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Sample records for radiation-attenuated cercariae t-cell

  1. Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae. T-cell activation of macrophages for larval killing

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    Gordon, J.R.; McLaren, D.J.

    1988-02-01

    This study addresses macrophage activation in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosom mansoni. Peritoneal exudate macrophages elicited in vaccinated animals by mineral oil injection were activated to kill larval schistosomes in vitro. Killing efficiency is dependent upon the cell:target ratio employed and is enhanced by, but is not strictly dependent on, the presence of specific antibodies. Macrophages co-cultured with parasites release superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide, but the use of inhibitors has shown that neither of these reactive oxygen intermediates are the causal agents of cellular cytotoxicity in this system. Oil-elicited macrophages from naive guinea-pigs do not show comparable activation; they can, however, be activated in vitro by incubation with culture supernatant fluids from schistosome antigen-stimulated spleen, or lymph node cells harvested from vaccinated guinea-pigs. Naive macrophages activated in this way kill schistosomula in vitro and release the activation markers IL-l and superoxide anion. The macrophage-activating factor (MAF) present in spleen cell culture supernatant fluids has a MW of 35,000-55,000, but does not have the chemical characteristics of gamma-interferon.

  2. Reinfection immunity in schistosomiasis. With special reference to immunity induced by radiation attenuated Cercariae

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    Kamiya, Haruo

    1987-07-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most important parasitic diseases in the world, especially in endemic areas of developing countries. This situation has prompted parasitologist to attempt intensive researches on immune mechanisms, especially those of reinfection immunity associated with eliminating challenge infection. The current knowledge of reinfection immunity against Schistosoma spp. infection was therefore reviewed briefly and discussed with special reference to our data on protective immune responses induced by radiation-attenuated cercarial infection. A recently developed technique of compressed organ autoradiography (COA) has contributed to assessing parasite attrition in immune animals following challenge infection. Our study using COA has demonstrated that major attrition of schistosomula from challenge infection occurs in the skin of CBA/Ca mice vaccinated with 20 Krad gamma radiation-attenuated cercariae of S. mansoni, while in both lungs and liver of similarly vaccinated guinea pig model. Furthermore, gamma-irradiation to cercariae affected their migration potential and surface-antigen profiles. The immunizing stimuli of gamma radiation-attenuated cercariae profoundly affected the expression of responsiveness in vaccinated animals. The change in antigenic profiles and migration potential of those vaccinating population was discussed in relation to the kinetics of reinfection immunity induced in vaccinated amimal models. These works might provide a base line data to develop a practical vaccine for schistosomiasis using defined antigens. It must be emphasized that these vaccines could serve as a practical prophylactic measure for schistosomiasis in the endemic areas, even if the vaccines fail to induce sterilizing immunity. (author). 141 refs.

  3. Schistosoma mansoni polypeptides immunogenic in mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae

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    Dalton, J.P.; Strand, M.

    1987-10-01

    We compared the humoral immune response of mice protected against Schistosoma mansoni by vaccination with radiation-attenuated cercariae to that of patently infected mice, and we identified antigens that elicit a greater, or unique, immune response in the vaccinated mice. These comparisons were based upon radioimmunoprecipitations and immunodepletion of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled schistosomular and adult worm polypeptides, followed by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel analyses. The humoral responses of patently infected mice and of mice vaccinated once were remarkably similar and were directed against schistosome glycoproteins ranging in molecular size from greater than 300 to less than 10 kDa. Exposing mice to a second vaccination resulted in a marked change in the immune response, to one predominantly directed toward high molecular size glycoproteins. Sequential immunodepletion techniques identified five schistosomular and seven adult worm antigens that showed a greater or unique immunogenicity in vaccinated mice as compared with patently infected mice. These adult worm antigens were purified by preparative sequential immunoaffinity chromatography and used to prepare a polyclonal antiserum, anti-irradiated vaccine. This antiserum bound to the surface of live newly transformed and lung-stage schistosomula, as assessed by immunofluorescence assays, and was reactive with a number of /sup 125/I-labeled schistosomular surface polypeptides, including a doublet of 150 kDa that was also recognized by sera of vaccinated mice but not by sera of patently infected mice.

  4. Analysis and comparison of immune reactivity in guinea-pigs immunized with equivalent numbers of normal or radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni

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    Rogers, M.V.; McLaren, D.J.

    1987-08-01

    Guinea-pigs immunized with equivalent numbers of normal or radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni develop close to complete resistance to reinfection at weeks 12 and 4.5 respectively. We here analyse and compare the immune responses induced by the two populations of cercariae. Both radiation-attenuated and normal parasites of S. mansoni elicited an extensive germinal centre response in guinea-pigs by week 4.5 post-immunization. The anti-parasite antibody titre and cytotoxic activity of serum from 4.5-week-vaccinated, or 4.5-week-infected guinea-pigs were approximately equal, but sera from 12-week-infected individuals had high titres of anti-parasite antibody, which promoted significant larvicidal activity in vitro. In all cases, larvicidal activity was mediated by the IgG/sub 2/ fraction of the immune serum. Lymphocyte transformation tests conducted on splenic lymphocytes from 4.5-week vaccinated guinea-pigs revealed maximal stimulation against cercarial, 2-week and 3-week worm antigens, whereas spleen cells from 4.5-week-infected guinea-pigs were maximally stimulated by cercarial and 6-week worm antigens. The splenic lymphocyte responses of 12-week infected animals were dramatic against antigens prepared from all life-stages of the parasite.

  5. Extreme CD8 T cell requirements for anti-malarial liver-stage immunity following immunization with radiation attenuated sporozoites.

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    Nathan W Schmidt

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-attenuated Plasmodium sporozoites (RAS are the only vaccine shown to induce sterilizing protection against malaria in both humans and rodents. Importantly, these "whole-parasite" vaccines are currently under evaluation in human clinical trials. Studies with inbred mice reveal that RAS-induced CD8 T cells targeting liver-stage parasites are critical for protection. However, the paucity of defined T cell epitopes for these parasites has precluded precise understanding of the specific characteristics of RAS-induced protective CD8 T cell responses. Thus, it is not known whether quantitative or qualitative differences in RAS-induced CD8 T cell responses underlie the relative resistance or susceptibility of immune inbred mice to sporozoite challenge. Moreover, whether extraordinarily large CD8 T cell responses are generated and required for protection following RAS immunization, as has been described for CD8 T cell responses following single-antigen subunit vaccination, remains unknown. Here, we used surrogate T cell activation markers to identify and track whole-parasite, RAS-vaccine-induced effector and memory CD8 T cell responses. Our data show that the differential susceptibility of RAS-immune inbred mouse strains to Plasmodium berghei or P. yoelii sporozoite challenge does not result from host- or parasite-specific decreases in the CD8 T cell response. Moreover, the surrogate activation marker approach allowed us for the first time to evaluate CD8 T cell responses and protective immunity following RAS-immunization in outbred hosts. Importantly, we show that compared to a protective subunit vaccine that elicits a CD8 T cell response to a single epitope, diversifying the targeted antigens through whole-parasite RAS immunization only minimally, if at all, reduced the numerical requirements for memory CD8 T cell-mediated protection. Thus, our studies reveal that extremely high frequencies of RAS-induced memory CD8 T cells are required, but

  6. Evidence that radio-sensitive cells are central to skin-phase protective immunity in CBA/Ca mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni as well as in naive mice protected with vaccine serum

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    Delgado, V.S.; McLaren, D.J. (National Inst. for Medical Research, London (UK))

    1990-02-01

    Naive CBA/Ca mice and CBA/ca mice vaccinated 4 weeks previously with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni were subjected to 550 rad of whole body (gamma) irradiation and then challenged 3 days later with normal cercariae. The perfusion recovery data showed that this procedure reduced the primary worm burden in naive mice by 22% and the challence worm burden in vaccinated mice by 82%. Irradiation also ablated the peripheral blood leucocytes of both mouse groups by 90-100% at the time of challenge. Histological data revealed that such treatment caused a dramatic change in number, size and leucocyte composition of cutaneous inflammatory skin reactions that characterize challenged vacccinated mice and are known to entrap invading larvae; cutaneous eosinophils were preferentially abolished by this treatment. Polyvaccine mouse serum that conferred protection passively upon naive recipient mice, failed to protect naive/irradiated mice when administered by the same protocol. Distraction of macrophages by treatment of mice with silica did not affect the establishment of a primary worm burden and reduced the protection exhibited by vaccinated mice by only 16%. These data indicade that radio-sensitive cells are important to both innate and specific acquired resistance in this mouse model and that macrophages contribute only marginally to the expression of vaccine immunity. (author).

  7. Schistosoma mansoni: analysis of the humoral and cellular basis of resistance in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae

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    McLaren, D.J.; Delgado, V.S.; Gordon, J.R.; Rogers, M.V. (National Inst. for Medical Research, London (UK))

    1990-02-01

    This study addresses the humoral and cellular basis of specific acquired immunity in the guinea-pig irradiated vaccine model of schistosomiasis mansoni. Rodents vaccinated with 500 gamma-irradiated cercariae and then splenectomized 4. 5 weeks later showed a 33% reduction in resistance to challenge as compared to vaccinated animals or vaccinated/sham splenectomized controls. Serum harvested from once vaccinated individuals conferred modest levels of resistance upon naive recipients in some experiments, but transfer was not achieved consistently. Serum from vaccinated and thrice boosted rodents (Vbbb) routinely transferred about 45% immunity, however, provided it was given in 4 ml aliquots on day 9 post-challenge; Vbbb serum thus transferred 50% of donor immunity. Interestingly, multiple doses of this protective serum given on and either side of day 9 did not enhance the protection achieved with a single 4 ml aliquot. Neither peripheral lymph node cells nor splenocytes from the polyvaccinated serum donors were able to transfer resistance to recipient guinea-pigs and they failed to augment the protection achieved with Vbbb serum. Foot-pad testing revealed no correlation between delayed hypersensitivity responses and immunity to challenge in vaccinated guinea-pigs. Polyvaccine guinea-pig serum failed to protect mice and guinea-pigs could not be protected with polyvaccine rat serum. (author).

  8. 辐照致弱血吸虫尾蚴在小动物中诱导的保护力及其影响因素%The protective effects and relevant factors of vaccination with radiation-attenuated schistosome cercariae in small animals

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    张素华; 吴海玮

    2008-01-01

    动物免疫/攻击感染实验显示,辐照致弱尾蚴在多种动物模型能诱导出高水平保护力.与辐照致弱曼氏血吸虫(Schistosoma mansoni,S.m)尾蚴诱导产生稳定高保护力相比,辐照致弱日本血吸虫(Schistosoma japonicum,S.j)尾蚴在小动物(特别是小鼠)中诱导产生的保护力常不稳定,可能与尾蚴的生物学特性、免疫程序、实验条件以及所采用的动物品系等因素有关,目前尚缺乏公认的能对其产生稳定高保护力的小鼠品系.该文就辐照致弱尾蚴在小动物尤其是小鼠诱导产生的抗感染保护力,特别是其影响因素作一综述,为构建S.j辐照致弱尾蚴的高保护力动物模型提供参考.%Experiments in animals indicated that attenuated cercariae could induce high level of protection to schistosome infection.Compared with Schistosoma mansoni(S.m),the levels of protection in mouse induced by Schistosoma japonicum(S.j)attenuated cercariae were variable,which may be related with several factors,such as the biological features of cercariae,the immunization procedure,experimental environment,animal strains,etc.There is still no well-established mice model that would show stable protection after S.j attenuated cercanae vaccination.Hence,we reviewed here the protective effects induced by vaccination with radiation-attenuated schistosome cercariae in small animals,especially the relevant influential factors.

  9. T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Informed d Corporate Support Corporate Partners National Teams Partnership Opportunities d Personal Stories Ambassadors & Familiar Faces Life ... d Our Healthcare Voice Home What Is MS? Definition of MS T Cells Share this page Facebook ...

  10. Studies on Cercariae from Kuwait Bay. XI. Description and surface topography of Cercaria kuwaitae XI sp.n. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae

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    Abdul-Salam J

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A new echinostome cercaria, Cercaria kuwaitae XI sp.n., from the prosobranch gastropod Cerithidea cingulata (Gmelin from Kuwait Bay is described. The new cercaria is characterized by 23 collar spines and primary excretory tubules with distinct diverticula. The cercaria encysts in the snail host and is similar to those of Acanthoparyphium sp. The surface topography of the redia, cercaria and metacercarial cyst wall is studied by scanning electron microscopy. This is the first echinostome cercaria to be recorded in a gastropod from the Arabian Gulf region.

  11. T-Cell Lymphoma

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    Getting the Facts T-Cell Lymphoma Overview Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The two main forms of lymphoma are Hodgkin lymphoma ... develop into lymphomas: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells). T-cell lymphomas account for ...

  12. Radiation attenuation and opacity in smoke and water sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Gilles; Boulet, Pascal; Morlon, Romain; Blanchard, Elizabeth

    2017-08-01

    Radiation attenuation through sprays, smoke and mixings of both media was studied in the infrared and in the visible range, by conducting real scale experiments in a corridor. The effect of water injection by a water mist nozzle and a sprinkler device was investigated. Radiation attenuation in the infrared range and opacity in the visible range were measured, by using a FTIR spectrometer and a dedicated opacimetry device especially designed for the present application. Experiments were done using either a blackbody source for attenuation characterization, or a heptane pool fire aimed at producing smoke for opacity measurements. For tests with smoke, the difficulties raised by the harsh environment involving a hot mixing of gas plus soot and vapor carrying water droplets were circumvented with an original device involving an optical fiber network. Mean infrared transmission was found equal to 12% for the water mist (with a 25 L/min water flowrate) and 37% for the sprinkler (with a 91 L/min water flowrate). Fitting the infrared transmission spectra with results obtained using a Monte Carlo simulation provided an estimation of the water volumetric fraction in the spray. It was shown that the better attenuation capability of the water mist is due to two factors: (1) a higher extinction coefficient of the water mist for a given water volumetric fraction due to the small size of the injected droplets and (2) a higher water volumetric fraction. Opacity measurements in the visible range yielded a measured extinction coefficient in good agreement with an estimation obtained with the Mie theory and the identified water volumetric fraction. Moreover, the water sprays (sprinkler or water mist) was seen to lead to a quick de-stratification of the smoke layer. When the spraying operation was stopped, the visibility re-increased in two main steps: a first step of fast increase and a second step of slow increase needing a few tens of seconds to get again a fully stratified smoke

  13. Innate Memory T cells

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    Jameson, Stephen C.; Lee, You Jeong; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are usually considered to be a feature of a successful immune response against a foreign antigen, and such cells can mediate potent immunity. However, in mice, alternative pathways have been described, through which naïve T cells can acquire the characteristics and functions of memory T cells without encountering specific foreign antigen or the typical signals required for conventional T cell differentiation. Such cells reflect a response to the internal rather the external environment, and hence such cells are called innate memory T cells. In this review, we describe how innate memory subsets were identified, the signals that induce their generation and their functional properties and potential role in the normal immune response. The existence of innate memory T cells in mice raises questions about whether parallel populations exist in humans, and we discuss the evidence for such populations during human T cell development and differentiation. PMID:25727290

  14. Pulmonary leukocytic responses are linked to the acquired immunity of mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni

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    Aitken, R.; Coulson, P.S.; Wilson, R.A.

    1988-05-15

    Pulmonary cellular responses in C57BL/6 mice exposed to Schistosoma mansoni have been investigated by sampling cells from the respiratory airways with bronchoalveolar lavage. Mice exposed to cercariae attenuated with 20 krad gamma-radiation developed stronger and more persistent pulmonary leukocytic responses than animals exposed to equal numbers of normal parasites. Although vaccination with irradiated cercariae also stimulated T cell responses of greater magnitude and duration than normal infection, the lymphocytic infiltrate elicited by each regimen did not differ substantially in its composition, 5 wk after exposure. Studies with cercariae attenuated by different treatments established that a link exists between the recruitment of leukocytes to the lungs of vaccinated mice and resistance to reinfection. There was a strong association between pulmonary leukocytic responses and the elimination of challenge infections by vaccinated mice. Animals exposed to irradiated cercariae of S. mansoni were resistant to homologous challenge infection but were not protected against Schistosoma margrebowiei. Homologous challenge of vaccinated mice stimulated anamnestic leukocytic and T lymphocytic responses in the lungs, 2 wk postinfection, but exposure of immunized animals to the heterologous species failed to trigger an expansion in these populations of cells. Our studies indicate that pulmonary leukocytes and T lymphocytes are intimately involved in the mechanism of vaccine-induced resistance to S. mansoni. It remains unclear whether these populations of cells initiate protective inflammatory reactions against challenge parasites in the lungs, or accumulate in response to the activation of the protective mechanism by other means.

  15. Schistosoma mansoni cercariae exploit an elastohydrodynamic coupling to swim efficiently

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    Krishnamurthy, Deepak; Bhargava, Arjun; Prakash, Manu

    2016-01-01

    The motility of many parasites is critical for the infection process of their host, as exemplified by the transmission cycle of the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. In their human infectious stage, immature, submillimetre-scale forms of the parasite known as cercariae swim in freshwater and infect humans by penetrating through the skin. This infection causes Schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease that is comparable to malaria in its global socio-economic impact. Given that cercariae do not feed and hence have a finite lifetime of around 12 hours, efficient motility is crucial for the parasite's survival and transmission of Schistosomiasis. However, a first-principles understanding of how cercariae swim is lacking. Via a combined experimental, theoretical and robotics based approach, we demonstrate that cercariae propel themselves against gravity by exploiting a unique elastohydrodynamic coupling. We show that cercariae beat their tail in a periodic fashion while maintaining a fixed flexibility near their poster...

  16. Regulatory T cell memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  17. Localization of the cystogenous glands of Opisthorchis viverrini cercariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunsan, Patpicha; Donthaisong, Chalermlap; Suwannatrai, Kulwadee; Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Kulsantiwong, Jutharat; Suwannatrai, Apiporn; Boonmars, Thidarut; Welbat, Jariya Umka; Oopachitakul, Songpol; Tesana, Smarn

    2014-03-01

    Opisthorchiasis in northeastern Thailand is an important etiology of cholangiocarcinoma. To form the infectious stage, free swimming cercariae penetrate cyprinid fish, shed their tails, and then secret a cystic substance to cover their larval stage to form metacercariae in the fish body. We determined the location of the cystogenous glands in Opisthorchis viverrini cercariae. The cercariae and metacercariae were obtained from the naturally infected snail host, Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos and from cyprinid fish, respectively. The cyst walls of the metacercariae were separated and used to immunize inbred male BALB/c mice to obtain cyst wall antibodies. The general characteristics of the O. viverrini cercariae and metacercariae were studied by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of sections. The location and ultrastructure of the cystogenous glands of cercariae were studied by immunoperoxidase, immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. The structures and organelles of cercariae and metacercariae could be identified, but the cystogenous glands could not be detected in H&E sections. The immunoperoxidase and immunofluorescence sections revealed positive reactions for cystogenous glands predominanted in the lateral part of the cercariae and were clearly seen in the cyst wall of the metacercariae. The ultrastructure of the cystogenous glands contained semitranslucent electron dense oval shaped granules. If interference occurs during the formation of the cysts by fish immune response, the metacercariae may not develop to maturity. It may be easily digested or degraded by human stomach acid and pepsin. This may be an efficient method for control of O. viverrini infection which requires further detailed study.

  18. Schistosoma mansoni cercariae swim efficiently by exploiting an elastohydrodynamic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Deepak; Katsikis, Georgios; Bhargava, Arjun; Prakash, Manu

    2017-03-01

    The motility of many parasites is critical for infecting their host, as exemplified in the transmission cycle of the parasite Schistosoma mansoni. In its human infectious stage, submillimetre-scale forms of the parasite known as cercariae swim in freshwater and infect humans by penetrating the skin. This infection causes schistosomiasis, a disease comparable to malaria in global socio-economic impact. Given that cercariae do not feed and hence have a lifetime of around 12 hours, efficient motility is crucial for schistosomiasis transmission. Despite this, a first-principles understanding of how cercariae swim is lacking. Combining biological experiments, a novel theoretical model and its robotic realization, we show that cercariae use their forked tail to swim against gravity using a novel swimming gait, described here as a `T-swimmer gait'. During this gait, cercariae beat their tail periodically while maintaining an increased flexibility near their posterior and anterior ends. This flexibility allows an interaction between fluid drag and bending resistance--an elastohydrodynamic coupling, to naturally break time-reversal symmetry and enable locomotion at small length scales. Finally, we find that cercariae maintain this flexibility at an optimal regime for efficient swimming. We anticipate that our work sets the ground for linking the swimming of cercariae to disease transmission, and could potentially enable explorations of novel strategies for schistosomiasis control and prevention.

  19. Small estuarine fishes feed on large trematode cercariae: Lab and field investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, A.T.; Rebhal, S.; Lafferty, K.D.; Kuris, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, dense populations of snails can shed millions of digenean trematode cercariae every day. These short-lived, free-living larvae are rich in energy and present a potential resource for consumers. We investigated whether estuarine fishes eat cercariae shed by trematodes of the estuarine snail Cerithidea californica. In aquaria we presented cercariae from 10 native trematode species to 6 species of native estuarine fishes. Many of these fishes readily engorged on cercariae. To determine if fishes ate cercariae in the field, we collected the most common fish species, Fundulus parvipinnis (California killifish), from shallow water on rising tides when snails shed cercariae. Of 61 killifish, 3 had recognizable cercariae in their gut. Because cercariae are common in this estuary, they could be frequent sources of energy for small fishes. In turn, predation on cercariae by fishes (and other predators) could also reduce the transmission success of trematodes. ?? 2009 American Society of Parasitologists.

  20. T-cell costimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1996-01-01

    The CD40L molecule expressed by CD4+ regulatory T lymphocytes is known to deliver signals that activate B cells and macrophages. It now appears that CD40L regulates T cells themselves, during both their development and their participation in adaptive immune responses....

  1. Gene Transcription Profile in Mice Vaccinated with Ultraviolet-attenuated Cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum Reveals Molecules Contributing to Elevated IFN-γLevels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang ZHU; Feng LIU; Chuan SU; Guan-Ling WU; Zhao-Song ZHANG; Min-Jun JI; Hai-Wei WU; Yong WANG; Xiao-Ping CAI; Lei ZHANG; Shu-Ying HU; Lin-Lin FU

    2005-01-01

    Vaccination with ultraviolet-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum induced protective immunity against challenge infection in experimental animal models. Our preliminary study on the transcription levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 in splenic CD4+ T cells revealed that attenuated cercariae elicited predominantly a Thl response in mice at the early stage, whereas normal cercariae stimulated primarily Th2dependent responses. Further analysis on the gene profile of the skin-draining lymph nodes demonstrated that the levels of IFN-γ were significantly higher in vaccinated mice than those in infected mice at day 4, 7 and 14 post-vaccination or post-infection. However, for IL-12 and IL-4, the potent inducers of Th l and Th2 responses, respectively, as well as IL-10, there were no differences over the course of the experiment between the infected and vaccinated mice. To explore the underlying factors that may potentially contribute to elevated IFN-γ in vaccinated mice, the mRNA profiles of the skin-draining lymph nodes at day 4 postexposure were compared using oligonucleotide microarrays. Within the 847 probe sets with increased signal values, we focused on chemokines, cytokines and relevant receptors, which were validated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. A comprehensive understanding of the immune mechanisms of attenuated cercariae-induced protection may contribute to developing efficient vaccination strategies against S. japonicum, especially during the early stage of infection.

  2. Regulatory T cell memory

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    Rosenblum, Md; Way, SS; Abbas, AK

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved. Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime–challenge models of infection. However, recent work ...

  3. Protective Efficacy of Plasmodium vivax Radiation-Attenuated Sporozoites in Colombian Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Vásquez-Jiménez, Juan M; Lopez-Perez, Mary;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunizing human volunteers by mosquito bite with radiation-attenuated Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites (RAS) results in high-level protection against infection. Only two volunteers have been similarly immunized with P. vivax (Pv) RAS, and both were protected. A phase 2 controlled cl...

  4. I spy alloreactive T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2015-01-28

    High-throughput sequencing of the T cell receptor Vβ CDR3 region allowed longitudinal tracking of alloreactive T cells in kidney transplant patients, revealing clonal deletion as a mechanism of transplantation tolerance (Morris et al., this issue).

  5. Homeostasis of T Cell Diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vinay S. Mahajan; Ilya B. Leskov; Jianzhu Chen

    2005-01-01

    T cell homeostasis commonly refers to the maintenance of relatively stable T cell numbers in the peripheral lymphoid organs. Among the large numbers of T cells in the periphery, T cells exhibit structural diversity, I.e., the expression of a diverse repertoire of T cell receptors (TCRs), and functional diversity, I.e., the presence of T cells at na(I)ve, effector, and memory developmental stages. Although the homeostasis of T cell numbers has been extensively studied, investigation of the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of structural and functional diversity of T cells is still at an early stage. The fundamental feature throughout T cell development is the interaction between the TCR and either self or foreign peptides in association with MHC molecules. In this review, we present evidence showing that homeostasis of T cell number and diversity is mediated through competition for limiting resources.The number of T cells is maintained through competition for limiting cytokines, whereas the diversity of T cells is maintained by competition for self-peptide-MHC complexes. In other words, diversity of the self-peptide repertoire limits the structural (TCR) diversity of a T cell population. We speculate that cognate low affinity self-peptides,acting as weak agonists and antagonists, regulate the homeostasis of T cell diversity whereas non-cognate or null peptides which are extremely abundant for any given TCR, may contribute to the homeostasis of T cell number by providing survival signals. Moreover, self-peptides and cytokines may form specialized niches for the regulation of T cell homeostasis.

  6. Homeostasis of T Cell Diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VinayS.Mahajan; IlyaB.Leskov; JianzhuChen

    2005-01-01

    T cell homeostasis commonly refers to the maintenance of relatively stable T cell numbers in the peripheral lymphoid organs. Among the large numbers of T cells in the periphery, T cells exhibit structural diversity, i.e., the expression of a diverse repertoire of T cell receptors (TCRs), and functional diversity, i.e., the presence of T cells at naive, effector, and memory developmental stages. Although the homeostasis of T cell numbers has been extensively studied, investigation of the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of structural and functional diversity of T cells is still at an early stage. The fundamental feature throughout T cell development is the interaction between the TCR and either self or foreign peptides in association with MHC molecules. In this review, we present evidence showing that homeostasis of T cell number and diversity is mediated through competition for limiting resources. The number of T cells is maintained through competition for limiting cytokines, whereas the diversity of T cells is maintained by competition for self-peptide-MHC complexes. In other words, diversity of the self-peptide repertoire limits the structural (TCR) diversity of a T cell population. We speculate that cognate low affinity self-peptides, acting as weak agonists and antagonists, regulate the homeostasis of T cell diversity whereas non-cognate or null peptides which are extremely abundant for any given TCR, may contribute to the homeostasis of T cell number by providing survival signals. Moreover, self-peptides and cytokines may form specialized niches for the regulation of T cell homeostasis. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1): 1-10.

  7. Regulating regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, N T; Chao, N

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a specialized subpopulation of T cells that act to suppress activation of other immune cells and thereby maintain immune system homeostasis, self-tolerance as well as control excessive response to foreign antigens. The mere concept of Tregs was the subject of significant controversy among immunologists for many years owing to the paucity of reliable markers for defining these cells and the ambiguity of the nature and molecular basis of suppressive phenomena. However, recent advances in the molecular characterization of this cell population have firmly established their existence and their vital role in the vertebrate immune system. Of interest, accumulating evidence from both humans and experimental animal models has implicated the involvement of Tregs in the development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The demonstration that Tregs could separate GVHD from graft-versus-tumor (GVT) activity suggests that their immunosuppressive potential could be manipulated to reduce GVHD without detrimental consequence on GVT effect. Although a variety of T lymphocytes with suppressive capabilities have been reported, the two best-characterized subsets are the naturally arising, intrathymic-generated Tregs (natural Tregs) and the peripherally generated, inducible Tregs (inducible Tregs). This review summarizes our current knowledge of the generation, function and regulation of these two populations of Tregs during an immune response. Their role in the development of GVHD and their therapeutic potential for the prevention and treatment of GVHD will also be described.

  8. Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting the Facts Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Overview Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The two main forms of lymphoma are Hodgkin lymphoma and ... develop into lymphomas: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells). Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) ...

  9. Immunisation of baboons against Schistosoma mansoni using irradiated S. mansoni cercariae and schistosomula and non-irradiated S. rodhaini cercariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M G; James, E R; Nelson, G S; Bickle, Q; Andrews, B J; Dobinson, A R; Webbe, G

    1976-09-01

    In an attempt to develop a non-pathogenic procedure for immunising baboons against S. mansoni, groups of five baboons were exposed to three doses of 5000 6 Kr-irradiated S. mansoni cercariae or to similar numbers of normal S. rodhaini cercariae and challenged at week 15 with 500 normal S. mansoni cercariae. Faecal egg counts, worm and tissue egg counts, and histopathological examination, showed that neither of the immunising schedules had produced significant protection. In the second experiment baboons were injected by the intramuscular route with 31000 schistosomula of S. mansoni in three doses and the irradiation dose was reduced to near the minimum required for worm sterilisation (2-1--2-4 Kr). Challenge with 3500 normal cercariae of S. mansoni 21 weeks after the first immunising dose again showed no significant protection, although reductions of 20--30% were found in egg and worm counts resulting from the challenge. These results indicate that it may be difficult to develop an effective live vaccine for S. mansoni unless the antigenicity of the immunising larvae can be greatly increased.

  10. CCL22-specific T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinenaite, Evelina; Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating macrophages produce the chemokine CCL22, which attracts regulatory T cells (Tregs) into the tumor microenvironment, decreasing anticancer immunity. Here, we investigated the possibility of targeting CCL22-expressing cells by activating specific T cells. We...... analyzed the CCL22 protein signal sequence, identifying a human leukocyte antigen A2- (HLA-A2-) restricted peptide epitope, which we then used to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs) to expand populations of CCL22-specific T cells in vitro. T cells recognizing an epitope derived from...... the signal-peptide of CCL22 will recognize CCL22-expressing cells even though CCL22 is secreted out of the cell. CCL22-specific T cells recognized and killed CCL22-expressing cancer cells. Furthermore, CCL22-specific T cells lysed acute monocytic leukemia cells in a CCL22 expression-dependent manner. Using...

  11. The deadly swimming of Cercariae: an unusual Stokesian swimmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Manu; Krishnamurthy, Deepak

    2014-11-01

    Schistosomiasis, also known as Bilharzia, is a Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) caused by a parasitic Trematode blood fluke worm. In terms of socio-economic and public health impact, Schistosomiasis is second only to Malaria as the most devastating parasitic disease in tropical countries; with roughly 200 million people infected at any time world-wide and up to 200,000 deaths every year. The infectious form of the parasite, known as Cercariae, emerge from snails into freshwater and infect humans by directly burrowing into the skin. Thus, anyone in contact with infected waters is at risk, which mostly includes children. By establishing a safe experimental means of studying the Cercariae in our lab, we report here their unusual swimming dynamics which include both head-first and tail-first swimming modes. These swimming modes are crucial for the chemotactic activity of Cercariae which allows them to seek out and burrow into human skin. By experimental and analytical means, we demonstrate that Cercariae break symmetry and achieve locomotion at small Reynolds number differently when compared to well-known methods involving traveling waves in the flagellum or chiral beating. Although they utilize the well-known drag anisotropy of a slender body in Stokes flow, the geometry and kinematics of their propulsion mechanism is novel. Based on these results, we propose a new kind of simple Stokesian swimmer (T-joint swimmer) in an attempt to explain the evolutionary advantages of this novel swimming mechanism. Using the above physical insights from a biological and global-health standpoint, we explore ways to hinder the chemotactic capabilities of this parasite.

  12. Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma Overview Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The two main forms of lymphoma are ... develop into lymphomas: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells). Cancerous lymphocytes can travel to ...

  13. T cell receptor-engineered T cells to treat solid tumors: T cell processing toward optimal T cell fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Lamers (Cor); S. van Steenbergen-Langeveld (Sabine); M. van Brakel (Mandy); C.M. Groot-van Ruijven (Corrien); P.M.M.L. van Elzakker (Pascal); B.A. van Krimpen (Brigitte); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractTherapy with autologous T cells that have been gene-engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) or T cell receptors (TCR) provides a feasible and broadly applicable treatment for cancer patients. In a clinical study in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with CAR T ce

  14. Self-reactive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    -proteins expressed in regulatory immune cells have been reported, especially in patients with cancer. The seemingly lack of tolerance toward such proteins is interesting, as it suggests a regulatory function of self-reactive T (srT) cells, which may be important for the fine tuning of the immune system....... In particular, surprising has been the description of cytotoxic srT cells that are able to eliminate normal regulatory immune cells. Such srT cells may be important as effector cells that suppress regulatory suppressor cells. The current knowledge of the nature and function of srT cells is still limited. Still......, the therapeutic targeting of srT cells offers a novel approach to harness immune-regulatory networks in cancer....

  15. The effect of sublethal concentrations of the molluscicide niclosamide on the infectivity of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandour, A M; Webbe, G

    1975-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effect of sublethal concentrations of niclosamide on the infectivity of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. Exposure of cercariae to 0.02 mg/l and 0.05 mg/l of niclosamide, respectively, for only two hours increased their mortality during penetration of mammalian host skin. The observed increase in mortality in the skin resulted in a consequent reduction of adult worm recovery from the liver and mesenteric veins of animals infected with the treated cercariae.

  16. First record of a rare transversotrematid cercaria larva (Trematoda: Digenea) from Rajasthan, India: focus on seasonal occurrence and host-specificity of diverse cercariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubisa, Shanti Lal; Jaroli, Vishva Jeet; Sheikh, Zulfiya

    2017-06-01

    During the survey of freshwater snail hosts and their digenean larval trematode parasites, a rare cercaria larva belonging to family Transversotrematidae and subclass Digenea (Trematoda) was recovered from the snail species Melanoides striatella tuberculata inhabiting perennial Som river of Udaipur district, Rajasthan, India. More than 28 % mature specimens of these snails were found to be infected with transversotrematid cercaria larvae in the spring season. Body of this cercaria is large, bowl-shaped, biocellate, spinose, transparent and laterally extended having two pigmented eye spots, two hold fast organs extended from the junction of body and tail, large tail with two foliated furcal rami, and cyclocoel intestinal caeca. As far as the authors are aware, this is the first record of a transversotrematid larva from Rajasthan, India. Simultaneously, other forms of cercariae viz., amphistome, echinostome, monostome, gymnocephalous, furcocercous and xiphidiocercous cercariae were also recovered from fifteen species of pulmonate and operculate snails including Lymnaea acuminata f. patula, L. acuminata f. chlamys, L. acuminata f. typica, L. acuminata f. rufescens, L. luteola f. australis, L. luteola f. typica, L. luteola f. impura, Planorbis (Indoplanorbis) exustus, and Anisus (Gyraulus) convexiusculus, Faunus ater, Melania (Plotia) scabra, Thiara (Tarebia) lineata, Melanoides striatella tuberculata, Vivipara bengalensis race gigantica and V. bengalensis race mandiensis. The seasonal occurrence and host-specificity of diverse trematode cercaria larvae are also discussed besides the first record of a rare transversotrematid cercaria larva from Rajasthan, India.

  17. Measurement of skeletal muscle radiation attenuation and basis of its biological variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrey, J; Esfandiari, N; Baracos, V E; Buteau, F A; Frenette, J; Putman, C T; Mazurak, V C

    2014-03-01

    Skeletal muscle contains intramyocellular lipid droplets within the cytoplasm of myocytes as well as intermuscular adipocytes. These depots exhibit physiological and pathological variation which has been revealed with the advent of diagnostic imaging approaches: magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR spectroscopy and computed tomography (CT). CT uses computer-processed X-rays and is now being applied in muscle physiology research. The purpose of this review is to present CT methodologies and summarize factors that influence muscle radiation attenuation, a parameter which is inversely related to muscle fat content. Pre-defined radiation attenuation ranges are used to demarcate intermuscular adipose tissue [from -190 to -30 Hounsfield units (HU)] and muscle (-29 HU to +150 HU). Within the latter range, the mean muscle radiation attenuation [muscle (radio) density] is reported. Inconsistent criteria for the upper and lower HU cut-offs used to characterize muscle attenuation limit comparisons between investigations. This area of research would benefit from standardized criteria for reporting muscle attenuation. Available evidence suggests that muscle attenuation is plastic with physiological variation induced by the process of ageing, as well as by aerobic training, which probably reflects accumulation of lipids to fuel aerobic work. Pathological variation in muscle attenuation reflects excess fat deposition in the tissue and is observed in people with obesity, diabetes type II, myositis, osteoarthritis, spinal stenosis and cancer. A poor prognosis and different types of morbidity are predicted by the presence of reduced mean muscle attenuation values in patients with these conditions; however, the biological features of muscle with these characteristics require further investigation.

  18. B and T cell screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direct immunofluorescence; E-rosetting; T and B lymphocyte assays; B and T lymphocyte assays ... identifiers are added to distinguish between T and B cells. The E-rosetting test identifies T cells ...

  19. Effective radiation attenuation calibration for breast density: compression thickness influences and correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jerry A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibrating mammograms to produce a standardized breast density measurement for breast cancer risk analysis requires an accurate spatial measure of the compressed breast thickness. Thickness inaccuracies due to the nominal system readout value and compression paddle orientation induce unacceptable errors in the calibration. Method A thickness correction was developed and evaluated using a fully specified two-component surrogate breast model. A previously developed calibration approach based on effective radiation attenuation coefficient measurements was used in the analysis. Water and oil were used to construct phantoms to replicate the deformable properties of the breast. Phantoms consisting of measured proportions of water and oil were used to estimate calibration errors without correction, evaluate the thickness correction, and investigate the reproducibility of the various calibration representations under compression thickness variations. Results The average thickness uncertainty due to compression paddle warp was characterized to within 0.5 mm. The relative calibration error was reduced to 7% from 48-68% with the correction. The normalized effective radiation attenuation coefficient (planar representation was reproducible under intra-sample compression thickness variations compared with calibrated volume measures. Conclusion Incorporating this thickness correction into the rigid breast tissue equivalent calibration method should improve the calibration accuracy of mammograms for risk assessments using the reproducible planar calibration measure.

  20. Morphological Characteristics and Phylogenetic Trends of Trematode Cercariae in Freshwater Snails from Nakhon Nayok Province, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chontananarth, Thapana; Tejangkura, Thanawan; Wetchasart, Napat; Chimburut, Cherdchay

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of cercarial infection in freshwater snails and their evolutionary trends were studied in Nakhon Nayok province, Thailand. A total of 2,869 individual snails were examined for parasitic infections. The results showed that 12 snail species were found to host larval stages of trematodes with an overall prevalence of 4.7%. The infected specimens included 7 types at the cercarial stage; cercariae, megalurous cercariae, echinostome cercariae, furcocercous cercariae, parapleurolophocercous cercariae, virgulate cercariae, and xiphidiocercariae. Regarding molecular identification, ITS2 sequence data of each larval trematode were analyzed, and a dendrogram was constructed using the neighbor-joining method with 10,000 replicates. The dendrogram was separated into 6 clades (order/family), including Echinostomatida/Echinostomatidae, Echinostomatida/Philophthalmidae, Opisthorchiida/Heterophyidae, Plagiorchiida/Prosthogonimidae, Plagiorchiida/Lecithodendriidae, and Strigeatida/Cyathocotylidae. These findings were used to confirm morphological characteristics and evolutionary trends of each type of cercariae discovered in Nakhon Nayok province. Furthermore, this investigation confirmed that the ITS2 data of cercariae could be used to study on phylogenetic relationships or to determine classification of this species at order and/or family level when possible. PMID:28285506

  1. Morphological Characteristics and Phylogenetic Trends of Trematode Cercariae in Freshwater Snails from Nakhon Nayok Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chontananarth, Thapana; Tejangkura, Thanawan; Wetchasart, Napat; Chimburut, Cherdchay

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of cercarial infection in freshwater snails and their evolutionary trends were studied in Nakhon Nayok province, Thailand. A total of 2,869 individual snails were examined for parasitic infections. The results showed that 12 snail species were found to host larval stages of trematodes with an overall prevalence of 4.7%. The infected specimens included 7 types at the cercarial stage; cercariae, megalurous cercariae, echinostome cercariae, furcocercous cercariae, parapleurolophocercous cercariae, virgulate cercariae, and xiphidiocercariae. Regarding molecular identification, ITS2 sequence data of each larval trematode were analyzed, and a dendrogram was constructed using the neighbor-joining method with 10,000 replicates. The dendrogram was separated into 6 clades (order/family), including Echinostomatida/Echinostomatidae, Echinostomatida/Philophthalmidae, Opisthorchiida/Heterophyidae, Plagiorchiida/Prosthogonimidae, Plagiorchiida/Lecithodendriidae, and Strigeatida/Cyathocotylidae. These findings were used to confirm morphological characteristics and evolutionary trends of each type of cercariae discovered in Nakhon Nayok province. Furthermore, this investigation confirmed that the ITS2 data of cercariae could be used to study on phylogenetic relationships or to determine classification of this species at order and/or family level when possible.

  2. Cercariae of the lakes Maarsseveen (Netherlands) infecting Bithynia spp. (Gastropoda: Prosobranchia) and Physa fontinalis (Gastropoda: Pulmonata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, Stef M.A.

    1981-01-01

    In 1978 cercariae have been collected from four species of freshwater snails in two lakes near Utrecht (Netherlands). Eleven species are recorded, of which six are described in detail. Five of these are new: Cercaria gutta n. sp. (Psilostomidae), C. cana n. sp. (Notocotilydae), C. quadrata n. sp.

  3. Prevalence of Cercariae Infection in Lymnaea auricularia (Linnaeus, 1758 in NorthWest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Imani-Baran

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The pond snail Lymnaea auricularia serves as an intermediate host for many digenian species. In West Azerbaijan province, northwestern Iran, the cercariae infection investigation was undertaken in L. auricularia from May to November 2010. Of 6759 collected Lymnaeid snails, 370(5.5% L. auricularia snails were identified. Cercariae infection was found in a number of 276 (74.56 % snails. The results showed that removed cercariae from L. auricularia belonged to Echinostomcercariae (96.38 % and Furcocercariae (3.62 % which were found in two out of 28 sites during the course of study. In summer and fall, the highest prevalence of cercariae infection was recorded for both identified cercariae. It is concluded that L. auricularia could be an important intermediate host of large group digenian trematodes in the region, which is necessary to take consideration in the control program of trematode infection.

  4. Production of marine trematode cercariae: a potentially overlooked path of energy flow in benthic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieltges, David W.; de Montaudouin, Xavier; Fredensborg, Brian

    2008-01-01

    reported for free-living invertebrates inhabiting benthic ecosystems. These estimates would be much higher if they included all trematode species in an ecosystem, and not just single-species values. Overall, results suggest that trematode cercariae represent potentially important paths of energy flow....... We use published data on rates at which trematodes produce free-swimming infective larvae (cercariae) that are released from their gastropod intermediate hosts to investigate patterns in cercarial output as a function of different variables, and to calculate the annual production of cercariae...... of cercariae, and was influenced by the type of downstream host sought by cercariae, being highest when this host was a vertebrate. Our estimates of annual cercarial production (kJ m-2 yr-1), which take into account the density of infected snails in the habitat, were within the range of production values...

  5. [Isolation of the cercaria Diplostomum phoxini (Faust, 1918) Arvy et Buttner, 1954 (Diplostomatidae) from fresh water mollusks of the Crimea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sten'ko, R P

    1976-01-01

    Data on the biology and morphology of cercariae of Diplostomum phoxini (Faust, 1918) Arvy et Buttner, 1954 are given. The cercariae were found in Radix auricularia from the middle part of the Burulcha river (Ukranian SSR, Crimea). In November, 1974 the invasion extensity of mollusks was 16.3%. No cercariae were found in spring and summer samples.

  6. Anti-regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host...... responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells—termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)—that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune...... reactions as well as effector cells that counteract the effects of suppressor cells and support immune reactions. Self-reactive anti-Tregs have been described that specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes derived from proteins that are normally expressed by regulatory immune cells...

  7. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Benjamin

    2005-12-30

    A 32-year-old man presented with a 5-year history of cutaneous nodules on his head and a diffuse, lichenified eruption. Histopathologic examination showed an atypical lymphocytic infiltrate. Immunophenotyping studies determined that the lymphocyte population to be CD4-positive, with partial loss of CD3 and CD7, and immunogenotyping studies showed a clonal rearrangement of the T-cell receptor. A positron-emission tomography scan showed increased uptake in cervical, axillary, and inguinal lymph nodes. A diagnosis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma was made, and the patient is undergoing chemotherapy.

  8. Assessment of the Radiation Attenuation Properties of Several Lead Free Composites by Monte Carlo Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazempour M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In diagnostic radiology lead apron, are usually used to protect patients and radiology staff against ionizing radiation. Lead apron is a desirable shield due to high absorption and effective attenuation of x-ray photons in the diagnostic radiology range. Objective: Although lead aprons have good radiation protection properties, in recent years, researchers have been looking for alternative materials to be used instead of lead apron because of some problems derived from lead-content of aprons. Because of its lead-content, these radiation protection garments are so heavy and uncomfortable for the staff to wear, particularly in long-time uses. In addition, lead is a toxic element and its disposal is associated with environmental and human-health hazards. Method: In this study, several new combinations of lead free materials ((W-Si, (W-Sn-Ba-EPVC , (W-Sn-Cd-EPVC have been investigated in the energy range of diagnostic radiology in two geometries: narrow and broad beam. Geometries of the radiation attenuation characteristics of these materials was assessed in 40, 60, 90 and 120 kVp and the results compared with those of some lead-containing materials ((Pb-Si, (Pb-EPVC. Results: Lead shields still provide better protection in low energies (below 40 kVp. Combination of W-Sn-Cd-EPVC has shown the best radiation attenuation features in 60 and 90 kVp and the composition of (W-Sn-Ba-EPVC represents the best attenuation in 120 kVp, even better than previously mentioned lead- containing composites. Conclusion: Lead free shields are completely effective for protection against X-ray energies in the range of 60 to 120 kVp.

  9. Kinetics of the cercaria-schistosomulum transformation in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Melo

    1985-03-01

    Full Text Available Sitice most studies on the cercaria-schistosomulum transformation have been carried out in vitro, the authors used the inoculation ofcercariae into the peritoneal cavity of mice tofollow the steps involved in this progressive adaptation of cercarie to the vertebmte host. The main conclusions were: 1. Most cercariae reach the schistosomular stage between 90-120 min after intraperitoneal inoculation. 2. Changes usuallystart with detachment of the tail followed by loss, rupture or changes of the glycocalix. 3. After 120 min most larvae loss their tails and present water sensitivity. 4. Acetabular grands depletion usually does not occur in cercaria-shistosomulum changes in the peritoneal cavity of mice. These steps differ in some way from those described in the kinetics of the in vitro observations performed by other investigators, and is more like those described in the penetration in the skin of living vertebrates.Uma vez que a maioria dos estudos da transformação cercária-esquistossômulo têm sido realizados in vitro, os autores usaram a inoculação de cercárias na cavidade peritoneal de camundongos para seguir as etapas envolvidas nesta adaptação progressiva das larvas ao hospedeiro vertebrado. conclusões principais foram: 1. A maioria das cercárias atinge 0 estádio de esquistossômulo entre 90 - 120 minutos após a inoculação intraperitoneal. 2. As modificações usualmente são iniciadas com a perda da cauda, seguidas pela perda, ruptura ou modificações do glicocálice. 3. Após 120 minutos do inóculo, a maioria das larvas perde sua cauda e apresenta intolerância à água. 4. A depleção das glândulas acetabulares habitualmente não ocorre durante o processo de transformação cercária-esquistossômulo, na cavidade peritoneal do camundongo. Os resultados da inoculação intraperitoneal em camundongos aproximam-se mais dos achados da penetração da cercária na pele de hospedeiros vertebrados, e diferem, em parte, das

  10. Fish T cells: recent advances through genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Kerry J.; Hansen, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This brief review is intended to provide a concise overview of the current literature concerning T cells, advances in identifying distinct T cell functional subsets, and in distinguishing effector cells from memory cells. We compare and contrast a wealth of recent progress made in T cell immunology of teleost, elasmobranch, and agnathan fish, to knowledge derived from mammalian T cell studies. From genome studies, fish clearly have most components associated with T cell function and we can speculate on the presence of putative T cell subsets, and the ability to detect their differentiation to form memory cells. Some recombinant proteins for T cell associated cytokines and antibodies for T cell surface receptors have been generated that will facilitate studying the functional roles of teleost T cells during immune responses. Although there is still a long way to go, major advances have occurred in recent years for investigating T cell responses, thus phenotypic and functional characterization is on the near horizon.

  11. T cell recognition of beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shaodong; Falta, Michael T; Bowerman, Natalie A; McKee, Amy S; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-12-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous lung disorder caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium and characterized by the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells in the lung. Genetic susceptibility to beryllium-induced disease is strongly associated with HLA-DP alleles possessing a glutamic acid at the 69th position of the β-chain (βGlu69). The structure of HLA-DP2, the most prevalent βGlu69-containing molecule, revealed a unique solvent-exposed acidic pocket that includes βGlu69 and represents the putative beryllium-binding site. The delineation of mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that complete the αβTCR ligand for beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells suggests a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of altered self-peptides, blurring the distinction between hypersensitivity and autoimmunity.

  12. Aire and T cell Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.; Su, Maureen A.

    2011-01-01

    In the thymus, developing T cells that react against self-antigens with high affinity are deleted in the process of negative selection. An essential component of this process is the display of self-antigens, including those whose expression are usually restricted to specific tissues, to developing T cells within the thymus. The Autoimmune Regulator (Aire) gene plays a critical role in the expression of tissue specific self-antigens within the thymus, and disruption of Aire function results in spontaneous autoimmunity in both humans and mice. Recent advances have been made in our understanding of how Aire influences the expression of thousands of tissue-specific antigens in the thymus. Additional roles of Aire, including roles in chemokine and cytokine expression, have also been revealed. Factors important in the differentiation of Aire-expressing medullary thymic epithelial cells have been defined. Finally, the identity of antigen presenting cells in negative selection, including the role of medullary thymic epithelial cells in displaying tissue specific antigens to T cells, has also been clarified. PMID:21163636

  13. Delayed tail loss during the invasion of mouse skin by cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Fang, Zheng-Ming; Lei, Jia-Hui; Guan, Fei; Liu, Wen-Qi; Bartlett, Ann; Whitfield, Phil; Li, Yong-Long

    2012-02-01

    A traditional assumption is that schistosome cercariae lose their tails at the onset of penetration. It has, however, recently been demonstrated that, for Schistosoma mansoni, cercarial tails were not invariably being shed as penetration took place and a high proportion of tails entered human skin under experimental conditions. This phenomenon was termed delayed tail loss (DTL). In this paper, we report that DTL also happens with S. japonicum cercariae during penetration of mouse skin. It occurred at all cercarial densities tested, from as few as 10 cercariae/2·25 cm(2) of mouse skin up to 200 cercariae. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that there was a density-dependent increase in DTL as cercarial densities increased. No such density-dependent enhancement was shown for percentage attachment over the same cercarial density range.

  14. Behavioral analysis of Microphallus turgidus cercariae in relation to microhabitat of two host grass shrimp species (Palaemonetes spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Patricia A; Pung, Oscar J

    2017-01-24

    The behavior of Microphallus turgidus cercariae was examined and compared to microhabitat selection of the second intermediate hosts of the parasite, Palaemonetes spp. grass shrimp. Cercariae were tested for photokinetic and geotactic responses, and a behavioral ethogram was established for cercariae in control and grass shrimp-conditioned brackish water. Photokinesis trials were performed using a half-covered Petri dish, and geotaxis trials used a graduated cylinder. Both photokinesis and geotaxis trials were performed in lighted and unlighted conditions. In 9 of 10 photokinesis experiments, over half of the cercariae swam horizontally under the covered half of a Petri dish in both the lighted and the unlighted trials. However, movement of the cercariae to the covered half of the dish was highest (81.4%) when the parasites were exposed to light. In the geotaxis study, most cercariae were found in the bottom third of a graduated cylinder water column in both the lighted and unlighted trials. The most frequently observed activity of individual cercariae in a lighted Petri dish was swimming on the bottom of the dish. Activity patterns of the cercariae were not affected by shrimp-conditioned water. Movement of the cercariae away from light into dark, active swimming at or near the bottom of the water column, and a lack of response to host odors suggest that the cercariae utilize search patterns that place the parasite in the preferred microhabitat of the principle second intermediate host, the grass shrimp P. pugio.

  15. New insights into the reaction of Schistosoma mansoni cercaria to the human complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da'dara, Akram A; Krautz-Peterson, Greice

    2014-10-01

    Schistosomes are parasitic worms that have a complex life cycle. The larval stage cercaria, infectious to mammals, is described as highly susceptible to the complement system, largely due to the glycocalyx that covers the cercarial membrane. In an attempt to have a more complete understanding of cercaria reaction to the complement system, three different approaches were used. Live cercariae exposed to normal human serum (NHS) as source of complement factors were assessed for (i) membrane attack complex (MAC) deposition on the parasite surface, (ii) cercaria survival rate by Hoechst staining of parasite DNA, and (iii) transformation into schistosomula by detection of the glucose transporter protein 4 (SGTP4), a marker for new tegument formation. We found that 82-95% of cercariae directly exposed to NHS for 18 h were viable and retained their ability to shed the glycocalyx, suggesting minimal tegument damage. In contrast, inhibition of glycocalyx shedding using eserine caused significant MAC binding and parasite death. Culturing complement-exposed cercariae to measure long-term survival showed that more parasites died over time, reaching a survival rate of 18-31% by day 6 in culture. The reason for this slow death is unknown, but the surviving parasites were able to form a new tegument as shown by detection of SGTP4 on the parasite surface. Furthermore, we found that complement activation significantly damaged the acetabular gland ducts and lysed secretory vesicles released by transforming cercariae. These findings should contribute for future in vivo studies of the effects of the complement system in skin migrating cercariae.

  16. [Clonal and population RAPD variation of cercariae obtained from Bucephalus polymorphus sporocysts (Trematoda: Bucephalidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsunenko, A V; Tiutin, A V; Semenova, S K

    2009-01-01

    Three arbitrary primers produced 114 RAPD markers for 37 cercariae from nine Bucephalus polymorphus sporocysts obtained from three Dreissena polymorpha mollusks, which were collected in two water reservoirs of the Volga basin. Analysis of the RAPD patterns established a unique genotype for each cercaria. The topology of an UPGMA dendrogram did not reliably differentiate the cercaria according to the corresponding sporocysts. However, three groups of genotypes were isolated and corresponded to the host mollusks, indicating that each cercaria clone had a different genotype set. A within-sporocyst variation made the greatest contribution (53.0%) to the total RAPD diversity, while the contributions of within-host and between-host variations to the total diversity were equal (23.5%). Cercariae isolated from two mollusks of the Rybinsk Water Reservoir were more similar to each other than to cercariae from the geographically distant Gor'kovskoe Water Reservoir. Possible causes and distribution specifics of the observed genetic diversity of B. polymorphus are discussed.

  17. Global Manufacturing of CAR T Cell Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levine, Bruce L; Miskin, James; Wonnacott, Keith; Keir, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    .... As chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy moves into later-phase clinical trials and becomes an option for more patients, compliance of the chimeric antigen receptor T cell manufacturing process...

  18. T cell repertoires and competitive exclusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de; Perelson, A.S.

    1994-01-01

    Self-renewal is generally thought to play a major role in the maintenance of the T-cell repertoire. Here we develop a set of mathematical models for T-cell activation by peptides on antigen presenting cells (APCs). We show that competition between T cells is inherent to the processes involved in T c

  19. Theoretical models for T-cell vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de; Borghans, J.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    T cell vaccination (TCV) is a term for a whole collection of phenomena in which the injection of T cells provides protection against autoimmunity. Vaccination with T cells has been investigated for several autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, adjuvant arthritist

  20. Cytokine production in BALB/c mice immunized with radiation attenuated third stage larvae of the filarial nematode, Brugia pahangi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bancroft, A.J.; Devaney, E. (Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool (United Kingdom)); Grencis, R.K.; Else, K.J. (Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom))

    1993-02-15

    BALB/c mice immunized with radiation-attenuated third stage larvae of the filarial nematode Brugia pahangi are strongly immune to challenge infection. Investigation of the profile of cytokines secreted by spleen cells from immune mice stimulated in vitro with either parasite Ag or with Con A revealed high levels of IL-5 and IL-9 and moderate levels of IL-4. In contrast, secretion of IFN-[gamma] by spleen cells from immune animals was negligible. Spleen cells from control mice secreted low levels of all cytokines assayed. Levels of parasite-specific IgE were significantly elevated in immune animals and a peripheral blood eosinophilia was observed, which exhibited a biphasic distribution. Our results are consistent with the preferential expansion of Th2 cells in immune animals and provide the basis for dissecting the means by which radiation-attenuated larvae of filarial nematodes stimulate immunity. 5l refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. PD-L1-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Borch, Troels Holz; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    -specific T cells that recognize both PD-L1-expressing immune cells and malignant cells. Thus, PD-L1-specific T cells have the ability to modulate adaptive immune reactions by reacting to regulatory cells. Thus, utilization of PD-L1-derived T cell epitopes may represent an attractive vaccination strategy...... for targeting the tumor microenvironment and for boosting the clinical effects of additional anticancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes present information about PD-L1 as a T cell antigen, depicts the initial findings about the function of PD-L1-specific T cells in the adjustment of immune responses...

  2. Toxicity of cadmium to Schistosoma mansoni cercariae: effects on vitality and developmental ability in white mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliman, R.B. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg); Esham, L.P.

    1977-09-29

    Time-until-death studies were run on cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni in 8 concentrations of cadmium (from cadmium sulfate) ranging from 100 ppM to 0.0001 ppM. All concentrations used were found to be toxic, and at 10 ppM all cercariae were dead within 4 hours, which coincides with their period of maximum infectability following emergence from the snail host. At 2 ppM, all cercariae died within 8 hours, and at 1 ppM all died within 16 hours. In addition, groups of cercariae were exposed to cadmium concentrations of 10, 1, and 0.1 ppM for periods of 30, 20, and 10 minutes. Thereafter, cercariae from these groups were allowed to penetrate the tails of white mice or were injected subcutaneously into mice. After 8 weeks, these mice were autopsied and the adult worms collected by perfusion. Maturation of cercariae from both methods of invasion was seriously impaired. Statistical analysis using a 3 x 4 x 2 factoral design for analysis of variance showed both time of exposure and concentration of cadmium ion to be significant factors in determining number of worms developing at p = 0.01. A significant interaction between time of exposure and concentration was found to exist. The two methods of infection did not have a significant effect on the number of worms recovered. Therefore, it appears that those toxicant-exposed cercariae capable of maturing do not need assistance in transversing the skin barrier but can penetrate and migrate to reach the mesenteric venules for maturation.

  3. Regulatory T cells as immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin David Singer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs suppress exuberant immune system activation and promote immunologic tolerance. Because Tregs modulate both innate and adaptive immunity, the biomedical community has developed intense interest in using Tregs for immunotherapy. Conditions that require clinical tolerance to improve outcomes—autoimmune disease, solid organ transplantation, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation—may benefit from Treg immunotherapy. Investigators have designed ex vivo strategies to isolate, preserve, expand, and infuse Tregs. Protocols to manipulate Treg populations in vivo have also been considered. Barriers to clinically feasible Treg immunotherapy include Treg stability, off-cell effects, and demonstration of cell preparation purity and potency. Clinical trials involving Treg adoptive transfer to treat graft versus host disease preliminarily demonstrated the safety and efficacy of Treg immunotherapy in humans. Future work will need to confirm the safety of Treg immunotherapy and establish the efficacy of specific Treg subsets for the treatment of immune-mediated disease.

  4. Regulatory T Cells and Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TP. Velavan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human host encounters a wide array of parasites; however, the crucial aspect is the failure of the host immune system to clear these parasites despite antigen recognition. In the recent past, a new immunological concept has emerged, which provides a framework to better understand several aspects of host susceptibility to parasitic infection. It is widely believed that parasites are able to modulate the magnitude of effector responses by inducing regulatory T cell (Tregs population and several studies have investigated whether this cell population plays a role in balancing protective immunity and pathogenesis during parasite infection. This review discusses the several mechanism of Treg-mediated immunosuppression in the human host and focuses on the functional role of Tregs and regulatory gene polymorphisms in infectious diseases.

  5. Activated gammadelta T cells promote the activation of uveitogenic T cells and exacerbate EAU development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Hong; Shao, Hui; O'Brien, Rebecca L; Born, Willi K; Kaplan, Henry J; Sun, Deming

    2011-07-29

    To determine how the activation of γδ T cells affects the generation of uveitogenic αβ T cells and the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). γδ T cells were isolated from B6 mice immunized with the uveitogenic peptide IRBP(1-20) and αβ T cells from immunized TCR-δ(-/-) mice. Resting γδ T cells were prepared by culture of separated γδ T cells in cytokine-free medium for 3 to 5 days, when they showed downregulation of CD69 expression. Activated γδ T cells were prepared by incubating resting γδ T cells with anti-γδ TCR (GL3) for 2 days. Responder αβ T cells were cocultured with immunizing antigen and antigen-presenting cells. The numbers of antigen-specific T cells expressing IL-17 or IFN-γ were determined by intracellular staining followed by FACS analysis after stimulation, with or without the addition of purified γδ T cells. The cytokines in the culture medium were measured by ELISA. Highly enriched γδ T cells exert widely different effects on autoreactive αβ T cells in EAU, depending on the activation status of the γδ T cells. Whereas nonactivated γδ T cells had little effect on the activation of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein-specific αβ T cells in vitro and in vivo, activated γδ T cells promoted the generation of uveitogenic T cells and exacerbated the development of EAU. The functional ability of γδ T cells is greatly influenced by their activation status. Activated γδ T cells exacerbate EAU through increased activation of uveitogenic T cells.

  6. Radiation attenuation by lead and nonlead materials used in radiation shielding garments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, J P; Shen, H; Downton, B; Mainegra-Hing, E

    2007-02-01

    The attenuating properties of several types of lead (Pb)-based and non-Pb radiation shielding materials were studied and a correlation was made of radiation attenuation, materials properties, calculated spectra and ambient dose equivalent. Utilizing the well-characterized x-ray and gamma ray beams at the National Research Council of Canada, air kerma measurements were used to compare a variety of commercial and pre-commercial radiation shielding materials over mean energy ranges from 39 to 205 keV. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo user code cavity. cpp was extended to provide computed spectra for a variety of elements that have been used as a replacement for Pb in radiation shielding garments. Computed air kerma values were compared with experimental values and with the SRS-30 catalogue of diagnostic spectra available through the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine Report 78. In addition to garment materials, measurements also included pure Pb sheets, allowing direct comparisons to the common industry standards of 0.25 and 0.5 mm "lead equivalent." The parameter "lead equivalent" is misleading, since photon attenuation properties for all materials (including Pb) vary significantly over the energy spectrum, with the largest variations occurring in the diagnostic imaging range. Furthermore, air kerma measurements are typically made to determine attenuation properties without reference to the measures of biological damage such as ambient dose equivalent, which also vary significantly with air kerma over the diagnostic imaging energy range. A single material or combination cannot provide optimum shielding for all energy ranges. However, appropriate choice of materials for a particular energy range can offer significantly improved shielding per unit mass over traditional Pb-based materials.

  7. A sharp T-cell antigen receptor signaling threshold for T-cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Au-Yeung, Byron B.; Zikherman, Julie; James L. Mueller; Ashouri, Judith F.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Cheng, Debra A.; Chen, Yiling; Shokat, Kevan M; Weiss, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical signals triggered by the T-cell receptor (TCR) are required for stimulating T cells and can be initiated within seconds. However, a hallmark of T-cell activation, cell division, occurs hours after TCR signaling has begun, implying that T cells require a minimum duration and/or accumulate TCR signaling events to drive proliferation. To visualize the accumulated signaling experienced by T cells, we used a fluorescent reporter gene that is activated by TCR stimulation. This technique...

  8. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and cytochrome oxidase activity in Fasciola gigantica cercaria by phytoconstituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunita, Kumari; Habib, Maria; Kumar, P; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Singh, D K

    2016-02-01

    Fasciolosis is an important cattle and human disease caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. One of the possible methods to control this problem is to interrupt the life cycle of Fasciola by killing its larva (redia and cercaria) in host snail. Molecular identification of cercaria larva of F. gigantica was done by comparing the nucleotide sequencing with adult F. gigantica. It was noted that nucleotide sequencing of cercaria larva and adult F. gigantica were 99% same. Every month during the year 2011-2012, in vivo treatment with 60% of 4 h LC50 of phyto cercaricides citral, ferulic acid, umbelliferone, azadirachtin and allicin caused significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and cytochrome oxidase activity in the treated cercaria larva of F. gigantica. Whereas, activity of both enzymes were not significantly altered in the nervous tissues of vector snail Lymnaea acuminata exposed to same treatments. Maximum reduction in AChE (1.35% of control in month of June) and cytochrome oxidase (3.71% of control in the month of July) activity were noted in the cercaria exposed to 60% of 4 h LC50 of azadirachtin and allicin, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of the swimming mechanics of Schistosoma cercariae and its role in disease transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Deepak; Bhargava, Arjun; Katsikis, Georgios; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    Schistosomiasis is a Neglected Tropical Disease responsible for the deaths of an estimated 200,000 people annually. Human infection occurs when the infectious forms of the worm known as cercariae swim through freshwater, detect humans and penetrate the skin. Cercarial swimming is a bottleneck in disease transmission since cercariae have finite energy reserves, hence motivating studies of their swimming mechanics. Here we build on earlier studies which revealed the existence of two swimming modes: the tail-first and head-first modes. Of these the former was shown to display a novel symmetry breaking mechanism enabling locomotion at low Reynolds numbers. Here we propose simple models for the two swimming modes based on a three-link swimmer geometry. Using local slender-body-theory, we calculate the swimming gait for these model swimmers and compare with experiments, both on live cercariae and on scaled-up robotic swimmers. We use data from these experiments and the models to calculate the energy expended while swimming in the two modes. This along with long-time tracking of swimming cercariae in a lab setting allows estimation of the decrease in activity of the swimmer as a function of time which is an important factor in cercarial infectivity. Finally, we consider, through experiments and theoretical models, the effects of gravity since cercariae are negatively buoyant and sink in the water column while not swimming. This sinking affects cercarial spatial distribution which is important from a disease perspective.

  10. Three new species of cercariae from Melanopsis praemorsa (L. 1758, Buccinum) snails in Al-Bathan fresh water body, Palestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sami Bdir; Ghaleb Adwan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate other new species of cercariae encountered in Melanopsis praemorsa (M. praemorsa) snails collected from Palestine. Methods: A total of 1 100 M. praemorsa were collected from Al-Bathan water body, Palestine, from November, 2010 to November, 2011. Cercariae in M. praemorsa were obtained by emerging and crushing methods. Results: Other three new different species of cercariae have been identified from this snail. These species were Xiphidiocercaria (Cercaria melanopsi palestinia IV), Microcercous (Cercaria melanopsi palestinia V) and Longifurcate cercaria (Cercaria melanopsi palestinia VI). The infection rate ofM. praemorsa with these three different cercariae was (42.2%). Coinfection with Xiphidiocercariae and Longifurcate cercariae or Xiphidiocercariae and Microcercous cercariae has been noted and coinfection rate was 1.23% among the infected snails. The highest cercarial infection rate was in June (64.3%). No infected snails were found in September. It was also noted that infected snails attained a larger size than uninfected ones and all infected snails had a size between 17-22 mm (average 20 mm). Conclusions: Our studies imply that there are potentially more new species of trematodes in this area than were found until now. Due to the presence of infected M. praemorsa and may be species of other snails, water resources could be contaminated by the emerging new cercariae, consequently attack the local people directly via the skin or are transferred to them by metacercariae ingestion. More surveys are needed to identify the real prevalence of the trematodes both in human and animal hosts, and also to determine the range of snail hosts of the parasite in enzootic areas of the disease, as well as the life cycle and biology of trematodes and its effects on man should be elucidated.

  11. Heterogeneity assessment of functional T cell avidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Kalliopi; Baumgaertner, Petra; Gannon, Philippe O.; Speiser, Michel F.; Allard, Mathilde; Hebeisen, Michael; Rufer, Nathalie; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    The potency of cellular immune responses strongly depends on T cell avidity to antigen. Yet, functional avidity measurements are rarely performed in patients, mainly due to the technical challenges of characterizing heterogeneous T cells. The mean functional T cell avidity can be determined by the IFN-γ Elispot assay, with titrated amounts of peptide. Using this assay, we developed a method revealing the heterogeneity of functional avidity, represented by the steepness/hillslope of the peptide titration curve, documented by proof of principle experiments and mathematical modeling. Our data show that not only natural polyclonal CD8 T cell populations from cancer patients, but also monoclonal T cells differ strongly in their heterogeneity of functional avidity. Interestingly, clones and polyclonal cells displayed comparable ranges of heterogeneity. We conclude that besides the mean functional avidity, it is feasible and useful to determine its heterogeneity (hillslope) for characterizing T cell responses in basic research and patient investigation. PMID:28287160

  12. A review of the currently recognised zoogonid cercariae, including the identification and emergence ecology of Cercaria capricornia XI (Digenea: Zoogonidae) from Nassarius olivaceus (Gastropoda: Nassariidae) in Central Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Leonie J; Miller, Terrence L; Cribb, Thomas H

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, we review the known zoogonid cercariae, summarise their life-cycles and first intermediate host distributions, and present a new cercaria, Cercaria capricornia XI (Digenea: Zoogonidae), which was found in one of three nassariid gastropods, Nassarius olivaceus (Bruguière), surveyed in the intertidal zone in the Capricornia region of Central Queensland, Australia. Morphological data and molecular analysis of the ITS2 rDNA region support placement of this cercaria in the family Zoogonidae but do not allow any further resolution of its identity. There are now fifteen cercariae described as belonging to the Zoogonidae; thirteen of these, including the present species, infect neogastropods as first intermediate hosts and two use vetigastropods. This study reinforces the pattern that the Nassariidae is by far the most commonly reported family for the Zoogonidae. Given its richness we predict that the Nassariidae will prove to harbour many more zoogonid species.

  13. Experimental infection of Opisthorchis viverrini cercariae to the cyprinid fish, Barbonymus gonionotus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donthaisong, Chalermlap; Arunsan, Patpicha; Suwannatrai, Kulwadee; Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Kulsantiwong, Jutharat; Wongmaneeprateep, Sutee; Suwannatrai, Apiporn; Tesana, Smarn

    2014-08-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini is an important public health problem, a major cause of cholangiocarcinoma in the Greater Mekong subregion including Lao PDR, Cambodia, Vietnam and Thailand. Humans acquire the infection by consumption of raw, fermented or partially cooked freshwater cyprinid fish containing infective metacercariae. This study examined the effect of cercarial infection dosage (25-200 cercariae), age (1-60 day) and size (1-24mm) of Barbonymus gonionotus fish on infection success of O. viverrini cercariae. Additionally, the site of cyst formation of O. viverrini cercariae and subsequent development to the metacercariae was examined. The result showed that cercarial infection dose (F4,95=8.52, Pviverrini metacercariae recovery with in every additional fish age, the O. viverrini metacercarial recovery rate increased by 5.4% (Pviverrini cercarial infection dosage, and age and size of fish were important determinants for a successful infection to fish.

  14. Immunization of pigs against infection with Schistosoma japonicum using ultraviolet-attenuated cercariae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Y.-E.; Jiang, C.-F.; Han, J.-J.; Li, Y.-L. (Tongji Medical Univ., Wuhan (China). Dept. of Parasitology); Ruppel, A. (Institute for Tropical Hygiene, Heidelberg (Germany))

    1993-06-01

    Since pigs are important in the zoonotic transmission of schistosomiasis japonica in China, a veterinary vaccine might contribute to the control of the disease in humans. Pigs were immunized with three doses each of 10 000 cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum attenuated with ultraviolet light (400 [mu]Watt.min/cm[sup 2]). The experiment was performed with portable irradiation equipment in a rural area of the Hubei Province (P.R. China). A challenge infection of 1000 untreated cercariae was given 2.5 or 6 months after the last immunization, and age-matched naive pigs were challenged as a control. Immunized pigs developed about 90% resistance against the challenge. The liver egg load of these animals was reduced by over 90%. Less than 0.01% of the immunizing cercariae developed to adult parasites and the vaccination had no apparent adverse influence on the pig's health. (Author).

  15. Intracellular Signals of T Cell Costimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxun Song; Fengyang Tylan Lei; Xiaofang Xiong; Rizwanul Haque

    2008-01-01

    Ligation of T cell receptor (TCR) alone is insufficient to induce full activation of T lymphocytes. Additional ligand-receptor interactions (costimulation) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T cells are required. T cell costimulation has been shown to be essential for eliciting efficient T cell responses, involving all phases during T cell development. However, the mechanisms by which costimulation affects the function of T cells still need to be elucidated. In recent years, advances have been made in studies of costimulation as potential therapies in cancer, infectious disease as well as autoimmune disease. In this review, we discussed intracellular costimulation signals that regulate T cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cytokine production, survival, and memory development. In general, the pathway of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PBK)/protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) might be central to many costimulatory effects. Through these pathways, costimulation controls T-cell expansion and proliferation by maintenance of survivin and aurora B expression, and sustains long-term T-cell survival and memory development by regulating the expression of bci-2 family members. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2008;5(4):239-247.

  16. The strain specificity of vaccination with ultra violet attenuated cercariae of the Chinese strain of Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, N A; Garcia, E G; Webbe, G

    1985-01-01

    Mice vaccinated with ultra violet (u.v.) attenuated cercariae of the Chinese mainland strain of S. japonicum were resistant to homologous challenge, but were not resistant to challenge with the Philippine strain of S. japonicum. Thus vaccination using u.v. attenuated S. japonicum cercariae is strain specific.

  17. New cell sources for T cell engineering and adoptive immunotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Themeli, Maria; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-01-01

    .... Here we review emerging T cell engineering approaches that utilize alternative T cell sources, which include virus-specific or T cell receptor-less allogeneic T cells, expanded lymphoid progenitors...

  18. REGULATORY T CELLS AND VASECTOMY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rival, Claudia; Wheeler, Karen; Jeffrey, Sarah; Qiao, Hui; Luu, Brian; Tewalt, Eric F; Engelhard, Victor H; Tardif, Stephen; Hardy, Daniel; del Rio, Roxana; Teuscher, Cory; Tung, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) strongly influence the early and late autoimmune responses to meiotic germ cell antigens (MGCA) and the gonadal immunopathology in vasectomized mice. This is supported by the published and recently acquired information presented here. Within 24 hours of unilateral vasectomy (uni-vx) the ipsilateral epididymis undergoes epithelial cell apoptosis followed by necrosis, severe inflammation, and granuloma formation. Unexpectedly, vasectomy alone induced MGCA-specific tolerance. In contrast, uni-vx plus simultaneous Treg depletion resulted in MGCA-specific autoimmune response and bilateral autoimmune orchitis. Both tolerance and autoimmunity were strictly linked to the early epididymal injury. We now discovered that testicular autoimmunity in uni-vx mice did not occur when Treg depletion was delayed by one week. Remarkably, this delayed Treg depletion also prevented tolerance induction. Therefore, tolerance depends on a rapid de novo Treg response to MGCA exposed after vasectomy. Moreover, tolerance was blunted in mice genetically deficient in PD-1 ligand, suggesting the involvement of induced Treg. We conclude that pre-existing natural Treg prevents post-vasectomy autoimmunity, whereas vasectomy-induced Treg maintains post-vasectomy tolerance. We further discovered that vasectomized mice were still resistant to autoimmune orchitis induction for at least 12–16 months; thus, tolerance is long-lasting. Although significant sperm autoantibodies of low titers became detectable in uni-vx mice at seven months, the antibody titers fluctuated over time, suggesting a dynamic “balance” between the autoimmune and tolerance states. Finally, we observed severe epididymal fibrosis and hypo-spermatogenesis at 12 months after uni-vx: findings of highly critical clinical significance. PMID:24080233

  19. Expression of Master Regulators of T-cell, Helper T-cell and Follicular Helper T-cell Differentiation in Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yosuke; Nagoshi, Hisao; Yoshida, Mihoko; Kato, Seiichi; Kuroda, Junya; Shimura, Kazuho; Kaneko, Hiroto; Horiike, Shigeo; Nakamura, Shigeo; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2017-09-25

    Objective It has been postulated that the normal counterpart of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is the follicular helper T-cell (TFH). Recent immunological studies have identified several transcription factors responsible for T-cell differentiation. The master regulators associated with T-cell, helper T-cell (Th), and TFH differentiation are reportedly BCL11B, Th-POK, and BCL6, respectively. We explored the postulated normal counterpart of AITL with respect to the expression of the master regulators of T-cell differentiation. Methods We performed an immunohistochemical analysis in 15 AITL patients to determine the expression of the master regulators and several surface markers associated with T-cell differentiation. Results BCL11B was detected in 10 patients (67%), and the surface marker of T-cells (CD3) was detected in all patients. Only 2 patients (13%) expressed the marker of naïve T-cells (CD45RA), but all patients expressed the marker of effector T-cells (CD45RO). Nine patients expressed Th-POK (60%), and 7 (47%) expressed a set of surface antigens of Th (CD4-positive and CD8-negative). In addition, BCL6 and the surface markers of TFH (CXCL13, PD-1, and SAP) were detected in 11 (73%), 8 (53%), 14 (93%), and all patients, respectively. Th-POK-positive/BCL6-negative patients showed a significantly shorter overall survival (OS) than the other patients (median OS: 33.0 months vs. 74.0 months, p=0.020; log-rank test). Conclusion Many of the AITL patients analyzed in this study expressed the master regulators of T-cell differentiation. The clarification of the diagnostic significance and pathophysiology based on the expression of these master regulators in AITL is expected in the future.

  20. Carbohydrates and T cells: a sweet twosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Fikri Y; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Kasper, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    Carbohydrates as T cell-activating antigens have been generating significant interest. For many years, carbohydrates were thought of as T-independent antigens, however, more recent research had demonstrated that mono- or oligosaccharides glycosidically linked to peptides can be recognized by T cells. T cell recognition of these glycopeptides depends on the structure of both peptide and glycan portions of the antigen. Subsequently, it was discovered that natural killer T cells recognized glycolipids when presented by the antigen presenting molecule CD1d. A transformative insight into glycan-recognition by T cells occurred when zwitterionic polysaccharides were discovered to bind to and be presented by MHCII to CD4+ T cells. Based on this latter observation, the role that carbohydrate epitopes generated from glycoconjugate vaccines had in activating helper T cells was explored and it was found that these epitopes are presented to specific carbohydrate recognizing T cells through a unique mechanism. Here we review the key interactions between carbohydrate antigens and the adaptive immune system at the molecular, cellular and systems levels exploring the significant biological implications in health and disease.

  1. Visualizing T cell migration in-situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre P Benechet

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mounting a protective immune response is critically dependent on the orchestrated movement of cells within lymphoid tissues. The structure of secondary lymphoid organs regulates immune responses by promoting optimal cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Naïve T cells are initially activated by antigen presenting cells in secondary lymphoid organs. Following priming, effector T cells migrate to the site of infection to exert their functions. Majority of the effector cells die while a small population of antigen specific T cells persist as memory cells in distinct anatomical locations. The persistence and location of memory cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues is critical to protect the host from re-infection. The localization of memory T cells is carefully regulated by several factors including the highly organized secondary lymphoid structure, the cellular expression of chemokine receptors and compartmentalized secretion of their cognate ligands. This balance between the anatomy and the ordered expression of cell surface and soluble proteins regulates the subtle choreography of T cell migration. In recent years, our understanding of cellular dynamics of T cells has been advanced by the development of new imaging techniques allowing in-situ visualization of T cell responses. Here we review the past and more recent studies that have utilized sophisticated imaging technologies to investigate the migration dynamics of naive, effector and memory T cells.

  2. CRISPR Meets CAR T-cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-21

    Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, researchers have devised a method to deliver a CAR gene to a specific locus, TRAC, in T cells. This targeted approach yielded therapeutic cells that were more potent even at low doses; in a mouse model of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, they outperformed CAR T cells created with a randomly integrating retroviral vector.

  3. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thor Straten, Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell ...

  4. T cell senescence and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hee Tae; Park, Sungha; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, Won-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Age-related changes in the immune system, commonly termed "immunosenescence," contribute to deterioration of the immune response and fundamentally impact the health and survival of elderly individuals. Immunosenescence affects both the innate and adaptive immune systems; however, the most notable changes are in T cell immunity and include thymic involution, the collapse of T cell receptor (TCR) diversity, an imbalance in T cell populations, and the clonal expansion of senescent T cells. Senescent T cells have the ability to produce large quantities of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic mediators; thus, they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases. Recently, an increasing body of evidence has suggested that senescent T cells also have pathogenic potential in cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction, underscoring the detrimental roles of these cells in various chronic inflammatory responses. Given that cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide, there is great interest in understanding the contribution of age-related immunological changes to its pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss general features of age-related alterations in T cell immunity and the possible roles of senescent T cells in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.

  5. T cell immunity using transgenic B lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloni, Mara; Rizzi, Marta; Castiglioni, Paola; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2004-03-01

    Adaptive immunity exists in all vertebrates and plays a defense role against microbial pathogens and tumors. T cell responses begin when precursor T cells recognize antigen on specialized antigen-presenting cells and differentiate into effector cells. Currently, dendritic cells are considered the only cells capable of stimulating T lymphocytes. Here, we show that mature naïve B lymphocytes can be genetically programmed by using nonviral DNA and turned into powerful antigen-presenting cells with a dual capacity of synthesis and presentation of antigen to T cells in vivo. A single i.v. injection of transgenic lymphocytes activates T cell responses reproducibly and specifically even at very low cell doses (102). We also demonstrate that T cell priming can occur in the absence of dendritic cells and results in immunological memory with protective effector functions. These findings disclose aspects in the regulation of adaptive immunity and indicate possibilities for vaccination against viruses and cancer in humans.

  6. T cell immune responses in psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre Jadali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A central role for T cells and their cytokines in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been proposed; however, there are controversies over the details of this issue. The goal of this study is to summarise currently available data on the importance of T cells in psoriasis pathogenesis. A systematic review of the English medical literature was conducted by searching PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Iranian databases including Iranmedex, and SID for studies on associations between the involvement of T cell subsets and psoriasis. The results of the present study indicate that alterations in the number and function of different subsets of T-cells are associated with psoriasis. It appears that studies on T cell subsets contributed to understanding the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis. In addition, it may have provided novel therapeutic opportunities in ameliorating immunopathologies.

  7. Targeting regulatory T cells in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, William L

    2012-01-31

    Infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells confers growth and metastatic advantages by inhibiting antitumor immunity and by production of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand, which may directly stimulate metastatic propagation of RANK-expressing cancer cells. Modulation of regulatory T cells can enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Strategies include depletion, interference with function, inhibition of tumoral migration, and exploitation of T-cell plasticity. Problems with these strategies include a lack of specificity, resulting in depletion of antitumor effector T cells or global interruption of regulatory T cells, which may predispose to autoimmune diseases. Emerging technologies, such as RNA interference and tetramer-based targeting, may have the potential to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  8. Generation of antigen-specific T cell immunity through T cell receptor gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coccoris, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells often escape the attack of immune cells because they originate from self-tissue. Through T cell receptor gene transfer it is possible to equip peripheral T cells with a desired specificity, and this strategy may be useful to generate tumor-specific T cells for the treatment of cancer in

  9. Basic and Clinical Aspects of the T-cell Receptor in Mature T-cell Malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Sandberg (Yorick)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractDuring T-cell development, thymocytes undergo a sequence of immunophenotypic and immunogenotypic changes resulting in the formation of mature T cells with receptors that recognize antigens with high specificity: the T-cell receptor (TCR). Recombination processes underlie the generatio

  10. Generation of antigen-specific T cell immunity through T cell receptor gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coccoris, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells often escape the attack of immune cells because they originate from self-tissue. Through T cell receptor gene transfer it is possible to equip peripheral T cells with a desired specificity, and this strategy may be useful to generate tumor-specific T cells for the treatment of cancer in

  11. Designing T-cells with desired T-cell receptor make-up for immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loenen, Margaretha Magdalena van

    2011-01-01

    TCR gene transfer is a strategy that enables the rapid engineering of anti-leukemic T-cells with defined specificity, resulting in a so called ‘off the shelf ‘ therapy. An elegant strategy to promote persistence of TCR modified T-cells may be TCR gene transfer into CMV- and EBV-specific T-cells, whi

  12. [Characterization of the cercaria of Bucephalus polymorphus Baer, 1827 (Trematoda, Bucephalidae): chetotaxy and excretory system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallet, M; Lambert, A

    1984-01-01

    We describe the excretory system and the chetotaxy of the cercaria of Bucephalus polymorphus Baer, 1827 which develops in Dreissena polymorpha (Lamellibranch, Dreissenidae) in South-East of France. We compare our observations with those realised in Poland and we discuss about the differences observed.

  13. The induction of specific immunity against Schistosoma japonicum by exposure of mice to ultraviolet attenuated cercariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, N A; Bickle, Q D; Webbe, G

    1985-04-01

    Mice can be partially protected against Schistosoma japonicum by prior exposure to ultraviolet (UV)-attenuated infections which fail to survive to the adult stage and produce no overt pathology in the host. Optimum resistance was induced by parasites exposed to 40 seconds of UV, significantly lower levels of resistance being stimulated by both shorter and longer exposures. No consistent relationship between the degree of resistance induced and the number of irradiated cercariae given could be demonstrated and equivocal results were obtained when comparing the efficacy of single and multiple vaccinations. Vaccinations with UV-attenuated cercariae given intraperitoneally (i.p.) were as efficacious as those given percutaneously but mice were as or more resistant to challenges given by the i.p. route, the possible reasons are discussed. There was no observed delay in the migration of the challenge, vaccinated mice being as resistant when perfused 6 or 3.5 weeks after challenge. Vaccination was species specific since mice exposed to either UV-attenuated S. japonicum cercariae or gamma-attenuated S. mansoni cercariae were resistant to homologous but not heterologous challenge.

  14. Induction of specific immunity against Schistosoma japonicum by exposure of mice to ultraviolet attenuated cercariae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moloney, N.A.; Bickle, Q.D.; Webbe, G. (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, St. Albans (UK). Winches Farm Field Station)

    1985-01-01

    Mice can be partially protected against Schistosoma japonicum by prior exposure to ultraviolet (UV)-attenuated infections which fail to survive to the adult stage and produce no overt pathology in the host. Optimum resistance was induced by parasites exposed to 40 seconds of UV, significantly lower levels of resistance being stimulated by both shorter and longer exposures. No consistent relationship between the degree of resistance induced and the number of irradiated cercariae given could be demonstrated and equivocal results were obtained when comparing the efficacy of single and multiple vaccinations. Vaccinations with UV-attenuated cercariae given intraperitoneally (i.p.) were as efficacious as those given percutaneously but mice were as or more resistant to challenges given by the i.p. route, the possible reasons are discussed. There was no observed delay in the migration of the challenge, vaccinated mice being as resistant when perfused 6 or 3.5 weeks after challenge. Vaccination was species specific since mice exposed to either UV-attenuated S. japonicum cercariae or gamma-attenuated S. mansoni cercariae were resistant to homologous but not heterologous challenge.

  15. Do parasitic trematode cercariae demonstrate a preference for susceptible host species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany F Sears

    Full Text Available Many parasites are motile and exhibit behavioural preferences for certain host species. Because hosts can vary in their susceptibility to infections, parasites might benefit from preferentially detecting and infecting the most susceptible host, but this mechanistic hypothesis for host-choice has rarely been tested. We evaluated whether cercariae (larval trematode parasites prefer the most susceptible host species by simultaneously presenting cercariae with four species of tadpole hosts. Cercariae consistently preferred hosts in the following order: Anaxyrus ( = Bufo terrestris (southern toad, Hyla squirella (squirrel tree frog, Lithobates ( = Rana sphenocephala (southern leopard frog, and Osteopilus septentrionalis (Cuban tree frog. These host species varied in susceptibility to cercariae in an order similar to their attractiveness with a correlation that approached significance. Host attractiveness to parasites also varied consistently and significantly among individuals within a host species. If heritable, this individual-level host variation would represent the raw material upon which selection could act, which could promote a Red Queen "arms race" between host cues and parasite detection of those cues. If, in general, motile parasites prefer to infect the most susceptible host species, this phenomenon could explain aggregated distributions of parasites among hosts and contribute to parasite transmission rates and the evolution of virulence. Parasite preferences for hosts belie the common assumption of disease models that parasites seek and infect hosts at random.

  16. Tumor Evasion from T Cell Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Töpfer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An intact immune system is essential to prevent the development and progression of neoplastic cells in a process termed immune surveillance. During this process the innate and the adaptive immune systems closely cooperate and especially T cells play an important role to detect and eliminate tumor cells. Due to the mechanism of central tolerance the frequency of T cells displaying appropriate arranged tumor-peptide-specific-T-cell receptors is very low and their activation by professional antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, is frequently hampered by insufficient costimulation resulting in peripheral tolerance. In addition, inhibitory immune circuits can impair an efficient antitumoral response of reactive T cells. It also has been demonstrated that large tumor burden can promote a state of immunosuppression that in turn can facilitate neoplastic progression. Moreover, tumor cells, which mostly are genetically instable, can gain rescue mechanisms which further impair immune surveillance by T cells. Herein, we summarize the data on how tumor cells evade T-cell immune surveillance with the focus on solid tumors and describe approaches to improve anticancer capacity of T cells.

  17. T Cell Repertoire and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Croitoru

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of the T cell receptor repertoire is generated through rearrangement of the variable, junctional and constant region genes. Selection processes in the thymus and periphery serve to eliminate self-reacting T cells, thereby preventing autoimmune disease. The possibility that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an autoimmune disease has led to the search for an auto-antigen. In addition, studies are exploring the T cell receptor repertoire in IBD patients for changes that may provide clues regarding etiopathogenesis. Using monoclonal antibodies to T cell receptor variable-gene products or polymerase chain reaction analysis of variable-gene mRNA expression, the mucosal T cell repertoire has been examined in humans. The intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes show a significant degree of oligoclonal expansion that may represent local antigen exposure or unique selection processes. This is in keeping with studies that show that murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes undergo positive and possibly negative selection independent of the thymus. In the inflamed human gut, shifts in the T cell receptor repertoire may also reflect recruitment of peripheral T cells to the gut. In one study, a subset of Crohn’s disease patients was shown to have an increase in the proportion of variable β8 peripheral blood lymphocyte and mesenteric lymph node cells, suggesting a superantigen effect. The authors hypothesized that changes in the functional T cell receptor repertoire can also occur which might be independent of changes in the distribution of T cells expressing variable β T cell receptors. In fact, the authors have shown there is a selective decrease in the cytotoxic function of peripheral variable β8 T cells in Crohn’s disease. Furthermore, stimulation with the variable β8 selective bacterial enterotoxin staphylococcal enterotoxin E failed to increase the cytotoxic function in this subset of Crohn’s disease patients compared with

  18. T cell priming: let there be light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ludmila Jirmanova; Jonathan D Ashwell

    2010-01-01

    @@ Activation of naive T cells via the T cell receptor (TCR) induces proliferation, gain of effector functions, and ultimately the development of long-lived memory cells. Memory cells have lower thresholds of activation than naive cells and respond more robustly to similar degrees of stimulation, which are fundamental properties of adaptive immunity. TCR occupancy leads to phosphorylation of TCR-ζ and CD3 cytoplasmic tails by Lck and Fyn, recruitment of ζ-associated protein kinase 70 (ZAP70), and phosphorylation/acti-vation of downstream targets such as the linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and SLP-76 [1].

  19. Changes in surface glycosylation and glycocalyx shedding in Trichobilharzia regenti (Schistosomatidae) during the transformation of cercaria to schistosomulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řimnáčová, Jana; Turjanicová, Libuše; Bulantová, Jana; Horák, Petr

    2017-01-01

    The invasive larvae (cercariae) of schistosomes penetrate the skin of their definitive hosts. During the invasion, they undergo dramatic ultrastructural and physiological transitions. These changes result in the development of the subsequent stage, schistosomulum, which migrates through host tissues in close contact with host’s immune system. One of the striking changes in the transforming cercariae is the shedding of their thick tegumental glycocalyx, which represents an immunoattractive structure; therefore its removal helps cercariae to avoid immune attack. A set of commercial fluorescently labeled lectin probes, their saccharide inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies against the trisaccharide Lewis-X antigen (LeX, CD15) were used to characterize changes in the surface saccharide composition of the neuropathogenic avian schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti during the transformation of cercariae to schistosomula, both in vitro and in vivo. The effect of various lectins on glycocalyx shedding was evaluated microscopically. The involvement of peptidases and their inhibitors on the shedding of glycocalyx was investigated using T. regenti recombinant cathepsin B2 and a set of peptidase inhibitors. The surface glycocalyx of T. regenti cercariae was rich in fucose and mannose/glucose residues. After the transformation of cercariae in vitro or in vivo within their specific duck host, reduction and vanishing of these epitopes was observed, and galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine emerged. The presence of LeX was not observed on the cercariae, but the antigen was gradually expressed from the anterior part of the body in the developing schistosomula. Some lectins which bind to the cercarial surface also induced secretion from the acetabular penetration glands. Seven lectins induced the shedding of glycocalyx by cercariae, among which five bound strongly to cercarial surface; the effect could be blocked by saccharide inhibitors. Mannose-binding protein, part of the lectin pathway

  20. Differential T cell receptor-mediated signaling in naive and memory CD4 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, D L; Acuto, O; Bottomly, K

    1997-08-01

    Naive and memory CD4 T cells differ in cell surface phenotype, function, activation requirements, and modes of regulation. To investigate the molecular bases for the dichotomies between naive and memory CD4 T cells and to understand how the T cell receptor (TCR) directs diverse functional outcomes, we investigated proximal signaling events triggered through the TCR/CD3 complex in naive and memory CD4 T cell subsets isolated on the basis of CD45 isoform expression. Naive CD4 T cells signal through TCR/CD3 similar to unseparated CD4 T cells, producing multiple tyrosine-phosphorylated protein species overall and phosphorylating the T cell-specific ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase which is recruited to the CD3zeta subunit of the TCR. Memory CD4 T cells, however, exhibit a unique pattern of signaling through TCR/CD3. Following stimulation through TCR/CD3, memory CD4 T cells produce fewer species of tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates and fail to phosphorylate ZAP-70, yet unphosphorylated ZAP-70 can associate with the TCR/CD3 complex. Moreover, a 26/28-kDa phosphorylated doublet is associated with CD3zeta in resting and activated memory but not in naive CD4 T cells. Despite these differences in the phosphorylation of ZAP-70 and CD3-associated proteins, the ZAP-70-related kinase, p72syk, exhibits similar phosphorylation in naive and memory T cell subsets, suggesting that this kinase could function in place of ZAP-70 in memory CD4 T cells. These results indicate that proximal signals are differentially coupled to the TCR in naive versus memory CD4 T cells, potentially leading to distinct downstream signaling events and ultimately to the diverse functions elicited by these two CD4 T cell subsets.

  1. The induction of species-specific immunity against Schistosoma japonicum by exposure of rats to ultra-violet attenuated cercariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, N A; Webbe, G; Hinchcliffe, P

    1987-02-01

    Single percutaneous immunizations of Fischer rats with 1000 ultra-violet attenuated Schistosoma japonicum cercariae induced 52-88% resistance to challenge 4 weeks later. Increasing this to 3 immunizations induced 90% resistance to challenge, and this level of protection remained undiminished for up to 40 weeks after vaccination. Rats vaccinated with gamma-irradiated S. mansoni cercariae were resistant to challenge with S. mansoni but not S. japonicum. Similarly rats vaccinated with u.v.-attenuated S. japonicum cercariae were not resistant to heterologous challenge. Thus irradiated vaccines are species-specific in both permissive and non-permissive hosts.

  2. Induction of species-specific immunity against Schistosoma japonicum by exposure of rats to ultra-violet attenuated cercariae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moloney, N.A.; Webbe, G.; Hinchcliffe, P.

    1987-02-01

    Single percutaneous immunizations of Fischer rats with 1000 ultra-violet attenuated Schistosoma japonicum cercariae induced 52-88% resistance to challenge 4 weeks later. Increasing this to 3 immunizations induced 90% resistance to challenge, and this level of protection remained undiminished for up to 40 weeks after vaccination. Rats vaccinated with gamma-irradiated S. mansoni cercariae were resistant to challenge with S. mansoni but not S. japonicum. Similarly rats vaccinated with u.v.-attenuated S. japonicum cercariae were not resistant to heterologous challenge. Thus irradiated vaccines are species-specific in both permissive and non-permissive hosts.

  3. Choreography of MAGUKs during T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Mercedes; Davis, Roger J

    2007-02-01

    T cell receptor activation requires the membrane-associated guanylate kinase CARMA1. A new study finds that a second such kinase, Dlgh1, is also required specifically for activation of the alternative p38 kinase pathway.

  4. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, Eivind Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell...... infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However......, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells...

  5. Dopamine, T cells and multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, Mia; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2017-03-10

    Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter that induces critical effects in the nervous system and in many peripheral organs, via 5 dopamine receptors (DRs): D1R-D5R. Dopamine also induces many direct and very potent effects on many DR-expressing immune cells, primarily T cells and dendritic cells. In this review, we focus only on dopamine receptors, effects and production in T cells. Dopamine by itself (at an optimal concentration of~0.1 nM) induces multiple function of resting normal human T cells, among them: T cell adhesion, chemotactic migration, homing, cytokine secretion and others. Interestingly, dopamine activates resting effector T cells (Teffs), but suppresses regulatory T cells (Tregs), and both effects lead eventually to Teff activation. Dopamine-induced effects on T cells are dynamic, context-sensitive and determined by the: T cell activation state, T cell type, DR type, and dopamine concentration. Dopamine itself, and also few dopaminergic molecules/ drugs that are in clinical use for cardiac, neurological and other non-immune indications, have direct effects on human T cells (summarized in this review). These dopaminergic drugs include: dopamine = intropin, L-DOPA, bromocriptine, pramipexole, pergolide, haloperidol, pimozide, and amantadine. Other dopaminergic drugs were not yet tested for their direct effects on T cells. Extensive evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) show dopaminergic dysregulations in T cells in these diseases: D1-like DRs are decreased in Teffs of MS patients, and dopamine does not affect these cells. In contrast, D1-like DRs are increased in Tregs of MS patients, possibly causing functional Treg impairment in MS. Treatment of MS patients with interferon β (IFN-β) increases D1-like DRs and decreases D2-like DRs in Teffs, decreases D1-like DRs in Tregs, and most important: restores responsiveness of patient's Teffs to dopamine. DR agonists and antagonists confer some benefits in

  6. T cell activation in APECED patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mannerström, Helga

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidasis-ectodermal dystrophy, APECED, is a rare monogenic autoimmune disease in humans, which is caused by loss-of-function mutation in Autoimmune Regulator gene, AIRE. Previous results have shown impairments in the circulating T cells of the APECED patients. In this study we wanted to look closer on the disturbance in the T cell receptor development of APECED patients. By studying the TCR-mediated responsiveness of CD3 stimulation and comparing the activation...

  7. γδ T Cells Support Pancreatic Oncogenesis by Restraining αβ T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Donnele; Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Seifert, Lena; Akkad, Neha; Mohan, Navyatha; Werba, Gregor; Barilla, Rocky; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu Raj Kumar; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel; Narayanan, Rajkishen; Jang, Jung-Eun; Newman, Elliot; Pillarisetty, Venu Gopal; Dustin, Michael Loran; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2016-09-08

    Inflammation is paramount in pancreatic oncogenesis. We identified a uniquely activated γδT cell population, which constituted ∼40% of tumor-infiltrating T cells in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Recruitment and activation of γδT cells was contingent on diverse chemokine signals. Deletion, depletion, or blockade of γδT cell recruitment was protective against PDA and resulted in increased infiltration, activation, and Th1 polarization of αβT cells. Although αβT cells were dispensable to outcome in PDA, they became indispensable mediators of tumor protection upon γδT cell ablation. PDA-infiltrating γδT cells expressed high levels of exhaustion ligands and thereby negated adaptive anti-tumor immunity. Blockade of PD-L1 in γδT cells enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltration and immunogenicity and induced tumor protection suggesting that γδT cells are critical sources of immune-suppressive checkpoint ligands in PDA. We describe γδT cells as central regulators of effector T cell activation in cancer via novel cross-talk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurohypophysial Receptor Gene Expression by Thymic T Cell Subsets and Thymic T Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hansenne

    2004-01-01

    transcribed in thymic epithelium, while immature T lymphocytes express functional neurohypophysial receptors. Neurohypophysial receptors belong to the G protein-linked seven-transmembrane receptor superfamily and are encoded by four distinct genes, OTR, V1R, V2R and V3R. The objective of this study was to identify the nature of neurohypophysial receptor in thymic T cell subsets purified by immunomagnetic selection, as well as in murine thymic lymphoma cell lines RL12-NP and BW5147. OTR is transcribed in all thymic T cell subsets and T cell lines, while V3R transcription is restricted to CD4+ CD8+ and CD8+ thymic cells. Neither V1R nor V2R transcripts are detected in any kind of T cells. The OTR protein was identified by immunocytochemistry on thymocytes freshly isolated from C57BL/6 mice. In murine fetal thymic organ cultures, a specific OTR antagonist does not modify the percentage of T cell subsets, but increases late T cell apoptosis further evidencing the involvement of OT/OTR signaling in the control of T cell proliferation and survival. According to these data, OTR and V3R are differentially expressed during T cell ontogeny. Moreover, the restriction of OTR transcription to T cell lines derived from thymic lymphomas may be important in the context of T cell leukemia pathogenesis and treatment.

  9. CD4+ T cell effects on CD8+ T cell location defined using bioluminescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Azadniv

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes of the CD8+ class are critical in delivering cytotoxic function and in controlling viral and intracellular infections. These cells are "helped" by T lymphocytes of the CD4+ class, which facilitate their activation, clonal expansion, full differentiation and the persistence of memory. In this study we investigated the impact of CD4+ T cells on the location of CD8+ T cells, using antibody-mediated CD4+ T cell depletion and imaging the antigen-driven redistribution of bioluminescent CD8+ T cells in living mice. We documented that CD4+ T cells influence the biodistribution of CD8+ T cells, favoring their localization to abdominal lymph nodes. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that this was associated with an increase in the expression of specific integrins. The presence of CD4+ T cells at the time of initial CD8+ T cell activation also influences their biodistribution in the memory phase. Based on these results, we propose the model that one of the functions of CD4+ T cell "help" is to program the homing potential of CD8+ T cells.

  10. Regulatory T cells in viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva Billerbeck; Tobias B(o)ttler; Robert Thimme

    2007-01-01

    The pathogenesis and outcome of viral infections are significantly influenced by the host immune response.The immune system is able to eliminate many viruses in the acute phase of infection. However, some viruses,like hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV),can evade the host immune responses and establish a persistent infection. HCV and HBV persistence is caused by various mechanisms, like subversion of innate immune responses by viral factors, the emergence of T cell escape mutations, or T cell dysfunction and suppression.Recently, it has become evident that regulatory T cells may contribute to the pathogenesis and outcome of viral infections by suppressing antiviral immune responses.Indeed, the control of HCV and HBV specific immune responses mediated by regulatory T cells may be one mechanism that favors viral persistence, but it may also prevent the host from overwhelming T cell activity and liver damage. This review will focus on the role of regulatory T cells in viral hepatitis.

  11. T cell migration in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eMellado

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in joints, associated with synovial hyperplasia and with bone and cartilage destruction. Although the primacy of T cell-related events early in the disease continues to be debated, there is strong evidence that autoantigen recognition by specific T cells is crucial to the pathophysiology of rheumatoid synovitis. In addition, T cells are key components of the immune cell infiltrate detected in the joints of RA patients. Initial analysis of the cytokines released into the synovial membrane showed an imbalance, with a predominance of proinflammatory mediators, indicating a deleterious effect of Th1 T cells. There is nonetheless evidence that Th17 cells also play an important role in RA. T cells migrate from the bloodstream to the synovial tissue via their interactions with the endothelial cells that line synovial postcapillary venules. At this stage, selectins, integrins and chemokines have a central role in blood cell invasion of synovial tissue, and therefore in the intensity of the inflammatory response.In this review we will focus on the mechanisms involved in T cell attraction to the joint, the proteins involved in their extravasation from blood vessels, and the signaling pathways activated. Knowledge of these processes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the systemic immune response causes local joint disorders and will help to provide a molecular basis for therapeutic strategies.

  12. Ex vivo expansion protocol for human tumor specific T cells for adoptive T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Anne-Marie; Borelli, Gabriel; Hoel, Hanna Julie; Lislerud, Kari; Gaudernack, Gustav; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Aarvak, Tanja

    2010-04-15

    Adoptive T cell therapy is a promising treatment strategy for patients with different types of cancer. The methods used for generation of high numbers of tumor specific T cells usually require long-term ex vivo culture, which frequently lead to generation of terminally differentiated effector cells, demonstrating low persistence in vivo. Therefore, optimization of protocols for generation of T cells for adoptive cell therapy is warranted. The aim of this work was to develop a protocol for expansion of antigen-specific T cells using Dynabeads CD3/CD28 to obtain T cells expressing markers important for in vivo persistence and survival. To achieve high numbers of antigen-specific T cells following expansion, we have tested the effect of depleting regulatory T cells using Dynabeads CD25 and including a pre-stimulation step with peptide prior to the non-specific expansion with Dynabeads. Our data demonstrate that virus- and tumor specific T cells can be expanded to high numbers using Dynabeads CD3/CD28 following optimization of the culture conditions. The expansion protocol presented here results in enrichment of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells with an early/intermediate memory phenotype. This is observed even when the antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells demonstrated a terminal effector phenotype prior to expansion. This protocol thus results in expanded T cells with a phenotypic profile which may increase the chance of retaining long-term persistence following adoptive transfer. Based on these data we have developed a cGMP protocol for expansion of tumor specific T cells for adoptive T cell therapy.

  13. Measuring T cell receptor and T cell gene expression diversity in antigen-responsive human CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, Anne; Lindner, Annett; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; Wilhelm, Carmen; Dietz, Sevina; Catani, Mara; Ziegler, Anette-G; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2013-12-31

    T cells have diversity in TCR, epitope recognition, and cytokine production, and can be used for immune monitoring. Furthermore, clonal expansion of TCR families in disease may provide opportunities for TCR-directed therapies. We developed methodology for sequencing expressed genes of TCR alpha and beta chains from single cells and applied this to vaccine (tetanus-toxoid)-responsive CD4(+) T cells. TCR alpha and beta chains were both successfully sequenced in 1309 (43%) of 3038 CD4(+) T cells yielding 677 different receptors. TRAV and TRBV gene usage differed between tetanus-toxoid-responsive and non-responsive cells (p=0.004 and 0.0002), and there was extensive TCR diversity in tetanus-toxoid-responsive cells within individuals. Identical TCRs could be recovered in different samples from the same subject: TCRs identified after booster vaccination were frequent in pre-booster memory T cells (31% of pre-booster TCR), and also identified in pre-booster vaccination naïve cells (6.5%). No TCR was shared between subjects, but tetanus toxoid-responsive cells sharing one of their TCR chains were observed within and between subjects. Coupling single-cell gene expression profiling to TCR sequencing revealed examples of distinct cytokine profiles in cells bearing identical TCR. Novel molecular methodology demonstrates extensive diversity of Ag-responsive CD4(+) T cells within and between individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A study of chemical composition and radiation attenuation properties in clinoptilolite-rich natural zeolite from Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurudirek, Murat, E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.co [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Ozdemir, Yueksel [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Tuerkmen, Ibrahim [Faculty of Engineering, Department of Civil Engineering, Inonu University, Malatya (Turkey); Levet, Aytac [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Clinoptilolite, a type of natural zeolite, has been commonly used as pozzolanic additive in concrete. This type of natural zeolite is generally used as a mineral admixture by substitution in Portland cement to produce high performance concretes. In the present study, the major, minor and trace element levels present in the clinoptilolite-rich natural zeolite (CRNZ) have been determined using a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Also, the clinoptilolite-rich natural zeolite has been compared with Portland cement with respect to the radiation attenuation properties. From the results it can be concluded that due to the natural radioactive content of clinoptilolite-rich natural zeolite (CRNZ) even if it is in trace level and also due to the poorer X-ray attenuation compared with Portland cement, special care should be taken to use this type of natural zeolite as blend materials in cements, etc.

  15. A study of chemical composition and radiation attenuation properties in clinoptilolite-rich natural zeolite from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Özdemir, Yüksel; Türkmen, İbrahim; Levet, Aytaç

    2010-11-01

    Clinoptilolite, a type of natural zeolite, has been commonly used as pozzolanic additive in concrete. This type of natural zeolite is generally used as a mineral admixture by substitution in Portland cement to produce high performance concretes. In the present study, the major, minor and trace element levels present in the clinoptilolite-rich natural zeolite (CRNZ) have been determined using a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Also, the clinoptilolite-rich natural zeolite has been compared with Portland cement with respect to the radiation attenuation properties. From the results it can be concluded that due to the natural radioactive content of clinoptilolite-rich natural zeolite (CRNZ) even if it is in trace level and also due to the poorer X-ray attenuation compared with Portland cement, special care should be taken to use this type of natural zeolite as blend materials in cements, etc.

  16. The Epigenome of Schistosoma mansoni Provides Insight about How Cercariae Poise Transcription until Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Roquis

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure can control gene expression and can define specific transcription states. For example, bivalent methylation of histone H3K4 and H3K27 is linked to poised transcription in vertebrate embryonic stem cells (ESC. It allows them to rapidly engage specific developmental pathways. We reasoned that non-vertebrate metazoans that encounter a similar developmental constraint (i.e. to quickly start development into a new phenotype might use a similar system. Schistosomes are parasitic platyhelminthes that are characterized by passage through two hosts: a mollusk as intermediate host and humans or rodents as definitive host. During its development, the parasite undergoes drastic changes, most notable immediately after infection of the definitive host, i.e. during the transition from the free-swimming cercariae into adult worms.We used Chromatin Immunoprecipitation followed by massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq to analyze genome-wide chromatin structure of S. mansoni on the level of histone modifications (H3K4me3, H3K27me3, H3K9me3, and H3K9ac in cercariae, schistosomula and adults (available at http://genome.univ-perp.fr. We saw striking differences in chromatin structure between the developmental stages, but most importantly we found that cercariae possess a specific combination of marks at the transcription start sites (TSS that has similarities to a structure found in ESC. We demonstrate that in cercariae no transcription occurs, and we provide evidences that cercariae do not possess large numbers of canonical stem cells.We describe here a broad view on the epigenome of a metazoan parasite. Most notably, we find bivalent histone H3 methylation in cercariae. Methylation of H3K27 is removed during transformation into schistosomula (and stays absent in adults and transcription is activated. In addition, shifts of H3K9 methylation and acetylation occur towards upstream and downstream of the transcriptional start site (TSS. We conclude

  17. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediated enhanced tumor rejection compared with equal numbers of PB T cells, leading to improved survival in the CB group (P cells that were autologous vs allogeneic to the lymphoma demonstrated that this antitumor effect was mediated by alloreactive rather than EBV-specific T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated that CB T cells mediated this enhanced antitumor effect by rapid infiltration of the tumor with CCR7(+)CD8(+) T cells and prompt induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-helper (Th1) T cells in the tumor microenvironment. In contrast, in the PB group, this antilymphoma effect is impaired because of delayed tumoral infiltration of PB T cells and a relative bias toward suppressive Th2 and T-regulatory cells. Our data suggest that, despite being naturally programmed toward tolerance, reconstituting T cells after unrelated T-replete CBT may provide superior Tc1-Th1 antitumor effects against high-risk hematologic malignancies.

  18. Supernatural T cells: genetic modification of T cells for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Michael H; Teng, Michele W L; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K

    2005-12-01

    Immunotherapy is receiving much attention as a means of treating cancer, but complete, durable responses remain rare for most malignancies. The natural immune system seems to have limitations and deficiencies that might affect its ability to control malignant disease. An alternative to relying on endogenous components in the immune repertoire is to generate lymphocytes with abilities that are greater than those of natural T cells, through genetic modification to produce 'supernatural' T cells. This Review describes how such T cells can circumvent many of the barriers that are inherent in the tumour microenvironment while optimizing T-cell specificity, activation, homing and antitumour function.

  19. Markers of T Cell Senescence in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are facing the aging of their population, and many more will face a similar obstacle in the near future, which could be a burden to many healthcare systems. Increased susceptibility to infections, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease, cancer as well as reduced efficacy of vaccination are important matters for researchers in the field of aging. As older adults show higher prevalence for a variety of diseases, this also implies higher risk of complications, including nosocomial infections, slower recovery and sequels that may reduce the autonomy and overall quality of life of older adults. The age-related effects on the immune system termed as “immunosenescence” can be exemplified by the reported hypo-responsiveness to influenza vaccination of the elderly. T cells, which belong to the adaptive arm of the immune system, have been extensively studied and the knowledge gathered enables a better understanding of how the immune system may be affected after acute/chronic infections and how this matters in the long run. In this review, we will focus on T cells and discuss the surface and molecular markers that are associated with T cell senescence. We will also look at the implications that senescent T cells could have on human health and diseases. Finally, we will discuss the benefits of having these markers for investigators and the future work that is needed to advance the field of T cell senescence markers.

  20. Cutaneous natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radonich, Michael A; Lazova, Rossitza; Bolognia, Jean

    2002-03-01

    Lymphomas are classified as either Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's. The 2 subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that can present primarily in the skin are cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and cutaneous B-cell lymphoma, both of which tend to be low-grade malignant neoplasms. Recently another distinct subtype of lymphoma was discovered, the natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, which can involve the skin in a primary or secondary fashion. The NK/T-cell subtype of lymphoma is characterized by the expression of the NK-cell antigen CD56. These CD56(+) lymphomas are further subdivided into nasal NK/T-cell lymphomas that commonly present as midfacial destructive disease and non-nasal NK/T-cell lymphomas that often arise in extranodal locations, including the skin. We report a case of aggressive NK-cell leukemia/lymphoma with numerous secondary cutaneous lesions and review the clinical and histopathologic spectrum of non-nasal CD56(+) lymphomas, with an emphasis on the dermatologic findings.

  1. Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.

  2. Roscovitine suppresses CD4+ T cells and T cell-mediated experimental uveitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zili Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: T cells are essential for the development of uveitis and other autoimmune diseases. After initial activation, CD4+ lymphocytes express the co-stimulatory molecule OX40 that plays an important role in T cell proliferation. Cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CdK2 plays a pivotal role in the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase. In addition, recent research has implicated CdK2 in T cell activation. Thus, we sought to test the immunosuppressive effect of roscovitine, a potent CdK2 inhibitor, on CD4+ T cell activation, proliferation, and function. DESIGN AND METHODS: Mouse CD4+ T cells were activated by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. The expression of OX40, CD44, and CdK2 were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, cell cycle progression and apoptosis of control and roscovitine-treated T lymphocytes were measured by BrdU incorporation and annexin V assay, respectively. Furthermore, the immunoregulatory effect of roscovitine was evaluated in both ovalbumin-induced uveitis and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU models. RESULTS: In this study, we found that T cell activation induced OX40 expression. Cell cycle analysis showed that more CD4+OX40+ cells entered S phase than OX40- T cells. Concurrently, CD4+OX40+ cells had a higher level of CdK2 expression. Roscovitine treatment blocked activated CD4+ cells from entering S phase. In addition, roscovitine not only reduced the viability of CD4+ lymphocytes but also suppressed T cell activation and cytokine production. Finally, roscovitine significantly attenuated the severity of T cell-dependent, OX40-enhanced uveitis. CONCLUSION: These results implicate CdK2 in OX40-augmented T cell response and expansion. Furthermore, this study suggests that roscovitine is a novel, promising, therapeutic agent for treating T cell-mediated diseases such as uveitis.

  3. Roscovitine suppresses CD4+ T cells and T cell-mediated experimental uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zili; Liu, Qi; Leskov, Konstantin S; Wu, Xiumei; Duan, Jie; Zhang, Gary L; Hall, Mark; Rosenbaum, James T

    2013-01-01

    T cells are essential for the development of uveitis and other autoimmune diseases. After initial activation, CD4+ lymphocytes express the co-stimulatory molecule OX40 that plays an important role in T cell proliferation. Cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CdK2) plays a pivotal role in the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase. In addition, recent research has implicated CdK2 in T cell activation. Thus, we sought to test the immunosuppressive effect of roscovitine, a potent CdK2 inhibitor, on CD4+ T cell activation, proliferation, and function. Mouse CD4+ T cells were activated by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. The expression of OX40, CD44, and CdK2 were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, cell cycle progression and apoptosis of control and roscovitine-treated T lymphocytes were measured by BrdU incorporation and annexin V assay, respectively. Furthermore, the immunoregulatory effect of roscovitine was evaluated in both ovalbumin-induced uveitis and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) models. In this study, we found that T cell activation induced OX40 expression. Cell cycle analysis showed that more CD4+OX40+ cells entered S phase than OX40- T cells. Concurrently, CD4+OX40+ cells had a higher level of CdK2 expression. Roscovitine treatment blocked activated CD4+ cells from entering S phase. In addition, roscovitine not only reduced the viability of CD4+ lymphocytes but also suppressed T cell activation and cytokine production. Finally, roscovitine significantly attenuated the severity of T cell-dependent, OX40-enhanced uveitis. These results implicate CdK2 in OX40-augmented T cell response and expansion. Furthermore, this study suggests that roscovitine is a novel, promising, therapeutic agent for treating T cell-mediated diseases such as uveitis.

  4. T cell intrinsic NOD2 is dispensable for CD8 T cell immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria H Y Lin

    Full Text Available NOD2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor that provides innate sensing of bacterial muramyl dipeptide by host cells, such as dendritic cells, macrophages and epithelial cells. While NOD2's role as an innate pathogen sensor is well established, NOD2 is also expressed at low levels in T cells and there are conflicting data as to whether NOD2 plays an intrinsic role in T cell function. Here we show that following adoptive transfer into WT hosts, NOD2(-/- OT-I T cells show a small decrease in the number of OVA-specific CD8 T cells recovered at the peak of the response to respiratory influenza virus infection. On the other hand, no such defect was observed upon intranasal immunization with a replication defective adenovirus carrying the OVA epitope recognized by OT-I, or when OVA was delivered with LPS subcutaneously, or when influenza-OVA was delivered intraperitoneally. Thus we observed a selective defect in NOD2-deficient T cell responses only during a live viral infection. Moreover, there was no apparent defect when NOD2(-/- OT-I T cells were stimulated in vitro. Finally, this selective defect in recovery of NOD2-deficient CD8 T cells was not observed in a non-transgenic respiratory infection model in which mixed bone marrow chimeras were used such that the NOD2(-/- T cells were allowed to develop and respond in a NOD2-sufficient host. Taken together our data indicate that T cell intrinsic NOD2 is not required for CD8 T cell responses to antigen delivered under a variety of conditions in vitro and in vivo. However, CD8 T cells that have developed in the absence of NOD2 show a selective and modest impairment in their response to live respiratory influenza infection.

  5. T cell polarizing properties of probiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberi, Chiara; Campana, Stefania; De Pasquale, Claudia; Rabbani Khorasgani, Mohammad; Ferlazzo, Guido; Bonaccorsi, Irene

    2015-12-01

    Different commensal bacteria employed as probiotics have been shown to be endowed with immunomodulatory properties and to actively interact with antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells and macrophages. In particular, different strains of probiotic bacteria may induce the secretion of a discrete cytokine profile able to induce divergent T cell polarization. Here, we briefly review current knowledge regarding the effects of different species and strains of probiotic bacteria on T cell polarization. Given that the loss of intestinal homeostasis is frequently associated with an aberrant T cell polarization profile, a comprehensive knowledge of the immunomodulatory potential of these bacteria is crucial for their employment in the management of human immune-mediated pathologies, such as allergies or inflammatory bowel diseases.

  6. Malignant T cells express lymphotoxin alpha and drive endothelial activation in cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Britt; Christensen, Louise; Ralfkiaer, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    Lymphotoxin α (LTα) plays a key role in the formation of lymphatic vasculature and secondary lymphoid structures. Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is the most common primary lymphoma of the skin and in advanced stages, malignant T cells spreads through the lymphatic to regional lymph nodes to int...

  7. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy.

  8. Neuron-mediated generation of regulatory T cells from encephalitogenic T cells suppresses EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawei; Teige, Ingrid; Birnir, Bryndis

    2006-01-01

    ) inflammation. Neurons induce the proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells through B7-CD28 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-TGF-beta receptor signaling pathways, resulting in amplification of T-cell receptor signaling through phosphorylated ZAP-70, interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-9. The interaction between...

  9. A sharp T-cell antigen receptor signaling threshold for T-cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au-Yeung, Byron B.; Zikherman, Julie; Mueller, James L.; Ashouri, Judith F.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Cheng, Debra A.; Chen, Yiling; Shokat, Kevan M.; Weiss, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling is essential for activation, proliferation, and effector function of T cells. Modulation of both intensity and duration of TCR signaling can regulate these events. However, it remains unclear how individual T cells integrate such signals over time to make critical cell-fate decisions. We have previously developed an engineered mutant allele of the critical T-cell kinase zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 kDa (Zap70) that is catalytically inhibited by a small molecule inhibitor, thereby blocking TCR signaling specifically and efficiently. We have also characterized a fluorescent reporter Nur77–eGFP transgenic mouse line in which T cells up-regulate GFP uniquely in response to TCR stimulation. The combination of these technologies unmasked a sharp TCR signaling threshold for commitment to cell division both in vitro and in vivo. Further, we demonstrate that this threshold is independent of both the magnitude of the TCR stimulus and Interleukin 2. Similarly, we identify a temporal threshold of TCR signaling that is required for commitment to proliferation, after which T cells are able to proliferate in a Zap70 kinase-independent manner. Taken together, our studies reveal a sharp threshold for the magnitude and duration of TCR signaling required for commitment of T cells to proliferation. These results have important implications for understanding T-cell responses to infection and optimizing strategies for immunomodulatory drug delivery. PMID:25136127

  10. T-cell response in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Kemp, K; Ismail, A

    1999-01-01

    In the present communication we provide evidence for the existence of a Th1/Th2 dichotomy in the T-cell response to Leishmania antigens in human leishmaniasis. Our data suggest that the pattern of IL-4 and IFN-gamma response is polarised in these patients. Lymphocytes from individuals recovered......+. Furthermore, IL-10 plays an important role in the development of post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) from VL. The balance between the parasitic-specific T-cell response plays an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of Leishmania infections in humans....

  11. T-cell responses in malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Jakobsen, P H; Abu-Zeid, Y A

    1992-01-01

    Malaria is caused by infection with protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. It remains one of the most severe health problems in tropical regions of the world, and the rapid spread of resistance to drugs and insecticides has stimulated intensive research aimed at the development of a malaria...... vaccine. Despite this, no efficient operative vaccine is currently available. A large amount of information on T-cell responses to malaria antigens has been accumulated, concerning antigens derived from all stages of the parasite life cycle. The present review summarizes some of that information......, and discusses factors affecting the responses of T cells to malaria antigens....

  12. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  13. TCR down-regulation controls T cell homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Nielsen, Bodil L

    2009-01-01

    was caused by the combination of reduced thymic output, decreased T cell apoptosis, and increased transition of naive T cells to memory T cells. Experiments with bone marrow chimeric mice confirmed that the CD3gammaLLAA mutation exerted a T cell intrinsic effect on T cell homeostasis that resulted...... in an increased transition of CD3gammaLLAA naive T cells to memory T cells and a survival advantage of CD3gammaLLAA T cells compared with wild-type T cells. The experimental observations were further supported by mathematical modeling of T cell homeostasis. Our study thus identifies an important role of CD3gamma......-mediated TCR down-regulation in T cell homeostasis....

  14. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieffer, Tom E. C.; Faas, Marijke M.; Scherjon, Sicco A.; Prins, Jelmer R.

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the

  15. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  16. Genetic engineering with T cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Morgan, Richard A

    2012-06-01

    In the past two decades, human gene transfer research has been translated from a laboratory technology to clinical evaluation. The success of adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive lymphocytes to treat the patients with metastatic melanoma has led to new strategies to redirect normal T cells to recognize tumor antigens by genetic engineering with tumor antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes. This new strategy can generate large numbers of defined antigen-specific cells for therapeutic application. Much progress has been made to TCR gene transfer systems by optimizing gene expression and gene transfer protocols. Vector and protein modifications have enabled excellent expression of introduced TCR chains in human lymphocytes with reduced mis-pairing between the introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Initial clinical studies have demonstrated that TCR gene-engineered T cells could mediate tumor regression in vivo. In this review, we discuss the progress and prospects of TCR gene-engineered T cells as a therapeutic strategy for treating patients with melanoma and other cancers.

  17. T cells and the humoral immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. van Muiswinkel (Willem)

    1975-01-01

    textabstractLymphoid cells and macrophages play an important role in the development and rnaintance of humoral and cellular immunity in mammals. The lymphoid cells in the peripheral lymphoid organs are divided into two major classes: (1) thymus-derived lymphocytes or T cells and (2) bursa-equivalent

  18. T cells and the humoral immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. van Muiswinkel (Willem)

    1975-01-01

    textabstractLymphoid cells and macrophages play an important role in the development and rnaintance of humoral and cellular immunity in mammals. The lymphoid cells in the peripheral lymphoid organs are divided into two major classes: (1) thymus-derived lymphocytes or T cells and (2) bursa-equivalent

  19. Genetics of T Cell Defects in Lupus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yifang Chen; Laurence More

    2005-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by anti-nuclear autoantibodies that cause damage to multiple organs and tissues. Intrinsic defects have been demonstrated in the lymphoid and myeloid cellular compartments, including T cells. Lupus susceptibility is mediated through the interplay of a large number of genes, most of which are still unidentified. Most of the genetic studies in both human patients and mouse models have addressed lupus susceptibility as a whole. More recently however, more attention has been paid to the inheritance of specific lupus-associated phenotypes. In this review, we summarized our results obtained with the Slel locus in the NZM2410 mouse model, which mediates the generation of anti-histone autoreactive T cells. Sle1,which is constituted of multiple genes, is the only known genomic region that is sufficient for the generation of autoreactive T cells. The identification of the corresponding genes will constitute a landmark for our understanding of the mechanisms of autoimmunity. Our results are discussed in the context of candidate genes and the role of T cells in systemic autoimmunity.

  20. Long term protection after immunization with P. berghei sporozoites correlates with sustained IFNγ responses of hepatic CD8+ memory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystelle Nganou-Makamdop

    Full Text Available Protection against P. berghei malaria can successfully be induced in mice by immunization with both radiation attenuated sporozoites (RAS arresting early during liver stage development, or sporozoites combined with chloroquine chemoprophylaxis (CPS, resulting in complete intra-hepatic parasite development before killing of blood-stages by chloroquine takes place. We assessed the longevity of protective cellular immune responses by RAS and CPS P. berghei immunization of C57BL/6j mice. Strong effector and memory (T(EM CD8+ T cell responses were induced predominantly in the liver of both RAS and CPS immunized mice while CD4+ T cells with memory phenotype remained at base line levels. Compared to unprotected naïve mice, we found high sporozoite-specific IFNγ ex vivo responses that associated with induced levels of in vivo CD8+ T(EM cells in the liver but not spleen. Long term evaluation over a period of 9 months showed a decline of malaria-specific IFNγ responses in RAS and CPS mice that significantly correlated with loss of protection (r(2 = 0.60, p<0.0001. The reducing IFNγ response by hepatic memory CD8+ T cells could be boosted by re-exposure to wild-type sporozoites. Our data show that sustainable protection against malaria associates with distinct intra-hepatic immune responses characterized by strong IFNγ producing CD8+ memory T cells.

  1. Role of T cells in asthma

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    A Barry Kay

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The T-cell hypothesis of asthma, particularly chronic asthma, is based around the concept that the disease is 'driven' and maintained by the persistence of a specialized subset of chronically activated T-memory cells, sensitized against an array of allergenic, occupational or viral antigens that 'home' to the lung after appropriate antigen exposure or viral infection. Allergens induce a CD4 T-helper (Th cell response, whereas viruses recognize CD8+ cytotoxic (Tc cells. In the asthmatic airways there appears to be both CD4+ and CD8+ cells with a type 2 cytokine phenotype (i.e. Th2-and Tc2-types. These cells produce interleukin (IL-5, IL-3 and granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor, which recruit, mobilize and activate eosinophils for subsequent mucosal tissue damage, and IL-4, an essential co-factor for local or generalized immunoglobulin (Ig E production. This in turn leads to 'eosinophilic desquamative bronchitis' with epithelial shedding, mucus hypersecretion and bronchial smooth muscle contraction. Thus, although the eosinophil is believed to produce airway damage, function appears to be under T cell control. Support for this hypothesis includes the observations that activated T cells and their products can be identified in biopsies from the major variants of the disease (atopic, nonatopic ('intrinsic' and occupational asthma, the colocalization of mRNA for type 2 cytokines to CD4+ and CD8+ cells in atopic and non-atopic asthma, the presence of chronically activated cytokine-producing T cells in corticosteroid-resistant asthma, the association of disease severity with type 2 cytokines, particularly IL-5, and the efficacy of cyclosporine A in chronic steroid-dependent disease. Inhibitors and/or antagonists directed against more precise t cell-associated molecular targets hold promise for the future treatment of chronic asthma.

  2. T cell responses and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip

    2006-01-01

    The enhancement of severe disease upon secondary infection makes dengue almost unique among infectious pathogens and presents a serious challenge to vaccine design. Several key observations have been made which shed light onto this phenomenon particularly that antibodies can enhance Fc receptor-dependent uptake of virus into macrophages thereby increasing virus replication. Furthermore there seems to be a relationship between the peak virus load and disease severity. However, a second key feature of dengue is that the life-threatening symptoms do not correlate with the period of high viraemia; instead they occur at a time when the virus load is in steep decline. The coincidence of severe disease manifestations with defervescence and virus control suggests that the symptoms may be a consequence of the immune response to the virus rather than virus induced cytopathology. One of the key elements in the immune response to viruses are T cells which can both secrete a host of inflammatory cytokines and also be directly cytotoxic to infected cells. There are a number of experimental models of T cell-induced immunopathology including in responses to viruses. Particularly interesting in this respect are models of RSV-induced immunopathology, which have direct relevance to vaccine design as a formalin-inactivated vaccine to RSV actually enhanced disease in children when they became naturally infected with RSV, an echo of the disease enhancement seen in dengue. We will present an analysis of CD8+ T cell responses to a number of novel T cell epitopes during dengue infection and also analyse the function and cytokine secretion of these cells. We suggest that an exaggerated and partially misdirected T cell response seen in secondary dengue infection may be part of the complex series of events leading to dengue haemorrhagic fever and shock.

  3. Rac activation by the T-cell receptor inhibits T cell migration.

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    Eva Cernuda-Morollón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: T cell migration is essential for immune responses and inflammation. Activation of the T-cell receptor (TCR triggers a migration stop signal to facilitate interaction with antigen-presenting cells and cell retention at inflammatory sites, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Migrating T cells are polarized with a lamellipodium at the front and uropod at the rear. Here we show that transient TCR activation induces prolonged inhibition of T-cell migration. TCR pre-activation leads to cells with multiple lamellipodia and lacking a uropod even after removal of the TCR signal. A similar phenotype is induced by expression of constitutively active Rac1, and TCR signaling activates Rac1. TCR signaling acts via Rac to reduce phosphorylation of ezrin/radixin/moesin proteins, which are required for uropod formation, and to increase stathmin phosphorylation, which regulates microtubule stability. T cell polarity and migration is partially restored by inhibiting Rac or by expressing constitutively active moesin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that transient TCR signaling induces sustained inhibition of T cell migration via Rac1, increased stathmin phosphorylation and reduced ERM phosphorylation which act together to inhibit T-cell migratory polarity.

  4. PPARγ negatively regulates T cell activation to prevent follicular helper T cells and germinal center formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong-Jai; Kim, Do-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Won-Ju; Kim, Ji Yun; Senejani, Alireza G; Hwang, Soo Seok; Kim, Lark Kyun; Tobiasova, Zuzana; Lee, Gap Ryol; Craft, Joseph; Bothwell, Alfred L M; Choi, Je-Min

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that regulates lipid and glucose metabolism. Although studies of PPARγ ligands have demonstrated its regulatory functions in inflammation and adaptive immunity, its intrinsic role in T cells and autoimmunity has yet to be fully elucidated. Here we used CD4-PPARγKO mice to investigate PPARγ-deficient T cells, which were hyper-reactive to produce higher levels of cytokines and exhibited greater proliferation than wild type T cells with increased ERK and AKT phosphorylation. Diminished expression of IκBα, Sirt1, and Foxo1, which are inhibitors of NF-κB, was observed in PPARγ-deficient T cells that were prone to produce all the signature cytokines under Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th9 skewing condition. Interestingly, 1-year-old CD4-PPARγKO mice spontaneously developed moderate autoimmune phenotype by increased activated T cells, follicular helper T cells (TFH cells) and germinal center B cells with glomerular inflammation and enhanced autoantibody production. Sheep red blood cell immunization more induced TFH cells and germinal centers in CD4-PPARγKO mice and the T cells showed increased of Bcl-6 and IL-21 expression suggesting its regulatory role in germinal center reaction. Collectively, these results suggest that PPARγ has a regulatory role for TFH cells and germinal center reaction to prevent autoimmunity.

  5. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K;

    1994-01-01

    lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1......MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...

  6. Gut-homing CD4+ T cell receptor alpha beta+ T cells in the pathogenesis of murine inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolphi, A; Boll, G; Poulsen, S S

    1994-01-01

    reconstituted a CD3+ T cell receptor alpha beta+ CD4+ T cell subset. CD4+ cells of this subset expressed the surface phenotype of mucosa-seeking, memory T cells. In the immunodeficient scid host, this gut-derived CD4+ T cell subset was found in spleen, peritoneal cavity, mesenteric lymph nodes (LN), epithelial...

  7. Role of the T cell receptor ligand affinity in T cell activation by bacterial superantigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Geisler, C; Buus, S

    2001-01-01

    Similar to native peptide/MHC ligands, bacterial superantigens have been found to bind with low affinity to the T cell receptor (TCR). It has been hypothesized that low ligand affinity is required to allow optimal TCR signaling. To test this, we generated variants of Staphylococcus enterotoxin C3...... (SEC3) with up to a 150-fold increase in TCR affinity. By stimulating T cells with SEC3 molecules immobilized onto plastic surfaces, we demonstrate that increasing the affinity of the SEC3/TCR interaction caused a proportional increase in the ability of SEC3 to activate T cells. Thus, the potency...... correlation between ligand affinity and ligand potency indicating that it is the density of receptor-ligand complexes in the T cell contact area that determines TCR signaling strength....

  8. Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Chronic Urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohleen Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL is a rare but distinct type of T cell lymphoma with an aggressive course and high mortality. Most patients are diagnosed late in the disease and usually present with generalized lymphadenopathy. A minority have skin lesions at the time of diagnosis, more commonly in the form of nonspecific maculopapular rash with or without pruritus. We report a rare case of AITL presenting with chronic, recurrent angioedema and urticaria-like lesions and no palpable peripheral adenopathy. Primary Care physicians, dermatologists, and allergists must maintain a high index of suspicion for cutaneous manifestations of lymphoma, especially if the skin lesions are refractory to standard treatment. Timely diagnosis is essential to improve survival.

  9. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Tom E C; Faas, Marijke M; Scherjon, Sicco A; Prins, Jelmer R

    2017-02-01

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the constitution, size and activation status of peripheral human memory T-lymphocyte populations. Effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) T-lymphocytes were analyzed using flow cytometry of peripheral blood from 14 nulligravid, 12 primigravid and 15 parous women that were on average 18 months postpartum. The short term effects were shown by the significantly higher CD4+ EM cell and activated CD4+ memory cell proportions in primigravid women compared to nulligravid women. The persistent effects found in this study were the significantly higher proportions of CD4+ EM, CD4+ CM and activated memory T cells in parous women compared to nulligravid women. In contrast to CD4+ cells, activation status of CD8+ memory cells did not differ between the groups. This study shows that pregnancy persistently affects the pre-pregnancy CD4+ memory cell pool in human peripheral blood. During pregnancy, CD4+ T-lymphocytes might differentiate into EM cells followed by persistent higher proportions of CD4+ CM and EM cells postpartum. The persistent effects of pregnancy on memory T cells found in this study support the hypothesis that memory T cells are generated during pregnancy and that these cells could be involved in the lower complication risks in multiparous pregnancies in humans.

  10. Inducible T-cell receptor expression in precursor T-cells for leukemia control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Shahabuddin S; Hapke, Martin; Herbst, Jessica; Wedekind, Dirk; Baumann, Rolf; Heinz, Niels; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard; Vignali, Dario AA; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Schambach, Axel; Blazar, Bruce R.; Sauer, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Co-transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells with those engineered to express leukemia-reactive T cell receptors (TCRs) and differentiated ex vivo into precursor T cells (preTs) may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse. Since expression of potentially self-(leukemia-) reactive TCRs will lead to negative selection or provoke autoimmunity upon thymic maturation, we investigated a novel concept whereby TCR expression set under the control of an inducible promoter would allow timely controlled TCR expression. After in vivo maturation and gene induction, preTs developed potent anti-leukemia effects. Engineered preTs provided protection even after repeated leukemia challenges by giving rise to effector and central memory cells. Importantly, adoptive transfer of TCR-transduced allogeneic preTs mediated anti-leukemia effect without evoking graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Earlier transgene induction forced CD8+ T cell development, was required to obtain a mature T cell subset of targeted specificity, allowed engineered T cells to efficiently pass positive selection and abrogated the endogenous T cell repertoire. Later induction favored CD4 differentiation and failed to produce a leukemia-reactive population emphasizing the dominant role of positive selection. Taken together, we provide new functional insights for the employment of TCR-engineered precursor cells as a controllable immunotherapeutic modality with significant anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25652739

  11. Pathogenic T cells persist after reversal of autoimmune disease by immunosuppression with regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Eric; Bourges, Dorothée; Gleeson, Paul A; Ang, Desmond K Y; van Driel, Ian R

    2013-05-01

    Autoimmune disease can be prevented with immunosuppressive agents; however, the effectiveness of these treatments in advanced stage of disease and the fate of pathogenic T cells following such treatments are not clear. In this study we demonstrate that a single dose of in vitro-induced Treg cells (iTreg cells) resulted in the functional repair and restitution of stomach tissue that had been severely damaged in advanced autoimmune gastritis. iTreg cells caused depletion or inactivation of autoreactive naïve T cells that were antigen inexperienced, however, autoreactive effector/memory T cells persisted in treated mice, resulting in residual cellular infiltrates within the repaired stomach tissue. The persisting autoreactive T cells were able to rapidly cause autoimmune disease if iTreg cells were removed. Similar data were obtained from mice treated continuously with corticosteroid, in that there was substantial restitution of the gastric mucosa; however, effector T cells persisted and rapidly caused pathology following drug removal. Therefore, iTreg cells or corticosteroid can suppress pathogenic autoreactive cells in advanced autoimmune disease, reversing tissue damage and improving tissue function. However, the persistence of pathogenic T cells represents a disease risk.

  12. Vaccinia Virus Inhibits T Cell Receptor–Dependent Responses by Human γδ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haishan; Deetz, Carl O.; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Cairo, Cristiana; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Propp, Nadia; Salvato, Maria S.; Shao, Yiming; Pauza, C. David

    2008-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an effective vaccine and vector but has evolved multiple mechanisms for evading host immunity. We characterized the interactions of VV (TianTan and New York City Board of Health strains) with human γδ T cells because of the role they play in immune control of this virus. Exposure to VV failed to trigger proliferative responses in γδ T cells from unprimed individuals, but it was an unexpected finding that VV blocked responses to model antigens by the Vγ2Vδ2 T cell subset. Infectious or ultraviolet light–inactivated VV inhibited proliferative Vγ2Vδ2 T cell responses to phosphoantigens and tumor cells, prevented cytolysis of Daudi B cells, and reduced cytokine production. Inhibiting Vγ2Vδ2 T cells may be a mechanism for evading host immunity and increasing VV virulence. Increased VV replication or expression in the absence of γδ T cell responses might contribute to its potency as a vaccine against poxvirus and recombinant antigens. PMID:17152007

  13. Vaccinia virus inhibits T cell receptor-dependent responses by human gammadelta T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haishan; Deetz, Carl O; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Cairo, Cristiana; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Propp, Nadia; Salvato, Maria S; Shao, Yiming; Pauza, C David

    2007-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an effective vaccine and vector but has evolved multiple mechanisms for evading host immunity. We characterized the interactions of VV (TianTan and New York City Board of Health strains) with human gammadelta T cells because of the role they play in immune control of this virus. Exposure to VV failed to trigger proliferative responses in gammadelta T cells from unprimed individuals, but it was an unexpected finding that VV blocked responses to model antigens by the Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell subset. Infectious or ultraviolet light-inactivated VV inhibited proliferative Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell responses to phosphoantigens and tumor cells, prevented cytolysis of Daudi B cells, and reduced cytokine production. Inhibiting Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells may be a mechanism for evading host immunity and increasing VV virulence. Increased VV replication or expression in the absence of gammadelta T cell responses might contribute to its potency as a vaccine against poxvirus and recombinant antigens.

  14. Accumulation of cytolytic CD8{sup +} T cells in B16-melanoma and proliferation of mature T cells in TIS21-knockout mice after T cell receptor stimulation

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    Ryu, Min Sook [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Min-Yeong [Department of Microbiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, The Graduate School, Ajou University (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Daeho [Department of Microbiology, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Gangneung, Gangwon-do 210-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Allen E. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kye Yong [Department of Pathology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun [Department of Microbiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, In Kyoung [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    In vivo and in vitro effects of TIS21 gene on the mature T cell activation and antitumor activities were explored by employing MO5 melanoma orthograft and splenocytes isolated from the TIS21-knockout (KO) mice. Proliferation and survival of mature T cells were significantly increased in the KO than the wild type (WT) cells, indicating that TIS21 inhibits the rate of mature T cell proliferation and its survival. In MO5 melanoma orthograft model, the KO mice recruited much more CD8{sup +} T cells into the tumors at around day 14 after tumor cell injection along with reduced tumor volumes compared with the WT. The increased frequency of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in splenocytes of the KO mice compared with the WT may account for antitumor-immunity of TIS21 gene in the melanoma orthograft. In contrast, reduced frequencies of CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in the splenocytes of KO mice may affect the loss of CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in the orthograft at around day 19. These results indicate that TIS21 exhibits antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in mature T cells, and differentially affects the frequencies of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells and CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells, thus transiently regulating in vivo anti-tumor immunity. - Highlights: • Constitutive expression of TIS21 in splenocytes and upregulation by TCR stimulation. • Proliferation of mature T-cells in spleen of TIS21KO mice after TCR stimulation. • Inhibition of cell death in mature T-cells of TIS21KO mice compared with the wild type. • Inhibition of melanoma growth in TIS21KO mice and CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in tumor. • Reduction of CD 107{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cells, but increased granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in TIS21KO mice.

  15. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View

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    Derek C. Macallan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy.

  16. Evolution of two prototypic T cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sabyasachi; Li, Jianxu; Hirano, Masayuki; Sutoh, Yoichi; Herrin, Brantley R; Cooper, Max D

    2015-07-01

    Jawless vertebrates, which occupy a unique position in chordate phylogeny, employ leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-based variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) for antigen recognition. During the assembly of the VLR genes (VLRA, VLRB and VLRC), donor LRR-encoding sequences are copied in a step-wise manner into the incomplete germ-line genes. The assembled VLR genes are differentially expressed by discrete lymphocyte lineages: VLRA- and VLRC-producing cells are T-cell like, whereas VLRB-producing cells are B-cell like. VLRA(+) and VLRC(+) lymphocytes resemble the two principal T-cell lineages of jawed vertebrates that express the αβ or γδ T-cell receptors (TCR). Reminiscent of the interspersed nature of the TCRα/TCRδ locus in jawed vertebrates, the close proximity of the VLRA and VLRC loci facilitates sharing of donor LRR sequences during VLRA and VLRC assembly. Here we discuss the insight these findings provide into vertebrate T- and B-cell evolution, and the alternative types of anticipatory receptors they use for adaptive immunity.

  17. T cell epitope-based allergy vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larché, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) with extracts containing intact allergen molecules is clinically efficacious, but associated with frequent adverse events related to the allergic sensitization of the patient. As a result, treatment is initiated in an incremental dose fashion which ultimately achieves a plateau (maintenance dose) that may be continued for several years. Reduction of allergic adverse events may allow safer and more rapid treatment Thus, many groups have developed and evaluated strategies to reduce allergenicity whilst maintaining immunogenicity, the latter being required to achieve specific modulation of the immune response. Peptide immunotherapy can be used to target T and/or B cells in an antigen-specific manner. To date, only approaches that target T cells have been clinically evaluated. Short, synthetic peptides representing immunodominant T cell epitopes of major allergens are able to modulate allergen-specific T cell responses in the absence of IgE cross linking and activation of effector cells. Here we review clinical and mechanistic studies associated with peptide immunotherapy targeting allergy to cats or to bee venom. 

  18. CD7-edited T cells expressing a CD7-specific CAR for the therapy of T-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Silva, Diogo; Srinivasan, Madhuwanti; Sharma, Sandhya; Lee, Ciaran M; Wagner, Dimitrios L; Davis, Timothy H; Rouce, Rayne H; Bao, Gang; Brenner, Malcolm K; Mamonkin, Maksim

    2017-07-20

    Extending the success of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells to T-cell malignancies is problematic because most target antigens are shared between normal and malignant cells, leading to CAR T-cell fratricide. CD7 is a transmembrane protein highly expressed in acute T-cell leukemia (T-ALL) and in a subset of peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Normal expression of CD7 is largely confined to T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, reducing the risk of off-target-organ toxicity. Here, we show that the expression of a CD7-specific CAR impaired expansion of transduced T cells because of residual CD7 expression and the ensuing fratricide. We demonstrate that targeted genomic disruption of the CD7 gene prevented this fratricide and enabled expansion of CD7 CAR T cells without compromising their cytotoxic function. CD7 CAR T cells produced robust cytotoxicity against malignant T-cell lines and primary tumors and were protective in a mouse xenograft model of T-ALL. Although CD7 CAR T cells were also toxic against unedited (CD7(+)) T and NK lymphocytes, we show that the CD7-edited T cells themselves can respond to viral peptides and therefore could be protective against pathogens. Hence, genomic disruption of a target antigen overcomes fratricide of CAR T cells and establishes the feasibility of using CD7 CAR T cells for the targeted therapy of T-cell malignancies. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. T cells and gene regulation: the switching on and turning up of genes after T cell receptor stimulation in CD8 T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Conley

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Signaling downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR is directly regulated by the dose and affinity of peptide antigen. The strength of TCR signaling drives a multitude of T cell functions from development to differentiation. CD8 T cells differentiate into a diverse pool of effector and memory cells after activation, a process that is critical for pathogen clearance and is highly regulated by TCR signal strength. T cells rapidly alter their gene expression upon activation. Multiple signaling pathways downstream of the TCR activate transcription factors, which are critical for this process. The dynamics between proximal TCR signaling, transcription factor activation, and CD8 T cell function are discussed here. We propose that Inducible T cell kinase (ITK acts as a rheostat for gene expression. This unique regulation of TCR signaling by ITK provides a possible signaling mechanism for the promotion of a diverse T cell repertoire in response to pathogen.

  20. T Cells and Gene Regulation: The Switching On and Turning Up of Genes after T Cell Receptor Stimulation in CD8 T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, James M.; Gallagher, Michael P.; Berg, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Signaling downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) is directly regulated by the dose and affinity of peptide antigen. The strength of TCR signaling drives a multitude of T cell functions from development to differentiation. CD8 T cells differentiate into a diverse pool of effector and memory cells after activation, a process that is critical for pathogen clearance and is highly regulated by TCR signal strength. T cells rapidly alter their gene expression upon activation. Multiple signaling pathways downstream of the TCR activate transcription factors, which are critical for this process. The dynamics between proximal TCR signaling, transcription factor activation and CD8 T cell function are discussed here. We propose that inducible T cell kinase (ITK) acts as a rheostat for gene expression. This unique regulation of TCR signaling by ITK provides a possible signaling mechanism for the promotion of a diverse T cell repertoire in response to pathogen. PMID:26973653

  1. Neoantigen landscape dynamics during human melanoma-T cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdegaal, Els M. E.; De Miranda, Noel F. C. C.; Visser, Marten

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of neoantigens that are formed as a consequence of DNA damage is likely to form a major driving force behind the clinical activity of cancer immunotherapies such as T-cell checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell therapy. Therefore, strategies to selectively enhance T-cell reactivity...... is constant over time is unclear. Here we analyse the stability of neoantigen-specific T-cell responses and the antigens they recognize in two patients with stage IV melanoma treated by adoptive T-cell transfer. The T-cell-recognized neoantigens can be selectively lost from the tumour cell population, either...

  2. Nylon wool purification alters the activation of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohler, Jillian E; Barnum, Scott R

    2009-02-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method.

  3. New Cell Sources for T Cell Engineering and Adoptive Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themeli, Maria; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2017-01-01

    The promising clinical results obtained with engineered T cells, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy, call for further advancements to facilitate and broaden their applicability. One potentially beneficial innovation is to exploit new T cell sources that reduce the need for autologous cell manufacturing and enable cell transfer across histocompatibility barriers. Here we review emerging T cell engineering approaches that utilize alternative T cell sources, which include virus-specific or T cell receptor-less allogeneic T cells, expanded lymphoid progenitors, and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived T lymphocytes. The latter offer the prospect for true off-the-shelf, genetically enhanced, histocompatible cell therapy products. PMID:25842976

  4. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies.

  5. Memory CD8 T cells specific for liver stage antigens maintain protracted protection against malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula eKrzych

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Immunologic memory induced by pathogenic agents or vaccinations is inextricably linked to long-lasting protection. Adequately maintained memory T and B cell pools assure a fast, effective and specific response against re-infections. Studies of immune responses amongst residents of malaria endemic areas suggest that memory responses to Plasmodia antigens appear to be neither adequately developed nor maintained, because persons who survive episodes of childhood malaria remain vulnerable to persistent or intermittent malaria infections. By contrast, multiple exposures of humans and laboratory rodents to radiation-attenuated Plasmodia sporozoites (γ-spz induces sterile and long-lasting protection against experimental sporozoite challenge. Protection is associated with MHC class I-dependent CD8 T cells, the key effectors against pre-erythrocytic stage infection. We have adopted the P. berghei γ-spz mouse model to study memory CD8 T cells that are specific for antigens expressed by Pb liver-stage (LS parasites and are found predominantly in the liver. On the basis of phenotypic and functional characteristics, we have demonstrated that liver CD8 T cells form two subsets: CD44hiCD62LloKLRG-1+CD107+CD127-CD122loCD8 T effector/effector memory (TE/EM cells that are the dominant IFN-γ producers and CD44hiCD62LhiKLRG-1-CD107-CD127+CD122hiCD8 T central memory (TCM cells. In this review, we discuss our observations concerning the role of CD8 TE/EM and CD8 TCM cells in the maintenance of protracted protective immunity against experimental malaria infection. Finally, we present a hypothesis consistent with a model whereby intrahepatic CD8 TCM cells, that are maintained in part by LS-Ag depot and by IL-15-mediated survival and homeostatic proliferation, form a reservoir of cells ready for conscription to CD8 TE/EM cells needed to prevent re-infections.

  6. Antigen localization and the induction of resistance in mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mountford, A.P.; Coulson, P.S.; Wilson, R.A.

    1988-08-01

    The fate of /sup 75/Se-labelled parasites and their released pre-synthesized macromolecules has been followed in three murine infection models. Marked differences were found between the three models. The pattern of migration of normal schistosomula was similar to that previously reported. In addition we have described the transit of parasites through the lymph nodes draining the infection site. Significant quantities of released material were detected in the skin, draining lymph nodes, bloodstream and liver. The circulating material was of parasite origin, macromolecular, and hence potentially antigenic. In comparison to the normal infection, radiation-attenuated parasites (inducing a high level of resistance to challenge) persisted in the skin, draining lymph nodes and lungs, releasing a proportionally greater amount of material in the nodes. In mice exposed to attenuated parasites and treated with the compound RO11-3128 at 24 h (inducing a low level of resistance) there was an early death and rapid clearance of the parasites whilst still in the skin. This situation resulted in the highest levels of released material in the skin, bloodstream and liver, but negligible levels in the draining lymph nodes. We suggest that the persistence of radiation-attenuated parasites in the skin and draining lymph nodes, together with the prolonged release of antigen in the latter site, compared to the normal situation, are major factors in the induction of resistance.

  7. Selective Function of PKC-θ in T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santhakumar Manicassamy; Sonal Gupta; Zuoming Sun

    2006-01-01

    T cell activation is a critical process in initiating adaptive immune response since only through this process the na(i)ve antigen specific T cells differentiate into armed effector T cells that mediate the actual immune response.During T cell activation, na(i)ve T cells undergo clonal expansion and acquire the capability to kill target cells infected with pathogens or produce cytokines essential for regulating immune response. Inappropriate activation or inactivation of T cells leads to autoimmunity or severe immunodeficiencies. PKC-θ is selectively expressed in T cells and required for mediating T cell activation process. Mice deficient in PKC-θ exhibit defects in T cell activation, survival and activation-inducedcell death. PKC-θ selectively translocates to immunological synapse and mediates the signals required for activation of NF-κB, AP1 and NFAT that are essential for T cell activation.Furthermore, PKC-θ-/- mice displayed multiple defects in the development of T cell-mediated immune responses in vivo. PKC-θ is thus a critical molecule that regulates T cell function at multiple stages in T cell-mediated immune responses in vivo. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2006;3(4):263-270.

  8. T-cell regulation in lepromatous leprosy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidist Bobosha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells are known for their role in maintaining self-tolerance and balancing immune reactions in autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. However, regulatory mechanisms can also lead to prolonged survival of pathogens in chronic infections like leprosy and tuberculosis (TB. Despite high humoral responses against Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae, lepromatous leprosy (LL patients have the characteristic inability to generate T helper 1 (Th1 responses against the bacterium. In this study, we investigated the unresponsiveness to M. leprae in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of LL patients by analysis of IFN-γ responses to M. leprae before and after depletion of CD25+ cells, by cell subsets analysis of PBMC and by immunohistochemistry of patients' skin lesions. Depletion of CD25+ cells from total PBMC identified two groups of LL patients: 7/18 (38.8% gained in vitro responsiveness towards M. leprae after depletion of CD25+ cells, which was reversed to M. leprae-specific T-cell unresponsiveness by addition of autologous CD25+ cells. In contrast, 11/18 (61.1% remained anergic in the absence of CD25+ T-cells. For both groups mitogen-induced IFN-γ was, however, not affected by depletion of CD25+ cells. In M. leprae responding healthy controls, treated lepromatous leprosy (LL and borderline tuberculoid leprosy (BT patients, depletion of CD25+ cells only slightly increased the IFN-γ response. Furthermore, cell subset analysis showed significantly higher (p = 0.02 numbers of FoxP3+ CD8+CD25+ T-cells in LL compared to BT patients, whereas confocal microscopy of skin biopsies revealed increased numbers of CD68+CD163+ as well as FoxP3+ cells in lesions of LL compared to tuberculoid and borderline tuberculoid leprosy (TT/BT lesions. Thus, these data show that CD25+ Treg cells play a role in M. leprae-Th1 unresponsiveness in LL.

  9. CD8+ T Cells: GITR Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Ronchetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As many members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related gene (GITR plays multiple roles mostly in the cells of immune system. CD8+ T cells are key players in the immunity against viruses and tumors, and GITR has been demonstrated to be an essential molecule for these cells to mount an immune response. The aim of this paper is to focus on GITR function in CD8+ cells, paying particular attention to numerous and recent studies that suggest its crucial role in mouse disease models.

  10. Photomediated Larvicidal Activity of Pheophorbide a against Cercaria Larvae of Fasciola gigantica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Jyoti Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fasciolosis is a parasitic disease caused by Fasciola gigantica. The freshwater snail Lymnaea acuminata is the intermediate host of F. gigantica which cause endemic fasciolosis in the northern part of India. To investigate larvicidal activity of pure and laboratory extracted pheophorbide a (Pa against cercaria larvae of F. gigantica, data were analyzed in different spectra of visible light, sunlight, and laboratory conditions. Photostimulation of chlorophyll derivative pheophorbide a (Pa caused time and concentration dependent larvicidal activity against cercaria larvae of F. gigantica. Larvicidal activity of pure Pa under 650 nm and 400–650 nm (8 h LC50 0.006 mg/10 mL was more pronounced than extracted Pa under same irradiations (650 nm LC50 0.12 mg/10 mL, 400–650 nm LC50 0.14 mg/10 mL. Lowest toxicity of pure (8 h LC50 0.14 mg/10 mL and extracted Pa (8 h LC50 1.25 mg/10 mL was noted under 400 nm. Pa was found to be toxic in laboratory conditions also. The results presented in this paper indicate that pheophorbide a possess potential larvicidal activity against Fasciola gigantica larvae in different wavelengths of visible light, sunlight, and laboratory conditions.

  11. Photomediated Larvicidal Activity of Pheophorbide a against Cercaria Larvae of Fasciola gigantica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Divya Jyoti; Singh, Vinay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Fasciolosis is a parasitic disease caused by Fasciola gigantica. The freshwater snail Lymnaea acuminata is the intermediate host of F. gigantica which cause endemic fasciolosis in the northern part of India. To investigate larvicidal activity of pure and laboratory extracted pheophorbide a (Pa) against cercaria larvae of F. gigantica, data were analyzed in different spectra of visible light, sunlight, and laboratory conditions. Photostimulation of chlorophyll derivative pheophorbide a (Pa) caused time and concentration dependent larvicidal activity against cercaria larvae of F. gigantica. Larvicidal activity of pure Pa under 650 nm and 400–650 nm (8 h LC50 0.006 mg/10 mL) was more pronounced than extracted Pa under same irradiations (650 nm LC50 0.12 mg/10 mL, 400–650 nm LC50 0.14 mg/10 mL). Lowest toxicity of pure (8 h LC50 0.14 mg/10 mL) and extracted Pa (8 h LC50 1.25 mg/10 mL) was noted under 400 nm. Pa was found to be toxic in laboratory conditions also. The results presented in this paper indicate that pheophorbide a possess potential larvicidal activity against Fasciola gigantica larvae in different wavelengths of visible light, sunlight, and laboratory conditions. PMID:28127494

  12. Auto-reactive T cells revised. Overestimation based on methodology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius-Ussing, Gorm; Sørensen, Jesper F; Wandall, Hans H

    2015-01-01

    Autoreactive T cells have been identified in most autoimmune diseases and recently even in healthy individuals. Similar, T cells that recognize either wild-type or tumorspecific tumor antigens have been increasingly reported to develop spontaneously in cancer patients. This insight has become...... possible mainly due to novel immunoassays which have revolutionized the discovery of rare antigen specific T cells. At present, the major dogma that explains this increasing number of reports of autoreactive T cells is that autoreactive T cells are counteracted by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells...... in vivo, in particular in healthy individuals, whereas dysfunction in Tregs or Treg responsiveness may unmask the autoreactive T cell responses in patients with autoimmune diseases. However, studies that identify autoreactive T cells are usually performed by culturing T cells with antigen presenting cells...

  13. T Cell Vaccination as an Immunotherapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingwuZhang

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells (T cell vaccination) selected from individual's own T cellrepertoire provides a unique in vivo setting for testing immune regulation that is known to involve interactionsof a variety of related surface molecules (1). It induces regulatory immune responses that closely resemble thein vivo situation where the immune system is challenged by clonal activation and expansion of given T cellpopulations in various autoimmune diseases. T cell vaccination provides a powerful means of eliciting naturalreactions of the immune system in response to clonal expansion of T cells, which can used as a therapeuticapproach to suppress or eliminate specific pathogenic autoreactive T cells in autoimmune conditions. Clinicaltrials using T cell vaccination to deplete autoreactive T cells in human autoimmune conditions have begun toreveal the pathologic relevance of various autoimmune T cell populations in the disease processes, providing aunique opportunity to test the autoimmune theories in a clinical setting. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2004; 1(5):321-327.

  14. Evidence of endothelial inflammation, T cell activation, and T cell reallocation in uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elhassan, I M; Hviid, L; Satti, G

    1994-01-01

    To explain the observation that acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria is associated with a transient inability of peripheral blood cells to respond to antigenic stimulation in vitro, we have postulated the disease-induced reallocation of peripheral lymphocytes, possibly by adhesion to inflamed...... endothelium. We measured plasma levels of soluble markers of endothelial inflammation and T cell activation in 32 patients suffering from acute, uncomplication P. falciparum malaria, as well as in 10 healthy, aparasitemic control donors. All donors were residents of a malaria-endemic area of Eastern State...... with the control donors. In addition, we found a disease-induced depletion of T cells with high expression of the LFA-1 antigen, particularly in the CD4+ subset. The results obtained provide further support for the hypothesis of T cell reallocation to inflamed endothelium in acute P. falciparum malaria....

  15. Imaging regulatory T cell dynamics and CTLA4-mediated suppression of T cell priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheu, Melanie P; Othy, Shivashankar; Greenberg, Milton L; Dong, Tobias X; Schuijs, Martijn; Deswarte, Kim; Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N; Parker, Ian; Cahalan, Michael D

    2015-02-05

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain immune homoeostasis through mechanisms that remain incompletely defined. Here by two-photon (2P) imaging, we examine the cellular dynamics of endogenous Tregs. Tregs are identified as two non-overlapping populations in the T-zone and follicular regions of the lymph node (LN). In the T-zone, Tregs migrate more rapidly than conventional T cells (Tconv), extend longer processes and interact with resident dendritic cells (DC) and Tconv. Tregs intercept immigrant DCs and interact with antigen-induced DC:Tconv clusters, while continuing to form contacts with activated Tconv. During antigen-specific responses, blocking CTLA4-B7 interactions reduces Treg-Tconv interaction times, increases the volume of DC:Tconv clusters and enhances subsequent Tconv proliferation in vivo. Our results demonstrate a role for altered cellular choreography of Tregs through CTLA4-based interactions to limit T-cell priming.

  16. Apoptosis and T cell depletion during feline infectious peritonitis

    OpenAIRE

    Horzinek, M.C.; Haagmans, B. L.; Egberink, H F

    1996-01-01

    Cats that have succumbed to feline infectious peritonitis, an immune- mediated disease caused by variants of feline coronaviruses, show apoptosis and T-cell depletion in their lymphoid organs. The ascitic fluid that develops in the course of the condition causes apoptosis in vitro but only in activated T cells. Since feline infectious peritonitis virus does not infect T cells, and viral proteins did not inhibit T-cell proliferation, we postulate that soluble mediators released during the infe...

  17. Effector T cell differentiation: are master regulators of effector T cells still the masters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Collins, Mary; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2015-12-01

    Effector CD4 T cell lineages have been implicated as potent inducers of autoimmune diseases. Tbet, Gata3 and Rorgt are master transcriptional regulators of Th1, Th2 and Th17 lineages respectively and promote the distinct expression of signature cytokines. Significant progress has been made in understanding the transcriptional network that drives CD4 T cell differentiation, revealing novel points of regulation mediated by transcription factors, cell surface receptors, cytokines and chemokines. Epigenetic modifications and metabolic mediators define the transcriptional landscape in which master transcription factors operate and collaborate with a network of transcriptional modifiers to guide lineage specification, plasticity and function.

  18. Clinical experience in T cell deficient patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Theresa S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell disorders have been poorly understood until recently. Lack of knowledge of underlying molecular mechanisms together with incomplete data on long term outcome have made it difficult to assess prognosis and give the most effective treatment. Rapid progress in defining molecular defects, improved supportive care and much improved results from hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT now mean that curative treatment is possible for many patients. However, this depends on prompt recognition, accurate diagnosis and careful treatment planning. This review will discuss recent progress in our clinical and molecular understanding of a variety of disorders including: severe combined immunodeficiency, specific T cell immunodeficiencies, signaling defects, DNA repair defects, immune-osseous dysplasias, thymic disorders and abnormalities of apoptosis. There is still much to discover in this area and some conditions which are as yet very poorly understood. However, with increased knowledge about how these disorders can present and the particular problems each group may face it is hoped that these patients can be recognized early and managed appropriately, so providing them with the best possible outcome.

  19. A response calculus for immobilized T cell receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Menné, C; Mariuzza, R A

    2001-01-01

    To address the molecular mechanism of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, we have formulated a model for T cell activation, termed the 2D-affinity model, in which the density of TCR on the T cell surface, the density of ligand on the presenting surface, and their corresponding two-dimensional affini...

  20. Novel understanding of self-reactive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2016-01-01

    In a recent issue of Immunity, Mark Davis and colleagues describe that thymic selection does not eliminate but prunes self-reactive T cell clones. Self-reactive T cells are a natural part of the T-cell repertoire and may be important in the fight against pathogens in addition to being important...

  1. Characterization of T cell epitopes in bovine α-lactalbumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbroek, Laura A P M; den Hartog Jager, Constance F; Lebens, Ans F M; Knulst, André C; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A F M; Garssen, Johan; Knippels, Léon M J; van Hoffen, Els

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have indicated that peptides containing T cell epitopes may be used for immunotherapy. While for several cow's milk allergens the T cell epitopes have been described, the T cell epitopes in the major allergen α-lactalbumin (α-LAC) are unknown. Therefore, the aim of this st

  2. Engineering T cell immunity by TCR gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linnemann, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    T cell responses against tumor-antigens are frequently observed for some human malignancies, in particular melanoma. However, the spontaneous development of T cell responses of a sufficient strength to eradicate human malignancies is rare. The transfer of T cell receptor (TCR) αβ genes into autologo

  3. Adoptive immunotherapy via CD4+ versus CD8+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Phan-Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of cancer immunotherapy is to induce specific and durable antitumor immunity. Adoptive T cell therapy (ACT has garnered wide interest, particularly in regard to strategies to improve T cell efficacy in trials. There are many types of T cells (and subsets which can be selected for use in ACT. CD4+ T cells are critical for the regulation, activation and aid of host defense mechanisms and, importantly, for enhancing the function of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. To date, much research in cancer immunotherapy has focused on CD8+ T cells, in melanoma and other cancers. Both CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells have been evaluated as ACT in mice and humans, and both are effective at eliciting antitumor responses. IL-17 producing CD4+ T cells are a new subset of CD4+ T cells to be evaluated in ACT models. This review discusses the benefits of adoptive immunotherapy mediated by CD8+ and CD4+ cells. It also discusses the various type of T cells, source of T cells, and ex vivo cytokine growth factors for augmenting clinical efficacy of ACT. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(4.000: 588-595

  4. Dissection of T-cell antigen specificity in human melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Albæk Thrue, Charlotte; Junker, Niels

    2012-01-01

    -associated antigens and applying a novel technology for high-throughput analysis of T-cell responses, we dissected the composition of melanoma-restricted T-cell responses in 63 TIL cultures. T-cell reactivity screens against 175 melanoma-associated epitopes detected 90 responses against 18 different epitopes...

  5. Elutriated lymphocytes for manufacturing chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroncek, David F; Lee, Daniel W; Ren, Jiaqiang; Sabatino, Marianna; Highfill, Steven; Khuu, Hanh; Shah, Nirali N; Kaplan, Rosandra N; Fry, Terry J; Mackall, Crystal L

    2017-03-16

    Clinical trials of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells manufactured from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) concentrates for the treatment of hematologic malignancies have been promising, but CAR T cell yields have been variable. This variability is due in part to the contamination of the PBMC concentrates with monocytes and granulocytes. Counter-flow elutriation allows for the closed system separation of lymphocytes from monocytes and granulocytes. We investigated the use of PBMC concentrates enriched for lymphocytes using elutriation for manufacturing 8 CD19- and 5 GD2-CAR T cell products. When compared to PBMC concentrates, lymphocyte-enriched elutriation fractions contained greater proportions of CD3+ and CD56+ cells and reduced proportions of CD14+ and CD15+ cells. All 13 CAR T cell products manufactured using the elutriated lymphocytes yielded sufficient quantities of transduced CAR T cells to meet clinical dose criteria. The GD2-CAR T cell products contained significantly more T cells and transduced T cells than the CD19-CAR T cell products. A comparison of the yields of CAR T cells produced from elutriated lymphocytes with the yields of CAR T cells previous produced from cells isolated from PBMC concentrates by anti-CD3/CD28 bead selection or by anti-CD3/CD28 bead selection plus plastic adherence found that greater quantities of GD2-CAR T cells were produced from elutriated lymphocytes, but not CD19-CAR T cells. Enrichment of PBMC concentrates for lymphocytes using elutriation increased the quantity of GD2-CAR T cells produced. These results provide further evidence that CAR T cell expansion is inhibited by monocytes and granulocytes.

  6. Multiple vaccinations with UV- attenuated cercariae in pig enhance protective immunity against Schistosoma japonicum infection as compared to single vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dandan; Tian, Fang; Wu, Haiwei; Gao, Yanan; Wu, Jingjiao; Zhang, Donghui; Ji, Minjun; McManus, Donald P; Driguez, Patrick; Wu, Guanling

    2011-06-10

    Schistosomiasis japonica is a major public health problem in the endemic areas of China, the Philippines, and Indonesia. To date, a vaccine has not been developed against this disease but immunization with UV-attenuated cercariae can induce a high level of protective immunity in Landrace/Yorkshire/Duroc crossbred pigs. To compare the efficacy of a single vaccination and multiple vaccinations with UV-attenuated Schistosoma japonicum cercariae, two groups of pigs received either one or three exposures to 10,000 cercariae attenuated with 400 μw UV. Pigs with a single immunization had a 59.33% reduction in adult worm burden, a 89.87% reduction in hepatic eggs and a 86.27% reduction in fecal eggs at eight weeks post-challenge (P vaccinated groups were higher than in the infection-control group. Triple vaccinations resulted in higher levels of antibodies, especially IgG2, compared with a single vaccination and IFN-γ levels increased with repeated immunization with UV-irradiated cercariae. The high levels of protection against S. japonicum infection can be achieved with a UV-attenuated vaccine in pigs, and that three vaccinations were possibly more effective than a single vaccination. Moreover, triple vaccinations evoked a more vigorous IFN-γ response and a stronger antibody-mediated response, especially an increase in the levels of IgG2 antibodies.

  7. Clinical significance of T-cell clonality in mycosis fungoides and other cutaneous T-cell lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muche, Joachim Marcus

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to obtain more insight into T-cell clonality in blood of mycosis fungoides (MF) patients. Investigation of the frequency of blood T-cell clonality clearly indicated early dissemination of neoplastic T-cells into skin and blood as a sign of physiological recirculation.

  8. Clinical significance of T-cell clonality in mycosis fungoides and other cutaneous T-cell lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muche, Joachim Marcus

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to obtain more insight into T-cell clonality in blood of mycosis fungoides (MF) patients. Investigation of the frequency of blood T-cell clonality clearly indicated early dissemination of neoplastic T-cells into skin and blood as a sign of physiological recirculation.

  9. Nonmalignant T cells stimulate growth of T-cell lymphoma cells in the presence of bacterial toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, Anders; Lovato, Paola; Eriksen, Karsten W;

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial toxins including staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). Here, we investigate SE-mediated interactions between nonmalignant T cells and malignant T-cell lines established from skin and blood of CTCL patients...

  10. Adoptive T cell therapy: Addressing challenges in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Cassian

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adoptive T cell therapy involves the ex vivo selection and expansion of effector cells for the treatment of patients with cancer. In this review, the advantages and limitations of using antigen-specific T cells are discussed in counterpoint to vaccine strategies. Although vaccination strategies represent more readily available reagents, adoptive T cell therapy provides highly selected T cells of defined phenotype, specificity and function that may influence their biological behavior in vivo. Adoptive T cell therapy offers not only translational opportunities but also a means to address fundamental issues in the evolving field of cancer immunotherapy.

  11. CD8+ T cells in inflammatory demyelinating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Hanne A; Millward, Jason M; Owens, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    We review the contribution made by CD8+ T cells to inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and discuss their role in the animal model Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that the inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-17...... are differentially regulated in CNS-infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in EAE, and that CD8+ T cells regulate disease. In MS, CD8+ T cells appear to play a role in promotion of disease, so cytokine regulation is likely different in CD8+ T cells in MS and EAE...

  12. Vaccination against Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis with T Cell Receptor Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Mark D.; Winters, Steven T.; Olee, Tsaiwei; Powell, Henry C.; Carlo, Dennis J.; Brostoff, Steven W.

    1989-11-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system mediated by CD4+ T cells reactive with myelin basic protein (MBP). Rats were rendered resistant to the induction of EAE by vaccination with synthetic peptides corresponding to idiotypic determinants of the β chain VDJ region and Jα regions of the T cell receptor (TCR) that are conserved among encephalitogenic T cells. These findings demonstrate the utility of TCR peptide vaccination for modulating the activity of autoreactive T cells and represent a general therapeutic approach for T cell--mediated pathogenesis.

  13. Shaping the T-cell repertoire in the periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Stacey; Turner, Stephen J; Bourges, Dorothée; Gleeson, Paul A; van Driel, Ian R

    2011-01-01

    Selection of T cells does not end with events in the thymus, but continues in extrathymic tissues and for the life of the organism. In this review, we examine how self-reactive T cells are rendered harmless and the processes that select for T cells that are most efficient at combating pathogens. The implications of peripheral T-cell selection for the immune response as animals age are discussed as is the critical role of dendritic cells in directing T-cell differentiation.

  14. Exploiting cytokines in adoptive T-cell therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrozziello, Elisabetta; Sturmheit, Tabea; Mondino, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with tumor-reactive autologous T cells, either expanded from tumor specimens or genetically engineered to express tumor-reactive T-cell receptors and chimeric antigen receptors, is holding promising results in clinical trials. Several critical issues have been identified and results underline the possibility to exploit cytokines to further ameliorate the efficacy of current treatment protocols, also encompassing adoptive T-cell therapy. Here we review latest developments on the use of cytokines to better direct the nature of the T-cell infusion product, T-cell function and persistence in vivo, as well as to modulate the tumor microenvironment.

  15. Green tea EGCG, T cells, and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the proposed health benefits of consuming green tea is its protective effect on autoimmune diseases. Research on the immunopathogenesis of autoimmune diseases has made significant progression in the past few years and several key concepts have been revised. T cells, particularly CD4+ T helper...

  16. Primary intestinal T cell lymphomas in Indian patients - In search of enteropathic T cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shet Tanuja

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This series of six intestinal T cell lymphomas (ITCL attempts to document enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATCL in India. Materials and Methods: A total of six ITCL were selected from 170 gastrointestinal lymphomas in last 10 years. Results: The cases studied included EATCL (4, ITCL with a CD4 positive phenotype (1 and ITCL NK/T cell type (1. Of the four EATCL, two occurred in the ileum, one in right colon and one in duodenum. In three EATCL cases, there was history of celiac disease or lactose intolerance and enteropathic changes were noted in the adjacent mucosa. These tumors had CD3+/CD8+/CD56 (+/-/CD4-/ Granzyme B+ immunophenotype. One EATCL was monomorphic small cell type (type II EATCL with a CD3+/CD8-CD56+/CD4-/ Granzyme B+ phenotype. EBER- ISH (Epstein Barr virus coded RNA′s- in situ hybridization revealed positive tumor cells in ITCL NK/T cell type and in bystander cells in three EATCL. Conclusion: ITCL are rare in Indian patients but do occur and comprise a mixture of the enteropathic and non-enteropathic subtypes.

  17. Optimal T cell cross-reactivity and the role of regulatory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeki, Koichi; Doekes, Hilje M.; De Boer, Rob J.

    2015-01-01

    The T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system constitute a highly diverse repertoire of clones expressing a unique T cell receptor (TCR). It has been argued that TCRs are cross-reactive, meaning that one receptor can recognize a multitude of epitopes. Cross-reactivity between self and foreign

  18. Optimal T cell cross-reactivity and the role of regulatory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeki, Koichi; Doekes, Hilje M; De Boer, Rob J; Sub Theoretical Biology; Sub Theoretical Biology & Bioinformatics; Theoretical Biology and Bioinformatics

    2014-01-01

    The T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system constitute a highly diverse repertoire of clones expressing a unique T cell receptor (TCR). It has been argued that TCRs are cross-reactive, meaning that one receptor can recognize a multitude of epitopes. Cross-reactivity between self and foreign

  19. Role of T cells in malnutrition and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie A Gerriets

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional status is critically important for immune cell function. While obesity is characterized by inflammation that promotes metabolic syndrome including cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance, malnutrition can result in immune cell defects and increased risk of mortality from infectious diseases. T cells play an important role in the immune adaptation to both obesity and malnutrition. T cells in obesity have been shown to have an early and critical role in inducing inflammation, accompanying the accumulation of inflammatory macrophages in obese adipose tissue, which are known to promote insulin resistance. How T cells are recruited to adipose tissue and activated in obesity is a topic of considerable interest. Conversely, T cell number is decreased in malnourished individuals, and T cells in the setting of malnutrition have decreased effector function and proliferative capacity. The adipokine leptin, which is secreted in proportion to adipocyte mass, may have a key role in mediating adipocyte-T cell interactions in both obesity and malnutrition, and has been shown to promote effector T cell function and metabolism while inhibiting regulatory T cell proliferation. Additionally, key molecular signals are involved in T cell metabolic adaptation during nutrient stress; among them, the metabolic regulator AMP kinase (AMPK and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR have critical roles in regulating T cell number, function, and metabolism. In summary, understanding how T cell number and function are altered in obesity and malnutrition will lead to better understanding of and treatment for diseases where nutritional status determines clinical outcome.

  20. CD39 Expression Identifies Terminally Exhausted CD8+ T Cells.

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    Prakash K Gupta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Exhausted T cells express multiple co-inhibitory molecules that impair their function and limit immunity to chronic viral infection. Defining novel markers of exhaustion is important both for identifying and potentially reversing T cell exhaustion. Herein, we show that the ectonucleotidse CD39 is a marker of exhausted CD8+ T cells. CD8+ T cells specific for HCV or HIV express high levels of CD39, but those specific for EBV and CMV do not. CD39 expressed by CD8+ T cells in chronic infection is enzymatically active, co-expressed with PD-1, marks cells with a transcriptional signature of T cell exhaustion and correlates with viral load in HIV and HCV. In the mouse model of chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus infection, virus-specific CD8+ T cells contain a population of CD39high CD8+ T cells that is absent in functional memory cells elicited by acute infection. This CD39high CD8+ T cell population is enriched for cells with the phenotypic and functional profile of terminal exhaustion. These findings provide a new marker of T cell exhaustion, and implicate the purinergic pathway in the regulation of T cell exhaustion.

  1. T cell avidity and tumor recognition: implications and therapeutic strategies

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    Roszkowski Jeffrey J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the last two decades, great advances have been made studying the immune response to human tumors. The identification of protein antigens from cancer cells and better techniques for eliciting antigen specific T cell responses in vitro and in vivo have led to improved understanding of tumor recognition by T cells. Yet, much remains to be learned about the intricate details of T cell – tumor cell interactions. Though the strength of interaction between T cell and target is thought to be a key factor influencing the T cell response, investigations of T cell avidity, T cell receptor (TCR affinity for peptide-MHC complex, and the recognition of peptide on antigen presenting targets or tumor cells reveal complex relationships. Coincident with these investigations, therapeutic strategies have been developed to enhance tumor recognition using antigens with altered peptide structures and T cells modified by the introduction of new antigen binding receptor molecules. The profound effects of these strategies on T cell – tumor interactions and the clinical implications of these effects are of interest to both scientists and clinicians. In recent years, the focus of much of our work has been the avidity and effector characteristics of tumor reactive T cells. Here we review concepts and current results in the field, and the implications of therapeutic strategies using altered antigens and altered effector T cells.

  2. Melatonin signaling in T cells: Functions and applications.

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    Ren, Wenkai; Liu, Gang; Chen, Shuai; Yin, Jie; Wang, Jing; Tan, Bie; Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W; Peng, Yuanyi; Li, Tiejun; Reiter, Russel J; Yin, Yulong

    2017-04-01

    Melatonin affects a variety of physiological processes including circadian rhythms, cellular redox status, and immune function. Importantly, melatonin significantly influences T-cell-mediated immune responses, which are crucial to protect mammals against cancers and infections, but are associated with pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. This review focuses on our current understanding of the significance of melatonin in T-cell biology and the beneficial effects of melatonin in T-cell response-based diseases. In addition to expressing both membrane and nuclear receptors for melatonin, T cells have the four enzymes required for the synthesis of melatonin and produce high levels of melatonin. Meanwhile, melatonin is highly effective in modulating T-cell activation and differentiation, especially for Th17 and Treg cells, and also memory T cells. Mechanistically, the influence of melatonin in T-cell biology is associated with membrane and nuclear receptors as well as receptor-independent pathways, for example, via calcineurin. Several cell signaling pathways, including ERK1/2-C/EBPα, are involved in the regulatory roles of melatonin in T-cell biology. Through modulation in T-cell responses, melatonin exerts beneficial effects in various inflammatory diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis. These findings highlight the importance of melatonin signaling in T-cell fate determination, and T cell-based immune pathologies.

  3. PTPN2 attenuates T-cell lymphopenia-induced proliferation

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    Wiede, Florian; La Gruta, Nicole L.; Tiganis, Tony

    2014-01-01

    When the peripheral T-cell pool is depleted, T cells undergo homoeostatic expansion. This expansion is reliant on the recognition of self-antigens and/or cytokines, in particular interleukin-7. The T cell-intrinsic mechanisms that prevent excessive homoeostatic T-cell responses and consequent overt autoreactivity remain poorly defined. Here we show that protein tyrosine phosphatase N2 (PTPN2) is elevated in naive T cells leaving the thymus to restrict homoeostatic T-cell proliferation and prevent excess responses to self-antigens in the periphery. PTPN2-deficient CD8+ T cells undergo rapid lymphopenia-induced proliferation (LIP) when transferred into lymphopenic hosts and acquire the characteristics of antigen-experienced effector T cells. The enhanced LIP is attributed to elevated T-cell receptor-dependent, but not interleukin-7-dependent responses, results in a skewed T-cell receptor repertoire and the development of autoimmunity. Our results identify a major mechanism by which homoeostatic T-cell responses are tuned to prevent the development of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  4. Toxicities of chimeric antigen receptor T cells: recognition and management.

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    Brudno, Jennifer N; Kochenderfer, James N

    2016-06-30

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells can produce durable remissions in hematologic malignancies that are not responsive to standard therapies. Yet the use of CAR T cells is limited by potentially severe toxicities. Early case reports of unexpected organ damage and deaths following CAR T-cell therapy first highlighted the possible dangers of this new treatment. CAR T cells can potentially damage normal tissues by specifically targeting a tumor-associated antigen that is also expressed on those tissues. Cytokine release syndrome (CRS), a systemic inflammatory response caused by cytokines released by infused CAR T cells can lead to widespread reversible organ dysfunction. CRS is the most common type of toxicity caused by CAR T cells. Neurologic toxicity due to CAR T cells might in some cases have a different pathophysiology than CRS and requires different management. Aggressive supportive care is necessary for all patients experiencing CAR T-cell toxicities, with early intervention for hypotension and treatment of concurrent infections being essential. Interleukin-6 receptor blockade with tocilizumab remains the mainstay pharmacologic therapy for CRS, though indications for administration vary among centers. Corticosteroids should be reserved for neurologic toxicities and CRS not responsive to tocilizumab. Pharmacologic management is complicated by the risk of immunosuppressive therapy abrogating the antimalignancy activity of the CAR T cells. This review describes the toxicities caused by CAR T cells and reviews the published approaches used to manage toxicities. We present guidelines for treating patients experiencing CRS and other adverse events following CAR T-cell therapy.

  5. Gene therapy of primary T cell immunodeficiencies.

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    Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2013-08-10

    Gene therapy of severe combined immunodeficiencies has been proven to be effective to provide sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiencies. This has been achieved for 2 forms of SCID, i.e SCID-X1 (γc deficiency) and adenosine deaminase deficiency. Occurrence of gene toxicity generated by integration of first generation retroviral vectors, as observed in the SCID-X1 trials has led to replace these vectors by self inactivated (SIN) retro(or lenti) viruses that may provide equivalent efficacy with a better safety profile. Results of ongoing clinical studies in SCID as well as in other primary immunodeficiencies, such as the Wiskott Aldrich syndrome, will be thus very informative.

  6. To investigate the necessity of STRA6 upregulation in T cells during T cell immune responses.

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    Rafik Terra

    Full Text Available Our earlier study revealed that STRA6 (stimulated by retinoic acid gene 6 was up-regulated within 3 h of TCR stimulation. STRA6 is the high-affinity receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. We generated STRA6 knockout (KO mice to assess whether such up-regulation was critical for T-cell activation, differentiation and function. STRA6 KO mice under vitamin A sufficient conditions were fertile without apparent anomalies upon visual inspection. The size, cellularity and lymphocyte subpopulations of STRA6 KO thymus and spleen were comparable to those of their wild type (WT controls. KO and WT T cells were similar in terms of TCR-stimulated proliferation in vitro and homeostatic expansion in vivo. Naive KO CD4 cells differentiated in vitro into Th1, Th2, Th17 as well as regulatory T cells in an analogous manner as their WT counterparts. In vivo experiments revealed that anti-viral immune responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in KO mice were comparable to those of WT controls. We also demonstrated that STRA6 KO and WT mice had similar glucose tolerance. Total vitamin A levels are dramatically lower in the eyes of KO mice as compared to those of WT mice, but the levels in other organs were not significantly affected after STRA6 deletion under vitamin A sufficient conditions, indicating that the eye is the mouse organ most sensitive to the loss of STRA6. Our results demonstrate that 1 in vitamin A sufficiency, the deletion of STRA6 in T cells does no affect the T-cell immune responses so-far tested, including those depend on STAT5 signaling; 2 STRA6-independent vitamin A uptake compensated the lack of STRA6 in lymphoid organs under vitamin A sufficient conditions in mice; 3 STRA6 is critical for vitamin A uptake in the eyes even in vitamin A sufficiency.

  7. CAR T cell immunotherapy in hematology and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossig, Claudia

    2017-09-18

    Chimeric T cell receptors (CARs) combine extracellular antigen recognition domains and T cell activation components in single molecules. CAR gene transfer thereby allows to generate T cells with engineered specificities. The translational development of CAR-based T cell therapies is most advanced in B cell cancers where CAR-engineered T cells against the B lineage antigen CD19 have generated impressive results in early clinical trials. CARs are now also explored as tools to eliminate autoreactive B cell clones and to engineer T cells with immunosuppressive function for preventing pathological auto- or alloresponses. With ongoing intensive preclinical investigation and the advent of simplified manufacturing techniques, CAR T cells are expected to enter clinical investigation in a broader variety of hematological and solid cancers and in autoimmune diseases in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cellular factors targeting APCs to modulate adaptive T cell immunity.

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    Visperas, Anabelle; Do, Jeongsu; Min, Booki

    2014-01-01

    The fate of adaptive T cell immunity is determined by multiple cellular and molecular factors, among which the cytokine milieu plays the most important role in this process. Depending on the cytokines present during the initial T cell activation, T cells become effector cells that produce different effector molecules and execute adaptive immune functions. Studies thus far have primarily focused on defining how these factors control T cell differentiation by targeting T cells themselves. However, other non-T cells, particularly APCs, also express receptors for the factors and are capable of responding to them. In this review, we will discuss how APCs, by responding to those cytokines, influence T cell differentiation and adaptive immunity.

  9. Cellular Factors Targeting APCs to Modulate Adaptive T Cell Immunity

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    Anabelle Visperas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fate of adaptive T cell immunity is determined by multiple cellular and molecular factors, among which the cytokine milieu plays the most important role in this process. Depending on the cytokines present during the initial T cell activation, T cells become effector cells that produce different effector molecules and execute adaptive immune functions. Studies thus far have primarily focused on defining how these factors control T cell differentiation by targeting T cells themselves. However, other non-T cells, particularly APCs, also express receptors for the factors and are capable of responding to them. In this review, we will discuss how APCs, by responding to those cytokines, influence T cell differentiation and adaptive immunity.

  10. Effector and suppressor T cells in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Giuseppe

    2015-06-28

    Celiac disease (CD) is a T-cell mediated immune disease in which gliadin-derived peptides activate lamina propria effector CD4+ T cells. This activation leads to the release of cytokines, compatible with a Th1-like pattern, which play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of CD, controlling many aspects of the inflammatory immune response. Recent studies have shown that a novel subset of effector T cells, characterized by expression of high levels of IL-17A, termed Th17 cells, plays a pathogenic role in CD. While these effector T cell subsets produce proinflammatory cytokines, which cause substantial tissue injury in vivo in CD, recent studies have suggested the existence of additional CD4(+) T cell subsets with suppressor functions. These subsets include type 1 regulatory T cells and CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells, expressing the master transcription factor Foxp3, which have important implications for disease progression.

  11. Regulatory T cells in radiotherapeutic responses

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    Dörthe eSchaue

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RT can extend its influence in cancer therapy beyond what can be attributed to in-field cytotoxicity by modulating the immune system. While complex, these systemic effects can help tip the therapeutic balance in favor of treatment success or failure. Engagement of the immune system is generally through recognition of damage-associated molecules expressed or released as a result of tumor and normal tissue radiation damage. This system has evolved to discriminate pathological from physiological forms of cell death by signaling danger. The multiple mechanisms that can be evoked include a shift towards a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant microenvironment that can promote maturation of dendritic cells and, in cancer treatment, the development of effector T cell responses to tumor-associated antigens. Control over these processes is exerted by regulatory T cells (Tregs, suppressor macrophages and immunosuppressive cytokines that act in consort to maintain tolerance to self, limit tissue damage, and re-establish tissue homeostasis. Unfortunately, by the time RT for cancer is initiated the tumor-host relationship has already been sculpted in favor of tumor growth and against immune-mediated mechanisms for tumor regression. Reversing this situation is a major challenge. However, recent data show that removal of Tregs can tip the balance in favor of the generation of radiation-induced anti-tumor immunity. The clinical challenge is to do so without excessive depletion that might precipitate serious autoimmune reactions and increase the likelihood of normal tissue complications. The selective modulation of Treg biology to maintain immune tolerance and control of normal tissue damage, while releasing the brakes on anti-tumor immune responses, is a worthy aim with promise for enhancing the therapeutic benefit of RT for cancer.

  12. Enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma

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    Bakrač Milena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATCL is a high grade, pleomorphic peripheral T-cell lymphoma with usually cytotoxic phenotype. This is a case report of three patients with EATCL. The first patient was 50 year-old woman with four year history of gluten sensitive enteropathy (GSE. Diagnosis of lymphoma was confirmed after the resection of the jejunum (small intestine obstruction. Pathohistological (PAS, Reticulin, Giemsa and immunohistochemical (anti-LCA, anti-CD20, anti- CD45RO, anti-CD3 methods revealed the diagnosis of EATCL: CD45RO+, CD3+. After the third cycle of chemotherapy, the disease progressed with massive lung infiltration. Patient died due to complications of bone marrow aplasia. The second patient was 23 year-old woman with long earlier history of GSE. She presented with the acute renal failure. According to established diagnosis of tubulointerstitial nephritis, she was treated with pulse doses of steroid therapy. After temporary improvement, she had dissemination of the disease. On MRI, small intestinal wall was thickened, and abdominal lymph nodes were enlarged with extraluminal compression of common bile duct. Laparotomy with mesenterial lymph node biopsy and consecutive pathohistological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed the diagnosis of EATCL. The patient received chemotherapy, but she died with signs of pulmonary embolization. The third patient was 53 year-old woman without previous history of GSE. Diagnosis of EATCL was revealed after the resection of jejunum because of small intestinal obstruction. She received two cycles of chemotherapy, but she died with signs of disease progression. IgA antiendomysial antibodies were detected in the serum of all patients. The overall survival of patients was 7 months. The possibility of lymphoma rising in patients with clinical progression of GSE despite gluten free diet must be kept in mind.

  13. Effector Vγ9Vδ2 T cells dominate the human fetal γδ T-cell repertoire.

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    Dimova, Tanya; Brouwer, Margreet; Gosselin, Françoise; Tassignon, Joël; Leo, Oberdan; Donner, Catherine; Marchant, Arnaud; Vermijlen, David

    2015-02-10

    γδ T cells are unconventional T cells recognizing antigens via their γδ T-cell receptor (TCR) in a way that is fundamentally different from conventional αβ T cells. γδ T cells usually are divided into subsets according the type of Vγ and/or Vδ chain they express in their TCR. T cells expressing the TCR containing the γ-chain variable region 9 and the δ-chain variable region 2 (Vγ9Vδ2 T cells) are the predominant γδ T-cell subset in human adult peripheral blood. The current thought is that this predominance is the result of the postnatal expansion of cells expressing particular complementary-determining region 3 (CDR3) in response to encounters with microbes, especially those generating phosphoantigens derived from the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway of isoprenoid synthesis. However, here we show that, rather than requiring postnatal microbial exposure, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are the predominant blood subset in the second-trimester fetus, whereas Vδ1(+) and Vδ3(+) γδ T cells are present only at low frequencies at this gestational time. Fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are phosphoantigen responsive and display very limited diversity in the CDR3 of the Vγ9 chain gene, where a germline-encoded sequence accounts for >50% of all sequences, in association with a prototypic CDR3δ2. Furthermore, these fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are functionally preprogrammed (e.g., IFN-γ and granzymes-A/K), with properties of rapidly activatable innatelike T cells. Thus, enrichment for phosphoantigen-responsive effector T cells has occurred within the fetus before postnatal microbial exposure. These various characteristics have been linked in the mouse to the action of selecting elements and would establish a much stronger parallel between human and murine γδ T cells than is usually articulated.

  14. Retroviral transduction of peptide stimulated t cells can generate dual t cell receptor-expressing (bifunctional t cells reactive with two defined antigens

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    Callender Glenda G

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumors and viruses have developed many mechanisms to evade the immune system, including down-regulation of target antigens and MHC molecules. These immune escape mechanisms may be able to be circumvented by adoptively transferring T cells engineered to express two different T cell receptors, each specific for a different antigen or MHC restriction molecule. Methods PBMC from the blood of normal healthy donors were stimulated for three days with an antigenic peptide from cytomegalovirus (CMV pp65. These CMV reactive cultures were transduced with a encoding the TIL 5 T cell receptor (TCR that mediates recognition of the dominant epitope of the melanoma antigen MART-1. Following selection for transduced cells, the cultures were evaluated for recognition of CMV pp65 and MART-1 expressing targets. Results We were able to rapidly create bifunctional T cells capable of recognizing both CMV pp65 and MART-1 using a combination of HLA-A2 tetramer staining and intracellular staining for interferon-γ. These bifunctional T cells were sensitive to very low levels of antigen, recognize MART-1+ tumor cells, and maintained their bifunctionality for over 40 days in culture. Conclusion Bifunctional T cells can be engineered by transducing short term peptide stimulated T cell cultures. These bifunctional T cells may be more effective in treating patients with cancer or chronic virus infections because they would reduce the possibility of disease progression due to antigen and/or MHC loss variants.

  15. CD8+ T cells specific for the islet autoantigen IGRP are restricted in their T cell receptor chain usage

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    Fuchs, Yannick F.; Eugster, Anne; Dietz, Sevina; Sebelefsky, Christian; Kühn, Denise; Wilhelm, Carmen; Lindner, Annett; Gavrisan, Anita; Knoop, Jan; Dahl, Andreas; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2017-01-01

    CD8+ T cells directed against beta cell autoantigens are considered relevant for the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Using single cell T cell receptor sequencing of CD8+ T cells specific for the IGRP265-273 epitope, we examined whether there was expansion of clonotypes and sharing of T cell receptor chains in autoreactive CD8+ T cell repertoires. HLA-A*0201 positive type 1 diabetes patients (n = 19) and controls (n = 18) were analysed. TCR α- and β-chain sequences of 418 patient-derived IGRP265-273-multimer+ CD8+ T cells representing 48 clonotypes were obtained. Expanded populations of IGRP265-273-specific CD8+ T cells with dominant clonotypes that had TCR α-chains shared across patients were observed. The SGGSNYKLTF motif corresponding to TRAJ53 was contained in 384 (91.9%) cells, and in 20 (41.7%) patient-derived clonotypes. TRAJ53 together with TRAV29/DV5 was found in 15 (31.3%) clonotypes. Using next generation TCR α-chain sequencing, we found enrichment of one of these TCR α-chains in the memory CD8+ T cells of patients as compared to healthy controls. CD8+ T cell clones bearing the enriched motifs mediated antigen-specific target cell lysis. We provide the first evidence for restriction of T cell receptor motifs in the alpha chain of human CD8+ T cells with specificity to a beta cell antigen. PMID:28300170

  16. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

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    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs.

  17. Human antigen-specific regulatory T cells generated by T cell receptor gene transfer.

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    Todd M Brusko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapies directed at augmenting regulatory T cell (Treg activities in vivo as a systemic treatment for autoimmune disorders and transplantation may be associated with significant off-target effects, including a generalized immunosuppression that may compromise beneficial immune responses to infections and cancer cells. Adoptive cellular therapies using purified expanded Tregs represents an attractive alternative to systemic treatments, with results from animal studies noting increased therapeutic potency of antigen-specific Tregs over polyclonal populations. However, current methodologies are limited in terms of the capacity to isolate and expand a sufficient quantity of endogenous antigen-specific Tregs for therapeutic intervention. Moreover, FOXP3+ Tregs fall largely within the CD4+ T cell subset and are thus routinely MHC class II-specific, whereas class I-specific Tregs may function optimally in vivo by facilitating direct tissue recognition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel means for generating large numbers of antigen-specific Tregs involving lentiviral T cell receptor (TCR gene transfer into in vitro expanded polyclonal natural Treg populations. Tregs redirected with a high-avidity class I-specific TCR were capable of recognizing the melanoma antigen tyrosinase in the context of HLA-A*0201 and could be further enriched during the expansion process by antigen-specific reactivation with peptide loaded artificial antigen presenting cells. These in vitro expanded Tregs continued to express FOXP3 and functional TCRs, and maintained the capacity to suppress conventional T cell responses directed against tyrosinase, as well as bystander T cell responses. Using this methodology in a model tumor system, murine Tregs designed to express the tyrosinase TCR effectively blocked antigen-specific effector T cell (Teff activity as determined by tumor cell growth and luciferase reporter

  18. CD31 is required on CD4+ T cells to promote T cell survival during Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ewan A; Coughlan, Ruth E; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Bobat, Saeeda; Marshall, Jennifer L; Hussain, Khiyam; Charlesworth, James; Abhyankar, Nikita; Hitchcock, Jessica; Gil, Cristina; López-Macías, Constantino; Henderson, Ian R; Khan, Mahmood; Watson, Steve P; MacLennan, Ian C M; Buckley, Christopher D; Cunningham, Adam F

    2011-08-15

    Hematopoietic cells constitutively express CD31/PECAM1, a signaling adhesion receptor associated with controlling responses to inflammatory stimuli. Although expressed on CD4(+) T cells, its function on these cells is unclear. To address this, we have used a model of systemic Salmonella infection that induces high levels of T cell activation and depends on CD4(+) T cells for resolution. Infection of CD31-deficient (CD31KO) mice demonstrates that these mice fail to control infection effectively. During infection, CD31KO mice have diminished numbers of total CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ-secreting Th1 cells. This is despite a higher proportion of CD31KO CD4(+) T cells exhibiting an activated phenotype and an undiminished capacity to prime normally and polarize to Th1. Reduced numbers of T cells reflected the increased propensity of naive and activated CD31KO T cells to undergo apoptosis postinfection compared with wild-type T cells. Using adoptive transfer experiments, we show that loss of CD31 on CD4(+) T cells alone is sufficient to account for the defective CD31KO T cell accumulation. These data are consistent with CD31 helping to control T cell activation, because in its absence, T cells have a greater propensity to become activated, resulting in increased susceptibility to become apoptotic. The impact of CD31 loss on T cell homeostasis becomes most pronounced during severe, inflammatory, and immunological stresses such as those caused by systemic Salmonella infection. This identifies a novel role for CD31 in regulating CD4 T cell homeostasis.

  19. T Cell Vaccination as an Immunotherapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingwu Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells (T cell vaccination) selected from individual's own T cell repertoire provides a unique in vivo setting for testing immune regulation that is known to involve interactions of a variety of related surface molecules (1). It induces regulatory immune responses that closely resemble the in vivo situation where the immune system is challenged by clonal activation and expansion of given T cell populations in various autoimmune diseases. T cell vaccination provides a powerful means of eliciting natural reactions of the immune system in response to clonal expansion of T cells, which can used as a therapeutic approach to suppress or eliminate specific pathogenic autoreactive T cells in autoimmune conditions. Clinical trials using T cell vaccination to deplete autoreactive T cells in human autoimmune conditions have begun to reveal the pathologic relevance of various autoimmune T cell populations in the disease processes, providing a unique opportunity to test the autoimmune theories in a clinical setting. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2004;1(5):321-327.

  20. Mogamulizumab for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Shinichi; Tobinai, Kensei

    2017-09-01

    T-cell lymphoma is a relatively rare hematologic malignancy that accounts for 10-20% of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Treatment strategies for T-cell lymphomas are different from that for B-cell lymphomas and have poor prognoses. Among various subtypes of T-cell lymphomas, adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) has the worst prognosis. To achieve further improvement in the treatment outcome of T-cell lymphomas, several novel agents such as brentuximab vedotin, lenalidomide, romidepsin, and pralatrexate are actively being studied. Mogamulizumab, an anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) monoclonal antibody, is one of the promising agents for CCR4-positive T-cell lymphomas, especially for ATL. Areas covered: First, basic information about the current treatment strategy of T-cell lymphomas including ATL is described. Then, the authors discuss the current clinical development of mogamulizumab and its clinical implications for T-cell lymphomas. Expert opinion: Mogamulizumab has potent clinical efficacy against CCR4-positive T-cell lymphomas, especially against ATL. Among various toxicities associated with mogamulizumab, skin eruptions are the most significant. Although there are several effective competitors, mogamulizumab has a unique mechanism and is expected to be a key agent for treating CCR4-positive T-cell lymphomas, especially ATL.

  1. Suppression of T cell-induced osteoclast formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karieb, Sahar; Fox, Simon W., E-mail: Simon.fox@plymouth.ac.uk

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Genistein and coumestrol prevent activated T cell induced osteoclast formation. •Anti-TNF neutralising antibodies prevent the pro-osteoclastic effect of activated T cells. •Phytoestrogens inhibit T cell derived TNF alpha and inflammatory cytokine production. •Phytoestrogens have a broader range of anti-osteoclastic actions than other anti-resorptives. -- Abstract: Inhibition of T cell derived cytokine production could help suppress osteoclast differentiation in inflammatory skeletal disorders. Bisphosphonates are typically prescribed to prevent inflammatory bone loss but are not tolerated by all patients and are associated with an increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. In light of this other anti-resorptives such as phytoestrogens are being considered. However the effect of phytoestrogens on T cell-induced osteoclast formation is unclear. The effect of genistein and coumestrol on activated T cell-induced osteoclastogenesis and cytokine production was therefore examined. Concentrations of genistein and coumestrol (10{sup −7} M) previously shown to directly inhibit osteoclast formation also suppressed the formation of TRAP positive osteoclast induced by con A activated T cells, which was dependent on inhibition of T cell derived TNF-α. While both reduced osteoclast formation their mechanism of action differed. The anti-osteoclastic effect of coumestrol was associated with a dual effect on con A induced T cell proliferation and activation; 10{sup −7} M coumestrol significantly reducing T cell number (0.36) and TNF-α (0.47), IL-1β (0.23) and IL-6 (0.35) expression, whereas genistein (10{sup −7} M) had no effect on T cell number but a more pronounced effect on T cell differentiation reducing expression of TNF-α (0.49), IL-1β (0.52), IL-6 (0.71) and RANKL (0.71). Phytoestrogens therefore prevent the pro-osteoclastic action of T cells suggesting they may have a role in the control of inflammatory bone loss.

  2. Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma – A Case Report of An Uncommon Extranodal T Cell Lymphoma

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    V, Geetha; Kudva, Ranjini

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma is a rare primary intestinal lymphoma. It is often, but not always associated with celiac disease. Intraepithelial T cells are postulated as the cell of origin. It is a rare disease accounting for fewer than 5% of all gastrointestinal tract lymphomas. Recent studies indicate that EATL consists of two diseases that are morphologically and genetically distinct and differ with respect to their frequency of association with celiac disease. Current WHO classification recognises two subtypes of EATL – type 1 (classic) and type 2, based on morphology and immunophenotype. EATL type 1 is a large cell lymphoma which is more common and is more commonly associated with celiac disease compared to type 2. Most common site of involvement is the small intestine. We report a case of EATL type 1, in a 62-year-old female patient who presented with features of intestinal obstruction. However, she did not have spruce like featutes. PMID:25478355

  3. Prevention of cytotoxic T cell escape using a heteroclitic subdominant viral T cell determinant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah S Butler

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available High affinity antigen-specific T cells play a critical role during protective immune responses. Epitope enhancement can elicit more potent T cell responses and can subsequently lead to a stronger memory pool; however, the molecular basis of such enhancement is unclear. We used the consensus peptide-binding motif for the Major Histocompatibility Complex molecule H-2K(b to design a heteroclitic version of the mouse hepatitis virus-specific subdominant S598 determinant. We demonstrate that a single amino acid substitution at a secondary anchor residue (Q to Y at position 3 increased the stability of the engineered determinant in complex with H-2K(b. The structural basis for this enhanced stability was associated with local alterations in the pMHC conformation as a result of the Q to Y substitution. Recombinant viruses encoding this engineered determinant primed CTL responses that also reacted to the wildtype epitope with significantly higher functional avidity, and protected against selection of virus mutated at a second CTL determinant and consequent disease progression in persistently infected mice. Collectively, our findings provide a basis for the enhanced immunogenicity of an engineered determinant that will serve as a template for guiding the development of heteroclitic T cell determinants with applications in prevention of CTL escape in chronic viral infections as well as in tumor immunity.

  4. Heterogeneous differentiation patterns of individual CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Carmen; Rohr, Jan C; Perié, Leïla; van Rooij, Nienke; van Heijst, Jeroen W J; Velds, Arno; Urbanus, Jos; Naik, Shalin H; Jacobs, Heinz; Beltman, Joost B; de Boer, Rob J; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2013-05-03

    Upon infection, antigen-specific CD8(+) T lymphocyte responses display a highly reproducible pattern of expansion and contraction that is thought to reflect a uniform behavior of individual cells. We tracked the progeny of individual mouse CD8(+) T cells by in vivo lineage tracing and demonstrated that, even for T cells bearing identical T cell receptors, both clonal expansion and differentiation patterns are heterogeneous. As a consequence, individual naïve T lymphocytes contributed differentially to short- and long-term protection, as revealed by participation of their progeny during primary versus recall infections. The discordance in fate of individual naïve T cells argues against asymmetric division as a singular driver of CD8(+) T cell heterogeneity and demonstrates that reproducibility of CD8(+) T cell responses is achieved through population averaging.

  5. Engineered T cells: the promise and challenges of cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesnak, Andrew D; June, Carl H; Levine, Bruce L

    2016-08-23

    The immune system evolved to distinguish non-self from self to protect the organism. As cancer is derived from our own cells, immune responses to dysregulated cell growth present a unique challenge. This is compounded by mechanisms of immune evasion and immunosuppression that develop in the tumour microenvironment. The modern genetic toolbox enables the adoptive transfer of engineered T cells to create enhanced anticancer immune functions where natural cancer-specific immune responses have failed. Genetically engineered T cells, so-called 'living drugs', represent a new paradigm in anticancer therapy. Recent clinical trials using T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or engineered T cell receptors (TCRs) have produced stunning results in patients with relapsed or refractory haematological malignancies. In this Review we describe some of the most recent and promising advances in engineered T cell therapy with a particular emphasis on what the next generation of T cell therapy is likely to entail.

  6. Mechanisms Underlying T Cell Immunosenescence: Aging and Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wenjuan; Rao, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the human immune system to protect against infectious disease declines with age and efficacy of vaccination reduces significantly in the elderly. Aging of the immune system, also termed as immunosenescence, involves many changes in human T cell immunity that is characterized by a loss in naïve T cell population and an increase in highly differentiated CD28- memory T cell subset. There is extensive data showing that latent persistent human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is also associated with age-related immune dysfunction in the T cells, which might enhance immunosenescence. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related and HCMV-related immunosenescence is critical for the development of effective age-targeted vaccines and immunotherapies. In this review, we will address the role of both aging and HCMV infection that contribute to the T cell senescence and discuss the potential molecular mechanisms in aged T cells. PMID:28082969

  7. CD4+/CD8+ double-positive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana H; Jung, Ji-Won; Steptoe, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    CD4(+)/CD8(+) DP thymocytes are a well-described T cell developmental stage within the thymus. However, once differentiated, the CD4(+) lineage or the CD8(+) lineage is generally considered to be fixed. Nevertheless, mature CD4(+)/CD8(+) DP T cells have been described in the blood and peripheral...... cells, CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell populations, outside of the thymus, have recently been described to express concurrently ThPOK and Runx3. Considerable heterogeneity exists within the CD4(+)/CD8(+) DP T cell pool, and the function of CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell populations remains controversial, with conflicting...... reports describing cytotoxic or suppressive roles for these cells. In this review, we describe how transcriptional regulation, lineage of origin, heterogeneity of CD4 and CD8 expression, age, species, and specific disease settings influence the functionality of this rarely studied T cell population....

  8. Nylon Wool Purification Alters the Activation of T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohler, Jillian E.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method. PMID:18952296

  9. T Cell Subset and Stimulation Strength-Dependent Modulation of T Cell Activation by Kv1.3 Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping; Edwards, Wilson; Liu, Yi; Ngo, Karen; Angsana, Julianty; Castro, Glenda; Wu, Nancy; Liu, Xuejun; Swanson, Ronald V.; Wickenden, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    Kv1.3 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed on T cells that plays an important role in T cell activation. Previous studies have shown that blocking Kv1.3 channels in human T cells during activation results in reduced calcium entry, cytokine production, and proliferation. The aim of the present study was to further explore the effects of Kv1.3 blockers on the response of different human T cell subsets under various stimulation conditions. Our studies show that, unlike the immune suppressor cyclosporine A, the inhibitory effect of Kv1.3 blockers was partial and stimulation strength dependent, with reduced inhibitory efficacy on T cells under strengthened anti-CD3/CD28 stimulations. T cell responses to allergens including house dust mites and ragweed were partially reduced by Kv1.3 blockers. The effect of Kv1.3 inhibition was dependent on T cell subsets, with stronger effects on CCR7- effector memory compared to CCR7+ central memory CD4 T cells. Calcium entry studies also revealed a population of CD4 T cells resistant to Kv1.3 blockade. Activation of CD4 T cells was accompanied with an increase in Kv1.3 currents but Kv1.3 transcripts were found to be reduced, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism in the regulation of Kv1.3 activities. In summary, Kv1.3 blockers inhibit T cell activation in a manner that is highly dependent on the T cell identity and stimulation strength, These findings suggest that Kv1.3 blockers inhibit T cells in a unique, conditional manner, further refining our understanding of the therapeutic potential of Kv1.3 blockers. PMID:28107393

  10. Memory CD4+ T cells are suppressed by CD8+ regulatory T cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xin; Cheng, Qi; Liang, Huifang; Zhao, Jianping; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Tomlinson, Stephen; Chen, Lin; Atkinson, Carl; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute graft rejection mediated by alloreactive memory CD4+ T cells is a major obstacle to transplantation tolerance. It has been reported that CD8+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) have the ability to induce graft tolerance by restraining the function of activated CD4+ T cells, but not including memory T cells. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of CD8+ Tregs on alloreactive memory CD4+ T cells. Methods: We detected Qa-1 expression and performed proliferative assay on memory CD4+ T cells. All memory CD4+ T cells were purified from mice receiving skin allografts. We performed inhibitory and cytotoxic assays on CD8+ Tregs, which were isolated from a T cell vaccination mouse model, and IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ levels were measured in co-culture supernatants by ELISA. To confirm CD8+ Tregs inhibition of memory CD4+ T cells in-vivo, we utilized a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. Results: Memory CD4+ T cells mediated acute allograft rejection, and CD8+ Tregs suppressed the proliferation of memory CD4+ T cells. In vitro, memory CD4+ T cells were inhibited and lysed by CD8+ Tregs. There was a positive correlation between IFN-γ levels, and cell lysis rate induced by CD8+ Tregs. In-vivo studies demonstrated CD8+ Tregs prolonged graft survival times, by inhibiting CD4+ memory T cells, through a Qa-1-peptide-TCR pathway. Conclusions: CD8+ Tregs inhibit CD4+ memory T cell-mediated acute murine cardiac allograft rejection, and further prolong graft survival times. These results provide new insights into immune regulation of organ rejection. PMID:28123634

  11. Differentiation, distribution and gammadelta T cell-driven regulation of IL-22-producing T cells in tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyu Yao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation, distribution and immune regulation of human IL-22-producing T cells in infections remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated in a nonhuman primate model that M. tuberculosis infection resulted in apparent increases in numbers of T cells capable of producing IL-22 de novo without in vitro Ag stimulation, and drove distribution of these cells more dramatically in lungs than in blood and lymphoid tissues. Consistently, IL-22-producing T cells were visualized in situ in lung tuberculosis (TB granulomas by confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry, indicating that mature IL-22-producing T cells were present in TB granuloma. Surprisingly, phosphoantigen HMBPP activation of Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells down-regulated the capability of T cells to produce IL-22 de novo in lymphocytes from blood, lung/BAL fluid, spleen and lymph node. Up-regulation of IFNgamma-producing Vgamma2Vdelta2 T effector cells after HMBPP stimulation coincided with the down-regulated capacity of these T cells to produce IL-22 de novo. Importantly, anti-IFNgamma neutralizing Ab treatment reversed the HMBPP-mediated down-regulation effect on IL-22-producing T cells, suggesting that Vgamma2Vdelta2 T-cell-driven IFNgamma-networking function was the mechanism underlying the HMBPP-mediated down-regulation of the capability of T cells to produce IL-22. These novel findings raise the possibility to ultimately investigate the function of IL-22 producing T cells and to target Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells for balancing potentially hyper-activating IL-22-producing T cells in severe TB.

  12. Regulation of CD8+ T cell responses to retinal antigen by local FoxP3+ regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W McPherson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available While pathogenic CD4 T cells are well known mediators of autoimmune uveoretinitis, CD8 T cells can also be uveitogenic. Since preliminary studies indicated that C57BL/6 mice were minimally susceptible to autoimmune uveoretinitis induction by CD8 T cells, the basis of the retinal disease resistance was sought. Mice that express β-galactosidase (βgal on a retina-specific promoter (arrβgal mice were backcrossed to mice expressing green fluorescent protein and diphtheria toxin receptor under control of the Foxp3 promoter (Foxp3-DTR/GFP mice, and to T cell receptor transgenic mice that produce βgal specific CD8 T cells (BG1 mice. These mice were used to explore the role of regulatory T cells in the resistance to retinal autoimmune disease. Experiments with T cells from double transgenic BG1 x Foxp3-DTR/GFP mice transferred into Foxp3-DTR/GFP x arrβgal mice confirmed that the retina was well protected from attempts to induce disease by adoptive transfer of activated BG1 T cells. The successful induction of retinal disease following unilateral intraocular administration of diphtheria toxin to deplete regulatory T cells showed that the protective activity was dependent on local, toxin-sensitive regulatory T cells; the opposite, untreated eye remained disease-free. Although there were very few Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the parenchyma of quiescent retina, and they did not accumulate in retina, their depletion by local toxin administration led to disease susceptibility. We propose that these regulatory T cells modulate the pathogenic activity of βgal-specific CD8 T cells in the retinas of arrβgal mice on a local basis, allowing immunoregulation to be responsive to local conditions.

  13. Stimulation of adult oligodendrogenesis by myelin-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted Nielsen, Helle; Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2011-01-01

    investigated the effect of myelin-specific T cells on oligodendrocyte formation at sites of axonal damage in the mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus. Infiltrating T cells specific for myelin proteolipid protein stimulated proliferation of chondroitin sulfate NG2-expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells early...... of calretinergic associational/commissural fibers within the dentate gyrus. These results have implications for the perception of MS pathogenesis because they show that infiltrating myelin-specific T cells can stimulate oligodendrogenesis in the adult central nervous system....

  14. Retinoic acid signalling in thymocytes regulates T cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendland, Kerstin; Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Kotarsky, Knut

    in the regulatory regions of targetgenes. RA has been reported to play a direct role in regulating multiple aspects of peripheralT cell responses1, but whether endogenous RA signalling occurs in developingthymocytes and the potential impact of such signals in regulating T cell developmentremains unclear. To address......RARα. This blocks RA signalling in developing thymocytes from the DN3/4 stageonwards and thus allows us to study the role of RA in T cell development...

  15. Adult T-Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) is an uncommon highly aggressive T-cell lymphoma associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. It is rarely encountered during pregnancy and is particularly challenging to treat due to its aggressive nature and because of the lack of robust data on optimal chemotherapy. We report a case of a Jamaican immigrant diagnosed with ATL during pregnancy.

  16. Adult T-Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Miguel Amor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL is an uncommon highly aggressive T-cell lymphoma associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infection. It is rarely encountered during pregnancy and is particularly challenging to treat due to its aggressive nature and because of the lack of robust data on optimal chemotherapy. We report a case of a Jamaican immigrant diagnosed with ATL during pregnancy.

  17. Mobilizing forces -CD4~+ helper T cells script adaptive immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frédérick Masson; Gabrielle T Belz

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, CD4~+ T cells have been understood to play a key role in 'helping' CD8~+ T cells undergo efficient activation and proliferation in response to foreign pathogens. This has been thought to be directed primarily by CD4~+ T cell interactions with dendritic cells (DCs) [1, 2] that convert 'unlicenced' DCs into DCs capable of implementing a full blown immune response ('licenced' DCs).

  18. Circumsporozoite Protein-Specific Kd-Restricted CD8+ T Cells Mediate Protective Antimalaria Immunity in Sporozoite-Immunized MHC-I-Kd Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6 transgenic (Tg mice, expressing Kd molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg, which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, Kd-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  19. Sensory Adaptation in Naive Peripheral CD4 T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Katy; Seddon, Benedict; Purbhoo, Marco A.; Zamoyska, Rose; Fisher, Amanda G.; Merkenschlager, Matthias

    2001-01-01

    T cell receptor interactions with peptide/major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligands control the selection of T cells in the thymus as well as their homeostasis in peripheral lymphoid organs. Here we show that pMHC contact modulates the expression of CD5 by naive CD4 T cells in a process that requires the continued expression of p56lck. Reduced CD5 levels in T cells deprived of pMHC contact are predictive of elevated Ca2+ responses to subsequent TCR engagement by anti-CD3 or nominal anti...

  20. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapies for lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudno, Jennifer N; Kochenderfer, James N

    2017-08-31

    New therapies are needed for patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphomas that are resistant to standard therapies. Indeed, unresponsiveness to standard chemotherapy and relapse after autologous stem-cell transplantation are indicators of an especially poor prognosis. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are emerging as a novel treatment modality for these patients. Clinical trial data have demonstrated the potent activity of anti-CD19 CAR T cells against multiple subtypes of B-cell lymphoma, including diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma, mantle-cell lymphoma, and marginal-zone lymphoma. Importantly, anti-CD19 CAR T cells have impressive activity against chemotherapy-refractory lymphoma, inducing durable complete remissions lasting >2 years in some patients with refractory DLBCL. CAR-T-cell therapies are, however, associated with potentially fatal toxicities, including cytokine-release syndrome and neurological toxicities. CAR T cells with novel target antigens, including CD20, CD22, and κ-light chain for B-cell lymphomas, and CD30 for Hodgkin and T-cell lymphomas, are currently being investigated in clinical trials. Centrally manufactured CAR T cells are also being tested in industry-sponsored multicentre clinical trials, and will probably soon become a standard therapy. Herein, we review the clinical efficacy and toxicity of CAR-T-cell therapies for lymphoma, and discuss their limitations and future directions with regard to toxicity management, CAR designs and CAR-T-cell phenotypes, conditioning regimens, and combination therapies.

  1. CD8+ T cells in Leishmania infections: friends or foes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona eStager

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Host protection against several intracellular pathogens requires the induction of CD8+ T cell responses. CD8+ T cells are potent effector cells that can produce high amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines and kill infected target cells efficiently. However, a protective role for CD8+ T cells during Leishmania infections is still controversial and largely depends on the infection model. In this review, we discuss the role of CD8+ T cells during various types Leishmania infections, following vaccination, and as potential immunotherapeutic targets.

  2. Genetically Modified T-Cell Therapy for Osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRenzo, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    T-cell immunotherapy may offer an approach to improve outcomes for patients with osteosarcoma, who fail current therapies. In addition, it has the potential to reduce treatment-related complications for all patients. Generating tumor-specific T cells with conventional antigen presenting cells ex vivo is time consuming and often results in T-cell products with a low frequency of tumor-specific T cells. In addition, the generated T cells remain sensitive to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Genetic modification of T cells is one strategy to overcome these limitations. For example, T cells can be genetically modified to render them antigen specific, resistant to inhibitory factors, or increase their ability to home to tumor sites. Most genetic modification strategies have only been evaluated in preclinical models, however early phase clinical trials are in progress. In this chapter we review the current status of gene-modified T-cell therapy with special focus on osteosarcoma, highlighting potential antigenic targets, preclinical and clinical studies, and strategies to improve current T-cell therapy approaches. PMID:24924183

  3. The vitamin d receptor and T cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Martin; Levring, Trine B; Geisler, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    ultimately to increase their chance of survival. Immune modulatory therapies that enhance VDR expression and activity are therefore considered in the clinic today to a greater extent. As T cells are of great importance for both protective immunity and development of inflammatory diseases a variety of studies...... have been engaged investigating the impact of VDR expression in T cells and found that VDR expression and activity plays an important role in both T cell development, differentiation and effector function. In this review we will analyze current knowledge of VDR regulation and function in T cells...

  4. Limitations in plasticity of the T-cell receptor repertoire.

    OpenAIRE

    Nanda, N K; Apple, R; Sercarz, E.

    1991-01-01

    How constrained is T-cell recognition? Is a truncated T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire, missing half of its V beta components (where V indicates variable), still broad enough to produce an antigen-specific T-cell response to all determinants? These questions can be answered for certain T-cell antigenic determinants whose response in the wild type is limited to specific gene segments. Our results show that mice with such a deletion in their TCR V beta genes (V beta truncated haplotype, Va beta...

  5. Clinicopathologic features of intestinal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周军

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the clinicopathologic features,diagnosis and differential diagnosis of intestinal natural killer(NK)/T-cell lymphoma.Methods The clinical features,histopathology,immunohistochemical

  6. Consensus nomenclature for CD8+ T cell phenotypes in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apetoh, Lionel; Smyth, Mark J.; Drake, Charles G.; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Apte, Ron N.; Ayyoub, Maha; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bonneville, Marc; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Esteban; Chen, Lieping; Colombo, Mario P.; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Coukos, Georges; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Dranoff, Glenn; Frazer, Ian H.; Fridman, Wolf-Hervé; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kaufman, Howard L.; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John; Knuth, Alexander; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Marincola, Francesco; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Odun, Kunle; Overwijk, Willem W.; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Parmiani, Giorgio; Ribas, Antoni; Romero, Pedro; Schreiber, Robert D.; Schuler, Gerold; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Tartour, Eric; Valmori, Danila; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; van der Bruggen, Pierre; van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Wang, Ena; Zou, Weiping; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Anderson, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas preclinical investigations and clinical studies have established that CD8+ T cells can profoundly affect cancer progression, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Challenging the prevalent view that the beneficial effect of CD8+ T cells in cancer is solely attributable to their cytotoxic activity, several reports have indicated that the ability of CD8+ T cells to promote tumor regression is dependent on their cytokine secretion profile and their ability to self-renew. Evidence has also shown that the tumor microenvironment can disarm CD8+ T cell immunity, leading to the emergence of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells. The existence of different types of CD8+ T cells in cancer calls for a more precise definition of the CD8+ T cell immune phenotypes in cancer and the abandonment of the generic terms “pro-tumor” and “antitumor.” Based on recent studies investigating the functions of CD8+ T cells in cancer, we here propose some guidelines to precisely define the functional states of CD8+ T cells in cancer. PMID:26137416

  7. Monoclonal T-cell receptors: new reagents for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauss, Hans J; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Thomas, Sharyn; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Little, Ann-Margaret; Pospori, Constantina; King, Judy; Morris, Emma C

    2007-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an effective form of immunotherapy for persistent virus infections and cancer. A major limitation of adoptive therapy is the inability to isolate antigen-specific T lymphocytes reproducibly. The demonstration that cloned T-cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T-cell therapy. TCR gene-modified lymphocytes display antigen-specific function in vitro, and were shown to protect against virus infection and tumor growth in animal models. A recent trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted in all and reduced melanoma burden in 2/15 patients. In future trials, it may be possible to use TCR gene transfer to equip helper and cytotoxic T cells with new antigen-specificity, allowing both T-cell subsets to cooperate in achieving improved clinical responses. Sequence modifications of TCR genes are being explored to enhance TCR surface expression, while minimizing the risk of pairing between introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Current T-cell transduction protocols that trigger T-cell differentiation need to be modified to generate "undifferentiated" T cells, which, upon adoptive transfer, display improved in vivo expansion and survival. Both, expression of only the introduced TCR chains and the production of naïve T cells may be possible in the future by TCR gene transfer into stem cells.

  8. Chronic Inflammation and  T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan S Fay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial tissues of the skin, lungs, reproductive tract, and intestines are the largest physical barriers the body has to protect against infection. Epithelial tissues are woven with a matrix of immune cells programmed to mobilize the host innate and adaptive immune responses. Included among these immune cells are  T cells that are unique in their TCR usage, location, and functions in the body. Stress reception by  T cells as a result of traumatic epithelial injury, malignancy, and/or infection induces  T cell activation. Once activated,  T cells function to repair tissue, induce inflammation, recruit leukocytes, and lyse cells. Many of these functions are mediated via the production of cytokines and growth factors upon  T cell activation. Pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases involve  T cells; some of which are exacerbated by their presence, while others are improved.  T cells require a delicate balance between their need for acute inflammatory mediators to function normally and the detrimental impact imparted by chronic inflammation. This review will focus on the recent progress made in understanding how epithelial  T cells influence the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and how a balance between acute and chronic inflammation impacts  T cell function. Future studies will be important to understand how this balance is achieved.

  9. CD4 T cell depletion at the cervix during HIV infection is associated with accumulation of terminally differentiated T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbi, P P; Jaumdally, S Z; Salkinder, A L; Burgers, W A; Mkhize, N N; Hanekom, W; Coetzee, D; Williamson, A; Passmore, J S

    2011-12-01

    In blood, the accumulation of terminally differentiated (TD) T cells during HIV infection is associated with CD4 T cell loss and HIV disease progression. Here, we investigated the maintenance and functional characteristics of memory T cells at the cervix. We found that CD4 T cell depletion at the cervix mirrors CD4 depletion in blood. In all women, depletion of CD4 T cells at the cervix was associated with significant reductions in CD45RA- CCR7+ (central memory [CM]) T cells and the accumulation of CD45RA+ CCR7- (TD T cells). We determined whether inflammation in the genital tract was associated with the local differentiation of T cells at the cervix. In uninfected women, genital tract inflammation was associated with the accumulation of CD45RA- CCR7+ CM CD4 T cells and reduced frequencies of CD45RA+ CCR7- TD cells at the cervix. This finding may reflect the fact that, in the absence of HIV infection, TD T cells may be slowly lost in the presence of genital inflammation, while CD45RA- CCR7+ CM T cells are recruited to replenish the diminishing CD4 T cell pool. Following global stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-ionomycin, we noted a significant interleukin 2 (IL-2) deficit in both cervical and blood CD4 T cells from HIV-infected women compared to uninfected women, while gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production was similar, irrespective of HIV status. Few HIV-infected women had detectable IFN-γ and IL-2 HIV-specific T cell responses at the cervix, and these responses were significantly lower in magnitude than the corresponding responses in blood. These data suggest that CD4 depletion was associated with the accumulation of terminally differentiated T cell phenotypes at the cervical mucosa defective in their ability to produce IL-2. CD4 depletion and compromised immunity at the cervix may be accompanied by progressive decline of central memory-like T cells and development of T cells toward terminally differentiated phenotypes.

  10. New Strategies in Engineering T-cell Receptor Gene-Modified T cells to More Effectively Target Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Thomas M; Stromnes, Ingunn M; Chapuis, Aude G; Greenberg, Philip D

    2015-12-01

    The immune system, T cells in particular, have the ability to target and destroy malignant cells. However, antitumor immune responses induced from the endogenous T-cell repertoire are often insufficient for the eradication of established tumors, as illustrated by the failure of cancer vaccination strategies or checkpoint blockade for most tumors. Genetic modification of T cells to express a defined T-cell receptor (TCR) can provide the means to rapidly generate large numbers of tumor-reactive T cells capable of targeting tumor cells in vivo. However, cell-intrinsic factors as well as immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment can limit the function of such gene-modified T cells. New strategies currently being developed are refining and enhancing this approach, resulting in cellular therapies that more effectively target tumors and that are less susceptible to tumor immune evasion.

  11. T-cell Metabolism as a Target to Control Autoreactive T Cells in β-Cell Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordignon, Carlotta; Canu, Adriana; Dyczko, Aleksandra; Leone, Serena; Monti, Paolo

    2017-05-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that bio-energetic metabolism of activated T cells is a potential target to control the autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes (T1D). T-cell activation and proliferation is linked to the cell capacity to provide sufficient energy and biosynthesis molecules to support T-cell growth and division. This makes T cells susceptible to metabolic inhibition for the control of the T-cell response. There is a wide therapeutic arsenal of metabolic inhibitors, including novel classes of drugs that have become recently available. With the current knowledge and availability of metabolic inhibitors, we are now in the position to design a metabolic inhibition strategy to determine whether targeting of autoreactive T cells is an effective strategy to control the process of β-cell destruction in T1D.

  12. Contribution of Herpesvirus Specific CD8 T Cells to Anti-Viral T Cell Response in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Sandalova; Diletta Laccabue; Carolina Boni; Tan, Anthony T; Katja Fink; Eng Eong Ooi; Robert Chua; Bahar Shafaeddin Schreve; Carlo Ferrari; Antonio Bertoletti

    2010-01-01

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 1...

  13. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sandalova

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR, proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV. CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  14. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandalova, Elena; Laccabue, Diletta; Boni, Carolina; Tan, Anthony T; Fink, Katja; Ooi, Eng Eong; Chua, Robert; Shafaeddin Schreve, Bahar; Ferrari, Carlo; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2010-08-19

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza) pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR), proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low)) and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV). CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza) were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  15. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Keiko [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute of Life Sciences for the Next Generation of Women Scientists, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Fujimoto, Takahiro [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Okamura, Tadashi [Division of Animal Models, Department of Infectious Diseases, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Masahiro [Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tanaka, Yoko [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito [Division of Animal Models, Department of Infectious Diseases, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kuroki, Masahide [Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tsunoda, Toshiyuki [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Sasazuki, Takehiko [Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shirasawa, Senji, E-mail: sshirasa@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  16. B7-deficient autoreactive T cells are highly susceptible to suppression by CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Kenneth F; Chang, Xing; Zhang, Huiming; Lute, Kenneth D; Zhou, Penghui; Kocak, Ergun; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2007-02-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress immunity to infections and tumors as well as autoimmunity and graft-vs-host disease. Since Tregs constitutively express CTLA-4 and activated T cells express B7-1 and B7-2, it has been suggested that the interaction between CTLA-4 on Tregs and B7-1/2 on the effector T cells may be required for immune suppression. In this study, we report that autopathogenic T cells from B7-deficient mice cause multiorgan inflammation when adoptively transferred into syngeneic RAG-1-deficient hosts. More importantly, this inflammation is suppressed by adoptive transfer of purified wild-type (WT) CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells. WT Tregs also inhibited lymphoproliferation and acquisition of activation markers by the B7-deficient T cells. An in vitro suppressor assay revealed that WT and B7-deficient T cells are equally susceptible to WT Treg regulation. These results demonstrate that B7-deficient T cells are highly susceptible to immune suppression by WT Tregs and refute the hypothesis that B7-CTLA-4 interaction between effector T cells and Tregs plays an essential role in Treg function.

  17. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theaker, Sarah M.; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J.; Cole, David K.; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K.; Dolton, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8+ or CD4+ polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein–Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  18. The effect of conditional EFNB1 deletion in the T cell compartment on T cell development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eph kinases are the largest family of cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. The ligands of Ephs, ephrins (EFNs, are also cell surface molecules. Ephs interact with EFNs transmitting signals in both directions, i.e., from Ephs to EFNs and from EFNs to Ephs. EFNB1 is known to be able to co-stimulate T cells in vitro and to modulate thymocyte development in a model of foetal thymus organ culture. To further understand the role of EFNB1 in T cell immunity, we generated T-cell-specific EFNB1 gene knockout mice to assess T cell development and function in these mice. Results The mice were of normal size and cellularity in the thymus and spleen and had normal T cell subpopulations in these organs. The bone marrow progenitors from KO mice and WT control mice repopulated host spleen T cell pool to similar extents. The activation and proliferation of KO T cells was comparable to that of control mice. Naïve KO CD4 cells showed an ability to differentiate into Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg cells similar to control CD4 cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that the function of EFNB1 in the T cell compartment could be compensated by other members of the EFN family, and that such redundancy safeguards the pivotal roles of EFNB1 in T cell development and function.

  19. In vitro expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells distorts the T-cell repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Dan; Costa, Ana I; Hasrat, Raiza; Grady, Bart P X; Spijkers, Sanne; Nanlohy, Nening; Keşmir, Can; van Baarle, Debbie

    2014-03-01

    Short-term in vitro expansion of antigen-specific T cells is an appreciated assay for the analysis of small memory T-cell populations. However, how well short-term expanded T cells represent the direct ex vivo situation remains to be elucidated. In this study we compared the clonality of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8(+) T cells directly ex vivo and after in vitro stimulation with antigen. Our data show that the antigen-specific T cell repertoire significantly alters after in vitro culture. Clear shifts in clonotype hierarchy were observed, with the most dominant ex vivo clonotype decreasing after stimulation at the expense of several previously subdominant clonotypes. Notably, these alterations were more pronounced in polyclonal T-cell populations compared to mono- or oligoclonal repertoires. Furthermore, TCR diversity significantly increased after culture with antigen. These results suggest that the T-cell repertoire is highly subjective to variation after in vitro stimulation with antigen. Hence, although short-term expansion of T cells provides a simple and efficient tool to examine antigen-specific immune responses, caution is required if T-cell populations are expanded prior to detailed, clonotypic analyses or other repertoire-based investigations.

  20. Increased autophagy in CD4(+) T cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients results in T-cell hyperactivation and apoptosis resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loosdregt, Jorg; Rossetti, Maura; Spreafico, Roberto; Moshref, Maryam; Olmer, Merissa; Williams, Gary W; Kumar, Pavanish; Copeland, Dana; Pischel, Ken; Lotz, Martin; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease hallmarked by aberrant cellular homeostasis, resulting in hyperactive CD4(+) T cells that are more resistant to apoptosis. Both hyperactivation and resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the pathogenicity of CD4(+) T cells in the autoimmune process. A better knowledge of the mechanisms determining such impaired homeostasis could contribute significantly to both the understanding and the treatment of the disease. Here we investigated whether autophagy, is dysregulated in CD4(+) T cells of RA patients, resulting in disturbed T-cell homeostasis. We demonstrate that the rate of autophagy is significantly increased in CD4(+) T cells from RA patients, and that increased autophagy is also a feature of in vitro activated CD4(+) T cells. The increased apoptosis resistance observed in CD4(+) T cells from RA patients was significantly reversed upon autophagy inhibition. These mechanisms may contribute to RA pathogenesis, as autophagy inhibition reduced both arthritis incidence and disease severity in a mouse collagen induced arthritis mouse model. Conversely, in Atg5(flox/flox) -CD4-Cre(+) mice, in which all T cells are autophagy deficient, T cells showed impaired activation and proliferation. These data provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of RA and underscore the relevance of autophagy as a promising therapeutic target.

  1. Switching CAR T cells on and off: a novel modular platform for retargeting of T cells to AML blasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartellieri, M; Feldmann, A; Koristka, S; Arndt, C; Loff, S; Ehninger, A; von Bonin, M; Bejestani, E P; Ehninger, G; Bachmann, M P

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells (CAR T cells) resulted in encouraging clinical trials in indolent B-cell malignancies. However, they also show the limitations of this fascinating technology: CAR T cells can lead to even life-threatening off-tumor, on-target side effects if CAR T cells crossreact with healthy tissues. Here, we describe a novel modular universal CAR platform technology termed UniCAR that reduces the risk of on-target side effects by a rapid and reversible control of CAR T-cell reactivity. The UniCAR system consists of two components: (1) a CAR for an inert manipulation of T cells and (2) specific targeting modules (TMs) for redirecting UniCAR T cells in an individualized time- and target-dependent manner. UniCAR T cells can be armed against different tumor targets simply by replacement of the respective TM for (1) targeting more than one antigen simultaneously or subsequently to enhance efficacy and (2) reducing the risk for development of antigen-loss tumor variants under treatment. Here we provide ‘proof of concept' for retargeting of UniCAR T cells to CD33- and/or CD123-positive acute myeloid leukemia blasts in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27518241

  2. EXPRESSION OF T CELL RECEPTOR Vα GENE FAMILIES IN INTRATHYROIDAL T CELLS OF CHINESE PATIENTS WITH GRAVES' DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Patients with Graves' disease (GD) have marked lymphocytic infiltration in their thyroid glands. We examined the gene for the variable regions of the α-chain of the Chinese T-cell receptor( Vα gene) in intrathyroidal Tcells to determine the role of T cells in the pathogenesis of GD and offer potential for the development of immunothera-peutic remedies for GD. Methods. We used the reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) to amplify complementary DNA(cDNA) for the 18 known families of the Vα gene in intrathyroidal T cells from 5 patients with Graves' disease.The findings were compared with the results of peripheral blood T cells in the same patients as well as those in normalsubjects. Results. We found that marked restriction in the expression of T cell receptor Vα genes by T cells from the thyroidtissue of Chinese patients with GD(P < 0.001). An average of only 4.6 ± 1.52 of the 18 Vα genes were expressed insuch samples, as compared with 10.4 ± 2.30Vα genes expressed in peripheral blood T cells from the same patients.The pattem of expressed Vα genes differed from patient to patient with no clear predominance. Condusions. Expression of intrathyroidal T cell receptor Vα genes in GD is highly restricted suggesting the prima-cy of T cells in causing the disorders.

  3. Experimental exposure of adult San Marcos salamanders and larval leopard frogs to the cercariae of Centrocestus formosanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, D C; Cantu, V; Huffman, D G

    2014-04-01

    The gill parasite Centrocestus formosanus (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) is an exotic parasite of concern in Texas because it has been shown to infect multiple threatened and endangered fish species. The purpose of this study was to determine if C. formosanus could present a threat to larval anurans, as well as threatened neotenic salamanders endemic to the spring-fed systems of Texas. We exposed adults of the San Marcos salamander Eurycea nana (Caudata: Plethodontidae) and tadpoles of the Rio Grande leopard frog Lithobates berlandieri (Anura: Ranidae) to the cercariae of C. formosanus . The San Marcos salamander showed no signs of metacercarial infection, suggesting that E. nana may be refractory to C. formosanus cercariae. Centrocestus formosanus readily infects the gills of leopard frog tadpoles, but the metacercariae apparently died prior to reaching maturity in our tadpoles.

  4. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With HTLV-Associated T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-26

    Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; CD3 Positive; CD4-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; Hypercalcemia; Lymphomatous Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  5. Lenalidomide Therapy for Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory, Peripheral T-Cell Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphomas; Adult T-cell Leukemia; Adult T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Unspecified; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T/Null Cell Systemic Type; Cutaneous t-Cell Lymphoma With Nodal/Visceral Disease

  6. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma : molecular pathogenesis and clinical behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, Remco van

    2005-01-01

    Studies presented in this thesis focus on clinicopathological determinants of disease behaviour in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and molecular studies aimed at identifying (epi)genetic features of malignant T cells relevant in the development and progression of these malignancies.

  7. Cortisol patterns are associated with T cell activation in HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Patterson

    Full Text Available The level of T cell activation in untreated HIV disease is strongly and independently associated with risk of immunologic and clinical progression. The factors that influence the level of activation, however, are not fully defined. Since endogenous glucocorticoids are important in regulating inflammation, we sought to determine whether less optimal diurnal cortisol patterns are associated with greater T cell activation.We studied 128 HIV-infected adults who were not on treatment and had a CD4(+ T cell count above 250 cells/µl. We assessed T cell activation by CD38 expression using flow cytometry, and diurnal cortisol was assessed with salivary measurements.Lower waking cortisol levels correlated with greater T cell immune activation, measured by CD38 mean fluorescent intensity, on CD4(+ T cells (r = -0.26, p = 0.006. Participants with lower waking cortisol also showed a trend toward greater activation on CD8(+ T cells (r = -0.17, p = 0.08. A greater diurnal decline in cortisol, usually considered a healthy pattern, correlated with less CD4(+ (r = 0.24, p = 0.018 and CD8(+ (r = 0.24, p = 0.017 activation.These data suggest that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis contributes to the regulation of T cell activation in HIV. This may represent an important pathway through which psychological states and the HPA axis influence progression of HIV.

  8. T cells display mitochondria hyperpolarization in human type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Chernatynskaya, Anna V; Li, Jian-Wei; Kimbrell, Matthew R; Cassidy, Richard J; Perry, Daniel J; Muir, Andrew B; Atkinson, Mark A; Brusko, Todd M; Mathews, Clayton E

    2017-09-07

    T lymphocytes constitute a major effector cell population in autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Despite essential functions of mitochondria in regulating activation, proliferation, and apoptosis of T cells, little is known regarding T cell metabolism in the progression of human type 1 diabetes. In this study, we report, using two independent cohorts, that T cells from patients with type 1 diabetes exhibited mitochondrial inner-membrane hyperpolarization (MHP). Increased MHP was a general phenotype observed in T cell subsets irrespective of prior antigen exposure, and was not correlated with HbA1C levels, subject age, or duration of diabetes. Elevated T cell MHP was not detected in subjects with type 2 diabetes. T cell MHP was associated with increased activation-induced IFNγ production, and activation-induced IFNγ was linked to mitochondria-specific ROS production. T cells from subjects with type 1 diabetes also exhibited lower intracellular ATP levels. In conclusion, intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction observed in type 1 diabetes alters mitochondrial ATP and IFNγ production; the latter is correlated with ROS generation. These changes impact T cell bioenergetics and function.

  9. Lymph node topology dictates T cell migration behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; Lynch, Jennifer N; Miller, Mark J; de Boer, Rob J

    2007-04-16

    Adaptive immunity is initiated by T cell recognition of foreign peptides presented on dendritic cells (DCs) by major histocompatibility molecules. These interactions take place in secondary lymphoid tissues, such as lymph nodes (LNs) and spleen, and hence the anatomical structure of these tissues plays a crucial role in the development of immune responses. Two-photon microscopy (2PM) imaging in LNs suggests that T cells walk in a consistent direction for several minutes, pause briefly with a regular period, and then take off in a new, random direction. Here, we construct a spatially explicit model of T cell and DC migration in LNs and show that all dynamical properties of T cells could be a consequence of the densely packed LN environment. By means of 2PM experiments, we confirm that the large velocity fluctuations of T cells are indeed environmentally determined rather than resulting from an intrinsic motility program. Our simulations further predict that T cells self-organize into microscopically small, highly dynamic streams. We present experimental evidence for the presence of such turbulent streams in LNs. Finally, the model allows us to estimate the scanning rates of DCs (2,000 different T cells per hour) and T cells (100 different DCs per hour).

  10. T Cell Fate at the Single-Cell Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Veit R; Schumacher, Ton N M; Busch, Dirk H

    2016-05-20

    T cell responses display two key characteristics. First, a small population of epitope-specific naive T cells expands by several orders of magnitude. Second, the T cells within this proliferating population take on diverse functional and phenotypic properties that determine their ability to exert effector functions and contribute to T cell memory. Recent technological advances in lineage tracing allow us for the first time to study these processes in vivo at single-cell resolution. Here, we summarize resulting data demonstrating that although epitope-specific T cell responses are reproducibly similar at the population level, expansion potential and diversification patterns of the offspring derived from individual T cells are highly variable during both primary and recall immune responses. In spite of this stochastic response variation, individual memory T cells can serve as adult stem cells that provide robust regeneration of an epitope-specific tissue through population averaging. We discuss the relevance of these findings for T cell memory formation and clinical immunotherapy.

  11. T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia and tuberculosis: a puzzling association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Pascale; Gilhot, Amélie; Marzac, Christophe; Féger, Frédéric; Tang, Ruoping; Jaff, Nabaz; Coppo, Paul

    2017-09-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia can result in severe immune T-cell deficiency. Clinicians should be aware of this complication in this rare lymphoid malignancy, and opportunistic infections should be ruled out before the use of usual immunosuppressive procedures such as alemtuzumab and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  12. The architects of B and T cell immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Peter J L

    2008-08-15

    Published work links adult lymphoid tissue-inducer cells (LTi) with T cell-dependent antibody responses. In this issue of Immunity, Tsuji et al. (2008) associate LTi with T cell-independent IgA antibody responses in the gut.

  13. The transcriptional landscape of alpha beta T cell differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mingueneau, Michael; Kreslavsky, Taras; Gray, Daniel; Heng, Tracy; Cruse, Richard; Ericson, Jeffrey; Bendall, Sean; Spitzer, Matt; Nolan, Garry; Kobayashi, Koichi; von Boehmer, Harald; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe; Best, Adam J.; Knell, Jamie; Goldrath, Ananda; Jojic, Vladimir; Koller, Daphne; Shay, Tal; Regev, Aviv; Cohen, Nadia; Brennan, Patrick; Brenner, Michael; Kim, Francis; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Wagers, Amy; Heng, Tracy; Ericson, Jeffrey; Rothamel, Katherine; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Mathis, Diane; Bezman, Natalie A.; Sun, Joseph C.; Min-Oo, Gundula; Kim, Charlie C.; Lanier, Lewis L.; Miller, Jennifer; Brown, Brian; Merad, Miriam; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Jakubzick, Claudia; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Monach, Paul; Blair, David A.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shinton, Susan A.; Hardy, Richard R.; Laidlaw, David; Collins, Jim; Gazit, Roi; Rossi, Derrick J.; Malhotra, Nidhi; Sylvia, Katelyn; Kang, Joonsoo; Kreslavsky, Taras; Fletcher, Anne; Elpek, Kutlu; Bellemare-Pelletier, Angelique; Malhotra, Deepali; Turley, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    The differentiation of abT cells from thymic precursors is a complex process essential for adaptive immunity. Here we exploited the breadth of expression data sets from the Immunological Genome Project to analyze how the differentiation of thymic precursors gives rise to mature T cell transcriptomes

  14. T Cell Responses: Naive to Memory and Everything in Between

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennock, Nathan D.; White, Jason T.; Cross, Eric W.; Cheney, Elizabeth E.; Tamburini, Beth A.; Kedl, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the actions that take place in T cells because of their amazing capacity to proliferate and adopt functional roles aimed at clearing a host of an infectious agent. There is a drastic decline in the T cell population once the primary response is over and the infection is terminated. What remains afterward is a population of T…

  15. T Cell Responses: Naive to Memory and Everything in Between

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennock, Nathan D.; White, Jason T.; Cross, Eric W.; Cheney, Elizabeth E.; Tamburini, Beth A.; Kedl, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the actions that take place in T cells because of their amazing capacity to proliferate and adopt functional roles aimed at clearing a host of an infectious agent. There is a drastic decline in the T cell population once the primary response is over and the infection is terminated. What remains afterward is a population of T…

  16. The transcriptional landscape of alpha beta T cell differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mingueneau, Michael; Kreslavsky, Taras; Gray, Daniel; Heng, Tracy; Cruse, Richard; Ericson, Jeffrey; Bendall, Sean; Spitzer, Matt; Nolan, Garry; Kobayashi, Koichi; von Boehmer, Harald; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe; Best, Adam J.; Knell, Jamie; Goldrath, Ananda; Jojic, Vladimir; Koller, Daphne; Shay, Tal; Regev, Aviv; Cohen, Nadia; Brennan, Patrick; Brenner, Michael; Kim, Francis; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Wagers, Amy; Heng, Tracy; Ericson, Jeffrey; Rothamel, Katherine; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Mathis, Diane; Bezman, Natalie A.; Sun, Joseph C.; Min-Oo, Gundula; Kim, Charlie C.; Lanier, Lewis L.; Miller, Jennifer; Brown, Brian; Merad, Miriam; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Jakubzick, Claudia; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Monach, Paul; Blair, David A.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shinton, Susan A.; Hardy, Richard R.; Laidlaw, David; Collins, Jim; Gazit, Roi; Rossi, Derrick J.; Malhotra, Nidhi; Sylvia, Katelyn; Kang, Joonsoo; Kreslavsky, Taras; Fletcher, Anne; Elpek, Kutlu; Bellemare-Pelletier, Angelique; Malhotra, Deepali; Turley, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    The differentiation of abT cells from thymic precursors is a complex process essential for adaptive immunity. Here we exploited the breadth of expression data sets from the Immunological Genome Project to analyze how the differentiation of thymic precursors gives rise to mature T cell transcriptomes

  17. Dissection and manipulation of antigen-specific T cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Koen

    2006-01-01

    T cells recognize pathogen-derived antigens and are crucial for fighting pathogens such as viruses and bacteria. In addition, T cells are able to recognize and attack certain types of tumors, in particular virally induced tumors. In this thesis we aimed 1) to obtain more insight into

  18. Cytotoxic T cells mediate pathology and metastasis in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda O Novais

    Full Text Available Disease progression in response to infection can be strongly influenced by both pathogen burden and infection-induced immunopathology. While current therapeutics focus on augmenting protective immune responses, identifying therapeutics that reduce infection-induced immunopathology are clearly warranted. Despite the apparent protective role for murine CD8⁺ T cells following infection with the intracellular parasite Leishmania, CD8⁺ T cells have been paradoxically linked to immunopathological responses in human cutaneous leishmaniasis. Transcriptome analysis of lesions from Leishmania braziliensis patients revealed that genes associated with the cytolytic pathway are highly expressed and CD8⁺ T cells from lesions exhibited a cytolytic phenotype. To determine if CD8⁺ T cells play a causal role in disease, we turned to a murine model. These studies revealed that disease progression and metastasis in L. braziliensis infected mice was independent of parasite burden and was instead directly associated with the presence of CD8⁺ T cells. In mice with severe pathology, we visualized CD8⁺ T cell degranulation and lysis of L. braziliensis infected cells. Finally, in contrast to wild-type CD8⁺ T cells, perforin-deficient cells failed to induce disease. Thus, we show for the first time that cytolytic CD8⁺ T cells mediate immunopathology and drive the development of metastatic lesions in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  19. Thymic CCL2 influences induction of T-cell tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cédile, O; Løbner, M; Toft-Hansen, H

    2014-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC) and dendritic cells (DC) play a role in T cell development by controlling the selection of the T cell receptor repertoire. DC have been described to take up antigens in the periphery and migrate into the thymus where they mediate tolerance via deletion of autoreactiv...

  20. Multiple vaccinations with UV- attenuated cercariae in pig enhance protective immunity against Schistosoma japonicum infection as compared to single vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Donghui

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosomiasis japonica is a major public health problem in the endemic areas of China, the Philippines, and Indonesia. To date, a vaccine has not been developed against this disease but immunization with UV-attenuated cercariae can induce a high level of protective immunity in Landrace/Yorkshire/Duroc crossbred pigs. To compare the efficacy of a single vaccination and multiple vaccinations with UV-attenuated Schistosoma japonicum cercariae, two groups of pigs received either one or three exposures to 10,000 cercariae attenuated with 400 μw UV. Results Pigs with a single immunization had a 59.33% reduction in adult worm burden, a 89.87% reduction in hepatic eggs and a 86.27% reduction in fecal eggs at eight weeks post-challenge (P P Conclusion The high levels of protection against S. japonicum infection can be achieved with a UV-attenuated vaccine in pigs, and that three vaccinations were possibly more effective than a single vaccination. Moreover, triple vaccinations evoked a more vigorous IFN-γ response and a stronger antibody-mediated response, especially an increase in the levels of IgG2 antibodies.

  1. Analysis of trait mean and variability versus temperature in trematode cercariae: is there scope for adaptation to global warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, A; Poulin, R

    2014-05-01

    The potential of species for evolutionary adaptation in the context of global climate change has recently come under scrutiny. Estimates of phenotypic variation in biological traits may prove valuable for identifying species, or groups of species, with greater or lower potential for evolutionary adaptation, as this variation, when heritable, represents the basis for natural selection. Assuming that measures of trait variability reflect the evolutionary potential of these traits, we conducted an analysis across trematode species to determine the potential of these parasites as a group to adapt to increasing temperatures. Firstly, we assessed how the mean number of infective stages (cercariae) emerging from infected snail hosts as well as the survival and infectivity of cercariae are related to temperature. Secondly and importantly in the context of evolutionary potential, we assessed how coefficients of variation for these traits are related to temperature, in both cases controlling for other factors such as habitat, acclimatisation, latitude and type of target host. With increasing temperature, an optimum curve was found for mean output and mean infectivity, and a linear decrease for survival of cercariae. For coefficients of variation, temperature was only an important predictor in the case of cercarial output, where results indicated that there is, however, no evidence for limited trait variation at the higher temperature range. No directional trend was found for either variation of survival or infectivity. These results, characterising general patterns among trematodes, suggest that all three traits considered may have potential to change through adaptive evolution.

  2. Experimental and molecular study of cercariae of Clinostomum sp. (Trematoda: Clinostomidae) from Biomphalaria spp. (Mollusca: Planorbidae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, H A; Caffara, M; Fioravanti, M L; Melo, A L

    2015-02-01

    Despite the large number of reports of species of Clinostomum from vertebrate hosts in South America, studies evaluating the molluscan transmitters of these parasites are scarce. In the present study, clinostomatoid cercariae shed from 0.02% (4/17,485) specimens of Biomphalaria spp., collected at the Pampulha reservoir, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, were used for experimental infection of Poecilia reticulata . Samples of cercariae from molluscs and metacercariae experimentally obtained from fish were subjected to morphological and molecular analyses and compared with species of Clinostomum reported in the Americas. The cercariae and metacercariae, here identified as Clinostomum sp., present general morphology similar to that reported for Clinostomum marginatum , however, from molecular point of view, differ significantly from North American C. marginatum and other species of Clinostomum reported in South America. These results suggest that the diversity of Clinostomum found in Brazil may be underestimated. Additional studies aimed at molecular characterization of South American species of Clinostomum, including the finding of specimens with sequences similar to that reported for C. marginatum in North America are required.

  3. Dopamine and T cells: dopamine receptors and potent effects on T cells, dopamine production in T cells, and abnormalities in the dopaminergic system in T cells in autoimmune, neurological and psychiatric diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, M

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine, a principal neurotransmitter, deserves upgrading to 'NeuroImmunotransmitter' thanks to its multiple, direct and powerful effects on most/all immune cells. Dopamine by itself is a potent activator of resting effector T cells (Teffs), via two independent ways: direct Teffs activation, and indirect Teffs activation by suppression of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The review covers the following findings: (i) T cells express functional dopamine receptors (DRs) D1R-D5R, but their level and function are dynamic and context-sensitive, (ii) DR membranal protein levels do not necessarily correlate with DR mRNA levels, (iii) different T cell types/subtypes have different DR levels and composition and different responses to dopamine, (iv) autoimmune and pro-inflammatory T cells and T cell leukaemia/lymphoma also express functional DRs, (v) dopamine (~10(-8) M) activates resting/naive Teffs (CD8(+) >CD4(+) ), (vi) dopamine affects Th1/Th2/Th17 differentiation, (vii) dopamine inhibits already activated Teffs (i.e. T cells that have been already activated by either antigen, mitogen, anti-CD3 antibodies cytokines or other molecules), (viii) dopamine inhibits activated Tregs in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Thus, dopamine 'suppresses the suppressors' and releases the inhibition they exert on Teffs, (ix) dopamine affects intracellular signalling molecules and cascades in T cells (e.g. ERK, Lck, Fyn, NF-κB, KLF2), (x) T cells produce dopamine (Tregs>Teffs), can release dopamine, mainly after activation (by antigen, mitogen, anti-CD3 antibodies, PKC activators or other), uptake extracellular dopamine, and most probably need dopamine, (xi) dopamine is important for antigen-specific interactions between T cells and dendritic cells, (xii) in few autoimmune diseases (e.g. multiple sclerosis/SLE/rheumatoid arthritis), and neurological/psychiatric diseases (e.g. Parkinson disease, Alzheimer's disease, Schizophrenia and Tourette), patient's T cells seem to have abnormal DRs

  4. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4(+) T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4(+) T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 1% of CD4(+) T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4(+) T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6(+) and CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8(+) T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4(+) T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6(+) cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE.

  5. Low-dose controlled release of mTOR inhibitors maintains T cell plasticity and promotes central memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Joshua M; Gosselin, Emily A; Tostanoski, Lisa H; Chiu, Yu-Chieh; Zeng, Xiangbin; Zeng, Qin; Jewell, Christopher M

    2017-10-10

    An important goal for improving vaccine and immunotherapy technologies is the ability to provide further control over the specific phenotypes of T cells arising from these agents. Along these lines, frequent administration of rapamycin (Rapa), a small molecule inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), exhibits a striking ability to polarize T cells toward central memory phenotypes (TCM), or to suppress immune function, depending on the concentrations and other signals present during administration. TCM exhibit greater plasticity and proliferative capacity than effector memory T cells (TEFF) and, therefore, polarizing vaccine-induced T cells toward TCM is an intriguing strategy to enhance T cell expansion and function against pathogens or tumors. Here we combined biodegradable microparticles encapsulating Rapa (Rapa MPs) with vaccines composed of soluble peptide antigens and molecular adjuvants to test if this approach allows polarization of differentiating T cells toward TCM. We show Rapa MPs modulate DC function, enhancing secretion of inflammatory cytokines at very low doses, and suppressing function at high doses. While Rapa MP treatment reduced - but did not stop - T cell proliferation in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) transgenic T cell co-cultures, the expanding CD8(+) T cells differentiated to higher frequencies of TCM at low doses of MP Rapa MPs. Lastly, we show in mice that local delivery of Rapa MPs to lymph nodes during vaccination either suppresses or enhances T cell function in response to melanoma antigens, depending on the dose of drug in the depots. In particular, at low Rapa MP doses, vaccines increased antigen-specific TCM, resulting in enhanced T cell expansion measured during subsequent booster injections over at least 100days. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Antigen presentation for priming T cells in central system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Shaoni; Dasgupta, Subhajit

    2017-01-01

    Generation of myelin antigen-specific T cells is a major event in neuroimmune responses that causes demyelination. The antigen-priming of T cells and its location is important in chronic and acute inflammation. In autoimmune multiple sclerosis, the effector T cells are considered to generate in periphery. However, the reasons for chronic relapsing-remitting events are obscure. Considering mechanisms, a feasible aim of research is to investigate the role of antigen-primed T cells in lupus cerebritis. Last thirty years of investigations emphasize the relevance of microglia and infiltrated dendritic cells/macrophages as antigen presenting cells in the central nervous system. The recent approach towards circulating B-lymphocytes is an important area in the context. Here, we analyze the existing findings on antigen presentation in the central nervous system. The aim is to visualize signaling events of myelin antigen presentation to T cells and lead to the strategy of future goals on immunotherapy research.

  7. Engineering Therapeutic T Cells: From Synthetic Biology to Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esensten, Jonathan H; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Lim, Wendell A

    2017-01-24

    Engineered T cells are currently in clinical trials to treat patients with cancer, solid organ transplants, and autoimmune diseases. However, the field is still in its infancy. The design, and manufacturing, of T cell therapies is not standardized and is performed mostly in academic settings by competing groups. Reliable methods to define dose and pharmacokinetics of T cell therapies need to be developed. As of mid-2016, there are no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved T cell therapeutics on the market, and FDA regulations are only slowly adapting to the new technologies. Further development of engineered T cell therapies requires advances in immunology, synthetic biology, manufacturing processes, and government regulation. In this review, we outline some of these challenges and discuss the contributions that pathologists can make to this emerging field.

  8. Strategies to genetically engineer T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Timothy T; Nagato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising and innovative approaches to treat cancer, viral infections, and other immune-modulated diseases. Adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified T cells is an exciting and rapidly evolving field. Exploiting knowledge of basic T cell biology and immune cell receptor function has fostered innovative approaches to modify immune cell function. Highly translatable clinical technologies have been developed to redirect T cell specificity by introducing designed receptors. The ability to engineer T cells to manifest desired phenotypes and functions is now a thrilling reality. In this review, we focus on outlining different varieties of genetically engineered T cells, their respective advantages and disadvantages as tools for immunotherapy, and their promise and drawbacks in the clinic.

  9. Metabolic regulation of regulatory T cell development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David John Coe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that the effector T cell (Teff response is regulated by a series of metabolic switches. Quiescent T cells predominantly require ATP-generating processes, whereas proliferating Teff require high metabolic flux through growth-promoting pathways, such as glycolysis. Pathways that control metabolism and immune cell function are intimately linked, and changes in cell metabolism at both the cell and system levels have been shown to enhance or suppress specific T cell effector functions. Furthermore, functionally distinct T cell subsets have been shown to require distinct energetic and biosynthetic pathways to support their specific functional needs. In particular, naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Treg are characterized by a unique metabolic signature distinct to that of conventional Teff cells. We here briefly review the signaling pathways that control Treg metabolism and how this metabolic phenotype integrates their differentiation and function. Ultimately, these metabolic features may provide new opportunities for the therapeutic modulation of unwanted immune responses.

  10. TCR trafficking in resting and stimulated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    constants, the molecular mechanisms, and the proposed physiological roles of TCR trafficking in resting and stimulated T cells. In resting T cells, the TCR slowly and constitutively cycles between the plasma membrane and the intracellular compartment. Constitutive TCR cycling is dependent on the di......Dynamic regulation of TCR expression levels plays important roles in modulating T-cell responses during T-cell development and in mature T cells. TCR expression levels are determined by the rate constants for synthesis, endocytosis, recycling, and degradation. This review examines the rate....../or might ensure an internal store of TCR that can be rerouted to the immunological synapse during the encounter with an antigen-presenting cell....

  11. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20...... receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4(+) T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed...... whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4(+) T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays...

  12. Involvement of distinct PKC gene products in T cell functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried eBaier

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that members of the Protein kinase C(PKC family seem to have important roles in T cells. Focusing on the physiological and non-redundant PKC functions established in primary mouse T cells via germline gene-targeting approaches, our current knowledge defines two particularly critical PKC gene products, PKCθ and PKCα, as the flavor of PKC in T cells that appear to have a positive role in signaling pathways that are necessary for full antigen receptor-mediated T cell activation ex vivo and T cell-mediated immunity in vivo. Consistently, in spite of the current dogma that PKCθ inhibition might be sufficient to achieve complete immunosuppressive effects, more recent results have indicated that the pharmacological inhibition of PKCθ, and additionally, at least PKCα, appears to be needed to provide a successful approach for the prevention of allograft rejection and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  13. Parathyroid hormone dependent T cell proliferation in uremic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewin, E; Ladefoged, Jens; Brandi, L

    1993-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is combined with an impairment of the immune system. The T cell may be a target for the action of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Rats with CRF have high blood levels of PTH. Therefore, the present investigation examined some aspects of the T cell function in both normal...... and CRF rats before and after parathyroidectomy and after an isogenic kidney transplantation. The T cell proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation was significantly higher in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures obtained from CRF rats than from normal rats. After...... parathyroidectomy the T cells of normal as well as of uremic rats could still be significantly stimulated by PHA, but now no significant difference was seen. When CRF was reversed after an isogenic kidney transplantation and PTH reversed to levels in the normal range, the T cell proliferative response to PHA...

  14. Asymmetric cell division during T cell development controls downstream fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Kim; Shimoni, Raz; Charnley, Mirren; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Ramsbottom, Kelly; Oliaro, Jane; Izon, David; Ting, Stephen B.; Reynolds, Joseph; Lythe, Grant; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Melichar, Heather; Robey, Ellen; Humbert, Patrick O.; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian T cell development, the requirement for expansion of many individual T cell clones, rather than merely expansion of the entire T cell population, suggests a possible role for asymmetric cell division (ACD). We show that ACD of developing T cells controls cell fate through differential inheritance of cell fate determinants Numb and α-Adaptin. ACD occurs specifically during the β-selection stage of T cell development, and subsequent divisions are predominantly symmetric. ACD is controlled by interaction with stromal cells and chemokine receptor signaling and uses a conserved network of polarity regulators. The disruption of polarity by deletion of the polarity regulator, Scribble, or the altered inheritance of fate determinants impacts subsequent fate decisions to influence the numbers of DN4 cells arising after the β-selection checkpoint. These findings indicate that ACD enables the thymic microenvironment to orchestrate fate decisions related to differentiation and self-renewal. PMID:26370500

  15. [Histological and immunophenotypical characteristics of peripheral T-cell lymphomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivolapov, Iu A

    2005-01-01

    Histopathologic features of immunohistochemically confirmed 37 nodal peripheral T-cell lymphomas are described. Unspecified and 10 angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas were analyzed. The most demonstrative histological features of both types of lymphomas were spectrum of small, medium and large lymphoid cells, lymphoid cells with irregular nuclei, presence of clusters of clear cells, arborizing endothelial venules, increased number of histiocytes, eosinophils and plasma cells. Isolated paracortical expantion, compartmentalization of neoplastic infiltrate and large atypical Reed-Stemberg-like cells were occasional findings. Delineation between peripheral T-cell lymphoma, unspecified and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma needs evaluation of follicular dendritic cell pattern. The results suggest that detection of histopathologic features typical for peripheral T-cell lymphomas gives an opportunity to compose optimal panel for immunotyping which is absolutely necessary.

  16. Cytoskeletal forces during signaling activation in Jurkat T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, King Lam; Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2015-01-01

    T-cells are critical for the adaptive immune response in the body. The binding of the T-cell receptor (TCR) with antigen on the surface of antigen-presenting cells leads to cell spreading and signaling activation. The underlying mechanism of signaling activation is not completely understood. Although cytoskeletal forces have been implicated in this process, the contribution of different cytoskeletal components and their spatial organization are unknown. Here we use traction force microscopy to measure the forces exerted by Jurkat T-cells during TCR activation. Perturbation experiments reveal that these forces are largely due to actin assembly and dynamics, with myosin contractility contributing to the development of force but not its maintenance. We find that Jurkat T-cells are mechanosensitive, with cytoskeletal forces and signaling dynamics both sensitive to the stiffness of the substrate. Our results delineate the cytoskeletal contributions to interfacial forces exerted by T-cells during activation. PMID:25518938

  17. CRTAM is negatively regulated by ZEB1 in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Marquez, C; Valle-Rios, R; Lopez-Bayghen, E; Ortiz-Navarrete, V

    2015-08-01

    T cell activation leads to the induction of genes that are required for appropriate immune responses. This includes CRTAM (Class-I MHC-restricted T cell associated molecule), a protein that plays a key role in T cell development, proliferation, and generating cell polarity during activation. We previously characterized the CRTAM promoter and described how AP-1 family members are important for inducing CRTAM expression upon antigenic activation. Here, we show that CRTAM is a molecular target for ZEB1 (zinc finger E-box-binding protein), a homeodomain/Zn finger transcription factor. Overexpression of ZEB1 repressed CRTAM promoter activity, as well as endogenous CRTAM levels in human T cells. ZEB1-mediated transcriptional repression was abolished when E-box-like elements in the CRTAM promoter are mutated. In summary, ZEB1 functions as a transcriptional repressor for the CRTAM gene in both non-stimulated and stimulated T cells, thereby modulating adaptive immune responses.

  18. Impact of sepsis on CD4 T cell immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Condotta, Stephanie A.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis remains the primary cause of death from infection in hospital patients, despite improvements in antibiotics and intensive-care practices. Patients who survive severe sepsis can display suppressed immune function, often manifested as an increased susceptibility to (and mortality from) nosocomial infections. Not only is there a significant reduction in the number of various immune cell populations during sepsis, but there is also decreased function in the remaining lymphocytes. Within the immune system, CD4 T cells are important players in the proper development of numerous cellular and humoral immune responses. Despite sufficient clinical evidence of CD4 T cell loss in septic patients of all ages, the impact of sepsis on CD4 T cell responses is not well understood. Recent findings suggest that CD4 T cell impairment is a multipronged problem that results from initial sepsis-induced cell loss. However, the subsequent lymphopenia-induced numerical recovery of the CD4 T cell compartment leads to intrinsic alterations in phenotype and effector function, reduced repertoire diversity, changes in the composition of naive antigen-specific CD4 T cell pools, and changes in the representation of different CD4 T cell subpopulations (e.g., increases in Treg frequency). This review focuses on sepsis-induced alterations within the CD4 T cell compartment that influence the ability of the immune system to control secondary heterologous infections. The understanding of how sepsis affects CD4 T cells through their numerical loss and recovery, as well as function, is important in the development of future treatments designed to restore CD4 T cells to their presepsis state. PMID:24791959

  19. Decrease in T Cell Activation and Calcium Flux during Clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Clarence; Holtzclaw, J. David

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of altered gravitational environments on T cell activation. We isolated human, naive T cells (CD3+CD14-CD19-CD16-CD56-CD25-CD69-CD45RA-) following IRB approved protocols. These purified T cells were then incubated with 6 mm polystyrene beads coated with OKT3 (Ortho Biotech, Raritan, NJ) and antiCD28 (Becton Dickinson (BD), San Jose, CA) at 37 C for 24 hours. Antibodies were at a 1:1 ratio and the bead-to-cell ratio was 2:1. Four incubation conditions existed: 1) static or "1g"; 2) centrifugation at 10 relative centrifugal force (RCF) or "10g"; 3) clinorotation at 25 RPM (functional weightlessness or "0g"); and 4) clinorotation at 80 RPM ("1g" plus net shear force approx.30 dynes/sq cm). Following incubation, T cells were stained for CD25 expression (BD) and intracellular calcium (ratio of Fluo4 to Fura Red, Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and analyzed by flow cytometry (Coulter EPICS XL, Miami, FL). Results: Static or "1g" T cells had the highest level of CD25 expression and intracellular calcium. T cells centrifuged at 10 RCF ("10g") had lower CD25 expression and calcium levels compared to the static control. However, cells centrifuged at 10 RCF had higher CD25 expression and calcium levels than those exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation ("0g"). T cells exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation had lower CD25 expression, but the approximately the same calcium levels than T cells exposed to 80 RPM clinorotation. These data suggest that stress-activated calcium channel exist in T cells and may play a role during T cell activation.

  20. Human regulatory T cell suppressive function is independent of apoptosis induction in activated effector T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Vercoulen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CD4(+CD25(+FOXP3(+ Regulatory T cells (Treg play a central role in the immune balance to prevent autoimmune disease. One outstanding question is how Tregs suppress effector immune responses in human. Experiments in mice demonstrated that Treg restrict effector T cell (Teff responses by deprivation of the growth factor IL-2 through Treg consumption, resulting in apoptosis of Teff. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigated the relevance of Teff apoptosis induction to human Treg function. To this end, we studied naturally occurring Treg (nTreg from peripheral blood of healthy donors, and, to investigate Treg function in inflammation in vivo, Treg from synovial fluid of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA patients (SF-Treg. Both nTreg and SF-Treg suppress Teff proliferation and cytokine production efficiently as predicted. However, in contrast with murine Treg, neither nTreg nor SF-Treg induce apoptosis in Teff. Furthermore, exogenously supplied IL-2 and IL-7 reverse suppression, but do not influence apoptosis of Teff. SIGNIFICANCE: Our functional data here support that Treg are excellent clinical targets to counteract autoimmune diseases. For optimal functional outcome in human clinical trials, future work should focus on the ability of Treg to suppress proliferation and cytokine production of Teff, rather than induction of Teff apoptosis.

  1. Invariant natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Elena; De Biasi, Sara; Simone, Anna Maria; Ferraro, Diana; Sola, Patrizia; Cossarizza, Andrea; Pinti, Marcello

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, and in several countries is a leading cause of permanent neurological disability in young adults, particularly women. MS is considered an autoimmune disease, caused by an aberrant immune response to environmental triggers in genetically susceptible subjects. However, the contribution of the innate or of the adaptive immune system to the development and progression of the disease has not yet been fully elucidated. Innate-like T lymphocytes are unconventional T cells that bridge the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, because they use a T cell receptor to sense external ligands, but behave like innate cells when they rapidly respond to stimuli. These cells could play an important role in the pathogenesis of MS. Here, we focus on invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, and we review the current knowledge on their biology and possible involvement in MS. Although several studies have evaluated the frequency and functions of iNKT and MAIT cells both in MS patients and in experimental mouse models, contradictory observations have been reported, and it is not clear whether they exert a protective or a pro-inflammatory and harmful role. A better understanding of how immune cells are involved in MS, and of their interactions could be of great interest for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  2. T Cell Epitope Immunotherapy Induces a CD4+ T Cell Population with Regulatory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhoef Adrienne

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Synthetic peptides, representing CD4+ T cell epitopes, derived from the primary sequence of allergen molecules have been used to down-regulate allergic inflammation in sensitised individuals. Treatment of allergic diseases with peptides may offer substantial advantages over treatment with native allergen molecules because of the reduced potential for cross-linking IgE bound to the surface of mast cells and basophils. Methods and Findings In this study we address the mechanism of action of peptide immunotherapy (PIT in cat-allergic, asthmatic patients. Cell-division-tracking dyes, cell-mixing experiments, surface phenotyping, and cytokine measurements were used to investigate immunomodulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs after therapy. Proliferative responses of PBMCs to allergen extract were significantly reduced after PIT. This was associated with modified cytokine profiles generally characterised by an increase in interleukin-10 and a decrease in interleukin-5 production. CD4+ cells isolated after PIT were able to actively suppress allergen-specific proliferative responses of pretreatment CD4neg PBMCs in co-culture experiments. PIT was associated with a significant increase in surface expression of CD5 on both CD4+ and CD8+ PBMCs. Conclusion This study provides evidence for the induction of a population of CD4+ T cells with suppressor/regulatory activity following PIT. Furthermore, up-regulation of cell surface levels of CD5 may contribute to reduced reactivity to allergen.

  3. Increased autophagy in CD4(+) T cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients results in T-cell hyperactivation and apoptosis resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loosdregt, Jorg; Rossetti, Maura; Spreafico, Roberto; Moshref, Maryam; Olmer, Merissa; Williams, Gary W; Kumar, Pavanish; Copeland, Dana; Pischel, Ken; Lotz, Martin; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease hallmarked by aberrant cellular homeostasis, resulting in hyperactive CD4(+) T cells that are more resistant to apoptosis. Both hyperactivation and resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the pathogenicity of CD4(+) T cells in the autoimmune proce

  4. T cell maturation stage prior to and during GMP processing informs on CAR T cell expansion in patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Klaver (Yarne); S.C.L. van Steenbergen; S. Sleijfer (Stefan); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno); C.H.J. Lamers (Cor)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAutologous T cells were genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed toward carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX) and used to treat patients with CAIX-positive metastatic renal cell carcinoma. In this study, we questioned whether the T cell maturation stage in the pre

  5. Serine Phosphorylation of SLP76 Is Dispensable for T Cell Development but Modulates Helper T Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Victor H.; Cuche, Céline; Alcover, Andres

    2017-01-01

    The adapter protein SLP76 is a key orchestrator of T cell receptor (TCR) signal transduction. We previously identified a negative feedback loop that modulates T cell activation, involving phosphorylation of Ser376 of SLP76 by the hematopoietic progenitor kinase 1 (HPK1). However, the physiological relevance of this regulatory mechanism was still unknown. To address this question, we generated a SLP76-S376A-expressing knock-in mouse strain and investigated the effects of Ser376 mutation on T cell development and function. We report here that SLP76-S376A-expressing mice exhibit normal thymocyte development and no detectable phenotypic alterations in mature T cell subsets or other lymphoid and myeloid cell lineages. Biochemical analyses revealed that mutant T cells were hypersensitive to TCR stimulation. Indeed, phosphorylation of several signaling proteins, including SLP76 itself, phospholipase Cγ1 and the protein kinases AKT and ERK1/2, was increased. These modifications correlated with increased Th1-type and decreased Th2-type cytokine production by SLP76-S376A T cells, but did not result in significant changes of proliferative capacity nor activation-induced cell death susceptibility. Hence, our results reveal that SLP76-Ser376 phosphorylation does not mediate all HPK1-dependent regulatory effects in T cells but it fine-tunes helper T cell responses. PMID:28107427

  6. Delineation of canine parvovirus T cell epitopes with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and T cell clones from immunized dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); M.C.M. Poelen (Martien); R.H. Meloen; J. Carlson; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThree synthetic peptides derived from the amino acid sequence of VP2 of canine parvovirus (CPV) which were recently shown to represent three distinct T cell epitopes for BALB/c mice could prime BALB/c mice for a CPV-specific proliferative T cell response upon immunization. Proliferative

  7. NOD1 cooperates with TLR2 to enhance T cell receptor-mediated activation in CD8 T cells.

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    Blandine C Mercier

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRR, like Toll-like receptors (TLR and NOD-like receptors (NLR, are involved in the detection of microbial infections and tissue damage by cells of the innate immune system. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that TLR2 can additionally function as a costimulatory receptor on CD8 T cells. Here, we establish that the intracytosolic receptor NOD1 is expressed and functional in CD8 T cells. We show that C12-iEDAP, a synthetic ligand for NOD1, has a direct impact on both murine and human CD8 T cells, increasing proliferation and effector functions of cells activated via their T cell receptor (TCR. This effect is dependent on the adaptor molecule RIP2 and is associated with an increased activation of the NF-κB, JNK and p38 signaling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrate that NOD1 stimulation can cooperate with TLR2 engagement on CD8 T cells to enhance TCR-mediated activation. Altogether our results indicate that NOD1 might function as an alternative costimulatory receptor in CD8 T cells. Our study provides new insights into the function of NLR in T cells and extends to NOD1 the recent concept that PRR stimulation can directly control T cell functions.

  8. T cell maturation stage prior to and during GMP processing informs on CAR T cell expansion in patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Klaver (Yarne); S.C.L. van Steenbergen; S. Sleijfer (Stefan); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno); C.H.J. Lamers (Cor)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAutologous T cells were genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed toward carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX) and used to treat patients with CAIX-positive metastatic renal cell carcinoma. In this study, we questioned whether the T cell maturation stage in the

  9. Age-related accumulation of T cells with markers of relatively stronger autoreactivity leads to functional erosion of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatari-Calderone, Zohreh; Stojakovic, Milica; Dewan, Ramita; Le Bouder, Gama; Jankovic, Dragana; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2012-02-09

    Thymic involution is a prominent characteristic of an aging immune system. When thymic function is reduced/absent, the peripheral T cell pool is subject to the laws of peripheral T cell homeostasis that favor survival/expansion of T cell receptors with relatively higher functional avidity for self-peptide/MHC complexes. Due to difficulties in assessing the TCR avidity in polyclonal population of T cells, it is currently not known whether high avidity T cells preferentially survive in aging individuals, and what impact this might have on the function of the immune system and development of autoimmune diseases. The phenotype of T cells from aged mice (18-24 months) indicating functional TCR avidity (CD3 and CD5 expression) correlates with the level of preserved thymic function. In mice with moderate thymic output (> 30% of peripheral CD62L(hi) T cells), T cells displayed CD3(low)CD5(hi) phenotype characteristic for high functional avidity. In old mice with drastically low numbers of CD62L(hi) T cells reduced CD5 levels were found. After adult thymectomy, T cells of young mice developed CD3(low)CD5(hi) phenotype, followed by a CD3(low)CD5(low) phenotype. Spleens of old mice with the CD3(low)/CD5(hi) T cell phenotype displayed increased levels of IL-10 mRNA, and their T cells could be induced to secrete IL-10 in vitro. In contrast, downmodulation of CD5 was accompanied with reduced IL-10 expression and impaired anti-CD3 induced proliferation. Irrespective of the CD3/CD5 phenotype, reduced severity of experimental allergic myelitis occurred in old mice. In MTB TCRβ transgenic mice that display globally elevated TCR avidity for self peptide/MHC, identical change patterns occurred, only at an accelerated pace. These findings suggest that age-associated dysfunctions of the immune system could in part be due to functional erosion of T cells devised to protect the hosts from the prolonged exposure to T cells with high-avidity for self.

  10. Age-related accumulation of T cells with markers of relatively stronger autoreactivity leads to functional erosion of T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatari-Calderone Zohreh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymic involution is a prominent characteristic of an aging immune system. When thymic function is reduced/absent, the peripheral T cell pool is subject to the laws of peripheral T cell homeostasis that favor survival/expansion of T cell receptors with relatively higher functional avidity for self-peptide/MHC complexes. Due to difficulties in assessing the TCR avidity in polyclonal population of T cells, it is currently not known whether high avidity T cells preferentially survive in aging individuals, and what impact this might have on the function of the immune system and development of autoimmune diseases. Results The phenotype of T cells from aged mice (18-24 months indicating functional TCR avidity (CD3 and CD5 expression correlates with the level of preserved thymic function. In mice with moderate thymic output (> 30% of peripheral CD62Lhi T cells, T cells displayed CD3lowCD5hi phenotype characteristic for high functional avidity. In old mice with drastically low numbers of CD62Lhi T cells reduced CD5 levels were found. After adult thymectomy, T cells of young mice developed CD3lowCD5hi phenotype, followed by a CD3lowCD5low phenotype. Spleens of old mice with the CD3low/CD5hi T cell phenotype displayed increased levels of IL-10 mRNA, and their T cells could be induced to secrete IL-10 in vitro. In contrast, downmodulation of CD5 was accompanied with reduced IL-10 expression and impaired anti-CD3 induced proliferation. Irrespective of the CD3/CD5 phenotype, reduced severity of experimental allergic myelitis occurred in old mice. In MTB TCRβ transgenic mice that display globally elevated TCR avidity for self peptide/MHC, identical change patterns occurred, only at an accelerated pace. Conclusions These findings suggest that age-associated dysfunctions of the immune system could in part be due to functional erosion of T cells devised to protect the hosts from the prolonged exposure to T cells with high-avidity for self.

  11. A role for CD4 sup + but not CD8 sup + T cells in immunity to Schistosoma mansoni induced by 20 krad-irradiated and Ro 11-3128-terminated infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignali, D.A.A.; Bickle, Q.D.; Taylor, M.G. (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (UK)); Crocker, P. (Oxford Univ. (UK). Sir William Dunn School of Pathology); Cobbold, S.; Waldmann, H (Cambridge Univ. (UK). Dept. of Pathology)

    1989-08-01

    The role of CD4{sup +} (L3/T4{sup +}) and CD8{sup +} (Lyt-2{sup +}) T cells in immunity to Schistosoma mansoni induced by 20 krad-irradiated and Ro 11-terminated infections in mice was investigated directly by in vivo depletion of these subsets with cytotoxic rat monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Effective physical depletion was demonstrated by flow cytometric analysis and immunohistochemical staining. Functional depletion of helper activity following anti-CD4 treatment was indicated by an abrogation of concanavalin A(Con A)-induced colony-stimulating factor (CSF) release, while anti-CD8 treatment had no effect in these assays. Pre-existing S. mansoni-specific antibody levels were unaffected by anti-CD4 and anti-CD8 treatment. In vivo depletion of CD4 {sup +} T cells resulted in a dramatic reduction in immunity induced by one (up to 100%) and two (up to 70%) vaccinations with 20 krad-irradiated cercariae and also of resistance induced by Ro 11-attenuated infections (up to 100%). Depletion of CD8{sup +} T cells had no effect on resistance induced by any of the vaccination protocols investigated. A correlation was observed between resistance and T cell-induced, macrophage-mediated killing of schistosomula in vitro, both of which were abrogated following anti-CD4 treatment but were unaffected by CD8{sup +} T-cell depletion. The possible role of CD4{sup +} T cells in vivo and the implications for vaccine development are discussed. (author).

  12. Induction of Specific CD8+ T Cells against Intracellular Bacteria by CD8+ T-Cell-Oriented Immunization Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshi Nagata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For protection against intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Listeria monocytogenes, the cellular arm of adaptive immunity is necessary. A variety of immunization methods have been evaluated and are reported to induce specific CD8+ T cells against intracellular bacterial infection. Modified BCG vaccines have been examined to enhance CD8+ T-cell responses. Naked DNA vaccination is a promising strategy to induce CD8+ T cells. In addition to this strategy, live attenuated intracellular bacteria such as Shigella, Salmonella, and Listeria have been utilized as carriers of DNA vaccines in animal models. Vaccination with dendritic cells pulsed with antigenic peptides or the cells introduced antigen genes by virus vectors such as retroviruses is also a powerful strategy. Furthermore, vaccination with recombinant lentivirus has been attempted to induce specific CD8+ T cells. Combinations of these strategies (prime-boost immunization have been studied for the efficient induction of intracellular bacteria-specific CD8+ T cells.

  13. Protection from experimental cerebral malaria with a single dose of radiation-attenuated, blood-stage Plasmodium berghei parasites.

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    Noel J Gerald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whole malaria parasites are highly effective in inducing immunity against malaria. Due to the limited success of subunit based vaccines in clinical studies, there has been a renewed interest in whole parasite-based malaria vaccines. Apart from attenuated sporozoites, there have also been efforts to use live asexual stage parasites as vaccine immunogens. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: We used radiation exposure to attenuate the highly virulent asexual blood stages of the murine malaria parasite P. berghei to a non-replicable, avirulent form. We tested the ability of the attenuated blood stage parasites to induce immunity to parasitemia and the symptoms of severe malaria disease. Depending on the mouse genetic background, a single high dose immunization without adjuvant protected mice from parasitemia and severe disease (CD1 mice or from experimental cerebral malaria (ECM (C57BL/6 mice. A low dose immunization did not protect against parasitemia or severe disease in either model after one or two immunizations. The protection from ECM was associated with a parasite specific antibody response and also with a lower level of splenic parasite-specific IFN-γ production, which is a mediator of ECM pathology in C57BL/6 mice. Surprisingly, there was no difference in the sequestration of CD8+ T cells and CD45+ CD11b+ macrophages in the brains of immunized, ECM-protected mice. CONCLUSIONS: This report further demonstrates the effectiveness of a whole parasite blood-stage vaccine in inducing immunity to malaria and explicitly demonstrates its effectiveness against ECM, the most pathogenic consequence of malaria infection. This experimental model will be important to explore the formulation of whole parasite blood-stage vaccines against malaria and to investigate the immune mechanisms that mediate protection against parasitemia and cerebral malaria.

  14. T cell responses against microsatellite instability-induced frameshift peptides and influence of regulatory T cells in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Kathrin; Nelius, Nina; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Koch, Moritz; Weitz, Jürgen; Steinert, Gunnar; Kopitz, Jürgen; Beckhove, Philipp; Tariverdian, Mirjam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kloor, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    High-level microsatellite-unstable (MSI-H) colorectal carcinomas (CRC) represent a distinct subtype of tumors commonly characterized by dense infiltration with cytotoxic T cells, most likely due to expression of MSI-H-related frameshift peptides (FSP). The contribution of FSP and classical antigens like MUC1 and CEA to the cellular immune response against MSI-H CRC had not been analyzed so far. We analyzed tumor-infiltrating and peripheral T cells from MSI-H (n = 4 and n = 14, respectively) and microsatellite-stable (MSS) tumor patients (n = 26 and n = 17) using interferon gamma ELISpot assays. Responses against 4 FSP antigens and peptides derived from MUC1 to CEA were compared with and without depletion of regulatory T cells, and the results were related to the presence of the respective antigens in tumor tissue. Preexisting FSP-specific T cell responses were detected in all (4 out of 4) tumor-infiltrating and in the majority (10 out of 14) of peripheral T cell samples from MSI-H CRC patients, but rarely observed in MSS CRC patients. Preexisting T cell responses in MSI-H CRC patients were significantly more frequently directed against FSP tested in the present study than against peptides derived from classical antigens MUC1 or CEA (p = 0.049). Depletion of regulatory T cells increased the frequency of effector T cell responses specific for MUC1/CEA-derived peptides and, to a lesser extent, T cell responses specific for FSP. Our data suggest that the analyzed FSP may represent an immunologically relevant pool of antigens capable of eliciting antitumoral effector T cell responses.

  15. Human T Cell Crosstalk Is Induced by Tumor Membrane Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzana, Ronny; Eisenberg, Galit; Merims, Sharon; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Pato, Aviad; Yefenof, Eitan; Engelstein, Roni; Peretz, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC). Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+T-APCs). We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1) Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2) Fratricide (killing) of CD8+T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response. PMID:25671577

  16. Human T cell crosstalk is induced by tumor membrane transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Uzana

    Full Text Available Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC. Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+ T-APCs. We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+ T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1 Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2 Fratricide (killing of CD8+ T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response.

  17. Regulatory T Cells and Their Role in Animal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Parga, T

    2016-07-01

    In humans and mouse models, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are known to control all aspects of immune responses. However, only limited information exists on these cells' role in diseases of other animals. In this review, we cover the most important features and different types of regulatory T cells, which include those that are thymus-derived and peripherally induced, the mechanisms by which they control immune responses by targeting effector T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and most important, their role in animal health and diseases including cancer, infections, and other conditions such as hypersensitivities and autoimmunity. Although the literature regarding regulatory T cells in domestic animal species is still limited, multiple articles have recently emerged and are discussed. Moreover, we also discuss the evidence suggesting that regulatory T cells might limit the magnitude of effector responses, which can have either a positive or negative result, depending on the context of animal and human disease. In addition, the issue of plasticity is discussed because plasticity in regulatory T cells can result in the loss of their protective function in some microenvironments during disease. Lastly, the manipulation of regulatory T cells is discussed in assessing the possibility of their use as a treatment in the future. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Indoctrinating T cells to attack pathogens through homeschooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parello, Caitlin S; Huseby, Eric S

    2015-06-01

    Adaptive immunity is predicated on the ability of the T cell repertoire to have pre-existing specificity for the universe of potential pathogens. Recent findings suggest that T cell receptor (TCR)-self-major histocompatibility protein (pMHC) interactions limit autoimmune responses while enhancing T cell response to foreign antigens. We review these findings here, placing them in context of the current understanding of how TCR-self-pMHC interactions regulate T cell activation thresholds, and suggest that TCR-self-pMHC interactions increase the efficiency of the T cell repertoire by giving a competitive advantage to peptide cross-reactive T cells. We propose that self-reactivity and peptide cross-reactivity are controlled by particular CDR3 sequence motifs, which would allow thymic selection to contribute to solving the feat of broad pathogen specificity by exporting T cells that are pre-screened by positive and negative selection for the ability to be 'moderately' peptide cross-reactive.

  19. T-cell responses to dengue virus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurane, Ichiro; Matsutani, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A

    2011-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Dengue virus infection induces specific CD4+CD8- and CD8+CD4- T cells in humans. In primary infection, T-cell responses to DENV are serotype cross-reactive, but the highest response is to the serotype that caused the infection. The epitopes recognized by DENV-specific T cells are located in most of the structural and non-structural proteins, but NS3 is the protein that is most dominantly recognized. In patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) caused by secondary DENV infection, T cells are highly activated in vivo. These highly activated T cells are DENV-specific and oligoclonal. Multiple kinds of lymphokines are produced by the activated T cells, and it has been hypothesized that these lymphokines are responsible for induction of plasma leakage, one of the most characteristic features of DHF. Thus, T-cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of DHF and in the recovery from DENV infection.

  20. The role of CD8+ T cells during allograft rejection

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    Bueno V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ transplantation can be considered as replacement therapy for patients with end-stage organ failure. The percent of one-year allograft survival has increased due, among other factors, to a better understanding of the rejection process and new immunosuppressive drugs. Immunosuppressive therapy used in transplantation prevents activation and proliferation of alloreactive T lymphocytes, although not fully preventing chronic rejection. Recognition by recipient T cells of alloantigens expressed by donor tissues initiates immune destruction of allogeneic transplants. However, there is controversy concerning the relative contribution of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to allograft rejection. Some animal models indicate that there is an absolute requirement for CD4+ T cells in allogeneic rejection, whereas in others CD4-depleted mice reject certain types of allografts. Moreover, there is evidence that CD8+ T cells are more resistant to immunotherapy and tolerance induction protocols. An intense focal infiltration of mainly CD8+CTLA4+ T lymphocytes during kidney rejection has been described in patients. This suggests that CD8+ T cells could escape from immunosuppression and participate in the rejection process. Our group is primarily interested in the immune mechanisms involved in allograft rejection. Thus, we believe that a better understanding of the role of CD8+ T cells in allograft rejection could indicate new targets for immunotherapy in transplantation. Therefore, the objective of the present review was to focus on the role of the CD8+ T cell population in the rejection of allogeneic tissue.

  1. Peripheral T cell cytokine responses for diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

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    Johannes Nemeth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A test for diagnosis of active Tuberculosis (TB from peripheral blood could tremendously improve clinical management of patients. METHODS: Of 178 prospectively enrolled patients with possible TB, 60 patients were diagnosed with pulmonary and 27 patients with extrapulmonary TB. The frequencies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB specific CD4(+ T cells and CD8(+ T cells producing cytokines were assessed using overnight stimulation with purified protein derivate (PPD or early secretory antigenic target (ESAT-6, respectively. RESULTS: Among patients with active TB, an increased type 1 cytokine profile consisting of mainly CD4(+ T cell derived interferon (IFN-γ was detectable. Despite contributing to the cytokine profile as a whole, the independent diagnostic performance of one cytokine producing T cells as well as polyfunctional T cells was poor. IFN-γ/Interleukin(IL-2 cytokine ratios discriminated best between active TB and other diseases. CONCLUSION: T cells producing one cytokine and polyfunctional T cells have a limited role in diagnosis of active TB. The significant shift from a "memory type" to an "effector type" cytokine profile may be useful for further development of a rapid immune-diagnostic tool for active TB.

  2. From T cell "exhaustion" to anti-cancer immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdeil, Grégory; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Murray, Timothy; Speiser, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    The immune system has the potential to protect from malignant diseases for extended periods of time. Unfortunately, spontaneous immune responses are often inefficient. Significant effort is required to develop reliable, broadly applicable immunotherapies for cancer patients. A major innovation was transplantation with hematopoietic stem cells from genetically distinct donors for patients with hematologic malignancies. In this setting, donor T cells induce long-term remission by keeping cancer cells in check through powerful allogeneic graft-versus-leukemia effects. More recently, a long awaited breakthrough for patients with solid tissue cancers was achieved, by means of therapeutic blockade of T cell inhibitory receptors. In untreated cancer patients, T cells are dysfunctional and remain in a state of T cell "exhaustion". Nonetheless, they often retain a high potential for successful defense against cancer, indicating that many T cells are not entirely and irreversibly exhausted but can be mobilized to become highly functional. Novel antibody therapies that block inhibitory receptors can lead to strong activation of anti-tumor T cells, mediating clinically significant anti-cancer immunity for many years. Here we review these new treatments and the current knowledge on tumor antigen-specific T cells.

  3. T cells in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fletcher, J M

    2012-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), which involves autoimmune responses to myelin antigens. Studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS, have provided convincing evidence that T cells specific for self-antigens mediate pathology in these diseases. Until recently, T helper type 1 (Th1) cells were thought to be the main effector T cells responsible for the autoimmune inflammation. However more recent studies have highlighted an important pathogenic role for CD4(+) T cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-17, termed Th17, but also IL-17-secreting gammadelta T cells in EAE as well as other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory conditions. This has prompted intensive study of the induction, function and regulation of IL-17-producing T cells in MS and EAE. In this paper, we review the contribution of Th1, Th17, gammadelta, CD8(+) and regulatory T cells as well as the possible development of new therapeutic approaches for MS based on manipulating these T cell subtypes.

  4. Coaggregation of the T-cell receptor with CD4 and other T-cell surface molecules enhances T-cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Fazekas de St Groth, B; Miller, J F

    1987-01-01

    The CD4 molecule, expressed by T cells restricted by class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, is believed to play a role in T-cell activation. We have previously suggested that CD4 interacts with the T-cell receptor for antigen (TCR) and with class II MHC and that this dual...... interaction stabilizes the bond between the TCR and antigen in association with MHC. To investigate the contribution of CD4-TCR interaction, we have used the murine monoclonal anti-TCR V beta 8 antibody F23.1 to activate cloned T cells. Weak activation by soluble biotinylated F23.1 was markedly enhanced...... by crosslinking with either avidin or with anti-immunoglobulin (anti-Ig). The monoclonal anti-L3T4 antibody GK1.5, which normally inhibits the activation induced by F23.1, did not inhibit when GK1.5 and F23.1 were coaggregated on T cells by anti-Ig, and in many experiments activation was enhanced. Coaggregation...

  5. Possible neuroimmunomodulation therapy in T-cell-mediated oral diseases

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    Tsuyoshi Sato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus are local chronic inflammatory diseases which are implicated in T cell-mediated immunity. According to the systematic review, there is insufficient evidence to support any specific treatment for T-cell mediated oral diseases. The hypothesis: In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus can be treated with selective α7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 -nAChR agonists. Our hypothesis is supported by the following two facts. First, the pathophysiological conditions, T h 1/T h 17 cell activation and autonomic nervous system dysfunction, are observed in T-cell mediated oral diseases as well as in T-cell mediated systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Second, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is inhibited in systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. On the other hand, treatment with α7 -nAChR agonists which activate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway suppresses neuroinflammation via inhibition of T h 1/T h 17 responses in animal model of systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. We thus expect that selective α7 -nAChR agonists will be effective for the treatment of T-cell mediated oral diseases. Evaluation of the hypothesis: To test our hypothesis, we need to develop in vivo mouse model of T-cell mediated oral diseases. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of a selective α7 -nAChR agonist, we choose ABT-107 because of its safety and tolerability. We believe that the selective α7 -nAChR agonist, especially ABT-107, may be a therapeutic drug to treat T-cell mediated oral diseases.

  6. [In vitro amplification of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and identification of amplified T cell immunosuppressive function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wen-Jun; Pan, Li; Fang, Jian-Pei; Xu, Lv-Hong

    2013-10-01

    This study was purposed to compare the effect of 3 different cell components for expanding CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg in vitro, and identify their immunosuppressive function. CD4(+) T cells, CD4(+) CD25(-)T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+)T cells were isolated from mouse splenocytes by MACS and then expanded in vitro. Phenotype of the T cell lines and expression of the FOXP3 was determined by flow cytometry. The inhibitory effect of expanded CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells on CD4(+) CD25(-)T cells was tested by MLR method. The results showed that the Treg cells from all the three groups were expanded significantly after culture for 2 weeks. In the CD4(+) T cells group, the proliferation rate was (77.8 ± 5.32) folds with a percentage of Treg cells increasing from (6.61 ± 1.00)% to (15.33 ± 1.31)%. The proliferation rate in the CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells group was (95.20 ± 7.67) folds, with the percentage of CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells raising from (0.37 ± 0.13)% to (9.84 ± 0.98)%. The proliferation rate in the CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells group was (41.20 ± 6.92) folds, the proportion of Treg cells decreased from (86.75 ± 1.25)% to (85.32 ± 1.62)%, and the expression of Foxp3 decreased from (76.92 ± 1.72)% to (75.33 ± 2.11)% during the culture, there were not significant differences in the cell purity and the expression of Foxp3, compared with pre-amplification. The inhibitory test showed that the expanded CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells could inhibit the proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells in vitro in a cell dose-dependent manner. It is concluded that the amplification of CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg cells is successful in vitro, especially in the CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells group, the cell purity and Foxp3 gene is not obviously changes after amplification.

  7. Remote Control of T Cell Activation Using Magnetic Janus Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwahun; Yi, Yi; Yu, Yan

    2016-06-20

    We report a strategy for using magnetic Janus microparticles to control the stimulation of T cell signaling with single-cell precision. To achieve this, we designed Janus particles that are magnetically responsive on one hemisphere and stimulatory to T cells on the other side. By manipulating the rotation and locomotion of Janus particles under an external magnetic field, we could control the orientation of the particle-cell recognition and thereby the initiation of T cell activation. This study demonstrates a step towards employing anisotropic material properties of Janus particles to control single-cell activities without the need of complex magnetic manipulation devices.

  8. Regulatory T cells and B cells: implication on autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Although most studies are focusing on the role of Treg cells in T cells and T cells-mediated diseases, these cells also directly affect B cells and other non-T cells. This manuscript updates the role of Treg cells on the B cells and B cell-mediated diseases. In addition, the mechanisms whereby Treg cells suppress B cell responses have been discussed.

  9. A T Cell View of the Bone Marrow

    OpenAIRE

    Bonomo, Adriana; Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves-Silva, Triciana; Cordeiro-Spinetti, Eric; Galvani, Rômulo Gonçalves; Balduino, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The majority of T cells present in the bone marrow (BM) represent an activated/memory phenotype and most of these, if not all, are circulating T cells. Their lodging in the BM keeps them activated, turning the BM microenvironment into a “memory reservoir.” This article will focus on how T cell activation in the BM results in both direct and indirect effects on the hematopoiesis. The hematopoietic stem cell niche will be presented, with its main components and organization, along with the role...

  10. Bystander T cells in human immune responses to dengue antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwannasaen Duangchan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of T cell activation in dengue infection have focused on restriction of specific T cell receptors (TCRs and classical MHC molecules. However, bystander T cell activation, which is TCR independent, occurs via cytokines in other viral infections, both in vitro and in vivo, and enables T cells to bypass certain control checkpoints. Moreover, clinical and pathological evidence has pointed to cytokines as the mediators of dengue disease severity. Therefore, we investigated bystander T cell induction by dengue viral antigen. Results Whole blood samples from 55 Thai schoolchildren aged 13-14 years were assayed for in vitro interferon-gamma (IFN-γ induction in response to inactivated dengue serotype 2 antigen (Den2. The contribution of TCR-dependent and independent pathways was tested by treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA, which inhibits TCR-dependent activation of T cells. ELISA results revealed that approximately 72% of IFN-γ production occurred via the TCR-dependent pathway. The major IFN-γ sources were natural killer (NK (mean ± SE = 55.2 ± 3.3, CD4+T (24.5 ± 3.3 and CD8+T cells (17.9 ± 1.5, respectively, as demonstrated by four-color flow cytometry. Interestingly, in addition to these cells, we found CsA-resistant IFN-γ producing T cells (CD4+T = 26.9 ± 3.6% and CD8+T = 20.3 ± 2.1% implying the existence of activated bystander T cells in response to dengue antigen in vitro. These bystander CD4+ and CD8+T cells had similar kinetics to NK cells, appeared after 12 h and were inhibited by anti-IL-12 neutralization indicating cytokine involvement. Conclusions This study described immune cell profiles and highlighted bystander T cell activation in response to dengue viral antigens of healthy people in an endemic area. Further studies on bystander T cell activation in dengue viral infection may reveal the immune mechanisms that protect or enhance pathogenesis of secondary dengue infection.

  11. Innovative T Cell-Targeted Therapy for Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    A. Tabilio. 2009. Activated autologous T cells exert an anti-B-cell chronic lymphatic leukemia effect in vitro and in vivo. Cytotherapy 11:86-96... leukemia . Sci Transl Med 2011; 3(95): 95ra73. 15. Porter DL, Levine BL, Kalos M, Bagg A, June CH. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells in chronic ...malignancies. Kasumi 3 is a CD33þ CD34þ undifferentiated leukemia cell line that was lysed at intermediate levels by gd T cells. Chronic myelogenous leukemia

  12. T-cell receptor gene rearrangement analysis: cutaneous T cell lymphoma, peripheral T cell lymphoma, and premalignant and benign cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelickson, B D; Peters, M S; Muller, S A; Thibodeau, S N; Lust, J A; Quam, L M; Pittelkow, M R

    1991-11-01

    T-cell receptor gene rearrangement analysis is a useful technique to detect clonality and determine lineage of lymphoid neoplasms. We examined 103 patients with mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, peripheral T cell lymphoma, potentially malignant lymphoproliferative disorders including pre-Sézary syndrome, large plaque parapsoriasis, lymphomatoid papulosis and follicular mucinosis, and various benign inflammatory infiltrates. A clonal rearrangement was detected in skin samples in 20 of 24 patients with mycosis fungoides and in peripheral blood samples in 19 of 21 patients with Sézary syndrome. A clonal population was also detected in seven of eight cases classified as peripheral T cell lymphoma. The potentially malignant dermatoses tended to have clonal rearrangement, with the exception of large plaque parapsoriasis, and further follow-up is needed to correlate clonality with the disease course. These studies demonstrate the value of molecular genetics as an adjunct to morphology in the examination of patients with cutaneous lymphoproliferative disease.

  13. GFP-specific CD8 T cells enable targeted cell depletion and visualization of T-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, Judith; Ruzo, Albert; Park, Eun Sook; Sweeney, Robert; Kana, Veronika; Wu, Meng; Zhao, Yong; Egli, Dieter; Merad, Miriam; Brown, Brian D

    2015-12-01

    There are numerous cell types with scarcely understood functions, whose interactions with the immune system are not well characterized. To facilitate their study, we generated a mouse bearing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-specific CD8(+) T cells. Transfer of the T cells into EGFP reporter animals can be used to kill EGFP-expressing cells, allowing selective depletion of desired cell types, or to interrogate T-cell interactions with specific populations. Using this system, we eliminate a rare EGFP-expressing cell type in the heart and demonstrate its role in cardiac function. We also show that naive T cells are recruited into the mouse brain by antigen-expressing microglia, providing evidence of an immune surveillance pathway in the central nervous system. The just EGFP death-inducing (Jedi) T cells enable visualization of a T-cell antigen. They also make it possible to utilize hundreds of existing EGFP-expressing mice, tumors, pathogens and other tools, to study T-cell interactions with many different cell types, to model disease states and to determine the functions of poorly characterized cell populations.

  14. Old Mice Accumulate Activated Effector CD4 T Cells Refractory to Regulatory T Cell-Induced Immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpaz, Idan; Bhattacharya, Udayan; Elyahu, Yehezqel; Strominger, Itai; Monsonego, Alon

    2017-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation and reduced lymphocyte potency are implicated in the pathogenesis of major illnesses associated with aging. Whether this immune phenotype results from a loss of cell-mediated regulation or intrinsic dysregulated function of effector T cells (Teffs) requires further research. Here, we report that, as compared with young C57BL6 mice, old mice show an increased frequency of CD4+CD62L- Teffs with a dysregulated activated phenotype and markedly increased effector functions. Analysis of the frequency and suppressive function of CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) indicates an increase in the frequency of FoxP3+ T cells with aging which, however, occurs within the CD4+CD25- T cells. Furthermore, whereas Tregs from young and old mice similarly suppress Teffs from young mice, both have a compromised suppressive capacity of Teffs from old mice, a phenomenon which is partially recovered in the presence of IL-2-producing CD4+CD62L+ non-Teffs. Finally, we observed that Teff subsets from old mice are enriched with IL-17A-producing T cells and exhibit intrinsically dysregulated expression of genes encoding cell-surface molecules and transcription factors, which play a key role in T-cell activation and regulation. We, thus, demonstrate an age-related impairment in the regulation of effector CD4 T cells, which may underlie the higher risk for destructive inflammation associated with aging.

  15. Membrane-bound Dickkopf-1 in Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells suppresses T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Wook-Jin; Park, Jong-Hyun; Henegariu, Octavian; Yilmaz, Saliha; Hao, Liming; Bothwell, Alfred L M

    2017-10-01

    Induction of tolerance is a key mechanism to maintain or to restore immunological homeostasis. Here we show that Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells use Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) to regulate T-cell-mediated tolerance in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis model. Treg cells from DKK-1 hypomorphic doubleridge mice failed to control CD4(+) T-cell proliferation, resulting in CD4 T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. Thymus-derived Treg cells showed a robust expression of DKK-1 but not in naive or effector CD4 T cells. DKK-1 expression in Foxp3(+) Treg cells was further increased upon T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, Foxp3(+) Treg cells expressed DKK-1 in the cell membrane and the functional inhibition of DKK-1 using DKK-1 monoclonal antibody abrogated the suppressor function of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. DKK-1 expression was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway but not by the canonical Wnt pathway. Taken together, our results highlight membrane-bound DKK-1 as a novel Treg-derived mediator to maintain immunological tolerance in T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. ROCKing cytokine secretion balance in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Waksal, Samuel D

    2015-04-01

    Balanced regulation of cytokine secretion in T cells is critical for maintenance of immune homeostasis and prevention of autoimmunity. The Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) 2 signaling pathway was previously shown to be involved in controlling of cellular movement and shape. However, recent work from our group and others has demonstrated a new and important role of ROCK2 in regulating cytokine secretion in T cells. We found that ROCK2 promotes pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17 and IL-21, whereas IL-2 and IL-10 secretion are negatively regulated by ROCK2 under Th17-skewing activation. Also, in disease, but not in steady state conditions, ROCK2 contributes to regulation of IFN-γ secretion in T cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients. Thus, ROCK2 signaling is a key pathway in modulation of T-cell mediated immune responses underscoring the therapeutic potential of targeted inhibition of ROCK2 in autoimmunity.

  17. CAR T cells engage in anticancer martial arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Saar

    2017-01-18

    A clever redesign of the chimeric antigen receptor T cell concept turns a cancer-mediated immunosuppressive cytokine into a growth signal. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Impaired survival of regulatory T cells in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Broos (Caroline); M. van Nimwegen (Menno); A. Kleinjan (Alex); B. ten Berge (Bregje); F. Muskens (Femke); J.C.C.M. in 't Veen (Johannes); J.T. Annema (Jouke); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi); M. Kool (Mirjam); B. van den Blink (Bernt)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Impaired regulatory T cell (Treg) function is thought to contribute to ongoing inflammatory responses in sarcoidosis, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Moreover, it is not known if increased apoptotic susceptibility of Tregs may contribute to an impaired

  19. Increased sensitivity to interferon-alpha in psoriatic T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Karsten Wessel; Lovato, Paola; Skov, Lone

    2005-01-01

    disease characterized by CD8(+)-infiltrating T cells. In this study, we therefore investigate IFN-alpha signaling in T cells isolated from involved skin of psoriatic patients. We show that psoriatic T cells have increased and prolonged responses to IFN-alpha, on the level of signal transducers......Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by abnormal epidermal proliferation. Several studies have shown that skin-infiltrating activated T cells and cytokines play a pivotal role during the initiation and maintenance of the disease. Interferon (IFN)-alpha plays an important...... role in host defense against infections, but recent data have also implicated IFN-alpha in psoriasis. Thus, IFN-alpha induces or aggravates psoriasis in some patients, and mice lacking a transcriptional attenuator of IFN-alpha/beta signaling spontaneously develop a psoriasis-like inflammatory skin...

  20. T cell mediated pathogenesis in EAE: Molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian C Kurschus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available T cells are major initiators and mediators of disease in multiple sclerosis (MS and in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. EAE is an antigen-driven autoimmune model in which immunization against myelin autoantigens elicits strong T cell responses which initiate its pathology with CNS myelin destruction. T cells cause pathogenic events by several mechanisms; some work in a direct fashion in the CNS, such as direct cytokine-induced damage, granzyme-mediated killing, or glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, whereas most are indirect mechanisms, such as activation of other cell types like macrophages, B cells, or neutrophils. This review aims to describe and discuss the molecular effector mechanism by which T cells harm the CNS during EAE.

  1. γδ T cells in infection and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lifei; Wang, Tian; Sun, Jiaren

    2015-10-01

    Standing at the interface of innate and adaptive immune, γδ T cells play important pathophysiologic roles in infection, autoimmunity, and tumorigenesis. Recent studies indicate that γδ T cells could be categorized into IFN-γ(+) and IL-17(+) subsets, both of which possess select TCR usages, bear unique surface markers and require different cytokine signaling to maintain the homeostasis. In addition, as the major innate IL-17 producers, γδ T cells are increasingly appreciated for their involvement in various acute infections and injuries. This review will summarize the characteristics of IFN-γ(+) (γδ T-IFN-γ) and IL-17(+) γδ T cells (γδT17) and discuss their distinct pathogenic functions in different disease models.

  2. Mechanism of T cell regulation by microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Liu; Chang-Ping Wu; Bin-Feng Lu; Jing-Ting Jiang

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding single-stranded RNAs that can modulate target gene expression at post-transcriptional level and participate in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. T cells have important functions in acquired immune response;miRNAs regulate this immune response by targeting the mRNAs of genes involved in T cell development, proliferation, differentiation, and function. For instance, miR-181 family members function in progression by targeting Bcl2 and CD69, among others. MiR-17 to miR-92 clusters function by binding to CREB1, PTEN, and Bim. Considering that the suppression of T cell-mediated immune responses against tumor cells is involved in cancer progression, we should investigate the mechanism by which miRNA regulates T cells to develop new approaches for cancer treatment.

  3. Establishing guidelines for CAR-T cells: challenges and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Di-Yuan; Zhang, Bing-Lan; Wei, Wei; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-04-01

    T cells, genetically modified by chimeric antigen receptors (CAR-T), are endowed with specificity to a desired antigen and are cytotoxic to cells expressing the targeted antigen. CAR-T-based cancer immunotherapy is a promising therapy for curing hematological malignancy, such as acute lymphoid leukemia, and is promising for extending their efficacy to defeat solid tumors. To date, dozens of different CAR-T cells have been evaluated in clinical trials to treat tumors; this necessitates the establishment of guidelines for the production and application of CAR-T cells. However, it is challenging to standardize CAR-T cancer therapy because it involves a combination of gene therapy and cell therapy. In this review, we compare the existing guidelines for CAR-T cells and discuss the challenges and considerations for establishing guidance for CAR-T-based cancer immunotherapy.

  4. Evolution of nonclassical MHC-dependent invariant T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2014-12-01

    TCR-mediated specific recognition of antigenic peptides in the context of classical MHC molecules is a cornerstone of adaptive immunity of jawed vertebrate. Ancillary to these interactions, the T cell repertoire also includes unconventional T cells that recognize endogenous and/or exogenous antigens in a classical MHC-unrestricted manner. Among these, the mammalian nonclassical MHC class I-restricted invariant T cell (iT) subsets, such as iNKT and MAIT cells, are now believed to be integral to immune response initiation as well as in orchestrating subsequent adaptive immunity. Until recently the evolutionary origins of these cells were unknown. Here we review our current understanding of a nonclassical MHC class I-restricted iT cell population in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Parallels with the mammalian iNKT and MAIT cells underline the crucial biological roles of these evolutionarily ancient immune subsets.

  5. Toxicity and management in CAR T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifant, Challice L; Jackson, Hollie J; Brentjens, Renier J; Curran, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    T cells can be genetically modified to target tumors through the expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Most notably, CAR T cells have demonstrated clinical efficacy in hematologic malignancies with more modest responses when targeting solid tumors. However, CAR T cells also have the capacity to elicit expected and unexpected toxicities including: cytokine release syndrome, neurologic toxicity, "on target/off tumor" recognition, and anaphylaxis. Theoretical toxicities including clonal expansion secondary to insertional oncogenesis, graft versus host disease, and off-target antigen recognition have not been clinically evident. Abrogating toxicity has become a critical step in the successful application of this emerging technology. To this end, we review the reported and theoretical toxicities of CAR T cells and their management.

  6. T Cell Integrin Overexpression as a Model of Murine Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Raymond L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrin adhesion molecules have important adhesion and signaling functions. They also play a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Over the past few years we have described a T cell adoptive transfer model to investigate the role of T cell integrin adhesion molecules in the development of autoimmunity. This report summarizes the methods we used in establishing this murine model. By treating murine CD4+ T cells with DNA hypomethylating agents and by transfection we were able to test the in vitro effects of integrin overexpression on T cell autoreactive proliferation, cytotoxicity, adhesion and trafficking. Furthermore, we showed that the ability to induce in vivo autoimmunity may be unique to the integrin lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1.

  7. Towards Future T Cell-Mediated Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi H. O. Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAVs infections impact significantly on global health, being particularly problematic in children, the elderly, pregnant women, indigenous populations and people with co-morbidities. Antibody-based vaccines require annual administration to combat rapidly acquired mutations modifying the surface haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA glycoproteins. Conversely, influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responses directed at peptides derived from the more conserved internal virus proteins are known to be protective, suggesting that T cell-based vaccines may provide long-lasting cross-protection. This review outlines the importance of CD8+ T cell immunity to seasonal influenza and pandemic IAVs and summarises current vaccination strategies for inducing durable CD8+ T cell memory. Aspects of future IAV vaccine design and the use of live virus challenge in humans to establish proof of principle are also discussed.

  8. The timing of T cell priming and cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard eObst

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of specific lymphocytes is the central tenet of the clonal selection paradigm. Antigen recognition by T cells triggers a series of events that produces expanded clones of differentiated effector cells. TCR signaling events are detectable within seconds and minutes and are likely to continue for hours and days in vivo. Here, I review the work done on the importance of TCR signals in the later part of the expansion phase of the primary T cell response, primarily regarding the regulation of the cell cycle in CD4+ and CD8+ cells. The results suggest a degree of programming by early signals for effector differentiation, particularly in the CD8+ T cell compartment, with optimal expansion supported by persistent antigen presentation later on. Differences to CD4+ T cell expansion and new avenues towards a molecular understanding of cell cycle regulation in lymphocytes are discussed.

  9. T-cell-predominant lymphoid hyperplasia in a tattoo*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Erica Sales; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Batista, Everton da Silva; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Ferreira; Farre, Lourdes; Bittencourt, Achilea Lisboa

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia (CLH) can be idiopathic or secondary to external stimuli, and is considered rare in tattoos. The infiltrate can be predominantly of B or T-cells, the latter being seldom reported in tattoos. We present a case of a predominantly T CLH, secondary to the black pigment of tattooing in a 35-year-old patient, with a dense infiltrate of small, medium and scarce large T-cells. Analysis of the rearrangement of T-cells receptor revealed a polyclonal proliferation. Since the infiltrate of CLH can simulate a T lymphoma, it is important to show that lesions from tattoos can have a predominance of T-cells. PMID:25387518

  10. Networked T cell death following macrophage infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H-F Macdonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depletion of T cells following infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb impairs disease resolution, and interferes with clinical test performance that relies on cell-mediated immunity. A number of mechanisms contribute to this T cell suppression, such as activation-induced death and trafficking of T cells out of the peripheral circulation and into the diseased lungs. The extent to which Mtb infection of human macrophages affects T cell viability however, is not well characterised. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that lymphopenia (<1.5 × 10(9 cells/l was prevalent among culture-positive tuberculosis patients, and lymphocyte counts significantly improved post-therapy. We previously reported that Mtb-infected human macrophages resulted in death of infected and uninfected bystander macrophages. In the current study, we sought to examine the influence of infected human alveolar macrophages on T cells. We infected primary human alveolar macrophages (the primary host cell for Mtb or PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells with Mtb H37Ra, then prepared cell-free supernatants. The supernatants of Mtb-infected macrophages caused dose-dependent, caspase-dependent, T cell apoptosis. This toxic effect of infected macrophage secreted factors did not require TNF-α or Fas. The supernatant cytotoxic signal(s were heat-labile and greater than 50 kDa in molecular size. Although ESAT-6 was toxic to T cells, other Mtb-secreted factors tested did not influence T cell viability; nor did macrophage-free Mtb bacilli or broth from Mtb cultures. Furthermore, supernatants from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille de Calmette et Guerin (BCG- infected macrophages also elicited T cell death suggesting that ESAT-6 itself, although cytotoxic, was not the principal mediator of T cell death in our system. CONCLUSIONS: Mtb-Infected macrophages secrete heat-labile factors that are toxic to T cells, and may contribute to the immunosuppression seen in tuberculosis as well as

  11. T-Cell Lymphomas Presenting as Colon Ulcers and Eosinophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Hsiu Wu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary gastrointestinal T-cell lymphoma is an uncommon entity and primary colon T-cell lymphoma is even rarer. The majority of enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphomas present predominantly as ulcers or strictures in the endoscopic examinations, while primary B-cell lymphomas commonly present as exophytic lesions. Ulcerative colon T-cell lymphoma may mimic Crohn's disease (CD, which is a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestines with ulcer and fistula formations difficult for clinicians to diagnose based on endoscopic observations alone. Like CD, T-cell lymphoma may be characterized by the presence of multiple skipped ulcers distributed from the terminal ileum to the descending colon. Furthermore, it is difficult to diagnose this unusual lymphoma by a single endoscopic biopsy. Typically, the histological composition of T-cell lymphoma is made of medium to large atypical cells located in the base of the ulcer with extension to the muscle layer and the adjacent mucosa. However, it is common that biopsy specimens show only mixed inflammatory changes where the lymphoma cells are hard to be identified. The differential diagnosis of malignant lymphoma must be considered when clinically diagnosed CD is refractory to the medical treatment or when its clinical behavior becomes aggressive. The current study presents a rare case of primary colon T-cell lymphoma in a 56-year-old male with marked recent weight loss, watery diarrhea and bilateral neck lymphadenopathy, who received a laboratory checkup and endoscopic workup for colon biopsy. The initial pathological report was consistent with mucosal inflammation and benign colon ulcers. Interestingly, the blood test showed a prominent eosinophilia. A biopsy of the enlarged neck lymph nodes done approximately 1 month after the colon biopsy unexpectedly showed T-cell lymphoma, which led to a review of the initial colonic biopsy specimens. Additional immunohistochemical stains were used accordingly, which

  12. Role of T Cells in Malnutrition and Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Gerriets, Valerie A.; MacIver, Nancie J.

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional status is critically important for immune cell function. While obesity is characterized by inflammation that promotes metabolic syndrome including cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance, malnutrition can result in immune cell defects and increased risk of mortality from infectious diseases. T cells play an important role in the immune adaptation to both obesity and malnutrition. T cells in obesity have been shown to have an early and critical role in inducing inflammation, ...

  13. Adsorption of multimeric T cell antigens on carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadel, Tarek R; Li, Nan; Shah, Smith;

    2013-01-01

    Antigen-specific activation of cytotoxic T cells can be enhanced up to three-fold more than soluble controls when using functionalized bundled carbon nanotube substrates ((b) CNTs). To overcome the denaturing effects of direct adsorption on (b) CNTs, a simple but robust method is demonstrated...... to stabilize the T cell stimulus on carbon nanotube substrates through non-covalent attachment of the linker neutravidin....

  14. Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma with Polyarthritis Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachoui, Ralph; Farooq, Nouman; Amos, Jonathan V; Shaw, Gene R

    2016-12-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is a rare subtype of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). AITL typically presents with lymphadenopathy, fever, rash, hepatosplenomegaly, and rarely polyarthritis. We report the case of a 50-year-old female who presented with lymphadenopathy, rash, and symmetric polyarthritis. She was later diagnosed with AITL and was treated with chemotherapy with resolution of arthritis. AITL should be suspected in paitents presenting with rheumatoid-like arthritis and diffuse lymphadenopathy. © 2016 Marshfield Clinic.

  15. Multiplicity of Sites for Extrathymic T-cell Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Abo, Toru; Watanabe, Hisami; Sekikawa, Hiroho

    1993-01-01

    In addition to an intrathymic pathway of T-cell differentiation, extrathymic pathways of T-cell differentiation have been found to exist at multiple sites in the living bodies of both mice and humans. Such sites include the sinusoids in the liver, intraepithelial sites in the intestine, the splenic red pulp, the thymic medulla, the decidua in the uterus, and the omentum in the peritoneal cavity. Although extrathymic pathways are minimal in youth, they become predominant with aging and under c...

  16. T-Cell Gene Therapy to Eradicate Disseminated Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    effectiveness of designed T cells for tumor therapy in rodent model by caliper. King’s College, London, United Kingdom Oct 1998 – Dec 2002 Ph.D...typ- ically normal cell constituents that are enriched in tumors. From a T cell perspective, CARs allow bypassing of thymic editing that prevents normal...PM, Solomon D, Topalian SL, Toy ST, Simon P, Lotze MT, Yang JC, Seipp CA, White DE, Steinberg SM: Use of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and

  17. Recognition of local anesthetics by alphabeta+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanni, M P; von Greyerz, S; Hari, Y; Schnyder, B; Pichler, W J

    1999-02-01

    Patients with drug allergy show a specific immune response to drugs. Chemically nonreactive drugs like, for example, local anesthetics are directly recognized by alphabeta+ T cells in an HLA-DR restricted way, as neither drug metabolism nor protein processing is required for T cell stimulation. In this study we identified some of the structural requirements that determine cross-reactivity of T cells to local anesthetics, with the aim to improve the molecular basis for the selection of alternatives in individuals sensitized to a certain local anesthetic and to better understand presentation and T cell recognition of these drugs. Fifty-five clones (52 lidocaine specific, three mepivacaine specific from two allergic donors) were analyzed. Stimulatory compounds induced a down-regulation of the T cell receptor, demonstrating that these non-peptide antigens are recognized by the T cell receptor itself. A consistent cross-reactivity between lidocaine and mepivacaine was found, as all except one lidocaine specific clone proliferated to both drugs tested. Sixteen chemically related local anesthetics (including ester local anesthetics, OH- and desalkylated metabolites) were used to identify structural requirements for T cell recognition. Each of the four clones examined in detail was uniquely sensitive to changes in the structures of the local anesthetic: clone SFT24, i.e., did not recognize any of the tested OH- or desalkylated metabolites, while the clone OFB2 proliferated to all OH-metabolites and other differently modified molecules. The broadly reactive clone OFB2 allowed us to propose a model, suggesting that the structure of the amine side chain of local anesthetics is essential for recognition by the T cell receptor.

  18. SHP-1 phosphatase activity counteracts increased T cell receptor affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeisen, Michael; Baitsch, Lukas; Presotto, Danilo; Baumgaertner, Petra; Romero, Pedro; Michielin, Olivier; Speiser, Daniel E; Rufer, Nathalie

    2013-03-01

    Anti-self/tumor T cell function can be improved by increasing TCR-peptide MHC (pMHC) affinity within physiological limits, but paradoxically further increases (K(d) affinity for the tumor antigen HLA-A2/NY-ESO-1, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying this high-affinity-associated loss of function. As compared with cells expressing TCR affinities generating optimal function (K(d) = 5 to 1 μM), those with supraphysiological affinity (K(d) = 1 μM to 15 nM) showed impaired gene expression, signaling, and surface expression of activatory/costimulatory receptors. Preferential expression of the inhibitory receptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) was limited to T cells with the highest TCR affinity, correlating with full functional recovery upon PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade. In contrast, upregulation of the Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1/PTPN6) was broad, with gradually enhanced expression in CD8(+) T cells with increasing TCR affinities. Consequently, pharmacological inhibition of SHP-1 with sodium stibogluconate augmented the function of all engineered T cells, and this correlated with the TCR affinity-dependent levels of SHP-1. These data highlight an unexpected and global role of SHP-1 in regulating CD8(+) T cell activation and responsiveness and support the development of therapies inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatases to enhance T cell-mediated immunity.

  19. T cell-dependence of Lassa fever pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Flatz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV, the causative agent of Lassa fever (LF, is endemic in West Africa, accounting for substantial morbidity and mortality. In spite of ongoing research efforts, LF pathogenesis and mechanisms of LASV immune control remain poorly understood. While normal laboratory mice are resistant to LASV, we report that mice expressing humanized instead of murine MHC class I (MHC-I failed to control LASV infection and develop severe LF. Infection of MHC-I knockout mice confirmed a key role for MHC-I-restricted T cell responses in controlling LASV. Intriguingly we found that T cell depletion in LASV-infected HHD mice prevented disease, irrespective of high-level viremia. Widespread activation of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, manifest through inducible NO synthase expression, and elevated IL-12p40 serum levels indicated a systemic inflammatory condition. The absence of extensive monocyte/macrophage activation in T cell-depleted mice suggested that T cell responses contribute to deleterious innate inflammatory reactions and LF pathogenesis. Our observations in mice indicate a dual role for T cells, not only protecting from LASV, but also enhancing LF pathogenesis. The possibility of T cell-driven enhancement and immunopathogenesis should be given consideration in future LF vaccine development.

  20. T cell-dependence of Lassa fever pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatz, Lukas; Rieger, Toni; Merkler, Doron; Bergthaler, Andreas; Regen, Tommy; Schedensack, Mariann; Bestmann, Lukas; Verschoor, Admar; Kreutzfeldt, Mario; Brück, Wolfgang; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Günther, Stephan; Pinschewer, Daniel D

    2010-03-26

    Lassa virus (LASV), the causative agent of Lassa fever (LF), is endemic in West Africa, accounting for substantial morbidity and mortality. In spite of ongoing research efforts, LF pathogenesis and mechanisms of LASV immune control remain poorly understood. While normal laboratory mice are resistant to LASV, we report that mice expressing humanized instead of murine MHC class I (MHC-I) failed to control LASV infection and develop severe LF. Infection of MHC-I knockout mice confirmed a key role for MHC-I-restricted T cell responses in controlling LASV. Intriguingly we found that T cell depletion in LASV-infected HHD mice prevented disease, irrespective of high-level viremia. Widespread activation of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, manifest through inducible NO synthase expression, and elevated IL-12p40 serum levels indicated a systemic inflammatory condition. The absence of extensive monocyte/macrophage activation in T cell-depleted mice suggested that T cell responses contribute to deleterious innate inflammatory reactions and LF pathogenesis. Our observations in mice indicate a dual role for T cells, not only protecting from LASV, but also enhancing LF pathogenesis. The possibility of T cell-driven enhancement and immunopathogenesis should be given consideration in future LF vaccine development.

  1. Human immunodeficiencies related to APC/T cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinos eKallikourdis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary event for initiating adaptive immune responses is the encounter between T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APC in the T cell area of secondary lymphoid organs and the formation of highly organized inter-cellular junctions referred to as the immune synapses. In vivo live-cell imaging of APC-T cell interactions combined to functional studies unveiled that T cell fate is dictated, in large part, by the stability of the initial contact. Immune cell interaction is equally important during delivery of T cell help to B cells and for the killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. The critical role of contact dynamics and synapse stability on the immune response is well illustrated by human immune deficiencies in which disease pathogenesis is linked to altered adhesion or defective cross-talk between the synaptic partners. Here we will discuss in details the mechanisms of defective APC-T cell communications in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS and in warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, myelokathexis syndrome (WHIM. In addition, we will summarize the evidences pointing to a compromised conjugate formation in WIP deficiency, DOCK8 deficiency and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

  2. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations.

  3. Nanoscale artificial antigen presenting cells for T cell immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perica, Karlo; De León Medero, Andrés; Durai, Malarvizhi; Chiu, Yen Ling; Bieler, Joan Glick; Sibener, Leah; Niemöller, Michaela; Assenmacher, Mario; Richter, Anne; Edidin, Michael; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC), which deliver stimulatory signals to cytotoxic lymphocytes, are a powerful tool for both adoptive and active immunotherapy. Thus far, aAPC have been synthesized by coupling T cell activating proteins such as CD3 or MHC-peptide to micron-sized beads. Nanoscale platforms have different trafficking and biophysical interaction properties and may allow development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. We therefore manufactured aAPC based on two types of nanoscale particle platforms: biocompatible iron-dextran paramagnetic particles (50-100 nm in diameter) and avidin-coated quantum dot nanocrystals (~30 nm). Nanoscale aAPC induced antigen-specific T cell proliferation from mouse splenocytes and human peripheral blood T cells. When injected in vivo, both iron-dextran particles and quantum dot nanocrystals enhanced tumor rejection in a subcutaneous mouse melanoma model. This is the first description of nanoscale aAPC that induce antigen-specific T cell proliferation in vitro and lead to effective T cell stimulation and inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Artifical antigen presenting cells could revolutionize the field of cancer-directed immunotherapy. This team of investigators have manufactured two types of nanoscale particle platform-based aAPCs and demonstrates that both iron-dextran particles and quantum dot nanocrystals enhance tumor rejection in a melanoma model, providing the first description of nanoscale aAPCs that lead to effective T cell stimulation and inhibition of tumor growth. © 2013.

  4. The Pathology of T Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Mak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is characterized by the production of a wide array of autoantibodies. Thus, the condition was traditionally classified as a “B-cell disease”. Compelling evidence has however shown that without the assistance of the helper T lymphocytes, it is indeed difficult for the “helpless” B cells to become functional enough to trigger SLE-related inflammation. T cells have been recognized to be crucial in the pathogenicity of SLE through their capabilities to communicate with and offer enormous help to B cells for driving autoantibody production. Recently, a number of phenotypic and functional alterations which increase the propensity to trigger lupus-related inflammation have been identified in lupus T cells. Here, potential mechanisms involving alterations in T-cell receptor expressions, postreceptor downstream signalling, epigenetics, and oxidative stress which favour activation of lupus T cells will be discussed. Additionally, how regulatory CD4+, CD8+, and γδ T cells tune down lupus-related inflammation will be highlighted. Lastly, while currently available outcomes of clinical trials evaluating therapeutic agents which manipulate the T cells such as calcineurin inhibitors indicate that they are at least as efficacious and safe as conventional immunosuppressants in treating lupus glomerulonephritis, larger clinical trials are undoubtedly required to validate these as-yet favourable findings.

  5. Impairment of T cell function in parasitic infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Rodrigues

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In mammals subverted as hosts by protozoan parasites, the latter and/or the agonists they release are detected and processed by sensors displayed by many distinct immune cell lineages, in a tissue(s-dependent context. Focusing on the T lymphocyte lineage, we review our present understanding on its transient or durable functional impairment over the course of the developmental program of the intracellular parasites Leishmania spp., Plasmodium spp., Toxoplasma gondii, and Trypanosoma cruzi in their mammalian hosts. Strategies employed by protozoa to down-regulate T lymphocyte function may act at the initial moment of naïve T cell priming, rendering T cells anergic or unresponsive throughout infection, or later, exhausting T cells due to antigen persistence. Furthermore, by exploiting host feedback mechanisms aimed at maintaining immune homeostasis, parasites can enhance T cell apoptosis. We will discuss how infections with prominent intracellular protozoan parasites lead to a general down-regulation of T cell function through T cell anergy and exhaustion, accompanied by apoptosis, and ultimately allowing pathogen persistence.

  6. Distinct Pattern of Human Vδ1 T Cells Recognizing MICA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianqiang Li; Lianxian Cui; Wei He

    2005-01-01

    γδ T cells represent one unique recognition pattern, the limited recognition, which distinguishes from the specific recognition for αβ T cells and pattern recognition for macrophages. Vδ1 γδ T cell is the major subset of human γδT cells, which predominates in mucosal tissue including the intestinal epithelia. Presently, a few antigens that human Vδ1TCR can recognize have been identified. Among them, MHC class Ⅰ chain-related molecules A (MICA)have been studied most intensively. Besides Vδ1TCR, MICA is also the ligand of NKG2D, a C-type lectin-like activating immunoreceptor. In human, only Vδ1 cells can simultaneously express both types of receptors of MICA while NK cells, αβ T cells and other subsets of γδ T cells likewise express NKG2D. Although the precise mechanisms are still enigmatic, this distinct pattern of Vδ1 cells recognizing MICA predicts unique biological significance of Vδ1 cells in immune defense. Recent years, some progresses have been made in this issue. In this review we summarize the related reports and put forward some novel views based on our group's studies.

  7. T-cell subsets in the germinal center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiscal, Roybel R; Vinuesa, Carola G

    2013-03-01

    T cells are known to migrate to B-cell-enriched follicles and germinal centers within secondary lymphoid organs to provide help to B cells. Cognate T:B interactions that take place at the T:B border and subsequently within germinal centers are essential for B-cell priming, differentiation into germinal center B cells, and selection of mutated cells into memory B cells or memory plasma cells. In recent years, different stages of maturation within B-cell helper T cells, collectively known as B-follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, as well as heterogeneity amid germinal center T cells are becoming clear. Indeed, germinal centers support not only bona fide Tfh cells but also CD4(+) and CD8(+) follicular regulatory T (Tfr) cells that act to suppress germinal center responses and B-cell helper natural killer T cells. There is a growing need for more precise phenotypic and functional distinction of these specialized T-cell subsets. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on the ontogeny, molecular identity, and functional relevance of the various subsets of germinal center T cells.

  8. CD8 T cell memory recall is enhanced by novel direct interactions with CD4 T cells enabled by MHC class II transferred from APCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo A Romagnoli

    Full Text Available Protection against many intracellular pathogens is provided by CD8 T cells, which are thought to need CD4 T cell help to develop into effective memory CD8 T cells. Because murine CD8 T cells do not transcribe MHC class II (MHC-II genes, several models have proposed antigen presenting cells (APCs as intermediaries required for CD4 T cells to deliver their help to CD8 T cells. Here, we demonstrate the presence of MHC-II molecules on activated murine CD8 T cells in vitro as well as in vivo. These MHC-II molecules are acquired via trogocytosis by CD8 T cells from their activating APCs, particularly CD11c positive dendritic cells (DCs. Transferred MHC-II molecules on activated murine CD8 T cells were functionally competent in stimulating specific indicator CD4 T cells. CD8 T cells that were "helped" in vitro and subsequently allowed to rest in vivo showed enhanced recall responses upon challenge compared to "helpless" CD8 T cells; in contrast, no differences were seen upon immediate challenge. These data indicate that direct CD8:CD4 T cell interactions may significantly contribute to help for CD8 T cells. Furthermore, this mechanism may enable CD8 T cells to communicate with different subsets of interacting CD4 T cells that could modulate immune responses.

  9. DMPD: Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role of cis-acting DNA elements thatrespond to T cell activation signals. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1492121 Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role of cis-acting DNA elements ...html) (.csml) Show Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role of cis-acting ...DNA elements thatrespond to T cell activation signals. PubmedID 1492121 Title Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role

  10. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M;

    1998-01-01

    induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  11. T cell activation and proliferation characteristic for HIV-Nef transgenic mice is lymphopenia induced

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, Paul G. F.; Hofhuis, Frans M.; Osterwegel, Mariette A.; Tesselaar, Kiki

    2007-01-01

    The HIV-Nef protein has been implicated in generating high viral loads and T cell activation. Transgenic (tg) mice with constitutive T cell-specific Nef expression show a dramatic reduction in T cell number and highly increased T cell turnover. Previous studies in Nef tg mice attributed this T cell

  12. Anti-ICOS Monoclonal Antibody MEDI-570 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Follicular Variant or Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Follicular Variant Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3a Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides; Recurrent Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides; Stage III Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides; Stage IV Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides

  13. The Defect in T-Cell Regulation in NOD Mice Is an Effect on the T-Cell Effectors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anna Morena D'Alise; Vincent Auyeung; Markus Feuerer; Junko Nishio; Jason Fontenot; Christophe Benoist; Diane Mathis

    2008-01-01

    FoxP3⁺ regulatory T cells (Tregs) protect against autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes (T1D) in particular, prompting the hypothesis that a deficiency in Tregs is a critical determinant of diabetes susceptibility in NOD mice...

  14. T cell metabolism. The protein LEM promotes CD8⁺ T cell immunity through effects on mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, Isobel; Wang, Lihui; Pallmer, Katharina; Richter, Kirsten; Ichimura, Takahuru; Haas, Robert; Crouse, Josh; Choi, Onjee; Heathcote, Dean; Lovo, Elena; Mauro, Claudio; Abdi, Reza; Oxenius, Annette; Rutschmann, Sophie; Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G

    2015-05-29

    Protective CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity requires a massive expansion in cell number and the development of long-lived memory cells. Using forward genetics in mice, we identified an orphan protein named lymphocyte expansion molecule (LEM) that promoted antigen-dependent CD8(+) T cell proliferation, effector function, and memory cell generation in response to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Generation of LEM-deficient mice confirmed these results. Through interaction with CR6 interacting factor (CRIF1), LEM controlled the levels of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes and respiration, resulting in the production of pro-proliferative mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS). LEM provides a link between immune activation and the expansion of protective CD8(+) T cells driven by OXPHOS and represents a pathway for the restoration of long-term protective immunity based on metabolically modified cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells.

  15. The phosphorylation state of CD3gamma influences T cell responsiveness and controls T cell receptor cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Bäckström, T; Lauritsen, J P

    1998-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) is internalized following activation of protein kinase C (PKC) via a leucine (Leu)-based motif in CD3gamma. Some studies have indicated that the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface following PKC-mediated internalization. The functional state of recycled TCR and the ...... the phosphorylation state of CD3gamma and T cell responsiveness. Based on these observations a physiological role of CD3gamma and TCR cycling is proposed....

  16. Inactivation of T cell receptor peptide-specific CD4 regulatory T cells induces chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR)-recognizing regulatory cells, induced after vaccination with self-reactive T cells or TCR peptides, have been shown to prevent autoimmunity. We have asked whether this regulation is involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance to myelin basic protein (MBP) in an autoimmune disease model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Antigen-induced EAE in (SJL x B10.PL)F1 mice is transient in that most animals recover permanently from the disease. Most of the i...

  17. ArtinM Mediates Murine T Cell Activation and Induces Cell Death in Jurkat Human Leukemic T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Brito, Patrícia Kellen Martins; Gonçalves, Thiago Eleutério; Vendruscolo, Patrícia Edivânia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The recognition of cell surface glycans by lectins may be critical for the innate and adaptive immune responses. ArtinM, a d-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, activates antigen-presenting cells by recognizing TLR2 N-glycans and induces Th1 immunity. We recently demonstrated that ArtinM stimulated CD4+ T cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we further studied the effects of ArtinM on adaptive immune cells. We showed that ArtinM activates murine CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, augmenting their positivity for CD25, CD69, and CD95 and showed higher interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production. The CD4+ T cells exhibited increased T-bet expression in response to ArtinM, and IL-2 production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depended on the recognition of CD3εγ-chain glycans by ArtinM. The ArtinM effect on aberrantly-glycosylated neoplastic lymphocytes was studied in Jurkat T cells, in which ArtinM induced IL-2, IFN-γ, and IL-1β production, but decreased cell viability and growth. A higher frequency of AnnexinV- and propidium iodide-stained cells demonstrated the induction of Jurkat T cells apoptosis by ArtinM, and this apoptotic response was reduced by caspases and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The ArtinM effects on murine T cells corroborated with the immunomodulatory property of lectin, whereas the promotion of Jurkat T cells apoptosis may reflect a potential applicability of ArtinM in novel strategies for treating lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:28665310

  18. Fli-1 overexpression in hematopoietic progenitors deregulates T cell development and induces pre-T cell lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique F M A Smeets

    Full Text Available The Ets transcription factor Fli-1 is preferentially expressed in hematopoietic tissues and cells, including immature T cells, but the role of Fli-1 in T cell development has not been closely examined. To address this we retrovirally overexpressed Fli-1 in various in vitro and in vivo settings and analysed its effect on T cell development. We found that Fli-1 overexpression perturbed the DN to DP transition and inhibited CD4 development whilst enhancing CD8 development both in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, Fli-1 overexpression in vivo eventuated in development of pre-T cell lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma (pre-T LBL. Known Fli-1 target genes such as the pro-survival Bcl-2 family members were not found to be upregulated. In contrast, we found increased NOTCH1 expression in all Fli-1 T cells and detected Notch1 mutations in all tumours. These data show a novel function for Fli-1 in T cell development and leukaemogenesis and provide a new mouse model of pre-T LBL to identify treatment options that target the Fli-1 and Notch1 signalling pathways.

  19. Fatty acids, lipid mediators, and T-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Anja J; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Toes, René E M; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Research toward the mechanisms underlying obesity-linked complications has intensified during the last years. As a consequence, it has become clear that metabolism and immunity are intimately linked. Free fatty acids and other lipids acquired in excess by current feeding patterns have been proposed to mediate this link due to their immune modulatory capacity. The functional differences between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, in combination with their dietary intake are believed to modulate the outcome of immune responses. Moreover, unsaturated fatty acids can be oxidized in a tightly regulated and specific manner to generate either potent pro-inflammatory or pro-resolving lipid mediators. These oxidative derivatives of fatty acids have received detailed attention during the last years, as they have proven to have strong immune modulatory capacity, even in pM ranges. Both fatty acids and oxidized fatty acids have been studied especially in relation to macrophage and T-cells functions. In this review, we propose to focus on the effect of fatty acids and their oxidative derivatives on T-cells, as it is an active area of research during the past 5 years. The effect of fatty acids and their derivatives on activation and proliferation of T-cells, as well as the delicate balance between stimulation and lipotoxicity will be discussed. Moreover, the receptors involved in the interaction between free fatty acids and their derivatives with T-cells will be summarized. Finally, the mechanisms involved in modulation of T-cells by fatty acids will be addressed, including cellular signaling and metabolism of T-cells. The in vitro results will be placed in context of in vivo studies both in humans and mice. In this review, we summarize the latest findings on the immune modulatory function of lipids on T-cells and will point out novel directions for future research.

  20. Fatty Acids, Lipid Mediators, and T-Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Anja J.; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Toes, René E. M.; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Research toward the mechanisms underlying obesity-linked complications has intensified during the last years. As a consequence, it has become clear that metabolism and immunity are intimately linked. Free fatty acids and other lipids acquired in excess by current feeding patterns have been proposed to mediate this link due to their immune modulatory capacity. The functional differences between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, in combination with their dietary intake are believed to modulate the outcome of immune responses. Moreover, unsaturated fatty acids can be oxidized in a tightly regulated and specific manner to generate either potent pro-inflammatory or pro-resolving lipid mediators. These oxidative derivatives of fatty acids have received detailed attention during the last years, as they have proven to have strong immune modulatory capacity, even in pM ranges. Both fatty acids and oxidized fatty acids have been studied especially in relation to macrophage and T-cells functions. In this review, we propose to focus on the effect of fatty acids and their oxidative derivatives on T-cells, as it is an active area of research during the past 5 years. The effect of fatty acids and their derivatives on activation and proliferation of T-cells, as well as the delicate balance between stimulation and lipotoxicity will be discussed. Moreover, the receptors involved in the interaction between free fatty acids and their derivatives with T-cells will be summarized. Finally, the mechanisms involved in modulation of T-cells by fatty acids will be addressed, including cellular signaling and metabolism of T-cells. The in vitro results will be placed in context of in vivo studies both in humans and mice. In this review, we summarize the latest findings on the immune modulatory function of lipids on T-cells and will point out novel directions for future research. PMID:25352844

  1. Dysregulation of CD4(+) T Cell Subsets in Intracranial Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Ming-Guang; Liang, Guo-Biao; Yu, Chun-Yong; He, Wenxiu; Li, Zhi-Qing; Gao, Xu

    2016-02-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) and potential IA rupture are one of the direct causes of permanent brain damage and mortality. Interestingly, the major risk factors of IA development, including hemodynamic stress, hypertension, smoking, and genetic predispositions, are closely associated with a proinflammatory immune status. Therefore, we examined the roles of CD4(+) T cells in IA pathogenesis. IA patients exhibited peripheral CD4(+) T-cell imbalance, with overrepresented T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 activities and underrepresented Th2 and regulatory T (Treg) activities, including increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17 production and decreased IL-10 production from total CD4(+) T cells. Chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6 were used to identify Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell subsets, and CD4(+)CD25(hi) was used to identify Treg cells. Based on these markers, the data then showed altered cytokine production by each cell type and shifted subpopulation frequency. Moreover, this shift in frequency was directly correlated with IA severity. To examine the underlying mechanism of CD4(+) T cell skewing, we cocultured CD4(+) T cells with autologous monocytes and found that coculture with monocytes could significantly increase IFN-γ and IL-17 production through contact-independent mechanisms, demonstrating that monocytes could potentially contribute to the altered CD4(+) T cell composition in IA. Analyzing mRNA transcripts revealed significantly upregulated IL-1β and TNF-α expression by monocytes from IA patients. We found a loss of CD4(+) T cell subset balance that was likely to promote a higher state of inflammation in IA, which may exacerbate the disease through a positive feedback loop.

  2. Modulation of T cell responses after cross-talk between antigen presenting cells and T cells: a give-and-take relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauben, Marca H M; 't Hoen, Esther N M; Taams, Leonie S

    2003-01-01

    T cells presenting antigens in the context of MHC class II can induce anergy. In rat CD4+ T cell clones we have shown that depending on the depth of anergy other T cell responses can be inhibited in the presence of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). This inhibition is cell-contact dependent, and APCs recovered from co-cultures with suppressive anergic T cells are modulated in their capacity to activate T cells. No changes in cell surface expression of MHC molecules, B7-1/B7-2, and OX40L were detected. Remarkably cell clusters formed by anergic T cells appeared to be more tight than clusters of activated T cells, and after fluorescent cell surface labelling of T cells, transfer of label was more profound in co-cultures of anergic T cells and APCs compared to activated T cells and APCs. Previously, it has been shown that activated T cells can absorb molecules from APCs in a unidirectional process. We now have evidence that also APCs can absorb cell surface molecules from T cells during APC-T cell co-cultures. We speculate that the quantity and quality of molecule reshuffling during cross-talk between T cells and APCs play a role in the regulation of the T cell response.

  3. Highly efficient gene transfer using a retroviral vector into murine T cells for preclinical chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cell therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusabuka, Hotaka; Fujiwara, Kento; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Hirobe, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku, E-mail: nakagawa@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp; Okada, Naoki, E-mail: okada@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2016-04-22

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T (CAR-T) cells has attracted attention as an efficacious strategy for cancer treatment. To prove the efficacy and safety of CAR-T cell therapy, the elucidation of immunological mechanisms underlying it in mice is required. Although a retroviral vector (Rv) is mainly used for the introduction of CAR to murine T cells, gene transduction efficiency is generally less than 50%. The low transduction efficiency causes poor precision in the functional analysis of CAR-T cells. We attempted to improve the Rv gene transduction protocol to more efficiently generate functional CAR-T cells by optimizing the period of pre-cultivation and antibody stimulation. In the improved protocol, gene transduction efficiency to murine T cells was more than 90%. In addition, almost all of the prepared murine T cells expressed CAR after puromycin selection. These CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity and secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. We believe that our optimized gene transduction protocol for murine T cells contributes to the advancement of T cell biology and development of immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells. - Highlights: • We established highly efficient gene transduction protocols for murine T cells. • CD8{sup +} CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity. • CD4{sup +} CAR-T cells secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. • This finding can contribute to the development of T-cell biology and immunotherapy.

  4. Challenges and Opportunities for T-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Eliminate HIV Reservoirs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brockman, Mark A; Jones, R Brad; Brumme, Zabrina L

    2015-01-01

    ...(+) T-cell-mediated mechanisms. In this perspective, we highlight challenges to T-cell-mediated elimination of HIV reservoirs, including characteristics of responding T cells, aspects of the cellular reservoirs, and properties...

  5. Activated human CD4 T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth;

    2012-01-01

    Because naïve T cells are unable to import cystine due to the absence of cystine transporters, it has been suggested that T cell activation is dependent on cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells. The aim of this study was to determine at which phases during T cell activation exogenous...... cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both...... cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell...

  6. Baseline levels of influenza-specific CD4 memory T-cells affect T-cell responses to influenza vaccines.

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    Xiao-Song He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Factors affecting immune responses to influenza vaccines have not been studied systematically. We hypothesized that T-cell and antibody responses to the vaccines are functions of pre-existing host immunity against influenza antigens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During the 2004 and 2005 influenza seasons, we have collected data on cellular and humoral immune reactivity to influenza virus in blood samples collected before and after immunization with inactivated or live attenuated influenza vaccines in healthy children and adults. We first used cross-validated lasso regression on the 2004 dataset to identify a group of candidate baseline correlates with T-cell and antibody responses to vaccines, defined as fold-increase in influenza-specific T-cells and serum HAI titer after vaccination. The following baseline parameters were examined: percentages of influenza-reactive IFN-gamma(+ cells in T and NK cell subsets, percentages of influenza-specific memory B-cells, HAI titer, age, and type of vaccine. The candidate baseline correlates were then tested with the independent 2005 dataset. Baseline percentage of influenza-specific IFN-gamma(+ CD4 T-cells was identified as a significant correlate of CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses, with lower baseline levels associated with larger T-cell responses. Baseline HAI titer and vaccine type were identified as significant correlates for HAI response, with lower baseline levels and the inactivated vaccine associated with larger HAI responses. Previously we reported that baseline levels of CD56(dim NK reactivity against influenza virus inversely correlated with the immediate T-cell response to vaccination, and that NK reactivity induced by influenza virus depended on IL-2 produced by influenza-specific memory T-cells. Taken together these results suggest a novel mechanism for the homeostasis of virus-specific T-cells, which involves interaction between memory helper T-cells, CD56(dim NK and DC

  7. The role of Protein Kinase Cη in T cell biology

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    Nicholas R.J. Gascoigne

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase Cη (PKCη is a member of the novel PKC subfamily, which also includes δ, ε, and θ isoforms. Compared to the other novel PKCs, the function of PKCη in the immune system is largely unknown. Several studies have started to reveal the role of PKCη, particularly in T cells. PKCη is highly expressed in T cells, and is upregulated during thymocyte positive selection. Interestingly, like the θ isoform, PKCη is also recruited to the immunological synapse that is formed between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell. However, unlike PKCθ, which becomes concentrated to the central region of the synapse, PKCη remains in a diffuse pattern over the whole area of the synapse, suggesting distinctive roles of these two isoforms in signal transduction. Although PKCη is dispensable for thymocyte development, further analysis of PKCη− or PKCθ−deficient and double knockout mice revealed the redundancy of these two isoforms in thymocyte development. In contrast, PKCη rather than PKCθ, plays an important role for T cell homeostatic proliferation, which requires recognition of self-antigen. Another piece of evidence demonstrating that PKCη and PKCθ have isoform specific as well as redundant roles come from the analysis of CD4 to CD8 T cell ratios in the periphery of these knockout mice. Deficiency in PKCη or PKCθ had opposing effects as PKCη knockout mice had a higher ratio of CD4 to CD8 T cells compared to that of wild-type mice, whereas PKCθ-deficient mice had a lower ratio. Biochemical studies showed that calcium flux and NFκB translocation is impaired in PKCη-deficient T cells upon TCR crosslinking stimulation, a character shared with PKCθ-deficient T cells. However, unlike the case with PKCθ, the mechanistic study of PKCη is at early stage and the signaling pathways involving PKCη, at least in T cells, are essentially unknown. In this review, we will cover the topics mentioned above as well as provide some

  8. T cells exacerbate Lyme borreliosis in TLR2-deficient mice

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    Carrie E. Lasky

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection of humans with the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, causes Lyme borreliosis and can lead to clinical manifestations such as, arthritis, carditis and neurological conditions. Experimental infection of mice recapitulates many of these symptoms and serves as a model system for the investigation of disease pathogenesis and immunity. Innate immunity is known to drive the development of Lyme arthritis and carditis, but the mechanisms driving this response remain unclear. Innate immune cells recognize B. burgdorferi surface lipoproteins primarily via Toll-like receptor (TLR2; however, previous work has demonstrated TLR2-/- mice had exacerbated disease and increased bacterial burden. We demonstrate increased CD4 and CD8 T cell infiltrates in B. burgdorferi-infected joints and hearts of C3H TLR2-/- mice. In vivo depletion of either CD4 or CD8 T cells reduced Borrelia-induced joint swelling and lowered tissue spirochete burden, while depletion of CD8 T cells alone reduced disease severity scores. Exacerbation of Lyme arthritis correlated with increased production of CXCL9 by synoviocytes and this was reduced with CD8 T cell depletion. These results demonstrate T cells can exacerbate Lyme disease pathogenesis and prolong disease resolution possibly through dysregulation of inflammatory responses and inhibition of bacterial clearance.

  9. Epigenetically Mediated Pathogenic Effects of Phenanthrene on Regulatory T Cells

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    Jing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthrene (Phe, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH, is a major constituent of urban air pollution. There have been conflicting results regarding the role of other AhR ligands 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD and 6-formylindolo [3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ in modifying regulatory T cell populations (Treg or T helper (Th17 differentiation, and the effects of Phe have been understudied. We hypothesized that different chemical entities of PAH induce Treg to become either Th2 or Th17 effector T cells through epigenetic modification of FOXP3. To determine specific effects on T cell populations by phenanthrene, primary human Treg were treated with Phe, TCDD, or FICZ and assessed for function, gene expression, and phenotype. Methylation of CpG sites within the FOXP3 locus reduced FOXP3 expression, leading to impaired Treg function and conversion of Treg into a CD4+CD25lo Th2 phenotype in Phe-treated cells. Conversely, TCDD treatment led to epigenetic modification of IL-17A and conversion of Treg to Th17 T cells. These findings present a mechanism by which exposure to AhR-ligands mediates human T cell responses and begins to elucidate the relationship between environmental exposures, immune modulation, and initiation of human disease.

  10. Functional Assessment of Pharmacological Telomerase Activators in Human T Cells

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    Rita B. Effros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are structures at the ends of chromosomes that shorten during cell division and eventually signal an irreversible state of growth arrest known as cellular senescence. To delay this cellular aging, human T cells, which are critical in the immune control over infections and cancer, activate the enzyme telomerase, which binds and extends the telomeres. Several different extracts from the Astragalus membranaceus root have been documented to activate telomerase activity in human T cells. The objective of this research was to compare two extracts from Astragalus membranaceus, TA-65 and HTA, for their effects on both telomerase and proliferative activity of human CD4 and CD8 T cells. Our results demonstrate that, TA-65 increased telomerase activity significantly (1.3 to 3.3-fold relative to controls in T cell cultures from six donors tested, whereas HTA only increased telomerase levels in two out of six donors. We also demonstrate that TA-65 activates telomerase by a MAPK- specific pathway. Finally, we determine that during a three-day culture period, only the T cells treated with the TA-65 extract showed a statistically significant increase in proliferative activity. Our results underscore the importance of comparing multiple telomerase activators within the same experiment, and of including functional assays in addition to measuring telomerase activity.

  11. Genetically modified T cells in cancer therapy: opportunities and challenges

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    Michaela Sharpe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumours use many strategies to evade the host immune response, including downregulation or weak immunogenicity of target antigens and creation of an immune-suppressive tumour environment. T cells play a key role in cell-mediated immunity and, recently, strategies to genetically modify T cells either through altering the specificity of the T cell receptor (TCR or through introducing antibody-like recognition in chimeric antigen receptors (CARs have made substantial advances. The potential of these approaches has been demonstrated in particular by the successful use of genetically modified T cells to treat B cell haematological malignancies in clinical trials. This clinical success is reflected in the growing number of strategic partnerships in this area that have attracted a high level of investment and involve large pharmaceutical organisations. Although our understanding of the factors that influence the safety and efficacy of these therapies has increased, challenges for bringing genetically modified T-cell immunotherapy to many patients with different tumour types remain. These challenges range from the selection of antigen targets and dealing with regulatory and safety issues to successfully navigating the routes to commercial development. However, the encouraging clinical data, the progress in the scientific understanding of tumour immunology and the improvements in the manufacture of cell products are all advancing the clinical translation of these important cellular immunotherapies.

  12. Reduction of Ca2+-transporting systems in memory T cells.

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    Sigova, A A; Dedkova, E N; Zinchenko, V P; Litvinov, I S

    2000-01-01

    Antigen-specific B and T lymphocytes make up the material grounds of immune memory, their main functional distinction from the so-called "naive" cells is due to the rapid and enhanced response to the antigen-pathogen. An essential distinction between the memory and naive T cells is different sensitivity of these two subpopulations of T lymphocytes to Ca2+-ionophores. Comparative analysis of Ca2+ responses of the immune memory T lymphocytes and naive T cells of mouse CBA/J line to the addition of Ca2+-mobilizing agents concanavalin A, thapsigargin, and ionomycin was carried out. These compounds in concentrations increasing [Ca2+]i in naive cells had no effect on [Ca2+]i in memory cells. Thus, the Ca2+ entrance into memory cells was not activated by exhaustion of intracellular resources. Estimation of intracellular resources of Ca2+, mobilized by ionomycin and thapsigargin in Ca2+ free medium has shown the absence in memory T cells of the intracellular Ca2+ pool, which may be one of factors of their resistance to ionophores. Reduction of the system of Ca2+ influx into memory T cells was shown using the SH-reagent thimerosal. Memory T cells appear to be resistant to "Ca2+ -paradox." Their incubation with 0.5 mM EDTA in the presence or absence of Ca2+ -mobilizing compounds followed by addition of 2 mM CaCl2 did not result in induction of Ca2+ influx into these cells.

  13. T cell reconstitution in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsen, K; Jordan, K K; Uhlving, H H

    2015-01-01

    Infections and acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) are major causes of treatment-related mortality and morbidity following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Both complications depend on reconstitution of the T-lymphocyte population based on donor T cells. Although...... it is well established that Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a cytokine essential for de novo T cell development in the thymus and homoeostatic peripheral expansion of T cells, associations between circulating levels of IL-7 and T cell reconstitution following HSCT have not been investigated previously. We...... in patients treated with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) compared with those not treated with ATG (P = 0.0079). IL-7 levels at day +7 were negatively associated with T cell counts at day +30 to +60 (at day +60: CD3(+) : β = -10.6 × 10(6) cells/l, P = 0.0030; CD8(+) : β = -8.4 × 10(6) cells/l, P = 0.061; CD4...

  14. Primary antitumor immune response mediated by CD4+ T cells.

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    Corthay, Alexandre; Skovseth, Dag K; Lundin, Katrin U; Røsjø, Egil; Omholt, Hilde; Hofgaard, Peter O; Haraldsen, Guttorm; Bogen, Bjarne

    2005-03-01

    Gene-targeted mice have recently revealed a role for lymphocytes and interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) in conferring protection against cancer, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we have characterized a successful primary antitumor immune response initiated by naive CD4+ T cells. Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-negative myeloma cells injected subcutaneously into syngeneic mice were surrounded within 3 days by macrophages that captured tumor antigens. Within 6 days, naive myeloma-specific CD4+ T cells became activated in draining lymph nodes and subsequently migrated to the incipient tumor site. Upon recognition of tumor-derived antigenic peptides presented on MHC-II by macrophages, the myeloma-specific CD4+ T cells were reactivated and started to secrete cytokines. T cell-derived IFNgamma activated macrophages in close proximity to the tumor cells. Tumor cell growth was completely inhibited by such locally activated macrophages. These data indicate a mechanism for immunosurveillance of MHC-II-negative cancer cells by tumor-specific CD4+ T cells through collaboration with macrophages.

  15. Tolerogenic dendritic cells for regulatory T cell induction in man

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    Verena eRaker

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are (DC highly specialized professional antigen-presenting cells (APC that regulate immune responses, maintaining the balance between tolerance and immunity. Mechanisms via which they can promote central and peripheral tolerance include clonal deletion, inhibition of memory T cell responses, T cell anergy and induction of regulatory T cells. These properties have led to the analysis of human tolerogenic DC as a therapeutic strategy for induction or re-establishment of tolerance. In the recent years, numerous protocols for the generation of human tolerogenic DC have been developed and their tolerogenic mechanisms, including induction of regulatory T cells, are relatively well understood. Phase I trials have been conducted in autoimmune disease, with results that emphasize the feasibility and safety of treatments with tolerogenic DC. Therefore, the scientific rationale for the use of tolerogenic DC therapy in the fields of transplantation medicine and allergic and autoimmune diseases is strong. This review will give an overview on efforts and protocols to generate human tolerogenic DC with focus on IL-10-modulated DC as inducers of regulatory T cells and discuss their clinical applications and challenges faced in further developing this form of immunotherapy.

  16. Hypercholesterolemia Induces Differentiation of Regulatory T Cells in the Liver.

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    Mailer, Reiner K W; Gisterå, Anton; Polyzos, Konstantinos A; Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Hansson, Göran K

    2017-05-26

    The liver is the central organ that responds to dietary cholesterol intake and facilitates the release and clearance of lipoprotein particles. Persistent hypercholesterolemia leads to immune responses against lipoprotein particles that drive atherosclerosis. However, the effect of hypercholesterolemia on hepatic T-cell differentiation remains unknown. To investigate hepatic T-cell subsets upon hypercholesterolemia. We observed that hypercholesterolemia elevated the intrahepatic regulatory T (Treg) cell population and increased the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 in the liver. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that intrahepatically differentiated Treg cells relocated to the inflamed aorta in atherosclerosis-prone low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice. Moreover, hypercholesterolemia induced the differentiation of intrahepatic, but not intrasplenic, Th17 cells in wild-type mice, whereas the disrupted liver homeostasis in hypercholesterolemic Ldlr(-/-) mice led to intrahepatic Th1 cell differentiation and CD11b(+)CD11c(+) leukocyte accumulation. Our results elucidate a new mechanism that controls intrahepatic T-cell differentiation during atherosclerosis development and indicates that intrahepatically differentiated T cells contribute to the CD4(+) T-cell pool in the atherosclerotic aorta. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. CAR T Cell Therapy: A Game Changer in Cancer Treatment

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    Hilde Almåsbak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of novel targeted therapies with acceptable safety profiles is critical to successful cancer outcomes with better survival rates. Immunotherapy offers promising opportunities with the potential to induce sustained remissions in patients with refractory disease. Recent dramatic clinical responses in trials with gene modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs in B-cell malignancies have generated great enthusiasm. This therapy might pave the way for a potential paradigm shift in the way we treat refractory or relapsed cancers. CARs are genetically engineered receptors that combine the specific binding domains from a tumor targeting antibody with T cell signaling domains to allow specifically targeted antibody redirected T cell activation. Despite current successes in hematological cancers, we are only in the beginning of exploring the powerful potential of CAR redirected T cells in the control and elimination of resistant, metastatic, or recurrent nonhematological cancers. This review discusses the application of the CAR T cell therapy, its challenges, and strategies for successful clinical and commercial translation.

  18. Regulation of Germinal Center Reactions by B and T Cells

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    Yeonseok Chung

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Break of B cell tolerance to self-antigens results in the development of autoantibodies and, thus, leads to autoimmunity. How B cell tolerance is maintained during active germinal center (GC reactions is yet to be fully understood. Recent advances revealed several subsets of T cells and B cells that can positively or negatively regulate GC B cell responses in vivo. IL-21-producing CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells comprise a distinct lineage of helper T cells—termed follicular helper T cells (TFH—that can provide help for the development of GC reactions where somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation take place. Although the function of TFH cells is beneficial in generating high affinity antibodies against infectious agents, aberrant activation of TFH cell or B cell to self-antigens results in autoimmunity. At least three subsets of immune cells have been proposed as regulatory cells that can limit such antibody-mediated autoimmunity, including follicular regulatory T cells (TFR, Qa-1 restricted CD8+ regulatory T cells (CD8+TREG, and regulatory B cells (BREG. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of GC B cell regulation with specific emphasis on the newly identified immune cell subsets involved in this process.

  19. Effect of substrate mechanical properties on T cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, King; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2013-03-01

    T cell activation is a key process in cell-mediated immunity, and engagement of T cell receptors by peptides on antigen presenting cells leads to activation of signaling cascades as well as cytoskeletal reorganization and large scale membrane deformations. While significant advances have been made in understanding the biochemical signaling pathways, the effects imposed by the physical environment and the role of mechanical forces on cell activation are not well understood. In this study, we have used anti-CD3 coated elastic polyacrylamide gels as stimulatory substrates to enable the spreading of Jurkat T cells and the measurement of cellular traction forces. We have investigated the effect of substrate stiffness on the dynamics of T cell spreading and cellular force generation. We found that T cells display more active and sustained edge dynamics on softer gels and that they exert increased traction stresses with increasing gel stiffness. A dynamic actin cytoskeleton was required to maintain the forces generated during activation, as inferred from small molecule inhibition experiments. Our results indicate an important role for physical properties of the antigen presenting cell as well as cytoskeleton-driven forces in signaling activation.

  20. Role of T Cells in Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy

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    Chia-Chao Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetic nephropathy (DN is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and is increasingly considered as an inflammatory disease characterized by leukocyte infiltration at every stage of renal involvement. Inflammation and activation of the immune system are closely involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its microvascular complications. Macrophage has been well recognized to play an important role in type 2 DN, leukocyte infiltration, and participated in process of DN, as was proposed recently. Th1, Th2, Th17, T reg, and cytotoxic T cells are involved in the development and progression of DN. The purpose of this review is to assemble current information concerning the role of T cells in the development and progression of type 2 DN. Specific emphasis is placed on the potential interaction and contribution of the T cells to renal damage. The therapeutic strategies involving T cells in the treatment of type 2 DN are also reviewed. Improving knowledge of the recognition of T cells as significant pathogenic mediators in DN reinforces the possibility of new potential therapeutic targets translated into future clinical treatments.

  1. Laminins affect T cell trafficking and allograft fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Kristi J; Iwami, Daiki; Harris, Donald G; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Burrell, Bryna E

    2014-05-01

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are integral sites for the generation of immune tolerance, migration of CD4⁺ T cells, and induction of Tregs. Despite the importance of LNs in regulation of inflammatory responses, the LN-specific factors that regulate T cell migration and the precise LN structural domains in which differentiation occurs remain undefined. Using intravital and fluorescent microscopy, we found that alloreactive T cells traffic distinctly into the tolerant LN and colocalize in exclusive regions with alloantigen-presenting cells, a process required for Treg induction. Extracellular matrix proteins, including those of the laminin family, formed regions within the LN that were permissive for colocalization of alloantigen-presenting cells, alloreactive T cells, and Tregs. We identified unique expression patterns of laminin proteins in high endothelial venule basement membranes and the cortical ridge that correlated with alloantigen-specific immunity or immune tolerance. The ratio of laminin α4 to laminin α5 was greater in domains within tolerant LNs, compared with immune LNs, and blocking laminin α4 function or inducing laminin α5 overexpression disrupted T cell and DC localization and transmigration through tolerant LNs. Furthermore, reducing α4 laminin circumvented tolerance induction and induced cardiac allograft inflammation and rejection in murine models. This work identifies laminins as potential targets for immune modulation.

  2. Functional heterogeneity of human effector CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Hiroshi; Naruto, Takuya; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2012-02-09

    Effector CD8(+) T cells are believed to be terminally differentiated cells having cytotoxic activity and the ability to produce effector cytokines such as INF-γ and TNF-α. We investigated the difference between CXCR1(+) and CXCR1(-) subsets of human effector CD27(-)CD28(-)CD8(+) T cells. The subsets expressed cytolytic molecules similarly and exerted substantial cytolytic activity, whereas only the CXCR1(-) subset had IL-2 productivity and self-proliferative activity and was more resistant to cell death than the CXCR1(+) subset. These differences were explained by the specific up-regulation of CAMK4, SPRY2, and IL-7R in the CXCR1(-) subset and that of pro-apoptotic death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) in the CXCR1(+) subset. The IL-2 producers were more frequently found in the IL-7R(+) subset of the CXCR1(-) effector CD8(+) T cells than in the IL-7R(-) subset. IL-7/IL-7R signaling promoted cell survival only in the CXCR1(-) subset. The present study has highlighted a novel subset of effector CD8(+) T cells producing IL-2 and suggests the importance of this subset in the homeostasis of effector CD8(+) T cells.

  3. Role of T-cells in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2007-10-01

    A number of studies have recently addressed the correlationship between diabetic pregnancy/macrosomia and differentiation of T-cells into Th1 and Th2 subsets. Diabetic pregnancy has been found to be associated with a decreased Th1 phenotype and IL-4 mRNA expression. In macrosomic offspring, high expression of IL-2 and IFN-gamma mRNA, but not of Th2 cytokines is observed, indicating that the Th1 phenotype is upregulated during macrosomia. T-cells of gestational diabetic rats and their macrosomic offspring seem to present a defect in signal transduction. Indeed, the recruitment of free intracellular calcium concentrations from intracellular pool in T-cells of these animals is altered. The phenotype of regulatory T-cells (T-Reg) is upregulated in diabetic pregnancy and their infants. T-cells in diabetic pregnancy and macrosomic obese offspring are in vivo activated. Adipokines and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) also seem to modulate the pro-inflammatory cytokines in these pathologies. Hence, activation of the immune system might be considered as one of the regulatory pathways including metabolic abnormalities in these two pathologies.

  4. Origin of CD8+ Effector and Memory T Cell Subsets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Stemberger; Michael Neuenhahn; Veit R.Buchholz; Dirk H.Busch

    2007-01-01

    It is well accepted that CD8+ T cells play a pivotal role in providing protection against infection with intracellular pathogens and some tumors. In many cases protective immunity is maintained for long periods of time (immunological memory). Over the past years, it has become evident that in order to fulfill these multiple tasks,distinct subsets of effector and memory T cells have to be generated. Until today, however, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of subset differentiation and the timing of lineage fate decisions. In this context, it is of special importance to determine at which level of clonal expansion functional and phenotypical heterogeneity is achieved. Different models for T cell subset diversification have been proposed; these differ mainly in the time point during priming and clonal expansion (prior, during, or beyond the first cell division) when differentiation programs are induced. Recently developed single-cell adoptive transfer technology has allowed us to demonstrate that individual precursor cell still bears the full plasticity to develop into a plethora different T cell subsets. This observation targets the shaping of T cell subset differentiation towards factors that are still operative beyond the first cell division. These findings have important implications for vaccine development, as the modulation of differentiation patterns towards distinct subsets could become a powerful strategy to enhance the efficacy and quality of vaccines.

  5. CD4+ T cell responses in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasser Semmo; Paul Klenerman

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver damage, with virus-induced end-stage disease such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma resulting in a high rate of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Evidence that CD4+ T cell responses to HCV play an important role in the outcome of acute infection has been shown in several studies. However, the mechanisms behind viral persistence and the failure of CD4+ T cell responses to contain virus are poorly understood. During chronic HCV infection, HCV-specific CD4+ T cell responses are relatively weak or absent whereas in resolved infection these responses are vigorous and multispecific. Persons with a T-helper type Ⅰ profile, which promotes cellular effector mechanisms are thought to be more likely to experience viral clearance, but the overall role of these cells in the immunopathogenesis of chronic liver disease is not known. To define this, much more data is required on the function and specificity of virus-specific CD4+ T cells,especially in the early phases of acute disease and in the liver during chronic infection. The role and possible mechanisms of action of CD4+ T cell responses in determining the outcome of acute and chronic HCV infection will be discussed in this review.

  6. T Cell Transcriptomes Describe Patient Subtypes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

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    Sean J Bradley

    Full Text Available T cells regulate the adaptive immune response and have altered function in autoimmunity. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE has great diversity of presentation and treatment response. Peripheral blood component gene expression affords an efficient platform to investigate SLE immune dysfunction and help guide diagnostic biomarker development for patient stratification.Gene expression in peripheral blood T cell samples for 14 SLE patients and 4 controls was analyzed by high depth sequencing. Unbiased clustering of genes and samples revealed novel patterns related to disease etiology. Functional annotation of these genes highlights pathways and protein domains involved in SLE manifestation.We found transcripts for hundreds of genes consistently altered in SLE T cell samples, for which DAVID analysis highlights induction of pathways related to mitochondria, nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication. Fewer genes had reduced mRNA expression, and these were linked to signaling, splicing and transcriptional activity. Gene signatures associated with the presence of dsDNA antibodies, low complement levels and nephritis were detected. T cell gene expression also indicates the presence of several patient subtypes, such as having only a minimal expression phenotype, male type, or severe with or without induction of genes related to membrane protein production.Unbiased transcriptome analysis of a peripheral blood component provides insight on autoimmune pathophysiology and patient variability. We present an open source workflow and richly annotated dataset to support investigation of T cell biology, develop biomarkers for patient stratification and perhaps help indicate a source of SLE immune dysfunction.

  7. Cellular plasticity of CD4+ T cells in the intestine

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    Verena eBrucklacher-Waldert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Barrier sites such as the gastrointestinal tract are in constant contact with the environment which contains both beneficial and harmful components. The immune system at the epithelia must make the distinction between these components to balance tolerance, protection and immunopathology. This is achieved via multifaceted immune recognition, highly organised lymphoid structures and the interaction of many types of immune cells. The adaptive immune response in the gut is orchestrated by CD4+ helper T (Th cells which are integral to gut immunity. In recent years it has become apparent that the functional identity of these Th cells is not as fixed as initially thought. Plasticity in differentiated T cell subsets has now been firmly established, in both health and disease. The gut, in particular, utilises CD4+ T cell plasticity to mould CD4+ T cell phenotypes to maintain its finely poised balance of tolerance and inflammation and to encourage biodiversity within the enteric microbiome. In this review we will discuss intestinal helper T cell plasticity and our current understanding of its mechanisms, including our growing knowledge of an evolutionarily ancient symbiosis between microbiota and malleable CD4+ T cell effectors.

  8. A molecular basis underpinning the T cell receptor heterogeneity of mucosal-associated invariant T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckle, Sidonia B G; Birkinshaw, Richard W; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Corbett, Alexandra J; McWilliam, Hamish E G; Reantragoon, Rangsima; Chen, Zhenjun; Gherardin, Nicholas A; Beddoe, Travis; Liu, Ligong; Patel, Onisha; Meehan, Bronwyn; Fairlie, David P; Villadangos, Jose A; Godfrey, Dale I; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2014-07-28

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express an invariant T cell receptor (TCR) α-chain (TRAV1-2 joined to TRAJ33, TRAJ20, or TRAJ12 in humans), which pairs with an array of TCR β-chains. MAIT TCRs can bind folate- and riboflavin-based metabolites restricted by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-related class I-like molecule, MR1. However, the impact of MAIT TCR and MR1-ligand heterogeneity on MAIT cell biology is unclear. We show how a previously uncharacterized MR1 ligand, acetyl-6-formylpterin (Ac-6-FP), markedly stabilized MR1, potently up-regulated MR1 cell surface expression, and inhibited MAIT cell activation. These enhanced properties of Ac-6-FP were attributable to structural alterations in MR1 that subsequently affected MAIT TCR recognition via conformational changes within the complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3β loop. Analysis of seven TRBV6-1(+) MAIT TCRs demonstrated how CDR3β hypervariability impacted on MAIT TCR recognition by altering TCR flexibility and contacts with MR1 and the Ag itself. Ternary structures of TRBV6-1, TRBV6-4, and TRBV20(+) MAIT TCRs in complex with MR1 bound to a potent riboflavin-based antigen (Ag) showed how variations in TRBV gene usage exclusively impacted on MR1 contacts within a consensus MAIT TCR-MR1 footprint. Moreover, differential TRAJ gene usage was readily accommodated within a conserved MAIT TCR-MR1-Ag docking mode. Collectively, MAIT TCR heterogeneity can fine-tune MR1 recognition in an Ag-dependent manner, thereby modulating MAIT cell recognition.

  9. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines.

  10. Expression of recombination-activating genes and T cell receptor gene recombination in the human T cell leukemia cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Hong-yun; MA Li; MENG Min-jie; YAO Xin-sheng; LIN Ying; WU Zhen-qiang; HE Xiao-wei; WANG Ju-fang; WANG Xiao-ning

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that mature T cells can change their specificity through reexpression of recombination-activating genes (RAG) and RAG-mediated V(D)J recombination. This process is named receptor revision and has been observed in mature peripheral T cells from transgenic mice and human donors. However, whether the receptor revision in mature T cells is a random or orientated process remains poorly understood. Here we used the Jurkat human T cell line, which represents a mature stage of T cell development, as a model to investigate the regulation of T cell receptor (TCR) gene recombination.Methods TCR Dβ-Jβ signal joint T cell receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs) were determined by nested and seminested PCR. Double-strand DNA breaks at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) in the TCRVβ chain locus were detected by ligation-mediated-PCR. Further analysis of the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) size of the TCRVβ chain was examined by the TCR GeneScan technique.Results RAG1, RAG2, and three crucial components of the nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) pathway were readily detected in Jurkat. Characteristics of junctional diversity of Dβ2-Jβ2 signal joints and ds RSS breaks associated with the Dβ25' and Dβ 23' sites were detected in DNA from Jurkat cells. CDR3 size and the gene sequences of the TCRVβ chain did not change during cell proliferation.Conclusions RAG1 and RAG2 and ongoing TCR gene recombination are coexpressed in Jurkat cells, but the ongoing recombination process may not play a role in modification of the TCR repertoire. However, the results suggest that Jurkat could be used as a model for studying the regulation of RAGs and V(D)J recombination and as a "special" model of the coexistence of TCR gene rearrangements and "negative" receptor revision.

  11. Differences in Brazilian strains of Schistosoma mansoni evaluated by means of morphometric analysis of cercariae of both sexes

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    Machado-Silva José Roberto

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphometrics of Brazilian strains (BH, SJ and CMO of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae were obtained with a computerized image analyzer (IMAGE PRO PLUS, MEDIA CYBERNETICS, considering the following characters: body area, tail, furcae, oral and ventral suckers and distance between them. For statistical analysis, the variance test (one-way Anova was applied and significant differences of p< 0.05 were considered. All morphometric values in the BH strain were significantly higher (p< 0.05 than in the others. Lower values were obtained in females of SJ strain for all characters, excepting the body area. Only this character showed to be significantly different in males and females of the three strains. Specimens of both sexes in the BH and SJ strains showed significant differences regarding all characters. It was observed that this morphometric analysis permits the characterization of strains and also the sex identification in S. mansoni cercariae. Due to its feasibility, this method can be applied as a tool in laboratories devoid of more complex equipment.

  12. Ultrastructure and chaetotaxy of sensory eeceptors in the cercaria of a species of Allopodocotyle Pritchard, 1966 (Digenea: Opecoelidae

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    T Bogéa

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous investigations of sensory systems in opecoelid cercariae have focused on chaetotaxy and ultrastructure of sensory receptors. They revealed chaetotaxic patterns within family, genus, and species as well as different receptors. Chaetotaxic and ultrastructural observations have rarely been combined. We investigated the ultrastructure of cercarial sensory receptors in conjunction with chaetotaxy and neuromorphology in a species of Allopodocotyle. Cercariae were treated with acetylthiocholine iodide and silver nitrate, and some were processed for light, scanning (SEM, and transmission (TEM electron microscopy. Five nerve regions were distinguished. Chaetotaxy was consistent with that of other opecoelids. Five types of receptors were distinguished with SEM. Types differed in number of cilium-like structures (one or more, length of cilium-like structure (short, moderately long, or long, presence or absence of a tegumentary collar, and length of tegumentary collar (low, moderately low, or very high. Internal ultrastructure of some types revealed unsheathed cilium-like structures, basal body, and thickened nerve collars. Possible subtegumentary and sheathed receptors are introduced. Some receptor types were site-specific. For example, receptors with multiple cilium-like structures were concentrated on cephalic region whereas receptors with short cilium-like structure were widespread throughout most regions. Ultrastructure and site-specificity observations suggest that most receptors are mechanoreceptors.

  13. Muscle architecture during the course of development of Diplostomum pseudospathaceum Niewiadomska, 1984 (Trematoda, Diplostomidae) from cercariae to metacercariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A; Podvyaznaya, I

    2016-05-01

    Recent confocal microscopy studies have greatly expanded our knowledge of muscle systems in cercariae and adult digeneans, but the gross anatomy and development of metacercarial musculature remain relatively little known. To further our understanding of metacercarial development, this study used phalloidin staining and confocal microscopy to examine changes in muscle architecture over the course of development from cercariae to infective metacercariae in Diplostomum pseudospathaceum Niewiadomska, 1984. The paper describes muscle development in the body wall, anterior organ (oral sucker), acetabulum, pharynx and midgut and in the musculo-glandular organs that first appear in metacercariae (lappets and holdfast). The muscle architecture of the cercarial tail is also described. The results of the study support previously reported observations that diplostomid musculature undergoes substantial transformation during metacercarial development. The most profound changes, involving extensive remodelling and replacement of cercarial muscles, were seen in the body-wall musculature and in the anterior organ as it developed into the oral sucker. Muscle systems of other cercarial organs showed more gradual changes. The adaptive importance of developmental changes in musculature is discussed.

  14. Cytokine treatment of macrophage suppression of T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Daniel; Bucknum, Amanda; Kozlowski, Megan; Matlack, Robin; Riggs, James

    2010-01-01

    High Mphi:T cell ratios suppress the immune response to the retroviral superantigen Mls by IFNgamma-triggered production of the arg- and trp-consuming enzymes iNOS and IDO. Attempts to reverse suppression by treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines revealed that IL-6 improved the T cell response to Mls and the pro-hematopoietic cyokines IL-3 and GM-CSF increased suppression. GM-CSF treatment increased Mphi expression of CD80, a ligand for the immune suppressive B7H1 and CTLA-4 receptors. These results illustrate potential strategies for reversing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity characteristic of the high Mphi:T cell ratios found in many tumors.

  15. Regulatory T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Clare; Mathen, Stephy; Crocker, Ian; Bruce, Ian N

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disorder that predominantly affects women of reproductive age. As clinical outcomes improve, pregnancy in these women is becoming more common. Although epidemiological data have documented an improvement in the prognosis of pregnancy in these women over recent years, they are still at significantly increased risk of pregnancy complications, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, pre-eclampsia and impaired foetal growth. The pathogenesis of SLE involves marked immune dysfunction, and in particular, the function of immunosuppressive elements of the immune system is impaired, including regulatory T-cell function. Because regulatory T cells are likely to be the key cell-modulating feto-maternal tolerance, this review overviews the possibility that regulatory T-cell impairments contribute to pregnancy pathology in women with SLE and contribute to the clinical challenge of managing these women during pregnancy.

  16. Changes of Regulatory T Cells in Graves' Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hongxiang; ZHAO Shi; TANG Xiaoqiong; LI Jingyuan

    2006-01-01

    The immune mechanism of Graves' diseases (GD) and the roles of regulator T cells were investigated. In 32 patients with GD (GD group) and 20 healthy volunteers (control group), flow cytometry was used to detect the proportion of CD4+CD25+ cells, MACS to isolate CD4+ CD25+ cells,RT-PCR to assay the expression of FOXP3, and ELISA to test the level of IL-10, respectively. It was found that there was no significant change in the proportion of CD4+CD25+ T cells between GD group and control group (P>0.05), while secretion of IL-10 and expression of FOXP3 in GD group were lower than control group (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). In conclusion, though the proportion of regulatory T cells of peripheral blood lymphocytes in the patients with GD, the functions of them were significantly weakened, which might be a pathogenic factor in GD.

  17. Tracking gene-modified T cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Alessandra; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2009-01-01

    Identification, monitoring, and analysis of genetically modified cells in the peripheral blood are an important component of the clinical follow-up of patients treated by hematopoietic cell gene therapy. Analysis of gene-marked peripheral blood cells provides crucial information on gene transfer efficiency as well as on the nature and characteristics of the genetically modified cells, and may provide early evidence of the occurrence of potentially detrimental side effects. T lymphocytes are a convenient target for this type of analysis, due to their abundance and their relatively long life span in vivo. Tracking of gene-marked T cells is based on relatively simple, FACS- and PCR-based techniques, which may be applied to monitoring genetically modified T cells as well as T cells derived from transplanted, genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells. This chapter provides a description of these techniques and clues to their rational use in a clinical setting.

  18. CD4 T-Cell Memory Generation and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasper, David J.; Tejera, Melba Marie; Suresh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic memory is the adaptive immune system's powerful ability to remember a previous antigen encounter and react with accelerated vigor upon antigen re-exposure. It provides durable protection against reinfection with pathogens and is the foundation for vaccine-induced immunity. Unlike the relatively restricted immunologic purview of memory B cells and CD8 T cells, the field of CD4 T-cell memory must account for multiple distinct lineages with diverse effector functions, the issue of lineage commitment and plasticity, and the variable distribution of memory cells within each lineage. Here, we discuss the evidence for lineage-specific CD4 T-cell memory and summarize the known factors contributing to memory-cell generation, plasticity, and long-term maintenance. PMID:24940912

  19. Immune Thrombocytopenia in a Child with T Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Tokeji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 13-year-old boy who presented with persistent thrombocytopenia during maintenance chemotherapy with mercaptopurine and methotrexate for T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. He was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP after thorough investigations for the relapse of lymphoma and was successfully treated with immunoglobulin and steroids. ITP is known to be associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and various types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma but rarely with T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma or in children. Diagnosis of ITP with lymphoma is challenging due to the many factors affecting platelet counts, and ITP often complicates the diagnosis or treatment course of lymphoma. The underlying mechanism of ITP with NHL is still unclear. Drug-induced immunomodulation with a reduction of regulatory T cells might have contributed to the development of ITP in our case.

  20. T cells recognizing a peptide contaminant undetectable by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brezar, Vedran; Culina, Slobodan; Østerbye, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are widely used in immunological research as epitopes to stimulate their cognate T cells. These preparations are never completely pure, but trace contaminants are commonly revealed by mass spectrometry quality controls. In an effort to characterize novel major histocompatibility...... complex (MHC) Class I-restricted ß-cell epitopes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, we identified islet-infiltrating CD8+ T cells recognizing a contaminating peptide. The amount of this contaminant was so small to be undetectable by direct mass spectrometry. Only after concentration by liquid...... chromatography, we observed a mass peak corresponding to an immunodominant islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)(206-214) epitope described in the literature. Generation of CD8+ T-cell clones recognizing IGRP(206-214) using a novel method confirmed the identity...

  1. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  2. SOCS1 and Regulation of Regulatory T Cells Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko Takahashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several reports have suggested that natural regulatory T cells (Tregs lose Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3 expression and suppression activity under certain inflammatory conditions. Treg plasticity has been studied because it may be associated with the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Some studies showed that a minor uncommitted Foxp3+ T cell population, which lacks hypomethylation at Treg-specific demethylation regions (TSDRs, may convert to effector/helper T cells. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1, a negative regulator of cytokine signaling, has been reported to play an important role in Treg cell integrity and function by protecting the cells from excessive inflammatory cytokines. In this review, we discuss Treg plasticity and maintenance of suppression functions in both physiological and pathological settings. In addition, we discuss molecular mechanisms of maintaining Treg plasticity by SOCS1 and other molecules. Such information will be useful for therapy of autoimmune diseases and reinforcement of antitumor immunity.

  3. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene.Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia.In particular,Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.Its role in T-cell leukemia,however,has been more controversial.While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell leukemias,loss of Ikaros appears to be rare in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).We review here the evidence linking Ikaros to T-ALL in mouse and human systems.

  4. CD1 mediated T cell recognition of glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajonc, Dirk M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2007-10-01

    Specialized subsets of T lymphocytes can distinguish the carbohydrate portions of microbial and self-glycolipids when they are presented by proteins in the CD1 family of antigen presenting molecules. Recent immunochemical and structural analyses indicate that the chemical composition of the presented carbohydrate, together with its precise orientation above the CD1 binding groove, determines if a particular T cell is activated. More recently, however, it has been shown that the lipid backbone of the glycolipid, buried inside the CD1 protein, also can have an impact on T cell activation. While glycolipid recognition is a relatively new category of T cell specificity, the powerful combination of microbial antigen discovery and structural biochemistry has provided great insight into the mechanism of carbohydrate recognition.

  5. TARGETING CD8 T CELL METABOLISM IN TRANSPLANTATION

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    Michelle eYap

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Infiltration of effector CD8 T cells play a major role in allograft rejection, and increases in memory and terminally-differentiated effector memory (TEMRA CD8 T cells are associated with long term allograft dysfunction. Alternatively, CD8 regulatory T (Tregs cells suppress the inflammatory responses of effector lymphocytes and induce allograft tolerance in animal models. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the field of immunometabolics and its important role in CD8 function and differentiation. The purpose of this review is to highlight the key metabolic pathways involved in CD8 T cells and to discuss how manipulating these metabolic pathways could lead to new immunosuppressive strategies for the transplantation field.

  6. Adoptive therapy with CAR redirected T cells for hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiqi; Yang, Zhi; Shen, Junjie; Shan, Juanjuan; Qian, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    The survival of patients with hematological malignancies has been significantly improved due to the development of new therapeutic agents. However, relapse remains a major matter for concern. Recently, T cells engineered with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) were reported to show unprecedented responses in a range of hematological malignancies. The persistence of the CAR-T cell can last for years and tends toward long-term antitumor memory by which relapses can be effectively prevented. The primary side effects that appear in most clinical trials are cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. However, these symptoms can be treated and reversed. In this review, we describe CAR structure and function and summarize recent advances in CAR-T cell therapy in hematological malignancies.

  7. Aberrant Signaling Pathways in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Deborah; Saccomani, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive disease caused by the malignant transformation of immature progenitors primed towards T-cell development. Clinically, T-ALL patients present with diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow by immature T-cell blasts high blood cell counts, mediastinal involvement, and diffusion to the central nervous system. In the past decade, the genomic landscape of T-ALL has been the target of intense research. The identification of specific genomic alterations has contributed to identify strong oncogenic drivers and signaling pathways regulating leukemia growth. Notwithstanding, T-ALL patients are still treated with high-dose multiagent chemotherapy, potentially exposing these patients to considerable acute and long-term side effects. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the signaling pathways relevant for the pathogenesis of T-ALL and the opportunities offered for targeted therapy. PMID:28872614

  8. Dominant and shared T cell receptor beta chain variable regions of T cells inducing synovial hyperplasia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mima, T; Ohshima, S; Sasai, M; Nishioka, K; Shimizu, M; Murata, N; Yasunami, R; Matsuno, H; Suemura, M; Kishimoto, T; Saeki, Y

    1999-09-16

    Previously, we demonstrated the presence of at least two distinct subpopulations of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) employing a cell-transfer experiment using severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. One group of patients, whose T cells derived from the rheumatoid joints, induced synovial hyperplasia (SH) in the SCID mice (the positive group). The other group did not display the induction of SH (the negative group). TCR/Vbeta gene usage analysis indicated that some dominant T cell subpopulations were oligoclonally expanding only in the rheumatoid joints, and not in the periphery of the patients of the positive group. Moreover, these T cell subpopulations were not seen in the joints of patients in the negative group or in non-RA patients. In addition, the preferential uses of certain TCR/Vbetas (Vbeta8, Vbeta12, Vbeta13, and Vbeta14) genes were demonstrated in these T cells. In this study, to investigate whether these T cells are driven by a certain antigen(s), the third complementarity determining regions (CDR3s) of TCR/Vbeta, especially Vbeta8 and Vbeta14 PCR products, were cloned and sequenced. As a result, a dominant CDR3 sequence, CASS-PRERAT-YEQ, was found in Vbeta14+ T cells from the rheumatoid joint of a patient (Patient 1) of the positive group with a Vbeta14 skew. The identical CDR3 sequence also predominated in Vbeta14+ T cells from the rheumatoid joint of another patient (Patient 7) of the positive group with a Vbeta14 skew. In addition, in the patients (Patients 4, 7, 8) of the positive group with a Vbeta8 skew, other dominant CDR3 sequences, CASS-ENS-YEQ and CASS-LTEP-DTQ, were found as in the case of Vbeta14. However, no identical CDR3 sequences were detected dominantly in the joints of the patients in the negative group or in non-RA patients. A Vbeta14+ T cell clone (TCL), named G3, with the identical CDR3 sequence, CASS-PRERAT-YEQ, was isolated successfully from Patient 1, and cell transfer of G3 with autologous irradiated peripheral

  9. HIV-1 induces DCIR expression in CD4+ T cells.

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    Alexandra A Lambert

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin receptor DCIR, which has been shown very recently to act as an attachment factor for HIV-1 in dendritic cells, is expressed predominantly on antigen-presenting cells. However, this concept was recently challenged by the discovery that DCIR can also be detected in CD4(+ T cells found in the synovial tissue from rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Given that RA and HIV-1 infections share common features such as a chronic inflammatory condition and polyclonal immune hyperactivation status, we hypothesized that HIV-1 could promote DCIR expression in CD4(+ T cells. We report here that HIV-1 drives DCIR expression in human primary CD4(+ T cells isolated from patients (from both aviremic/treated and viremic/treatment naive persons and cells acutely infected in vitro (seen in both virus-infected and uninfected cells. Soluble factors produced by virus-infected cells are responsible for the noticed DCIR up-regulation on uninfected cells. Infection studies with Vpr- or Nef-deleted viruses revealed that these two viral genes are not contributing to the mechanism of DCIR induction that is seen following acute infection of CD4(+ T cells with HIV-1. Moreover, we report that DCIR is linked to caspase-dependent (induced by a mitochondria-mediated generation of free radicals and -independent intrinsic apoptotic pathways (involving the death effector AIF. Finally, we demonstrate that the higher surface expression of DCIR in CD4(+ T cells is accompanied by an enhancement of virus attachment/entry, replication and transfer. This study shows for the first time that HIV-1 induces DCIR membrane expression in CD4(+ T cells, a process that might promote virus dissemination throughout the infected organism.

  10. Chidamide in the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Thomas S; Tse, Eric; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2017-01-01

    Mature T-cell lymphomas are aggressive malignancies. Treatment outcome is poor with conventional chemotherapy. They are about twice as common in Asia as compared with other non-Asian countries. Histone proteins form the basic structure of chromatin, and their acetylation at lysine residues relaxes chromatin structure, facilitating gene transcription. Conversely, histone deacetylation, catalyzed by histone deacetylases, compacts chromatin and represses gene transcription. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are an important class of antineoplastic agents. Chidamide is a novel orally active benzamide-type histone deacetylase inhibitor that has shown in vitro activities against a wide array of neoplasms. In Phase I trials, chidamide showed preferential efficacy in mature T-cell lymphomas. In a pivotal Phase II trial of chidamide in 79 patients with relapsed or refractory mature T-cell lymphomas, an overall response rate of 28% (complete remission/complete remission unconfirmed: 14%) was achieved, with most responses occurring within the first 6 weeks of treatment. The median duration of response (DOR) was 9.9 (1.1–40.8) months. Of 22 responders, 19 patients (86%) had a DOR of ≥3 months and eight patients (36%) had a DOR of >12 months. Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative) showed better response rates, with the most durable responses observed in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma patients. Safety profile was favorable, with very few cases of grade 3/4 toxicities observed. Chidamide is approved by the China Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed and refractory peripheral T-cell lymphomas. PMID:28138258

  11. T-cell triggering thresholds are modulated by the number of antigen within individual T-cell receptor clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manz, Boryana N. [Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jackson, Bryan L. [Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Petit, Rebecca S. [Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dustin, Michael L. [New York School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Groves, Jay [Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-05-31

    T cells react to extremely small numbers of activating agonist peptides. Spatial organization of T-cell receptors (TCR) and their peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligands into microclusters is correlated with T-cell activation. In this study, we have designed an experimental strategy that enables control over the number of agonist peptides per TCR cluster, without altering the total number engaged by the cell. Supported membranes, partitioned with grids of barriers to lateral mobility, provide an effective way of limiting the total number of pMHC ligands that may be assembled within a single TCR cluster. Observations directly reveal that restriction of pMHC content within individual TCR clusters can decrease T-cell sensitivity for triggering initial calcium flux at fixed total pMHC density. Further analysis suggests that triggering thresholds are determined by the number of activating ligands available to individual TCR clusters, not by the total number encountered by the cell. Results from a series of experiments in which the overall agonist density and the maximum number of agonist per TCR cluster are independently varied in primary T cells indicate that the most probable minimal triggering unit for calcium signaling is at least four pMHC in a single cluster for this system. In conclusion, this threshold is unchanged by inclusion of coagonist pMHC, but costimulation of CD28 by CD80 can modulate the threshold lower.

  12. Heterosybtypic T-cell immunity to influenza in humans: challenges for universal T-cell influenza vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya eSridhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV remains a significant global health issue causing annual epidemics, pandemics and sporadic human infections with highly pathogenic avian or swine influenza viruses. Current inactivated and live vaccines are the mainstay of the public health response to influenza although vaccine efficacy is lower against antigenically distinct viral strains. The first pandemic of the 21st century underlined the urgent need to develop new vaccines capable of protection against a broad range of influenza strains. Such universal influenza vaccines are based on the idea of heterosubtypic immunity wherein immune responses to epitopes conserved across IAV strains can confer protection against subsequent infection and disease. T-cells recognising conserved antigens are a key contributor to reducing viral load and limiting disease severity during heterosubtypic infection in animal models. Recent studies undertaken during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic provided key insights into the role of cross-reactive T-cells in mediating heterosubtypic protection in humans. This review focuses on human influenza to discuss the epidemiological observations that underpin cross-protective immunity, the role of T-cells as key players in mediating heterosubtypic immunity including recent data from natural history cohort studies and the ongoing clinical development of T-cell inducing universal influenza vaccines. The challenges and knowledge gaps for developing vaccines to generate long-lived protective T-cell responses is discussed.

  13. Concepts in mature T-cell lymphomas - highlights from an international joint symposium on T-cell immunology and oncology().

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herling, Marco; Rengstl, Benjamin; Scholtysik, René; Hartmann, Sylvia; Küppers, Ralf; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Diebner, Hans H; Roeder, Ingo; Abken, Hinrich; Newrzela, Sebastian; Kirberg, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Growing attention in mature T-cell lymphomas/leukemias (MTCL) is committed to more accurate and meaningful classifications, improved pathogenetic concepts and expanded therapeutic options. This requires considerations of the immunologic concepts of T-cell homeostasis and the specifics of T-cell receptor (TCR) affinities and signaling. Scientists from various disciplines established the CONTROL-T research unit and in an international conference on MTCL they brought together experts from T-cell immunity, oncology, immunotherapy and systems biology. We report here meeting highlights on the covered topics of diagnostic pitfalls, implications by the new WHO classification, insights from discovered genomic lesions as well as TCR-centric concepts of cellular dynamics in host defense, auto-immunity and tumorigenic clonal escape, including predictions to be derived from in vivo imaging and mathematical modeling. Presentations on novel treatment approaches were supplemented by strategies of optimizing T-cell immunotherapies. Work packages, that in joint efforts would advance the field of MTCL more efficiently, are identified.

  14. Dlgh1 coordinates actin polymerization, synaptic T cell receptor and lipid raft aggregation, and effector function in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, June L; Tomassian, Tamar; Zhang, Min; Patel, Viresh; Schoenberger, Stephen P; Miceli, M Carrie

    2005-02-07

    Lipid raft membrane compartmentalization and membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family molecular scaffolds function in establishing cell polarity and organizing signal transducers within epithelial cell junctions and neuronal synapses. Here, we elucidate a role for the MAGUK protein, Dlgh1, in polarized T cell synapse assembly and T cell function. We find that Dlgh1 translocates to the immune synapse and lipid rafts in response to T cell receptor (TCR)/CD28 engagement and that LckSH3-mediated interactions with Dlgh1 control its membrane targeting. TCR/CD28 engagement induces the formation of endogenous Lck-Dlgh1-Zap70-Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) complexes in which Dlgh1 acts to facilitate interactions of Lck with Zap70 and WASp. Using small interfering RNA and overexpression approaches, we show that Dlgh1 promotes antigen-induced actin polymerization, synaptic raft and TCR clustering, nuclear factor of activated T cell activity, and cytokine production. We propose that Dlgh1 coordinates TCR/CD28-induced actin-driven T cell synapse assembly, signal transduction, and effector function. These findings highlight common molecular strategies used to regulate cell polarity, synapse assembly, and transducer organization in diverse cellular systems.

  15. [Helper T cell paradigm: Th17 and regulatory T cells involved in autoimmune inflammatory disorders, pathogen defense and allergic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    The helper T cell paradigm, divided into two distinct subsets, Th1 and Th2 cells, characterized by distinct cytokine and functions, has been expanded to IL-17-producing Th17 cells. Th1 cells producing IFN-γ are involved in delayed-type hypersensitivity, effective in intracellular pathogens defense, while Th2 cells secrete IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and IL-25 and has a central role in IgE production, eosinophilic inflammation, and the protection for helminthic parasite infection. Th17 cell lineages, expressing IL-17 family of cytokines and IL-23-mediated functions on T cells, plays a role in immune response to fungi and extracellular pathogens and autoimmune inflammatory disorders. Th17 cells are required the combination of IL-6 and TGF-β and the transcription factors, RORC2/RORgt (mice) and STAT3 for differentiation, and produce IL-17, IL-22, IL-17F, IL-21 and CCL20. FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells produce TGF-β and IL-10, which regulate effector T cells, and thus maintain peripheral tolerance. Four functionally unique CD4+ T cells, including the regulatory T (Treg) cells are now involved in the regulation of immune responses to pathogens, self-antigens and allergens. Any defect in the entire CD4+T cell population might results in human diseases. In this review, the biology of Th17 cells and Treg cells and their role in immune diseases are presented.

  16. The interplay of sequence conservation and T cell immune recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresciani, Anne Gøther; Sette, Alessandro; Greenbaum, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Predicting which peptides can elicit a T cell response (i.e. are immunogenic) is of great importance for many immunological studies. While it is clear that MHC binding is a necessary requirement for peptide immunogenicity, other variables exist that are incompletely understood. In this study we...... the Immune Epitope Database with their conservation in the human microbiome. Indeed, we did see a lower immunogenicity for conserved peptides conserved. While many aspects how this conservation comparison is done require further optimization, this is a first step towards a better understanding T cell...

  17. Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and their management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs comprise a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by the proliferation of skin-homing post-thymic T-cells. It is the second most common extranodal non-Hodgekin′s lymphoma. Many variants of mycosis fungoides and CTCLs are known to date, differing in clinical, histological, and immunophenotypic characteristics. Oral involvement has also been reported rarely in CTCLs. Treatment depends on the disease stage or the type of variant. New insights into the disease and the number of emerging novel therapeutic options have made it an interesting area for dermatologists and medical oncologists.

  18. Signal Transduction in T Cell Activation and Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    nMunnol, 7, 175-207 26. Allison, J.P and Raulet, D.H (1990) The immunobiology of gamma delta+ T cells Seinin. InitunoI.f, 2, 59-65. 27. Blumberg, R S ... Janeway , C.A., Jr and Swain, S L. (1987) Coclustering of CD4 (L3T4) molecule with the T-cell receptor is induced by specific direct interaction of...rl ease; distribution is unl imi ted 4. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) S . MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) NMRI 93-49 6a. NAME OF

  19. Primary T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma in the middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Liu, Shixi; Yang, Hui; Wang, Weiya

    2016-03-01

    T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) is a highly aggressive lymphoma characterized by precursor T-cell malignancy and lymphadenopathy or mediastinal involvement. We present the case of an 11-year-old boy with a diagnosis of middle ear T-LBL, which manifested as a headache, hearing loss and peripheral facial paralysis. The child was given intensive chemotherapy and had a complete response. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of T-LBL originating in the middle ear. This case aims to help clinicians to be vigilant about the possibility of primary lesions at atypical sites in some special diseases.

  20. CD4 T Cell Depletion at the Cervix during HIV Infection Is Associated with Accumulation of Terminally Differentiated T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gumbi, P. P.; Jaumdally, S. Z.; Salkinder, A. L.; Burgers, W. A.; Mkhize, N. N.; Hanekom, W; Coetzee, D; Williamson, A; Passmore, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    In blood, the accumulation of terminally differentiated (TD) T cells during HIV infection is associated with CD4 T cell loss and HIV disease progression. Here, we investigated the maintenance and functional characteristics of memory T cells at the cervix. We found that CD4 T cell depletion at the cervix mirrors CD4 depletion in blood. In all women, depletion of CD4 T cells at the cervix was associated with significant reductions in CD45RA− CCR7+ (central memory [CM]) T cells and the accumulat...

  1. γδ T cells augment rejection of skin grafts by enhancing cross priming of CD8 T cells to skin derived antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimpour, Azad; Mattarollo, Stephen R; Yong, Michelle; Leggatt, Graham R; Steptoe, Raymond J.; Frazer, Ian H

    2012-01-01

    γδ T cells possess innate like properties and are proposed to bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immunity. In this study we explored the role of γδ T cells in cutaneous immunity utilizing a skin transplantation model. Following engraftment of skin expressing cell associated model antigen (ovalbumin) in epithelial keratinocytes, skin resident γδ T cells enhanced graft rejection. While effector function of CD8 T cells was intact in the absence of γδ T cells, cross priming of CD8 T cell ...

  2. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activation are associated with HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie R Cockerham

    Full Text Available The association between the host immune environment and the size of the HIV reservoir during effective antiretroviral therapy is not clear. Progress has also been limited by the lack of a well-accepted assay for quantifying HIV during therapy. We examined the association between multiple measurements of HIV and T cell activation (as defined by markers including CD38, HLA-DR, CCR5 and PD-1 in 30 antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected adults. We found a consistent association between the frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing HLA-DR and the frequency of resting CD4+ T cells containing HIV DNA. This study highlights the need to further examine this relationship and to better characterize the biology of markers commonly used in HIV studies. These results may also have implications for reactivation strategies.

  3. The phosphorylation state of CD3gamma influences T cell responsiveness and controls T cell receptor cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Backstrom, T; Lauritsen, JP

    1998-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) is internalized following activation of protein kinase C (PKC) via a leucine (Leu)-based motif in CD3gamma. Some studies have indicated that the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface following PKC-mediated internalization. The functional state of recycled TCR and the ......The T cell receptor (TCR) is internalized following activation of protein kinase C (PKC) via a leucine (Leu)-based motif in CD3gamma. Some studies have indicated that the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface following PKC-mediated internalization. The functional state of recycled TCR...... the phosphorylation state of CD3gamma and T cell responsiveness. Based on these observations a physiological role of CD3gamma and TCR cycling is proposed....

  4. Amino acid similarity accounts for T cell cross-reactivity and for "holes" in the T cell repertoire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; de Boer, Rob J.; Lund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cytotoxic T cell (CTL) cross-reactivity is believed to play a pivotal role in generating immune responses but the extent and mechanisms of CTL cross-reactivity remain largely unknown. Several studies suggest that CTL clones can recognize highly diverse peptides, some sharing no obvious...... sequence identity. The emerging realization in the field is that T cell receptors (TcR) recognize multiple distinct ligands. Principal Findings: First, we analyzed peptide scans of the HIV epitope SLFNTVATL (SFL9) and found that TCR specificity is position dependent and that biochemically similar amino...... to demonstrate that seemingly distinct T cell epitopes, i.e., ones with low sequence identity, are in fact more biochemically similar than expected. Additionally, an analysis of HIV immunogenicity data with our model showed that CTLs have the tendency to respond mostly to peptides that do not resemble self...

  5. Tumor eradication after cyclophosphamide depends on concurrent depletion of regulatory T cells: a role for cycling TNFR2-expressing effector-suppressor T cells in limiting effective chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Most, Robbert G; Currie, Andrew J; Mahendran, Sathish; Prosser, Amy; Darabi, Anna; Robinson, Bruce W S; Nowak, Anna K; Lake, Richard A

    2009-08-01

    Tumor cell death potentially engages with the immune system. However, the efficacy of anti-tumor chemotherapy may be limited by tumor-driven immunosuppression, e.g., through CD25+ regulatory T cells. We addressed this question in a mouse model of mesothelioma by depleting or reconstituting CD25+ regulatory T cells in combination with two different chemotherapeutic drugs. We found that the efficacy of cyclophosphamide to eradicate established tumors, which has been linked to regulatory T cell depletion, was negated by adoptive transfer of CD25+ regulatory T cells. Analysis of post-chemotherapy regulatory T cell populations revealed that cyclophosphamide depleted cycling (Ki-67(hi)) T cells, including foxp3+ regulatory CD4+ T cells. Ki-67(hi) CD4+ T cells expressed increased levels of two markers, TNFR2 and ICOS, that have been associated with a maximally suppressive phenotype according to recently published studies. This suggest that cyclophosphamide depletes a population of maximally suppressive regulatory T cells, which may explain its superior anti-tumor efficacy in our model. Our data suggest that regulatory T cell depletion could be used to improve the efficacy of anti-cancer chemotherapy regimens. Indeed, we observed that the drug gemcitabine, which does not deplete cycling regulatory T cells, eradicates established tumors in mice only when CD25+ CD4+ T cells are concurrently depleted. Cyclophosphamide could be used to achieve regulatory T cell depletion in combination with chemotherapy.

  6. T-Bet and Eomes Regulate the Balance between the Effector/Central Memory T Cells versus Memory Stem Like T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    Full Text Available Memory T cells are composed of effector, central, and memory stem cells. Previous studies have implicated that both T-bet and Eomes are involved in the generation of effector and central memory CD8 T cells. The exact role of these transcription factors in shaping the memory T cell pool is not well understood, particularly with memory stem T cells. Here, we demonstrate that both T-bet or Eomes are required for elimination of established tumors by adoptively transferred CD8 T cells. We also examined the role of T-bet and Eomes in the generation of tumor-specific memory T cell subsets upon adoptive transfer. We showed that combined T-bet and Eomes deficiency resulted in a severe reduction in the number of effector/central memory T cells but an increase in the percentage of CD62L(highCD44(low Sca-1(+ T cells which were similar to the phenotype of memory stem T cells. Despite preserving large numbers of phenotypic memory stem T cells, the lack of both of T-bet and Eomes resulted in a profound defect in antitumor memory responses, suggesting T-bet and Eomes are crucial for the antitumor function of these memory T cells. Our study establishes that T-bet and Eomes cooperate to promote the phenotype of effector/central memory CD8 T cell versus that of memory stem like T cells.

  7. Nuclear factor of activated T cells regulates neutrophil recruitment, systemic inflammation, and T-cell dysfunction in abdominal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su; Luo, Lingtao; Wang, Yongzhi; Gomez, Maria F; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-08-01

    The signaling mechanisms regulating neutrophil recruitment, systemic inflammation, and T-cell dysfunction in polymicrobial sepsis are not clear. This study explored the potential involvement of the calcium/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), in abdominal sepsis. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) triggered NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity in the lung, spleen, liver, and aorta in NFAT-luciferase reporter mice. Treatment with the NFAT inhibitor A-285222 prior to CLP completely prevented sepsis-induced NFAT activation in all these organs. Inhibition of NFAT activity reduced sepsis-induced formation of CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCL5 chemokines and edema as well as neutrophil infiltration in the lung. Notably, NFAT inhibition efficiently reduced the CLP-evoked increases in HMBG1, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and CXCL5 levels in plasma. Moreover, administration of A-285222 restored sepsis-induced T-cell dysfunction, as evidenced by markedly decreased apoptosis and restored proliferative capacity of CD4 T cells. Along these lines, treatment with A-285222 restored gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and IL-4 levels in the spleen, which were markedly reduced in septic mice. CLP-induced formation of regulatory T cells (CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+)) in the spleen was also abolished in A-285222-treated animals. All together, these novel findings suggest that NFAT is a powerful regulator of pathological inflammation and T-cell immune dysfunction in abdominal sepsis. Thus, our data suggest that NFAT signaling might be a useful target to protect against respiratory failure and immunosuppression in patients with sepsis.

  8. T cell receptor signaling pathway is overexpressed in CD4 + T cells from HAM/TSP individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Tomazini Pinto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a human retrovirus related to the chronic neuroinflammatory disease HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. CD4+ T cells activation appears to play a key role on HTLV-1 infection. Here we investigated the expression of genes associated to T cell activation CD3e molecule, epsilon (CD3?, lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK, vav 1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (VAV1, and zeta-chain (TCR associated protein kinase 70 kDa (ZAP70 on T lymphocytes of HTLV-1-infected individuals and compared to healthy uninfected individuals (CT. We observed that CD3?, LCK, ZAP70, and VAV1 gene expression were increased in CD4+ T cells from HAM/TSP group compared to HTLV-1 asymptomatic patients (HAC. Moreover, ZAP70 and VAV1 were also upregulated in HAM/TSP compared to CT group. We detected a positive correlation among all these genes. We also observed that CD3?, LCK, and VAV1 genes had a positive correlation with the proviral load (PVL and Tax expression. These results suggest that PVL and Tax protein could drive CD3?, LCK, and VAV1 gene expression in CD4+ T cells, and these genes function on a synchronized way on the CD4+ T cell activation. The elucidation of the mechanisms underlying T cell receptor signaling pathway is of considerable interest and might lead to new insights into the mechanism of HAM/TSP.

  9. Regulatory T Cell Effect on CD8(+) T Cell Responses to Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection and Development of Kaposi's Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepone, Lauren M; Rappocciolo, Giovanna; Piazza, Paolo A; Campbell, Diana M; Jenkins, Frank J; Rinaldo, Charles R

    2017-03-02

    We assessed CD8(+) T cell reactivity to human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8; Kaposi's sarcoma [KS]-associated herpesvirus) and the role of CD4(+)CD25(hi)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study who did or did not develop KS. There were similarly low CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ responses to MHC class I-restricted epitopes of HHV-8 lytic and latent proteins over 5.7 years before KS in participants who developed KS compared to those who did not. T cell reactivity to HHV-8 antigens was low relative to responses to a combination of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and influenza A virus (CEF) peptide epitopes, and dominant HIV peptide epitopes. There was no change in %Treg in the HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did not develop KS, whereas there was a significant increase in %Treg in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who developed KS beginning 1.8 years before development of KS. Removal of Treg enhanced HHV-8-specific T cell responses in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did or did not develop KS, with a similar pattern observed in response to CEF and HIV peptides. Thus, long-term, low levels of anti-HHV-8 CD8(+) T cell reactivity were present in both HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected men who did and did not develop KS. This was related to moderately enhanced Treg function.

  10. Expression of recombination-activating genes and T cell receptor gene recombination in the human T cell leukemia cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hong-yun; Ma, Li; Meng, Min-jie; Yao, Xin-sheng; Lin, Ying; Wu, Zhen-qiang; He, Xiao-wei; Wang, Ju-fang; Wang, Xiao-ning

    2007-03-05

    Recent studies have suggested that mature T cells can change their specificity through reexpression of recombination-activating genes (RAG) and RAG-mediated V(D)J recombination. This process is named receptor revision and has been observed in mature peripheral T cells from transgenic mice and human donors. However, whether thebreceptor revision in mature T cells is a random or orientated process remains poorly understood. Here we used the Jurkathuman T cell line, which represents a mature stage of T cell development, as a model to investigate the regulation of Tcell receptor (TCR) gene recombination. TCR Dbeta-Jbeta signal joint T cell receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs) were determined by nested and seminested PCR. Double-strand DNA breaks at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) in the TCRVbeta chain locus were detected by ligation-mediated-PCR. Further analysis of the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) size of the TCRVbeta chain was examined by the TCR GeneScan technique. RAG1, RAG2, and three crucial components of the nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) pathway were readily detected in Jurkat. Characteristics of junctional diversity of Dbeta2-Jbeta2 signal joints and ds RSS breaks associated with the Dbeta2 5' and Dbeta 2 3' sites were detected in DNA from Jurkat cells. CDR3 size and the gene sequences of the TCRVbeta chain did not change during cell proliferation. RAG1 and RAG2 and ongoing TCR gene recombination are coexpressed in Jurkat cells, but the ongoing recombination process may not play a role in modification of the TCR repertoire.However, the results suggest that Jurkat could be used as a model for studying the regulation of RAGs and V(D)J recombination and as a "special" model of the coexistence of TCR gene rearrangements and "negative" receptor revision.

  11. Schistosoma mansoni: the effect of dexamethasone on the cercaria-schistosomulum transformation, in vivo Schistosoma mansoni: o efeito da dexametasona na transformação da cercaria em esquistossômulo, in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Laue de Melo

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatment with dexamethasone (DMS in the early phases of the experimental Schistosoma mansoni infection causes an indirect effect on the cercaria-schistosomulum transformation process. This is observed when naive albino mice are treated with that drug (50 mg/Kg, subcutaneously and infected intraperitonealy 01 hour later with about 500 S. mansoni cercariae (LE strain. An inhibition in the host cell adhesion to the larvae, with a simultaneous delay in the cercaria-schistosomulum transformation, is observed. This effect is probably due to a blockade of the neutrophil migration to the peritoneal cavity of mice, by an impairment of the release of chemotactic substances. Such delay probably favors the killing of S. mansoni larvae, still in the transformation process, by the vertebrate host defenses, as the complement system.O tratamento com dexametasona (DMS nas fases iniciais da infecção experimental com S. mansoni leva a um efeito indireto sobre o processo de transformação da cercária em esquistossômulo, quando camundongos isentos de infecção são tratados com esta droga (50 mg/ kg, subcutâneamente e, 01 hora depois, são infectados intraperitonealmente com cerca de 500 cercárias de S. mansoni (cepa LE. Foi observada uma significativa redução na adesão de células do hospedeiro às larvas, com um atraso simultâneo no processo de transformação das cercárias em esquistossômulos. Este efeito é, provavelmente, devido a um bloqueio inespecifícico da migração neutrofilica para a cavidade peritoneal, através de um bloqueio da liberação de substâncias quimio-táticas. Tal atraso pode permitir a morte das larvas de S. mansoni (ainda em processo de transformação pelas defesas do hospedeiro vertebrado, como o sistema do complemento.

  12. Identification of the T-cell receptor alpha variable (TRAV) gene(s) in T-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, T; Kabelitz, D

    2000-12-01

    Due to the lack of a complete range of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) it is often impossible to rapidly identify by flow cytometry the T-cell receptor variable genes in patients suffering from T-cell malignancies. This applies especially to the alpha variable genes (TRAV), since only very few anti-TcR variable alpha mAb are available. We describe a very rapid method for inverse PCR amplification of the TcR alpha chain without prior purification of the double-stranded cDNA, provide the sequences for appropriate oligonucleotides, and describe a buffer system that dramatically enhances the amplification efficiency as compared to standard conditions.

  13. T-cell education in autoimmune diabetes : teachers and students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosmalen, JGM; van Ewijk, [No Value; Leenen, PJM

    2002-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a classical example of a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Several aberrations in immune regulation have been described in both human diabetes patients and animal models of type 1 diabetes. In this review, we summarize how proposed immune defects might be implicated in

  14. CD8 T Cells and Immunoediting of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    transfected cells treated with or without ADM by using a non-acetylation, enzyme immunoassay system (The HitHunter™ Enzyme Fragment Complementation...HC D3 HB IG I; 5 ) GJ4... immunoassay ." In some cases, DCs were not exposed to T cells but rather allowed to remain in media for 48 hours after which DC-conditioned media were

  15. CD4+ T cells memorize obesity and promote weight regain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jianghuan; Lai, Beibei; Zheng, Mingzhu; Chen, Qin; Jiang, Shujun; Song, Anying; Huang, Zan; Shi, Peiliang; Tu, Xin; Wang, Di; Lu, Linrong; Lin, Zhaoyu; Gao, Xiang

    2017-06-19

    Body weight regain often causes failure of obesity therapies while the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that immune cells, especially CD4+ T cells, mediate the 'memory' of previous obese status. In a weight gain-loss-regain model, we found that C57BL/6J mice with an obesity history showed a much faster rate of body weight regain. This obesity memory could last for at least 2 months after previously obese mice were kept at the same body weight as non-obese mice. Surprisingly, such obesity memory was abrogated by dexamethasone treatment, whereas immunodeficient Rag1(-/-) and H2A(-/-) mice failed to establish such memory. Rag1(-/-) mice repossessed the obesity memory when immune cells or CD4+ T cells isolated from previously obese mice were transferred. Furthermore, depletion of CD4+ T cells led to obesity memory ablation. Taken together, we conclude that CD4+ T cells mediate obesity memory and promote weight regain.Cellular &Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 19 June 2017; doi:10.1038/cmi.2017.36.

  16. Modulation of T cell response by Phellinus linteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Jung; Lien, Hsiu-Man; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Huang, Chao-Lu; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Wang, Chien-Kuo; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Yin-Kuang; Wu, Hua-Shan; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Phellinus linteus, a species of mushroom, has been shown to contribute to health benefits, such as anti-inflammatory activity and immunomodulatory efficacy. The aim of this study was to analyze the most effective constituents of P. linteus fermented broths, polysaccharides, and to evaluate their immunoregulatory effects on T cells. Four fermented broths (PL1-4) and the dialyzate medium (MD) were prepared from P. linteus mycelia, and the polysaccharide contents of each were analyzed. The P. linteus samples were tested for biological activity in the regulation of T cell activation. In T cells, the production of mitogen-induced interleukin (IL)-2 and cell cycle progression were dose-responsively inhibited by PL3 and MD, primarily through cell-cycle arrest in S phase. PL3 broth, which contained large quantities of polysaccharides, significantly decreased the ratio of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) to interleukin 4 (IL-4) in T cells. Thus, P. linteus fermented broths produced additive effects on the regulation of the Th1/Th2 balance and show promise for the development of immunomodulatory therapeutics.

  17. Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Garza, Jorge; Herz-Ruelas, Maira Elizabeth; González-Lopez, Elias Eugenio; Mendoza-Oviedo, Eric Eduardo; Garza-Chapa, Juana Irma; Ocampo-Garza, Sonia Sofía; Vázquez-Herrera, Norma Elizabeth; Miranda-Maldonado, Ivett; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) accounts for 15–20% of all peripheral T-cell lymphomas. It is a rare subtype of CD4 T-cell peripheral lymphoma that affects aged individuals, causing B symptoms, generalized lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. Its pathogenesis is still unclear, but in some cases it has been associated with infection, allergic reaction or drug exposure. The majority of patients are diagnosed in an advanced stage and anthracycline based regimen is considered the first-line therapy. Skin involvement is not well characterized, occurring in up to 50% of patients and presenting as nonspecific rash, macules, papules, petechiae, purpura, nodules and urticaria. We present the illustrative case of a 55-year-old woman with an AITL who presented prominent skin findings, arthritis, lymphadenopathy and hypereosinophilia. Skin biopsy reported a T-cell lymphoma and the diagnosis of AITL was confirmed by an axillary lymph node biopsy, which was also positive for Epstein-Barr virus. Chemotherapy with CHOP-21 and thalidomide was given, accomplishing complete remission after six cycles. PMID:25685133

  18. Immunotherapy of cancer employing adoptive T cell transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAOLI

    2005-01-01

    The current concept of“Adoptive T Cell Immunotherapy of Cancer”is quite different from how it was originally conceived.With the development of modern technology in molecular biology,cell biology,immunology and biochemistry during the last twenty years or so,adoptive immunotherapy has grown from its initial form of a simple“blood cell transfer”into its present process which involves host vauccination,effector cell activation/polarization and genetic modification.With the use of immune adjuvants and the identification/characterization of tumor-reactive T cell subsets,or in combination with other therapeutic strategies,adoptively transferred T cells have become much more potent inmediating tumor regression.In addition,studies on the trafficking of infused T cells,cell transfer performed in lymphopenic models,as well as the discovery of novel techniques in immune monitoring for the generation of effector cells in vitro and after cell transfer in vivo have provided useful tools to further improve the therapeutic efficacy of this approach.This article will review these related aspects of adoptive T cell immunotherapy of cancer with specific comments on certain critical areas in the application of this approach.With the rapidly evolving advances in this area,it is hoped that this cellular immunologic therapy as it was conceptualized in the past,can become more useful in the treatment of human cancer in the near future.

  19. Bidirectional regulation between B cells and T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margry, B.

    2014-01-01

    B cells were often thought of as simple precursors of end-stage effector cells that are merely in charge of antibody production. Research in the last decades has shown that B cells possess important other roles as well, including their involvement in the regulation and functioning of T cell-mediated

  20. Mechanisms behind functional avidity maturation in T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak, Martin; Geisler, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    During an immune response antigen-primed B-cells increase their antigen responsiveness by affinity maturation mediated by somatic hypermutation of the genes encoding the antigen-specific B-cell receptor (BCR) and by selection of higher-affinity B cell clones. Unlike the BCR, the T-cell receptor...

  1. Immune signatures of protective spleen memory CD8 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinza, Lilia; Djebali, Sophia; Tomkowiak, Martine; Mafille, Julien; Loiseau, Céline; Jouve, Pierre-Emmanuel; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michèle; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Schicklin, Stéphane; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Lauvau, Grégoire; Grau, Morgan; Wencker, Mélanie; Arpin, Christophe; Walzer, Thierry; Leverrier, Yann; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2016-11-24

    Memory CD8 T lymphocyte populations are remarkably heterogeneous and differ in their ability to protect the host. In order to identify the whole range of qualities uniquely associated with protective memory cells we compared the gene expression signatures of two qualities of memory CD8 T cells sharing the same antigenic-specificity: protective (Influenza-induced, Flu-TM) and non-protective (peptide-induced, TIM) spleen memory CD8 T cells. Although Flu-TM and TIM express classical phenotypic memory markers and are polyfunctional, only Flu-TM protects against a lethal viral challenge. Protective memory CD8 T cells express a unique set of genes involved in migration and survival that correlate with their unique capacity to rapidly migrate within the infected lung parenchyma in response to influenza infection. We also enlighten a new set of poised genes expressed by protective cells that is strongly enriched in cytokines and chemokines such as Ccl1, Ccl9 and Gm-csf. CCL1 and GM-CSF genes are also poised in human memory CD8 T cells. These immune signatures are also induced by two other pathogens (vaccinia virus and Listeria monocytogenes). The immune signatures associated with immune protection were identified on circulating cells, i.e. those that are easily accessible for immuno-monitoring and could help predict vaccines efficacy.

  2. Immune signatures of protective spleen memory CD8 T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinza, Lilia; Djebali, Sophia; Tomkowiak, Martine; Mafille, Julien; Loiseau, Céline; Jouve, Pierre-Emmanuel; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michèle; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Schicklin, Stéphane; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Lauvau, Grégoire; Grau, Morgan; Wencker, Mélanie; Arpin, Christophe; Walzer, Thierry; Leverrier, Yann; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Memory CD8 T lymphocyte populations are remarkably heterogeneous and differ in their ability to protect the host. In order to identify the whole range of qualities uniquely associated with protective memory cells we compared the gene expression signatures of two qualities of memory CD8 T cells sharing the same antigenic-specificity: protective (Influenza-induced, Flu-TM) and non-protective (peptide-induced, TIM) spleen memory CD8 T cells. Although Flu-TM and TIM express classical phenotypic memory markers and are polyfunctional, only Flu-TM protects against a lethal viral challenge. Protective memory CD8 T cells express a unique set of genes involved in migration and survival that correlate with their unique capacity to rapidly migrate within the infected lung parenchyma in response to influenza infection. We also enlighten a new set of poised genes expressed by protective cells that is strongly enriched in cytokines and chemokines such as Ccl1, Ccl9 and Gm-csf. CCL1 and GM-CSF genes are also poised in human memory CD8 T cells. These immune signatures are also induced by two other pathogens (vaccinia virus and Listeria monocytogenes). The immune signatures associated with immune protection were identified on circulating cells, i.e. those that are easily accessible for immuno-monitoring and could help predict vaccines efficacy. PMID:27883012

  3. Circadian control of antigen-specific T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobis CC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloé C Nobis,1–3 Nathalie Labrecque,2–4 Nicolas Cermakian1,5–8 1Douglas Mental Health University Institute, 2Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre, 3Department of Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and Immunology, 4Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, 5Department of Psychiatry, 6Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 7Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, 8Department of Physiology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: The immune system is composed of two arms, the innate and the adaptive immunity. While the innate response constitutes the first line of defense and is not specific for a particular pathogen, the adaptive response is highly specific and allows for long-term memory of the pathogen encounter. T lymphocytes (or T cells are central players in the adaptive immune response. Various aspects of T cell functions vary according to the time of day. Circadian clocks located in most tissues and cell types generate 24-hour rhythms of various physiological processes. These clocks are based on a set of clock genes, and this timing mechanism controls rhythmically the expression of numerous other genes. Clock genes are expressed in cells of the immune system, including T cells. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian control of the adaptive immune response, with emphasis on T cells, including their development, trafficking, response to antigen, and effector functions. Keywords: circadian clock, adaptive immune response, T lymphocyte, antigen, cytokine, proliferation

  4. CD8 T cell memory: it takes all kinds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Christopher Jameson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the differentiation and maintenance of CD8+ memory T cells is fundamental to the development of effective T cell based vaccines. Memory cell differentiation is influenced by the cytokines that accompany T cell priming, the history of previous antigen encounters, and the tissue sites into which memory cells migrate. These cues combine to influence the developing CD8+ memory pool, and recent work has revealed the importance of multiple transcription factors, metabolic molecules, and surface receptors in revealing the type of memory cell that is generated. Paired with increasingly meticulous subsetting and sorting of memory populations, we now know the CD8+ memory pool to be phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous in nature. This includes both recirculating and tissue resident memory populations, and cells with varying degrees of inherent longevity and protective function. These data point to the importance of tailored vaccine design. Here we discuss how the diversity of the memory CD8+ T cell pool challenges the notion that ‘one size fits all’ for pathogen control, and how distinct memory subsets may be suited for distinct aspects of protective immunity.

  5. MicroRNA 10a marks regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeker, Lukas T; Zhou, Xuyu; Gershberg, Kseniya

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial for regulatory T cell (Treg) stability and function. We report that microRNA-10a (miR-10a) is expressed in Tregs but not in other T cells including individual thymocyte subsets. Expression profiling in inbred mouse strains demonstrated that non-obese diabetic (NOD......) mice with a genetic susceptibility for autoimmune diabetes have lower Treg-specific miR-10a expression than C57BL/6J autoimmune resistant mice. Inhibition of miR-10a expression in vitro leads to reduced FoxP3 expression levels and miR-10a expression is lower in unstable "exFoxP3" T cells. Unstable...... and phenotype of natural Treg nor the capacity of conventional T cells to induce FoxP3 in response to TGFβ, RA, or a combination of the two. Thus, miR-10a is selectively expressed in Treg but inhibition by antagomiRs or genetic ablation resulted in discordant effects on FoxP3....

  6. MHC molecules protect T cell epitopes against proteolytic destruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, S; Meldal, M; Werdelin, O

    1992-01-01

    There is a subtle duality in the role of proteolytic enzymes in Ag processing. They are required to fragment protein Ag ingested by APC. However, prolonged exposure to proteolytic enzymes may lead to a complete degradation of the Ag, leaving nothing for the T cell system to recognize. What ensures...

  7. A T Cell View of the Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, Adriana; Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves-Silva, Triciana; Cordeiro-Spinetti, Eric; Galvani, Rômulo Gonçalves; Balduino, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The majority of T cells present in the bone marrow (BM) represent an activated/memory phenotype and most of these, if not all, are circulating T cells. Their lodging in the BM keeps them activated, turning the BM microenvironment into a “memory reservoir.” This article will focus on how T cell activation in the BM results in both direct and indirect effects on the hematopoiesis. The hematopoietic stem cell niche will be presented, with its main components and organization, along with the role played by T lymphocytes in basal and pathologic conditions and their effect on the bone remodeling process. Also discussed herein will be how “normal” bone mass peak is achieved only in the presence of an intact adaptive immune system, with T and B cells playing critical roles in this process. Our main hypothesis is that the partnership between T cells and cells of the BM microenvironment orchestrates numerous processes regulating immunity, hematopoiesis, and bone remodeling. PMID:27242791

  8. The Late Stage of T Cell Development within Mouse Thymus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weifeng Chen

    2004-01-01

    After positive selection and lineage commitment, the TCRαβ+CD4/CD8 SP medullary thymocytes migrate into and reside in thymic medulla, where they undergo an ordered program of late stage of T cell functional maturation and negative selection to delete self-reactive clones by apoptosis. Accomplishment of this final differentiation pathway, a physiological T cell repertoire is formed : T cells acquire immunocompetence to respond to foreign antigens and tolerance to self-antigens, ready for the emigration to homing to the T cell regions of peripheral lymphoid organs and tissues. In this review, emphases are put on introducing the approaches applied in this area and our own observations. Basically, we have analyzed the late stage of medullary thymocyte phenotypic differentiation pathways of both CD4 SP and CD8 SP medullary thymocytes and the concomitant functional maturation pathway, in particular, of CD4 SP thymocytes. It is to provide a standard to compare the functional capacity of the cells at the developmental stages induced by different conditions. The cellular and molecular basis of this differentiation process has been partially described. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):3-11.

  9. The Late Stage of T Cell Development within Mouse Thymus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WeifengChen

    2004-01-01

    After positive selection and lineage commitment, the TCRαβ+CD4/CD8 SP medullary thymocytes migrate into and reside in thymic medulla, where they undergo an ordered program of late stage of T cell functional maturation and negative selection to delete self-reactive clones by apoptosis. Accomplishment of this final differentiation pathway, a physiological T cell repertoire is formed: T cells acquire immunocompetence to respond to foreign antigens and tolerance to self-antigens, ready for the emigration to homing to the T cell regions of peripheral lymphoid organs and tissues. In this review, emphases are put on introducing the approaches applied in this area and our own observations. Basically, we have analyzed the late stage of medullary thymocyte phenotypic differentiation pathways of both CD4 SP and CD8 SP medullary thymocytes and the concomitant functional maturation pathway, in particular, of CD4 SP thymocytes. It is to provide a standard to compare the functional capacity of the cells at the developmental stages induced by different conditions. The cellular and molecular basis of this differentiation process has been partially described. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):3-11.

  10. Post-thymic T-cell development in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, J; Groen, H; Klatter, FA; Pater, JM; VanPetersen, AS; Roser, B; Nieuwenhuis, P; Aspinall, R

    1997-01-01

    The presence or absence of CD4, CD8, Thy-1, RT6 and CD45RC revealed a number of T-cell subpopulations in the rat. Vascular thymus transplantation was used in RT7 congenics to establish the lineage relationship between these subpopulations by following phenotypic changes after thymus emigration. We f

  11. Regulating CAR T Cells: A Remote Control Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Researchers have synthesized small organic molecules called adaptors that have a tumor-specific ligand on one end and FITC on the other. Instead of engineering a different chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) on T cells for each unique tumor antigen, these antigen-specific adaptors can be used to bridge FITC-binding CAR T and tumor cells.

  12. PD-1 Blockade Expands Intratumoral Memory T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribas, Antoni; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Zaretsky, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Tumor responses to programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) blockade therapy are mediated by T cells, which we characterized in 102 tumor biopsies obtained from 53 patients treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody to PD-1. Biopsies were dissociated, and single-cell infiltrates were analyzed by multi...

  13. Understanding the T cell immune response in SARS coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice Oh, Hsueh-Ling; Ken-En Gan, Samuel; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2012-09-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic started in late 2002 and swiftly spread across 5 continents with a mortality rate of around 10%. Although the epidemic was eventually controlled through the implementation of strict quarantine measures, there continues a need to investigate the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and develop interventions should it re-emerge. Numerous studies have shown that neutralizing antibodies against the virus can be found in patients infected with SARS-CoV within days upon the onset of illness and lasting up to several months. In contrast, there is little data on the kinetics of T cell responses during SARS-CoV infection and little is known about their role in the recovery process. However, recent studies in mice suggest the importance of T cells in viral clearance during SARS-CoV infection. Moreover, a growing number of studies have investigated the memory T cell responses in recovered SARS patients. This review covers the available literature on the emerging importance of T cell responses in SARS-CoV infection, particularly on the mapping of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, longevity, polyfunctionality and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association as well as their potential implications on treatment and vaccine development.

  14. T Cells Capture Bacteria by Transinfection from Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Ramírez-Santiago, Guillermo; Torres-Torresano, Mónica; Garcia-Ferreras, Raquel; Veiga Chacón, Esteban

    2016-01-13

    Recently, we have shown, contrary to what is described, that CD4(+) T cells, the paradigm of adaptive immune cells, capture bacteria from infected dendritic cells (DCs) by a process called transinfection. Here, we describe the analysis of the transinfection process, which occurs during the course of antigen presentation. This process was unveiled by using CD4(+) T cells from transgenic OTII mice, which bear a T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a peptide of ovoalbumin (OVAp), which therefore can form stable immune complexes with infected dendritic cells loaded with this specific OVAp. The dynamics of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing bacteria during DC-T cell transmission can be monitored by live-cell imaging and the quantification of bacterial transinfection can be performed by flow cytometry. In addition, transinfection can be quantified by a more sensitive method based in the use of gentamicin, a non-permeable aminoglycoside antibiotic killing extracellular bacteria but not intracellular ones. This classical method has been used previously in microbiology to study the efficiency of bacterial infections. We hereby explain the protocol of the complete process, from the isolation of the primary cells to the quantification of transinfection.

  15. Biogenesis and function of T cell-derived exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Alonso

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are a particular type of extracellular vesicle, characterized by their endosomal origin as intraluminal vesicles present in large endosomes with a multivesicular structure. After these endosomes fuse with the plasma membrane, exosomes are secreted into the extracellular space. The ability of exosomes to carry and selectively deliver bioactive molecules (e.g., lipids, proteins and nucleic acids confers on them the capacity to modulate the activity of receptor cells, even if these cells are located in distant tissues or organs. Since exosomal cargo depends on cell type, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the biochemical composition of exosomes is fundamental to a comprehensive view of exosome function. Here, we review the latest advances concerning exosome function and biogenesis in T cells, with particular focus on the mechanism of protein sorting at multivesicular endosomes. Exosomes secreted by specific T-cell subsets can modulate the activity of immune cells, including other T-cell subsets. Ceramide, tetraspanins and MAL have been revealed to be important in exosome biogenesis by T cells. These molecules, therefore, constitute potential molecular targets for artificially modulating exosome production and, hence, the immune response for therapeutic purposes.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of Treg-mediated T cell suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eSchmidt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs can suppress other immune cells and, thus, are critical mediators of peripheral self-tolerance. On the one hand, Tregs prevent autoimmune disease and allergies. On the other hand, Tregs can avert immune reactions against tumors and pathogens. Despite the importance of Tregs, the molecular mechanisms of suppression remain incompletely understood and controversial. Proliferation and cytokine production of CD4+CD25− conventional T cells (Tcons can be inhibited directly by Tregs. In addition, Tregs can indirectly suppress Tcon activation via inhibition of the stimulatory capacity of antigen presenting cells (APCs. Direct suppression of Tcons by Tregs can involve immunosuppressive soluble factors or cell contact. Different mechanisms of suppression have been described, so far with no consensus on one universal mechanism. Controversies might be explained by the fact that different mechanisms may operate depending on the site of the immune reaction and on the type and activation state of the suppressed target cell. Further, inhibition of T cell effector function can occur independently of suppression of proliferation. In this review, we summarize the described molecular mechanisms of suppression with a particular focus on suppression of Tcons and rapid suppression of T cell receptor (TCR-induced calcium (Ca2+, NFAT and NF-κB signaling in Tcons by Tregs.

  17. Impaired survival of regulatory T cells in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Broos (Caroline); M. van Nimwegen (Menno); A. Kleinjan (Alex); B. ten Berge (Bregje); F. Muskens (Femke); J.C.C.M. in 't Veen (Johannes); J.T. Annema (Jouke); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi); M. Kool (Mirjam); B. van den Blink (Bernt)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Impaired regulatory T cell (Treg) function is thought to contribute to ongoing inflammatory responses in sarcoidosis, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Moreover, it is not known if increased apoptotic susceptibility of Tregs may contribute to an impaired immunosuppres

  18. Identification of novel Notch target genes in T cell leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrander Fiona

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulated Notch signalling is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of T cell leukaemia. At a cellular level, Notch signalling promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL cells. In this study we aimed to identify novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling in the T-ALL cell line, Jurkat. Results RNA was prepared from Jurkat cells retrovirally transduced with an empty vector (GFP-alone or vectors containing constitutively active forms of Notch (N1ΔE or N3ΔE, and used for Affymetrix microarray analysis. A subset of genes found to be regulated by Notch was chosen for real-time PCR validation and in some cases, validation at the protein level, using several Notch-transduced T-ALL and non-T-ALL leukaemic cell lines. As expected, several known transcriptional target of Notch, such as HES1 and Deltex, were found to be overexpressed in Notch-transduced cells, however, many novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling were identified using this approach. These included the T cell costimulatory molecule CD28, the anti-apoptotic protein GIMAP5, and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (1D1. Conclusion The identification of such downstream Notch target genes provides insights into the mechanisms of Notch function in T cell leukaemia, and may help identify novel therapeutic targets in this disease.

  19. Apoptosis and T cell depletion during feline infectious peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Haagmans, B.L.; Egberink, H.F.

    1996-01-01

    Cats that have succumbed to feline infectious peritonitis, an immune- mediated disease caused by variants of feline coronaviruses, show apoptosis and T-cell depletion in their lymphoid organs. The ascitic fluid that develops in the course of the condition causes apoptosis in vitro but only in activa

  20. How T cells earn the follicular rite of passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa, Carola G; Cyster, Jason G

    2011-11-23

    The discovery that Bcl-6 was the transcriptional regulator of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells completed the recognition of this population as an effector subset specialized in the provision of help to B cells. Improved reagents and recent models that allow tracking of Bcl-6-expressing T cells have revealed that the decision to become a Tfh cell occurs soon after T cells are primed by dendritic cells and start dividing, before interaction with B cells. The latter are important for sustaining Bcl-6 expression. Bcl-6 coordinates a signaling program that changes expression or function of multiple guidance receptors, leading to Tfh cell localization within germinal centers. This program is not unique to CD4(+) helper T cells; FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells and NKT cells co-opt the follicular differentiation pathway to enter the follicle and become specialized follicular cells. This review will focus on recent insights into the early events that determine Tfh cell differentiation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. How Notch and Wnt make T-cells tick

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbig, C.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation shows that the ancient Wnt and Notch signaling modules have been coopted by the immune system to direct T-cell responses. Notch has turned out to be particularly dedicated to induction of effector cell differentiation and function. Lack of Notch activation may predispose cells to l

  2. T-cell-directed therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandkumar, P; Furie, R

    2016-09-01

    Drug development for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has largely focused on B-cell therapies. A greater understanding of the immunopathogenesis of SLE coupled with advanced bioengineering has allowed for clinical trials centered on other targets for SLE therapy. The authors discuss the benefits and shortcomings of focusing on T-cell-directed therapies in SLE and lupus nephritis clinical trials.

  3. Schistosoma haematobium in the baboon (Papio anubis): effect of vaccination with irradiated larvae on the subsequent infection with percutaneously applied cercariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbe, G; Sturrock, R F; James, E R; James, C

    1982-01-01

    Groups of five baboons were vaccinated three times at approximately six-weekly intervals at a rate of 1,000 organisms per kg of gamma-irradiated Schistosoma haematobium larvae. Five vaccines were tested: 3 and 20 Krad cercariae applied percutaneously; fresh 3 and 20 Krad mechanically transformed schistosomula injected intramuscularly; and cryopreserved 20 Krad schistosomula injected intramuscularly. These five groups and an unvaccinated control group were challenged percutaneously with 7,500 S. haematobium cercariae three months after the last vaccination. The efficacy of the vaccines was judged by faecal egg excretion, and by adult worm and tissue egg recoveries at necropsy 4.5 months after challenge. Significant protection, with 64 to 89% reductions in worm burden and parallel reductions in egg production, was achieved by all but the cryopreserved vaccine, although egg production was not significantly reduced in those female worms which did mature. Cercariae tended to give more protection than schistosomula and 20 Krad more protection than 3 Krad. No significant pathology could be detected in an additional baboon vaccinated with 20 Krad schistosomula but not challenged with cercariae. This is an encouraging result for the development of a live vaccine against S. haematobium.

  4. Reprogramming T cell Lymphocytes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bared, Kalia

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) provided a novel technology for the study of development and pharmacology and complement embryonic stem cells (ES) for cell therapy applications. Though iPSC are derived from adult tissue they are comparable to ES cells in their behavior; multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal. This makes iPSC research appealing because they can be studied in great detail and expanded in culture broadly. Fibroblasts were the first cell type reprogrammed to an iPSC using a retrovirus vector, since then alternative cell types including lymphocytes have been used to generate iPSC. Different types of vectors have also been developed to enhance iPSC formation and quality. However, specific T lymphocyte subsets have not been shown to reprogram to a pluripotent state to date. Here, we proposed to derive iPSC from peripheral blood effector and central memory T cells, reasoning that the resultant iPSC will maintain the epigenetic memory of a T lymphocyte, including the T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement. This epigenetic memory will enable the differentiation and expansion of T cell iPSC into professional T cells containing a specific TCR. These could then be used for cell therapy to target specific antigens, as well as to improve culture techniques to expand T cells in vitro. We studied different gene delivery methods to derive iPSC from different types of T lymphocytes. We assessed the viability of viral transduction using flow cytometry to detect green fluorescent marker contained in the viral construct and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to detect Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc gene expression. Our results demonstrate that the Sendai virus construct is the most feasible platform to reprogram T lymphocytes. We anticipate that this platform will provide an efficient and safe approach to derive iPSC from different T cell subsets, including memory T cells.

  5. Alefacept (anti-CD2 causes a selective reduction in circulating effector memory T cells (Tem and relative preservation of central memory T cells (Tcm in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novitskaya Inna

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alefacept (anti-CD2 biological therapy selectively targets effector memory T cells (Tem in psoriasis vulgaris, a model Type 1 autoimmune disease. Methods Circulating leukocytes were phenotyped in patients receiving alefacept for moderate to severe psoriasis. Results In all patients, this treatment caused a preferential decrease in effector memory T cells (CCR7- CD45RA- (mean 63% reduction for both CD4+ and CD8+ Tem, while central memory T cells (Tcm (CCR7+CD45RA- were less affected, and naïve T cells (CCR7+CD45RA+ were relatively spared. Circulating CD8+ effector T cells and Type 1 T cells (IFN-γ-producing were also significantly reduced. Conclusion Alefacept causes a selective reduction in circulating effector memory T cells (Tem and relative preservation of central memory T cells (Tcm in psoriasis.

  6. The regulation of CD5 expression in murine T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzenberg Leonard A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD5 is a pan-T cell surface marker that is also present on a subset of B cells, B-1a cells.Functional and developmental subsets of T cells express characteristic CD5 levels that vary over roughly a 30-fold range. Previous investigators have cloned a 1.7 Kb fragment containing the CD5 promoter and showed that it can confer similar lymphocyte-specific expression pattern as observed for endogenous CD5 expression. Results We further characterize the CD5 promoter and identify minimal and regulatory regions on the CD5 promoter. Using a luciferase reporter system, we show that a 43 bp region on the CD5 promoter regulates CD5 expression in resting mouse thymoma EL4 T cells and that an Ets binding site within the 43 bp region mediates the CD5 expression. In addition, we show that Ets-1, a member of the Ets family of transcription factors, recognizes the Ets binding site in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. This Ets binding site is directly responsible for the increase in reporter activity when co-transfected with increasing amounts of Ets-1 expression plasmid. We also identify two additional evolutionarily-conserved regions in the CD5 promoter (CD5X and CD5Y and demonstrate the respective roles of the each region in the regulation of CD5 transcription. Conclusion Our studies define a minimal and regulatory promoter for CD5 and show that the CD5 expression level in T cells is at least partially dependent on the level of Ets-1 protein. Based on the findings in this report, we propose a model of CD5 transcriptional regulation in T cells.

  7. T-cell repertoires in refractory coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Julia; Zimmermann, Karin; Jöhrens, Korinna; Mende, Stefanie; Seegebarth, Anke; Siegmund, Britta; Hennig, Steffen; Todorova, Kremena; Rosenwald, Andreas; Daum, Severin; Hummel, Michael; Schumann, Michael

    2017-02-10

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is a potentially hazardous complication of coeliac disease (CD). In contrast to RCD type I, RCD type II is a precursor entity of enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL), which is associated with clonally expanding T-cells that are also found in the sequentially developing EATL. Using high-throughput sequencing (HTS), we aimed to establish the small-intestinal T-cell repertoire (TCR) in CD and RCD to unravel the role of distinct T-cell clonotypes in RCD pathogenesis. DNA extracted from duodenal mucosa specimens of controls (n=9), active coeliacs (n=10), coeliacs on a gluten-free diet (n=9), RCD type I (n=8), RCD type II (n=8) and unclassified Marsh I cases (n=3) collected from 2002 to 2013 was examined by TCRβ-complementarity-determining regions 3 (CDR3) multiplex PCR followed by HTS of the amplicons. On average, 10(6) sequence reads per sample were generated consisting of up to 900 individual TCRβ rearrangements. In RCD type II, the most frequent clonotypes (ie, sequence reads with identical CDR3) represent in average 42.6% of all TCRβ rearrangements, which was significantly higher than in controls (6.8%; pRCD type I (6.7%; pRCD type II were unique and not related between patients. CD-associated, gliadin-dependent CDR3 motifs were only detectable at low frequencies. TCRβ-HTS analysis unravels the TCR in CD and allows detailed analysis of individual TCRβ rearrangements. Dominant TCRβ sequences identified in patients with RCD type II are unique and not homologous to known gliadin-specific TCR sequences, supporting the assumption that these clonal T-cells expand independent of gluten stimulation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Proteomic profiling of the human T-cell nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboui, Mohamed Ali; Wynne, Kieran; Elia, Giuliano; Hall, William W; Gautier, Virginie W

    2011-12-01

    The nucleolus, site of ribosome biogenesis, is a dynamic subnuclear organelle involved in diverse cellular functions. The size, number and organisation of nucleoli are cell-specific and while it remains to be established, the nucleolar protein composition would be expected to reflect lineage-specific transcriptional regulation of rDNA genes and have cell-type functional components. Here, we describe the first characterisation of the human T-cell nucleolar proteome. Using the Jurkat T-cell line and a reproducible organellar proteomic approach, we identified 872 nucleolar proteins. In addition to ribosome biogenesis and RNA processing networks, network modeling and topological analysis of nucleolar proteome revealed distinct macromolecular complexes known to orchestrate chromatin structure and to contribute to the regulation of gene expression, replication, recombination and repair, and chromosome segregation. Furthermore, among our dataset, we identified proteins known to functionally participate in T-cell biology, including RUNX1, ILF3, ILF2, STAT3, LSH, TCF-1, SATB1, CTCF, HMGB3, BCLAF1, FX4L1, ZAP70, TIAM1, RAC2, THEMIS, LCP1, RPL22, TOPK, RETN, IFI-16, MCT-1, ISG15, and 14-3-3τ, which support cell-specific composition of the Jurkat nucleolus. Subsequently, the nucleolar localisation of RUNX1, ILF3, STAT3, ZAP70 and RAC2 was further validated by Western Blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Overall, our T-cell nucleolar proteome dataset not only further expands the existing repertoire of the human nucleolar proteome but support a cell type-specific composition of the nucleolus in T cell and highlights the potential roles of the nucleoli in lymphocyte biology.

  9. CD8+ T cells in human autoimmune arthritis : The unusual suspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrelli, Alessandra; Van Wijk, Femke

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T cells are key players in the body's defence against viral infections and cancer. To date, data on the role of CD8+ T cells in autoimmune diseases have been scarce, especially when compared with the wealth of research on CD4+ T cells. However, growing evidence suggests that CD8+ T-cell homeost

  10. The role of cytokine signaling in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    abraham, Robert; Zhang, Qiang; Ødum, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) displays immunosuppressive properties and phenotypic plasticity. The malignant T cells in CTCL can possess features of immunomodulating regulatory T cells (Treg) and IL-17-producing helper T cells (Th17) depending on the stimuli they receive from antigen presenting...