scutellar chaeta number. Where evidence has been obtained, genetic architectures are in qualitative agreement with Mather's concept of balance for traits under stabilizing selection. Additive genetic control is found for acute environmental stresses, but not for less acute stresses as shown by exposure to 60 Co-γ rays. D. simulans probably has a narrower ecological niche than its sibling species D. melanogaster associated with lower genetic heterogeneity. One specific environmental stress to which D. simulans is sensitive in nature is ethyl alcohol as shown by winery data. (U.S.)

  9. Quantitative pulsed eddy current analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    The potential of pulsed eddy current testing for furnishing more information than conventional single-frequency eddy current methods has been known for some time. However, a fundamental problem has been analyzing the pulse shape with sufficient precision to produce accurate quantitative results. Accordingly, the primary goal of this investigation was to: demonstrate ways of digitizing the short pulses encountered in PEC testing, and to develop empirical analysis techniques that would predict some of the parameters (e.g., depth) of simple types of defect. This report describes a digitizing technique using a computer and either a conventional nuclear ADC or a fast transient analyzer; the computer software used to collect and analyze pulses; and some of the results obtained. (U.S.)

  10. Innovations in Quantitative Risk Management

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Matthias; Zagst, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative models are omnipresent –but often controversially discussed– in todays risk management practice. New regulations, innovative financial products, and advances in valuation techniques provide a continuous flow of challenging problems for financial engineers and risk managers alike. Designing a sound stochastic model requires finding a careful balance between parsimonious model assumptions, mathematical viability, and interpretability of the output. Moreover, data requirements and the end-user training are to be considered as well. The KPMG Center of Excellence in Risk Management conference Risk Management Reloaded and this proceedings volume contribute to bridging the gap between academia –providing methodological advances– and practice –having a firm understanding of the economic conditions in which a given model is used. Discussed fields of application range from asset management, credit risk, and energy to risk management issues in insurance. Methodologically, dependence modeling...

  11. Synchrotron radiation-based multi-analytical approach for studying underglaze color: The microstructure of Chinese Qinghua blue decors (Ming dynasty)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T. [CEMES, CNRS, Toulouse University, Toulouse (France); Zhu, T.Q., E-mail: zhutq@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Sociology and Anthropology of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Feng, Z.Y. [School of Sociology and Anthropology of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Fayard, B. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS – UMR 8502, 91405 Orsay (France); Pouyet, E. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Cotte, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 8220, Laboratoire d' archéologie moléculaire et structurale (LAMS), 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); De Nolf, W.; Salomé, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Sciau, Ph., E-mail: philippe.sciau@cemes.fr [CEMES, CNRS, Toulouse University, Toulouse (France)

    2016-07-20

    In this paper, we develop a methodological approach combining macro-X-ray fluorescence and synchrotron radiation-based techniques (μXRF, full-field XANES and μXRD) to determine the composition and microstructure of underglaze decors of Qinghua porcelains (Ming dynasty). Various transition metal elements (Fe, Mn, Co) are present in the blue decoration of these ceramics and the approach proposed allows for establishing the feature of each. Thus it shows that Fe ions are distributed homogeneously over the whole glaze without any significant difference in blue and white parts. They do not play a significant role in the color. In contrast, Co ions exhibit a heterogeneous distribution with CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles close to the body/glaze interphase. These particles play a key role in the blue color and, the hue variations seem in greater part to link to their density and repartition. Co dispersed in the glassy matrix is also bivalent and mainly in tetragonal coordination, leading also to a blue color. Mn ion distribution is similar to the one of Co but without presenting local high concentrations associated to Mn based particles. Mn affects the darkness of the color and for the sample without CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} particle; it is the main color contribution. The presence of CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals was confirmed by μXRD, which revealed, in addition, a variation of cell parameters certainly linking to a Co partial substitution. - Highlights: • A new methodological approach to describe and determine the underglaze porcelain decors is proposed. • SR-μXRF and FF-XANES allow identifying the speciation of colorant ions and mapping their distribution. • Co in tetragonal coordination is the main cause of blue color of Qinghua porcelains. • The density and the repartition of CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles define the density of blue color. • Mn ions have an influence on the color darkness.

  12. Quantitative sampling and analysis of trace elements in atmospheric aerosols: impactor characterization and Synchrotron-XRF mass calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Richard

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Identification of trace elements in ambient air can add substantial information to pollution source apportionment studies, although they do not contribute significantly to emissions in terms of mass. A method for quantitative size and time-resolved trace element evaluation in ambient aerosols with a rotating drum impactor and synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence is presented. The impactor collection efficiency curves and size segregation characteristics were investigated in an experiment with oil and salt particles. Cutoff diameters were determined through the ratio of size distributions measured with two particle sizers. Furthermore, an external calibration technique to empirically link fluorescence intensities to ambient concentrations was developed. Solutions of elemental standards were applied with an ink-jet printer on thin films and area concentrations were subsequently evaluated with external wet chemical methods. These customized and reusable reference standards enable quantification of different data sets analyzed under varying experimental conditions.

  13. Recent trends in social systems quantitative theories and quantitative models

    CERN Document Server

    Hošková-Mayerová, Šárka; Soitu, Daniela-Tatiana; Kacprzyk, Janusz

    2017-01-01

    The papers collected in this volume focus on new perspectives on individuals, society, and science, specifically in the field of socio-economic systems. The book is the result of a scientific collaboration among experts from “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University of Iaşi (Romania), “G. d’Annunzio” University of Chieti-Pescara (Italy), "University of Defence" of Brno (Czech Republic), and "Pablo de Olavide" University of Sevilla (Spain). The heterogeneity of the contributions presented in this volume reflects the variety and complexity of social phenomena. The book is divided in four Sections as follows. The first Section deals with recent trends in social decisions. Specifically, it aims to understand which are the driving forces of social decisions. The second Section focuses on the social and public sphere. Indeed, it is oriented on recent developments in social systems and control. Trends in quantitative theories and models are described in Section 3, where many new formal, mathematical-statistical to...

  14. Quantitative imaging as cancer biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankoff, David A.

    2015-03-01

    The ability to assay tumor biologic features and the impact of drugs on tumor biology is fundamental to drug development. Advances in our ability to measure genomics, gene expression, protein expression, and cellular biology have led to a host of new targets for anticancer drug therapy. In translating new drugs into clinical trials and clinical practice, these same assays serve to identify patients most likely to benefit from specific anticancer treatments. As cancer therapy becomes more individualized and targeted, there is an increasing need to characterize tumors and identify therapeutic targets to select therapy most likely to be successful in treating the individual patient's cancer. Thus far assays to identify cancer therapeutic targets or anticancer drug pharmacodynamics have been based upon in vitro assay of tissue or blood samples. Advances in molecular imaging, particularly PET, have led to the ability to perform quantitative non-invasive molecular assays. Imaging has traditionally relied on structural and anatomic features to detect cancer and determine its extent. More recently, imaging has expanded to include the ability to image regional biochemistry and molecular biology, often termed molecular imaging. Molecular imaging can be considered an in vivo assay technique, capable of measuring regional tumor biology without perturbing it. This makes molecular imaging a unique tool for cancer drug development, complementary to traditional assay methods, and a potentially powerful method for guiding targeted therapy in clinical trials and clinical practice. The ability to quantify, in absolute measures, regional in vivo biologic parameters strongly supports the use of molecular imaging as a tool to guide therapy. This review summarizes current and future applications of quantitative molecular imaging as a biomarker for cancer therapy, including the use of imaging to (1) identify patients whose tumors express a specific therapeutic target; (2) determine

  15. Quantitation of esophageal transit and gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Scintigraphic techniques are the only quantitative methods for the evaluation of esophageal transit and gastroesophageal reflux. By comparison, other techniques are not quantitative and are either indirect, inconvenient, or less sensitive. Methods, such as perfusion techniques, which measure flow, require the introduction of a tube assembly into the gastrointestinal tract with the possible introduction of artifacts into the measurements due to the indwelling tubes. Earlier authors using radionuclide markers, introduced a method for measuring gastric emptying which was both tubeless and quantitative in comparison to other techniques. More recently, a number of scintigraphic methods have been introduced for the quantitation of esophageal transit and clearance, the detection and quantitation of gastroesophageal reflux, the measurement of gastric emptying using a mixed solid-liquid meal, and the quantitation of enterogastric reflux. This chapter reviews current techniques for the evaluation of esophageal transit and gastroesophageal reflux

  16. Quantitative organ visualization using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircos, L.T.; Carey, J.E. Jr.; Keyes, J.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Quantitative organ visualization (QOV) was performed using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Organ size was calculated from serial, contiguous ECT images taken through the organ of interest with image boundaries determined using a maximum directional gradient edge finding technique. Organ activity was calculated using ECT counts bounded by the directional gradient, imaging system efficiency, and imaging time. The technique used to perform QOV was evaluated using phantom studies, in vivo canine liver, spleen, bladder, and kidney studies, and in vivo human bladder studies. It was demonstrated that absolute organ activity and organ size could be determined with this system and total imaging time restricted to less than 45 min to an accuracy of about +/- 10% providing the minimum dimensions of the organ are greater than the FWHM of the imaging system and the total radioactivity within the organ of interest exceeds 15 nCi/cc for dog-sized torsos. In addition, effective half-lives of approximately 1.5 hr or greater could be determined

  17. Quantitative isotopes miction cystoureterography (QIMCU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szy, D.A.G.; Stroetges, M.W.; Funke-Voelkers, R.

    1982-01-01

    A simple method for a quantitative evaluation of vesicoureteral reflux was developed. It allows the determination of a) the volume of reflux b) the volume of the bladder at each point of time during the examination. The QIMCU gives an insight into the dynamic of reflux, of reflux volume, and of actual bladder volume. The clinical application in 37 patients with 53 insufficient ureteral orifices (i.e. reflux) showed that the onset of reflux occured in 60% as early as in the first five minutes of the examination but later in the remaining 40%. The maximal reflux was found only in 26% during the first five minutes. The reflux volume exceeded in more than 50% the amount of 3.5 ml. The international grading corresponds with the reflux volume determined by this method. Radionuclide cystoureterography can be used as well in childhood as in adults. Because the radiaction exposure is low, the method can be recommended for the initial examination and for follow up studies. (Author)

  18. A quantitative philology of introspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eDiuk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The cultural evolution of introspective thought has been recognized to undergo a drastic change during the middle of the first millennium BC. This period, known as the ``Axial Age'', saw the birth of religions and philosophies still alive in modern culture, as well as the transition from orality to literacy - which led to the hypothesis of a link between introspection and literacy. Here we set out to examine the evolution of introspection in the Axial Age, studying the cultural record of the Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian literary traditions. Using a statistical measure of semantic similarity, we identify a single ``arrow of time'' in the Old and New Testaments of the Bible, and a more complex non-monotonic dynamics in the Greco-Roman tradition reflecting the rise and fall of the respective societies. A comparable analysis of the 20th century cultural record shows a steady increase in the incidence of introspective topics, punctuated by abrupt declines during and preceding the First and Second World Wars. Our results show that (a it is possible to devise a consistent metric to quantify the history of a high-level concept such as introspection, cementing the path for a new quantitative philology and (b to the extent that it is captured in the cultural record, the increased ability of human thought for self-reflection that the Axial Age brought about is still heavily determined by societal contingencies beyond the orality-literacy nexus.

  19. Practical quantitative measures of ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathren, R.L.; Larson, H.V.

    1982-06-01

    Twenty specific quantitative measures to assist in evaluating the effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) programs are described along with their applicability, practicality, advantages, disadvantages, and potential for misinterpretation or dortion. Although no single index or combination of indices is suitable for all facilities, generally, these five: (1) mean individual dose equivalent (MIDE) to the total body from penetrating radiations; (2) statistical distribution of MIDE to the whole body from penetrating radiations; (3) cumulative penetrating whole body dose equivalent; (4) MIDE evaluated by job classification; and (5) MIDE evaluated by work location-apply to most programs. Evaluation of other programs may require other specific dose equivalent based indices, including extremity exposure data, cumulative dose equivalent to organs or to the general population, and nonpenetrating radiation dose equivalents. Certain nondose equivalent indices, such as the size of the radiation or contamination area, may also be used; an airborne activity index based on air concentration, room volume, and radiotoxicity is developed for application in some ALARA programs

  20. Connecting qualitative observation and quantitative measurement for enhancing quantitative literacy in plant anatomy course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuraeni, E.; Rahmat, A.

    2018-05-01

    Forming of cognitive schemes of plant anatomy concepts is performed by processing of qualitative and quantitative data obtained from microscopic observations. To enhancing student’s quantitative literacy, strategy of plant anatomy course was modified by adding the task to analyze quantitative data produced by quantitative measurement of plant anatomy guided by material course. Participant in this study was 24 biology students and 35 biology education students. Quantitative Literacy test, complex thinking in plant anatomy test and questioner used to evaluate the course. Quantitative literacy capability data was collected by quantitative literacy test with the rubric from the Association of American Colleges and Universities, Complex thinking in plant anatomy by test according to Marzano and questioner. Quantitative literacy data are categorized according to modified Rhodes and Finley categories. The results showed that quantitative literacy of biology education students is better than biology students.

  1. Quantitative Ultrasound Measurements at the Heel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugschies, M.; Brixen, K.; Hermann, P.

    2015-01-01

    Calcaneal quantitative ultrasound can be used to predict osteoporotic fracture risk, but its ability to monitor therapy is unclear possibly because of its limited precision. We developed a quantitative ultrasound device (foot ultrasound scanner) that measures the speed of sound at the heel...... with the foot ultrasound scanner reduced precision errors by half (p quantitative ultrasound measurements is feasible. (E-mail: m.daugschies@rad.uni-kiel.de) (C) 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology....

  2. Qualitative and quantitative methods in health research

    OpenAIRE

    V?zquez Navarrete, M. Luisa

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Research in the area of health has been traditionally dominated by quantitative research. However, the complexity of ill-health, which is socially constructed by individuals, health personnel and health authorities have motivated the search for other forms to approach knowledge. Aim To discuss the complementarities of qualitative and quantitative research methods in the generation of knowledge. Contents The purpose of quantitative research is to measure the magnitude of an event,...

  3. Quantitative autoradiography - a method of radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treutler, H.C.; Freyer, K.

    1988-01-01

    In the last years the autoradiography has been developed to a quantitative method of radioactivity measurement. Operating techniques of quantitative autoradiography are demonstrated using special standard objects. Influences of irradiation quality, of backscattering in sample and detector materials, and of sensitivity and fading of the detectors are considered. Furthermore, questions of quantitative evaluation of autoradiograms are dealt with, and measuring errors are discussed. Finally, some practical uses of quantitative autoradiography are demonstrated by means of the estimation of activity distribution in radioactive foil samples. (author)

  4. Quantitative PET of liver functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Susanne; Sørensen, Michael; Frisch, Kim; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2018-01-01

    Improved understanding of liver physiology and pathophysiology is urgently needed to assist the choice of new and upcoming therapeutic modalities for patients with liver diseases. In this review, we focus on functional PET of the liver: 1) Dynamic PET with 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro- D -galactose ( 18 F-FDGal) provides quantitative images of the hepatic metabolic clearance K met (mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Standard-uptake-value ( SUV ) from a static liver 18 F-FDGal PET/CT scan can replace K met and is currently used clinically. 2) Dynamic liver PET/CT in humans with 11 C-palmitate and with the conjugated bile acid tracer [ N -methyl- 11 C]cholylsarcosine ( 11 C-CSar) can distinguish between individual intrahepatic transport steps in hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatic transport of bile acid from blood to bile, respectively, showing diagnostic potential for individual patients. 3) Standard compartment analysis of dynamic PET data can lead to physiological inconsistencies, such as a unidirectional hepatic clearance of tracer from blood ( K 1 ; mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) greater than the hepatic blood perfusion. We developed a new microvascular compartment model with more physiology, by including tracer uptake into the hepatocytes from the blood flowing through the sinusoids, backflux from hepatocytes into the sinusoidal blood, and re-uptake along the sinusoidal path. Dynamic PET data include information on liver physiology which cannot be extracted using a standard compartment model. In conclusion , SUV of non-invasive static PET with 18 F-FDGal provides a clinically useful measurement of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Secondly, assessment of individual intrahepatic transport steps is a notable feature of dynamic liver PET.

  5. Quantitative PET of liver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Susanne; Sørensen, Michael; Frisch, Kim; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2018-01-01

    Improved understanding of liver physiology and pathophysiology is urgently needed to assist the choice of new and upcoming therapeutic modalities for patients with liver diseases. In this review, we focus on functional PET of the liver: 1) Dynamic PET with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-galactose (18F-FDGal) provides quantitative images of the hepatic metabolic clearance K met (mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Standard-uptake-value (SUV) from a static liver 18F-FDGal PET/CT scan can replace K met and is currently used clinically. 2) Dynamic liver PET/CT in humans with 11C-palmitate and with the conjugated bile acid tracer [N-methyl-11C]cholylsarcosine (11C-CSar) can distinguish between individual intrahepatic transport steps in hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatic transport of bile acid from blood to bile, respectively, showing diagnostic potential for individual patients. 3) Standard compartment analysis of dynamic PET data can lead to physiological inconsistencies, such as a unidirectional hepatic clearance of tracer from blood (K 1; mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) greater than the hepatic blood perfusion. We developed a new microvascular compartment model with more physiology, by including tracer uptake into the hepatocytes from the blood flowing through the sinusoids, backflux from hepatocytes into the sinusoidal blood, and re-uptake along the sinusoidal path. Dynamic PET data include information on liver physiology which cannot be extracted using a standard compartment model. In conclusion, SUV of non-invasive static PET with 18F-FDGal provides a clinically useful measurement of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Secondly, assessment of individual intrahepatic transport steps is a notable feature of dynamic liver PET. PMID:29755841

  6. Validating quantitative precipitation forecast for the Flood ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In order to issue an accurate warning for flood, a better or appropriate quantitative forecasting of precipitationis required. In view of this, the present study intends to validate the quantitative precipitationforecast (QPF) issued during southwest monsoon season for six river catchments (basin) under theflood meteorological ...

  7. 78 FR 64202 - Quantitative Messaging Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION Quantitative Messaging Research AGENCY: Commodity Futures... survey will follow qualitative message testing research (for which CFTC received fast- track OMB approval... comments. Please submit your comments using only one method and identify that it is for the ``Quantitative...

  8. Applications of quantitative remote sensing to hydrology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Z.; Troch, P.A.A.

    2003-01-01

    In order to quantify the rates of the exchanges of energy and matter among hydrosphere, biosphere and atmosphere, quantitative description of land surface processes by means of measurements at different scales are essential. Quantitative remote sensing plays an important role in this respect. The

  9. Development and applications of quantitative NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, quantitative NMR spectroscopy has attracted attention as an analytical method which can easily secure traceability to SI unit system, and discussions about its accuracy and inaccuracy are also started. This paper focuses on the literatures on the advancement of quantitative NMR spectroscopy reported between 2009 and 2016, and introduces both NMR measurement conditions and actual analysis cases in quantitative NMR. The quantitative NMR spectroscopy using an internal reference method enables accurate quantitative analysis with a quick and versatile way in general, and it is possible to obtain the precision sufficiently applicable to the evaluation of pure substances and standard solutions. Since the external reference method can easily prevent contamination to samples and the collection of samples, there are many reported cases related to the quantitative analysis of biologically related samples and highly scarce natural products in which NMR spectra are complicated. In the precision of quantitative NMR spectroscopy, the internal reference method is superior. As the quantitative NMR spectroscopy widely spreads, discussions are also progressing on how to utilize this analytical method as the official methods in various countries around the world. In Japan, this method is listed in the Pharmacopoeia and Japanese Standard of Food Additives, and it is also used as the official method for purity evaluation. In the future, this method will be expected to spread as the general-purpose analysis method that can ensure traceability to SI unit system. (A.O.)

  10. Quantitative Phase Imaging Using Hard X Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugent, K.A.; Gureyev, T.E.; Cookson, D.J.; Paganin, D.; Barnea, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The quantitative imaging of a phase object using 16keV xrays is reported. The theoretical basis of the techniques is presented along with its implementation using a synchrotron x-ray source. We find that our phase image is in quantitative agreement with independent measurements of the object. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  11. A Primer on Disseminating Applied Quantitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Bethany A.; DiStefano, Christine; Morgan, Grant B.

    2010-01-01

    Transparency and replication are essential features of scientific inquiry, yet scientific communications of applied quantitative research are often lacking in much-needed procedural information. In an effort to promote researchers dissemination of their quantitative studies in a cohesive, detailed, and informative manner, the authors delineate…

  12. Using Popular Culture to Teach Quantitative Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyard, Cinnamon

    2007-01-01

    Popular culture provides many opportunities to develop quantitative reasoning. This article describes a junior-level, interdisciplinary, quantitative reasoning course that uses examples from movies, cartoons, television, magazine advertisements, and children's literature. Some benefits from and cautions to using popular culture to teach…

  13. Theory and Practice in Quantitative Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posthuma, Daniëlle; Beem, A Leo; de Geus, Eco J C

    2003-01-01

    With the rapid advances in molecular biology, the near completion of the human genome, the development of appropriate statistical genetic methods and the availability of the necessary computing power, the identification of quantitative trait loci has now become a realistic prospect for quantitative...... geneticists. We briefly describe the theoretical biometrical foundations underlying quantitative genetics. These theoretical underpinnings are translated into mathematical equations that allow the assessment of the contribution of observed (using DNA samples) and unobserved (using known genetic relationships......) genetic variation to population variance in quantitative traits. Several statistical models for quantitative genetic analyses are described, such as models for the classical twin design, multivariate and longitudinal genetic analyses, extended twin analyses, and linkage and association analyses. For each...

  14. Applications of Microfluidics in Quantitative Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Gao, Meng; Wen, Lingling; He, Caiyun; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Chenli; Fu, Xiongfei; Huang, Shuqiang

    2018-05-01

    Quantitative biology is dedicated to taking advantage of quantitative reasoning and advanced engineering technologies to make biology more predictable. Microfluidics, as an emerging technique, provides new approaches to precisely control fluidic conditions on small scales and collect data in high-throughput and quantitative manners. In this review, the authors present the relevant applications of microfluidics to quantitative biology based on two major categories (channel-based microfluidics and droplet-based microfluidics), and their typical features. We also envision some other microfluidic techniques that may not be employed in quantitative biology right now, but have great potential in the near future. © 2017 Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Biotechnology Journal Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  15. Quantitative neutron radiography using neutron absorbing honeycomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Masayoshi; Oda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Ohkubo, Kohei; Tasaka, Kanji; Tsuruno, Akira; Matsubayashi, Masahito.

    1993-01-01

    This investigation concerns quantitative neutron radiography and computed tomography by using a neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator. By setting the neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator between object and imaging system, neutrons scattered in the object were absorbed by the honeycomb material and eliminated before coming to the imaging system, but the neutrons which were transmitted the object without interaction could reach the imaging system. The image by purely transmitted neutrons gives the quantitative information. Two honeycombs were prepared with coating of boron nitride and gadolinium oxide and evaluated for the quantitative application. The relation between the neutron total cross section and the attenuation coefficient confirmed that they were in a fairly good agreement. Application to quantitative computed tomography was also successfully conducted. The new neutron radiography method using the neutron-absorbing honeycomb collimator for the elimination of the scattered neutrons improved remarkably the quantitativeness of the neutron radiography and computed tomography. (author)

  16. Induced mutations for quantitative traits in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, B.N.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics and frequency of micro-mutations induced in quantitative traits by radiation treatment and the extent of heterozygotic effects of different recessive chlorophyll-mutant-genes on quantitative trait has been presented. Mutagenic treatments increased the variance for quantitative traits in all cases although the magnitude of increase varied depending on the treatment and the selection procedure adopted. The overall superiority of the chlorophyll-mutant heterozygotes over the corresponding wild homozygotes, as noted in consecutive two seasons, was not observed when these were grown at a high level of nitrogen fertiliser. (author)

  17. Quantitative determination of uranium by SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.; Harvan, D.; Galanda, D.; Matel, L.; Aranyosiova, M.; Velic, D.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents results of quantitative measurements of uranium-238 by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with using alpha spectrometry as well as complementary technique. Samples with specific activity of uranium-238 were prepared by electrodeposition from aqueous solution of UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ·6H 2 O. We tried to apply SIMS to quantitative analysis and search for correlation between intensity obtained from SIMS and activity of uranium-238 in dependence on the surface's weight and possibility of using SIMS in quantitative analysis of environmental samples. The obtained results and correlations as well as results of two real samples measurements are presented in this paper. (authors)

  18. Quantitative traits in wheat (Triticum aestivum L

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MSS

    2012-11-13

    Nov 13, 2012 ... Of the quantitative traits in wheat, spike length, number of spikes per m2, grain mass per spike, number ... design with four liming variants along with three replications, in which the experimental field .... The sampling was done.

  19. Quantitative Fundus Autofluorescence in Recessive Stargardt Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Tomas R.; Duncker, Tobias; Woods, Russell L.; Greenberg, Jonathan P.; Zernant, Jana; Tsang, Stephen H.; Smith, R. Theodore; Allikmets, Rando; Sparrow, Janet R.; Delori, François C.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative fundus autofluorescence (qAF) is significantly increased in Stargardt disease, consistent with previous reports of increased RPE lipofuscin. QAF will help to establish genotype-phenotype correlations and may serve as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  20. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment Tutorial - Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document provides a Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) primer that organizes QMRA tutorials. The tutorials describe functionality of a QMRA infrastructure, guide the user through software use and assessment options, provide step-by-step instructions for implementi...

  1. Optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baoshan; Lei, Cheng; Wu, Yi; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Ito, Takuro; Yalikun, Yaxiaer; Lee, Sangwook; Isozaki, Akihiro; Li, Ming; Jiang, Yiyue; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Di Carlo, Dino; Tanaka, Yo; Yatomi, Yutaka; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2018-03-01

    Innovations in optical microscopy have opened new windows onto scientific research, industrial quality control, and medical practice over the last few decades. One of such innovations is optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy - an emerging method for high-throughput quantitative phase imaging that builds on the interference between temporally stretched signal and reference pulses by using dispersive properties of light in both spatial and temporal domains in an interferometric configuration on a microfluidic platform. It achieves the continuous acquisition of both intensity and phase images with a high throughput of more than 10,000 particles or cells per second by overcoming speed limitations that exist in conventional quantitative phase imaging methods. Applications enabled by such capabilities are versatile and include characterization of cancer cells and microalgal cultures. In this paper, we review the principles and applications of optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy and discuss its future perspective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Quantitative Technique for Beginning Microscopists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Marshall D.

    1984-01-01

    Stereology is the study of three-dimensional objects through the interpretation of two-dimensional images. Stereological techniques used in introductory botany to quantitatively examine changes in leaf anatomy in response to different environments are discussed. (JN)

  3. Understanding Pre-Quantitative Risk in Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2011-01-01

    Standard approaches to risk management in projects depend on the ability of teams to identify risks and quantify the probabilities and consequences of these risks (e.g., the 5 x 5 risk matrix). However, long before quantification does - or even can - occur, and long after, teams make decisions based on their pre-quantitative understanding of risk. These decisions can have long-lasting impacts on the project. While significant research has looked at the process of how to quantify risk, our understanding of how teams conceive of and manage pre-quantitative risk is lacking. This paper introduces the concept of pre-quantitative risk and discusses the implications of addressing pre-quantitative risk in projects.

  4. Quantitative data extraction from transmission electron micrographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprague, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The discussion will cover an overview of quantitative TEM, the digital image analysis process, coherent optical processing, and finally a summary of the author's views on potentially useful advances in TEM image processing

  5. Quantitative Ability as Correlates of Students' Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    The introduction of quantitative topics into the secondary school economics curriculum has ... since the quality of education at any level is highly dependent on the quality and dedication of ..... Ibadan: Constellations Books 466-481. Anderson ...

  6. Laboratory technique for quantitative thermal emissivity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Emission of radiation from a sample occurs due to thermal vibration of its .... Quantitative thermal emissivity measurements of geological samples. 393. Figure 1. ...... tral mixture modeling: A new analysis of rock and soil types at the Viking ...

  7. A Quantitative Gas Chromatographic Ethanol Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a gas chromatographic experiment for the quantitative determination of volume percent ethanol in water ethanol solutions. Background information, procedures, and typical results are included. Accuracy and precision of results are both on the order of two percent. (JN)

  8. Qualitative vs. quantitative atopic dermatitis criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, R M; Thyssen, J P; Maibach, H I

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes historical aspects, clinical expression and pathophysiology leading to coining of the terms atopy and atopic dermatitis, current diagnostic criteria and further explore the possibility of developing quantitative diagnostic criteria of atopic dermatitis (AD) based on the imp...

  9. Strategies for quantitation of phosphoproteomic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmisano, Giuseppe; Thingholm, Tine Engberg

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in phosphoproteomic sample-preparation techniques and sensitive mass spectrometry instrumentation have led to large-scale identifications of phosphoproteins and phosphorylation sites from highly complex samples. This has facilitated the implementation of different quantitation...

  10. Quantitative Methods to Evaluate Timetable Attractiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schittenhelm, Bernd; Landex, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The article describes how the attractiveness of timetables can be evaluated quantitatively to ensure a consistent evaluation of timetables. Since the different key stakeholders (infrastructure manager, train operating company, customers, and society) have different opinions on what an attractive...

  11. Instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes goals and accomplishments of the research program entitled Instrumentation and Quantitative Methods of Evaluation, during the period January 15, 1989 through July 15, 1991. This program is very closely integrated with the radiopharmaceutical program entitled Quantitative Studies in Radiopharmaceutical Science. Together, they constitute the PROGRAM OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND QUANTITATIVE IMAGING RESEARCH within The Franklin McLean Memorial Research Institute (FMI). The program addresses problems involving the basic science and technology that underlie the physical and conceptual tools of radiotracer methodology as they relate to the measurement of structural and functional parameters of physiologic importance in health and disease. The principal tool is quantitative radionuclide imaging. The objective of this program is to further the development and transfer of radiotracer methodology from basic theory to routine clinical practice. The focus of the research is on the development of new instruments and radiopharmaceuticals, and the evaluation of these through the phase of clinical feasibility. 234 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Quantitative approaches in climate change ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Christopher J.; Schoeman, David S.; Sydeman, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary impacts of anthropogenic climate change on ecosystems are increasingly being recognized. Documenting the extent of these impacts requires quantitative tools for analyses of ecological observations to distinguish climate impacts in noisy data and to understand interactions between...... climate variability and other drivers of change. To assist the development of reliable statistical approaches, we review the marine climate change literature and provide suggestions for quantitative approaches in climate change ecology. We compiled 267 peer‐reviewed articles that examined relationships...

  13. Development of quantitative x-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deckman, H.W.; Dunsmuir, J.A.; D'Amico, K.L.; Ferguson, S.R.; Flannery, B.P.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have developed several x-ray microtomography systems which function as quantitative three dimensional x-ray microscopes. In this paper the authors describe the evolutionary path followed from making the first high resolution experimental microscopes to later generations which can be routinely used for investigating materials. Developing the instrumentation for reliable quantitative x-ray microscopy using synchrotron and laboratory based x-ray sources has led to other imaging modalities for obtaining temporal and spatial two dimensional information

  14. Quantitative analysis of boron by neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayuelken, A.; Boeck, H.; Schachner, H.; Buchberger, T.

    1990-01-01

    The quantitative determination of boron in ores is a long process with chemical analysis techniques. As nuclear techniques like X-ray fluorescence and activation analysis are not applicable for boron, only the neutron radiography technique, using the high neutron absorption cross section of this element, can be applied for quantitative determinations. This paper describes preliminary tests and calibration experiments carried out at a 250 kW TRIGA reactor. (orig.) [de

  15. Quantitative autoradiography of semiconductor base material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treutler, H.C.; Freyer, K.

    1983-01-01

    Autoradiographic methods for the quantitative determination of elements interesting in semiconductor technology and their distribution in silicon are described. Whereas the local concentration and distribution of phosphorus has been determined with the aid of silver halide films the neutron-induced autoradiography has been applied in the case of boron. Silicon disks containing diffused phosphorus or implanted or diffused boron have been used as standard samples. Different possibilities of the quantitative evaluation of autoradiograms are considered and compared

  16. Quantitative methods in psychology: inevitable and useless

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaro Toomela

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Science begins with the question, what do I want to know? Science becomes science, however, only when this question is justified and the appropriate methodology is chosen for answering the research question. Research question should precede the other questions; methods should be chosen according to the research question and not vice versa. Modern quantitative psychology has accepted method as primary; research questions are adjusted to the methods. For understanding thinking in modern quantitative psychology, two epistemologies should be distinguished: structural-systemic that is based on Aristotelian thinking, and associative-quantitative that is based on Cartesian-Humean thinking. The first aims at understanding the structure that underlies the studied processes; the second looks for identification of cause-effect relationships between the events with no possible access to the understanding of the structures that underlie the processes. Quantitative methodology in particular as well as mathematical psychology in general, is useless for answering questions about structures and processes that underlie observed behaviors. Nevertheless, quantitative science is almost inevitable in a situation where the systemic-structural basis of behavior is not well understood; all sorts of applied decisions can be made on the basis of quantitative studies. In order to proceed, psychology should study structures; methodologically, constructive experiments should be added to observations and analytic experiments.

  17. Radiological interpretation 2020: Toward quantitative image assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, John M.

    2007-01-01

    The interpretation of medical images by radiologists is primarily and fundamentally a subjective activity, but there are a number of clinical applications such as tumor imaging where quantitative imaging (QI) metrics (such as tumor growth rate) would be valuable to the patient’s care. It is predicted that the subjective interpretive environment of the past will, over the next decade, evolve toward the increased use of quantitative metrics for evaluating patient health from images. The increasing sophistication and resolution of modern tomographic scanners promote the development of meaningful quantitative end points, determined from images which are in turn produced using well-controlled imaging protocols. For the QI environment to expand, medical physicists, physicians, other researchers and equipment vendors need to work collaboratively to develop the quantitative protocols for imaging, scanner calibrations, and robust analytical software that will lead to the routine inclusion of quantitative parameters in the diagnosis and therapeutic assessment of human health. Most importantly, quantitative metrics need to be developed which have genuine impact on patient diagnosis and welfare, and only then will QI techniques become integrated into the clinical environment.

  18. Qualitative versus quantitative methods in psychiatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafsha, Mahdi; Behforuzi, Hura; Azari, Hassan; Zhang, Zhiqun; Wang, Kevin K; Kobeissy, Firas H; Gold, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative studies are gaining their credibility after a period of being misinterpreted as "not being quantitative." Qualitative method is a broad umbrella term for research methodologies that describe and explain individuals' experiences, behaviors, interactions, and social contexts. In-depth interview, focus groups, and participant observation are among the qualitative methods of inquiry commonly used in psychiatry. Researchers measure the frequency of occurring events using quantitative methods; however, qualitative methods provide a broader understanding and a more thorough reasoning behind the event. Hence, it is considered to be of special importance in psychiatry. Besides hypothesis generation in earlier phases of the research, qualitative methods can be employed in questionnaire design, diagnostic criteria establishment, feasibility studies, as well as studies of attitude and beliefs. Animal models are another area that qualitative methods can be employed, especially when naturalistic observation of animal behavior is important. However, since qualitative results can be researcher's own view, they need to be statistically confirmed, quantitative methods. The tendency to combine both qualitative and quantitative methods as complementary methods has emerged over recent years. By applying both methods of research, scientists can take advantage of interpretative characteristics of qualitative methods as well as experimental dimensions of quantitative methods.

  19. Quantitative Appearance Inspection for Film Coated Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Kazunari; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    The decision criteria for the physical appearance of pharmaceutical products are subjective and qualitative means of evaluation that are based entirely on human interpretation. In this study, we have developed a comprehensive method for the quantitative analysis of the physical appearance of film coated tablets. Three different kinds of film coated tablets with considerable differences in their physical appearances were manufactured as models, and their surface roughness, contact angle, color measurements and physicochemical properties were investigated as potential characteristics for the quantitative analysis of their physical appearance. All of these characteristics were useful for the quantitative evaluation of the physical appearances of the tablets, and could potentially be used to establish decision criteria to assess the quality of tablets. In particular, the analysis of the surface roughness and film coating properties of the tablets by terahertz spectroscopy allowed for an effective evaluation of the tablets' properties. These results indicated the possibility of inspecting the appearance of tablets during the film coating process.

  20. Quantitative Modeling of Earth Surface Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jon D.

    This textbook describes some of the most effective and straightforward quantitative techniques for modeling Earth surface processes. By emphasizing a core set of equations and solution techniques, the book presents state-of-the-art models currently employed in Earth surface process research, as well as a set of simple but practical research tools. Detailed case studies demonstrate application of the methods to a wide variety of processes including hillslope, fluvial, aeolian, glacial, tectonic, and climatic systems. Exercises at the end of each chapter begin with simple calculations and then progress to more sophisticated problems that require computer programming. All the necessary computer codes are available online at www.cambridge.org/9780521855976. Assuming some knowledge of calculus and basic programming experience, this quantitative textbook is designed for advanced geomorphology courses and as a reference book for professional researchers in Earth and planetary science looking for a quantitative approach to Earth surface processes. More details...

  1. The rise of quantitative methods in Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Cousineau

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative methods have a long history in some scientific fields. Indeed, no one today would consider a qualitative data set in physics or a qualitative theory in chemistry. Quantitative methods are so central in these fields that they are often labelled “hard sciences”. Here, we examine the question whether psychology is ready to enter the “hard science club” like biology did in the forties. The facts that a over half of the statistical techniques used in psychology are less than 40 years old and that b the number of simulations in empirical papers has followed an exponential growth since the eighties, both suggests that the answer is yes. The purpose of Tutorials in Quantitative Methods for Psychology is to provide a concise and easy access to the currents methods.

  2. Infusion of Quantitative and Statistical Concepts into Biology Courses Does Not Improve Quantitative Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christopher W.

    2018-01-01

    Multiple national reports have pushed for the integration of quantitative concepts into the context of disciplinary science courses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quantitative and statistical literacy of biology students and explore learning gains when those skills were taught implicitly in the context of biology. I examined gains in…

  3. Affinity for Quantitative Tools: Undergraduate Marketing Students Moving beyond Quantitative Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasi, Crina O.; Wilson, J. Holton; Puri, Cheenu; Divine, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Marketing students are known as less likely to have an affinity for the quantitative aspects of the marketing discipline. In this article, we study the reasons why this might be true and develop a parsimonious 20-item scale for measuring quantitative affinity in undergraduate marketing students. The scale was administered to a sample of business…

  4. Quantitative whole body scintigraphy - a simplified approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marienhagen, J.; Maenner, P.; Bock, E.; Schoenberger, J.; Eilles, C.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we present investigations on a simplified method of quantitative whole body scintigraphy by using a dual head LFOV-gamma camera and a calibration algorithm without the need of additional attenuation or scatter correction. Validation of this approach to the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in patient studies showed a high accuracy concerning quantification of whole body activity (102.8% and 97.72%, resp.), by contrast organ activities were recovered with an error range up to 12%. The described method can be easily performed using commercially available software packages and is recommendable especially for quantitative whole body scintigraphy in a clinical setting. (orig.) [de

  5. Aspects of quantitative secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1982-05-01

    Parameters which have an influence on the formation of secondary ions by ion bombardment of a solid matrix are discussed. Quantitative SIMS-analysis with the help of calibration standards necessitates a stringent control of these parameters. This is particularly valid for the oxygen partial pressure which for metal analysis has to be maintained constant also under ultra high vacuum. The performance of the theoretical LTE-model (Local Thermal Equilibrium) using internal standards will be compared with the analysis with the help of external standards. The LTE-model does not satisfy the requirements for quantitative analysis. (Auth.)

  6. Accuracy of quantitative visual soil assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Maricke; Heuvelink, Gerard; Stoorvogel, Jetse; Wallinga, Jakob; de Boer, Imke; van Dam, Jos; van Essen, Everhard; Moolenaar, Simon; Verhoeven, Frank; Stoof, Cathelijne

    2016-04-01

    Visual soil assessment (VSA) is a method to assess soil quality visually, when standing in the field. VSA is increasingly used by farmers, farm organisations and companies, because it is rapid and cost-effective, and because looking at soil provides understanding about soil functioning. Often VSA is regarded as subjective, so there is a need to verify VSA. Also, many VSAs have not been fine-tuned for contrasting soil types. This could lead to wrong interpretation of soil quality and soil functioning when contrasting sites are compared to each other. We wanted to assess accuracy of VSA, while taking into account soil type. The first objective was to test whether quantitative visual field observations, which form the basis in many VSAs, could be validated with standardized field or laboratory measurements. The second objective was to assess whether quantitative visual field observations are reproducible, when used by observers with contrasting backgrounds. For the validation study, we made quantitative visual observations at 26 cattle farms. Farms were located at sand, clay and peat soils in the North Friesian Woodlands, the Netherlands. Quantitative visual observations evaluated were grass cover, number of biopores, number of roots, soil colour, soil structure, number of earthworms, number of gley mottles and soil compaction. Linear regression analysis showed that four out of eight quantitative visual observations could be well validated with standardized field or laboratory measurements. The following quantitative visual observations correlated well with standardized field or laboratory measurements: grass cover with classified images of surface cover; number of roots with root dry weight; amount of large structure elements with mean weight diameter; and soil colour with soil organic matter content. Correlation coefficients were greater than 0.3, from which half of the correlations were significant. For the reproducibility study, a group of 9 soil scientists and 7

  7. Review of progress in quantitative nondestructive evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.O.; Chimenti, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the current state of quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE), this volume brings together papers by researchers working in government, private industry, and university laboratories. Their papers cover a wide range of interests and concerns for researchers involved in theoretical and applied aspects of quantitative NDE. Specific topics examined include reliability probability of detection--ultrasonics and eddy currents weldments closure effects in fatigue cracks technology transfer ultrasonic scattering theory acoustic emission ultrasonic scattering, reliability and penetrating radiation metal matrix composites ultrasonic scattering from near-surface flaws ultrasonic multiple scattering

  8. Strategies for MCMC computation in quantitative genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus; Ibanez, Noelia; Sorensen, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Given observations of a trait and a pedigree for a group of animals, the basic model in quantitative genetics is a linear mixed model with genetic random effects. The correlation matrix of the genetic random effects is determined by the pedigree and is typically very highdimensional but with a sp......Given observations of a trait and a pedigree for a group of animals, the basic model in quantitative genetics is a linear mixed model with genetic random effects. The correlation matrix of the genetic random effects is determined by the pedigree and is typically very highdimensional...

  9. Quantitative phase analysis in industrial research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Monshi

    1996-01-01

    X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) is the only technique able to identify phase and all the other analytical techniques give information about the elements. Quantitative phase analysis of minerals and industrial products is logically the next step after a qualitative examination and is of great importance in industrial research. Since the application of XRD in industry, early in this century, workers were trying to develop quantitative XRD methods. In this paper some of the important methods are briefly discussed and partly compared. These methods are Internal Standard, Known Additions, Double Dilution, External Standard, Direct Comparison, Diffraction Absorption and Ratio of Slopes

  10. Electric Field Quantitative Measurement System and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and system are provided for making a quantitative measurement of an electric field. A plurality of antennas separated from one another by known distances are arrayed in a region that extends in at least one dimension. A voltage difference between at least one selected pair of antennas is measured. Each voltage difference is divided by the known distance associated with the selected pair of antennas corresponding thereto to generate a resulting quantity. The plurality of resulting quantities defined over the region quantitatively describe an electric field therein.

  11. Quantitative Mapping of Large Area Graphene Conductance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present quantitative mapping of large area graphene conductance by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and micro four point probe. We observe a clear correlation between the techniques and identify the observed systematic differences to be directly related to imperfections of the graphene sheet...

  12. The Sampling Issues in Quantitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delice, Ali

    2010-01-01

    A concern for generalization dominates quantitative research. For generalizability and repeatability, identification of sample size is essential. The present study investigates 90 qualitative master's theses submitted for the Primary and Secondary School Science and Mathematics Education Departments, Mathematic Education Discipline in 10…

  13. Critical Race Quantitative Intersections: A "testimonio" Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias, Alejandro; Nava, Pedro E.; Lara, Argelia; Burciaga, Rebeca; Vélez, Verónica N.; Solorzano, Daniel G.

    2018-01-01

    The educational pipeline has become a commonly referenced depiction of educational outcomes for racialized groups across the country. While visually impactful, an overreliance on decontextualized quantitative data often leads to majoritarian interpretations. Without sociohistorical contexts, these interpretations run the risk of perpetuating…

  14. SCRY: Enabling quantitative reasoning in SPARQL queries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meroño-Peñuela, A.; Stringer, Bas; Loizou, Antonis; Abeln, Sanne; Heringa, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    The inability to include quantitative reasoning in SPARQL queries slows down the application of Semantic Web technology in the life sciences. SCRY, our SPARQL compatible service layer, improves this by executing services at query time and making their outputs query-accessible, generating RDF data on

  15. Quantitative sample preparation of some heavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffey, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    A discussion is given of some techniques that have been useful in quantitatively preparing and analyzing samples used in the half-life determinations of some plutonium and uranium isotopes. Application of these methods to the preparation of uranium and plutonium samples used in neutron experiments is discussed

  16. Strategies for MCMC computation in quantitative genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus; Ibánez, N.; Sorensen, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Given observations of a trait and a pedigree for a group of animals, the basic model in quantitative genetics is a linear mixed model with genetic random effects. The correlation matrix of the genetic random effects is determined by the pedigree and is typically very highdimensional but with a sp...

  17. Proteomic approaches for quantitative cancer cell signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voellmy, Franziska

    studies in an effort to contribute to the study of signaling dynamics in cancer systems. This thesis is divided into two parts. Part I begins with a brief introduction in the use of omics in systems cancer research with a focus on mass spectrometry as a means to quantitatively measure protein...

  18. Quantitative analyses of shrinkage characteristics of neem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantitative analyses of shrinkage characteristics of neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss.) wood were carried out. Forty five wood specimens were prepared from the three ecological zones of north eastern Nigeria, viz: sahel savanna, sudan savanna and guinea savanna for the research. The results indicated that the wood ...

  19. Quantitative multiplex detection of pathogen biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Harshini; Xie, Hongzhi; Swanson, Basil I.; Martinez, Jennifer; Grace, Wynne K.

    2016-02-09

    The present invention addresses the simultaneous detection and quantitative measurement of multiple biomolecules, e.g., pathogen biomarkers through either a sandwich assay approach or a lipid insertion approach. The invention can further employ a multichannel, structure with multi-sensor elements per channel.

  20. Quantitative angiography after directional coronary atherectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); V.A.W.M. Umans (Victor); B.H. Strauss (Bradley); R-J. van Suylen (Robert-Jan); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); H. Suryapranata (Harry); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); J.R.T.C. Roelandt (Jos)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To assess by quantitative analysis the immediate angiographic results of directional coronary atherectomy. To compare the effects of successful atherectomy with those of successful balloon dilatation in a series of patients with matched lesions. DESIGN--Case series.

  1. Deforestation since independence: A quantitative assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deforestation since independence: A quantitative assessment of four decades of land-cover change in Malawi. ... pressure and demographic factors are important predictors of deforestation rate within our study area. Keywords: afforestation, Africa, deforestation, drivers, land-use change, reforestation, rural, urban ...

  2. Quantitative SPECT reconstruction of iodine-123 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilland, D.R.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Many clinical and research studies in nuclear medicine require quantitation of iodine-123 ( 123 I) distribution for the determination of kinetics or localization. The objective of this study was to implement several reconstruction methods designed for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using 123 I and to evaluate their performance in terms of quantitative accuracy, image artifacts, and noise. The methods consisted of four attenuation and scatter compensation schemes incorporated into both the filtered backprojection/Chang (FBP) and maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) reconstruction algorithms. The methods were evaluated on data acquired of a phantom containing a hot sphere of 123 I activity in a lower level background 123 I distribution and nonuniform density media. For both reconstruction algorithms, nonuniform attenuation compensation combined with either scatter subtraction or Metz filtering produced images that were quantitatively accurate to within 15% of the true value. The ML-EM algorithm demonstrated quantitative accuracy comparable to FBP and smaller relative noise magnitude for all compensation schemes

  3. Values in Qualitative and Quantitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Maureen; Chenail, Ronald J.

    2008-01-01

    The authors identify the philosophical underpinnings and value-ladenness of major research paradigms. They argue that useful and meaningful research findings for counseling can be generated from both qualitative and quantitative research methodologies, provided that the researcher has an appreciation of the importance of philosophical coherence in…

  4. 78 FR 52166 - Quantitative Messaging Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION Quantitative Messaging Research AGENCY: Commodity Futures... survey will follow qualitative message testing research (for which CFTC received fast-track OMB approval... message testing research (for which CFTC received fast-track OMB approval) and is necessary to identify...

  5. Quantitative grading of store separation trajectories

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jamison, Kevin A

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available . This paper describes the development of an automated analysis process and software that can run a multitude of separation scenarios. A key enabler for this software is the development of a quantitative grading algorithm that scores the outcome of each release...

  6. Subjective Quantitative Studies of Human Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkire, Sabina

    2005-01-01

    Amartya Sen's writings have articulated the importance of human agency, and identified the need for information on agency freedom to inform our evaluation of social arrangements. Many approaches to poverty reduction stress the need for empowerment. This paper reviews "subjective quantitative measures of human agency at the individual level." It…

  7. Quantitative system validation in model driven design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermanns, Hilger; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Raskin, Jean-Francois

    2010-01-01

    The European STREP project Quasimodo1 develops theory, techniques and tool components for handling quantitative constraints in model-driven development of real-time embedded systems, covering in particular real-time, hybrid and stochastic aspects. This tutorial highlights the advances made, focus...

  8. Quantitative X-ray analysis of pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, M. Marrocos de

    1987-01-01

    The 'matrix-flushing' and the 'adiabatic principle' methods have been applied for the quantitative analysis through X-ray diffraction patterns of pigments and extenders mixtures, frequently used in paint industry. The results obtained have shown the usefulness of these methods, but still ask for improving their accuracy. (Author) [pt

  9. Quantitative Models and Analysis for Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Claus

    phones and websites. Acknowledging that now more than ever, systems come in contact with the physical world, we need to revise the way we construct models and verification algorithms, to take into account the behavior of systems in the presence of approximate, or quantitative information, provided...

  10. Quantitative multiplex detection of pathogen biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, Harshini; Xie, Hongzhi; Swanson, Basil I; Martinez, Jennifer; Grace, Wynne K

    2014-10-14

    The present invention addresses the simultaneous detection and quantitative measurement of multiple biomolecules, e.g., pathogen biomarkers through either a sandwich assay approach or a lipid insertion approach. The invention can further employ a multichannel, structure with multi-sensor elements per channel.

  11. A quantitative lubricant test for deep drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam; Bay, Niels; Andreasen, Jan L.

    2010-01-01

    A tribological test for deep drawing has been developed by which the performance of lubricants may be evaluated quantitatively measuring the maximum backstroke force on the punch owing to friction between tool and workpiece surface. The forming force is found not to give useful information...

  12. Reactor applications of quantitative diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feguson, I.F.

    1976-09-01

    Current work in quantitative diffraction analysis was presented under the main headings of: thermal systems, fast reactor systems, SGHWR applications and irradiation damage. Preliminary results are included on a comparison of various new instrumental methods of boron analysis as well as preliminary new results on Zircaloy corrosion, and materials transfer in liquid sodium. (author)

  13. Quantitative muscle ultrasonography in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, I.M.P.; Rooij, F.G. van; Overeem, S.; Pillen, S.; Janssen, H.M.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether quantitative muscle ultrasonography can detect structural muscle changes in early-stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Bilateral transverse scans were made of five muscles or muscle groups (sternocleidomastoid, biceps brachii/brachialis, forearm flexor group,

  14. Quantitative penetration testing with item response theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, W.; Arnold, F.; Stoelinga, M.I.A.

    2013-01-01

    Existing penetration testing approaches assess the vulnerability of a system by determining whether certain attack paths are possible in practice. Therefore, penetration testing has thus far been used as a qualitative research method. To enable quantitative approaches to security risk management,

  15. QUANTITATIVE EXTRACTION OF MEIOFAUNA: A COMPARISON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and A G DE WET. Department of Mathematical Statistics, University of Port Elizabeth. Accepted: May 1978. ABSTRACT. Two methods for the quantitative extraction of meiofauna from natural sandy sediments were investigated and compared: Cobb's decanting and sieving technique and the Oostenbrink elutriator. Both.

  16. Development of Three Methods for Simultaneous Quantitative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of Three Methods for Simultaneous Quantitative Determination of Chlorpheniramine Maleate and Dexamethasone in the Presence of Parabens in ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Results: All the proposed methods were successfully applied to the analysis of raw materials and dosage form.

  17. Automated approach to quantitative error analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bareiss, E.H.

    1977-04-01

    A method is described how a quantitative measure for the robustness of a given neutron transport theory code for coarse network calculations can be obtained. A code that performs this task automatically and at only nominal cost is described. This code also generates user-oriented benchmark problems which exhibit the analytic behavior at interfaces. 5 figures, 1 table

  18. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  19. Quantitative image analysis of synovial tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hall, Pascal O.; Kraan, Maarten C.; Tak, Paul Peter

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative image analysis is a form of imaging that includes microscopic histological quantification, video microscopy, image analysis, and image processing. Hallmarks are the generation of reliable, reproducible, and efficient measurements via strict calibration and step-by-step control of the

  20. Quantitative blood flow analysis with digital techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, G.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of digital techniques in quantitating absolute blood flow during arteriography are described. Results are presented for a phantom constructed to correlate digitally calculated absolute flow with direct flow measurements. The clinical use of digital techniques in cerebrovascular angiography is briefly described. (U.K.)

  1. Uncertainties in elemental quantitative analysis by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montenegro, E.C.; Baptista, G.B.; Paschoa, A.S.; Barros Leite, C.V.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of the degree of non-uniformity of the particle beam, matrix composition and matrix thickness in a quantitative elemental analysis by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) are discussed and a criterion to evaluate the resulting degree of uncertainty in the mass determination by this method is established. (Auth.)

  2. Quantitative and Qualitative Extensions of Event Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katoen, Joost P.

    1996-01-01

    An important application of formal methods is the specification, design, and analysis of functional aspects of (distributed) systems. Recently the study of quantitative aspects of such systems based on formal methods has come into focus. Several extensions of formal methods where the occurrence of

  3. Quantitative Evidence Synthesis with Power Priors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/322847796

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to provide the applied researcher with a practical approach for quantitative evidence synthesis using the conditional power prior that allows for subjective input and thereby provides an alternative tgbgo deal with the difficulties as- sociated with the joint power prior

  4. Quantitative Penetration Testing with Item Response Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, Florian; Pieters, Wolter; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette

    2014-01-01

    Existing penetration testing approaches assess the vulnerability of a system by determining whether certain attack paths are possible in practice. Thus, penetration testing has so far been used as a qualitative research method. To enable quantitative approaches to security risk management, including

  5. Quantitative penetration testing with item response theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, Florian; Pieters, Wolter; Stoelinga, Mariëlle

    2013-01-01

    Existing penetration testing approaches assess the vulnerability of a system by determining whether certain attack paths are possible in practice. Thus, penetration testing has so far been used as a qualitative research method. To enable quantitative approaches to security risk management, including

  6. Engaging Business Students in Quantitative Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Anthony; Carroll, Paula

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the complex problems of developing quantitative and analytical skills in undergraduate first year, first semester business students are addressed. An action research project, detailing how first year business students perceive the relevance of data analysis and inferential statistics in light of the economic downturn and the…

  7. Leaderless Covert Networks : A Quantitative Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husslage, B.G.M.; Lindelauf, R.; Hamers, H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Lindelauf et al. (2009a) introduced a quantitative approach to investigate optimal structures of covert networks. This approach used an objective function which is based on the secrecy versus information trade-off these organizations face. Sageman (2008) hypothesized that covert networks

  8. Quantitative MRI of kidneys in renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Timothy L; Edwards, Marie E; Garg, Ishan; Irazabal, Maria V; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Harris, Peter C; King, Bernard F; Torres, Vicente E; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K; Erickson, Bradley J

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility and utility of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for the assessment of kidneys in young adults with normal renal function (eGFR ranged from 90 to 130 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ) and patients with early renal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). This prospective case-control study was performed on ten normal young adults (18-30 years old) and ten age- and sex-matched patients with early renal parenchymal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). All subjects underwent a comprehensive kidney MRI protocol, including qualitative imaging: T1w, T2w, FIESTA, and quantitative imaging: 2D cine phase contrast of the renal arteries, and parenchymal diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging, and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). The normal controls were imaged on two separate occasions ≥24 h apart (range 24-210 h) to assess reproducibility of the measurements. Quantitative MR imaging sequences were found to be reproducible. The mean ± SD absolute percent difference between quantitative parameters measured ≥24 h apart were: MTI-derived ratio = 4.5 ± 3.6%, DWI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) = 6.5 ± 3.4%, BOLD-derived R2* = 7.4 ± 5.9%, and MRE-derived tissue stiffness = 7.6 ± 3.3%. Compared with controls, the ADPKD patient's non-cystic renal parenchyma (NCRP) had statistically significant differences with regard to quantitative parenchymal measures: lower MTI percent ratios (16.3 ± 4.4 vs. 23.8 ± 1.2, p quantitative measurements was obtained in all cases. Significantly different quantitative MR parenchymal measurement parameters between ADPKD patients and normal controls were obtained by MT, DWI, BOLD, and MRE indicating the potential for detecting and following renal disease at an earlier stage than the conventional qualitative imaging techniques.

  9. Quantitative Reasoning in Environmental Science: A Learning Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Robert Lee; Forrester, Jennifer Harris; Christus, Jennifer Schuttlefield; Peterson, Franziska Isabel; Bonilla, Rachel; Yestness, Nissa

    2014-01-01

    The ability of middle and high school students to reason quantitatively within the context of environmental science was investigated. A quantitative reasoning (QR) learning progression was created with three progress variables: quantification act, quantitative interpretation, and quantitative modeling. An iterative research design was used as it…

  10. Bringing quality and meaning to quantitative data - Bringing quantitative evidence to qualitative observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpatschof, Benny

    2007-01-01

    Based on the author's methodological theory defining the distinctive properties of quantitative and qualitative method the article demonstrates the possibilities and advantages of combining the two types of investigation in the same research project. The project being an effect study...

  11. Portable smartphone based quantitative phase microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xin; Tian, Xiaolin; Yu, Wei; Kong, Yan; Jiang, Zhilong; Liu, Fei; Xue, Liang; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Shouyu

    2018-01-01

    To realize portable device with high contrast imaging capability, we designed a quantitative phase microscope using transport of intensity equation method based on a smartphone. The whole system employs an objective and an eyepiece as imaging system and a cost-effective LED as illumination source. A 3-D printed cradle is used to align these components. Images of different focal planes are captured by manual focusing, followed by calculation of sample phase via a self-developed Android application. To validate its accuracy, we first tested the device by measuring a random phase plate with known phases, and then red blood cell smear, Pap smear, broad bean epidermis sections and monocot root were also measured to show its performance. Owing to its advantages as accuracy, high-contrast, cost-effective and portability, the portable smartphone based quantitative phase microscope is a promising tool which can be future adopted in remote healthcare and medical diagnosis.

  12. Using Local Data To Advance Quantitative Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Sweet

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we consider the application of local data as a means of advancing quantitative literacy. We illustrate the use of three different sources of local data: institutional data, Census data, and the National College Health Assessment survey. Our learning modules are applied in courses in sociology and communication, but the strategy of using local data can be integrated beyond these disciplinary boundaries. We demonstrate how these data can be used to stimulate student interests in class discussion, advance analytic skills, as well as develop capacities in written and verbal communication. We conclude by considering concerns that may influence the types of local data used and the challenges of integrating these data in a course in which quantitative analysis is not typically part of the curriculum.

  13. Balance between qualitative and quantitative verification methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nidaira, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    The amount of inspection effort for verification of declared nuclear material needs to be optimized in the situation where qualitative and quantitative measures are applied. Game theory was referred to investigate the relation of detection probability and deterrence of diversion. Payoffs used in the theory were quantified for cases of conventional safeguards and integrated safeguards by using AHP, Analytical Hierarchy Process. Then, it became possible to estimate detection probability under integrated safeguards which had equivalent deterrence capability for detection probability under conventional safeguards. In addition the distribution of inspection effort for qualitative and quantitative measures was estimated. Although the AHP has some ambiguities in quantifying qualitative factors, its application to optimization in safeguards is useful to reconsider the detection probabilities under integrated safeguards. (author)

  14. Quality control in quantitative computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessen, K.A.; Joergensen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has for several years been an indispensable tool in diagnostic radiology, but it is only recently that extraction of quantitative information from CT images has been of practical clinical value. Only careful control of the scan parameters, and especially the scan geometry, allows useful information to be obtained; and it can be demonstrated by simple phantom measurements how sensitive a CT system can be to variations in size, shape and position of the phantom in the gantry aperture. Significant differences exist between systems that are not manifested in normal control of image quality and general performance tests. Therefore an actual system has to be analysed for its suitability for quantitative use of the images before critical clinical applications are justified. (author)

  15. Credit Institutions Management Evaluation using Quantitative Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Dardac

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Credit institutions supervising mission by state authorities is mostly assimilated with systemic risk prevention. In present, the mission is orientated on analyzing the risk profile of the credit institutions, the mechanism and existing systems as management tools providing to bank rules the proper instruments to avoid and control specific bank risks. Rating systems are sophisticated measurement instruments which are capable to assure the above objectives, such as success in banking risk management. The management quality is one of the most important elements from the set of variables used in the quoting process in credit operations. Evaluation of this quality is – generally speaking – fundamented on quantitative appreciations which can induce subjectivism and heterogeneity in quotation. The problem can be solved by using, complementary, quantitative technics such us DEA (Data Envelopment Analysis.

  16. Quantitative analysis of thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemoto, Nariaki; Hoer, G.; Johost, S.; Maul, F.-D.; Standke, R.

    1981-01-01

    The method of quantitative analysis of thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy using computer assisted technique was described. Calculated indices are washout factor, vitality index and redistribution factor. Washout factor is the ratio of counts at certain period of time after exercise and immediately after exercise. This value is neccessary for the evaluation of redistribution to the ischemic areas in serial imagings to correct the Tl-201 washout from the myocardium under the assumption that the washout is constant in the whole myocardium. Vitality index is the ratio between the Tl-201 uptake in the region of interest and that of the maximum. Redistribution factor is the ratio of the redistribution in the region of interest in serial imagings after exercise to that of immediately after exercise. Four examples of exercise Tl-201 myocardial scintigrams and the quantitative analyses before and after the percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty were presented. (author)

  17. Nanostructured surfaces investigated by quantitative morphological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perani, Martina; Carapezzi, Stefania; Mutta, Geeta Rani; Cavalcoli, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of different surfaces has been investigated by atomic force microscopy and quantitatively analyzed in this paper. Two different tools have been employed to this scope: the analysis of the height–height correlation function and the determination of the mean grain size, which have been combined to obtain a complete characterization of the surfaces. Different materials have been analyzed: SiO_xN_y, InGaN/GaN quantum wells and Si nanowires, grown with different techniques. Notwithstanding the presence of grain-like structures on all the samples analyzed, they present very diverse surface design, underlying that this procedure can be of general use. Our results show that the quantitative analysis of nanostructured surfaces allows us to obtain interesting information, such as grain clustering, from the comparison of the lateral correlation length and the grain size. (paper)

  18. Quantitative phosphoproteomics to characterize signaling networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2012-01-01

    for analyzing protein phosphorylation at a system-wide scale and has become the intuitive strategy for comprehensive characterization of signaling networks. Contemporary phosphoproteomics use highly optimized procedures for sample preparation, mass spectrometry and data analysis algorithms to identify......Reversible protein phosphorylation is involved in the regulation of most, if not all, major cellular processes via dynamic signal transduction pathways. During the last decade quantitative phosphoproteomics have evolved from a highly specialized area to a powerful and versatile platform...... and quantify thousands of phosphorylations, thus providing extensive overviews of the cellular signaling networks. As a result of these developments quantitative phosphoproteomics have been applied to study processes as diverse as immunology, stem cell biology and DNA damage. Here we review the developments...

  19. Quantitative risk in radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1979-01-01

    Although the overall aim of radiobiology is to understand the biological effects of radiation, it also has the implied practical purpose of developing rational measures for the control of radiation exposure in man. The emphasis in this presentation is to show that the enormous effort expended over the years to develop quantitative dose-effect relationships in biochemical and cellular systems, animals, and human beings now seems to be paying off. The pieces appear to be falling into place, and a framework is evolving to utilize these data. Specifically, quantitative risk assessments will be discussed in terms of the cellular, animal, and human data on which they are based; their use in the development of radiation protection standards; and their present and potential impact and meaning in relation to the quantity dose equivalent and its special unit, the rem

  20. Quantitative sputter profiling at surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschner, J.; Etzkorn, H.W.

    1981-01-01

    The key problem in quantitative sputter profiling, that of a sliding depth scale has been solved by combined Auger/X-ray microanalysis. By means of this technique and for the model system Ge/Si (amorphous) the following questions are treated quantitatively: shape of the sputter profiles when sputtering through an interface and origin of their asymmetry; precise location of the interface plane on the depth profile; broadening effects due to limited depth of information and their correction; origin and amount of bombardment induced broadening for different primary ions and energies; depth dependence of the broadening, and basic limits to depth resolution. Comparisons are made to recent theoretical calculations based on recoil mixing in the collision cascade and very good agreement is found

  1. Quantitative image processing in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, Lambertus; Helman, James; Ning, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The current status of digital image processing in fluid flow research is reviewed. In particular, attention is given to a comprehensive approach to the extraction of quantitative data from multivariate databases and examples of recent developments. The discussion covers numerical simulations and experiments, data processing, generation and dissemination of knowledge, traditional image processing, hybrid processing, fluid flow vector field topology, and isosurface analysis using Marching Cubes.

  2. On the quantitativeness of EDS STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugg, N.R. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kothleitner, G. [Institute for Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Centre for Electron Microscopy, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria); Shibata, N.; Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Chemical mapping using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has recently shown to be a powerful technique in analyzing the elemental identity and location of atomic columns in materials at atomic resolution. However, most applications of EDS STEM have been used only to qualitatively map whether elements are present at specific sites. Obtaining calibrated EDS STEM maps so that they are on an absolute scale is a difficult task and even if one achieves this, extracting quantitative information about the specimen – such as the number or density of atoms under the probe – adds yet another layer of complexity to the analysis due to the multiple elastic and inelastic scattering of the electron probe. Quantitative information may be obtained by comparing calibrated EDS STEM with theoretical simulations, but in this case a model of the structure must be assumed a priori. Here we first theoretically explore how exactly elastic and thermal scattering of the probe confounds the quantitative information one is able to extract about the specimen from an EDS STEM map. We then show using simulation how tilting the specimen (or incident probe) can reduce the effects of scattering and how it can provide quantitative information about the specimen. We then discuss drawbacks of this method – such as the loss of atomic resolution along the tilt direction – but follow this with a possible remedy: precession averaged EDS STEM mapping. - Highlights: • Signal obtained in EDS STEM maps (of STO) compared to non-channelling signal. • Deviation from non-channelling signal occurs in on-axis experiments. • Tilting specimen: signal close to non-channelling case but atomic resolution is lost. • Tilt-precession series: non-channelling signal and atomic-resolution features obtained. • Associated issues are discussed.

  3. Quantitative indicators of fruit and vegetable consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Dagmar Kozelová; Dana Országhová; Milan Fiľa; Zuzana Čmiková

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative research of the market is often based on surveys and questionnaires which are finding out the behavior of customers in observed areas. Before purchasing process consumers consider where they will buy fruit and vegetables, what kind to choose and in what quantity of goods. Consumers' behavior is affected by the factors as: regional gastronomic traditions, price, product appearance, aroma, place of buying, own experience and knowledge, taste preferences as well as specific heal...

  4. Development of a quantitative risk standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temme, M.I.

    1982-01-01

    IEEE Working Group SC-5.4 is developing a quantitative risk standard for LWR plant design and operation. The paper describes the Working Group's conclusions on significant issues, including the scope of the standard, the need to define the process (i.e., PRA calculation) for meeting risk criteria, the need for PRA quality requirements and the importance of distinguishing standards from goals. The paper also describes the Working Group's approach to writing this standard

  5. Quantitative possibility analysis. Present status in ESCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brion, D.

    1981-01-01

    A short review of the recent developments in quantification of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy or ESCA is presented. The basic equations are reminded. Each involved parameter (photoionisation, inelastic mean free paths, 'response function' of the instruments, intensity measurement) is separately discussed in relation with the accuracy and the precision of the method. Other topics are considered such as roughness, surface contamination, matrix effect and inhomogeneous composition. Some aspects of the quantitative ESCA analysis and AES analysis are compared [fr

  6. Quantitative imaging of bilirubin by photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Noninvasive detection of both bilirubin concentration and its distribution is important for disease diagnosis. Here we implemented photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to detect bilirubin distribution. We first demonstrate that our PAM system can measure the absorption spectra of bilirubin and blood. We also image bilirubin distributions in tissuemimicking samples, both without and with blood mixed. Our results show that PAM has the potential to quantitatively image bilirubin in vivo for clinical applications.

  7. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Contact Sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Api, Anne Marie; Belsito, Donald; Bickers, David

    2010-01-01

    Background: Contact hypersensitivity quantitative risk assessment (QRA) for fragrance ingredients is being used to establish new international standards for all fragrance ingredients that are potential skin sensitizers. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the retrospective clinical data...... as potential sensitizers. Methods: This article reviews clinical data for three fragrance ingredients cinnamic aldehyde, citral, and isoeugenol to assess the utility of the QRA approach for fragrance ingredients. Results: This assessment suggests that had the QRA approach been available at the time standards...

  8. Quantitative Method of Measuring Metastatic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated uroldnase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  9. Quantitative maps of groundwater resources in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, A M; Bonsor, H C; Dochartaigh, B É Ó; Taylor, R G

    2012-01-01

    In Africa, groundwater is the major source of drinking water and its use for irrigation is forecast to increase substantially to combat growing food insecurity. Despite this, there is little quantitative information on groundwater resources in Africa, and groundwater storage is consequently omitted from assessments of freshwater availability. Here we present the first quantitative continent-wide maps of aquifer storage and potential borehole yields in Africa based on an extensive review of available maps, publications and data. We estimate total groundwater storage in Africa to be 0.66 million km 3 (0.36–1.75 million km 3 ). Not all of this groundwater storage is available for abstraction, but the estimated volume is more than 100 times estimates of annual renewable freshwater resources on Africa. Groundwater resources are unevenly distributed: the largest groundwater volumes are found in the large sedimentary aquifers in the North African countries Libya, Algeria, Egypt and Sudan. Nevertheless, for many African countries appropriately sited and constructed boreholes can support handpump abstraction (yields of 0.1–0.3 l s −1 ), and contain sufficient storage to sustain abstraction through inter-annual variations in recharge. The maps show further that the potential for higher yielding boreholes ( > 5 l s −1 ) is much more limited. Therefore, strategies for increasing irrigation or supplying water to rapidly urbanizing cities that are predicated on the widespread drilling of high yielding boreholes are likely to be unsuccessful. As groundwater is the largest and most widely distributed store of freshwater in Africa, the quantitative maps are intended to lead to more realistic assessments of water security and water stress, and to promote a more quantitative approach to mapping of groundwater resources at national and regional level. (letter)

  10. Review of progress in quantitative NDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This booklet is composed of abstracts from papers submitted at a meeting on quantitative NDE. A multitude of topics are discussed including analysis of composite materials, NMR uses, x-ray instruments and techniques, manufacturing uses, neural networks, eddy currents, stress measurements, magnetic materials, adhesive bonds, signal processing, NDE of mechanical structures, tomography,defect sizing, NDE of plastics and ceramics, new techniques, optical and electromagnetic techniques, and nonlinear techniques

  11. Radioimmunoassay to quantitatively measure cell surface immunoglobulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishman, E.C.; Jewell, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay techniques developed to quantitatively measure the presence of immunoglobulins on the surface of cells, is described. The amount of immunoglobulins found on different tumor cells varied from 200 to 1140 ng/10 6 cells. Determination of immunoglobulins on the peripheral lymphocytes obtained from different cancer patients varied between 340 to 1040 ng/10 6 cells. Cultured tumor cells, on the other hand, were found to contain negligible quantities of human IgG [pt

  12. Quantitative analysis of untreated bio-samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sera, K.; Futatsugawa, S.; Matsuda, K.

    1999-01-01

    A standard-free method of quantitative analysis for untreated samples has been developed. For hair samples, measurements were performed by irradiating with a proton beam a few hairs as they are, and quantitative analysis was carried out by means of a standard-free method developed by ourselves. First, quantitative values of concentration of zinc were derived, then concentration of other elements was obtained by regarding zinc as an internal standard. As the result, values of concentration of sulphur for 40 samples agree well with the average value for a typical Japanese and also with each other within 20%, and validity of the present method could be confirmed. Accuracy was confirmed by comparing the results with those obtained by the usual internal standard method, too. For the purpose of a surface analysis of a bone sample, a very small incidence angle of the proton beam was used, so that both energy loss of the projectile and self-absorption of X-rays become negligible. As the result, consistent values of concentration for many elements were obtained by the standard-free method

  13. Quantitative evaluation of dysphagia using scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seok Gun; Hyun, Jung Keun; Lee, Seong Jae

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate dysphagia objectively and quantitatively, and to clarify the effect of neck position and viscosity changes in patients with aspiration and laryngeal penetration. We studied 35 patients with dysphagia and 21 normal controls using videofluoroscopy and scintigraphy. Videofluoroscopy was performed with barium with three different viscosity, and scintigraphy was done with water, yogurt, and steamed egg mixed with Tc-99m tin colloid. If aspiration was found during videofluoroscopic examination, patient's neck position was changed and study repeated. Videofluoroscopy was analyzed qualitatively. We calculated 7 quantitative parameters from scintigraphy. According to the videofluoroscopic findings, we divided patients into 3 subgroups; aspiration, laryngeal penetration, and no-aspiration group. The result of videofluoroscopy revealed that the most common finding was the delay in triggering pharyngeal swallow. Pharyngeal transit time (PTT) and pharyngeal swallowing efficiency (PSE) in patients with aspiration were significantly different from other groups. After neck position change, aspiration could be reduced in all of 7 patients, and laryngeal penetration reduced by about 82%. PTT and PSE were also improved after position change. Aspiration and laryngeal penetration occurred more frequently in thin liquid swallowing than in thin liquid and solid swallowing. PTT and PSE were useful for the evaluation of dysphagia. Aspiration and laryngeal penetration could by reduced when appropriate position assumed. We could decrease the chance of aspiration by changing the patient diet consistency. Scintigraphy might be useful tool to quantitate and follow up these changes

  14. Quantitative evaluation of dysphagia using scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seok Gun; Hyun, Jung Keun; Lee, Seong Jae [College of Medicine, Dankook Univ., Cheonnon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate dysphagia objectively and quantitatively, and to clarify the effect of neck position and viscosity changes in patients with aspiration and laryngeal penetration. We studied 35 patients with dysphagia and 21 normal controls using videofluoroscopy and scintigraphy. Videofluoroscopy was performed with barium with three different viscosity, and scintigraphy was done with water, yogurt, and steamed egg mixed with Tc-99m tin colloid. If aspiration was found during videofluoroscopic examination, patient's neck position was changed and study repeated. Videofluoroscopy was analyzed qualitatively. We calculated 7 quantitative parameters from scintigraphy. According to the videofluoroscopic findings, we divided patients into 3 subgroups; aspiration, laryngeal penetration, and no-aspiration group. The result of videofluoroscopy revealed that the most common finding was the delay in triggering pharyngeal swallow. Pharyngeal transit time (PTT) and pharyngeal swallowing efficiency (PSE) in patients with aspiration were significantly different from other groups. After neck position change, aspiration could be reduced in all of 7 patients, and laryngeal penetration reduced by about 82%. PTT and PSE were also improved after position change. Aspiration and laryngeal penetration occurred more frequently in thin liquid swallowing than in thin liquid and solid swallowing. PTT and PSE were useful for the evaluation of dysphagia. Aspiration and laryngeal penetration could by reduced when appropriate position assumed. We could decrease the chance of aspiration by changing the patient diet consistency. Scintigraphy might be useful tool to quantitate and follow up these changes.

  15. Quantitative and qualitative coronary arteriography. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.G.; Simpson, Paul; Dodge, J.T. Jr; Bolson, E.L.; Dodge, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical objectives of arteriography are to obtain information that contributes to an understanding of the mechanisms of the clinical syndrome, provides prognostic information, facilitates therapeutic decisions, and guides invasive therapy. Quantitative and improved qualitative assessments of arterial disease provide us with a common descriptive language which has the potential to accomplish these objectives more effectively and thus to improve clinical outcome. In certain situations, this potential has been demonstrated. Clinical investigation using quantitative techniques has definitely contributed to our understanding of disease mechanisms and of atherosclerosis progression/regression. Routine quantitation of clinical images should permit more accurate and repeatable estimates of disease severity and promises to provide useful estimates of coronary flow reserve. But routine clinical QCA awaits more cost- and time-efficient methods and clear proof of a clinical advantage. Careful inspection of highly magnified, high-resolution arteriographic images reveals morphologic features related to the pathophysiology of the clinical syndrome and to the likelihood of future progression or regression of obstruction. Features that have been found useful include thrombus in its various forms, ulceration and irregularity, eccentricity, flexing and dissection. The description of such high-resolution features should be included among, rather than excluded from, the goals of image processing, since they contribute substantially to the understanding and treatment of the clinical syndrome. (author). 81 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 tab

  16. Rational quantitative safety goals: a summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unwin, S.D.; Hayns, M.R.

    1984-08-01

    We introduce the notion of a Rational Quantitative Safety Goal. Such a goal reflects the imprecision and vagueness inherent in any reasonable notion of adequate safety and permits such vagueness to be incorporated into the formal regulatory decision-making process. A quantitative goal of the form, the parameter x, characterizing the safety level of the nuclear plant, shall not exceed the value x 0 , for example, is of a non-rational nature in that it invokes a strict binary logic in which the parameter space underlying x is cut sharply into two portions: that containing those values of x that comply with the goal and that containing those that do not. Here, we utilize an alternative form of logic which, in accordance with any intuitively reasonable notion of safety, permits a smooth transition of a safety determining parameter between the adequately safe and inadequately safe domains. Fuzzy set theory provides a suitable mathematical basis for the formulation of rational quantitative safety goals. The decision-making process proposed here is compatible with current risk assessment techniques and produces results in a transparent and useful format. Our methodology is illustrated with reference to the NUS Corporation risk assessment of the Limerick Generating Station

  17. Sample normalization methods in quantitative metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiman; Li, Liang

    2016-01-22

    To reveal metabolomic changes caused by a biological event in quantitative metabolomics, it is critical to use an analytical tool that can perform accurate and precise quantification to examine the true concentration differences of individual metabolites found in different samples. A number of steps are involved in metabolomic analysis including pre-analytical work (e.g., sample collection and storage), analytical work (e.g., sample analysis) and data analysis (e.g., feature extraction and quantification). Each one of them can influence the quantitative results significantly and thus should be performed with great care. Among them, the total sample amount or concentration of metabolites can be significantly different from one sample to another. Thus, it is critical to reduce or eliminate the effect of total sample amount variation on quantification of individual metabolites. In this review, we describe the importance of sample normalization in the analytical workflow with a focus on mass spectrometry (MS)-based platforms, discuss a number of methods recently reported in the literature and comment on their applicability in real world metabolomics applications. Sample normalization has been sometimes ignored in metabolomics, partially due to the lack of a convenient means of performing sample normalization. We show that several methods are now available and sample normalization should be performed in quantitative metabolomics where the analyzed samples have significant variations in total sample amounts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative trait loci and metabolic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, M. D.; Byrne, P. F.; Snook, M. E.; Wiseman, B. R.; Lee, E. A.; Widstrom, N. W.; Coe, E. H.

    1998-01-01

    The interpretation of quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies is limited by the lack of information on metabolic pathways leading to most economic traits. Inferences about the roles of the underlying genes with a pathway or the nature of their interaction with other loci are generally not possible. An exception is resistance to the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) in maize (Zea mays L.) because of maysin, a C-glycosyl flavone synthesized in silks via a branch of the well characterized flavonoid pathway. Our results using flavone synthesis as a model QTL system indicate: (i) the importance of regulatory loci as QTLs, (ii) the importance of interconnecting biochemical pathways on product levels, (iii) evidence for “channeling” of intermediates, allowing independent synthesis of related compounds, (iv) the utility of QTL analysis in clarifying the role of specific genes in a biochemical pathway, and (v) identification of a previously unknown locus on chromosome 9S affecting flavone level. A greater understanding of the genetic basis of maysin synthesis and associated corn earworm resistance should lead to improved breeding strategies. More broadly, the insights gained in relating a defined genetic and biochemical pathway affecting a quantitative trait should enhance interpretation of the biological basis of variation for other quantitative traits. PMID:9482823

  19. Quantitative learning strategies based on word networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue-Tian-Yi; Jia, Zi-Yang; Tang, Yong; Xiong, Jason Jie; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2018-02-01

    Learning English requires a considerable effort, but the way that vocabulary is introduced in textbooks is not optimized for learning efficiency. With the increasing population of English learners, learning process optimization will have significant impact and improvement towards English learning and teaching. The recent developments of big data analysis and complex network science provide additional opportunities to design and further investigate the strategies in English learning. In this paper, quantitative English learning strategies based on word network and word usage information are proposed. The strategies integrate the words frequency with topological structural information. By analyzing the influence of connected learned words, the learning weights for the unlearned words and dynamically updating of the network are studied and analyzed. The results suggest that quantitative strategies significantly improve learning efficiency while maintaining effectiveness. Especially, the optimized-weight-first strategy and segmented strategies outperform other strategies. The results provide opportunities for researchers and practitioners to reconsider the way of English teaching and designing vocabularies quantitatively by balancing the efficiency and learning costs based on the word network.

  20. Quantitative tools for addressing hospital readmissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagoe Ronald J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased interest in health care cost containment is focusing attention on reduction of hospital readmissions. Major payors have already developed financial penalties for providers that generate excess readmissions. This subject has benefitted from the development of resources such as the Potentially Preventable Readmissions software. This process has encouraged hospitals to renew efforts to improve these outcomes. The aim of this study was to describe quantitative tools such as definitions, risk estimation, and tracking of patients for reducing hospital readmissions. Findings This study employed the Potentially Preventable Readmissions software to develop quantitative tools for addressing hospital readmissions. These tools included two definitions of readmissions that support identification and management of patients. They also included analytical approaches for estimation of the risk of readmission for individual patients by age, discharge status of the initial admission, and severity of illness. They also included patient specific spreadsheets for tracking of target populations and for evaluation of the impact of interventions. Conclusions The study demonstrated that quantitative tools including the development of definitions of readmissions, estimation of the risk of readmission, and patient specific spreadsheets could contribute to the improvement of patient outcomes in hospitals.

  1. Some exercises in quantitative NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, C.J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The articles represented in this thesis result from a series of investigations that evaluate the potential of NMR imaging as a quantitative research tool. In the first article the possible use of proton spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 in tissue characterization, tumor recognition and monitoring tissue response to radiotherapy is explored. The next article addresses the question whether water proton spin-lattice relaxation curves of biological tissues are adequately described by a single time constant T 1 , and analyzes the implications of multi-exponentiality for quantitative NMR imaging. In the third article the use of NMR imaging as a quantitative research tool is discussed on the basis of phantom experiments. The fourth article describes a method which enables unambiguous retrieval of sign information in a set of magnetic resonance images of the inversion recovery type. The next article shows how this method can be adapted to allow accurate calculation of T 1 pictures on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The sixth article, finally, describes a simulation procedure which enables a straightforward determination of NMR imaging pulse sequence parameters for optimal tissue contrast. (orig.)

  2. Quantitative assessment of breast density from mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal, N.; Ng, K.H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: It is known that breast density is increasingly used as a risk factor for breast cancer. This study was undertaken to develop and validate a semi-automated computer technique for the quantitative assessment of breast density from digitised mammograms. A computer technique had been developed using MATLAB (Version 6.1) based GUI applications. This semi-automated image analysis tool consists of gradient correction, segmentation of breast region from background, segmentation of fibroglandular and adipose region within the breast area and calculation of breast density. The density is defined as the percentage of fibroglandular tissue area divided by the total breast area in the mammogram. This technique was clinically validated with 122 normal mammograms; these were subjectively evaluated and classified according to the five parenchyma patterns of the Tabar's scheme (Class I- V) by a consultant radiologist. There was a statistical significant correlation between the computer technique and subjective classification (r 2 = 0.84, p<0.05). 71.3% of subjective classification was correctly classified using the computer technique. We had developed a computer technique for the quantitative assessment of breast density and validated its accuracy for computerized classification based on Tabar's scheme. This quantitative tool is useful for the evaluation of a large dataset of mammograms to predict breast cancer risk based on density. Furthermore it has the potential to provide an early marker for success or failure in chemoprevention studies such as hormonal replacement therapy. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  3. Quantitative Reasoning Learning Progressions for Environmental Science: Developing a Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Mayes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative reasoning is a complex concept with many definitions and a diverse account in the literature. The purpose of this article is to establish a working definition of quantitative reasoning within the context of science, construct a quantitative reasoning framework, and summarize research on key components in that framework. Context underlies all quantitative reasoning; for this review, environmental science serves as the context.In the framework, we identify four components of quantitative reasoning: the quantification act, quantitative literacy, quantitative interpretation of a model, and quantitative modeling. Within each of these components, the framework provides elements that comprise the four components. The quantification act includes the elements of variable identification, communication, context, and variation. Quantitative literacy includes the elements of numeracy, measurement, proportional reasoning, and basic probability/statistics. Quantitative interpretation includes the elements of representations, science diagrams, statistics and probability, and logarithmic scales. Quantitative modeling includes the elements of logic, problem solving, modeling, and inference. A brief comparison of the quantitative reasoning framework with the AAC&U Quantitative Literacy VALUE rubric is presented, demonstrating a mapping of the components and illustrating differences in structure. The framework serves as a precursor for a quantitative reasoning learning progression which is currently under development.

  4. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy and image deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedlow, Jason R

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative imaging and image deconvolution have become standard techniques for the modern cell biologist because they can form the basis of an increasing number of assays for molecular function in a cellular context. There are two major types of deconvolution approaches--deblurring and restoration algorithms. Deblurring algorithms remove blur but treat a series of optical sections as individual two-dimensional entities and therefore sometimes mishandle blurred light. Restoration algorithms determine an object that, when convolved with the point-spread function of the microscope, could produce the image data. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed in this chapter. Image deconvolution in fluorescence microscopy has usually been applied to high-resolution imaging to improve contrast and thus detect small, dim objects that might otherwise be obscured. Their proper use demands some consideration of the imaging hardware, the acquisition process, fundamental aspects of photon detection, and image processing. This can prove daunting for some cell biologists, but the power of these techniques has been proven many times in the works cited in the chapter and elsewhere. Their usage is now well defined, so they can be incorporated into the capabilities of most laboratories. A major application of fluorescence microscopy is the quantitative measurement of the localization, dynamics, and interactions of cellular factors. The introduction of green fluorescent protein and its spectral variants has led to a significant increase in the use of fluorescence microscopy as a quantitative assay system. For quantitative imaging assays, it is critical to consider the nature of the image-acquisition system and to validate its response to known standards. Any image-processing algorithms used before quantitative analysis should preserve the relative signal levels in different parts of the image. A very common image-processing algorithm, image deconvolution, is used

  5. The quantitative imaging network: the role of quantitative imaging in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, Pushpa; Nordstrom, Robert J.; Clark, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    The potential value of modern medical imaging methods has created a need for mechanisms to develop, translate and disseminate emerging imaging technologies and, ideally, to quantitatively correlate those with other related laboratory methods, such as the genomics and proteomics analyses required to support clinical decisions. One strategy to meet these needs efficiently and cost effectively is to develop an international network to share and reach consensus on best practices, imaging protocols, common databases, and open science strategies, and to collaboratively seek opportunities to leverage resources wherever possible. One such network is the Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) started by the National Cancer Institute, USA. The mission of the QIN is to improve the role of quantitative imaging for clinical decision making in oncology by the development and validation of data acquisition, analysis methods, and other quantitative imaging tools to predict or monitor the response to drug or radiation therapy. The network currently has 24 teams (two from Canada and 22 from the USA) and several associate members, including one from Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India. Each QIN team collects data from ongoing clinical trials and develops software tools for quantitation and validation to create standards for imaging research, and for use in developing models for therapy response prediction and measurement and tools for clinical decision making. The members of QIN are addressing a wide variety of cancer problems (Head and Neck cancer, Prostrate, Breast, Brain, Lung, Liver, Colon) using multiple imaging modalities (PET, CT, MRI, FMISO PET, DW-MRI, PET-CT). (author)

  6. Analytical research using synchrotron radiation based techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Shambhu Nath

    2015-01-01

    There are many Synchrotron Radiation (SR) based techniques such as X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray Fluorescence Analysis (XRF), SR-Fourier-transform Infrared (SRFTIR), Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HAXPS) etc. which are increasingly being employed worldwide in analytical research. With advent of modern synchrotron sources these analytical techniques have been further revitalized and paved ways for new techniques such as microprobe XRF and XAS, FTIR microscopy, Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HAXPS) etc. The talk will cover mainly two techniques illustrating its capability in analytical research namely XRF and XAS. XRF spectroscopy: XRF spectroscopy is an analytical technique which involves the detection of emitted characteristic X-rays following excitation of the elements within the sample. While electron, particle (protons or alpha particles), or X-ray beams can be employed as the exciting source for this analysis, the use of X-ray beams from a synchrotron source has been instrumental in the advancement of the technique in the area of microprobe XRF imaging and trace level compositional characterisation of any sample. Synchrotron radiation induced X-ray emission spectroscopy, has become competitive with the earlier microprobe and nanoprobe techniques following the advancements in manipulating and detecting these X-rays. There are two important features that contribute to the superb elemental sensitivities of microprobe SR induced XRF: (i) the absence of the continuum (Bremsstrahlung) background radiation that is a feature of spectra obtained from charged particle beams, and (ii) the increased X-ray flux on the sample associated with the use of tunable third generation synchrotron facilities. Detection sensitivities have been reported in the ppb range, with values of 10 -17 g - 10 -14 g (depending on the particular element and matrix). Keeping in mind its demand, a microprobe XRF beamline has been setup by RRCAT at Indus-2 synchrotron source facility for trace level compositional characterization of materials

  7. Quantitative Imaging with a Mobile Phone Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandarajah, Arunan; Reber, Clay D.; Switz, Neil A.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Use of optical imaging for medical and scientific applications requires accurate quantification of features such as object size, color, and brightness. High pixel density cameras available on modern mobile phones have made photography simple and convenient for consumer applications; however, the camera hardware and software that enables this simplicity can present a barrier to accurate quantification of image data. This issue is exacerbated by automated settings, proprietary image processing algorithms, rapid phone evolution, and the diversity of manufacturers. If mobile phone cameras are to live up to their potential to increase access to healthcare in low-resource settings, limitations of mobile phone–based imaging must be fully understood and addressed with procedures that minimize their effects on image quantification. Here we focus on microscopic optical imaging using a custom mobile phone microscope that is compatible with phones from multiple manufacturers. We demonstrate that quantitative microscopy with micron-scale spatial resolution can be carried out with multiple phones and that image linearity, distortion, and color can be corrected as needed. Using all versions of the iPhone and a selection of Android phones released between 2007 and 2012, we show that phones with greater than 5 MP are capable of nearly diffraction-limited resolution over a broad range of magnifications, including those relevant for single cell imaging. We find that automatic focus, exposure, and color gain standard on mobile phones can degrade image resolution and reduce accuracy of color capture if uncorrected, and we devise procedures to avoid these barriers to quantitative imaging. By accommodating the differences between mobile phone cameras and the scientific cameras, mobile phone microscopes can be reliably used to increase access to quantitative imaging for a variety of medical and scientific applications. PMID:24824072

  8. Quantitative Imaging in Cancer Evolution and Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Olya; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer therapy, even when highly targeted, typically fails because of the remarkable capacity of malignant cells to evolve effective adaptations. These evolutionary dynamics are both a cause and a consequence of cancer system heterogeneity at many scales, ranging from genetic properties of individual cells to large-scale imaging features. Tumors of the same organ and cell type can have remarkably diverse appearances in different patients. Furthermore, even within a single tumor, marked variations in imaging features, such as necrosis or contrast enhancement, are common. Similar spatial variations recently have been reported in genetic profiles. Radiologic heterogeneity within tumors is usually governed by variations in blood flow, whereas genetic heterogeneity is typically ascribed to random mutations. However, evolution within tumors, as in all living systems, is subject to Darwinian principles; thus, it is governed by predictable and reproducible interactions between environmental selection forces and cell phenotype (not genotype). This link between regional variations in environmental properties and cellular adaptive strategies may permit clinical imaging to be used to assess and monitor intratumoral evolution in individual patients. This approach is enabled by new methods that extract, report, and analyze quantitative, reproducible, and mineable clinical imaging data. However, most current quantitative metrics lack spatialness, expressing quantitative radiologic features as a single value for a region of interest encompassing the whole tumor. In contrast, spatially explicit image analysis recognizes that tumors are heterogeneous but not well mixed and defines regionally distinct habitats, some of which appear to harbor tumor populations that are more aggressive and less treatable than others. By identifying regional variations in key environmental selection forces and evidence of cellular adaptation, clinical imaging can enable us to define intratumoral

  9. Quantitative imaging with a mobile phone microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunan Skandarajah

    Full Text Available Use of optical imaging for medical and scientific applications requires accurate quantification of features such as object size, color, and brightness. High pixel density cameras available on modern mobile phones have made photography simple and convenient for consumer applications; however, the camera hardware and software that enables this simplicity can present a barrier to accurate quantification of image data. This issue is exacerbated by automated settings, proprietary image processing algorithms, rapid phone evolution, and the diversity of manufacturers. If mobile phone cameras are to live up to their potential to increase access to healthcare in low-resource settings, limitations of mobile phone-based imaging must be fully understood and addressed with procedures that minimize their effects on image quantification. Here we focus on microscopic optical imaging using a custom mobile phone microscope that is compatible with phones from multiple manufacturers. We demonstrate that quantitative microscopy with micron-scale spatial resolution can be carried out with multiple phones and that image linearity, distortion, and color can be corrected as needed. Using all versions of the iPhone and a selection of Android phones released between 2007 and 2012, we show that phones with greater than 5 MP are capable of nearly diffraction-limited resolution over a broad range of magnifications, including those relevant for single cell imaging. We find that automatic focus, exposure, and color gain standard on mobile phones can degrade image resolution and reduce accuracy of color capture if uncorrected, and we devise procedures to avoid these barriers to quantitative imaging. By accommodating the differences between mobile phone cameras and the scientific cameras, mobile phone microscopes can be reliably used to increase access to quantitative imaging for a variety of medical and scientific applications.

  10. Quantitative safety goals for the regulatory process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksimovic, V.; O'Donnell, L.F.

    1981-01-01

    The paper offers a brief summary of the current regulatory background in the USA, emphasizing nuclear, related to the establishment of quantitative safety goals as a way to respond to the key issue of 'how safe is safe enough'. General Atomic has taken a leading role in advocating the use of probabilistic risk assessment techniques in the regulatory process. This has led to understanding of the importance of quantitative safety goals. The approach developed by GA is discussed in the paper. It is centred around definition of quantitative safety regions. The regions were termed: design basis, safety margin or design capability and safety research. The design basis region is bounded by the frequency of 10 -4 /reactor-year and consequences of no identifiable public injury. 10 -4 /reactor-year is associated with the total projected lifetime of a commercial US nuclear power programme. Events which have a 50% chance of happening are included in the design basis region. In the safety margin region, which extends below the design basis region, protection is provided against some events whose probability of not happening during the expected course of the US nuclear power programme is within the range of 50 to 90%. Setting the lower mean frequency to this region of 10 -5 /reactor-year is equivalent to offering 90% assurance that an accident of given severity will not happen. Rare events with a mean frequency below 10 -5 can be predicted to occur. However, accidents predicted to have a probability of less than 10 -6 are 99% certain not to happen at all, and are thus not anticipated to affect public health and safety. The area between 10 -5 and 10 -6 defines the frequency portion of the safety research region. Safety goals associated with individual risk to a maximum-exposed member of public, general societal risk and property risk are proposed in the paper

  11. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  12. Quantitative microanalysis with a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Themner, Klas.

    1989-01-01

    The analytical techniques of paticle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS), together with the nuclear microprobe, form a very powerful tool for performing quantitative microanalysis of biological material. Calibration of the X-ray detection system in the microprobe set-up has been performed and the accuracy of the quantitative procedure using RBS for determination of the areal mass density was investigated. The accuracy of the analysis can be affected by alteration in the elemental concentrations during irradiation due to the radiation damage induced by the very intense beams of ionixing radiation. Loss of matrix elements from freeze-dried tissue sections and polymer films have been studied during proton and photon irradiation and the effect on the accuracy discussed. Scanning the beam over an area of the target, with e.g. 32x32 pixels, in order to produce en elemental map, yields a lot of information and, to be able to make an accurate quantitatification, a fast algorithm using descriptions of the different spectral contributions is of need. The production of continuum X-rays by 2.55 MeV protons has been studied and absolute cross-sections for the bremsstrahlung production from thin carbon and some polymer films determined. For the determination of the bremsstrahlung background knowledge of the amounts of the matrix elements is important and a fast program for the evaluation of spectra of proton back- and forward scattering from biological samples has been developed. Quantitative microanalysis with the nuclear microprobe has been performed on brain tissue from rats subjected to different pathological conditions. Increase in calcium levels and decrease in potssium levels for animals subjected to crebral ischaemia and for animals suffering from epileptic seizures were observed coincidentally with or, in some cases before, visible signs of cell necrosis. (author)

  13. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L J; D'Alfonso, A J; Forbes, B D; Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M; Stemmer, S

    2012-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) it is possible to operate the microscope in bright-field mode under conditions which, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, are equivalent to those in conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). The results of such an experiment will be presented which are in excellent quantitative agreement with theory for specimens up to 25 nm thick. This is at variance with the large contrast mismatch (typically between two and five) noted in equivalent CTEM experiments. The implications of this will be discussed.

  14. Quantitative spectrographic determination of zirconium minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocal Adell, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, F.; Fernandez Cellini, R.

    1958-01-01

    The method described in the following report permits the quantitative determination of zirconium in minerals and rocks in a 0,02-100% of ZrO 2 concentration rate. The excitation is carried out by a 10 ampere continuous current arc among carbon electrodes, and placing the sample in a crater of 2 mm depth. For low concentrations a dilution of the sample with the same weight as its own in carbon powder and with 1/25 of its weight of Co 3 O 4 (internal patron) is carried out. Line Zr 2571,4, Co 2585,3 and Co 2587,2 are used. (Author) 6 refs

  15. Quantitative angiography methods for bifurcation lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collet, Carlos; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Cavalcante, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Bifurcation lesions represent one of the most challenging lesion subsets in interventional cardiology. The European Bifurcation Club (EBC) is an academic consortium whose goal has been to assess and recommend the appropriate strategies to manage bifurcation lesions. The quantitative coronary...... angiography (QCA) methods for the evaluation of bifurcation lesions have been subject to extensive research. Single-vessel QCA has been shown to be inaccurate for the assessment of bifurcation lesion dimensions. For this reason, dedicated bifurcation software has been developed and validated. These software...

  16. Software performance and scalability a quantitative approach

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Henry H

    2009-01-01

    Praise from the Reviewers:"The practicality of the subject in a real-world situation distinguishes this book from othersavailable on the market."—Professor Behrouz Far, University of Calgary"This book could replace the computer organization texts now in use that every CS and CpEstudent must take. . . . It is much needed, well written, and thoughtful."—Professor Larry Bernstein, Stevens Institute of TechnologyA distinctive, educational text onsoftware performance and scalabilityThis is the first book to take a quantitative approach to the subject of software performance and scalability

  17. MR Fingerprinting for Rapid Quantitative Abdominal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Jiang, Yun; Pahwa, Shivani; Ma, Dan; Lu, Lan; Twieg, Michael D; Wright, Katherine L; Seiberlich, Nicole; Griswold, Mark A; Gulani, Vikas

    2016-04-01

    To develop a magnetic resonance (MR) "fingerprinting" technique for quantitative abdominal imaging. This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval, and informed consent was obtained from all subjects. To achieve accurate quantification in the presence of marked B0 and B1 field inhomogeneities, the MR fingerprinting framework was extended by using a two-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state free precession, or FISP, acquisition and a Bloch-Siegert B1 mapping method. The accuracy of the proposed technique was validated by using agarose phantoms. Quantitative measurements were performed in eight asymptomatic subjects and in six patients with 20 focal liver lesions. A two-tailed Student t test was used to compare the T1 and T2 results in metastatic adenocarcinoma with those in surrounding liver parenchyma and healthy subjects. Phantom experiments showed good agreement with standard methods in T1 and T2 after B1 correction. In vivo studies demonstrated that quantitative T1, T2, and B1 maps can be acquired within a breath hold of approximately 19 seconds. T1 and T2 measurements were compatible with those in the literature. Representative values included the following: liver, 745 msec ± 65 (standard deviation) and 31 msec ± 6; renal medulla, 1702 msec ± 205 and 60 msec ± 21; renal cortex, 1314 msec ± 77 and 47 msec ± 10; spleen, 1232 msec ± 92 and 60 msec ± 19; skeletal muscle, 1100 msec ± 59 and 44 msec ± 9; and fat, 253 msec ± 42 and 77 msec ± 16, respectively. T1 and T2 in metastatic adenocarcinoma were 1673 msec ± 331 and 43 msec ± 13, respectively, significantly different from surrounding liver parenchyma relaxation times of 840 msec ± 113 and 28 msec ± 3 (P < .0001 and P < .01) and those in hepatic parenchyma in healthy volunteers (745 msec ± 65 and 31 msec ± 6, P < .0001 and P = .021, respectively). A rapid technique for quantitative abdominal imaging was developed that allows simultaneous quantification of multiple tissue

  18. Chinese legal texts – Quantitative Description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľuboš GAJDOŠ

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to provide a quantitative description of legal Chinese. This study adopts the approach of corpus-based analyses and it shows basic statistical parameters of legal texts in Chinese, namely the length of a sentence, the proportion of part of speech etc. The research is conducted on the Chinese monolingual corpus Hanku. The paper also discusses the issues of statistical data processing from various corpora, e.g. the tokenisation and part of speech tagging and their relevance to study of registers variation.

  19. Enhancing quantitative approaches for assessing community resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, W. C.; Garmestani, A.S.; Eason, T. N.; Spanbauer, T. L.; Fried-Peterson, H. B.; Roberts, C.P.; Sundstrom, Shana M.; Burnett, J.L.; Angeler, David G.; Chaffin, Brian C.; Gunderson, L.; Twidwell, Dirac; Allen, Craig R.

    2018-01-01

    Scholars from many different intellectual disciplines have attempted to measure, estimate, or quantify resilience. However, there is growing concern that lack of clarity on the operationalization of the concept will limit its application. In this paper, we discuss the theory, research development and quantitative approaches in ecological and community resilience. Upon noting the lack of methods that quantify the complexities of the linked human and natural aspects of community resilience, we identify several promising approaches within the ecological resilience tradition that may be useful in filling these gaps. Further, we discuss the challenges for consolidating these approaches into a more integrated perspective for managing social-ecological systems.

  20. Quantitative interface models for simulating microstructure evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.Z.; Wang, T.; Zhou, S.H.; Liu, Z.K.; Chen, L.Q.

    2004-01-01

    To quantitatively simulate microstructural evolution in real systems, we investigated three different interface models: a sharp-interface model implemented by the software DICTRA and two diffuse-interface models which use either physical order parameters or artificial order parameters. A particular example is considered, the diffusion-controlled growth of a γ ' precipitate in a supersaturated γ matrix in Ni-Al binary alloys. All three models use the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters from the same databases. The temporal evolution profiles of composition from different models are shown to agree with each other. The focus is on examining the advantages and disadvantages of each model as applied to microstructure evolution in alloys

  1. Quantitative risk in radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1978-01-01

    The bases for developing quantitative assessment of exposure risks in the human being, and the several problems that accompany the assessment and introduction of the risk of exposure to high and low LET radiation into radiation protection, will be evaluated. The extension of the pioneering radiation protection philosophies to the control of other hazardous agents that cannot be eliminated from the environment will be discussed, as will the serious misunderstandings and misuse of concepts and facts that have inevitably surrounded the application to one agent alone, of the protection philosophy that must in time be applied to a broad spectrum of potentially hazardous agents. (orig.) [de

  2. Quantitative methods for management and economics

    CERN Document Server

    Chakravarty, Pulak

    2009-01-01

    ""Quantitative Methods for Management and Economics"" is specially prepared for the MBA students in India and all over the world. It starts from the basics, such that even a beginner with out much mathematical sophistication can grasp the ideas and then comes forward to more complex and professional problems. Thus, both the ordinary students as well as ""above average: i.e., ""bright and sincere"" students would be benefited equally through this book.Since, most of the problems are solved or hints are given, students can do well within the short duration of the semesters of their busy course.

  3. Quantitative proteomic analysis of intact plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraya, Takeshi; Kaneko, Kentaro; Mitsui, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Plastids are specialized cell organelles in plant cells that are differentiated into various forms including chloroplasts, chromoplasts, and amyloplasts, and fulfill important functions in maintaining the overall cell metabolism and sensing environmental factors such as sunlight. It is therefore important to grasp the mechanisms of differentiation and functional changes of plastids in order to enhance the understanding of vegetality. In this chapter, details of a method for the extraction of intact plastids that makes analysis possible while maintaining the plastid functions are provided; in addition, a quantitative shotgun method for analyzing the composition and changes in the content of proteins in plastids as a result of environmental impacts is described.

  4. Quantitative texture analysis of electrodeposited line patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Free-standing line patterns of Cu and Ni were manufactured by electrochemical deposition into lithographically prepared patterns. Electrodeposition was carried out on top of a highly oriented Au-layer physically vapor deposited on glass. Quantitative texture analysis carried out by means of x......-ray diffraction for both the substrate layer and the electrodeposits yielded experimental evidence for epitaxy between Cu and Au. An orientation relation between film and substrate was discussed with respect to various concepts of epitaxy. While the conventional mode of epitaxy fails for the Cu...

  5. A Quantitative Scale of Oxophilicity and Thiophilicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    Oxophilicity and thiophilicity are widely used concepts with no quantitative definition. In this paper, a simple, generic scale is developed that solves issues with reference states and system dependencies and captures empirically known tendencies toward oxygen. This enables a detailed analysis......, ionic bonding is stronger to metals of low electronegativity. Left-side d-block elements with low effective nuclear charges and electro-negativities are thus highly oxophilic, and the f-block elements, not because of their hardness, which is normal, but as a result of the small ionization energies...

  6. Path to development of quantitative safety goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksimovic, V.; Houghton, W.J.

    1980-04-01

    There is a growing interest in defining numerical safety goals for nuclear power plants as exemplified by an ACRS recommendation. This paper proposes a lower frequency limit of approximately 10 -4 /reactor-year for design basis events. Below this frequency, down, to a small frequency such as 10 -5 /reactor-year, safety margin can be provided by, say, site emergency plans. Accident sequences below 10 -5 should not impact public safety, but it is prudent that safety research programs examine sequences with significant consequences. Once tentatively agreed upon, quantitative safety goals together with associated implementation tools would be factored into regulatory and design processes

  7. Expermental Studies of quantitative evaluation using HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Rok Kwon

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Methods : This study was conducted to carry out quantitative evaluation using HPLC Content analysis was done using HPLC Results : According to HPLC analysis, each BVA-1 contained approximately 0.36㎍ melittin, and BVA-2 contained approximately 0.54㎍ melittin. But the volume of coating was so minute, slight difference exists between each needle. Conclusion : Above results indicate that the bee venom acupuncture can complement shortcomings of syringe usage as a part of Oriental medicine treatment, but extensive researches should be done for further verification.

  8. Quantitative Assessment of the IT Agile Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orłowski Cezary

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the quantitative perspective of the agile transformation processes in IT organisations. The phenomenon of agile transformation becomes a complex challenge for an IT organisation since it has not been analysed in detail so far. There is no research on the readiness of IT organisations to realise agile transformation processes. Such processes also prove to have uncontrolled character. Therefore, to minimise the risk of failure referring to the realisation of transformation processes, it is necessary to monitor them. It is also necessary to identify and analyse such processes to ensure their continuous character.

  9. Quantitative Communication Research: Review, Trends, and Critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R. Levine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Trends in quantitative communication research are reviewed. A content analysis of 48 articles reporting original communication research published in 1988-1991 and 2008-2011 is reported. Survey research and self-report measurement remain common approaches to research. Null hypothesis significance testing remains the dominant approach to statistical analysis. Reporting the shapes of distributions, estimates of statistical power, and confidence intervals remain uncommon. Trends over time include the increased popularity of health communication and computer mediated communication as topics of research, and increased attention to mediator and moderator variables. The implications of these practices for scientific progress are critically discussed, and suggestions for the future are provided.

  10. Quantitative Methods in the Study of Local History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Pene

    1974-01-01

    The author suggests how the quantitative analysis of data from census records, assessment roles, and newspapers may be integrated into the classroom. Suggestions for obtaining quantitative data are provided. (DE)

  11. Developing quantitative tools for measuring aspects of prisonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær Minke, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The article describes and discusses the preparation and completion of a quantitative study among prison officers and prisoners.......The article describes and discusses the preparation and completion of a quantitative study among prison officers and prisoners....

  12. Inspection, visualisation and analysis of quantitative proteomics data

    OpenAIRE

    Gatto, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Material Quantitative Proteomics and Data Analysis Course. 4 - 5 April 2016, Queen Hotel, Chester, UK Table D - Inspection, visualisation and analysis of quantitative proteomics data, Laurent Gatto (University of Cambridge)

  13. Quantitative Methods for Molecular Diagnostic and Therapeutic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Quanzheng

    2013-01-01

    This theme issue provides an overview on the basic quantitative methods, an in-depth discussion on the cutting-edge quantitative analysis approaches as well as their applications for both static and dynamic molecular diagnostic and therapeutic imaging.

  14. Diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative and quantitative stress CMR perfusion analysis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, R; van Assen, M; Vliegenthart, R; de Bock, G H; van der Harst, P; Oudkerk, M

    2017-11-27

    Stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) perfusion imaging is a promising modality for the evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD) due to high spatial resolution and absence of radiation. Semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of CMR perfusion are based on signal-intensity curves produced during the first-pass of gadolinium contrast. Multiple semi-quantitative and quantitative parameters have been introduced. Diagnostic performance of these parameters varies extensively among studies and standardized protocols are lacking. This study aims to determine the diagnostic accuracy of semi- quantitative and quantitative CMR perfusion parameters, compared to multiple reference standards. Pubmed, WebOfScience, and Embase were systematically searched using predefined criteria (3272 articles). A check for duplicates was performed (1967 articles). Eligibility and relevance of the articles was determined by two reviewers using pre-defined criteria. The primary data extraction was performed independently by two researchers with the use of a predefined template. Differences in extracted data were resolved by discussion between the two researchers. The quality of the included studies was assessed using the 'Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies Tool' (QUADAS-2). True positives, false positives, true negatives, and false negatives were subtracted/calculated from the articles. The principal summary measures used to assess diagnostic accuracy were sensitivity, specificity, andarea under the receiver operating curve (AUC). Data was pooled according to analysis territory, reference standard and perfusion parameter. Twenty-two articles were eligible based on the predefined study eligibility criteria. The pooled diagnostic accuracy for segment-, territory- and patient-based analyses showed good diagnostic performance with sensitivity of 0.88, 0.82, and 0.83, specificity of 0.72, 0.83, and 0.76 and AUC of 0.90, 0.84, and 0.87, respectively. In per territory

  15. Micro photometer's automation for quantitative spectrograph analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez E, C.Y.A.

    1996-01-01

    A Microphotometer is used to increase the sharpness of dark spectral lines. Analyzing these lines one sample content and its concentration could be determined and the analysis is known as Quantitative Spectrographic Analysis. The Quantitative Spectrographic Analysis is carried out in 3 steps, as follows. 1. Emulsion calibration. This consists of gauging a photographic emulsion, to determine the intensity variations in terms of the incident radiation. For the procedure of emulsion calibration an adjustment with square minimum to the data obtained is applied to obtain a graph. It is possible to determine the density of dark spectral line against the incident light intensity shown by the microphotometer. 2. Working curves. The values of known concentration of an element against incident light intensity are plotted. Since the sample contains several elements, it is necessary to find a work curve for each one of them. 3. Analytical results. The calibration curve and working curves are compared and the concentration of the studied element is determined. The automatic data acquisition, calculation and obtaining of resulting, is done by means of a computer (PC) and a computer program. The conditioning signal circuits have the function of delivering TTL levels (Transistor Transistor Logic) to make the communication between the microphotometer and the computer possible. Data calculation is done using a computer programm

  16. Fundamental quantitative security in quantum key generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuen, Horace P.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the fundamental security significance of the quantitative criteria on the final generated key K in quantum key generation including the quantum criterion d, the attacker's mutual information on K, and the statistical distance between her distribution on K and the uniform distribution. For operational significance a criterion has to produce a guarantee on the attacker's probability of correctly estimating some portions of K from her measurement, in particular her maximum probability of identifying the whole K. We distinguish between the raw security of K when the attacker just gets at K before it is used in a cryptographic context and its composition security when the attacker may gain further information during its actual use to help get at K. We compare both of these securities of K to those obtainable from conventional key expansion with a symmetric key cipher. It is pointed out that a common belief in the superior security of a quantum generated K is based on an incorrect interpretation of d which cannot be true, and the security significance of d is uncertain. Generally, the quantum key distribution key K has no composition security guarantee and its raw security guarantee from concrete protocols is worse than that of conventional ciphers. Furthermore, for both raw and composition security there is an exponential catch-up problem that would make it difficult to quantitatively improve the security of K in a realistic protocol. Some possible ways to deal with the situation are suggested.

  17. Quantitative image fusion in infrared radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romm, Iliya; Cukurel, Beni

    2018-05-01

    Towards high-accuracy infrared radiance estimates, measurement practices and processing techniques aimed to achieve quantitative image fusion using a set of multi-exposure images of a static scene are reviewed. The conventional non-uniformity correction technique is extended, as the original is incompatible with quantitative fusion. Recognizing the inherent limitations of even the extended non-uniformity correction, an alternative measurement methodology, which relies on estimates of the detector bias using self-calibration, is developed. Combining data from multi-exposure images, two novel image fusion techniques that ultimately provide high tonal fidelity of a photoquantity are considered: ‘subtract-then-fuse’, which conducts image subtraction in the camera output domain and partially negates the bias frame contribution common to both the dark and scene frames; and ‘fuse-then-subtract’, which reconstructs the bias frame explicitly and conducts image fusion independently for the dark and the scene frames, followed by subtraction in the photoquantity domain. The performances of the different techniques are evaluated for various synthetic and experimental data, identifying the factors contributing to potential degradation of the image quality. The findings reflect the superiority of the ‘fuse-then-subtract’ approach, conducting image fusion via per-pixel nonlinear weighted least squares optimization.

  18. QUANTITATIVE INDICATORS OF THE SECURITIZATION OF ASSETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis VOSTRICOV

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Securitization is instrumental in return on capital increment through the withdrawal from the balance oflending activities being accompanied by off-balance incomes flow from fees, which are less capital-intensive. Thepurpose of this paper is to analyze the quantitative indicators characterizing the securitization of assets. For draftingthis article, the method of analysis, synthesis method, logic and dialectic method, normative method, the study ofstatistical sampling and time series of expert evaluations (Standard and Poor’s, personal observations, andmonographic studies have been used. The main difference between the securitization of assets from traditional waysof financing is related to the achievement of a plenty of secondary goals in attracting financial resources, whichcan play a significant role in choosing to favour the securitization of assets or other types of financing. Inparticular, it gives a possibility to write off the assets from the balance sheet along with the relevant obligationsunder the securities, to expand the range of potential investors accompanied by the reducing of credit risk, interestrate and liquidity risk, as well as to improve the management quality of assets, liabilities and risks. All of thesesecondary effects are achieved by the isolation of selected assets from the total credit risk of the enterprise, raisingits funds, which forms the pivotal actuality and significance of asset securitization. The article containsdemonstrations of quantitative and qualitative indicators characterizing the securitization of assets.

  19. Quantitating cellular immune responses to cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, H Kim

    2003-06-01

    While the future of immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer is promising, it is difficult to compare the various approaches because monitoring assays have not been standardized in approach or technique. Common assays for measuring the immune response need to be established so that these assays can one day serve as surrogate markers for clinical response. Assays that accurately detect and quantitate T-cell-mediated, antigen-specific immune responses are particularly desired. However, to date, increases in the number of cytotoxic T cells through immunization have not been correlated with clinical tumor regression. Ideally, then, a T-cell assay not only needs to be sensitive, specific, reliable, reproducible, simple, and quick to perform, it must also demonstrate close correlation with clinical outcome. Assays currently used to measure T-cell response are delayed-type hypersensitivity testing, flow cytometry using peptide major histocompatibility complex tetramers, lymphoproliferation assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, enzyme-linked immunospot assay, cytokine flow cytometry, direct cytotoxicity assay, measurement of cytokine mRNA by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and limiting dilution analysis. The purpose of this review is to describe the attributes of each test and compare their advantages and disadvantages.

  20. A quantitative calculation for software reliability evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Jun; Lee, Jang-Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    To meet these regulatory requirements, the software used in the nuclear safety field has been ensured through the development, validation, safety analysis, and quality assurance activities throughout the entire process life cycle from the planning phase to the installation phase. A variety of activities, such as the quality assurance activities are also required to improve the quality of a software. However, there are limitations to ensure that the quality is improved enough. Therefore, the effort to calculate the reliability of the software continues for a quantitative evaluation instead of a qualitative evaluation. In this paper, we propose a quantitative calculation method for the software to be used for a specific operation of the digital controller in an NPP. After injecting random faults in the internal space of a developed controller and calculating the ability to detect the injected faults using diagnostic software, we can evaluate the software reliability of a digital controller in an NPP. We tried to calculate the software reliability of the controller in an NPP using a new method that differs from a traditional method. It calculates the fault detection coverage after injecting the faults into the software memory space rather than the activity through the life cycle process. We attempt differentiation by creating a new definition of the fault, imitating the software fault using the hardware, and giving a consideration and weights for injection faults.

  1. Quantitative stratification of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushravya Raghunath

    Full Text Available Diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs are characterized by widespread pathological changes within the pulmonary tissue that impair the elasticity and gas exchange properties of the lungs. Clinical-radiological diagnosis of these diseases remains challenging and their clinical course is characterized by variable disease progression. These challenges have hindered the introduction of robust objective biomarkers for patient-specific prediction based on specific phenotypes in clinical practice for patients with DPLD. Therefore, strategies facilitating individualized clinical management, staging and identification of specific phenotypes linked to clinical disease outcomes or therapeutic responses are urgently needed. A classification schema consistently reflecting the radiological, clinical (lung function and clinical outcomes and pathological features of a disease represents a critical need in modern pulmonary medicine. Herein, we report a quantitative stratification paradigm to identify subsets of DPLD patients with characteristic radiologic patterns in an unsupervised manner and demonstrate significant correlation of these self-organized disease groups with clinically accepted surrogate endpoints. The proposed consistent and reproducible technique could potentially transform diagnostic staging, clinical management and prognostication of DPLD patients as well as facilitate patient selection for clinical trials beyond the ability of current radiological tools. In addition, the sequential quantitative stratification of the type and extent of parenchymal process may allow standardized and objective monitoring of disease, early assessment of treatment response and mortality prediction for DPLD patients.

  2. Quantitative Stratification of Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Sushravya; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Karwoski, Ronald A.; Maldonado, Fabien; Peikert, Tobias; Moua, Teng; Ryu, Jay H.; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs) are characterized by widespread pathological changes within the pulmonary tissue that impair the elasticity and gas exchange properties of the lungs. Clinical-radiological diagnosis of these diseases remains challenging and their clinical course is characterized by variable disease progression. These challenges have hindered the introduction of robust objective biomarkers for patient-specific prediction based on specific phenotypes in clinical practice for patients with DPLD. Therefore, strategies facilitating individualized clinical management, staging and identification of specific phenotypes linked to clinical disease outcomes or therapeutic responses are urgently needed. A classification schema consistently reflecting the radiological, clinical (lung function and clinical outcomes) and pathological features of a disease represents a critical need in modern pulmonary medicine. Herein, we report a quantitative stratification paradigm to identify subsets of DPLD patients with characteristic radiologic patterns in an unsupervised manner and demonstrate significant correlation of these self-organized disease groups with clinically accepted surrogate endpoints. The proposed consistent and reproducible technique could potentially transform diagnostic staging, clinical management and prognostication of DPLD patients as well as facilitate patient selection for clinical trials beyond the ability of current radiological tools. In addition, the sequential quantitative stratification of the type and extent of parenchymal process may allow standardized and objective monitoring of disease, early assessment of treatment response and mortality prediction for DPLD patients. PMID:24676019

  3. The Quantitative Nature of Autistic Social Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, John N.

    2011-01-01

    Autism, like intellectual disability, represents the severe end of a continuous distribution of developmental impairments that occur in nature, that are highly inherited, and that are orthogonally related to other parameters of development. A paradigm shift in understanding the core social abnormality of autism as a quantitative trait rather than as a categorically-defined condition has key implications for diagnostic classification, the measurement of change over time, the search for underlying genetic and neurobiologic mechanisms, and public health efforts to identify and support affected children. Here a recent body of research in genetics and epidemiology is presented to examine a dimensional reconceptualization of autistic social impairment—as manifested in clinical autistic syndromes, the broader autism phenotype, and normal variation in the general population. It illustrates how traditional categorical approaches to diagnosis may lead to misclassification of subjects (especially girls and mildly affected boys in multiple-incidence autism families), which can be particularly damaging to biological studies, and proposes continued efforts to derive a standardized quantitative system by which to characterize this family of conditions. PMID:21289537

  4. Quantitative analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wainai, T; Mashimo, K [Nihon Univ., Tokyo. Coll. of Science and Engineering

    1976-04-01

    Recent papers on the practical quantitative analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) are reviewed. Specifically, the determination of moisture in liquid N/sub 2/O/sub 4/ as an oxidizing agent for rocket propulsion, the analysis of hydroperoxides, the quantitative analysis using a shift reagent, the analysis of aromatic sulfonates, and the determination of acids and bases are reviewed. Attention is paid to the accuracy. The sweeping velocity and RF level in addition to the other factors must be on the optimal condition to eliminate the errors, particularly when computation is made with a machine. Higher sweeping velocity is preferable in view of S/N ratio, but it may be limited to 30 Hz/s. The relative error in the measurement of area is generally 1%, but when those of dilute concentration and integrated, the error will become smaller by one digit. If impurities are treated carefully, the water content on N/sub 2/O/sub 4/ can be determined with accuracy of about 0.002%. The comparison method between peak heights is as accurate as that between areas, when the uniformity of magnetic field and T/sub 2/ are not questionable. In the case of chemical shift movable due to content, the substance can be determined by the position of the chemical shift. Oil and water contents in rape-seed, peanuts, and sunflower-seed are determined by measuring T/sub 1/ with 90 deg pulses.

  5. Immune chromatography: a quantitative radioimmunological assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.W.; Demetriades, M.; Bowen, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Immune chromatography, a radioimmunological binding assay, employs paper chromatography to separate immune complexes from free antigen and antibodies. During chromatography free antigen and antibodies become distributed throughout the paper, while immune complexes remain near the bottoms of the strips. The chromatographic differences can be made quantitative by using either iodinated antigens or antibodies. Under these conditions nanogram quantities of antigen can be detected or antibodies in sera diluted several 1000-fold. The immune chromatography assay can also be performed as an indirect assay, since the paper strips are cut from nitrocellulose paper. In this case the immune components are absorbed by the paper during chromatography. Antigen is then detected with an iodinated second antibody. The indirect immune chromatography assay is particularly useful for identifying different sera that react with the same antigen. Reaction with the first serum before chromatography reduces the amount of antigen available to the second serum following chromatography. In addition to characterizing the immune chromatography procedure, we discuss the possible applications of chromatography assays for the quantitation of other types of molecular binding interactions. (Auth.)

  6. Quantitative fluorescence nanoscopy for cancer biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Nickerson, Andrew; Peters, Alec; Nan, Xiaolin

    2015-08-01

    Cancer is a major health threat worldwide. Options for targeted cancer therapy, however, are often limited, in a large part due to our incomplete understanding of how key processes including oncogenesis and drug response are mediated at the molecular level. New imaging techniques for visualizing biomolecules and their interactions at the nanometer and single molecule scales, collectively named fluorescence nanoscopy, hold the promise to transform biomedical research by providing direct mechanistic insight into cellular processes. We discuss the principles of quantitative single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM), a subset of fluorescence nanoscopy, and their applications to cancer biomedicine. In particular, we will examine oncogenesis and drug resistance mediated by mutant Ras, which is associated with ~1/3 of all human cancers but has remained an intractable drug target. At ~20 nm spatial and single-molecule stoichiometric resolutions, SMLM clearly showed that mutant Ras must form dimers to activate its effector pathways and drive oncogenesis. SMLM further showed that the Raf kinase, one of the most important effectors of Ras, also forms dimers upon activation by Ras. Moreover, treatment of cells expressing wild type Raf with Raf inhibitors induces Raf dimer formation in a manner dependent on Ras dimerization. Together, these data suggest that Ras dimers mediate oncogenesis and drug resistance in tumors with hyperactive Ras and can potentially be targeted for cancer therapy. We also discuss recent advances in SMLM that enable simultaneous imaging of multiple biomolecules and their interactions at the nanoscale. Our work demonstrates the power of quantitative SMLM in cancer biomedicine.

  7. Quantitative analysis method for ship construction quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FU Senzong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The excellent performance of a ship is assured by the accurate evaluation of its construction quality. For a long time, research into the construction quality of ships has mainly focused on qualitative analysis due to a shortage of process data, which results from limited samples, varied process types and non-standardized processes. Aiming at predicting and controlling the influence of the construction process on the construction quality of ships, this article proposes a reliability quantitative analysis flow path for the ship construction process and fuzzy calculation method. Based on the process-quality factor model proposed by the Function-Oriented Quality Control (FOQC method, we combine fuzzy mathematics with the expert grading method to deduce formulations calculating the fuzzy process reliability of the ordinal connection model, series connection model and mixed connection model. The quantitative analysis method is applied in analyzing the process reliability of a ship's shaft gear box installation, which proves the applicability and effectiveness of the method. The analysis results can be a useful reference for setting key quality inspection points and optimizing key processes.

  8. Quantitative diagnosis of skeletons with demineralizing osteopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzer, D.

    1979-01-01

    The quantitative diagnosis of bone diseases must be assessed according to the accuracy of the applied method, the expense in apparatus, personnel and financial resources and the comparability of results. Nuclide absorptiometry and in the future perhaps computed tomography represent the most accurate methods for determining the mineral content of bones. Their application is the clinics' prerogative because of the costs. Morphometry provides quantiative information, in particular in course control, and enables an objective judgement of visual pictures. It requires little expenditure and should be combined with microradioscopy. Direct comparability of the findings of different working groups is most easy in morphometry; it depends on the equipment in computerized tomography and is still hardly possible in nuclide absorptiometry. For fundamental physical reason, it will hardly be possible to produce a low-cost, fast and easy-to-handle instrument for the determination of the mineral salt concentration in bones. Instead, there is rather a trend towards more expensive equipment, e.g. CT instruments; the universal use of these instruments, however, will help to promote quantitative diagnoses. (orig.) [de

  9. Quantitative Adverse Outcome Pathways and Their ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A quantitative adverse outcome pathway (qAOP) consists of one or more biologically based, computational models describing key event relationships linking a molecular initiating event (MIE) to an adverse outcome. A qAOP provides quantitative, dose–response, and time-course predictions that can support regulatory decision-making. Herein we describe several facets of qAOPs, including (a) motivation for development, (b) technical considerations, (c) evaluation of confidence, and (d) potential applications. The qAOP used as an illustrative example for these points describes the linkage between inhibition of cytochrome P450 19A aromatase (the MIE) and population-level decreases in the fathead minnow (FHM; Pimephales promelas). The qAOP consists of three linked computational models for the following: (a) the hypothalamic-pitutitary-gonadal axis in female FHMs, where aromatase inhibition decreases the conversion of testosterone to 17β-estradiol (E2), thereby reducing E2-dependent vitellogenin (VTG; egg yolk protein precursor) synthesis, (b) VTG-dependent egg development and spawning (fecundity), and (c) fecundity-dependent population trajectory. While development of the example qAOP was based on experiments with FHMs exposed to the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole, we also show how a toxic equivalence (TEQ) calculation allows use of the qAOP to predict effects of another, untested aromatase inhibitor, iprodione. While qAOP development can be resource-intensive, the quan

  10. Quantitative fluorescence angiography for neurosurgical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichelt, Claudia; Duscha, Philipp; Steinmeier, Ralf; Meyer, Tobias; Kuß, Julia; Cimalla, Peter; Kirsch, Matthias; Sobottka, Stephan B; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Morgenstern, Ute

    2013-06-01

    Present methods for quantitative measurement of cerebral perfusion during neurosurgical operations require additional technology for measurement, data acquisition, and processing. This study used conventional fluorescence video angiography--as an established method to visualize blood flow in brain vessels--enhanced by a quantifying perfusion software tool. For these purposes, the fluorescence dye indocyanine green is given intravenously, and after activation by a near-infrared light source the fluorescence signal is recorded. Video data are analyzed by software algorithms to allow quantification of the blood flow. Additionally, perfusion is measured intraoperatively by a reference system. Furthermore, comparing reference measurements using a flow phantom were performed to verify the quantitative blood flow results of the software and to validate the software algorithm. Analysis of intraoperative video data provides characteristic biological parameters. These parameters were implemented in the special flow phantom for experimental validation of the developed software algorithms. Furthermore, various factors that influence the determination of perfusion parameters were analyzed by means of mathematical simulation. Comparing patient measurement, phantom experiment, and computer simulation under certain conditions (variable frame rate, vessel diameter, etc.), the results of the software algorithms are within the range of parameter accuracy of the reference methods. Therefore, the software algorithm for calculating cortical perfusion parameters from video data presents a helpful intraoperative tool without complex additional measurement technology.

  11. Developments in quantitative electron probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tixier, R.

    1977-01-01

    A study of the range of validity of the formulae for corrections used with massive specimen analysis is made. The method used is original; we have shown that it was possible to use a property of invariability of corrected intensity ratios for standards. This invariance property provides a test for the self consistency of the theory. The theoretical and experimental conditions required for quantitative electron probe microanalysis of thin transmission electron microscope specimens are examined. The correction formulae for atomic number, absorption and fluorescence effects are calculated. Several examples of experimental results are given, relative to the quantitative analysis of intermetallic precipitates and carbides in steels. Advances in applications of electron probe instruments related to the use of computer and the present development of fully automated instruments are reviewed. The necessary statistics for measurements of X ray count data are studied. Estimation procedure and tests are developed. These methods are used to perform a statistical check of electron probe microanalysis measurements and to reject rogue values. An estimator of the confidence interval of the apparent concentration is derived. Formulae were also obtained to optimize the counting time in order to obtain the best precision in a minimum amount of time [fr

  12. Quantitative phase analysis by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Song, Su Ho; Lee, Jin Ho; Shim, Hae Seop [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-06-01

    This study is to apply quantitative phase analysis (QPA) by neutron diffraction to the round robin samples provided by the International Union of Crystallography(IUCr). We measured neutron diffraction patterns for mixed samples which have several different weight percentages and their unique characteristic features. Neutron diffraction method has been known to be superior to its complementary methods such as X-ray or Synchrotron, but it is still accepted as highly reliable under limited conditions or samples. Neutron diffraction has strong capability especially on oxides due to its scattering cross-section of the oxygen and it can become a more strong tool for analysis on the industrial materials with this quantitative phase analysis techniques. By doing this study, we hope not only to do one of instrument performance tests on our HRPD but also to improve our ability on the analysis of neutron diffraction data by comparing our QPA results with others from any advanced reactor facilities. 14 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs. (Author)

  13. Quantitative evaluations of male pattern baldness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Y; Ishino, A; Hanzawa, N; Uzuka, M; Okazaki, K; Adachi, K; Imamura, S

    1994-07-01

    Several methods for the evaluation of hair growth have been reported; however, none of the hitherto reported methods are satisfactory as unbiased double blind studies to evaluate the efficacy of hair growth agents. In the present paper, we describe quantitative evaluation methods for hair growth by measuring the anagen ratio and hair diameters in 56 Japanese subjects aged 23-56 for 3 years. The average anagen ratio decreased by 3.8% in 3 years. The average hair diameters showed a statistically significant decrease each year totalling 3.4 microns. Subjects were sorted according to their anagen ratio into 4 groups. Each group showed different distribution patterns of hair diameters. The higher anagen ratio group has a high frequency peak at thicker hair diameters and the lower anagen ratio group has a high frequency peak at thinner hair diameters. The number of thicker hairs decreased and the high frequency peak shifted to thinner hair diameters in 3 years. These methods are useful to evaluate both the progression of male pattern baldness and the effects of hair growth agents with double blind studies in an unbiased quantitative fashion.

  14. Technological innovation in neurosurgery: a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Hani J; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Kwasnicki, Richard M; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Nandi, Dipankar

    2015-07-01

    Technological innovation within health care may be defined as the introduction of a new technology that initiates a change in clinical practice. Neurosurgery is a particularly technology-intensive surgical discipline, and new technologies have preceded many of the major advances in operative neurosurgical techniques. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate technological innovation in neurosurgery using patents and peer-reviewed publications as metrics of technology development and clinical translation, respectively. The authors searched a patent database for articles published between 1960 and 2010 using the Boolean search term "neurosurgeon OR neurosurgical OR neurosurgery." The top 50 performing patent codes were then grouped into technology clusters. Patent and publication growth curves were then generated for these technology clusters. A top-performing technology cluster was then selected as an exemplar for a more detailed analysis of individual patents. In all, 11,672 patents and 208,203 publications related to neurosurgery were identified. The top-performing technology clusters during these 50 years were image-guidance devices, clinical neurophysiology devices, neuromodulation devices, operating microscopes, and endoscopes. In relation to image-guidance and neuromodulation devices, the authors found a highly correlated rapid rise in the numbers of patents and publications, which suggests that these are areas of technology expansion. An in-depth analysis of neuromodulation-device patents revealed that the majority of well-performing patents were related to deep brain stimulation. Patent and publication data may be used to quantitatively evaluate technological innovation in neurosurgery.

  15. Quantitative assessment of growth plate activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harcke, H.T.; Macy, N.J.; Mandell, G.A.; MacEwen, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    In the immature skeleton the physis or growth plate is the area of bone least able to withstand external forces and is therefore prone to trauma. Such trauma often leads to premature closure of the plate and results in limb shortening and/or angular deformity (varus or valgus). Active localization of bone seeking tracers in the physis makes bone scintigraphy an excellent method for assessing growth plate physiology. To be most effective, however, physeal activity should be quantified so that serial evaluations are accurate and comparable. The authors have developed a quantitative method for assessing physeal activity and have applied it ot the hip and knee. Using computer acquired pinhole images of the abnormal and contralateral normal joints, ten regions of interest are placed at key locations around each joint and comparative ratios are generated to form a growth plate profile. The ratios compare segmental physeal activity to total growth plate activity on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides and to adjacent bone. In 25 patients, ages 2 to 15 years, with angular deformities of the legs secondary to trauma, Blount's disease, and Perthes disease, this technique is able to differentiate abnormal segmental physeal activity. This is important since plate closure does not usually occur uniformly across the physis. The technique may permit the use of scintigraphy in the prediction of early closure through the quantitative analysis of serial studies

  16. Quantitative tomographic measurements of opaque multiphase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GEORGE,DARIN L.; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.; SHOLLENBERGER,KIM ANN; O' HERN,TIMOTHY J.; CECCIO,STEVEN L.

    2000-03-01

    An electrical-impedance tomography (EIT) system has been developed for quantitative measurements of radial phase distribution profiles in two-phase and three-phase vertical column flows. The EIT system is described along with the computer algorithm used for reconstructing phase volume fraction profiles. EIT measurements were validated by comparison with a gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT) system. The EIT system was used to accurately measure average solid volume fractions up to 0.05 in solid-liquid flows, and radial gas volume fraction profiles in gas-liquid flows with gas volume fractions up to 0.15. In both flows, average phase volume fractions and radial volume fraction profiles from GDT and EIT were in good agreement. A minor modification to the formula used to relate conductivity data to phase volume fractions was found to improve agreement between the methods. GDT and EIT were then applied together to simultaneously measure the solid, liquid, and gas radial distributions within several vertical three-phase flows. For average solid volume fractions up to 0.30, the gas distribution for each gas flow rate was approximately independent of the amount of solids in the column. Measurements made with this EIT system demonstrate that EIT may be used successfully for noninvasive, quantitative measurements of dispersed multiphase flows.

  17. Allometric trajectories and "stress": a quantitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Anfodillo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The term stress is an important but vague term in plant biology. We show situations in which thinking in terms of stress is profitably replaced by quantifying distance from functionally optimal scaling relationships between plant parts. These relationships include, for example, the often-cited one between leaf area and sapwood area, which presumably reflects mutual dependence between source and sink tissues and which scales positively within individuals and across species. These relationships seem to be so basic to plant functioning that they are favored by selection across nearly all plant lineages. Within a species or population, individuals that are far from the common scaling patterns are thus expected to perform negatively. For instance, too little leaf area (e.g. due to herbivory or disease per unit of active stem mass would be expected to incur to low carbon income per respiratory cost and thus lead to lower growth. We present a framework that allows quantitative study of phenomena traditionally assigned to stress, without need for recourse to this term. Our approach contrasts with traditional approaches for studying stress, e.g. revealing that small stressed plants likely are in fact well suited to local conditions. We thus offer a quantitative perspective to the study of phenomena often referred to under such terms as stress, plasticity, adaptation, and acclimation.

  18. Allometric Trajectories and "Stress": A Quantitative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfodillo, Tommaso; Petit, Giai; Sterck, Frank; Lechthaler, Silvia; Olson, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    The term "stress" is an important but vague term in plant biology. We show situations in which thinking in terms of "stress" is profitably replaced by quantifying distance from functionally optimal scaling relationships between plant parts. These relationships include, for example, the often-cited one between leaf area and sapwood area, which presumably reflects mutual dependence between sources and sink tissues and which scales positively within individuals and across species. These relationships seem to be so basic to plant functioning that they are favored by selection across nearly all plant lineages. Within a species or population, individuals that are far from the common scaling patterns are thus expected to perform negatively. For instance, "too little" leaf area (e.g., due to herbivory or disease) per unit of active stem mass would be expected to incur to low carbon income per respiratory cost and thus lead to lower growth. We present a framework that allows quantitative study of phenomena traditionally assigned to "stress," without need for recourse to this term. Our approach contrasts with traditional approaches for studying "stress," e.g., revealing that small "stressed" plants likely are in fact well suited to local conditions. We thus offer a quantitative perspective to the study of phenomena often referred to under such terms as "stress," plasticity, adaptation, and acclimation.

  19. Quantitative standard-less XRF analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulitzka, S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: For most analytical tasks in the mining and associated industries matrix-matched calibrations are used for the monitoring of ore grades and process control. In general, such calibrations are product specific (iron ore, bauxite, alumina, mineral sands, cement etc.) and apply to a relatively narrow concentration range but give the best precision and accuracy for those materials. A wide range of CRMs is available and for less common materials synthetic standards can be made up from 'pure' chemicals. At times, analysis of materials with varying matrices (powders, scales, fly ash, alloys, polymers, liquors, etc.) and diverse physical shapes (non-flat, metal drillings, thin layers on substrates etc.) is required that could also contain elements which are not part of a specific calibration. A qualitative analysis can provide information about the presence of certain elements and the relative intensities of element peaks in a scan can give a rough idea about their concentrations. More often however, quantitative values are required. The paper will look into the basics of quantitative standardless analysis and show results for some well-defined CRMs. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  20. Analysis of Ingredient Lists to Quantitatively Characterize ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s ExpoCast program is developing high throughput (HT) approaches to generate the needed exposure estimates to compare against HT bioactivity data generated from the US inter-agency Tox21 and the US EPA ToxCast programs. Assessing such exposures for the thousands of chemicals in consumer products requires data on product composition. This is a challenge since quantitative product composition data are rarely available. We developed methods to predict the weight fractions of chemicals in consumer products from weight fraction-ordered chemical ingredient lists, and curated a library of such lists from online manufacturer and retailer sites. The probabilistic model predicts weight fraction as a function of the total number of reported ingredients, the rank of the ingredient in the list, the minimum weight fraction for which ingredients were reported, and the total weight fraction of unreported ingredients. Weight fractions predicted by the model compared very well to available quantitative weight fraction data obtained from Material Safety Data Sheets for products with 3-8 ingredients. Lists were located from the online sources for 5148 products containing 8422 unique ingredient names. A total of 1100 of these names could be located in EPA’s HT chemical database (DSSTox), and linked to 864 unique Chemical Abstract Service Registration Numbers (392 of which were in the Tox21 chemical library). Weight fractions were estimated for these 864 CASRN. Using a

  1. Another Curriculum Requirement? Quantitative Reasoning in Economics: Some First Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Patrick B.; Flynn, David T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe first steps toward focusing on quantitative reasoning in an intermediate microeconomic theory course. We find student attitudes toward quantitative aspects of economics improve over the duration of the course (as we would hope). Perhaps more importantly, student attitude toward quantitative reasoning improves, in…

  2. Quantitative Literacy Courses as a Space for Fusing Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunstall, Samuel Luke; Matz, Rebecca L.; Craig, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we examine how students in a general education quantitative literacy course reason with public issues when unprompted to use quantitative reasoning. Michigan State University, like many institutions, not only has a quantitative literacy requirement for all undergraduates but also offers two courses specifically for meeting the…

  3. Videodensitometric quantitative angiography after coronary balloon angioplasty, compared to edge-detection quantitative angiography and intracoronary ultrasound imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R. J.; Kok, W. E.; Pasterkamp, G.; von Birgelen, C.; Prins, M. [=Martin H.; Serruys, P. W.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the value of videodensitometric quantification of the coronary lumen after angioplasty by comparison to two other techniques of coronary artery lumen quantification. METHODS AND RESULTS: Videodensitometric quantitative angiography, edge detection quantitative angiography and 30 MHz

  4. Good practices for quantitative bias analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, Timothy L; Fox, Matthew P; MacLehose, Richard F; Maldonado, George; McCandless, Lawrence C; Greenland, Sander

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative bias analysis serves several objectives in epidemiological research. First, it provides a quantitative estimate of the direction, magnitude and uncertainty arising from systematic errors. Second, the acts of identifying sources of systematic error, writing down models to quantify them, assigning values to the bias parameters and interpreting the results combat the human tendency towards overconfidence in research results, syntheses and critiques and the inferences that rest upon them. Finally, by suggesting aspects that dominate uncertainty in a particular research result or topic area, bias analysis can guide efficient allocation of sparse research resources. The fundamental methods of bias analyses have been known for decades, and there have been calls for more widespread use for nearly as long. There was a time when some believed that bias analyses were rarely undertaken because the methods were not widely known and because automated computing tools were not readily available to implement the methods. These shortcomings have been largely resolved. We must, therefore, contemplate other barriers to implementation. One possibility is that practitioners avoid the analyses because they lack confidence in the practice of bias analysis. The purpose of this paper is therefore to describe what we view as good practices for applying quantitative bias analysis to epidemiological data, directed towards those familiar with the methods. We focus on answering questions often posed to those of us who advocate incorporation of bias analysis methods into teaching and research. These include the following. When is bias analysis practical and productive? How does one select the biases that ought to be addressed? How does one select a method to model biases? How does one assign values to the parameters of a bias model? How does one present and interpret a bias analysis?. We hope that our guide to good practices for conducting and presenting bias analyses will encourage

  5. [Progress in stable isotope labeled quantitative proteomics methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Shan, Yichu; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative proteomics is an important research field in post-genomics era. There are two strategies for proteome quantification: label-free methods and stable isotope labeling methods which have become the most important strategy for quantitative proteomics at present. In the past few years, a number of quantitative methods have been developed, which support the fast development in biology research. In this work, we discuss the progress in the stable isotope labeling methods for quantitative proteomics including relative and absolute quantitative proteomics, and then give our opinions on the outlook of proteome quantification methods.

  6. Real time quantitative amplification detection on a microarray: towards high multiplex quantitative PCR.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, A.; Moamfa, M; van Zelst, M.; Clout, D.; Stapert, H.; Dijksman, Johan Frederik; Broer, D.; Wimberger-Friedl, R.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qrtPCR) is widely used as a research and diagnostic tool. Notwithstanding its many powerful features, the method is limited in the degree of multiplexing to about 6 due to spectral overlap of the available fluorophores. A new method is presented that

  7. Real time quantitative amplification detection on a microarray : towards high multiplex quantitative PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, Anke; Boamfa, M.; Zelst, van M.; Clout, D.; Stapert, H.R.; Dijksman, J.F.; Broer, D.J.; Wimberger-Friedl, R.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qrtPCR) is widely used as a research and diagnostic tool. Notwithstanding its many powerful features, the method is limited in the degree of multiplexing to about 6 due to spectral overlap of the available fluorophores. A new method is presented that

  8. Quantitative Determination of Aluminum in Deodorant Brands: A Guided Inquiry Learning Experience in Quantitative Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedwick, Victoria; Leal, Anne; Turner, Dea; Kanu, A. Bakarr

    2018-01-01

    The monitoring of metals in commercial products is essential for protecting public health against the hazards of metal toxicity. This article presents a guided inquiry (GI) experimental lab approach in a quantitative analysis lab class that enabled students' to determine the levels of aluminum in deodorant brands. The utility of a GI experimental…

  9. Progress towards in vitro quantitative imaging of human femur using compound quantitative ultrasonic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasaygues, Philippe; Ouedraogo, Edgard; Lefebvre, Jean-Pierre; Gindre, Marcel; Talmant, Marilyne; Laugier, Pascal

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to make cross-sectional ultrasonic quantitative tomography of the diaphysis of long bones. Ultrasonic propagation in bones is affected by the severe mismatch between the acoustic properties of this biological solid and those of the surrounding soft medium, namely, the soft tissues in vivo or water in vitro. Bone imaging is then a nonlinear inverse-scattering problem. In this paper, we showed that in vitro quantitative images of sound velocities in a human femur cross section could be reconstructed by combining ultrasonic reflection tomography (URT), which provides images of the macroscopic structure of the bone, and ultrasonic transmission tomography (UTT), which provides quantitative images of the sound velocity. For the shape, we developed an image-processing tool to extract the external and internal boundaries and cortical thickness measurements. For velocity mapping, we used a wavelet analysis tool adapted to ultrasound, which allowed us to detect precisely the time of flight from the transmitted signals. A brief review of the ultrasonic tomography that we developed using correction algorithms of the wavepaths and compensation procedures are presented. Also shown are the first results of our analyses on models and specimens of long bone using our new iterative quantitative protocol

  10. Electrostatically driven resonance energy transfer in “cationic” biocompatible indium phosphide quantum dots† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental methods, the synthesis and characterization of QDs, bioimaging, stability studies, control experiments, and the calculation of various parameters involved in the resonance energy transfer process etc. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc00592j Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devatha, Gayathri; Roy, Soumendu; Rao, Anish; Mallick, Abhik; Basu, Sudipta

    2017-01-01

    Indium Phosphide Quantum Dots (InP QDs) have emerged as an alternative to toxic metal ion based QDs in nanobiotechnology. The ability to generate cationic surface charge, without compromising stability and biocompatibility, is essential in realizing the full potential of InP QDs in biological applications. We have addressed this challenge by developing a place exchange protocol for the preparation of cationic InP/ZnS QDs. The quaternary ammonium group provides the much required permanent positive charge and stability to InP/ZnS QDs in biofluids. The two important properties of QDs, namely bioimaging and light induced resonance energy transfer, are successfully demonstrated in cationic InP/ZnS QDs. The low cytotoxicity and stable photoluminescence of cationic InP/ZnS QDs inside cells make them ideal candidates as optical probes for cellular imaging. An efficient resonance energy transfer (E ∼ 60%) is observed, under physiological conditions, between the cationic InP/ZnS QD donor and anionic dye acceptor. A large bimolecular quenching constant along with a linear Stern–Volmer plot confirms the formation of a strong ground state complex between the cationic InP/ZnS QDs and the anionic dye. Control experiments prove the role of electrostatic attraction in driving the light induced interactions, which can rightfully form the basis for future nano-bio studies between cationic InP/ZnS QDs and anionic biomolecules. PMID:28626557

  11. Characterization of calcium and zinc spatial distributions at the fibrocartilage zone of bone-tendon junction by synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis combined with backscattered electron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongbin; Chen, Can; Wang, Zhanwen; Qu, Jin; Xu, Daqi; Wu, Tianding; Cao, Yong; Zhou, Jingyong; Zheng, Cheng; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-09-01

    Tendon attaches to bone through a functionally graded fibrocartilage zone, including uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF), tidemark (TM) and calcified fibrocartilage (CF). This transition zone plays a pivotal role in relaxing load transfer between tendon and bone, and serves as a boundary between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. Calcium and zinc are believed to play important roles in the normal growth, mineralization, and repair of the fibrocartilage zone of bone-tendon junction (BTJ). However, spatial distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of BTJ and their distribution-function relationship are not totally understood. Thus, synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μXRF) in combination with backscattered electron imaging (BEI) was employed to characterize the distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of rabbit patella-patellar tendon complex (PPTC). For the first time, the unique distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were clearly mapped by this method. The distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were inhomogeneous. A significant accumulation of zinc was exhibited in the transition region between UF and CF. The highest zinc content (3.17 times of that of patellar tendon) was found in the TM of fibrocartilage zone. The calcium content began to increase near the TM and increased exponentially across the calcified fibrocartilage region towards the patella. The highest calcium content (43.14 times of that of patellar tendon) was in the transitional zone of calcified fibrocartilage region and the patella, approximately 69 μm from the location with the highest zinc content. This study indicated, for the first time, that there is a differential distribution of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of PPTC. These observations reveal new insights into region-dependent changes across the fibrocartilage zone of

  12. Winston-Lutz Test: A quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Aline Garcia; Nandi, Dorival Menegaz; Saraiva, Crystian Wilian Chagas

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Describe a method of quantitative analysis for the Winston-Lutz test. Materials and methods The research is a qualitative exploratory study. The materials used were: portal film; Winston- Lutz test tools and Omni Pro software. Sixteen portal films were used as samples and were analyzed by five different technicians to measure the deviation between the radiation isocenters and mechanic. Results: Among the results were identified two combinations with offset values greater than 1 mm. In addition, when compared the method developed with the previously studied, it was observed that the data obtained are very close, with the maximum percentage deviation of 32.5%, which demonstrates its efficacy in reducing dependence on the performer. Conclusion: The results show that the method is reproducible and practical, which constitutes one of the fundamental factors for its implementation. (author)

  13. Quantitative recurrence for free semigroup actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Maria; Rodrigues, Fagner B.; Varandas, Paulo

    2018-03-01

    We consider finitely generated free semigroup actions on a compact metric space and obtain quantitative information on Poincaré recurrence, average first return time and hitting frequency for the random orbits induced by the semigroup action. Besides, we relate the recurrence to balls with the rates of expansion of the semigroup generators and the topological entropy of the semigroup action. Finally, we establish a partial variational principle and prove an ergodic optimization for this kind of dynamical action. MC has been financially supported by CMUP (UID/MAT/00144/2013), which is funded by FCT (Portugal) with national (MEC) and European structural funds (FEDER) under the partnership agreement PT2020. FR and PV were partially supported by BREUDS. PV has also benefited from a fellowship awarded by CNPq-Brazil and is grateful to the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Porto for the excellent research conditions.

  14. Nailfold capillaroscopic report: qualitative and quantitative methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zeni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nailfold capillaroscopy (NVC is a simple and non-invasive method used for the assessment of patients with Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP and in the differential diagnosis of various connective tissue diseases. The scleroderma pattern abnormalities (giant capillaries, haemorrages and/or avascular areas have a positive predictive value for the development of scleroderma spectrum disorders. Thus, an analytical approach to nailfold capillaroscopy can be useful in quantitatively and reproducibly recording various parameters. We developed a new method to assess patients with RP that is capable of predicting the 5-year transition from isolated RP to RP secondary to scleroderma spectrum disorders. This model is a weighted combination of different capillaroscopic parameters (giant capillaries, microhaemorrages, number of capillaries that allows physicians to stratify RP patients easily using a relatively simple diagram to deduce prognosis.

  15. Quantitative radiation monitors for containment and surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative radiation monitors make it possible to differentiate between shielded and unshielded nuclear materials. The hardness of the gamma-ray spectrum is the attribute that characterizes bare or shielded material. Separate high- and low-energy gamma-ray regions are obtained from a single-channel analyzer through its window and discriminator outputs. The monitor counts both outputs and computes a ratio of the high- and low-energy region counts whenever an alarm occurs. The ratio clearly differentiates between shielded and unshielded nuclear material so that the net alarm count may be identified with a small quantity of unshielded material or a large quantity of shielded material. Knowledge of the diverted quantity helps determine whether an inventory should be called to identify the loss

  16. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of postmortem muscle development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Honggang

    Meat quality development is highly dependent on postmortem (PM) metabolism and rigor mortis development in PM muscle. PM glycometabolism and rigor mortis fundamentally determine most of the important qualities of raw meat, such as ultimate pH, tenderness, color and water-holding capacity. Protein...... phosphorylation is known to play essential roles on regulating metabolism, contraction and other important activities in muscle systems. However, protein phosphorylation has rarely been systematically explored in PM muscle in relation to meat quality. In this PhD project, both gel-based and mass spectrometry (MS......)-based quantitative phosphoproteomic strategies were employed to analyze PM muscle with the aim to intensively characterize the protein phosphorylation involved in meat quality development. Firstly, gel-based phosphoproteomic studies were performed to analyze the protein phosphorylation in both sarcoplasmic proteins...

  17. The quantitative modelling of human spatial habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A model for the quantitative assessment of human spatial habitability is presented in the space station context. The visual aspect assesses how interior spaces appear to the inhabitants. This aspect concerns criteria such as sensed spaciousness and the affective (emotional) connotations of settings' appearances. The kinesthetic aspect evaluates the available space in terms of its suitability to accommodate human movement patterns, as well as the postural and anthrometric changes due to microgravity. Finally, social logic concerns how the volume and geometry of available space either affirms or contravenes established social and organizational expectations for spatial arrangements. Here, the criteria include privacy, status, social power, and proxemics (the uses of space as a medium of social communication).

  18. Quantitative models for sustainable supply chain management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandenburg, M.; Govindan, Kannan; Sarkis, J.

    2014-01-01

    and directions of this research area, this paper provides a content analysis of 134 carefully identified papers on quantitative, formal models that address sustainability aspects in the forward SC. It was found that a preponderance of the publications and models appeared in a limited set of six journals......Sustainability, the consideration of environmental factors and social aspects, in supply chain management (SCM) has become a highly relevant topic for researchers and practitioners. The application of operations research methods and related models, i.e. formal modeling, for closed-loop SCM...... and reverse logistics has been effectively reviewed in previously published research. This situation is in contrast to the understanding and review of mathematical models that focus on environmental or social factors in forward supply chains (SC), which has seen less investigation. To evaluate developments...

  19. Review of progress in quantitative nondestructive evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Chimenti, Dale

    1999-01-01

    This series provides a comprehensive review of the latest research results in quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Leading investigators working in government agencies, major industries, and universities present a broad spectrum of work extending from basic research to early engineering applications. An international assembly of noted authorities in NDE thoroughly cover such topics as: elastic waves, guided waves, and eddy-current detection, inversion, and modeling; radiography and computed tomography, thermal techniques, and acoustic emission; laser ultrasonics, optical methods, and microwaves; signal processing and image analysis and reconstruction, with an emphasis on interpretation for defect detection; and NDE sensors and fields, both ultrasonic and electromagnetic; engineered materials and composites, bonded joints, pipes, tubing, and biomedical materials; linear and nonlinear properties, ultrasonic backscatter and microstructure, coatings and layers, residual stress and texture, and constructi...

  20. Quantitative Analysis in Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a review of image analysis techniques as they are applied in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Driven in part by the remarkable increase in computing power and its ready and inexpensive availability, this is a relatively new yet rapidly expanding field. Likewise, although the use of radionuclides for diagnosis and therapy has origins dating back almost to the discovery of natural radioactivity itself, radionuclide therapy and, in particular, targeted radionuclide therapy has only recently emerged as a promising approach for therapy of cancer and, to a lesser extent, other diseases. As effort has, therefore, been made to place the reviews provided in this book in a broader context. The effort to do this is reflected by the inclusion of introductory chapters that address basic principles of nuclear medicine imaging, followed by overview of issues that are closely related to quantitative nuclear imaging and its potential role in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. ...

  1. Quantitative aspects of myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion measurements have traditionally been performed in a quantitative fashion using application of the Sapirstein, Fick, Kety-Schmidt, or compartmental analysis principles. Although global myocardial blood flow measurements have not proven clinically useful, regional determinations have substantially advanced our understanding of and ability to detect myocardial ischemia. With the introduction of thallium-201, such studies have become widely available, although these have generally undergone qualitative evaluation. Using computer-digitized data, several methods for the quantification of myocardial perfusion images have been introduced. These include orthogonal and polar coordinate systems and anatomically oriented region of interest segmentation. Statistical ranges of normal and time-activity analyses have been applied to these data, resulting in objective and reproducible means of data evaluation

  2. Quantitative Estimation for the Effectiveness of Automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Min; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    In advanced MCR, various automation systems are applied to enhance the human performance and reduce the human errors in industrial fields. It is expected that automation provides greater efficiency, lower workload, and fewer human errors. However, these promises are not always fulfilled. As the new types of events related to application of the imperfect and complex automation are occurred, it is required to analyze the effects of automation system for the performance of human operators. Therefore, we suggest the quantitative estimation method to analyze the effectiveness of the automation systems according to Level of Automation (LOA) classification, which has been developed over 30 years. The estimation of the effectiveness of automation will be achieved by calculating the failure probability of human performance related to the cognitive activities

  3. Quantitative Efficiency Evaluation Method for Transportation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Qin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An effective evaluation of transportation network efficiency/performance is essential to the establishment of sustainable development in any transportation system. Based on a redefinition of transportation network efficiency, a quantitative efficiency evaluation method for transportation network is proposed, which could reflect the effects of network structure, traffic demands, travel choice, and travel costs on network efficiency. Furthermore, the efficiency-oriented importance measure for network components is presented, which can be used to help engineers identify the critical nodes and links in the network. The numerical examples show that, compared with existing efficiency evaluation methods, the network efficiency value calculated by the method proposed in this paper can portray the real operation situation of the transportation network as well as the effects of main factors on network efficiency. We also find that the network efficiency and the importance values of the network components both are functions of demands and network structure in the transportation network.

  4. Quantitative Accelerated Life Testing of MEMS Accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bâzu, Marius; Gălăţeanu, Lucian; Ilian, Virgil Emil; Loicq, Jerome; Habraken, Serge; Collette, Jean-Paul

    2007-11-20

    Quantitative Accelerated Life Testing (QALT) is a solution for assessing thereliability of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). A procedure for QALT is shownin this paper and an attempt to assess the reliability level for a batch of MEMSaccelerometers is reported. The testing plan is application-driven and contains combinedtests: thermal (high temperature) and mechanical stress. Two variants of mechanical stressare used: vibration (at a fixed frequency) and tilting. Original equipment for testing at tiltingand high temperature is used. Tilting is appropriate as application-driven stress, because thetilt movement is a natural environment for devices used for automotive and aerospaceapplications. Also, tilting is used by MEMS accelerometers for anti-theft systems. The testresults demonstrated the excellent reliability of the studied devices, the failure rate in the"worst case" being smaller than 10 -7 h -1 .

  5. Nonparametric functional mapping of quantitative trait loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Wu, Rongling; Casella, George

    2009-03-01

    Functional mapping is a useful tool for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) that control dynamic traits. It incorporates mathematical aspects of biological processes into the mixture model-based likelihood setting for QTL mapping, thus increasing the power of QTL detection and the precision of parameter estimation. However, in many situations there is no obvious functional form and, in such cases, this strategy will not be optimal. Here we propose to use nonparametric function estimation, typically implemented with B-splines, to estimate the underlying functional form of phenotypic trajectories, and then construct a nonparametric test to find evidence of existing QTL. Using the representation of a nonparametric regression as a mixed model, the final test statistic is a likelihood ratio test. We consider two types of genetic maps: dense maps and general maps, and the power of nonparametric functional mapping is investigated through simulation studies and demonstrated by examples.

  6. Immune adherence: a quantitative and kinetic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, T [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Research Inst.

    1978-09-01

    Quantitative and kinetic analysis of the immune-adherence reaction (IA) between C3b fragments and IA receptors as an agglutination reaction is difficult. Analysis is possible, however, by use of radio-iodinated bovine serum albumin as antigen at low concentrations (less than 200 ng/ml) and optimal concentration of antibody to avoid precipitation of antigen-antibody complexes with human erythrocytes without participation of complement. Antigen and antibody are reacted at 37/sup 0/C, complement is added, the mixture incubated and human erythrocytes added; after further incubation, ice-cold EDTA containing buffer is added and the erythrocytes centrifuged and assayed for radioactivity. Control cells reacted with heated guinea pig serum retained less than 5% of the added radioactivity. The method facilitates measurement of IA reactivity and permits more detailed analysis of the mechanism underlying the reaction.

  7. Quantitative MFM on superconducting thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopfel, Henry; Vock, Silvia; Shapoval, Tetyana; Neu, Volker; Wolff, Ulrike; Haindl, Silvia; Engelmann, Jan; Schaefer, Rudolf; Holzapfel, Bernhard; Schultz, Ludwig [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Material (Germany); Inosov, Dmytro S. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Quantitative interpretation of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) data is a challenge, because the measured signal is a convolution between the magnetization of the tip and the stray field emanated by the sample. It was established theoretically that the field distribution just above the surface of the superconductor can be well approximated by the stray field of a magnetic monopole. The description of the MFM tip, however, needs a second approximation. The temperature-dependent vortex-distribution images on a NbN thin film were fitted using two different tip models. Firstly, the magnetic tip was assumed to be a monopole that leads to the simple monopole-monopole model for the tip-sample interaction force. Performing a 2D fitting of the data with this model, we extracted λ, Δ and the vortex pinning force. Secondly, a geometrical model was applied to calculate the tip-transfer-function of the MFM tip using the numerical BEM method.

  8. Quantitative linking hypotheses for infant eye movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Yurovsky

    Full Text Available The study of cognitive development hinges, largely, on the analysis of infant looking. But analyses of eye gaze data require the adoption of linking hypotheses: assumptions about the relationship between observed eye movements and underlying cognitive processes. We develop a general framework for constructing, testing, and comparing these hypotheses, and thus for producing new insights into early cognitive development. We first introduce the general framework--applicable to any infant gaze experiment--and then demonstrate its utility by analyzing data from a set of experiments investigating the role of attentional cues in infant learning. The new analysis uncovers significantly more structure in these data, finding evidence of learning that was not found in standard analyses and showing an unexpected relationship between cue use and learning rate. Finally, we discuss general implications for the construction and testing of quantitative linking hypotheses. MATLAB code for sample linking hypotheses can be found on the first author's website.

  9. Safety culture management and quantitative indicator evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandula, J.

    2002-01-01

    This report discuses a relationship between safety culture and evaluation of quantitative indicators. It shows how a systematic use of generally shared operational safety indicators may contribute to formation and reinforcement of safety culture characteristics in routine plant operation. The report also briefly describes the system of operational safety indicators used at the Dukovany plant. It is a PC database application enabling an effective work with the indicators and providing all users with an efficient tool for making synoptic overviews of indicator values in their links and hierarchical structure. Using color coding, the system allows quick indicator evaluation against predefined limits considering indicator value trends. The system, which has resulted from several-year development, was completely established at the plant during the years 2001 and 2002. (author)

  10. Geomorphology: now a more quantitative science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, D.

    1995-01-01

    Geomorphology, one of the oldest branches of planetary science, is now growing into a quantitative field with the development of a nuclear method capable of providing numeric time controls on a great variety of superficial processes. The method complement the conventional dating methods, e.g. 40 K/ 40 Ar, 87 Rb/ 87 Sr, by providing information on geomorphic processes., e.g. the dwell times of rocks on the earth's surface with strict geometrical constraints; e.g., rates of physical and chemical weathering in the past, chronology of events associated with glaciation, etc. This article attempts to discuss the new possibilities that now exist for studying a wide range of geomorphic processes, with examples of some specific isotopic changes that allow one to model glacial chronology, and evolutionary histories of alluvial fans and sand dunes. (author). 9 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Investment appraisal using quantitative risk analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Henrik

    2002-07-01

    Investment appraisal concerned with investments in fire safety systems is discussed. Particular attention is directed at evaluating, in terms of the Bayesian decision theory, the risk reduction that investment in a fire safety system involves. It is shown how the monetary value of the change from a building design without any specific fire protection system to one including such a system can be estimated by use of quantitative risk analysis, the results of which are expressed in terms of a Risk-adjusted net present value. This represents the intrinsic monetary value of investing in the fire safety system. The method suggested is exemplified by a case study performed in an Avesta Sheffield factory.

  12. Quantitative measurement of the cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houdart, R.; Mamo, H.; Meric, P.; Seylaz, J.

    1976-01-01

    The value of the cerebral blood flow measurement (CBF) is outlined, its limits are defined and some future prospects discussed. The xenon 133 brain clearance study is at present the most accurate quantitative method to evaluate the CBF in different regions of the brain simultaneously. The method and the progress it has led to in the physiological, physiopathological and therapeutic fields are described. The major disadvantage of the method is shown to be the need to puncture the internal carotid for each measurement. Prospects are discussed concerning methods derived from the same general principle but using a simpler, non-traumatic way to introduce the radio-tracer, either by breathing into the lungs or intraveinously [fr

  13. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langkammer, Christian; Pirpamer, Lukas; Seiler, Stephan; Deistung, Andreas; Schweser, Ferdinand; Franthal, Sebastian; Homayoon, Nina; Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Koegl-Wallner, Mariella; Pendl, Tamara; Stoegerer, Eva Maria; Wenzel, Karoline; Fazekas, Franz; Ropele, Stefan; Reichenbach, Jürgen Rainer; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schwingenschuh, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and R2* relaxation rate mapping have demonstrated increased iron deposition in the substantia nigra of patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the findings in other subcortical deep gray matter nuclei are converse and the sensitivity of QSM and R2* for morphological changes and their relation to clinical measures of disease severity has so far been investigated only sparsely. The local ethics committee approved this study and all subjects gave written informed consent. 66 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 58 control subjects underwent quantitative MRI at 3T. Susceptibility and R2* maps were reconstructed from a spoiled multi-echo 3D gradient echo sequence. Mean susceptibilities and R2* rates were measured in subcortical deep gray matter nuclei and compared between patients with PD and controls as well as related to clinical variables. Compared to control subjects, patients with PD had increased R2* values in the substantia nigra. QSM also showed higher susceptibilities in patients with PD in substantia nigra, in the nucleus ruber, thalamus, and globus pallidus. Magnetic susceptibility of several of these structures was correlated with the levodopa-equivalent daily dose (LEDD) and clinical markers of motor and non-motor disease severity (total MDS-UPDRS, MDS-UPDRS-I and II). Disease severity as assessed by the Hoehn & Yahr scale was correlated with magnetic susceptibility in the substantia nigra. The established finding of higher R2* rates in the substantia nigra was extended by QSM showing superior sensitivity for PD-related tissue changes in nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways. QSM additionally reflected the levodopa-dosage and disease severity. These results suggest a more widespread pathologic involvement and QSM as a novel means for its investigation, more sensitive than current MRI techniques.

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Thallium-201 Myocardial Tomograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Eun; Nam, Gi Byung; Choi, Chang Woon

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of quantitative Tl-201 tomography to identify and localize coronary artery disease (CAD). The study population consisted of 41 patients (31 males, 10 females; mean age 55 ± 7 yr) including 14 with prior myocardial infarction who underwent both exercise Tl-201 myocardium SPECT and coronary angiography for the evaluation of chest pain. From the short axis and vertical long axis tomograms, stress extent polar maps were generated by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center program, and the 9 stress defect extent (SDE) was quantified for each coronary artery territory. For the purpose of this study, the coronary circulation was divided into 6 arterial segments, and the myocardial ischemic score (MIS) was calculated from the coronary angiogram. Sensitivity for the detection of CAD (>50% coronary stenosis by angiography) by stress extent polar map was 95% in single vessel disease, and 100% in double and triple vessel diseases. Overall sensitivity was 97%<. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of individual diseased vessels were, respectively, 87% and 90% for the left anterior descending artery (LAD), 36% and 93% for the left circumflex artery (LCX), and 71% and 70%, for the right coronary artery (RCA). Concordance for the detection of individual diseased vessels between the coronary angiography and stress polar map was fair for the LAD (kappa=0.70), and RCA (kappa=0.41) lesions, whereas it was poor for the LCK lesions (kappa =0.32) There were significant correlations between the MIS and SDE in LAD (rs=0. 56, p=0.0027), and RCA territory (rs=0.60, p=0.0094). No significant correlation was found in LCX territory. When total vascular territories were combined, there was a significant correlation between the MIS and SDE (rs=0.42, p=0,0116). In conclusion, the quantitative analysis of Tl-201 tomograms appears to be accurate for determining the presence and location of CAD.

  15. Reproducibility of quantitative planar thallium-201 scintigraphy: quantitative criteria for reversibility of myocardial perfusion defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, S.L.; Soufer, R.; Fetterman, R.C.; Mattera, J.A.; Wackers, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fifty-two paired stress/delayed planar 201 TI studies (27 exercise studies, 25 dipyridamole studies) were processed twice by seven technologists to assess inter- and intraobserver variability. The reproducibility was inversely related to the size of 201 Tl perfusion abnormalities. Intraobserver variability was not different between exercise and dipyridamole studies for lesions of similar size. Based upon intraobserver variability, objective quantitative criteria for reversibility of perfusion abnormalities were defined. These objective criteria were tested prospectively in a separate group of 35 201 Tl studies and compared with the subjective interpretation of quantitative circumferential profiles. Overall, exact agreement existed in 78% of images (kappa statistic k = 0.66). We conclude that quantification of planar 201 Tl scans is highly reproducible, with acceptable inter- and intraobserver variability. Objective criteria for lesion reversibility correlated well with analysis by experienced observers

  16. Evolutionary Quantitative Genomics of Populus trichocarpa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilga Porth

    Full Text Available Forest trees generally show high levels of local adaptation and efforts focusing on understanding adaptation to climate will be crucial for species survival and management. Here, we address fundamental questions regarding the molecular basis of adaptation in undomesticated forest tree populations to past climatic environments by employing an integrative quantitative genetics and landscape genomics approach. Using this comprehensive approach, we studied the molecular basis of climate adaptation in 433 Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood genotypes originating across western North America. Variation in 74 field-assessed traits (growth, ecophysiology, phenology, leaf stomata, wood, and disease resistance was investigated for signatures of selection (comparing QST-FST using clustering of individuals by climate of origin (temperature and precipitation. 29,354 SNPs were investigated employing three different outlier detection methods and marker-inferred relatedness was estimated to obtain the narrow-sense estimate of population differentiation in wild populations. In addition, we compared our results with previously assessed selection of candidate SNPs using the 25 topographical units (drainages across the P. trichocarpa sampling range as population groupings. Narrow-sense QST for 53% of distinct field traits was significantly divergent from expectations of neutrality (indicating adaptive trait variation; 2,855 SNPs showed signals of diversifying selection and of these, 118 SNPs (within 81 genes were associated with adaptive traits (based on significant QST. Many SNPs were putatively pleiotropic for functionally uncorrelated adaptive traits, such as autumn phenology, height, and disease resistance. Evolutionary quantitative genomics in P. trichocarpa provides an enhanced understanding regarding the molecular basis of climate-driven selection in forest trees and we highlight that important loci underlying adaptive trait variation also show

  17. The Quantitative Preparation of Future Geoscience Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Hancock, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    Modern geoscience is a highly quantitative science. In February, a small group of faculty and graduate students from across the country met to discuss the quantitative preparation of geoscience majors for graduate school. The group included ten faculty supervising graduate students in quantitative areas spanning the earth, atmosphere, and ocean sciences; five current graduate students in these areas; and five faculty teaching undergraduate students in the spectrum of institutions preparing students for graduate work. Discussion focused in four key ares: Are incoming graduate students adequately prepared for the quantitative aspects of graduate geoscience programs? What are the essential quantitative skills are that are required for success in graduate school? What are perceived as the important courses to prepare students for the quantitative aspects of graduate school? What programs/resources would be valuable in helping faculty/departments improve the quantitative preparation of students? The participants concluded that strengthening the quantitative preparation of undergraduate geoscience majors would increase their opportunities in graduate school. While specifics differed amongst disciplines, a special importance was placed on developing the ability to use quantitative skills to solve geoscience problems. This requires the ability to pose problems so they can be addressed quantitatively, understand the relationship between quantitative concepts and physical representations, visualize mathematics, test the reasonableness of quantitative results, creatively move forward from existing models/techniques/approaches, and move between quantitative and verbal descriptions. A list of important quantitative competencies desirable in incoming graduate students includes mechanical skills in basic mathematics, functions, multi-variate analysis, statistics and calculus, as well as skills in logical analysis and the ability to learn independently in quantitative ways

  18. Micelles as delivery vehicles for oligofluorene for bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fengyu; Alam, Ruhaniyah; Mei, Qian; Tian, Yanqing; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2011-01-01

    With the successful development of organic/polymeric light emitting diodes, many organic and polymeric fluorophores with high quantum efficiencies and optical stability were synthesized. However, most of these materials which have excellent optical properties are insoluble in water, limiting their applications in biological fields. Herein, we used micelles formed from an amino-group-containing poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PCL-b-PEG-NH(2)) to incorporate a hydrophobic blue emitter oligofluorene (OF) to enable its application in biological conditions. Although OF is completely insoluble in water, it was successfully transferred into aqueous solutions with a good retention of its photophysical properties. OF exhibited a high quantum efficiency of 0.84 in a typical organic solvent of tetrahydrofuran (THF). In addition, OF also showed a good quantum efficiency of 0.46 after being encapsulated into micelles. Two cells lines, human glioblastoma (U87MG) and esophagus premalignant (CP-A), were used to study the cellular internalization of the OF incorporated micelles. Results showed that the hydrophobic OF was located in the cytoplasm, which was confirmed by co-staining the cells with nucleic acid specific SYTO 9, lysosome specific LysoTracker Red®, and mitochondria specific MitoTracker Red. MTT assay indicated non-toxicity of the OF-incorporated micelles. This study will broaden the application of hydrophobic functional organic compounds, oligomers, and polymers with good optical properties to enable their applications in biological research fields.

  19. Micelles as delivery vehicles for oligofluorene for bioimaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyu Su

    Full Text Available With the successful development of organic/polymeric light emitting diodes, many organic and polymeric fluorophores with high quantum efficiencies and optical stability were synthesized. However, most of these materials which have excellent optical properties are insoluble in water, limiting their applications in biological fields. Herein, we used micelles formed from an amino-group-containing poly(ε-caprolactone-block-poly(ethylene glycol (PCL-b-PEG-NH(2 to incorporate a hydrophobic blue emitter oligofluorene (OF to enable its application in biological conditions. Although OF is completely insoluble in water, it was successfully transferred into aqueous solutions with a good retention of its photophysical properties. OF exhibited a high quantum efficiency of 0.84 in a typical organic solvent of tetrahydrofuran (THF. In addition, OF also showed a good quantum efficiency of 0.46 after being encapsulated into micelles. Two cells lines, human glioblastoma (U87MG and esophagus premalignant (CP-A, were used to study the cellular internalization of the OF incorporated micelles. Results showed that the hydrophobic OF was located in the cytoplasm, which was confirmed by co-staining the cells with nucleic acid specific SYTO 9, lysosome specific LysoTracker Red®, and mitochondria specific MitoTracker Red. MTT assay indicated non-toxicity of the OF-incorporated micelles. This study will broaden the application of hydrophobic functional organic compounds, oligomers, and polymers with good optical properties to enable their applications in biological research fields.

  20. Biochemical and Bioimaging Evidence of Cholesterol in Acquired Cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsted, Bjarne; Bloksgaard, Maria; Groza, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    : The results show that the total lipid content of the cholesteatoma matrix is similar to that of stratum corneum from skin and that the cholesteatoma matrix unquestionably contains cholesterol. The cholesterol content in the cholesteatoma matrix is increased by over 30% (w/w dry weight) compared to the control....... The cholesterol sulfate content is below 1% of the total lipids in both the cholesteatoma and the control. Cholesterol ester was reduced by over 30% when compared to the control. CONCLUSIONS: The content of cholesterol in the cholesteatoma matrix is significantly different from that in stratum corneum from skin...

  1. Synthesis, characterization and bioimaging of fluorescent labeled polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisberger, Georg; Gyenge, Emina Besic; Hinger, Doris; Bösiger, Peter; Maake, Caroline; Patzke, Greta R

    2013-07-21

    A fluorescent labeled Wells-Dawson type POM ({P2W17O61Fluo}) was newly synthesized and characterized by a wide range of analytical methods. {P2W17O61Fluo} was functionalized with fluorescein amine through a stable amide bond, and its long time stability was verified by UV/vis spectroscopic techniques at physiologically relevant pH values. No significant impact on the cell viability or morphology of HeLa cells was observed for POM concentrations up to 100 μg mL(-1). Cellular uptake of fluorescent {P2W17O61Fluo} was monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy. POM uptake occurs mainly after prolonged incubation times of 24 h resulting in different intracellular patterns, i.e. randomly distributed over the entire cytoplasm, or aggregated in larger clusters. This direct monitoring strategy for the interaction of POMs with cells opens up new pathways for elucidating their unknown mode of action on the way to POM-based drug development.

  2. Semiconductor quantum dots for bioimaging and biodiagnostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairdolf, Brad A; Smith, Andrew M; Stokes, Todd H; Wang, May D; Young, Andrew N; Nie, Shuming

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are light-emitting particles on the nanometer scale that have emerged as a new class of fluorescent labels for chemical analysis, molecular imaging, and biomedical diagnostics. Compared with traditional fluorescent probes, QDs have unique optical and electronic properties such as size-tunable light emission, narrow and symmetric emission spectra, and broad absorption spectra that enable the simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colors. QDs are also considerably brighter and more resistant to photobleaching than are organic dyes and fluorescent proteins. These properties are well suited for dynamic imaging at the single-molecule level and for multiplexed biomedical diagnostics at ultrahigh sensitivity. Here, we discuss the fundamental properties of QDs; the development of next-generation QDs; and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry, dynamic cellular imaging, and medical diagnostics. For in vivo and clinical imaging, the potential toxicity of QDs remains a major concern. However, the toxic nature of cadmium-containing QDs is no longer a factor for in vitro diagnostics, so the use of multicolor QDs for molecular diagnostics and pathology is probably the most important and clinically relevant application for semiconductor QDs in the immediate future.

  3. ESIPT-Based Photoactivatable Fluorescent Probe for Ratiometric Spatiotemporal Bioimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Photoactivatable fluorophores have become an important technique for the high spatiotemporal resolution of biological imaging. Here, we developed a novel photoactivatable probe (PHBT, which is based on 2-(2-hydroxyphenylbenzothiazole (HBT, a small organic fluorophore known for its classic luminescence mechanism through excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT with the keto form and the enol form. After photocleavage, PHBT released a ratiometric fluorophore HBT, which showed dual emission bands with more than 73-fold fluorescence enhancement at 512 nm in buffer and more than 69-fold enhancement at 452 nm in bovine serum. The probe displayed a high ratiometric imaging resolution and is believed to have a wide application in biological imaging.

  4. Novel stable dendrimersome formulation for safe bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, M.; Patrucco, D.; Martinelli, J.; Botta, M.; Castro-Hartmann, P.; Tei, L.; Terreno, E.

    2015-07-01

    Dendrimersomes are nanosized vesicles constituted by amphiphilic Janus dendrimers (JDs), which have been recently proposed as innovative nanocarriers for biomedical applications. Recently, we have demonstrated that dendrimersomes self-assembled from (3,5)12G1-PE-BMPA-G2-(OH)8 dendrimers can be successfully loaded with hydrophilic and amphiphilic imaging contrast agents. Here, we present two newly synthesized low generation isomeric JDs: JDG0G1(3,5) and JDG0G1(3,4). Though less branched than the above-cited dendrimers, they retain the ability to form self-assembled, almost monodisperse vesicular nanoparticles. This contribution reports on the characterization of such nanovesicles loaded with the clinically approved MRI probe Gadoteridol and the comparison with the related nanoparticles assembled from more branched dendrimers. Special emphasis was given to the in vitro stability test of the systems in biologically relevant media, complemented by preliminary in vivo data about blood circulation lifetime collected from healthy mice. The results point to very promising safety and stability profiles of the nanovesicles, in particular for those made of JDG0G1(3,5), whose spontaneous self-organization in water gives rise to a homogeneous suspension. Importantly, the blood lifetimes of these systems are comparable to those of standard liposomes. By virtue of the reported results, the herein presented nanovesicles augur well for future use in a variety of biomedical applications.Dendrimersomes are nanosized vesicles constituted by amphiphilic Janus dendrimers (JDs), which have been recently proposed as innovative nanocarriers for biomedical applications. Recently, we have demonstrated that dendrimersomes self-assembled from (3,5)12G1-PE-BMPA-G2-(OH)8 dendrimers can be successfully loaded with hydrophilic and amphiphilic imaging contrast agents. Here, we present two newly synthesized low generation isomeric JDs: JDG0G1(3,5) and JDG0G1(3,4). Though less branched than the above-cited dendrimers, they retain the ability to form self-assembled, almost monodisperse vesicular nanoparticles. This contribution reports on the characterization of such nanovesicles loaded with the clinically approved MRI probe Gadoteridol and the comparison with the related nanoparticles assembled from more branched dendrimers. Special emphasis was given to the in vitro stability test of the systems in biologically relevant media, complemented by preliminary in vivo data about blood circulation lifetime collected from healthy mice. The results point to very promising safety and stability profiles of the nanovesicles, in particular for those made of JDG0G1(3,5), whose spontaneous self-organization in water gives rise to a homogeneous suspension. Importantly, the blood lifetimes of these systems are comparable to those of standard liposomes. By virtue of the reported results, the herein presented nanovesicles augur well for future use in a variety of biomedical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02695d

  5. A bioimage informatics platform for high-throughput embryo phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James M; Horner, Neil R; Lawson, Thomas N; Fiegel, Tanja; Greenaway, Simon; Morgan, Hugh; Ring, Natalie; Santos, Luis; Sneddon, Duncan; Teboul, Lydia; Vibert, Jennifer; Yaikhom, Gagarine; Westerberg, Henrik; Mallon, Ann-Marie

    2018-01-01

    High-throughput phenotyping is a cornerstone of numerous functional genomics projects. In recent years, imaging screens have become increasingly important in understanding gene-phenotype relationships in studies of cells, tissues and whole organisms. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging has risen to prominence in the field of developmental biology for its ability to capture whole embryo morphology and gene expression, as exemplified by the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC). Large volumes of image data are being acquired by multiple institutions around the world that encompass a range of modalities, proprietary software and metadata. To facilitate robust downstream analysis, images and metadata must be standardized to account for these differences. As an open scientific enterprise, making the data readily accessible is essential so that members of biomedical and clinical research communities can study the images for themselves without the need for highly specialized software or technical expertise. In this article, we present a platform of software tools that facilitate the upload, analysis and dissemination of 3D images for the IMPC. Over 750 reconstructions from 80 embryonic lethal and subviable lines have been captured to date, all of which are openly accessible at mousephenotype.org. Although designed for the IMPC, all software is available under an open-source licence for others to use and develop further. Ongoing developments aim to increase throughput and improve the analysis and dissemination of image data. Furthermore, we aim to ensure that images are searchable so that users can locate relevant images associated with genes, phenotypes or human diseases of interest. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Compact green-diode-based lasers for biophotonic bioimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-01-01

    Diode lasers simultaneously offer tunability, high-power emission, and compact size at fairly low cost and are increasingly preferred for pumping titanium:sapphire lasers.......Diode lasers simultaneously offer tunability, high-power emission, and compact size at fairly low cost and are increasingly preferred for pumping titanium:sapphire lasers....

  7. 6th Krakow-Winnipeg Conference on Advanced Bioimaging Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    Starting from 1997 researchers have been meet in Krakow, Poland for the Krakow-Winnipeg conference on MRI. The scope of the conference includes the latest technical advances in biomedical imaging including molecular imaging and nanotechnology. Other topics for presentation include recent developments in whole body MRI, multi-transmit technology and gradient-free MRI. Book of Abstracts from the 6 th Conference contains 29 abstracts of Oral Presentations and 11 abstracts of Posters.

  8. Bioimaging of cells and tissues using accelerator-based sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibois, Cyril; Cestelli Guidi, Mariangela

    2008-07-01

    A variety of techniques exist that provide chemical information in the form of a spatially resolved image: electron microprobe analysis, nuclear microprobe analysis, synchrotron radiation microprobe analysis, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Linear (LINAC) and circular (synchrotrons) particle accelerators have been constructed worldwide to provide to the scientific community unprecedented analytical performances. Now, these facilities match at least one of the three analytical features required for the biological field: (1) a sufficient spatial resolution for single cell (pros and cons of the most popular techniques that have been implemented on accelerator-based sources to address analytical issues on biological specimens.

  9. Multimodal Microchannel and Nanowell-Based Microfluidic Platforms for Bioimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Tao; Smallwood, Chuck R.; Zhu, Ying; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Baker, Scott E.; Evans, James E.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2017-03-30

    Modern live-cell imaging approaches permit real-time visualization of biological processes. However, limitations for unicellular organism trapping, culturing and long-term imaging can preclude complete understanding of how such microorganisms respond to perturbations in their local environment or linking single-cell variability to whole population dynamics. We have developed microfluidic platforms to overcome prior technical bottlenecks to allow both chemostat and compartmentalized cellular growth conditions using the same device. Additionally, a nanowell-based platform enables a high throughput approach to scale up compartmentalized imaging optimized within the microfluidic device. These channel and nanowell platforms are complementary, and both provide fine control over the local environment as well as the ability to add/replace media components at any experimental time point.

  10. DiversePathsJ: diverse shortest paths for bioimage analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Virginie; Haubold, Carsten; Hamprecht, Fred A; Unser, Michael

    2018-02-01

    We introduce a formulation for the general task of finding diverse shortest paths between two end-points. Our approach is not linked to a specific biological problem and can be applied to a large variety of images thanks to its generic implementation as a user-friendly ImageJ/Fiji plugin. It relies on the introduction of additional layers in a Viterbi path graph, which requires slight modifications to the standard Viterbi algorithm rules. This layered graph construction allows for the specification of various constraints imposing diversity between solutions. The software allows obtaining a collection of diverse shortest paths under some user-defined constraints through a convenient and user-friendly interface. It can be used alone or be integrated into larger image analysis pipelines. http://bigwww.epfl.ch/algorithms/diversepathsj. michael.unser@epfl.ch or fred.hamprecht@iwr.uni-heidelberg.de. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Rethinking the Numerate Citizen: Quantitative Literacy and Public Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ander W. Erickson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Does a citizen need to possess quantitative literacy in order to make responsible decisions on behalf of the public good? If so, how much is enough? This paper presents an analysis of the quantitative claims made on behalf of ballot measures in order to better delineate the role of quantitative literacy for the citizen. I argue that this role is surprisingly limited due to the contextualized nature of quantitative claims that are encountered outside of a school setting. Instead, rational dependence, or the reasoned dependence on the knowledge of others, is proposed as an educational goal that can supplement quantitative literacy and, in so doing, provide a more realistic plan for informed evaluations of quantitative claims.

  12. Progress in quantitative GPR development at CNDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenmann, David; Margetan, F. J.; Chiou, C.-P.; Roberts, Ron; Wendt, Scott [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, 1915 Scholl Road, Ames, IA 50011-3042 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) uses electromagnetic (EM) radiation pulses to locate and map embedded objects. Commercial GPR instruments are generally geared toward producing images showing the location and extent of buried objects, and often do not make full use of available absolute amplitude information. At the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (CNDE) at Iowa State University efforts are underway to develop a more quantitative approach to GPR inspections in which absolute amplitudes and spectra of measured signals play a key role. Guided by analogous work in ultrasonic inspection, there are three main thrusts to the effort. These focus, respectively, on the development of tools for: (1) analyzing raw GPR data; (2) measuring the EM properties of soils and other embedding media; and (3) simulating GPR inspections. This paper reviews progress in each category. The ultimate goal of the work is to develop model-based simulation tools that can be used assess the usefulness of GPR for a given inspection scenario, to optimize inspection choices, and to determine inspection reliability.

  13. Quantitative Ultrasond in the assessment of Osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Terlizzi, Francesca de

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is used in the clinical setting to identify changes in bone tissue connected with menopause, osteoporosis and bone fragility. The versatility of the technique, its low cost and lack of ionizing radiation have led to the use of this method worldwide. Furthermore, with increased clinical interest among clinicians, QUS has been applied to several field of investigation of bone, in various pathologies of bone metabolism, in paediatrics, neonatology, genetics and other fields. Several studies have been carried out in recent years to investigate the potential of QUS, with important positive results. The technique is able to predict osteoporotic fractures; some evidence of the ability to monitor therapies has been reported; the usefulness in the management of secondary osteoporosis has been confirmed; studies in paediatrics have reported reference curves for some QUS devices, and there have been relevant studies in conditions involving metabolic bone disorders. This article is an overview of the most relevant developments in the field of QUS, both in the clinical and in the experimental settings. The advantages and limitations of the present technique have been outlined, together with suggestions for the use in the clinical practice.

  14. Quantitation of vitamin K in human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canfield, L.M.; Hopkinson, J.M.; Lima, A.F.; Martin, G.S.; Sugimoto, K.; Burr, J.; Clark, L.; McGee, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative method was developed for the assay of vitamin K in human colostrum and milk. The procedure combines preparative and analytical chromatography on silica gel in a nitrogen atmosphere followed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Two HPLC steps were used: gradient separation with ultraviolet (UV) detection followed by isocratic separation detected electrochemically. Due to co-migrating impurities, UV detection alone is insufficient for identification of vitamin K. Exogenous vitamin K was shown to equilibrate with endogenous vitamin K in the samples. A statistical method was incorporated to control for experimental variability. Vitamin K1 was analyzed in 16 pooled milk samples from 7 donors and in individual samples from 15 donors at 1 month post-partum. Vitamin K1 was present at 2.94 +/- 1.94 and 3.15 +/- 2.87 ng/mL in pools and in individuals, respectively. Menaquinones, the bacterial form of the vitamin, were not detected. The significance of experimental variation to studies of vitamin K in individuals is discussed

  15. Quantitative theory of driven nonlinear brain dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J A; Robinson, P A

    2012-09-01

    Strong periodic stimuli such as bright flashing lights evoke nonlinear responses in the brain and interact nonlinearly with ongoing cortical activity, but the underlying mechanisms for these phenomena are poorly understood at present. The dominant features of these experimentally observed dynamics are reproduced by the dynamics of a quantitative neural field model subject to periodic drive. Model power spectra over a range of drive frequencies show agreement with multiple features of experimental measurements, exhibiting nonlinear effects including entrainment over a range of frequencies around the natural alpha frequency f(α), subharmonic entrainment near 2f(α), and harmonic generation. Further analysis of the driven dynamics as a function of the drive parameters reveals rich nonlinear dynamics that is predicted to be observable in future experiments at high drive amplitude, including period doubling, bistable phase-locking, hysteresis, wave mixing, and chaos indicated by positive Lyapunov exponents. Moreover, photosensitive seizures are predicted for physiologically realistic model parameters yielding bistability between healthy and seizure dynamics. These results demonstrate the applicability of neural field models to the new regime of periodically driven nonlinear dynamics, enabling interpretation of experimental data in terms of specific generating mechanisms and providing new tests of the theory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative risk assessment of drinking water contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cothern, C.R.; Coniglio, W.A.; Marcus, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    The development of criteria and standards for the regulation of drinking water contaminants involves a variety of processes, one of which is risk estimation. This estimation process, called quantitative risk assessment, involves combining data on the occurrence of the contaminant in drinking water and its toxicity. The human exposure to a contaminant can be estimated from occurrence data. Usually the toxicity or number of health effects per concentration level is estimated from animal bioassay studies using the multistage model. For comparison, other models will be used including the Weibull, probit, logit and quadratic ones. Because exposure and toxicity data are generally incomplete, assumptions need to be made and this generally results in a wide range of certainty in the estimates. This range can be as wide as four to six orders of magnitude in the case of the volatile organic compounds in drinking water and a factor of four to five for estimation of risk due to radionuclides in drinking water. As examples of the differences encountered in risk assessment of drinking water contaminants, discussions are presented on benzene, lead, radon and alachlor. The lifetime population risk estimates for these contaminants are, respectively, in the ranges of: <1 - 3000, <1 - 8000, 2000-40,000 and <1 - 80. 11 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  17. Progress in quantitative GPR development at CNDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, David; Margetan, F. J.; Chiou, C.-P.; Roberts, Ron; Wendt, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) uses electromagnetic (EM) radiation pulses to locate and map embedded objects. Commercial GPR instruments are generally geared toward producing images showing the location and extent of buried objects, and often do not make full use of available absolute amplitude information. At the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (CNDE) at Iowa State University efforts are underway to develop a more quantitative approach to GPR inspections in which absolute amplitudes and spectra of measured signals play a key role. Guided by analogous work in ultrasonic inspection, there are three main thrusts to the effort. These focus, respectively, on the development of tools for: (1) analyzing raw GPR data; (2) measuring the EM properties of soils and other embedding media; and (3) simulating GPR inspections. This paper reviews progress in each category. The ultimate goal of the work is to develop model-based simulation tools that can be used assess the usefulness of GPR for a given inspection scenario, to optimize inspection choices, and to determine inspection reliability.

  18. Progress in quantitative GPR development at CNDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenmann, David; Margetan, F. J.; Chiou, C.-P.; Roberts, Ron; Wendt, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) uses electromagnetic (EM) radiation pulses to locate and map embedded objects. Commercial GPR instruments are generally geared toward producing images showing the location and extent of buried objects, and often do not make full use of available absolute amplitude information. At the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (CNDE) at Iowa State University efforts are underway to develop a more quantitative approach to GPR inspections in which absolute amplitudes and spectra of measured signals play a key role. Guided by analogous work in ultrasonic inspection, there are three main thrusts to the effort. These focus, respectively, on the development of tools for: (1) analyzing raw GPR data; (2) measuring the EM properties of soils and other embedding media; and (3) simulating GPR inspections. This paper reviews progress in each category. The ultimate goal of the work is to develop model-based simulation tools that can be used assess the usefulness of GPR for a given inspection scenario, to optimize inspection choices, and to determine inspection reliability

  19. Quantitative phenotyping via deep barcode sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M; Heisler, Lawrence E; Mellor, Joseph; Kaper, Fiona; Thompson, Michael J; Chee, Mark; Roth, Frederick P; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2009-10-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized diverse genomics applications, including de novo genome sequencing, SNP detection, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and transcriptome analysis. Here we apply deep sequencing to genome-scale fitness profiling to evaluate yeast strain collections in parallel. This method, Barcode analysis by Sequencing, or "Bar-seq," outperforms the current benchmark barcode microarray assay in terms of both dynamic range and throughput. When applied to a complex chemogenomic assay, Bar-seq quantitatively identifies drug targets, with performance superior to the benchmark microarray assay. We also show that Bar-seq is well-suited for a multiplex format. We completely re-sequenced and re-annotated the yeast deletion collection using deep sequencing, found that approximately 20% of the barcodes and common priming sequences varied from expectation, and used this revised list of barcode sequences to improve data quality. Together, this new assay and analysis routine provide a deep-sequencing-based toolkit for identifying gene-environment interactions on a genome-wide scale.

  20. Qualitative and quantitative descriptions of glenohumeral motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A M; Bull, A M J; Wallace, A L; Johnson, G R

    2008-02-01

    Joint modelling plays an important role in qualitative and quantitative descriptions of both normal and abnormal joints, as well as predicting outcomes of alterations to joints in orthopaedic practice and research. Contemporary efforts in modelling have focussed upon the major articulations of the lower limb. Well-constrained arthrokinematics can form the basis of manageable kinetic and dynamic mathematical predictions. In order to contain computation of shoulder complex modelling, glenohumeral joint representations in both limited and complete shoulder girdle models have undergone a generic simplification. As such, glenohumeral joint models are often based upon kinematic descriptions of inadequate degrees of freedom (DOF) for clinical purposes and applications. Qualitative descriptions of glenohumeral motion range from the parody of a hinge joint to the complex realism of a spatial joint. In developing a model, a clear idea of intention is required in order to achieve a required application. Clinical applicability of a model requires both descriptive and predictive output potentials, and as such, a high level of validation is required. Without sufficient appreciation of the clinical intention of the arthrokinematic foundation to a model, error is all too easily introduced. Mathematical description of joint motion serves to quantify all relevant clinical parameters. Commonly, both the Euler angle and helical (screw) axis methods have been applied to the glenohumeral joint, although concordance between these methods and classical anatomical appreciation of joint motion is limited, resulting in miscommunication between clinician and engineer. Compounding these inconsistencies in motion quantification is gimbal lock and sequence dependency.

  1. An unconventional method of quantitative microstructural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastani, M.

    1995-01-01

    The experiment described here introduces a simple methodology which could be used to replace the time-consuming and expensive conventional methods of metallographic and quantitative analysis of thermal treatment effect on microstructure. The method is ideal for the microstructural evaluation of tungsten filaments and other wire samples such as copper wire which can be conveniently coiled. Ten such samples were heat treated by ohmic resistance at temperatures which were expected to span the recrystallization range. After treatment, the samples were evaluated in the elastic recovery test. The normalized elastic recovery factor was defined in terms of these deflections. Experimentally it has shown that elastic recovery factor depends on the degree of recrystallization. In other words this factor is used to determine the fraction of unrecrystallized material. Because the elastic recovery method examines the whole filament rather than just one section through the filament as in metallographical method, it more accurately measures the degree of recrystallization. The method also takes a considerably shorter time and cost compared to the conventional method

  2. Limits of qualitative detection and quantitative determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curie, L.A.

    1976-01-01

    The fact that one can find a series of disagreeing and limiting definitions of the detection limit leads to the reinvestigation of the problems of signal detection and signal processing in analytical and nuclear chemistry. Three cut-off levels were fixed: Lsub(C) - the net signal level (sensitivity of the equipment), above which an observed signal can be reliably recognized as 'detected'; Lsub(D) - the 'true' net signal level, from which one can a priori expect a detection; Lsub(Q) - the level at which the measuring accuracy is sufficient for quantitative determination. Exact definition equations as well as a series of working formulae are given for the general analytical case and for the investigation of radioactivity. As it is assumed that the radioactivity of the Poisson distribution is determined, it is dealt with in such a manner that precise limits can be derived for short-lived and long-lived radionuclides with or without disturbance. The fundamentals are made clear by simple examples for spectrophotometry and radioactivity and by a complicated example for activation analysis in which one must choose between alternative nuclear reactions. (orig./LH) [de

  3. Precision of different quantitative ultrasound densitometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocock, N.A.; Harris, N.D.; Griffiths, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the calcaneus, which measures Speed of Sound (SOS) and Broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), is predictive of the risk of osteoporotic fracture. However, the utility of QUS for predicting fracture risk or for monitoring treatment efficacy depends on its precision and reliability. Published results and manufacturers data vary significantly due to differences in statistical methodology. We have assessed the precision of the current model of the Lunar Achilles and the McCue Cuba QUS densitometers; the most commonly used QUS machines in Australia. Twenty seven subjects had duplicate QUS measurements performed on the same day on both machines. These data were used to calculate the within pair standard deviation (SD) the co-efficient of variation, CV and the standardised co efficient of variation (sCV) which is corrected for the dynamic range. In addition, the co-efficient of reliability (R) was calculated as an index of reliability which is independent of the population mean value, or the dynamic range of the measurements. R ranges between 0 (for no reliability) to 1(for a perfect reliability). The results indicate that the precision of QUS is dependent on the dynamic range and the instrument. Furthermore, they suggest that while QUS is a useful predictor of fracture risk, at present it has limited clinical value in monitoring short term age-related bone loss of 1-2% per year

  4. Quantitative Measurements using Ultrasound Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    scanner for pulsating flow mimicking the femoral artery from a CompuFlow 1000 pump (Shelley Medical). Data were used in four estimators based on directional transverse oscillation for velocity, flow angle, volume flow, and turbulence estimation and their respective precisions. An adaptive lag scheme gave...... the ability to estimate a large velocity range, or alternatively measure at two sites to find e.g. stenosis degree in a vessel. The mean angle at the vessel center was estimated to 90.9◦±8.2◦ indicating a laminar flow from a turbulence index being close to zero (0.1 ±0.1). Volume flow was 1.29 ±0.26 mL/stroke...... (true: 1.15 mL/stroke, bias: 12.2%). Measurements down to 160 mm were obtained with a relative standard deviation and bias of less than 10% for the lateral component for stationary, parabolic flow. The method can, thus, find quantitative velocities, angles, and volume flows at sites currently...

  5. Quantitative NDE of Composite Structures at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Howell, Patricia A.; Johnston, Patrick H.; Burke, Eric R.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.; Seebo, Jeffery P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community due to the potential benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and manufacturability. Ongoing work at NASA involves the use of the large-scale composite structures for spacecraft (payload shrouds, cryotanks, crew modules, etc). NASA is also working to enable the use and certification of composites in aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). The rapid, in situ characterization of a wide range of the composite materials and structures has become a critical concern for the industry. In many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over a long time. The quantitative characterization of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking are of particular interest. The research approaches of NASA's Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch include investigation of conventional, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods, infrared thermography and x-ray computed tomography techniques. The use of simulation tools for optimizing and developing these methods is also an active area of research. This paper will focus on current research activities related to large area NDE for rapidly characterizing aerospace composites.

  6. Neuropathic pain: is quantitative sensory testing helpful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumova, Elena K; Geber, Christian; Westermann, Andrea; Maier, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    Neuropathic pain arises as a consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system and is characterised by a combination of positive and negative sensory symptoms. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) examines the sensory perception after application of different mechanical and thermal stimuli of controlled intensity and the function of both large (A-beta) and small (A-delta and C) nerve fibres, including the corresponding central pathways. QST can be used to determine detection, pain thresholds and stimulus-response curves and can thus detect both negative and positive sensory signs, the second ones not being assessed by other methods. Similarly to all other psychophysical tests QST requires standardised examination, instructions and data evaluation to receive valid and reliable results. Since normative data are available, QST can contribute also to the individual diagnosis of neuropathy, especially in the case of isolated small-fibre neuropathy, in contrast to the conventional electrophysiology which assesses only large myelinated fibres. For example, detection of early stages of subclinical neuropathy in symptomatic or asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus can be helpful to optimise treatment and identify diabetic foot at risk of ulceration. QST assessed the individual's sensory profile and thus can be valuable to evaluate the underlying pain mechanisms which occur in different frequencies even in the same neuropathic pain syndromes. Furthermore, assessing the exact sensory phenotype by QST might be useful in the future to identify responders to certain treatments in accordance to the underlying pain mechanisms.

  7. Quantitative topographic differentiation of the neonatal EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Karel; Krajca, Vladimír; Roth, Zdenek; Melichar, Jan; Petránek, Svojmil

    2006-09-01

    To test the discriminatory topographic potential of a new method of the automatic EEG analysis in neonates. A quantitative description of the neonatal EEG can contribute to the objective assessment of the functional state of the brain, and may improve the precision of diagnosing cerebral dysfunctions manifested by 'disorganization', 'dysrhythmia' or 'dysmaturity'. 21 healthy, full-term newborns were examined polygraphically during sleep (EEG-8 referential derivations, respiration, ECG, EOG, EMG). From each EEG record, two 5-min samples (one from the middle of quiet sleep, the other from the middle of active sleep) were subject to subsequent automatic analysis and were described by 13 variables: spectral features and features describing shape and variability of the signal. The data from individual infants were averaged and the number of variables was reduced by factor analysis. All factors identified by factor analysis were statistically significantly influenced by the location of derivation. A large number of statistically significant differences were also established when comparing the effects of individual derivations on each of the 13 measured variables. Both spectral features and features describing shape and variability of the signal are largely accountable for the topographic differentiation of the neonatal EEG. The presented method of the automatic EEG analysis is capable to assess the topographic characteristics of the neonatal EEG, and it is adequately sensitive and describes the neonatal electroencephalogram with sufficient precision. The discriminatory capability of the used method represents a promise for their application in the clinical practice.

  8. Marketing communications: Qualitative and quantitative paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzelac Nikola

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on key issues in relation to the choice of basic language of communication of marketing as a practical and academic field. Principally, marketing managers prefer descriptive way of expression, but they should use the advantages of language of numbers much more. By doing so, they will advance decision-making process - and the communication with finance and top management. In this regard, models offered by academic community could be helpful. This especially pertains to those positive or normative verbal approaches and models in which mathematics and statistical solutions have been embedded, as well as to those which emphasize financial criteria in decision-making. Concerning the process of creation and verification of scientific knowledge, the choice between languages of words and numbers is the part of much wider dimension, because it is inseparable from the decision on basic research orientation. Quantitative paradigm is more appropriate for hypotheses testing, while qualitative paradigm gives greater contribution in their generation. Competition factor could become the key driver of changes by which existing "parallel worlds" of main paradigms would be integrating, for the sake of disciplinary knowledge advancement.

  9. Quantitative multi-modal NDT data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heideklang, René; Shokouhi, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    A single NDT technique is often not adequate to provide assessments about the integrity of test objects with the required coverage or accuracy. In such situations, it is often resorted to multi-modal testing, where complementary and overlapping information from different NDT techniques are combined for a more comprehensive evaluation. Multi-modal material and defect characterization is an interesting task which involves several diverse fields of research, including signal and image processing, statistics and data mining. The fusion of different modalities may improve quantitative nondestructive evaluation by effectively exploiting the augmented set of multi-sensor information about the material. It is the redundant information in particular, whose quantification is expected to lead to increased reliability and robustness of the inspection results. There are different systematic approaches to data fusion, each with its specific advantages and drawbacks. In our contribution, these will be discussed in the context of nondestructive materials testing. A practical study adopting a high-level scheme for the fusion of Eddy Current, GMR and Thermography measurements on a reference metallic specimen with built-in grooves will be presented. Results show that fusion is able to outperform the best single sensor regarding detection specificity, while retaining the same level of sensitivity

  10. Individual patient dosimetry using quantitative SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.; Oliva, J.; Baum, R.; Fisher, S.

    2002-01-01

    An approach is described to provide individual patient dosimetry for routine clinical use. Accurate quantitative SPECT imaging was achieved using appropriate methods. The volume of interest (VOI) was defined semi-automatically using a fixed threshold value obtained from phantom studies. The calibration factor to convert the voxel counts from SPECT images into activity values was determine from calibrated point source using the same threshold value as in phantom studies. From selected radionuclide the dose within and outside a sphere of voxel dimension at different distances was computed through dose point-kernels to obtain a discrete absorbed dose kernel representation around the volume source with uniform activity distribution. The spatial activity distribution from SPECT imaging was convolved with this kernel representation using the discrete Fourier transform method to yield three-dimensional absorbed dose rate distribution. The accuracy of dose rates calculation was validated by software phantoms. The absorbed dose was determined by integration of the dose rate distribution for each volume of interest (VOI). Parameters for treatment optimization such as dose rate volume histograms and dose rate statistic are provided. A patient example was used to illustrate our dosimetric calculations

  11. Quantitative infrared analysis of hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuta, D.M.

    1997-04-01

    This work was performed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant where hydrogen fluoride is produced upon the hydrolysis of UF 6 . This poses a problem for in this setting and a method for determining the mole percent concentration was desired. HF has been considered to be a non-ideal gas for many years. D. F. Smith utilized complex equations in his HF studies in the 1950s. We have evaluated HF behavior as a function of pressure from three different perspectives. (1) Absorbance at 3877 cm -1 as a function of pressure for 100% HF. (2) Absorbance at 3877 cm -1 as a function of increasing partial pressure HF. Total pressure = 300 mm HgA maintained with nitrogen. (3) Absorbance at 3877 cm -1 for constant partial pressure HF. Total pressure is increased to greater than 800 mm HgA with nitrogen. These experiments have shown that at partial pressures up to 35mm HgA, HIF follows the ideal gas law. The absorbance at 3877 cm -1 can be quantitatively analyzed via infrared methods

  12. Hepatic iron overload: Quantitative MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomori, J.M.; Horev, G.; Tamary, H.; Zandback, J.; Kornreich, L.; Zaizov, R.; Freud, E.; Krief, O.; Ben-Meir, J.; Rotem, H.

    1991-01-01

    Iron deposits demonstrate characteristically shortened T2 relaxation times. Several previously published studies reported poor correlation between the in vivo hepatic 1/T2 measurements made by means of midfield magnetic resonance (MR) units and the hepatic iron content of iron-overloaded patients. In this study, the authors assessed the use of in vivo 1/T2 measurements obtained by means of MR imaging at 0.5 T using short echo times (13.4 and 30 msec) and single-echo-sequences as well as computed tomographic (CT) attenuation as a measure of liver iron concentration in 10 severely iron-overloaded patients with beta-thalassemia major. The iron concentrations in surgical wedge biopsy samples of the liver, which varied between 3 and 9 mg/g of wet weight (normal, less than or equal to 0.5 mg/g), correlated well (r = .93, P less than or equal to .0001) with the preoperative in vivo hepatic 1/T2 measurements. The CT attenuation did not correlate with liver iron concentration. Quantitative MR imaging is a readily available noninvasive method for the assessment of hepatic iron concentration in iron-overloaded patients, reducing the need for needle biopsies of the liver

  13. Quantitative risk analysis preoperational of gas pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manfredi, Carlos; Bispo, Gustavo G.; Esteves, Alvaro [Gie S.A., Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to predict how it can be affected the individual risk and the public's general security due to the operation of a gas pipeline. In case that the single or social risks are considered intolerable, compared with the international standards, to be recommended measures of mitigation of the risk associated to the operation until levels that can be considered compatible with the best practices in the industry. The quantitative risk analysis calculates the probability of occurrence of an event based on the frequency of occurrence of the same one and it requires a complex mathematical treatment. The present work has as objective to develop a calculation methodology based on the previously mentioned publication. This calculation methodology is centered in defining the frequencies of occurrence of events, according to representative database of each case in study. Besides, it settles down the consequences particularly according to the considerations of each area and the different possibilities of interferences with the gas pipeline in study. For each one of the interferences a typical curve of ignition probabilities is developed in function from the distance to the pipe. (author)

  14. A Quantitative Index of Forest Structural Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A. Cale

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Forest health is a complex concept including many ecosystem functions, interactions and values. We develop a quantitative system applicable to many forest types to assess tree mortality with respect to stable forest structure and composition. We quantify impacts of observed tree mortality on structure by comparison to baseline mortality, and then develop a system that distinguishes between structurally stable and unstable forests. An empirical multivariate index of structural sustainability and a threshold value (70.6 derived from 22 nontropical tree species’ datasets differentiated structurally sustainable from unsustainable diameter distributions. Twelve of 22 species populations were sustainable with a mean score of 33.2 (median = 27.6. Ten species populations were unsustainable with a mean score of 142.6 (median = 130.1. Among them, Fagus grandifolia, Pinus lambertiana, P. ponderosa, and Nothofagus solandri were attributable to known disturbances; whereas the unsustainability of Abies balsamea, Acer rubrum, Calocedrus decurrens, Picea engelmannii, P. rubens, and Prunus serotina populations were not. This approach provides the ecological framework for rational management decisions using routine inventory data to objectively: determine scope and direction of change in structure and composition, assess excessive or insufficient mortality, compare disturbance impacts in time and space, and prioritize management needs and allocation of scarce resources.

  15. Quantitative Ultrasond in the assessment of Osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guglielmi, Giuseppe [Department of Radiology, University of Foggia, Viale L. Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Department of Radiology, Scientific Institute Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy)], E-mail: g.guglielmi@unifg.it; Terlizzi, Francesca de [IGEA srl, Via Parmenide 10/A 41012 Carpi, MO (Italy)], E-mail: f.deterlizzi@igeamedical.com

    2009-09-15

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is used in the clinical setting to identify changes in bone tissue connected with menopause, osteoporosis and bone fragility. The versatility of the technique, its low cost and lack of ionizing radiation have led to the use of this method worldwide. Furthermore, with increased clinical interest among clinicians, QUS has been applied to several field of investigation of bone, in various pathologies of bone metabolism, in paediatrics, neonatology, genetics and other fields. Several studies have been carried out in recent years to investigate the potential of QUS, with important positive results. The technique is able to predict osteoporotic fractures; some evidence of the ability to monitor therapies has been reported; the usefulness in the management of secondary osteoporosis has been confirmed; studies in paediatrics have reported reference curves for some QUS devices, and there have been relevant studies in conditions involving metabolic bone disorders. This article is an overview of the most relevant developments in the field of QUS, both in the clinical and in the experimental settings. The advantages and limitations of the present technique have been outlined, together with suggestions for the use in the clinical practice.

  16. Quantitative rotating frame relaxometry methods in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Irtiza Ali; Sepponen, Raimo

    2016-06-01

    Macromolecular degeneration and biochemical changes in tissue can be quantified using rotating frame relaxometry in MRI. It has been shown in several studies that the rotating frame longitudinal relaxation rate constant (R1ρ ) and the rotating frame transverse relaxation rate constant (R2ρ ) are sensitive biomarkers of phenomena at the cellular level. In this comprehensive review, existing MRI methods for probing the biophysical mechanisms that affect the rotating frame relaxation rates of the tissue (i.e. R1ρ and R2ρ ) are presented. Long acquisition times and high radiofrequency (RF) energy deposition into tissue during the process of spin-locking in rotating frame relaxometry are the major barriers to the establishment of these relaxation contrasts at high magnetic fields. Therefore, clinical applications of R1ρ and R2ρ MRI using on- or off-resonance RF excitation methods remain challenging. Accordingly, this review describes the theoretical and experimental approaches to the design of hard RF pulse cluster- and adiabatic RF pulse-based excitation schemes for accurate and precise measurements of R1ρ and R2ρ . The merits and drawbacks of different MRI acquisition strategies for quantitative relaxation rate measurement in the rotating frame regime are reviewed. In addition, this review summarizes current clinical applications of rotating frame MRI sequences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Expert judgement models in quantitative risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosqvist, T. [VTT Automation, Helsinki (Finland); Tuominen, R. [VTT Automation, Tampere (Finland)

    1999-12-01

    Expert judgement is a valuable source of information in risk management. Especially, risk-based decision making relies significantly on quantitative risk assessment, which requires numerical data describing the initiator event frequencies and conditional probabilities in the risk model. This data is seldom found in databases and has to be elicited from qualified experts. In this report, we discuss some modelling approaches to expert judgement in risk modelling. A classical and a Bayesian expert model is presented and applied to real case expert judgement data. The cornerstone in the models is the log-normal distribution, which is argued to be a satisfactory choice for modelling degree-of-belief type probability distributions with respect to the unknown parameters in a risk model. Expert judgements are qualified according to bias, dispersion, and dependency, which are treated differently in the classical and Bayesian approaches. The differences are pointed out and related to the application task. Differences in the results obtained from the different approaches, as applied to real case expert judgement data, are discussed. Also, the role of a degree-of-belief type probability in risk decision making is discussed.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Retrieved Glenoid Liners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katelyn Childs

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Revision of orthopedic surgeries is often expensive and involves higher risk from complications. Since most total joint replacement devices use a polyethylene bearing, which serves as a weak link, the assessment of damage to the liner due to in vivo exposure is very important. The failures often are due to excessive polyethylene wear. The glenoid liners are complex and hemispherical in shape and present challenges while assessing the damage. Therefore, the study on the analysis of glenoid liners retrieved from revision surgery may lend insight into common wear patterns and improve future product designs. The purpose of this pilot study is to further develop the methods of segmenting a liner into four quadrants to quantify the damage in the liner. Different damage modes are identified and statistically analyzed. Multiple analysts were recruited to conduct the damage assessments. In this paper, four analysts evaluated nine glenoid liners, retrieved from revision surgery, two of whom had an engineering background and two of whom had a non-engineering background. Associated human factor mechanisms are reported in this paper. The wear patterns were quantified using the Hood/Gunther, Wasielewski, Brandt, and Lombardi methods. The quantitative assessments made by several observers were analyzed. A new, composite damage parameter was developed and applied to assess damage. Inter-observer reliability was assessed using a paired t-test. Data reported by four analysts showed a high standard deviation; however, only two analysts performed the tests in a significantly similar way and they had engineering backgrounds.

  19. Quantitative magnetotail characteristics of different magnetospheric states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Shukhtina

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative relationships allowing one to compute the lobe magnetic field, flaring angle and tail radius, and to evaluate magnetic flux based on solar wind/IMF parameters and spacecraft position are obtained for the middle magnetotail, X=(–15,–35RE, using 3.5 years of simultaneous Geotail and Wind spacecraft observations. For the first time it was done separately for different states of magnetotail including the substorm onset (SO epoch, the steady magnetospheric convection (SMC and quiet periods (Q. In the explored distance range the magnetotail parameters appeared to be similar (within the error bar for Q and SMC states, whereas at SO their values are considerably larger. In particular, the tail radius is larger by 1–3 RE at substorm onset than during Q and SMC states, for which the radius value is close to previous magnetopause model values. The calculated lobe magnetic flux value at substorm onset is ~1GWb, exceeding that at Q (SMC states by ~50%. The model magnetic flux values at substorm onset and SMC show little dependence on the solar wind dynamic pressure and distance in the tail, so the magnetic flux value can serve as an important discriminator of the state of the middle magnetotail. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (solar windmagnetosphere- interactions, magnetotail, storms and substorms

  20. Quantitative magnetotail characteristics of different magnetospheric states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Shukhtina

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative relationships allowing one to compute the lobe magnetic field, flaring angle and tail radius, and to evaluate magnetic flux based on solar wind/IMF parameters and spacecraft position are obtained for the middle magnetotail, X=(–15,–35RE, using 3.5 years of simultaneous Geotail and Wind spacecraft observations. For the first time it was done separately for different states of magnetotail including the substorm onset (SO epoch, the steady magnetospheric convection (SMC and quiet periods (Q. In the explored distance range the magnetotail parameters appeared to be similar (within the error bar for Q and SMC states, whereas at SO their values are considerably larger. In particular, the tail radius is larger by 1–3 RE at substorm onset than during Q and SMC states, for which the radius value is close to previous magnetopause model values. The calculated lobe magnetic flux value at substorm onset is ~1GWb, exceeding that at Q (SMC states by ~50%. The model magnetic flux values at substorm onset and SMC show little dependence on the solar wind dynamic pressure and distance in the tail, so the magnetic flux value can serve as an important discriminator of the state of the middle magnetotail.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (solar windmagnetosphere- interactions, magnetotail, storms and substorms