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Sample records for radiation workers set

  1. Radiation exposure of workers in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujnova, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is an interdisciplinary department that deals with diagnosis and therapy using open sources. Therefore workers in nuclear medicine are in daily contact with ionizing radiation and thus it is essential to monitor a radiation load. Each work must therefore carry out monitoring of workers. It monitors compliance with the radiation limits set by law, allows an early detection of deviations from normal operation and to demonstrate whether the radiation protection at the workplace is optimized. This work describes the principles of monitoring of workers in nuclear medicine and monitoring methods for personal dosimetry. In the next section the author specifically deals with personal dosimetry at the Department of Nuclear Medicine St. Elizabeth Cancer Institute, Bratislava (KNM-Ba-OUSA). The main part of the work is to evaluate the results of a one-year monitoring of radiation workers KNM-Ba-OUSA. (author)

  2. Meaningful radiation worker training for temporary craftsmen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, S.L.

    1976-01-01

    The carefully organized Radiation Worker Training Program presented to permanently assigned personnel at a power reactor facility too often falls by the wayside when temporary craftsmen are brought in for an outage. Even though these temporary workers will frequently be assigned to outage jobs with high radiation and/or contamination exposures, their Radiation Worker Training is often squeezed into an already busy schedule, thus reducing its effectiveness. As an aid for evaluating the effectiveness of an existing Radiation Worker Training Program for temporary craftsmen or for setting up a new program, the following guides are presented and discussed in this paper: the training environment; the interest and meaningfulness of the presentation; the method or methods used for presentation of the training information; the use of demonstrations; trainee participation; and, measuring the amount and type of information retained by a trainee. Meaningful Radiation Worker Training for temporary craftsmen can pay big dividends. Craftsmen can be expected to make fewer mistakes, thus reducing radiation exposure and lessening the chance for the spread of contamination. The craftsmen will also benefit by being able to work longer and utility management will benefit by having lower outage costs

  3. The national registry for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, G.M.; Dennis, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The National Registry for Radiation Workers (NRRW) was set up by the National Radiological Protection Board in 1976. The analysis of registry data has four aims: a) To determine whether there is any evidence of differences in the causes of and ages at death of workers exposed to different levels of radiation and, if any differences are found, whether it seems likely that they can be attributed to radiation. b) To estimate the magnitude of the risk, if any differences are found, that seem likely to be attributable to radiation. c) To estimate bounds to the possible risk for particular types of malignancy, such as leukemia. d) To compare the mortality experience of radiation workers with national mortality data and also with that of other industrial groups for whom data exist. If current estimates of the risks of ionizing radiation are correct, very few deaths will be induced in the study population and it will be impossible to detect them statistically. The NRRW currently includes records for over 60,000 individuals. 6 refs

  4. Legislations set out to protect workers against ionizing radiations in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grivelet-Denais, M.-F.

    1975-01-01

    A physical review on ionizing radiations and a biological survey of their possible effects on exposed workers are followed by a study, first general and then analytical, of the various legislations set out to protect these workers in the European Community. In the light of this study a few comments are called for. In all member States the rules are particularly strict for everything to do with approval and homologation of plants and equipment, technical qualifications of users, safety measures, physical protection control, atmospheric checks and individual dosimetry. Reservations must be made as to the exact organization of controls and the interdependence between supervisory and user bodies, these points generally remaining rather vague. France more than the other member States has made an effort at precision which deserves credit but is disappointing in practice where medical supervision of exposed workers is concerned. This inadequacy of the medical examination is due mainly to the lack of any significant symptom betraying a biological overdose. The hematological examination is also disparaged for its lack of sensitivity and above all specificity [fr

  5. Risks for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotblat, J.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection; methods for determining dose limits to workers; use of data from survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki for estimating risk factors; use of data from survivors of nuclear explosions in Marshall Islands, uranium miners, and patients exposed to diagnostic and therapeutic radiation; risk factors for radioinduced malignancies; evidence that risk factors for persons exposed to partial-body radiation and Japanese survivors are too low; greater resistance of A-bomb survivors to radiation; and radiation doses received by U.K. medical workers and by U.K. fuel reprocessing workers. It is suggested that the dose limit for radiation workers should be reduced by a factor of 5

  6. Health of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.

    1979-11-01

    Radiation workers are healthier than the average person in the general population and appear to be as healthy as workers in other ΣsafeΣ industries. It is, however, assumed that there is no safe dose of radiation and that any exposure to radiation will cause a small increase in the incidence of cancer, this increase being directly proportional to the total radiation dose. On the basis of the risk estimates given by ICRP, radiation exposures up to 1 rem per year for 47 years are predicted to cause fewer work-related deaths than expected for the average worker in Canadian industry. Radiation exposures of 5 rem per year from age 18 to 65 would result in predicted risk which is about four times higher than that for most workers in Canada and might increase the chances of death before age 75 to nearly the same level as for the average member of the general public. (auth)

  7. Dose received by radiation workers in Australia, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, N D

    1994-07-01

    Exposure to radiation can cause genetic defects or cancer. People who use sources of radiation as part of their employment are potentially at a greater risk than others owing to the possibility of their being continually exposed to small radiation doses over a long period. In Australia, the National Health and Medical Research Council has established radiation protection standards and set annual effective dose limits for radiation workers in order to minimise the chance of adverse effects occurring. These standards are based on the the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1990). In order to ensure that the prescribed limits are not exceeded and to ensure that doses are kept to a minimum, some sort of monitoring is necessary. The primary purpose of this report is to provide data on the distribution of effective doses for different occupational categories of radiation worker in Australia. The total collective effective dose was found to be of the order of 4.9 Sv for a total of 34750 workers. 9 refs., 16 tabs., 6 figs.

  8. Dose received by radiation workers in Australia, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, N.D.

    1994-07-01

    Exposure to radiation can cause genetic defects or cancer. People who use sources of radiation as part of their employment are potentially at a greater risk than others owing to the possibility of their being continually exposed to small radiation doses over a long period. In Australia, the National Health and Medical Research Council has established radiation protection standards and set annual effective dose limits for radiation workers in order to minimise the chance of adverse effects occurring. These standards are based on the the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1990). In order to ensure that the prescribed limits are not exceeded and to ensure that doses are kept to a minimum, some sort of monitoring is necessary. The primary purpose of this report is to provide data on the distribution of effective doses for different occupational categories of radiation worker in Australia. The total collective effective dose was found to be of the order of 4.9 Sv for a total of 34750 workers. 9 refs., 16 tabs., 6 figs

  9. Health protection of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norwood, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    This textbook is addressed to all those concerned with the protection of radiation workers. It provides full coverage of the implications of radiation in exposed workers, and, after a chapter outlining, in simple terms, the basic facts about radiation, deals with measurement of ionising radiation; radiation dosimetry; effectiveness of absorbed dose; general biological effects of ionising radiation; somatic effects of radiation; the acute radiation syndrome; other somatic effects; hereditary effects; radiation protection standards and regulations; radiation protection; medical supervision of radiation workers; general methods of diagnosis and treatment; metabolism and health problems of some radioisotopes; plutonium and other transuranium elements; radiation accidents; emergency plans and medical care; atomic power plants; medico-legal problems

  10. Radiation protection medical care of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walt, H.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation protection medical care for radiation workers is part of the extensive programme protecting people against dangers emanating from the peaceful application of ionizing radiation. Thus it is a special field of occupational health care and emergency medicine in case of radiation accidents. It has proved helpful in preventing radiation damage as well as in early detection, treatment, after-care, and expert assessment. The medical checks include pre-employment and follow-up examinations, continued long-range medical care as well as specific monitoring of individuals and defined groups of workers. Three levels of action are involved: works medical officers specialized in radiation protection, the Institute of Medicine at the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection, and a network of clinical departments specialized in handling cases of acute radiation damage. An account is given of categories, types, and methods of examinations for radiation workers and operators. (author)

  11. Micronucleus assay for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasem, A.N.; Ali, A.S.K.

    1997-01-01

    Micronucleus assay was performed on 49 radiation workers and 22 healthy volunteers. Radiation workers were subdivided into two groups according to their employments durations in the radiation field. Group a consisted of 18 radiation workers who have been in this work between 5 and 22 years. Group b included 31 employees who have been classified as radiation workers for 1 to 4.5 years. Statistical analysis showed significant variations between the yields of micronuclei in groups A and B as well as between group A and a group of healthy controls. Meanwhile no significant difference was noticed between the yields of micronuclei in group B and the corresponding values in the healthy controls. The possible effect of age in the induction of micronuclei was discussed and a comparison with the yield of chromosomal aberrations was described. It seems that cytokinesis- blocking method may be used to detect the radiation-induced micronuclei in workers exposed occupationally to ionizing radiation in levels below the maximum permissible limit of 0.05 Sv per year

  12. Developing positive worker attitudes toward radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millis, N.L.

    1987-01-01

    Teamwork, productivity, and reducing exposure are admirable goals presented to the workers in a nuclear power plant. A common thread to achievement in these areas resides in worker attitudes toward the tasks presented. A positive, alert, and cooperative attitude is an element in a worker's mind that must be created and maintained by good leadership and management practices. At the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, management has used certain strategies to foster good positive worker attitudes toward radiation protection and quality workmanship in all tasks. Strategies differ from management by objectives in that they have no deadlines or timetables in and of themselves. Rather, strategies are preplanned methods that can be called upon when the opportunity arises to improve worker attitudes. A series of five strategies for positive attitude development are described in the full paper. The strategies are identified with buzz words to allow the user a recall mechanism (as with the acronyms abounding in the nuclear industry). They cover the range of management techniques from example setting to reward/recognition. Although not unique to radiation exposure management, nor all inclusive, the strategies provide some though stimulation in creating productive worker attitudes

  13. Occupational radiation protection: Protecting workers against exposure to ionizing radiation. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, mining and milling; medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The term 'occupational exposure' refers to the radiation exposure incurred by a worker, which is attributable to the worker's occupation and committed during a period of work. According to the latest (2000) Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), an estimated 11 million workers are monitored for exposure to ionizing radiation. They incur radiation doses attributable to their occupation, which range from a small fraction of the global average background exposure to natural radiation up to several times that value. It should be noted that the UNSCEAR 2000 Report describes a downward trend in the exposure of several groups of workers, but it also indicates that occupational exposure is affecting an increasingly large group of people worldwide. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS), which are co-sponsored by, inter alia, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO), establish a system of radiation protection which includes radiation dose limits for occupational exposure. Guidance supporting the requirements of the BSS for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, jointly sponsored by the IAEA and the ILO. These Guides describe, for example, the implications for employers in discharging their main responsibilities (such as setting up appropriate radiation protection programmes) and similarly for workers (such as properly using the radiation monitoring devices provided to them). The IAEA i organized its first International Conference on Occupational Radiation Protection. The

  14. Guidelines for the medical surveillance of atomic radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    These guidelines are provided for the use and guidance of occupational physicians concerned with the medical surveillance of atomic radiation workers (ARWs). Persons employed in industries where there is exposure to ionizing radiation should be screened medically for fitness for certain jobs before starting such work and at appropriate intervals while employed. This includes workers at uranium mines, mills and refineries, nuclear fuel fabrication plants, nuclear power plants and research facilities, and facilities using radionuclides in an industrial setting. An important purpose of medical surveillance is to ensure that workers are fit both physically and psychologically to undertake the tasks they may be called upon to perform

  15. The Study of External Radiation Dose for Radiation Worker at PRSG-BATAN Serpong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunarningsih; Mashudi; A Lilik W; Yosep S

    2012-01-01

    The study of External radiation dose for radiation worker at PRSG-BATAN Serpong has been carried out. The sample is taken from the System Reactor division (BSR), Operation Reactor division, (BOR) Safety division UPN, UJM and head of PRSG by setting Thermoluminescence Dosemeter (TLD) on the chest, then is detected by a tool TLD reader model 6600. The aim of this study is to evaluate the occupational exposure dose that has been accepted by the radiation worker for the last five years. The result in average doses at BSR is 0,99 mSv, BOR is 3,27 mSv, at BK is 0,69 mSv and UPN + UJM + head of PRSG is 0,03 mSv. The result highest doses at BSR is 6,58 mSv, BOR is 28,94 mSv, BK is 4,24 mSv, and UPN UJM Head of PRSG is 0,52 mSv. Dose interval radiation worker at PRSG BATAN ttd - 28,98 mSv. To overall the external personal dose acceptant for radiation worker at PRSG BATAN one below maximum permissible dose acceptant that allowed by BAPETEN, that is 20 mSv in average every year during five years. (author)

  16. Health management of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugita, Naoki; Igari, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    People in Japan have expressed great anxiety about possible radiation and radioactivity after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO), due to the great earthquake and tsunami in eastern Japan on 11 March 2011. A large number of workers were engaged in response and recovery operations, and they were possibly exposed to high doses of radiation as compared to the general population. In the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 1986, high doses of radiation to 134 plant staff and emergency personnel resulted in acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which proved fatal for 28 of them. In the Fukushima accident, six workers were exposed to more than 250 mSv of radiation during the initial response phase, but no one showed ARS. It is necessary to continue registration of radiation doses for all workers who were exposed to radiation to facilitate suitable healthcare management in the future. In addition to radiation exposure, a group of workers were also exposed to other health hazards. Frequent occurrence of heat disorders has been a concern for the workers wearing protective clothing with poor ventilation. A comprehensive program to prevent heat illness was implemented by TEPCO under the guidance of the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare. It is important to provide effective systems not only for prevention of radiation exposure but also for general management of other health risks including heat disorders and infection. (author)

  17. The analysis of radiation exposure of hospital radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Tae Sik; Shin, Byung Chul; Moon, Chang Woo; Cho, Yeong Duk; Lee, Yong Hwan; Yum, Ha Yong

    2000-01-01

    This investigation was performed in order to improve the health care of radiation workers, to predict a risk, to minimize the radiation exposure hazard to them and for them to realize radiation exposure danger when they work in radiation area in hospital. The documentations checked regularly for personal radiation exposure in four university hospitals in Pusan city in Korea between January 1, 1993 and December 31, 1997 were analyz ed. There were 458 persons in this documented but 111 persons who worked less then one year were excluded and only 347 persons were included in this study. The average of yearly radiation exposure of 347 persons was 1.52±1.35 mSv. Though it was less than 5OmSv, the limitaion of radiation in law but 125 (36%) people received higher radiation exposure than non-radiation workers. Radiation workers under 30 year old have received radiation exposure of mean 1.87±1.01 mSv/year, mean 1.22±0.69 mSv between 31 and 40 year old and mean 0.97±0.43 mSv/year over, 41year old (p<0.001). Men received mean 1.67±1.54 mSv/year were higher than women who received mean 1.13±0.61 mSv/year (p<0.01). Radiation exposure in the department of nuclear medicine department in spite of low energy sources is higher than other departments that use radiations in hospital (p<0.05). And the workers who received mean 3.69±1.81 mSv/year in parts of management of radiation sources and injection of sources to patient receive high radiation exposure in nuclear medicine department (0<0.01). In department of diagnostic radiology high radiation exposure is in barium enema rooms where workers received mean 3.74±1.74 mSv/year and other parts where they all use fluoroscopy such as angiography room of mean 1.17±0.35 mSv/year and upper gastrointestinal room of mean 1.74±1.34 mSv/year represented higher radiation exposure than average radiation exposure in diagnostic radiology (p<0.01). Doctors and radiation technologists received higher radiation exposure of each mean 1.75±1

  18. Epidemiological studies on radiation workers in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo Yong Choi; Hai Won Chung

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objectives: The aim of this study is to analyze the occupational exposure for external radiation and to evaluate radiation effects on Korean radiation workers. Methods: The National Dose Registry contains radiation exposure records for all monitored radiation workers since its creation in 1983. We are carrying out epidemiological survey for radiation workers. The items of information included personal identification, employment and dose data. The frequencies of various types of chromosome aberrations in radiation workers were compared with controls. The data were analyzed according to year, sex, age, duration of occupation, exposure dose, etc. using SPSS statistical package(version 15.0). The goodness-of-fit test for Poisson assumption and dispersion test for detecting heterogeneity for Poisson distribution were done with chromosomal aberrations among study subjects. Results: The total number of workers registered from 1983 to 2005 was 61,610. The number of workers steadily increased and the accumulated dose somewhat increased. The collective annual dose of radiation workers was 345.823 man Sv and the mean annual dose was 1.34mSv. The frequencies of chromosome aberrations in 102 workers were compared with those in 42 controls. The frequencies of all types of chromosome aberrations in the exposed subjects were higher than those in the control group. Poisson regression analysis showed that there was significant association of chromosome aberrations with radiation dose, duration of work, age and alcohol intake. We started to survey radiation workers in order to evaluate radiation effects, collected epidemiological data for 9,157 workers at present and analyzed their lifetime radiation exposure doses. Follow-up is carrying out using the Korean Mortality Data, Cancer Registry and individual investigation. Among study patients, 11 of 38 deaths were identified with cancer. Conclusions: The data on occupational doses shows that

  19. The radiologist obligations for the workers radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehel, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    After analysis of risks by the person competent in radiation protection (P.C.R.) the leader of any facility holder of a ionizing radiation source bounds around this one a controlled area. When the exposure exceeds the levels set by the regulations, he bounds areas specially regulated (yellow or orange) or forbidden. The studies of workstations realised by the P.C.R., must correlate the usual conditions of work. They allow the workers classification in two categories A or B according to their level of exposure. These workers must be the object of a medical and dosimetry follow-up by passive dosimetry. The access in controlled area implies a complementary operational dosimetry. An exposure card must be established for every exposed worker and transmitted to the work physician that will adapt the dosimetry surveillance. (N.C.)

  20. The Greek outside workers radiation passbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenopoulou, V.

    1997-01-01

    Following the European Council Directive 90/641/EURATOM of the 4 December 1990, on the operational protection of outside workers exposed to the risk of ionising radiation during their activities in controlled areas, the Greek Government has adopted the Ministerial Order, published in the Official Gazette (No 9087(FOR) 1004 of 1996). The Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) is the competent governmental authority for radiation protection matters. Therefore it is the GAEC's responsibility of monitoring the implementation of this Order. The Order consists of 6 parts, where among others are described the obligations of outside undertakings and operators and the obligations of outside workers. One of the major elements of this Ministerial Order is the radiation passbook.The Greek Radiation Passbook is written in two languages, Greek and English. It contains worker's personal data (identity, medical examinations, training in radiation protection, etc), information concerning his employee (name, address, etc) and worker's dosimetry information such as operational and the official dosimetry (external and internal) data. The radiation passbook is provided only to category A outside workers, working in Greece or abroad. The GAEC distributed the Ministerial Order with application forms to the possible outside undertakings for their information. Until August 1997, 41 radiation passbooks have been attributed to outride workers. All of them are technicians dealing with medical equipment using ionizing radiation. (author)

  1. Health protection of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norwood, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    Essential information on the health protection of radiation workers which has accumulated since the advent of nuclear fission thirty years ago is presented in simple terms. Basic facts on ionizing radiation, its measurement, and dosimetry are presented. Acute and chronic somatic and genetic effects are discussed with emphasis on prevention. Radiation protection standards and regulations are outlined, and methods for maintaining these standards are described. Diagnosis and treatment of radiation injury from external radiation and/or internally deposited radionuclides is considered generally as well as specifically for each radioisotope. The medical supervision of radiation workers, radiation accidents, atomic power plants, and medicolegal problems is also covered. (853 references) (U.S.)

  2. Radiation worker: the ALARA key

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weedon, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    As low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) is a simple concept that has come to be a complicated and expensive regulatory goal. There are essentially three factors that can be manipulated to achieve ALARA: (1) radionuclide inventory (source), (2) physical arrangement (primarily distance and shielding); (3) radiation worker performance (radiation safety responsibilities and functions). Of these three elements, item 3 is utilized the least and yet has the greatest potential for reducing exposure per dollar expended. By establishing a relationship with radiation workers consisting of credible leadership and expecting the radiation workers to be responsible for specific elements of radiological safety. Health Physics can gain a degree of cooperation and performance that will provide significant ALARA gains at a very small expense

  3. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin

    2017-01-01

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  4. Dose reconstruction modeling for medical radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yeong Chull; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Exposure information is a crucial element for the assessment of health risk due to radiation. Radiation doses received by medical radiation workers have been collected and maintained by public registry since 1996. Since exposure levels in the remote past are greater concern, it is essential to reconstruct unmeasured doses in the past using known information. We developed retrodiction models for different groups of medical radiation workers and estimate individual past doses before 1996. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure. Reconstruction models for past radiation doses received by medical radiation workers were developed, and the past doses were estimated. Using these estimates, organ doses should be calculated which, in turn, will be used to explore a wide range of health risks of medical occupational radiation exposure.

  5. The informed radiation worker and fetal dose policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harshaw, F.B.

    1991-01-01

    The role of women in a workplace in which radioactive materials and radiation producing equipment are used has never been more controversial than it is now. So important, in fact, has this become that the Supreme Court has decided to hear a case that will have major implication not only for female radiation worker but for all employers and certainly for all health physicist involved in attempting to set a reasonable policy for the female worker and her potential for pregnancy. In this paper, a review of the recent BEIR V information and the UNSCEAR data will be made as well as a review of fetal development. Also, the ALARA requirements will be reviewed. Finally, risk perception will be discussed

  6. Frequencies of chromosome aberration on radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanti Lusiyanti; Zubaidah Alatas

    2016-01-01

    Radiation exposure of the body can cause damage to the genetic material in cells (cytogenetic) in the form of changes in the structure or chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Chromosomal aberrations can be unstable as dicentric and ring chromosomes, and is stable as translocation. Dicentric chromosome is the gold standard biomarker due to radiation exposure, and chromosome translocation is a biomarker for retrospective biodosimetry. The aim of this studi is to conduct examination of chromosomal aberrations in the radiation worker to determine the potential damage of cell that may arise due to occupational radiation exposure. The examination have been carried out on blood samples from 55 radiation workers in the range of 5-30 year of service. Chromosome aberration frequency measurement starts with blood sampling, culturing, harvesting, slide preparations, and lymphocyte chromosome staining with Giemsa and painting with Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) technique. The results showed that chromosomal translocations are not found in blood samples radiation workers and dicentric chromosomes found only on 2 blood samples of radiation workers with a frequency of 0.001/cell. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the blood cells such workers within normal limits and this means that the workers have been implemented a radiation safety aspects very well. (author)

  7. Medical supervision of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santani, S.B.; Nandakumar, A.N.; Subramanian, G.

    1982-01-01

    The basic elements of an occupational medical supervision programme for radiation workers are very much the same as those relevant to other professions with some additional special features. This paper cites examples from literature and recommends measures such as spot checks and continuance of medical supervision even after a radiation worker leaves this profession. (author)

  8. Female all cancer incidence in medical radiation workers in Latvia 1982-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matisane, L.; Carpenter, L.; Venables, K.

    2005-01-01

    Medical radiation workers belong to one of the oldest occupational groups exposed to external radiation. Since the various radiological protection recommendations have been introduced, now ths process has resulted in low-dose exposure, regular monitoring of exposure and establishment of national dose registration bodies. In order to provide additional information to studies on cancer incidence among medical radiation workers (specially female workers) and in order to assess all cancer incidence in female medical radiation workers in Latvia, a retrospective cohort study based on the National Dose Register was set up in Latvia. The study cohort consisted of all workers employed in health care, occupationally exposed to ionising radiation for more than one year in any of the public health care establishments in Latvia, except military ones, between 1 January 1972 and 1 January 2002 and who were registered in the National Dose Register of Latvia. The cohort consisted of 1416 female medical radiation workers either in hospitals or outpatient departments, or both. The cohort included diagnostic and therapeutic radiologists with predominantly medical qualification, it also included radiotechnologits, nurses, junior nurses, but it did not include academic, physicists and dentists. In all cases the calculated SIR was over than expected or close to expected. Several major differences in study design makes ir difficult to compare the results of this study with the results of the studies carried out in other countries

  9. Radiation protection of workers in mining and processing of uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.H.; Sahoo, S.K; Puranik, V.D.

    2003-01-01

    Low grade of uranium ore mined from three underground mines is processed in a mill at Jaduguda in eastern India to recover uranium concentrate in the form of yellow cake. Radiation protection of workers is given due importance at all stages of these operations. Dedicated Health Physics Units and Environmental Survey Laboratories established at the site regularly carry out in-plant and environmental surveillance to keep radiation exposure of workers and the members of public within the limits prescribed by the regulatory body. The limits set by the national regulatory body based on the international standards recommended by the ICRP and the IAEA are followed. In the uranium mines, external gamma radiation, radon and airborne activity due to radioactive dust are monitored. Similarly, in the uranium ore processing mill, gamma radiation and airborne radioactivity due to long-lived α-emitters are monitored. Personal dosimeters are also issued to workers. The total radiation exposure of workers from external and internal sources is evaluated from the area and personal monitoring data. It has been observed that the average radiation dose to workers has been below 10 mSvy -1 and all exposures are well below 20 mSvy -1 at all stages of operations. Adequate ventilation is provided during mining and ore processing operations to keep the concentrations of airborne radioactivity well below the derived limits. Workers use personal protective appliances, where necessary, as a supplementary means of control. The monitoring methodologies, results and control measures are presented in the paper. (author)

  10. Analysis of causes of radiation overexposures for radiation workers in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, J.M.; Massand, O.P.

    2001-01-01

    About 5500 radiation workers are monitored from industrial institutions in our country out of which 3600 radiation workers are working in industrial radiography institutions. These workers have a higher potential of receiving overexposure (equivalent dose 3 10 mSv) due to their nature of work. This paper presents analysis of overexposures and their causes for radiation workers working in industrial radiography institutions during the last seven years. (author)

  11. Compensation for damage to workers health exposed to ionizing radiation in Argentina

    CERN Document Server

    Sobehart, L J

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this report is to analyze the possibility to establish a scheme to compensate damage to workers health exposed to ionizing radiation in Argentina for those cases in which it is possible to assume that the exposure to ionizing radiation is the cause of the cancer suffered by the worker. The proposed scheme is based on the recommendations set out in the 'International Conference on Occupational Radiation Protection: Protecting Workers against Exposure to Ionization Radiation, held in Geneva, Switzerland, August 26-30, 2002. To this end, the study analyzes the present state of scientific knowledge on cancer causation due to genotoxic factors, and the accepted form of the doses-response curve, for the human beings exposure to ionization radiation at low doses with low doses rates. Finally, the labor laws and regulations related to damage compensation; in particular the present Argentine Labor Law; the National Russian Federal Occupational Radiological Health Impairment and Workmen Compensation, t...

  12. Occupational radiation doses among diagnostic radiation workers in South Korea, 1996-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W. J.; Cha, E. S.; Ha, M.; Jin, Y. W.; Hwang, S. S.; Kong, K. A.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, K. Y.; Kim, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    This study details the distribution and trends of doses of occupational radiation among diagnostic radiation workers by using the national dose registry between 1996 and 2006 by the Korea Food and Drug Administration. Dose measurements were collected quarterly by the use of thermoluminescent dosemeter personal monitors. A total of 61 732 workers were monitored, including 18 376 radiologic technologists (30%), 13 762 physicians (22%), 9858 dentists (16%) and 6114 dental hygienists (9.9%). The average annual effective doses of all monitored workers decreased from 1.75 to 0.80 mSv over the study period. Among all diagnostic radiation workers, radiologic technologists received both the highest effective and collective doses. Male radiologic technologists aged 30-49 y composed the majority of workers receiving more than 5 mSv in a quarter. More intensive monitoring of occupational radiation exposure and investigation into its health effects on diagnostic radiation workers are required in South Korea. (authors)

  13. Radiation haunts shipyard workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrey, L.

    1978-01-01

    The apparent link recently found by Dr. Najarian between cancer among workers at a US Naval dockyard where up to 5000 civilian employees have been exposed to low dose irradiation while servicing nuclear ships and their radiation exposure is discussed. The study has revealed that 38.4% of the deaths of nuclear workers at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in New Hampshire were caused by cancer while the comparable rate for non-nuclear shipyard workers was 21.7% and the national average in the United States is 18%. The Portsmouth study, launched in October 1977, was based on a survey of 1722 death certificates of shipyard employees and interviews with 592 next-of-kin. In addition the results show that the rate of leukaemia of the shipyard workers was 450% higher than that of the general population, and the incidence of lymph gland cancers was 125% higher than the national rate. The most startling statistics compared mortality among workers aged 60 to 69. In this age group nearly 60% of the nuclear employees had died of cancer, while the cancer death rate among non-nuclear workers was only 26%. If these results are confirmed present ideas concerning the effects of low doses of radiation must be challenged. (U.K.)

  14. Biological effects of ionizing radiation - changing worker attitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.; Schenley, C.

    1989-01-01

    Training Resources and Data Exchange (TRADE) Radiation Protection Training Special Interest Group has taken an innovative approach to providing DOE contractors with radiation worker training material information. Newly-hired radiation workers may be afraid to work near radiation and long-term radiation workers may become indifferent to the biological hazard of radiation. Commercially available training material is often presented at an inappropriate technical level or in an uninteresting style. These training problems have been addressed in the DOE system through development of a training videotape and supporting material package entitled Understanding Ionizing Radiation and its Biological Effects. The training package, developed and distributed by TRADE specifically to meet the needs of DOE contractor facilities, contains the videotape and accompanying paper supporting materials designed to assist the instructor. Learning objectives, presentation suggestion for the instructor, trainee worksheets, guided discussion questions, and trainee self-evaluation sheets are included in the training package. DOE contractors have agreed that incorporating this training module into radiation worker training programs enhances the quality of the training and increase worker understanding of the biological effects of ionizing radiation

  15. Compensation for damage to workers health exposed to ionizing radiation in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobehart, Leonardo J.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this report is to analyze the possibility to establish a scheme to compensate damage to workers health exposed to ionizing radiation in Argentina for those cases in which it is possible to assume that the exposure to ionizing radiation is the cause of the cancer suffered by the worker. The proposed scheme is based on the recommendations set out in the 'International Conference on Occupational Radiation Protection: Protecting Workers against Exposure to Ionization Radiation, held in Geneva, Switzerland, August 26-30, 2002. To this end, the study analyzes the present state of scientific knowledge on cancer causation due to genotoxic factors, and the accepted form of the doses-response curve, for the human beings exposure to ionization radiation at low doses with low doses rates. Finally, the labor laws and regulations related to damage compensation; in particular the present Argentine Labor Law; the National Russian Federal Occupational Radiological Health Impairment and Workmen Compensation, the United Kingdom Compensation Scheme for Radiation-linked Diseases and the United States Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program are described. (author)

  16. Medical standards for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, S.

    1977-01-01

    The Council of the European Communities in its Directive of June 1, 1976 has laid down revised basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the danger of ionising radiation. The Directive requires each Member State of the Community 'for the guidance of medical practitioners.....to draw up a list, which need not be exhaustive, of the criteria which should be taken into account when judging a worker's fitness to be exposed to ionising radiation'. Medical officers with current responsibility for radiation workers in the U.K. therefore met recently for informal exploratory discussion at the National Radiological Protection Board's headquarters, and an account is given of the views expressed there about the composition of the required 'list', and the possibility of standardizing the procedure adopted. Consideration was given to the objectives of medical examinations, the form of examination, and specific conditions which may give rise to difficulty in making a fitness assessment. These conditions are skin abnormalities, blood abnormalities, cataract, pregnancy, and psychological and psychiatric conditions. It was concluded that the medical examination of radiation workers, including blood examinations, are of value to the extent that they form part of any good general occupational health practice. The promulgation of the Euratom Directive has provided an opportunity for reviewing and standardising procedures for medical surveillance in the light of current knowledge concerning average occupational radiation doses and dose-response relationships. (U.K.)

  17. Analysis of radiation overexposures for radiation workers in industrial institutions during 1991-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, J.M.; Raman, N.V.; Massand, O.P.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation Standards and Instrumentation Division (RS and ID) conducts country wide personnel monitoring service for external exposures of a total of about 41,000 radiation workers. Out of these, there are about 5300 radiation workers in industrial institutions alone. The analysis of overexposure cases (more than 10 mSv during a monitoring period) of these radiation workers has been presented for the period 1991-1995. The paper describes how the reporting, investigations and follow-up of these cases helps in obtaining effective control of doses to the radiation workers in the country keeping in view the dose limits stipulated by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board. (author)

  18. Occupational health care of radiation exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Rahim Rahman Hamzah

    1995-01-01

    The medical problems encountered by the earlier pioneer workers in radiation at the turn of the century are well known. In the 1928, the ICRP (International Committee for Radiological Protection) was instituted and the ALARA principle of radiation protection was evolved. Occupational health care is about maintaining the health and safety of workers in their workplaces. This involves using medical, nursing and engineering practices to achieve its objectives. In certain occupations, including those where workers are exposed to ionising radiation, some of these principles are enshrined in the legislation and would require statutory compliance. Occupational health care of radiation workers seek to prevent ill health arising from exposure to radiation by consolidating the benefits of exposures control and dosimetry. This is via health surveillance for spillages, contamination and exposures to unsealed sources of radiation. It is unlikely that can plan and hope to cater for a Chernobyl type of disaster. However, for the multitude of workers in industry exposed to radiation, control models are available. These are from the more in industrialize countries with a nuclear based energy industry, and where radioactive gadgetry are used in places ranging from factories and farms to construction sites. These models involve statutory requirements on the standard of work practices, assessment of fitness to work and the monitoring of both the worker and the workplace. A similar framework of activity is present in Malaysia. This will be further enhanced with the development of her general health and safety at work legislation. (author)

  19. Radiation protection training and information for workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The meeting reported in these proceedings was organized to discuss the specific problems of providing information and training on radiation protection to workers exposed to radiation, intervention staff and workers likely to be affected by an activity involving ionizing radiation. Particular emphasis was placed on the need to harmonize basic training on radiation protection in the context of 1992. It seemed advisable for technical training on radiation protection to be introduced into secondary education. To this end, the Commission was asked to draw up a guide for apprentices and students. In view of the growing diversification of activities involving the use of radioactive substances, the Commission was called upon to intensify its efforts in order to ensure that relevant information and training was provided in all firms to workers exposed to ionizing radiation, and to produce guides for specific categories of workers, such as those responsible for the transport of radioactive materials or those likely to be involved in organizing measures in the event of a radiological emergency

  20. The National Registry for Radiation Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reissland, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    This article gives a brief description of a study which is designed as a long-term follow-up of workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. The prime objective is to look for any differences in the causes and ages of death of workers which may be related to the radiation doses they had received during their working life. Some of the difficulties are outlined together with the steps that are necessary to minimise their effect on the study. In particular, attention is drawn to the need for the inclusion of as many radiation workers as possible. It is hoped that within the next few years sufficient data will have been compiled to test the claims being made by some that ICRP values for the risk of induced somatic effects at low levels of exposure to ionising radiation underestimate the effects by as much as an order of magnitude. (author)

  1. Biological effects of radiation and estimation of risk to radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.S.S.

    1987-01-01

    The biological effects of radiation have three stages: physical, chemical and biological. A precise mathematical description of biological effects and of one-to-one correspondence between the initial energy absorption and final effect has not been possible, because several factors are involved in biological effects and their manifestation period varies from less than one second to several years. The mechanism of biological radiation effects is outlined. The two groups of these effects are (1) immediate and (2) delayed. The main aim of radiation protection programme is to eliminate the risk of non-stochastic effects to an acceptable level. The mean annual dose for 30,000 radiation workers in India is 2.7 m Sv. Estimated risk of fatal cancer from this dose is about 50 cases of cancer per year per million workers which is well below the ICRP standard for safe occupation stipulated at fatality rate less than or equal to 100 per year per milion workers. When compared with risk in other occupations, the risk to radiation workers is much less. (M.G.B.)

  2. Radiation protection optimization of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents the contribution of CEPN (study center on protection evaluation in nuclear area) to the Days of the French Radiation Protection Society (SFRP) on optimization of workers radiation protection in electronuclear, industrial and medical areas

  3. Radiation exposure of uranium mill workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Giridhar; Saha, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    The uranium mill workers at Jaduguda were covered by a regular film badge service from 1969 onwards. Since the log normal plot is useful in interpreting occupational exposure, a statistical analysis of the radiation exposure data was attempted. Exposure data for each year has been plotted as cumulative percentage and worker's population with exposure levels in different class intervals. The plot for each of the year under investigation shows an occupational exposure distribution more or less consistent with the log normal distribution function. The analysis shows that more than 98% of radiation workers received less than 200 mrem (2 mSv). (author)

  4. Radiation exposure analysis of female nuclear medicine radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Young [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering Graduate School, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hoon Hee [Dept. of Radiological Technologist, Shingu College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In this study, radiation workers who work in nuclear medicine department were analyzed to find the cause of differences of radiation exposure from General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition and Conduct, especially females working on nuclear medicine radiation, in order to pave the way for positive defense against radiation exposure. The subjects were 106 radiation workers who were divided into two groups of sixty-four males and forty-two females answered questions about their General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition, Conduct, and radiation exposure dose which was measured by TLD (Thermo Luminescence Dosimeter). The results of the analysis revealed that as the higher score of knowledge and conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in female groups, and as the higher score of conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in male groups. In the correlation analysis of female groups, the non-experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of knowledge and conduct was higher and the experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of recognition and conduct was higher. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of nuclear medicine radiation workers, the gender caused the meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of female groups compared to male groups. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of female groups, the factor of conduct showed a meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of the experienced in pregnancy was lower compared to the non-experienced. The conclusion of this study revealed that radiation exposure of female groups was lower than that of male groups. Therefore, male groups need to more actively defend themselves against radiation exposure. Among the female groups, the experienced in pregnancy who have an active defense tendency showed a lower radiation exposure. Thus

  5. Radiation exposure analysis of female nuclear medicine radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ju Young; Park, Hoon Hee

    2016-01-01

    In this study, radiation workers who work in nuclear medicine department were analyzed to find the cause of differences of radiation exposure from General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition and Conduct, especially females working on nuclear medicine radiation, in order to pave the way for positive defense against radiation exposure. The subjects were 106 radiation workers who were divided into two groups of sixty-four males and forty-two females answered questions about their General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition, Conduct, and radiation exposure dose which was measured by TLD (Thermo Luminescence Dosimeter). The results of the analysis revealed that as the higher score of knowledge and conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in female groups, and as the higher score of conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in male groups. In the correlation analysis of female groups, the non-experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of knowledge and conduct was higher and the experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of recognition and conduct was higher. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of nuclear medicine radiation workers, the gender caused the meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of female groups compared to male groups. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of female groups, the factor of conduct showed a meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of the experienced in pregnancy was lower compared to the non-experienced. The conclusion of this study revealed that radiation exposure of female groups was lower than that of male groups. Therefore, male groups need to more actively defend themselves against radiation exposure. Among the female groups, the experienced in pregnancy who have an active defense tendency showed a lower radiation exposure. Thus

  6. Risk of occupational radiation-induced cataract in medical workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snezana, Milacic

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was determination of criteria for recognition of a pre senile cataract as a professional disease in health care personnel exposed to small doses of ionizing radiation. Method: The study included 3240 health workers in medical centers of Serbia in the period 1992-2002. A total of 1560 workers were employed in the zone (group A) and 1680 out of ionizing radiation zone (group B). Among group A, two groups had been selected: 1. Group A-1: Health workers in the ionizing radiation zone who contracted lens cataract during their years of service while dosimetry could not reveal higher absorbed dose (A-1=115); 2. Group A-2: Health workers in the ionizing radiation zone with higher incidence of chromosomal aberrations and without cataract (A-2=100). Results: More significant incidence of cataract was found in group A, χ 2 =65.92; p<0.01. Radiation risk was higher in health workers in radiation zone than in others, relative risk is 4, 6. Elevated blood sugar level was found in higher percentage with health workers working in radiation zone who developed cataract. Conclusion: Low doses of radiation are not the cause of occupational cataract as individual occupational disease. X-ray radiation may be a significant cofactor of cataract in radiological technicians. (author)

  7. Health effects of low-level radiation in shipyard workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanoski, G.M.

    1991-06-01

    The Nuclear Shipyard Workers Study (NSWS) was designed to determine whether there is an excess risk of leukemia or other cancers associated with exposure to low levels of gamma radiation. The study compares the mortality experience of shipyard workers who qualified to work in radiation areas to the mortality of similar workers who hold the same types of jobs but who are not authorized to work in radiation areas. The population consists of workers from six government and two private shipyards

  8. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Kunugita, Naoki; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, E.R.

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no death or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious disease. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered. (author)

  9. A knowledge and awareness level survey of radiation protection among the radiation workers in Henan Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiao-jun; Tian, Chong-bin; Zhang, Qin-fu; Liu, Cheng; Ding, Li

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To reveal the knowledge and awareness level of radiation protection among radiation workers in Henan province and to explore the methods to improve it. Methods: A questionnaire survey was carried out among 208 radiation workers. Results: The correct rate of the answer to radiation protection knowledge from radiation workers in Henan province is 53.78%. Most of them (88.9%) realized that it is important to protect patients and their companions. They adhere to the principles of justification of medial exposure and optimization of radiation protection and follow the management system of radiation protection. However, a few workers didn't follow the principles strictly. Sometime, during the radio diagnosis and radiotherapy services, the patients and their companions were not well protected from the radiation, and some patients were given unnecessary X-ray examine. Even worse, some workers did not attach importance to the regulations of radiation protection and disobey them frequently. Again, some hospital leaders disregard the regulation of radiation protection and didn't follow the regulation of health surveillance and radiation protection monitoring properly. And those behaviors and attitude, in fact, influence some workers' attitude to radiation protection. Conclusion: The level of radiation protection knowledge and awareness among the radiation workers in Henan province needs to be improved. It is necessary to strengthen radiation protection knowledge by strengthening training, and to improve safety awareness among the radiation staff, and, more important, the hospital leaders as well. (author)

  10. Estimation of radiation dose received by the radiation workers during radiographic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, N. A. H. O.

    2013-08-01

    This study was conducted primarily to evaluate occupational radiation dose in industrial radiography during radiographic testing at Balil-Hadida, with the aim of building up baseline data on radiation exposure in the industrial radiography practice in Sudan. Dose measurements during radiographic testing were performed and compared with IAEA reference dose. In this research the doses measured by using hand held radiation survey meter and personal monitoring dosimeter. The results showed that radiation doses ranged between minimum (0.448 mSv/ 3 month) , and maximum (1.838 mSv / 3 month), with an average value (0.778 mSv/ 3 month), and the standard deviation 0.292 for the workers used gamma mat camera. The analysis of data showed that the radiation dose for all radiation worker are receives less than annual limit for exposed workers 20 mSv/ year and compare with other study found that the dose received while body doses ranging from 0.1 to 9.4 mSv/ year, work area design in all the radiography site followed the three standard rules namely putting radiation signs, reducing access to control area and making of boundaries. Thus the accidents arising from design faults not likely to occur at these site. Results suggest that adequate fundamental training of radiation workers in general radiography prior to industrial radiography work will further improve the standard of personnel radiation protection. (Author)

  11. Controlling criteria for radiation exposure of astronauts and space workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Kazuaki

    1989-01-01

    Space workers likely to suffer from radiation exposure in the outer space are currently limited to the U.S. and Soviet Union, and only a small amount of data and information is available concerning the techniques and criteria for control of radiation exposure in this field. Criteria used in the Soviet Union are described first. The criteria (TRS-75), called the Radiation Safety Criteria for Space Navigation, are tentative ones set up in 1975. They are based on risk assessment. The standard radiation levels are established based on unit flight time: 50rem for 1 month, 80rem for 3 months, 110rem for 6 months and 150rem for 12 months. These are largely different from the emergency exposure limit of 100mSv (10rem) specified in a Japanese law, and the standard annual exposure value of 50mSv (5rem) for workers in nuclear power plants at normal times. For the U.S., J.A. Angelo, Jr., presented a paper titled 'Radiation Protection Issues and Techniques concerning Extended Manned Space Missions' at an IAEA meeting held in 1988. Though the criteria shown in the paper are not formal ones at the national level, similar criteria are expected to be adopted by the nation in the near future. The exposure limits recommended in the paper include a depth dose of 1-4Sv for the whole life span of a worker. (Nogami, K.)

  12. Proposed Regulations for Medical Examination of the Radiation Worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabon, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the widespread use of ionising radiation and radioactive isotopes and their well recognized adverse effects on human health. General requirements for workers to grant license to use ionizing radiation in Egypt was reported in the executive of Egyptian ionizing radiation regulation in 1962 following ionizing radiation law no. 59 for the year 1960. Egyptian Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (ENRRA) has enforced law no. 7 in 2010 and its executive regulation in 2011 through requesting certificates of medical examination as a requirement to grant Egyptian license to ionizing radiation worker. A deficiency in medical examination and special investigations for pre-placement and follow up of the radiation worker has been noticed. This paper provides practical guidance to the employers and the appointed doctors about health surveillance and medical examinations of the radiation worker. Past history, present history, clinical examination and investigations are presented. Illnesses and conditions that prevent the person to be classified are also mentioned.

  13. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, Erik Robert; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-05-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no deaths or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious diseases. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  14. Radiation protection and safety culture for cyclotron workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The main aim of the present study is to review radiation protection and safety culture measures to be applied to cyclotron workers. The radiation protection (measures are based on Basic Safety standards for the protection) of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiation, while the safety culture are based on IAEA publications

  15. Trend analysis of zinc content for radiation workers using fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy; Chakraborty, Debjani; Chakraborty, Chandan; Banerjee, Provas; Das, Arabinda K.; Palchowdhury, Snigdha; Chakraborty, Santanu; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Various radiation workers are occupationally exposed to chronic low dose ionizing radiations in addition to natural background radiations. But till date there is no such well-accepted biomarker to resolve actual effect (hazardous or beneficial) of chronic low dose radiation on human subjects though many schools of thoughts are prevailing in this regard. Present study investigates the zinc status in the peripheral blood and scalp hair of medical radiographers in comparison to age and economy matched normal healthy individuals in fuzzy environment. To capture more information from the experimental data, fuzzy regression analysis was applied. Accordingly, the zinc content for several periods of occupational radiation exposures (2-34 years) are considered as fuzzy and a fuzzy regression technique is used to capture the trend of tissue (blood and hair) zinc content. The study significantly reveals the fuzzy trend of zinc in blood and hair of medical radiographers. The nature of the fitted fuzzy curve for radiation workers is parabolic. In case of blood it exhibits opposite trend as compared to normal person. Initially the curve starts decreasing and attends stability. In case of hair, more or less stable pattern of the fitted zinc of normal subjects is being exhibited but in radiographers much fluctuation is noted with an initial increasing behavior followed by decreasing trend. Though we have dealt with a small data set but fuzzy trend analysis gave an interesting meaningful picture. A large data set with detailed information will enable us to achieve more accuracy in interpreting the low-dose radiation affects on human subjects

  16. Implementation of ICRP-60 recommendations on dose limits to radiation workers in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthasarathy, K.S.

    2000-01-01

    are contained in the AERB Safety Manual for Radiation Protection for Nuclear Facilities (Revision 3) issued in November 1996. In the medical, industrial and research applications of radiation, advice on matters related to radiation protection is given by radiological safety officers recognized by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board. The numbers of workers exposed to doses above 20 mSv/year in medical institutions were 0.27% in 1989 gradually lowering to 0.18% in 1998. The corresponding number of workers in industrial applications of radiation is 1.92% in 1989 down to 0.45% in 1998. As a follow up measure, AERB set up an apex committee presided over by a Member of the Board and consisting of a health physicist, radiation oncologist, radiologist, industrial hygiene specialist, medical physicist, an expert in personnel management and industrial relations to review all radiation exposures exceeding 20 mSv per year and recommend appropriate measures. The Committee was empowered to call for records and ask the representatives of the management to be present during the review. This procedure helped to attract the attention of the highest levels of management. The steps taken to enforce compliance will be explained. (author)

  17. A need for national registry of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marathe, P.K.; Krishnan, D.; Massand, O.P.; Dhond, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    In India about 33000 radiation workers are monitored regularly from a centralised Personnel Monitoring Service conducted by the Division of Radiological Protection, B.A.R.C. In view of the large dose data accumulated over the past thirty years it is only logical to investigate for biological effects if any. The need to initiate National Registry of Radiation Workers (NRRW) is pointed out. Such a registry is in force in U.K., Canada, France and Japan etc. Even in case of negative findings, such an exercise would help in allaying fears among radiation workers in particular and the public in general. (author)

  18. Micronuclei Frequencies in Lymphocytes of Nuclear Malaysia Radiation Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Rodzi Ali; Aisyah Mohd Yusof; Rahimah Abdul Rahim; Juliana Mahamat Napiah; Yahaya Talib; Shafii Khamis

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the frequency of cell aberration in lymphocytes of the Nuklear Malaysia radiation workers. A total of 58 blood samples were collected from the radiation workers during their routine medical examination. The donor age range is between 23 to 58 years, 31 male and 27 female. Blood samples were cultured according to the standard protocol recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The mean micronuclei (MN) is 23.5 ± 0.9 MN/ 1000 binucleate, with the median value of 24 MN/ 1000 binucleate. The lowest number of MN was 9, and the highest was 43. There is no correlation between the number of MN in blood and yearly cumulative dose for radiation workers. The results indicate the MN expression due to small radiation exposure is almost negligible in Nuclear Malaysia radiation workers. (author)

  19. Evaluation on the Radiation Exposure of Radiation Workers in Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Jang, Yo Jong; Kim, Tae Yoon; Jeong, Do Hyung; Choi, Gye Suk

    2012-01-01

    Unlike the existing linear accelerator with photon, proton therapy produces a number of second radiation due to the kinds of nuclide including neutron that is produced from the interaction with matter, and more attention must be paid on the exposure level of radiation workers for this reason. Therefore, thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) that is being widely used to measure radiation was utilized to analyze the exposure level of the radiation workers and propose a basic data about the radiation exposure level during the proton therapy. The subjects were radiation workers who worked at the proton therapy center of National Cancer Center and TLD Badge was used to compare the measured data of exposure level. In order to check the dispersion of exposure dose on body parts from the second radiation coming out surrounding the beam line of proton, TLD (width and length: 3 mm each) was attached to on the body spots (lateral canthi, neck, nipples, umbilicus, back, wrists) and retained them for 8 working hours, and the average data was obtained after measuring them for 80 hours. Moreover, in order to look into the dispersion of spatial exposure in the treatment room, TLD was attached on the snout, PPS (Patient Positioning System), Pendant, block closet, DIPS (Digital Image Positioning System), Console, doors and measured its exposure dose level during the working hours per day. As a result of measuring exposure level of TLD Badge of radiation workers, quarterly average was 0.174 mSv, yearly average was 0.543 mSv, and after measuring the exposure level of body spots, it showed that the highest exposed body spot was neck and the lowest exposed body spot was back (the middle point of a line connecting both scapula superior angles). Investigation into the spatial exposure according to the workers' movement revealed that the exposure level was highest near the snout and as the distance becomes distant, it went lower. Even a small amount of exposure will eventually increase

  20. Duties of the radiologist for the radiation protection of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehel, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    After a risk analysis has been completed by the radiation safety officer, all entities where a source of ionizing radiation is present must established a monitored or controlled zone containing the source. When exposure exceeds the maximum regulatory dose, a dedicated color-coded controlled (yellow or orange) or restricted zone must be established. All assessments performed by the RSO should reflect normal working conditions. From these results, workers can be divided into two categories, A or B, based on their level of exposure. The workers should undergo medical and dosimetric follow-up with the use of passive dosimetry. The use of operational dosimetry should be added when working in a controlled zone. A radiation dosimetry report for each worker should be available to the occupational medicine provider to ensure appropriate dosimetric monitoring. (author)

  1. Radiation protection of workers in uranium mining, ore processing and fuel fabrication in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A. H.; Jha, G.; Jha, S.; Srivastava, G. K.; Sadasivan, S.; Raj, Venkat

    2002-01-01

    Low grade of uranium ore mined from three underground mines is processed in a mill at Jaduguda in eastern India to recover uranium concentrate in the form of yellow cake. This concentrate is further processed at the Nuclear Fuel Complex at Hyderabad, in southern India, to produce fuel for use in nuclear power plants. Radiation protection of workers is given due importance at all stages of these operations. Dedicated Health Physics Units and Environmental Survey Laboratories established at each site regularly carry out in-plant and environmental surveillance to keep radiation exposure of workers and the members of public within the limits prescribed by the regulatory body. The limits set by the national regulatory body are based on the international standards suggested by the ICRP and the IAEA. In the uranium mines external gamma radiation, radon and airborne activity due to radioactive dust is monitored. Similarly, in the uranium mill and the fuel fabrication plant gamma radiation and airborne radioactivity due to long-lived α -emitters are monitored. Personal dosimeters are also issued to workers. The total radiation exposure of workers from external and internal sources is evaluated from the personal monitoring and area monitoring data. It has been observed that the total radiation dose to workers has been well below 20 mSv.y 1 at all stages of operations. Adequate ventilation is provided during mining, ore processing and fuel fabrication operations to keep the concentrations of airborne radioactivity well below the derived limits. Workers use personal protective appliances, where necessary, as a supplementary means of control. The monitoring methodologies, results and control measures are presented in the paper

  2. Radiation protection of workers in uranium mining, ore processing and fuel fabrication in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.H.; Jha, G.; Jha, S.; Srivastava, G.K.; Sadasivan, S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Low grade of uranium ore mined from three underground mines is processed in a mill at Jaduguda in eastern India to recover uranium concentrate in the form of yellow cake. This concentrate is further processed at the Nuclear Fuel Complex at Hyderabad, in southern India, to produce fuel for use in nuclear power plants. Radiation protection of workers is given due importance at all stages of these operations. Dedicated Health Physics Units and Environmental Survey Laboratories established at each site regularly carry out in-plant and environmental surveillance to keep radiation exposure of workers and the members of public within the limits prescribed by the regulatory body. The limits set by the national regulatory body are based on the international standards suggested by the ICRP and the IAEA. In the uranium mines external gamma radiation, radon and airborne activity due to radioactive dust is monitored. Similarly, in the uranium mill and the fuel fabrication plant gamma radiation and airborne radioactivity due to long-lived a- emitters are monitored. Personal dosimeters are also issued to workers. The total radiation exposure of workers from external and internal sources is evaluated from the personal monitoring and area monitoring data. It has been observed that the total radiation dose to workers has been well below 20 mSvy -1 at all stages of operations. Adequate ventilation is provided during mining, ore processing and fuel fabrication operations to keep the concentrations of airborne radioactivity well below the derived limits. Workers use personal protective appliances, where necessary, as a supplementary means of control. The monitoring methodologies, results and control measures are presented in the paper

  3. Probabilistic induction of delayed health hazards in occupational radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad, M.H.M.; Abdel-Ghani, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    Occupational radiation workers are periodically monitored for their personal occupational dose. Various types of radiation measurement devices are used, mostly film badges and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Several thousand occupational radiation workers were monitored over a period of seven years (jan. 1995- Dec. 2001). These included atomic energy personnel, nuclear materials personnel, staff of mediology departments (diagnostic, therapeutic and nuclear medicine) and industrial occupational workers handling industrial radiography equipment besides other applications of radiation sources in industry. The probably of induction of health hazards in these radiation workers was assessed using the nominal probability coefficient adopted by the ICRP (1991) for both hereditary effects and cancer induction. In this treatise, data procured are presented and discussed inthe light of basic postulations of probabilistic occurrence of radiation induced delayed health effects

  4. Radiation and stillbirths in Sellafield workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: In The Lancet (23 October 1999), Dr Louise Parker and colleagues from the Departments of Child Health and Statistics, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, report the findings of a new study on stillbirths among offspring of male radiation workers at Sellafield. By linking the birth registration and stillbirth records in Cumbria from 1950 to 1989 to the database of workers at Sellafield, Dr Parker's team examined the stillbirth risk according to the father's exposure to radiation before conception of the child. From the birth documents of 248 097 livebirths and 3715 stillbirths, the team identified 130 stillbirths and 9078 livebirths to wives and partners of male radiation workers employed at Sellafield. Lifetime exposure, and that in the 90 days before conception, was derived from annual-exposure summaries for each worker. Exposures recorded on individual film badges for the fathers of each stillborn child and for four matched controls were also examined. The researchers found that although, as a group, babies of radiation workers were not more likely to be stillborn than babies of other Cumbrian fathers, there was an increased risk of stillbirth with increasing exposure of a father to external radiation. Although confounding factors also associated with stillbirth, such as whether the mother smoked, cannot be completely excluded, the researchers state that 'extensive checks confirmed that the statistical models were a good fit to the data and there was no statistical evidence of unmeasured factors'. However, the researchers are cautious in drawing any conclusions regarding causality. In the Commentary given in The Lancet, Hazel Inskip from the University of Southampton advises that the possible risk of stillbirth should be kept in perspective, and comments that 'there is no obvious mechanism for the association', but does concede that 'the greater increase in risk for stillbirths with neural-tube defects is at least focused on a more specific disorder

  5. Quality of Life Among Radiation Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is a general term applied to the totality of physical, psychological, and social functioning. The World Health Organization (WHO) regards health as a state of complete physical, mental, and social well being, and not merely the absence of disease. Every person's life is different, and thus the way in which each person experiences a QOL is unique. Individuals lead complex lives that have many dimensions. A QOL approach recognizes that there are many different aspects of living that may contribute to quality. In this study, Quality of life was evaluated using the Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire for one hundred and fifty radiation workers who handled ionizing radiation for at least twelve years, and one hundred fifty control individuals who did not knowingly come in contact with any radiation source., the QOL effects on work and achievements were also evaluated. Results revealed that radiation workers have lower quality of life compared to those who never come in contact with a radiation source

  6. Radiation protection of workers in the mining and milling of radioactive ores. Code of practice and technical addendum. 1983 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This Code of Practice sets forth the means of ensuring protection against ionizing radiation for workers engaged in mining and milling of radioactive ores: general provisions outlining the responsibilities of the employer and the worker, limits of radiation exposure, administrative organization of radiation protection, radiation surveillance, engineering and administrative protective measures and medical surveillance. It is designed to facilitate the preparation and adoption of national and local regulations and factory rules for radiation protection in mining and milling of radioactive ores.

  7. Professional exposure of medical workers: radiation levels, radiation risk and personal dose monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Guang

    2005-01-01

    The application of radiation in the field of medicine is the most active area. Due to the rapid and strong development of intervention radiology at present near 20 years, particularly, the medical workers become a popularize group which most rapid increasing and also receiving the must high of professional exposure dose. Because, inter alias, radiation protection management nag training have not fully follow up, the aware of radioactive protection and appropriate approach have tot fully meet the development and need, the professional exposure dose received by medical workers, especially those being engaged in intervention radiology, are more higher, as well as have not yet fully receiving the complete personal dose monitoring, the medical workers become the population group which should be paid the most attention to. The writer would advice in this paper that all medical workers who being received a professional radiation exposure should pay more attention to the safety and healthy they by is strengthening radiation protection and receiving complete personal dose monitoring. (authors)

  8. Assessment and recording of radiation doses to workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The assessment and recording of the radiation exposure of workers in activities involving radiation risks are required for demonstrating compliance with institutional dose limitations and for a number of other complementary purposes. A significant proportion of the labor force involved in radiation work is currently represented by those specialised workers who operate as itinerant contractors for different nuclear installations and in different countries. In order to ensure that the exposure of these workers is adequately and consistently controlled and kept within acceptable limits, there is a need for the criteria and methods for dose assessment and recording to be harmonised throughout the different countries. An attempt in that direction has been made in this report, which has been prepared by a group of experts convened by the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. Its primary purpose is to describe recommended technical procedures for an unified approach to the assessment and recording of worker doses. The report is published under the responsibility of the Secretary-General of the OECD, and does not commit Member governments

  9. Analysis of occupational doses of radiation workers in medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanaye, S.S.; Baburajan, Sujatha; Joshi, V.D.; Pawar, S.G.; Nalawade, S.K.; Raman, N.V.; Kher, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    Routine monitoring of occupational radiation workers is done for controlling the doses to the individuals and to demonstrate the compliance with occupational dose limits. One of the objective of personnel monitoring program is the assessment of the radiation safety of working area and trends of exposure histories of individuals or group of workers. Computerised dose registry of all monitored radiation workers along with their personnel data helps in analyzing these trends. This in turn helps the institutions in management of their radiation safety programs. In India, annual and life time occupational dose records are maintained as National Dose Registry in the Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. This paper presents analysis of occupational dose data of monitored radiation workers in medical institutions in India during last five years (i.e. 2002-2006)

  10. Radiation workers of nuclear power stations and a method of regional economic development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Haruo

    2003-01-01

    In Japan, most of the electric power companies depend on radiation works to the external labor, but the employment of radiation works lacks its' stability. From the analysis on the mobility of radiation workers, we can see the stability of employment increases in proportion to the number of reactors. The radiation work is legally classified to harmful in Japan. And many health control systems for radiation workers are applied strictly. If we apply the health records registration system to the health control systems and involve them to the regional health care system, we can get more effective plan for regional economic development. It is therefore, very important to strive for employee controls, radiation controls, health examinations and data control. Furthermore, it is necessary to establish a total data management system that processes numerous amounts of data concerning radiation employees. This paper proposes the need for such a registration system to set up the system within regional medical information systems, and proposes the establishment of a radiation work market on the web using a total data management system. The system will include radiation employee control information service for members who are planning new employment contracts. (author)

  11. Occupational Radiation Dose for Medical Workers at a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Nassef

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Occupational radiation doses for medical workers from the departments of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy at the university hospital of King Abdul-Aziz University (KAU were measured and analysed. A total of 100 medical radiation workers were monitored to determine the status of their average annual effective dose. The analysis and the calibration procedures of this study were carried out at the Center for Radiation Protection and Training-KAU. The monitored workers were classified into subgroups, namely, medical staff/supervisors, technicians, and nurses, according to their responsibilities and specialties. The doses were measured using thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti placed over the lead apron at the chest level in all types of workers except for those in the cath lab, for whom the TLD was placed at the thyroid protective collar. For nuclear medicine, a hand dosimeter was used to measure the hand dose distribution. The annual average effective doses for diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy workers were found to be 0.66, 1.56, and 0.28 mSv, respectively. The results of the measured annual dose were well below the international recommended dose limit of 20 mSv. Keywords: Occupational radiation dose, radiation workers, TLD, radiation protection

  12. Health survey of radiation workers. Results of questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, Kaoru; Aoyama, Takashi; Kawagoe, Yasumitsu; Sunayashiki, Tadashi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Nishitani, Motohiro; Yoshinaga, Nobuharu

    1998-01-01

    The Japanese Society of Radiological Technology asked radiation workers about the radiation doses and the state of their health as well as family. The reports by the Health and Welfare Ministry were referenced to compare radiation workers with others. The questionnaire was sent to about 4,000 members, and returned from 2,479. The survey showed that 684 persons (27.6%) felt health anxiety, 455 persons (18.4%) had medical check for recent one year, and 1,645 persons (66.4%) had anamnesis. Radiation doses for one year and cumulated doses varied according to engaging duration. (K.H.)

  13. Radiation Dose to Post-Chernobyl Cleanup Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation dose calculation for post-Chernobyl Cleanup Workers in Ukraine - both external radiation exposure due to fallout and internal doses due to inhalation (I131 intake) or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs.

  14. Radiation exposure and the woman worker: biological and legal parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    The interpretation of federal and state legislation and regulations concerning the radiation protection of women in the workplace has not been a clear and straightforward procedure. On one hand, the safety of all workers, independent of sex, imposes a specific directive for the enforcement of working standards in general. On the other hand, must allowance be made in setting radiation standards for the particular biological characteristics of workers, some of whom are women. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act provides equal employment opportunity for women and is now being enforced. All legal questions aside, men and women are decidedly different in one aspect; only women can conceive and carry a fetus and studies have shown that, in humans, the most radiosensitive stage of the fetus is during the first trimester of pregnancy. Possible legal and socio-economic aspects of questions posed by the employment of women by the nuclear industry are considered

  15. Studies on chromosome aberrations in workers occupationally exposed to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hyung; Oh, Hyeon Joo; Shim, Sun Bo; Roh, Hye Won; Lee, Hai Yong [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Soon Ja [Ewha Womens Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    Cytogenetic assays for unstable chromosomes were performed on 54 medical radiation workers who are occupationally exposed to radiation and 42 controls. A total of 15,577 metaphase cells were scored. The frequencies of dicentrics and acentric chromosomes on controls were 0.52*10{sup -3} and 0.82*10{sup -2}, respectively. On radiation workers those were 2.28*10{sup -3} and 1.34*10{sup -2}, respectively. Though the frequencies of all types of chromosome aberrations in the workers were higher than those in the controls, the only significant difference was found in the case of dicentrics (P < 0.01). When we considered exposure dose of recent one year, duration of employment and smoking habit in radiation worker, a slight increase was shown in frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations on these workers, but no statistical differences were observed (P > 0.05) except exposure dose of recent one year (P < 0.05). These results could indicate that low level exposure to ionizing radiation can induce unstable chromosome aberrations in blood lymphocytes.

  16. Trends in doses to some UK radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Best, R.J.; Kendall, G.M.; Pook, E.A.; Saunders, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The NRPB runs a Personal Monitoring Service which issues dosemeters and keeps radiation dose records for over 10 000 workers. This database is a valuable source of information on occupational exposure to radiation though it is likely that in future the Central Index of Dose Information (CIDI) will provide more comprehensive statistics, albeit restricted to radiation workers in the sense of Ionising Radiation Regulations. This note describes doses incurred to the end of 1987 with some preliminary figures for 1988. It does not cover the same ground as earlier reports but gives more details of the structure of the monitored population by age and sex and examines evidence that mean radiation doses are decreasing with time. (author)

  17. Workers radiation protection. Solutions accommodate new needs. The tool box of radiation protection expands itself. Industrial radiology: workers aware of risks. To design a shielded enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannou, Alain; Billarand, Yann; Scanff, Pascale; Etard, Cecile; Sage, Julie; Jolivet, Patrick; Israel, Sylvain; Caplin, Helene; Couasnon, Olivier; Cordelle, Anne

    2017-01-01

    A first article proposes an overview of developments in the field of workers radiation protection. This development is notably motivated by the future dismantling works. It can be noticed that some other issues are considered as more important than radiation protection in the medical field even though radiation protection is a matter of concern for radiology manipulators. Radiation protection is also an issue for workers performing luggage X-ray controls in airports. As revealed by some measurements, artificial radioactivity should be controlled. Radiation protection is planned in relationship with an exposure scenario. The Belgium example is evoked with the development of centralised data and statistics in order to compare workers profiles. A second article comments the evolution of the activity of radiation protection with its new documents, methodologies (notably for operating rooms), and practical studies. While indicating how much the number of specialised workers increased, and how much dose control has been developed in the medical sector, and in terms of workers wearing a ring- or wrist-dosimeter between 2006 and 2015, and also indicating the distribution of controlled workers among sectors, the article outlines that a computation tool is shared between professionals, and how sheets on radionuclides are published and shared. The third article briefly addresses industrial radiology to outlines that workers are always more aware of risks. The last article briefly describes how a shielded enclosure is designed to limit workers exposure

  18. Job satisfaction and its relationship to Radiation Protection Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (RPKAP) of Iranian radiation workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, S S; Dabbagh, S T; Abbasi, M; Mehrdad, R

    2017-01-23

    This study aimed to find the association between job satisfaction and radiation protection knowledge, attitude and practice of medical radiation workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. In this crosssectional study, 530 radiation workers affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences completed a knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire on protecting themselves against radiation and Job Descriptive Index as a job satisfaction measure during May to November 2014. Opportunities for promotion (84.2%) and payment (91.5%) were the most important factors for dissatisfaction. Radiation workers who were married, had more positive attitudes toward protecting themselves against radiation, and had higher level of education accounted for 15.8% of the total variance in predicting job satisfaction. In conclusion, medical radiation workers with a more positive attitude toward self-protection against radiation were more satisfied with their jobs. In radiation environments, improving staff attitudes toward their safety may be considered as a key strategy to increase job satisfaction.

  19. A registry for the study of the health of radiation workers employed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.L.

    1979-05-01

    Factors to be considered in formulating a study of the health of radiation workers are discussed, and a proposal is made for the establishment of such a study in relation to the employees of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. By setting up a registry of AECL radiation workers, data could be accumulated suitable for the long-term followup of their health, and for preparing periodic interim reports on mortality and morbidity. (author)

  20. Application of CLIPPER in the design of radiation history card for a radiation worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, D.; Pendharkar, K.A.; Krishnamony, S.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation history card for the plant workers has been designed based on a PC software. The software is developed using CLIPPER language and is menu driven. The card gives instant information about the radiation data of an occupational worker useful for effective exposure control. (author). 1 tab

  1. A utility perspective on radiation worker access control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, B.A.; Goff, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    Based on an evaluation of the current commercial Radiation Worker Access Control Software Systems, Baltimore Gas and Electric Company has elected to design and develop a site specific access control and accountability system for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant. The vendor provided systems allow for radiation worker access control based on training and external exposure records and authorizations. These systems do not afford internal exposure control until after bioassay measurements or maximum permissible concentration-hours are tabulated. The vendor provided systems allow for data trending for ALARA purposes, but each software package must be modified to meet site specific requirements. Unlike the commercial systems, the Calvert Cliffs Radiological Controls and Accountability System (RCAS) will provide radiation worker exposure control, both internal and external. The RCAS is designed to fulfill the requirements by integrating the existing Radiation Safety, Dosemetry, and Training data bases with a comprehensive radiological surveillance program. Prior to each worker's entry into the Radiological Control Area; his training and qualifications, radiation exposure history and authorization, will be compared with administrative controls, such as radiation work permits, and respiratory protection requirements and the radiological conditions in the work area. The RCAS, a computer based applied health physics access control system is described as it is presently configured for development. The mechanisms for enhancing worker internal and external exposure controls are discussed. Proposed data application to both the Calvert Cliffs ALARA and outage planning programs is included

  2. Health effects of low level radiation exposure among radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Motoi

    2003-01-01

    In Japan, a cohort study of radiation workers has been conducted since 1990. The cohort population consisted of about 176,000 workers (mostly males) who had been registered in the centralized radiation dose registry system and engaged in various radiation works at nuclear facilities. Statistical analyses were performed mainly on the 2,934 deaths, of which 1,191 were cancer cases, detected among 119,000 male subjects during the prospective follow-up. The standardized mortality ratio showed that for any cancers mortality was not different between this population and Japanese general population. By the trend test, though significantly increasing trend in accord with increasing doses was not observed for both cancer in all sites and leukemia, it was highly significant for esophagus cancer and external causes of deaths. Results of the questionnaire survey study of lifestyle of radiation workers suggested that increasing trend of these diseases was at least partly due to the influence of some confounding factors. As a result of reviewing published studies, including the present work, trend of mortality from cancer in all sites with increasing doses seems still unclear, whereas for leukemia it appears to stay flat under 100 mSv but rapidly rise up in the doses higher than this as if fitting to either a linear-quadratic or threshold models. (author)

  3. Ionizing radiation risks to satellite power systems (SPS) workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    The radiation risks to the health of workers who will construct and maintain solar power satellites in the space environment were examined. For ionizing radiation, the major concern will be late or delayed health effects, particularly the increased risk of radiation-induced cancer. The estimated lifetime risk for cancer is 0.8 to 5.0 excess deaths per 10,000 workers per rad of exposure. Thus, for example, in 10,000 workers who completed ten missions with an exposure of 40 rem per mission, 320 to 2000 additional deaths in excess of the 1640 deaths from normally occurring cancer, would be expected. These estimates would indicate a 20 to 120% increase in cancer deaths in the worker-population. The wide range in these estimates stems from the choice of the risk-projection model and the dose-response relationsip. The choice between a linear and a linear-quadratic dose-response model may alter the risk estimate by a factor of about two. The method of analysis (e.g., relative vs absolute risk model) can alter the risk estimate by an additional factor of three. Choosing different age and sex distributions can further change the estimate by another factor of up to three. The potential genetic consequences could be of significance, but at the present time, sufficient information on the age and sex distribution of the worker population is lacking for precise estimation of risk. The potential teratogenic consequences resulting from radiation are considered significant. Radiation exposure of a pregnant worker could result in developmental abnormalities

  4. Ionizing radiation risks to satellite power systems (SPS) workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyman, J.T.; Ainsworth, E.J.; Alpen, E.L.; Bond, V.; Curtis, S.B.; Fry, R.J.M.; Jackson, K.L.; Nachtwey, S.; Sondhaus, C.; Tobias, C.A.; Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-11-01

    The radiation risks to the health of workers who will construct and maintain solar power satellites in the space environment were examined. For ionizing radiation, the major concern will be late or delayed health effects, particularly the increased risk of radiation-induced cancer. The estimated lifetime risk for cancer is 0.8 to 5.0 excess deaths per 10,000 workers per rad of exposure. Thus, for example, in 10,000 workers who completed ten missions with an exposure of 40 rem per mission, 320 to 2000 additional deaths in excess of the 1640 deaths from normally occurring cancer, would be expected. These estimates would indicate a 20 to 120% increase in cancer deaths in the worker-population. The wide range in these estimates stems from the choice of the risk-projection model and the dose-response relationsip. The choice between a linear and a linear-quadratic dose-response model may alter the risk estimate by a factor of about two. The method of analysis (e.g., relative vs absolute risk model) can alter the risk estimate by an additional factor of three. Choosing different age and sex distributions can further change the estimate by another factor of up to three. The potential genetic consequences could be of significance, but at the present time, sufficient information on the age and sex distribution of the worker population is lacking for precise estimation of risk. The potential teratogenic consequences resulting from radiation are considered significant. Radiation exposure of a pregnant worker could result in developmental abnormalities.

  5. Immune system investigations for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obreja, Doina; Tulbure, Rodica; Marinescu, Irina

    2001-01-01

    During the last decade a great deal of attention has been paid to the research in the field of the immune system. Some important steps forward have been achieved in understanding the mechanisms of action and control of the immunologic responses. At the same time the concern for the possible health effects of exposure to ionizing radiation has considerably increased. On the purpose of the evaluation of the modifications induced by the ionizing radiation for radiation workers, we have applied the method of lymphocytic subpopulations, a method that evinces the proportions for the various subtypes of lymphocytes having different roles within the immune system. A number of 62 persons, employees of the Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering at Bucharest - Magurele were involved in this study. All radiation workers from 2 departments characterized by a high exposure to ionizing radiation were included, as follows: Group no. 1, consisting of 20 persons working at RWTS (Radioactive Waste Treating Station), thus presenting both external and internal irradiation; Group no. 2, consisting of 18 persons working at RPC (Radioactive Isotopes Preparing Center), a place where besides the radioactive contamination, the chemical risk was also present. The control group (consisting of 24 persons) was formed of employees from the same institute, with the difference that they were not radiation workers. For the statistical processing of the results the programs EPI INFO 6 and CIA were used. Significantly, when analyzing globally the lymphocytic modifications for TT and/or B lymphocytes (either increments or decrements when compared to the normal values), a noticeable statistical difference among the groups in terms of the frequency of the immune system modifications (Hi square test p=0.001) occurs. The results are in accordance to those in special literature mentioning age as a factor having a role in the appearance of the immune modifications. The obtained results indicate a

  6. Medical supervision of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    The first part of this volume describes the effects of radiation on living organism, both at the overall and at the molecular level. Special attention is paid to the metabolism and toxicity of radioactivity substances. The second part deals with radiological exposure, natural, medical and occupational. The third part provides data on radiological protection standards, and the fourth part addresses the health supervision of workers exposed to ionizing radiation, covering both physical and medical control.

  7. Legal aspects related to workers and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, N.M. de; Fischer, D.

    1985-01-01

    The legal aspects related to protection of the worker during its activity and in case of accident which involves dead or invalidity or occupation disease are presented. The aspects concerning to employment relation for workers in nuclear installations, and the professional liability for workers who handle ionizing radiation are discussed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. Analysis of dose record and epidemiology for radiation workers in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S.Y.; Kim, T.H.

    2003-01-01

    This study presents data on the externally received doses and preliminary results of epidemiological survey for radiation workers. The statistical analysis was carried out in order to understand better the occupational radiation doses in Korea. Records containing dose information from 1984 to 1999 for 64,518 persons were extracted from the National Dose Registry of Korea (Korea Radioisotope Association's personal dose record). The total number of workers registered from 1984 to 1999 was 64,518. The number of workers steadily increased and the accumulated dose somewhat increased. The proportion of radiation workers by occupation was 38.4% for nuclear power plant, 20.3% for industrial organization and 12.4% for non-destructive industry, respectively. The collective annual dose of radiation workers was 31.72 man Sv in 1999. The mean annual dose by sex was 1.49 mSv for male and 0.56 mSv for female. The mean annual dose for workers was 1.41 mSv with the highest mean dose being received by non-destructive industry (3.53 mSv). Very few workers(0.8%) received more than 20 mSv and only one more than 50 mSv, the legal limit for an annual dose. There has been a steady decline in the mean dose since 1984, showing a significant decrease in dose with time. The data showed that radiation protection in Korea was improving, though annual doses were still higher than other countries. Nevertheless, this finding brings to light the necessity of the workers to pay more careful attention to radiation protection procedures and practices, and suggest the need for continuous effort to implement procedures. We are carrying out epidemiological survey in order to evaluate radiation effects on Korean workers based on radiation dose data from the year of 2000. Follow-up is carrying out in order to detect and measure directly the risks of cancer using the Korean Mortality Data, Cancer Registry and individual investigation

  9. Analysis of the occupational doses of female radiation workers in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardasani, P B; Joshi, V D; Awari, J M; Kher, R K [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiation Protection Services Div.

    1994-04-01

    Basis for control of occupational exposures of women are same as that of men except for pregnant women. Analysis of annual and cumulative occupational doses of female radiation workers as a group has been done. The average annual dose data in the four broad categories and age wise dose distribution is presented. The average working period for female radiation workers is about 3 to 5 years which is same as that of all the radiation workers on our records. The average cumulative dose for female workers is about 3 mSv. (author). 4 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Analysis of the occupational doses of female radiation workers in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardasani, P.B.; Joshi, V.D.; Awari, J.M.; Kher, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Basis for control of occupational exposures of women are same as that of men except for pregnant women. Analysis of annual and cumulative occupational doses of female radiation workers as a group has been done. The average annual dose data in the four broad categories and age wise dose distribution is presented. The average working period for female radiation workers is about 3 to 5 years which is same as that of all the radiation workers on our records. The average cumulative dose for female workers is about 3 mSv. (author). 4 refs., 4 tabs

  11. Is radiation protection for the unborn child guaranteed by radiation protection for female workers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosske, C.; Karcher, K.

    2003-01-01

    ICRP Publication 88 recommends doses to embryo and fetus from intakes of radionuclides by the mother for various intake scenarios. Mainly by answering the question 'Is radiation protection for the unborn child guaranteed by radiation protection for female workers?' it has been assessed if the intake scenarios given in ICRP Publication 88 are adequate for radiation protection purposes. This is generally the case, but the consideration of an additional chronic intake scenario for early pregnancy would be helpful. It is demonstrated that following chronic intake by inhalation, for most radionuclides radiation protection for (female) workers is also adequate for protection of the unborn child, considered as a member of the public. However, there are a number of radionuclides for which possible intakes in routine operations should be more restricted (up to 1% of the annual limits on intake for workers in the case of nickel isotopes) to ensure radiation protection for the unborn child. (author)

  12. Protocol for the National Registry for Radiation Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, S.C.

    1981-02-01

    This document describes the design and execution of an epidemiological study of the mortality of workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. Because the number of effects attributable to radiation in any group of workers is expected to be an extremely small proportion of the number of effects that would have occurred in the absence of occupational exposure to radiation, it is necessary to pay careful attention to the completeness and validity of the data being collected. The long-term objectives of the study are directed towards providing improved estimates of the risks associated with low doses of radiation, but it is likely that for some considerable time the contribution will be limited to estimating upper bounds for these risks. (author)

  13. Health effects of low-level radiation in shipyard workers. Final report: [Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matanoski, G.M.

    1991-06-01

    The Nuclear Shipyard Workers Study (NSWS) was designed to determine whether there is an excess risk of leukemia or other cancers associated with exposure to low levels of gamma radiation. The study compares the mortality experience of shipyard workers who qualified to work in radiation areas to the mortality of similar workers who hold the same types of jobs but who are not authorized to work in radiation areas. The population consists of workers from six government and two private shipyards.

  14. Evaluation of radiation protection educational level of professional exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, O.; Krstev, S.; Jovanovic, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Serbia and Montenegro legislation concerning with radiation protection was upgrading after publication ICRP- 60 and B.S.S., No.115. Present Law on the Protection against Ionizing Radiation is in force from 1996. Among quite new issues in radiation protection regulations there was article relate to obligatory refresher training. Due to adverse political and economic situation through many years radiation protection regulations were not fulfill completely. The aim of this investigation was to get real view to education level of professional exposed workers. In Serbia and Montenegro the most of ionizing radiation sources are in medical use and the most exposed workers are radiographers and radiologists. The test was passed by 200 radiographers and 50 radiologists. Main groups of questions were: Radiation protection and safety; difference between safety and security; legislation: law and regulations; incidents, accidents and operational failures: recording, learning. Usually, knowledge from school pales. New quantities (as ambient and personal dose equivalent) are mostly unknown. It is easier to understand the real difference between safety and security than to understand linguistic differences. Discussing regulations workers are more interesting in syndicate regulations than radiation protection ones. Operational failures and incidents are hidden. Better to say: nobody dare to speak about them. The results imposed conclusion that regulatory body has to pay more attention to upraise safety culture and radiation protection education level of professional exposed workers. (authors)

  15. Immune cells in Chernobyl radiation workers exposed to low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazyka, D.; Chumak, A.; Byelyaeva, N.; Gulaya, N.; Margytich, V.; Thevenon, C.; Guichardant, M.; Lagarde, M.

    2002-01-01

    the aim of this work was to study immune response parameters in Chernobyl emergency and recovery operation radiation workers and nuclear industry workers exposed under professional limits. The monohydroxylated fatty acid content in peripheral blood mononuclear cell of radiation workers compared to unexposed control at the 12-th year after Chernobyl NPP accident was studied too

  16. Chronic low dose radiation exposure and oxidative stress in radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.S.; Bhatt, M.B.; Kulkarni, MM.; Rajan, R.; Singh, B.B.; Venkataraman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases. In this study free radical stress due to low dose chronic radiation exposures of radiation workers was examined as a possible atherogenic risk factor. Data on lipid profiles, lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione content in blood indicated an absence of correlation with radiation doses up to 125 mSv. (author). 13 refs., 1 fig

  17. Epidemiological studies of radiation workers: preliminary communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, G.B.

    1982-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuels Limited has embarked on a study of the mortality data among those of its workforce who were employed prior to 1 January 1976. The study covers a total population of about 41000 current and ex-employees, but is initially concerned with a radiation worker cohort of 7500 at the Sellafield establishment where the highest radiation doses are received. Tracing of the health status of ex-employees has been undertaken using the services provided by the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) and the Department of Health and Social Security (DHSS) and it is expected that ultimately the level of trace will be better than 97%. Mortality data not specifically related to radiation workers are included and relate to male deaths among serving staff and pensioners during the years 1962-1978. Those observed deaths (O) are compared on an age standardized basis with those expected (E) from the general population, the ratio O/E being about 1 for all cancers and less than 1 for non-cancer deaths. This pattern is consistent with the well known 'healthy worker' effect seen in industry. (author)

  18. Epidemiologic Study of One Million U.S. Radiation Workers and Veterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boice, John D. [National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2017-12-14

    The single most important question in radiation epidemiology is determining the level of health risks associated with radiation exposures that occur gradually over time. The study of one million early U.S. radiation workers and veterans has been designed to provide information on risk following chronic exposures by focusing on occupational groups with differing radiation exposure patterns, including intakes of radionuclides. The cost-efficient study builds on the investments made and foundations laid by investigators and government agencies over the past 30-40 years, which have established early worker cohorts that can now provide answers to questions on the lifetime human health risks associated with low-level radiation exposures. Within the overall goal of the epidemiologic study of one million U.S. radiation workers and veterans, this project had a total of nine specific aims which included studies of six populations for multiple endpoints including cancer overall mortality, leukemia and non-cancer mortality. The six populations included: Mound, Ohio, workers exposed to polonium, tritium and plutonium; nuclear power plant workers within the Landauer dosimetry and Nuclear Regulatory Commission data files; industrial radiographers; Mallinckrodt uranium workers; uranium workers who linked with the US Renal Data System; and nuclear weapons test participants. Over 400,000 workers and atomic veterans are included in these populations, with vital status being determined and analyses of all causes of death undertaken. A critical, integral component of the studies has been comprehensive evaluations of dosimetry involving, in many cases, complex dose reconstructions, and assessments of uncertainties. The work has also involved development of state-of-the art statistical approaches and modeling. All nine aims were accomplished successfully, resulting in publication of two NCRP documents, 13 literature papers, numerous Boice Reports in Health Physics News and many

  19. A self-checking identification formula for radiation workers in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.N.; Srivastava, M.K.; Gohel, Chetna; Kher, R.K.; Awari, J.M.; Joshi, V.D.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate monitoring of radiation exposure of workers in any nuclear installation, institution or laboratory handling radiation sources forms an integral part of the radiation protection programme. This requires a system of unique identification of each radiation worker. When the radiation monitoring service started in India in 1953, the first identification formula of six digits was allotted to each radiation worker. This formula remained in use till 1970. With more number of institutions coming up, in the due course a second identification formula of eight digits was introduced which was in use during the period 1971-1978. For better data processing, a third identification formula of the same number of digits was introduced in 1978 with specific information about the category and location of the institution. To account for increasing number of institutions, a fourth formula consisting of 10 digits was started in 1995 which is currently in use. However, none of these formulas contained personal information about the radiation worker. Moreover, they were not self-checking type. Self-checking ability is extremely important for the preparation of a systematic data base and error free flow of information. With these considerations, a new 14 digit self-checking formula is being proposed in this report. Besides being less prone to error, it gives information in respect of date of birth, sex, institution category, location etc.. It does not suffer from the problem of millennium at the turn of century. It has enough capacity to account for a large number of institutions of different categories that might come up in future, and very large number of radiation workers in each institution. The inclusion of date of birth in a suitable format makes the capacity of the system virtually limitless and perpetual. (author)

  20. Personal monitoring and assessment of doses received by radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.; Morris, N.D.

    1981-12-01

    The Personal Radiation Monitoring Service operated by the Australian Radiation Laboratory is outlined and the types of monitors used for assessment of doses received by radiation workers are described. The distribution of doses received by radiation workers in different occupational categories is determined. From these distributions, the average doses received have been assessed and the maximum likely additional increase in cancer deaths in Australia as a result of occupational exposure estimated. This increase is shown to be very small. There is, however, a considerable spread of doses received by individuals within occupational groups

  1. Radiation monitoring of uranium workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    In order to manage radiological hazards in the workplace, it is necessary to have reliable measurements of workplace radiation levels and estimates of exposures and doses to workers. Over the past several years there have been many changes not only to the science of monitoring and dose assessment, but also to the regulatory framework. New International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations on dose in ICRP Publication 60 (1991) and the implications of the ICRP's new respiratory tract model in ICRP Publication 66 (1994) are of particular importance. In addition, triggered by the act establishing the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), which will replace the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), there is considerable activity in the review and development of regulatory guidance. Concurrent with these activities is the introduction of innovative mining procedures in Saskatchewan in order to extract uranium ore of particularly high grade. In view of these developments, the ACRP considered that a formal review of current monitoring practices would benefit both the CNSC and its licensees. In this report, 'uranium workers' refers to workers at uranium mines and mills, and workers at natural-uranium refineries, conversion, and fuel fabrication facilities; issues relating to long-term tailings management and to the handling of enriched materials are not addressed in this document. The report will have some relevance to workers in non-uranium mines and in industries handling naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) since, in some circumstances, these activities can present similar workplace radiation hazards. The report outlines the radiological hazards encountered in the Canadian uranium industry, and reviews current radiological monitoring practices and options; appendices include a glossary, a more technical discussion of monitoring methods, and an examination of errors and uncertainties in measurements of radon progeny and long

  2. Radiation protection and safety of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindhe, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This section briefly reviews the principles applicable to radiation protection and safety of workers, and methods that could be used to minimise occupational exposure in reclamation work. In considering the clean up of areas shortly after an accident, a decision would have to be made whether to implement clean-up actions early and thus cause higher occupational doses, or wait until short-lived isotopes have decayed and/or weathering has reduced the radiation levels. For example, the decision may be to stabilise the contamination using sprays to prevent re-suspension followed by a delay before actual clean-up starts. The timing of such actions would depend on many factors, including weather conditions, the area involved, equipment available and the competence of the work force. Means of reducing occupational exposure while carrying out the tasks should, as far as possible, be clearly defined in 'work procedures'. In general, reductions in occupational exposure during operational tasks can be accomplished by the use of shielding and limiting the time that workers spend exposed to radiation. (au)

  3. Radiation protection and the female worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folsom, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    An influx of young women into industrial occupations has resulted in a reexamination of policy regarding fetal protection. Each of the Environmental Protection Agency's four alternatives, as listed in Federal Radiation Protection Guidance for Occupational Exposures, is examined and given a critique: voluntary limitation of radiation exposure to the unborn, voluntary sterilization by women, exclusion of child-bearing-age women from occupational tasks resulting in possible fetal exposure, and limiting the mandatory exposure limit for all workers. The author lists employers and women employees responsibilities in considering occupations with radiation risks. 1 reference

  4. National registry of workers occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, P.G. da; Mota, H.C.; Alegre, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission started in 1987 a nationwide program in order to collect and maintain the radiation exposure records of the Brazilian workers. This data base consists of several files including: workers - personal data; institutions - section or department where the workers perform their activities; and annual doses - annual integrated doses and any relevant information regarding their exposures. The data base structure is introduced in the present work where its objectives are discussed taking into account the magnitude of the program as well as the difficulties of maintaining and the long term perspectives of a nationwide register of radiation occupational exposures. (author). 15 refs., 1 fig

  5. Analysis of changed bio-signal to radiation exposure of nuclear medicine worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwun Jae; Lee, Sang Bock

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we are evaluated about bio-signal between general workers and nuclear medicine workers which is more radiation exposure relatively. In order to reciprocal evaluated two group, we experimented nuclear medicine workers in Chung-Buk National University Hospital at department of nuclear medicine and worker in Chon-Nam National University Hospital at CT room, general radiographic room, medical recording room, receipt room, general office room. Used of experimental equipments as follows, for a level of radiation measurement by pocket dosimeter which made by Arrow-Tech company, for heart rate and blood pressure measurement by TONOPORT V which made by GE medical systems company, for heat flux and skin temperature and energy expenditure measurement by Armband senseware 2000 which made by Bodymedia company. Result of experiment obtains as follows : 1) Individual radiation exposure is recorded 3.05 uSv at department of nuclear medicine and order as follows CT room, general radiograpic room, medical recording room, receipt room, general office room. Department of nuclear medicine more 1.5 times than other places. 2) Radiation accumulated dose is not related to Heat flux, Skin temperature, Energy expenditure. 3) Blood pressure is recorded equal to nuclear medical workers, general officer, general people about systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. Compared to blood pressure between nuclear medical works which is more radiation exposure and other workers was not changed. Consequently, more radiation exposed workers at nuclear medicine field doesn't have hazard

  6. Enhanced safety of radiation workers: a regulatory approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalakrishnan, A [Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Bombay (India)

    1994-04-01

    Radiation safety should not only be strictly implemented, but also believed and understood by the workers, the unions, the media and the general public as being fairly and adequately enforced. It is not at all sufficient that only those in the operational management levels satisfy themselves that workers` safety is properly taken care of, but it is necessary that the workers and their unions are also convinced about it and share this management view.

  7. Enhanced safety of radiation workers: a regulatory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishnan, A.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation safety should not only be strictly implemented, but also believed and understood by the workers, the unions, the media and the general public as being fairly and adequately enforced. It is not at all sufficient that only those in the operational management levels satisfy themselves that workers' safety is properly taken care of, but it is necessary that the workers and their unions are also convinced about it and share this management view

  8. [Fitness of workers with particular sensitivity to non-ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccaldi, R; Grandi, C

    2011-01-01

    Chapter IV and V of Title VIII of D.Lgs 81/2008, implementing the Directives 2004/40/EC respectively (protection of workers exposed to electromagnetic fields) and 2006/25/EC (protection of workers exposed to artificial optical radiation), make frequent reference to the workers as "at particular risk" namely those workers who, by their biological or pathological characteristics, lifestyles, multiple exposure to other risk factors, may be more susceptible to the effects of electromagnetic fields or optical radiation. The identification of workers with particular sensitivity is essential for health surveillance, in particular regarding the determination of fitness. The operational guidance on Title VIII of D.Lgs 81/2008 drafted by the Italian Technical Coordination for Safety in the workplace of Regions and Autonomous Provinces (Document No. 1-2009), in collaboration with ISPESL and ISS, includes a preliminary identification of the categories of workers considered most susceptible to the risk from exposure to electromagnetic fields and optical radiation. On the basis of this information the authors identified more focused and structured classes of workers to be considered as "particularly sensitive to risk", it is not only related to a specific wavelength, but based on a comprehensive risk assessment in individual exposure situation, with regard to the exposure levels, any multiple exposures, the possibility of adequate personal protection.

  9. Mortality of Hanford radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1980-01-01

    Mortality from all causes for white males employed at Hanford for at least two years is 75 percent of that expected on the basis of US vital statistics. Mortality from cancer is 85 percent of that expected. These results are typical of a working population. Neither death from all causes nor death from all cancer types shows a positive correlation with external radiation exposures. Myeloid leukemia, the disease that several studies have found to be associated most strongly with radiation exposure, is not correlated with external radiation exposure of Hanford workers. Two specific cancers, multiple myeloma and to a lesser extent cancer of the pancreas, were found to be positively correlated with radiation exposure. The correlations identified result entirely from a small number of deaths (3 each for multiple myeloma and cancer of the pancreas) with cumulative exposure greater than 15 rem

  10. Monthly radiation protection training of workers: An evaluation of two years operational practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berus, D.; Covens, P.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation protection training and education is important in stimulating safety culture of occupationally exposed workers. Taking into account the mandatory requirements in relation to education and training a digital training tool was introduced for communication of personal dose results and regular information on radiation protection. This tool enables that personal dose reports are monthly sent to the individual mailbox of workers together with short comprehensive slideshows on radiation protection topics. After two years of operational practice a survey was organised to evaluate the training tool. The results show that the majority (92%) of the occupationally exposed workers are aware of the communication of personal dose results through e-mail. Furthermore, 81% of these workers are also aware of their monthly and cumulated dose level. The monthly information on radiation protection topics is however less consulted. Around 40% of the workers that noticed the link are indifferent to the monthly information. The interest in radiation protection issues increases however with the education level.

  11. Experience with qualification examinations of workers handling ionizing radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skokanova, K.

    1976-01-01

    The organization is described of examinations which have to be passed by supervising staff and workers using radioactive ionizing radiation sources. The requirements are listed of the examination in which these workers have to prove their professional knowledge and skills. The said examinations significantly contribute to the establishment of a system of safeguards at workplaces using ionizing radiation sources and may help economize operations at these workplaces

  12. Studies of workers exposed to low doses of external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1991-04-01

    Currently, several epidemiologic studies of workers who have been exposed occupationally to low levels of radiation are being conducted, and include studies of workers in the United States, Great Britain, and Canada involved in the production of both defense materials and nuclear power. This paper focuses on studies that evaluate the possible adverse effects resulting from external exposure to radiation. The radiation risk estimates that have been used to establish radiation protection standards for workers and others have been obtained mainly from studies of persons exposed at high doses and dose rates. However, questions remain with regard to the extrapolation process that has been necessary for estimating low-level radiation risks. Occupational studies provide a direct assessment of risk based on data on persons exposed at the actual levels of interest. If current risk estimates are correct, these studies have very little chance of detecting risk, but can still be used to provide useful upper limits on risks. The studies are also adequate to detect serious underestimation of risks. 36 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  13. A study on exposure dose from injection work and elution work for radiation workers and frequent workers in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Yong Jin; Chung, Woon Kwan; Dong, Kyung Rae; Choi, Eun Jin; Kwak, Jong Gil; Ryu, Jae Kwang

    2017-01-01

    Compared to other occupations, there is a greater risk of exposure to radiation due to the use of radioisotopes in nuclear medicine for diagnostic evaluations and therapy. To consider ways to reduce exposure dose for those in nuclear medicine involved in injection work and elution work among radiation workers as well as for sanitation workers and trainees among frequent workers an investigation into exposure dose and situational analysis from changes in yearly exposure dose evaluations, changes in work environment and changes in forms of inspection were conducted. Exposure dose measurements were taken by using EPD MK2 worn during working hours for one injection worker, one elution worker, two sanitation workers, and one trainee at a general hospital in the Seoul area for three days from July 18th to 20th 2016. Radiation from radioisotopes which are a part of nuclear medicine can significantly affect not only radiation workers who deal with radioisotopes directly but also frequency works as well. According to this study the annual dose limit for elution workers and injection workers were considered safe as the amount of exposure was not large enough to have a signifcant effect. The limits of this study consist in the duration of this study and the quantity of participants. Also there was a limitation of the measurement device involving accumulated exposure, where the EPD MK2 cannot check the changes in exposure according to a particular activity

  14. A study on exposure dose from injection work and elution work for radiation workers and frequent workers in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yong Jin; Chung, Woon Kwan [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Jin; Kwak, Jong Gil [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University Graduate School, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae Kwang [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Compared to other occupations, there is a greater risk of exposure to radiation due to the use of radioisotopes in nuclear medicine for diagnostic evaluations and therapy. To consider ways to reduce exposure dose for those in nuclear medicine involved in injection work and elution work among radiation workers as well as for sanitation workers and trainees among frequent workers an investigation into exposure dose and situational analysis from changes in yearly exposure dose evaluations, changes in work environment and changes in forms of inspection were conducted. Exposure dose measurements were taken by using EPD MK2 worn during working hours for one injection worker, one elution worker, two sanitation workers, and one trainee at a general hospital in the Seoul area for three days from July 18th to 20th 2016. Radiation from radioisotopes which are a part of nuclear medicine can significantly affect not only radiation workers who deal with radioisotopes directly but also frequency works as well. According to this study the annual dose limit for elution workers and injection workers were considered safe as the amount of exposure was not large enough to have a signifcant effect. The limits of this study consist in the duration of this study and the quantity of participants. Also there was a limitation of the measurement device involving accumulated exposure, where the EPD MK2 cannot check the changes in exposure according to a particular activity.

  15. Health check on radiation workers in the nuclear energy industry using Todai Health Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Takehiko; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Kumashiro, Masaharu; Sudo, Seiji; Hashimoto, Tetsuaki.

    1986-01-01

    In the nuclear energy industry, the plants are located far from urban areas and the working environments are generally separate from each other for radiation protection purposes. The health investigation on radiation workers in the nuclear energy industry was carried out using the Todai Health Index questionnaire in 1982, 1983 and 1984. As a control study non-radiation workers on the other several working fields were investigated in the same manner. The results showed that the status of radiation workers in the nuclear energy industry is similar to that of the workers in the other working fields and the THI questionnaire is useful to know health and working status of a group of workers. (author)

  16. Occupational exposure of medical radiation workers in Lithuania, 1950-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samerdokiene, V.; Atkocius, V.; Kurtinaitis, J.; Valuckas, K.P.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the summary of historical exposures, measurement practice and evolution of the recording of the individual doses of medical radiation workers during 1950-2003 in Lithuania. The aim of this study is to present occupational exposure of medical radiation workers in Lithuania since the earliest appearance period. Data from publications have been used for the earliest two periods prior to 1969; data from the archives of the largest hospitals, for the period 1970-1990 and data from Lithuanian Subdivision of Individual Dosimetry of Radiation Protection Center, for the period 1991-2003. The analysis of the data obtained from personal records allows to conclude that the average annual effective dose of Lithuanian medical radiation workers was greatly reduced in radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine in all occupational categories from 1950 to 2003. During the last period 1991-2003 extremity doses clearly decreased and after 1994 were no longer present in Lithuania. (authors)

  17. Study of External Radiation Expose Dose on Hands of Nuclear Medicine Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Chul; Pyo, Sung Jae

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study are to assess external radiation exposed doses of body and hands of nuclear medicine workers who handle radiation sources, and to measure radiation exposed doses of the hands induced by a whole body bone scan with high frequency and handling a radioactive sources like 99m Tc-HDP and 18 F-FDG in the PET/CT examination. Skillful workers, who directly dispense and inject from radiation sources, were asked to wear a TLD on the chest and ring finger. Then, radiation exposed dose and duration exposed from daily radiation sources for each section were measured by using a pocket dosimeter for the accumulated external doses and the absorbed dose to the hands. In the survey of four medical institutions in Incheon Metropolitan City, only one of four institutions has a radiation dosimeter for local area like hands. Most of institutions uses radiation shielding devices for the purpose of protecting the body trunk, not local area. Even some institutions were revealed not to use such a shielding device. The exposed doses on the hands of nuclear medicine workers who directly handles radioactive sources were approximately twice as much as those on the body. The radiation exposure level for each section of the whole body bone scan with high frequency and that of the PET/CT examination showed that radiation doses were revealed in decreasing order of synthesis of radioactive medicine and installation to a dispensing container, dispensing, administering and transferring. Furthermore, there were statistically significant differences of radiation exposure doses of the hands before and after wearing a syringe shielder in administration of a radioactive sources. In this study, although it did not reach the permissible effective dose for nuclear medicine, the occupational workers were exposed by relatively higher dose level than the non-occupational workers. Therefore, the workers, who closely exposed to radioactive sources should be in compliance with safety

  18. Management and processing of dosimetric data of workers exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasoarimalala, T.

    2012-01-01

    The Madagascar - INSTN Radiation protection and Dosimetry Department use the reader HARSHAW TLD 6600 for workers doses reading. Although the performance of this device, manual works is required to store and to maintain the dosimetric data after reading and to note the TLDs sent to the establishments. To avoid these manual works, this present work proposes computer programs written in Python and using SQLite software. One of the programs in python retrieves dose values after reading and transfers directly these doses in the workers database. The use of SQLite software provides a way for the dosimetric data management and the TLDs movement monitoring. The other program assesses estimation of the dose received by worker through a trend curve for workers dosimetric monitoring. The calculated differences of this curve over the curve connecting all points are less than 20%, acceptable limit in radiation protection for TLDs. This present work presents then significances for the personnel occupying individual monitoring of ionizing radiation workers and for these workers too. [fr

  19. Analysis of overexposure cases for female radiation workers in medical and research institutions in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, J.M.; Massand, O.P.; Venkataraman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation Protection Services Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre conducts country wide personnel monitoring service for 40,000 radiation workers, of which about 22,000 radiation workers are from industrial, medical and research institutions. The number of female radiation workers constitute about 5% of the total radiation workers monitored. Basis for control of occupational exposures of women are same as that for men except for pregnant women (foetus). Equivalent dose above 10 mSv in a service period is investigated as to the causes of exposure whether the exposure was really received by the worker (genuine) or only the monitoring badge received the exposure due to other reasons (non-genuine) and necessary remedial actions are taken. Analysis of overexposure cases in female radiation workers as a group has been done for the period of four years (1990-1993) and the conclusions are presented. (author). 2 refs., 4 tabs

  20. Recent trend of radiation doses of medical workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzai, I [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Tanaka, M; Nakamura, S; Nawa, H; Nukazawa, A

    1981-10-01

    Radiation doses of medical workers in Japan between 1976 and 1979 were analysed based on the data provided by a film badge servicing company. Average annual radiation doses between April, 1978 and March, 1979 were 129 mrems for 2556 doctors, 108 mrems for 2074 radiographers, and 60 mrems for 1915 nurses. It was also suggested that the log-normal distribution could provide a good fit to the frequency distribution of radiation doses of these medical staffs. Time series data of monthly average doses during the period between April, 1976 and March, 1979 were analysed using a computer code named EPA that had been developed by the Japanese Economic Planning Agency. The EPA code separated the original time series data into three components, i.e., the trend and cycle factor, the seasonal factor and the irregular factor based on a multiplicative model. The results of analyses strongly suggested that there existed a significant common pattern among the trend factors of doctors, radiographers and nurses. The similar phenomenon was also observed about the seasonal factors. Some specific cases of medical workers who received considerably high radiation doses were studied, and it was pointed out that, in order to lower the doses of medical workers, the factors which are peculiar to each medical facility must be precisely examined in addition to the strengthening of general radiological protective measures.

  1. Conditions for licensing workers exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This entrance speaking on conditions of license workers in the areas of employment ionizing radiation addresses two aspects, the first aspect: industrial applications: speak for the workers in this area by a supervisor to portray industrial and industrial photographer and a supervisor sounding wells and a Nuclear Gauges Supervisor and the previous and subsequent Practices of the law The second aspect: about the medical applications and describes the general conditions of the licenses in this area and those working in this area of professional diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine technician and technician treatment of radiotherapy and radiation protection officers at large and small institutions

  2. Risk of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation among medical workers in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, Jan M.; Band, Pierre R.; Garner, Michael J.; Krewski, Daniel; Shilnikova, Natalia S.; Jiang, Huixia; Ashmore, Patrick J.; Sont, Willem N.; Fair, Martha E.; Letourneau, Ernest G.; Semenciw, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Medical workers are exposed to chronic low dose ionizing radiation from a variety of sources. Potential cancer risks associated with ionizing radiation exposures have been derived from cohorts experiencing acute high intensity exposure, most notably the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Since such extrapolations are subject to uncertainty, direct information on the risk associated with chronic low dose occupational exposure to ionizing radiation is needed. We examined possible associations with cancer incidence and mortality in a cohort of medical workers ascertained by the National Dose Registry of Canada (NDR). Data from the NDR were used to assess the exposure to ionizing radiation incurred between 1951 to 1987 inclusive in a cohort of 67,562 subjects classified as medical workers. Standardized mortality (SMRs) and incidence (SIRs) ratios were ascertained by linking NDR data with the data maintained by Statistics Canada in the Canadian Mortality and in the Canadian Cancer Incidence Databases respectively. Dosimetry information was obtained from the National Dosimetry Services of the Radiation Protection Bureau of Health Canada. There were 23,580 male and 43,982 female medical workers in the cohort. During the follow-up period, 1309 incident cases of cancer (509 in males, 800 in females) and 1,325 deaths (823 in males, 502 in females) were observed. Mortality from cancer and non-cancer causes was generally below expected compared to the Canadian population. Thyroid cancer incidence was significantly elevated in both males and females, with a combined SIR of 1.74 and 90% confidence interval (90% CI: 1.40-2.10). Our result of an increased risk of thyroid cancer among medical workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation confirms previous reports. Over the last 50 years, radiation protection measures have been effective in reducing occupational exposures of medical workers to ionizing radiation to current very low levels. (author)

  3. Radiation exposure and central nervous system cancers: A case-control study among workers at two nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, A.V.; Flanders, W.D.; Frome, E.L.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Fry, S.A.

    1987-03-01

    A nested case-control study was conducted among workers employed between 1943 and 1977 at two nuclear facilities to investigate the possible association of primary malignant neoplasms of the central nervous system (CNS) with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from external and internal sources. Eighty-nine white male and female workers, who according to the information on death certificates dies of primary CNS cancers, were identified as cases. Four matched controls were selected for each case. External radiation exposure data were available from film badge readings for individual workers, whereas radiation dose to lung from internally deposited radionuclides, mainly uranium, was estimated from area and personnel monitoring data and was used in analyses in lieu of the dose to the brain. Matched sets were included in the analyses only if information was available for the case and at least one of the corresponding controls. Thus, the analyses of external radiation included 27 cases and 90 matched controls, and 47 cases and 120 matched controls were analyzed for the effects of radiation from internally deposited uranium. No association was observed between deaths fron CNS cancers and occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from external or internal sources. However, due to the small number of monitored subjects and low doses, a weak association could not be ruled out. 43 refs., 1 fig., 15 tabs

  4. Participation of workers in radiation protection training and information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbib, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The information and training of workers in radiation protection should be given priority as a means of preventing the hazards of ionizing radiation. In view of the importance of the human factor in accident prevention, it would be inconsistent not to place more emphasis on the training of workers exposed at work. Training staff should not only have technical knowledge in the field of radiation protection, but should also be properly trained in how to teach adults. Teaching tools should be developed at Community level to make the job of trainers, occupational physicians and radiation protection experts easier. Regularly updated documents should supply the basic information for radiation protection, and not neglect areas of uncertainty, or problems which the experts are still debating. These documents must include the special information referred to in the Directive of 15 July 1980, in particular: . the reasons for limiting the dose for women of child-bearing age and the nature and level of the risks for the embryo and foetus, according to the dose received; . the potential hazards of exceptional exposure. . The information and training of workers should help to improve understanding of occupational risks and not serve as a vehicle for propaganda on the harmlessness of nuclear power. In addition, they should openly recognize the nuclear risks including the difficult problem of low doses, but should not confuse the issue with ambiguous statistics

  5. A comparative analysis of exposure doses between the radiation workers in dental and general hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Nam Hee; Chung, Woon Kwan; Dong, Kyung Rae; Ju, Yong Jin; Song, Ha Jin; Choi, Eun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Research and investigation is required for the exposure dose of radiation workers to work in the dental hospital as increasing interest in exposure dose of the dental hospital recently accordingly, study aim to minimize radiation exposure by making a follow-up study of individual exposure doses of radiation workers, analyzing the status on individual radiation exposure management, prediction the radiation disability risk levels by radiation, and alerting the workers to the danger of radiation exposure. Especially given the changes in the dental hospital radiation safety awareness conducted the study in order to minimize radiation exposure. This study performed analyses by a comparison between general and dental hospital, comparing each occupation, with the 116,220 exposure dose data by quarter and year of 5,811 subjects at general and dental hospital across South Korea from January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2012. The following are the results obtained by analyzing average values year and quarter. In term of hospital, average doses were significantly higher in general hospitals than detal ones. In terms of job, average doses were higher in radiological technologists the other workers. Especially, they showed statistically significant differences between radiological technologists than dentists. The above-mentioned results indicate that radiation workers were exposed to radiation for the past 5 years to the extent not exceeding the dose limit (maximum 50 mSv y -1 ). The limitation of this study is that radiation workers before 2008 were excluded from the study. Objective evaluation standards did not apply to the work circumstance or condition of each hospital. Therefore, it is deemed necessary to work out analysis criteria that will be used as objective evaluation standard. It will be necessary to study radiation exposure in more precise ways on the basis of objective analysis standard in the future. Should try to minimize the radiation individual dose of

  6. A comparative analysis of exposure doses between the radiation workers in dental and general hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Nam Hee; Chung, Woon Kwan; Dong, Kyung Rae; Ju, Yong Jin; Song, Ha Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Jin [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Research and investigation is required for the exposure dose of radiation workers to work in the dental hospital as increasing interest in exposure dose of the dental hospital recently accordingly, study aim to minimize radiation exposure by making a follow-up study of individual exposure doses of radiation workers, analyzing the status on individual radiation exposure management, prediction the radiation disability risk levels by radiation, and alerting the workers to the danger of radiation exposure. Especially given the changes in the dental hospital radiation safety awareness conducted the study in order to minimize radiation exposure. This study performed analyses by a comparison between general and dental hospital, comparing each occupation, with the 116,220 exposure dose data by quarter and year of 5,811 subjects at general and dental hospital across South Korea from January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2012. The following are the results obtained by analyzing average values year and quarter. In term of hospital, average doses were significantly higher in general hospitals than detal ones. In terms of job, average doses were higher in radiological technologists the other workers. Especially, they showed statistically significant differences between radiological technologists than dentists. The above-mentioned results indicate that radiation workers were exposed to radiation for the past 5 years to the extent not exceeding the dose limit (maximum 50 mSv y{sup -1}). The limitation of this study is that radiation workers before 2008 were excluded from the study. Objective evaluation standards did not apply to the work circumstance or condition of each hospital. Therefore, it is deemed necessary to work out analysis criteria that will be used as objective evaluation standard. It will be necessary to study radiation exposure in more precise ways on the basis of objective analysis standard in the future. Should try to minimize the radiation individual dose of

  7. Experiences and Management of Pregnant Radiation Workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, Mary; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Bryant, Janet L.; Lipton, Mary S.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are divided into two classes based on whether or not they can encounter radioactive contamination in the normal course of their work. Level I workers primarily handle sealed radioactive materials such as those used to calibrate detectors. Level II workers perform benchtop chemistry. The U.S. Department of Energy has strict guidelines on the management of pregnant radiation workers. Staff members may voluntarily notify their line managers of a pregnancy and be subjected to stringent radiation exposure limits for the developing fetus. The staff member and manager develop a plan to limit and monitor radiation dose for the remainder of the pregnancy. Several examples of dose management plans and case examples of the impact of pregnancy on staff member's technical work and projects will be presented

  8. Radiation practices and radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    The guide presents the principal requirements on accuracy of radiation measurements and on the approval, calibration and operating condition inspections of radiation meters, together with requirements for dosimetric services measuring the individual radiation doses of workers engaged in radiation work (approved dosimetric services). The Guide also sets out the definitions of quantities and units used in radiation measurements. The radiation protection quantities used for assessing the harmful effects of radiation and for expressing the maximum values for radiation exposure (equivalent dose and effective dose) are set out in Guide ST 7.2. This Guide concerns measurements of ionizing radiation involved in radiation practices, the results of which are used for determining the radiation exposure of workers engaged in radiation work and members of the public, and of patients subject to the use of radiation in health services, or upon the basis of which compliance with safety requirements of appliances currently in use and of their premises of use or of the workplaces of workers is ensured. The Guide also concerns measurements of the radon concentration of inhaled air in both workplaces and dwellings. The Guide does not apply to determining the radiation exposure of aircrews, determination of exposure caused by internal radiation, or measurements made to protect the public in the event of, or in preparation for abnormal radiation conditions

  9. Study of national registration systems for health records of radiation workers. National radiation dose registration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Haruo; Kanda, Keiji

    1999-01-01

    A national radiation dose registration system is proposed in this paper. In Japan, only one radiation dose registration system is partly effective. It is applied for workers in nuclear power plants which are under control of regulatory laws for nuclear reactors. The total system was proposed previously by the Committee for Compensation Claims of Nuclear Accidents. The reason for the delay in establishing a registration system for all radiation workers is supposedly a lack of effort to adjust differences among items in radiation protection laws and the promotion of public acceptance to atomic power. Items about dose recordings, record keeping and dose-record reporting in all of the radiation regulatory laws are compared to each other, and items were extracted for revision. (author)

  10. Ionizing radiation risks to Satellite Power Systems (SPS) workers in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    A reference Satellite Power System (SPS) has been designed by NASA and its contractors for the purposes of evaluating the concept and carrying out assessments of the various consequences of development, including those on the health of the space workers. The Department of Energy has responsibility for directing various assessments. Present planning calls for the SPS workers to move from Earth to a low earth orbit (LEO) at an altitude of 500 kilometers; to travel by a transfer ellipse (TE) trajectory to a geosynchronous orbit (GEO) at an altitude of 36,000 kilometers; and to remain in GEO orbit for about 90 percent of the total time aloft. The radiation risks to the health of workers who will construct and maintain solar power satellites in the space environment are studied. The charge to the committee was: (a) to evaluate the radiation environment estimated for the Reference System which could represent a hazard; (b) to assess the possible somatic and genetic radiation hazards; and (c) to estimate the risks to the health of SPS workers due to space radiation exposure, and to make recommendations based on these conclusions. Details are presented. (WHK)

  11. Updated Mortality Analysis of Radiation Workers at Rocketdyne (Atomics International), 1948-2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boice Jr JD, Colen SS, Mumma MT, Ellis ED, Eckerman DF, Leggett RW, Boecker BB, Brill B, Henderson BE

    2011-08-01

    Updated analyses of mortality data are presented on 46,970 workers employed 1948-1999 at Rocketdyne (Atomics International). Overall, 5,801 workers were involved in radiation activities, including 2,232 who were monitored for intakes of radionuclides, and 41,169 workers were engaged in rocket testing or other non-radiation activities. The worker population is unique in that lifetime occupational doses from all places of employment were sought, updated and incorporated into the analyses. Further, radiation doses from intakes of 14 different radionuclides were calculated for 16 organs or tissues using biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). Because only negligible exposures were received by the 247 workers monitored for radiation activities after 1999, the mean dose from external radiation remained essentially the same at 13.5 mSv (maximum 1 Sv) as reported previously, as did the mean lung dose from external and internal radiation combined at 19.0 mSv (maximum 3.6 Sv). An additional 9 years of follow-up, from December 31,1999 through 2008, increased the person-years of observation for the radiation workers by 21.7% to 196,674 (mean 33.9 years) and the number of cancer deaths by 50% to 684. Analyses included external comparisons with the general population and the computation of standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and internal comparisons using proportional hazards models and the computation of relative risks (RRs). A low SMR for all causes of death (SMR 0.82; 95% CI 0.78-0.85) continued to indicate that the Rocketdyne radiation workers were healthier than the general population and were less likely to die. The SMRs for all cancers taken together (SMR 0.88; 95% CI 0.81-0.95), lung cancer (SMR 0.87; 95% CI 0.76-1.00) and leukemia other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (SMR 1.04; 95% 0.67-1.53) were not significantly elevated. Cox regression analyses revealed no significant dose-response trends for any cancer. For all

  12. Workers radiation protection. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiations in France: 2016 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-06-01

    National results of the individual monitoring of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation are reported for all civilian and military activities subject to authorization or declaration (i.e. medical and veterinary activities, nuclear industry, defence, non-nuclear industry and research), as well as for activities concerned by the enhanced exposure to natural radiation. 372 262 workers within activities subject to authorization or declaration were monitored by passive dosimetry in 2015, which represents an increase by 1.8 % compared to 2015. The average individual dose in 2016 was very close to the value in 2015. Furthermore, 14 218 workers received more than 1 mSv (i.e. the legal dose limit for the public), and 2 703 workers received more than 5 mSv. 1 worker received more than 20 mSv (i.e. the dose limit for the workers in the French regulation). As a result, the collective dose increased from 61.9 to 63.2 man.Sv (2 %), thus reaching the same level as in the years 2009 to 2013. Important differences are noticed according to the occupational activities: the average dose in the medical and veterinary field (which represents 61.2 % of the monitored workers) and that in the research field (3.1 % of the monitored workers) are less than 0.35 mSv; the average doses are higher in the nuclear field and in the non-nuclear industry (representing together 30.5 % of the monitored workers), respectively 1.15 mSv and 1.36 mSv. Concerning internal dosimetry, 279 659 individual examinations have been performed in 2016, 54 % of which are radio-toxicological analysis of excreta and 46 % are direct body counting. In 2016, 5 workers had a committed effective dose greater than or equal to 1 mSv and the maximum dose was 19.4 mSv. Data or trends relative to workers exposed to natural radioactivity are also dealt with in this report (air-crews, personnel subjected to radon exposure). In particular, results of aircrew dosimetry are reported: in 2016, the average individual dose of 19 875

  13. Workers radiation protection. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiations in France: 2015 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    National results of the individual monitoring of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation are reported for all civilian and military activities subject to authorization or declaration (i.e. medical and veterinary activities, nuclear industry, defence, non-nuclear industry and research), as well as for activities concerned by the enhanced exposure to natural radiation. 365 830 workers within activities subject to authorization or declaration were monitored by passive dosimetry in 2015, which represents an increase by 1.7 % compared to 2014. The average individual dose in 2015 was very close to the value in 2014. Furthermore, 14 138 workers received more than 1 mSv (i.e. the legal dose limit for the public), and 2 606 workers received more than 5 mSv. 2 workers received more than 20 mSv (i.e. the dose limit for the workers in the French regulation). As a result, the collective dose increased from 56.3 to 61.9 man.Sv (10 %), thus reaching the same level as in the years 2009 to 2013. Important differences are noticed according to the occupational activities: the average dose in the medical and veterinary field (which represents 62.4 % of the monitored workers) and that in the research field (3.6 % of the monitored workers) are less than 0.4 mSv; the average doses are higher in the nuclear field and in the non-nuclear industry (representing together 30.1 % of the monitored workers), respectively 1.17 mSv and 1.38 mSv. Concerning internal dosimetry, 279 877 individual examinations have been performed in 2015, 52 % of which are radio-toxicological analysis of excreta and 48 % are direct body counting. In 2015, 2 workers had a committed effective dose greater than or equal to 1 mSv and the maximum dose was 3 mSv. Data or trends relative to workers exposed to natural radioactivity are also dealt with in this report (air crews, personnel subjected to radon exposure). In particular, results of aircrew dosimetry are reported: in 2015, the average individual dose of 19 565

  14. Regional economic development programs related to the registration systems for the health records of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Haruo; Kanda, Keiji

    2000-01-01

    The two policies, 'Promotion of Health Care for Elderly Person' and Completion of Health Care System' are important for regional economic development. If we apply the Health Records Registration Systems for Radiation Workers to the Regional Health Care System, we can get a more effective plan for regional economic development. In Japan, most of the electric power companies depend on radiation works to the external labor. As the chance of employment usually depends on the time and the period of outage of nuclear power stations, the employment of radiation works lacks its stability. From the analysis on the mobility of radiation workers, we can see the stability of employment increases in proportion to the number of reactors. This paper proposes the need for such a registration system to be granted under three laws governing special accounts for power supply municipalities and to set up the system within regional medical information systems. It also proposes the founding of an Overall Health Insurance Cooperative, managed by contractors safety union in the municipalities as soon as the condition of founding, 3, 000 people, is satisfied. (author)

  15. Radiation dose registration and epidemiological study for workers of nuclear institutions in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumatori, T.

    1992-01-01

    The first nuclear reactor was operated in 1957 at Tokai-mura in Japan. Since then radiation dose of workers has been controlled by nuclear institutions according to the Law for the Regulations of Nuclear Source Material, Nuclear Fuel Material and Reactors. However, many nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities were built, resulting in the remarkable increase of workers in controlled areas. Further, periodical inspection and repair work at nuclear facilities were carried out by employees of subcontractors, who were engaged in such work at many different facilities, so that it was getting more and more difficult to obtain accurate information of radiation dose on these workers. In order to meet this situation, the open-quotes Radiation Dose Registration Center for Workersclose quotes (RADREC) was established in November 1977 within the open-quotes Radiation Effects Associationclose quotes (REA), which was founded in September 1960 for the purpose of supporting the research on radiation effects and radiation protection. In January 1978, RADREC was designated by the Government as an organization to preserve the records on exposure of radiation workers, which was linked up with the registration system

  16. Annual dose distribution of Nuclear Malaysia radiation workers for monitoring period from year 2003 to 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairul Nizam Idris; Azimawati Ahmad; Norain Ab Rahman

    2008-08-01

    Estimation of radiation dose (external exposure) received by Nuklear Malaysia's radiation workers are measured by using personal dosimetry device which are provided by SSDL-Nuklear Malaysia. Dose assessment report for monitoring period from year 2003 - 2007 shows that almost all radiation workers received annual doses less than 20 mSv, only in very small percentage of radiation workers received annual doses between 20.1 to 50 mSv and none of the workers received doses higher than 50 mSv/year. Exposure dose below 20 mSv/year (the new annual dose limit to be used in Malaysia soon) could be fully achieved by improving the compliance with the safety regulations and enhancing the awareness about radiation safety among the workers. (Author)

  17. Rubella virus detection by ELISA method in exposed radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jianmei; Zhu Bo; Zhu Youming; Shao Jinhui; Wu Weiping; Han Jinxiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A rapid diagnosis method was developed to detect Rubella virus infection in radiation workers. Methods: Modified ELISA method was used to detect the level of lgG and lgM antibodies in 514 in Jinan district. Results: 90.47% of 514 cases was shown to be resistant against Rubella virus; 6.42% were sensitive type; 0.78% belonged to be reinfected. Conclusion: Detection of Rubella virus in exposed radiation workers was imperative, and vaccine against Rubella virus was also needed to eliminate the infection risk. (authors)

  18. The occupational exposure of radiation workers, 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, S; Yamada, N; Sakurai, K [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-03-01

    Because the medical use of x-rays and radioisotopes is gradually increasing for diagnosis and therapy, radiation workers, special doctors, nurses and radiological technicians have occupational exposure. Procedures for monitoring external exposure of personnel include the wearing of a filmbadge or a pocket chamber. The results of filmbadge monitoring in Yamaguchi University Hospital for the last 10 years were described. In 1964, the total number of filmbadges that radiation workers used during a 2 week period of radiological examination and therapy was 610. This has been increasing yearly, and in 1972 it was 1999. Radiological technicians generally had low occupational exposure, and about 90 per cent of their filmbadges were exposed to less than 10 mR. Approximately 65 per cent of the filmbadges that nurses used were less than 10 mR, but some nurses who worked in radium therapy at the isotope ward suffered large doses. Some nurses had occasionally exposure higher than 100 mR in radiological examination. Some doctors sustained an occupational exposure of more than 150 mR. From these data, some problems on radiation monitoring using a filmbadge were discussed.

  19. The occupational exposure of radiation workers, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Shoji; Yamada, Norimasa; Sakurai, Koh

    1975-01-01

    Because the medical use of x-rays and radioisotopes is gradually increasing for diagnosis and therapy, radiation workers, special doctors, nurses and radiological technicians have occupational exposure. Procedures for monitoring external exposure of personnel include the wearing of a filmbadge or a pocket chamber. The results of filmbadge monitoring in Yamaguchi University Hospital for the last 10 years were described. In 1964, the total number of filmbadges that radiation workers used during a 2 week period of radiological examination and therapy was 610. This has been increasing yearly, and in 1972 it was 1999. Radiological technicians generally had low occupational exposure, and about 90 per cent of their filmbadges were exposed to less than 10 mR. Approximately 65 per cent of the filmbadges that nurses used were less than 10 mR, but some nurses who worked in radium therapy at the isotope ward suffered large doses. Some nurses had occasionally exposure higher than 100 mR in radiological examination. Some doctors sustained an occupational exposure of more than 150 mR. From these data, some problems on radiation monitoring using a filmbadge were discussed. (author)

  20. FINAL REPORT FORMER RADIATION WORKER MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AT ROCKY FLATS For Department of Energy Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe M. Aldrich

    2004-11-01

    The Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats was conducted in Arvada, CO, by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education under DOE Contract DE-AC05-00OR22750. Objectives of the program were to obtain information on the value of medical surveillance among at-risk former radiation workers and to provide long-term internal radiation dosimetry information to the scientific community. This program provided the former radiation workers of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (formerly Rocky Flats Plant) an opportunity to receive follow-up medical monitoring and a re-evaluation of their internal radiation dose. The former Rocky Flats radiation worker population is distinctive because it was a reasonably stable work force that received occupational exposures, at times substantial, over several decades. This report reflects the summation of health outcomes, statistical analyses, and dose assessment information on former Rocky Flats radiation workers to the date of study termination as of March 2004.

  1. FINAL REPORT. FORMER RADIATION WORKER MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AT ROCKY FLATS For Department of Energy Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, Joe M.

    2004-01-01

    The Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats was conducted in Arvada, CO, by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education under DOE Contract DE-AC--05-00OR22750. Objectives of the program were to obtain information on the value of medical surveillance among at-risk former radiation workers and to provide long-term internal radiation dosimetry information to the scientific community. This program provided the former radiation workers of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (formerly Rocky Flats Plant) an opportunity to receive follow-up medical monitoring and a re-evaluation of their internal radiation dose. The former Rocky Flats radiation worker population is distinctive because it was a reasonably stable work force that received occupational exposures, at times substantial, over several decades. This report reflects the summation of health outcomes, statistical analyses, and dose assessment information on former Rocky Flats radiation workers to the date of study termination as of March 2004

  2. Preparing the radiation protection worker to meet multiple needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abercrombie, J.S.; Thorpe, B.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the radiation protection worker aids in protecting personnel and their surrounding environment from the hazards of radiation. These individuals use their technical knowledge, skills, and abilities to survey and monitor various project-related activities. They must also provide guidance in project design, development, and implementation. These combined efforts assure that protective measures are taken in accordance with applicable standards. The ORNL performance-based training program enhances the skills of the worker. The program incorporates job specific information on the diverse facilities and activities monitored with basic fundamentals of radiation protection. Successful completion of this program includes passing both a qualification exam and an on-the-job skills review. This paper details the structure of such a program and explains the strategies taken to reach the program's goals. 4 refs., 2 tabs

  3. Cancer in the offspring of radiation workers - a record linkage study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draper, G.J. [Childhood Cancer Research Group, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Little, M.P. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom); Sorahan, T. [Institute of Occupational Health, University of Birmingham (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    The objectives of this study were to test the `Gardner hypothesis` that childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma can be caused by paternal exposure to ionising radiation before the conception of the child, and more generally, to investigate whether such radiation exposure of either parent is a cause of childhood cancer. This was a case-control study, conducted in Great Britain, that involved 35,949 children diagnosed as having cancer, together with matched controls. Examination was made of: parental employment as radiation worker as defined by inclusion in the National Registry for Radiation Workers and being monitored for external radiation before conception of child; cumulative dose of external ionising radiation for various periods of employment before conception; pregnancy dose. It is concluded that the results do not support the hypothesis that paternal preconception irradiation is a cause of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma; the observed associations may be chance or result from exposure to infective or other agents. If there is any increased risk for the children of fathers who are radiation workers it is small in absolute terms: in Britain the average risk by age 15 years is 6.5 per 10,000; our best estimate, using all available data, is that the increase is 5.4 per 10,000. For mothers, the numbers are too small for reliable estimates of the risk, if any, to be made. (author).

  4. Cancer in the offspring of radiation workers - a record linkage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, G.J.; Little, M.P.; Sorahan, T.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the 'Gardner hypothesis' that childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma can be caused by paternal exposure to ionising radiation before the conception of the child, and more generally, to investigate whether such radiation exposure of either parent is a cause of childhood cancer. This was a case-control study, conducted in Great Britain, that involved 35,949 children diagnosed as having cancer, together with matched controls. Examination was made of: parental employment as radiation worker as defined by inclusion in the National Registry for Radiation Workers and being monitored for external radiation before conception of child; cumulative dose of external ionising radiation for various periods of employment before conception; pregnancy dose. It is concluded that the results do not support the hypothesis that paternal preconception irradiation is a cause of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma; the observed associations may be chance or result from exposure to infective or other agents. If there is any increased risk for the children of fathers who are radiation workers it is small in absolute terms: in Britain the average risk by age 15 years is 6.5 per 10,000; our best estimate, using all available data, is that the increase is 5.4 per 10,000. For mothers, the numbers are too small for reliable estimates of the risk, if any, to be made. (author)

  5. Radiation safety. Handbook for laboratory workers in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotte, E.D.; Krueger, D.J.; Connor, K.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the Handbook is to provide a source of information on radiation safety for those who are involved in the use of ionizing radiation in the laboratory. The potential reader may be a laboratory worker in the university or biomedical setting or the safety professional who desires a basic understanding of radiation protection within the research environment. The Handbook may be used as a reference by the radiation protection specialist or Radiation Safety Officer. To this end, liberal use is made of Appendices to make the Handbook a source of reference for a wide spectrum of readership while avoiding complicating the main body of the text. Each chapter or appendix is designed to stand alone. A complete reading of the Handbook will show that topics may be covered more than once. For example, one may read about the hazards and protective measures on handling radioiodine in Chapter 5 on Practical Radiation Protection as well as in Appendix 19 on Safe Handling of 125 I. Extensive use of figures, rather than tables has been made to present data, in the belief that these produce a good visual representation to a level of precision which is sufficient for most purposes of radiation protection in laboratories. The reader must remember that this Handbook should be taken as a guide only to the applicable regulations. You must consult the appropriate state or federal regulation directly or receive advice of a qualified radiation safety professional. Also, some information in the Appendices, such as commercially available training institutions or radioactive waste brokers, may change with time. Telephone numbers are given for the reader to call directly and check the services provided

  6. An analysis of the awareness and performance of radiation workers' radiation/radioactivity protection in medical institutions : Focused on Busan regional medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol Koo; Hwang, Chul Hwan; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate safety management awareness and behavioral investigation of radiation/radioactivity performance defenses of radiation workers' in medical institutions. Data collection consisted of 267 radiation workers working in medical institutions using structured questionnaires. As a result, it was analyzed that radiation safety management awareness and performance were high in 40s, 50s group and higher education group. The analysis according to the radiation safety management knowledge was analyzed that the 'Know very well' group had higher scores on awareness and performance scores. The analysis according to the degree of safety management effort showed the high awareness scale and the performance scale in the group 'Receiving various education or studying the safety management contents through book'. The correlations between the sub-factors showed the highest positive correlation between perceived practician and personal perspective and perceived by patient and patient's caretaker perspective. Therefore, radiation safety management for workers, patients, and patient's caretaker should be conducted through continuous education of radiation safety management through various routes of radiation workers working at medical institutions

  7. Orthopaedic surgeries - assessment of ionising radiations exposure in health care workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, E.S.; Uva, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: 1. Objectives: The health care workers are exposed to ionizing radiations during their activities. In the operating rooms, the ionizing radiations are used in orthopaedic surgery and the dose depends on some factors, like the characteristics of the equipment. This study aims to: Estimate the occupational dose of ionizing radiations exposure of the orthopaedic doctors and nurses during the orthopaedic surgeries, in a Portuguese operating room; Sensitize the health care workers to use the individual dosimeter and to adopt radiation preventive measures. 2. Population and methods The study was conducted on nine Orthopaedic doctors and two nurses of an operating room of a hospital in Lisbon neighborhoods. We made a risk evaluating concerning: the radiations dose in different points, corresponding to gonads, hands and crystalline lens levels of all the professionals, during the surgeries; the average period of radiation in the orthopaedic surgeries; the number of annual orthopaedic surgeries, looking for that in the surgeries registers, to estimate the annual ionizing radiations dose of each orthopaedic doctor and nurse. 3. Results The annual doses estimated at different levels for orthopaedic doctors were the following: gonads: between 20,63 and 68,75 mGy; hands: 4,95 16,50 mGy; crystalline lens: 8,25 27,50 mGy). For the orthopaedic nurses: gonads: 130,63 151,25 mGy; hands: 31,35 36,30 mGy; crystalline lens 52,25 60,25 mGy. 4. Conclusions Although the location and positions of health care workers are not the same during the different surgeries and the equipment has an automatic control of the X ray emission, the annual ionizing radiations dose exposure for health care workers is an important one. The risk rating justifies the use of individual dosimeters for better individual dose assessment as part of an ionizing radiations prevention program. As a matter of fact preventive measures begin with a good quantitative risk assessment of

  8. Lead exposure in radiator repair workers: a survey of Washington State radiator repair shops and review of occupational lead exposure registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Stephen G

    2003-07-01

    Radiator repair workers in Washington State have the greatest number of very elevated (> or =60 microg/dL) blood lead levels of any other worker population. The goals of this study were to determine the number of radiator repair workers potentially exposed to lead; estimate the extent of blood lead data underreporting to the Occupational Lead Exposure Registry; describe current safety and health practices in radiator repair shops; and determine appropriate intervention strategies to reduce exposure and increase employer and worker awareness. Lead exposure in Washington State's radiator repair workers was assessed by reviewing Registry data and conducting a statewide survey of radiator repair businesses. This study revealed that a total of 226 workers in Washington State (including owner-operators and all employees) conduct repair activities that could potentially result in excessive exposures to lead. Approximately 26% of radiator repair workers with elevated blood lead levels (> or =25 microg/dL) were determined to report to Washington State's Registry. This study also revealed a lack of awareness of lead's health effects, appropriate industrial hygiene controls, and the requirements of the Lead Standard. Survey respondents requested information on a variety of workplace health and safety issues and waste management; 80% requested a confidential, free-of-charge consultation. Combining data derived from an occupational health surveillance system and a statewide mail survey proved effective at characterizing lead exposures and directing public health intervention in Washington State.

  9. Basis for radiation protection of the nuclear worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara, F.A.

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of the standards for protection of persons who work in areas that have a potential for radiation exposure. A review is given of the units of radiation exposure and dose equivalent and of the value of the maximum permissible dose limits for occupational exposure. Federal Regulations and Regulatory Guides for radiation protection are discussed. Average occupational equivalent doses experienced in several operations typical of the United States Nuclear Industry are presented and shown to be significantly lower than the maximum permissible. The concept of maintaining radiation doses to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable is discussed and the practice of imposing engineering and administrative controls to provide effective radiation protection for the nuclear worker is described

  10. Regulation No. 0-27 on working conditions and privileges of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Work performed in an ionizing radiation environment is held to be harmful despite the protective measures provided. Such an occupational environment is taken to exist in cases where the unsealed radioactive materials being handled have an activity exceeding the minimum level specified in the Radiation Safety Standards, or where sealed sources produce a dose rate of above 0,1 mrem/hour at a distance of 0,1 m. To ascertain the time actually spent in areas of such ambient radioactivity levels, occupancy records are kept to serve as a base in assigning privileges. The latter may be as follows: shift-hour reductions, salary increments, food and/or clothing free of charge, and additional holidays. Radiation workers are classified into three general categories. First-category workers or employees are persons primarily engaged in tasks involving direct handling of ionizing radiation sources (as in exploration, mining, processing, constructing, testing, adjustment, assemblage, operation, repair, monitoring, application of radiation sources, etc.). This category covers four groups. The first, second and fourth groups include workers employed at radioactive-ore mining and milling facilities, nuclear power stations, nuclear reactors, and elementary-particle accelerators. The third group comprises the staff members at laboratories, workshops, and other sites where radioactive isotopes or X-ray machines are handled. Those workers or employees who are primarily engaged in off-site work but periodically in the course of the month do perform tasks on-site fall into the second category. The latter is subdivided into three groups, the criterion for assigning pertinence to one of these being the number of working days per month spent in the radiation environment with a minimum requirement of six days per month. The thrd category covers workers or employees who are included in the staff of establishment using radiation sources, without, however, being directly exposed to ionizing

  11. Eye examinations of laser and radiofrequency radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocking, B.

    1988-01-01

    There are a growing number of uses of lasers and radiofrequency radiation in industry. Because these radiations may lead to various ocular effects, examinations of the eye are required for laser and radiofrequency workers as part of safe working practices. Various issues concerning these examinations are raised for discussion including: handling personal data, placement criteria, data collection, quality control, control data, the load on service providers, and costs

  12. Air crews - a new group of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antic, D.

    1997-01-01

    Air crews on commercial flights are not generally regarded as occupationally exposed radiation workers. The studies show that they may receive radiation doses in excess of the ICRP recommended limits for members of the public. An international approach to this problem could be enforced through IATA and other organizations in commercial air traffic. The results of the analysis for air crews of Yugoslav Airlines are used as example. (author)

  13. ESTIMATION OF WORKING CONDITIONS OF FOUNDRY WORKERS BY INFRARED (HEAT RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Lazarenkov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The description of infrared radiations, their influence on human organism is given. The results of investigation of infrared (heat radiation intensity on the workers in foundries are given.

  14. Cancer risks and low-level radiation in U.S. shipyard workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanoski, Genevieve M.; Tonascia, James A.; Correa-Villasenor, Adolfo; Yates, Katherine C.; Fink, Nancy; Elliott, Elizabeth; Sanders, Bruce; Lantry, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    The risks for four cancers, leukemia, lymphopoietic cancers (LHC), lung cancer and mesothelioma, were studied in workers from shipyards involved in nuclear powered ship overhauls. The population represented a sample of all workers based on radiation dose at study termination. The final sample included 28,000 workers with ≥5.0 mSv, 10,462 workers with <5.0 mSv and 33,353 non-nuclear workers. Nuclear workers had lower mortality rates for leukemia and LHC than United States (US) white males but higher rates of lung cancer and a significant five-fold excess of mesothelioma. Dose-dependent analyses of risks in the high exposure group indicated that for each cancer the risk increased at exposures above 10.0 mSv. An internal comparison of workers with 50.0 mSv exposures to workers with exposures of 5.0-9.9 mSv indicated relative risks for leukemia of 2.41 (95% CI: 0.5, 23.8), for LHC, 2.94 (95% CI: 1.0, 12.0), for lung cancer, 1.26 (95% CI: 0.9, 1.9) and for mesothelioma, 1.61 (95% CI: 0.4, 9.7) for the higher exposure group. Except for LHC, these risks are not significant. However, the increasing risk with increasing exposure for these cancers, some of which are known to be related to radiation, suggests that low-level protracted exposures to gamma rays may be associated with these cancers. Other agents such as asbestos, which are common to shipyard work, may play a role especially in the risk of mesothelioma. Future follow up of the population would identify bounds on radiation risks for this population for comparison with similar risks estimated from other populations. (author)

  15. Analysis of the mortality among Cogema workers monitored for external radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, C.; Hitz, M.; Samson, E.; Rogel, A.; Telle-Lamberton, M.; Tirmarche, M.; Caer, S.; Quesne, B.

    2006-01-01

    The present study follows 9287 Cogema workers exposed to low level of ionizing radiation from the beginning of employment to the end of 1994. This paper presents analyses of the mortality of Cogema workers monitored for external radiation exposure and the relation between their mortality and their cumulative external radiation dose. Workers were followed up for an average of 13 years. The percentage of subjects lost to follow up was less than 1%. during the follow-up period, 441 deaths occurred. The mean cumulative dose among the whole cohort was 19.4 mSv. As expected, the mortality of the cohort was lower than that of the French national population. The healthy worker effect is often observed in other nuclear workers studies. Part of the healthy worker effect is explained by a proportion of unemployed persons in general population, with a higher mortality rate. All causes S.M.R. increased with calendar period and duration of employment. this increase was not significant for all cancers S.M.R. by duration of employment. This could illustrate the decrease of the initial selection at employment with time. A significant increase in risk was observed for all cancers excluding leukemia mortality with increase of radiation dose in the 15-country study. Significant excess of leukemia by cumulative radiation exposure was observed in the 3-country study and was borderline significant in the 15-country study and in the UK National register for radiation workers study. A positive trend, not statistically significant, by level of external doses was observed in our study for all cancers and leukemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia mortality, but the analyses lack of statistical power. A significant trend was observed only for non-Hodgkin lymphoma death, but considering the large number of statistic tests computed, this result must be carefully interpreted. A borderline significant trend was observed for lung cancer death, a significant increase risk of lung cancer death

  16. Revision of the occupational health examination form for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chang'an; Chen Erdong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To revise the Occupational Health Examination Form for Radiation Workers, which is served as annex 3 of Management Regulations for Occupational Health Surveillance (Decree No.23 of Ministry of Health, P.R. China), so as to further improve and standardize the occupational health management for radiation workers. Methods: Based on corresponding laws, standards and general principles of occupational medicine. Results: The new version of the Form was established and passed auditing. Conclusion: The theoretical foundation, intention and methods of the revision process are briefly introduced. Requirements and necessary recommendations for implement the new Form are also described. (authors)

  17. Determination of Several Clinical Parameters of the Blood for the HealthyEvaluation of the Radiation Worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazid, M; Triyono; Aris-Bastianudin

    2000-01-01

    Determination of the several clinical parameters of the blood for healthyevaluation of the radiation worker has been done. This research was done forarrangement of the medical general check up of the radiation worker toobserve pathological indicator of several body organs. The blood sample wastaken from vena mediana cubiti and analyzed by reagent using standardprocedure from Boehringer Mainheim. That procedure is specific for eachclinical parameters. That clinical parameters concentration was measured byClinicon Photometer 4010. The clinical data of the radiation worker wascompared to the non radiation worker. The measurement results of 501patients, shown that total protein concentrations for all worker are > 8.00g%, the cholesterol concentration of 25 patient are > 260 mg%. The glucoseconcentration for fasting condition of 7 patients are > 200 mg/dl, the ureumconcentration of all patients are 7mg% and the creatinine of 112 patients are > 1.4 mg%. From those results canbe concluded that the most pathological indicator can be identified fromliver, heart and kidney function respectively. From the clinical aspects canbe seen that there is no significant difference between the health ofradiation worker and non radiation worker. (author)

  18. Hanford radiation study III: a cohort study of the cancer risks from radiation to workers at Hanford (1944-77 deaths) by the method of regression models in life-tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneale, G.W.; Stewart, A.M.; Mancuso, T.F.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented from the study initiated by Mancuso into the health risks from low-level radiation in workers engaged in plutonium manufacture at Hanford Works, Washington State, USA, and attempts to answer criticisms of previous reports by an in-depth study. Previous reports have aroused much controversy because the reported risk per unit radiation dose for cancers of radiosensitive tissues was much greater than the risk generally accepted on the basis of other studies and widely used in setting safety levels for exposure to low-level radiation. The method of regression models in life-tables isolates the effect of radiation after statistically controlling for a wide range of possible interfering factors. Like the risk of lung cancer for uranium miners the dose-response relation showed a significant downward curve at about 10 rem. There may, therefore, be better agreement with other studies, conducted at higher doses, than is widely assumed. The findings on cancer latency (of about 25 years) and the effect of exposure age (increasing age increases the risk) are in general agreement with other studies. An unexplained finding is a significantly higher dose for all workers than for workers who developed cancers in tissues that are supposed to have low sensitivity to cancer induction by radiation. (author)

  19. Genetic damages in radiation workers of radiology centers in Bushehr port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khamisipour

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Unstable genetic aberrations might provide a good marker for assessing genetic damage in populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation.The frequency of these aberrations was estimated in peripheral lymphocytes from hospital workers in Bushehr Port, occupationally exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation (54 subjects and age and sex matched controls. A total of 34 (23 males & 11 females subjects had unstable genetic aberrations (50 chromosomal-type & 31 chromatid type but only 7 subjects in control group had unstable genetic aberrations. When compared with controls, exposed workers showed a significant increase in structural chromosomal-type aberrations (p<0.001 OR=11 chromosomal exchange being the most frequent alteration. Chromatid deletion (18 cases and ring chromosome (4 cases were seen only in exposed group. There was no association between smoking status, sex, age, level of education or working years. The increased frequencies of chromosomal damage in radiation workers, indicate conducting cytogenetic analysis in parallel to physical dosimetry in the working place.

  20. Application of goal programming to decision problem on optimal allocation of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sa, Sangduk; Narita, Masakuni

    1993-01-01

    This paper is concerned with an optimal planning in a multiple objective decision-making problem of allocating radiation workers to workplaces associated with occupational exposure. The model problem is formulated with the application of goal programming which effectively followed up diverse and conflicting factors influencing the optimal decision. The formulation is based on the data simulating the typical situations encountered at the operating facilities such as nuclear power plants where exposure control is critical to the management. Multiple goals set by the decision-maker/manager who has the operational responsibilities for radiological protection are illustrated in terms of work requirements, exposure constraints of the places, desired allocation of specific personnel and so on. Test results of the model are considered to indicate that the model structure and its solution process can provide the manager with a good set of analysis of his problems in implementing the optimization review of radiation protection during normal operation. (author)

  1. Measurements of Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure at Work and at Leisure in Danish Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandahl, Kasper; Eriksen, Paul; Ibler, Kristina Sophie; Bonde, Jens Peter; Mortensen, Ole Steen

    2018-03-30

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation is the main cause of skin cancer and may well present an occupational health and safety problem. In Denmark, skin cancer is a common disease in the general population, but detailed data on solar ultraviolet radiation exposure among outdoor workers are lacking. The aim of this study was to provide objective measurements of solar ultraviolet radiation exposure on working days and at leisure and compare levels of exposure between groups of mainly outdoor, equal-parts-outdoor-and-indoor and indoor workers. To this end, UV-B dosimeters with an aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) photodiode detector were used to measure the solar ultraviolet radiation exposure of 457 workers in the Danish summer season. Presented as semi-annual standard erythemal dose (SED) on working days, respectively, at leisure, the results are for mainly outdoor workers 214.2 SED and 64.8 SED, equal-parts-outdoor-and-indoor workers 131.4 SED and 64.8 SED, indoor workers 55.8 SED and 57.6 SED. The daily SED by month is significantly different (α = 0.05) between mainly outdoor, equal-parts-outdoor-and-indoor and indoor workers and across professional groups; some of which are exposed at very high levels that is roofers 361.8 SED. These findings substantiate that exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation is indeed an occupational health and safety problem in Denmark. © 2018 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Photobiology.

  2. Cytogenetic studies in workers with chronic occupational radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grynszpan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of chromosomal aberration detection on peripheral lymphocytes blood samples from monazite industry workers was used to study the cytogenetic effect of low chronic radiation doses. Cells from 51 workers and 21 controls were analysed. Cytogenetic data from individuals from different working areas were statistically compared among themselves and with the control group. The possible correlations between chromosomal aberration frequencies and cumulative external dose and working time were investigated. The influence of smoking was also tested. The link to the wives spontaneous abortions was analysed. Our results indicate possible biological effects on this sample of workers. (author)

  3. Medical radiation workers and the risk of cancer: A retrospective follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seul Ki; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Medical radiation workers are important population to study of chronic low dose radiation exposure and the numbers are continuously increasing worldwide. We have launched a retrospective cohort for medical radiation workers to investigate their health status and to assess the association with occupational radiation exposure. In this first analysis of cancer incidence using data from national dose registry, a number of significant findings at specific cancer sites were observed. Further investigation is needed to assess the association with observed cancer risk and occupational radiation exposure. In this first analysis of cancer incidence using data from national dose registry, a number of significant findings at specific cancer sites were observed.

  4. [Occupational risk related to optical radiation exposure in construction workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobba, F; Modenese, A

    2012-01-01

    Optical Radiation is a relevant occupational risk in construction workers, mainly as a consequence of the exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) component of solar radiation (SR). Available data show that UV occupational limits are frequently exceeded in these workers, resulting in an increased occupational risk of various acute and chronic effects, mainly to skin and to the eye. One of the foremost is the carcinogenic effect: SR is indeed included in Group 1 IARC (carcinogenic to humans). UV exposure is related to an increase of the incidence of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma of the skin and cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). The incidence of these tumors, especially CMM, is constantly increasing in Caucasians in the last 50 years. As a conclusion, an adequate evaluation of the occupational risk related to SR, and adequate preventive measures are essential in construction workers. The role of occupational physicians in prevention is fundamental.

  5. The monetary value of the man-mSv for Korean NPP radiation workers assessed by the radiation aversion factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. I.; Suh, D. H.; Kim, S. I.; Jeong, M. S.; Lim, Y. K.

    2008-01-01

    The monetary value of the man-mSv for operators of Korean nuclear power plants (NPPs) was calculated using a radiation aversion factor based on a survey of NPP workers. Initially, the life expectancy in the population is 79.4 y, the average age of cancer occurrence is 60 y, the average annual wage for an electric worker is 56 000 $ y -1 and the nominal risk coefficient induced by radiation is 4.2 E-5 mSv were used to evaluate the basic monetary value (α base) resulting in 45.6 $ mSv -1 . To investigate the degree of radiation aversion, the subject of the investigation was selected as the working radiation workers in 10 NPPs in Korea (Kori 1-2, Yeonggwang 1-3, Ulchin 1-3 and Wolseong 1-2). In August 2010, with the cooperation of KHNP and partner companies, a total of 2500 survey questionnaires to 10 NPPs (or 250 surveys to each NPP) were distributed to currently employed radiation workers. From these, 2157 responses were obtained between August and October 2010. The assessed radiation aversion factor and the monetary value of the man-mSv from the calculated radiation aversion factor were 1.26 and ∼50 $ in the 0-1 mSv range, 1.38 and ∼200 $ in the 1-5 mSv range, 1.52 and ∼1000 $ in the 5-10 mSv range, 1.65 and ∼4000 $ in the 10-20 mSv range and 1.74 and ∼8500 $ >20 mSv. (authors)

  6. Proposal to integrate the service on radiation hygiene at the primary health care services for workers exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frometa Suarez, Ileana; Lopez Pumar, Georgina; Gonzalez Amil, Melva

    1998-01-01

    The National Health System implemented in the last few years a new pattern of primary attention for workers by creating doctors offices in work centers. At the same time, the Ministry of Public Health (MINSAP) carries the medical surveillance of the staff exposed to ionizing radiation. This work proposes a program to integrate the consulting room on radiation hygiene to primary health care services for workers that work with ionizing radiation sources, aiming to ameliorate and improve them

  7. Occupational radiation exposure monitoring among radiation workers in Nepal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, Chhavi Raj; Shrestha, Shanta Lall; Khanal, Tara; Ween, Borgny

    2008-01-01

    Nepal was accepted as a member of the IAEA in 2007. Nepal is one of the world's least developed countries and is defined in Health Level IV. The population counted 26.4 millions in 2007. The health care sector increases with new hospitals and clinics, however, Nepal has no radiation protection authority or radiation protection regulation in the country until now. The radiation producing equipment in the health sector includes conventional X-ray and dental X-ray equipment, fluoroscopes, mammography, CT, catheterization laboratory equipment, nuclear medicine facilities, a few linear accelerators, Co 60 teletherapy and High Dose Rate brachytherapy sources. The situation regarding dosimetry service for radiation workers is unclear. A survey has been carried out to give an overview of the situation. The data collection of the survey was performed by phone call interviews with responsible staff at the different hospitals and clinics. Data about different occupationally exposed staff, use of personal radiation monitoring and type of dosimetry system were collected. In addition, it was asked if dosimetry reports were compiled in files or databases for further follow-up of staff, if needed. The survey shows that less of 25% of the procedures performed on the surveyed hospitals and clinics are performed by staff with personnel radiation monitoring. Radiation monitoring service for exposed staff is not compulsory or standardized, since there is no radiation protection authority. Nepal has taken a step forward regarding radiation protection, with the IAEA membership, although there are still major problems that have to be solved. An evaluation of the existing practice of staff dosimetry can be the first helpful step for further work in building a national radiation protection authority. (author)

  8. Radiation Protection Of Outside Workers: Implementation Of The EC Council Directive 90/641/EURATOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannsens, A.; Schnuer, K.; Naegele, J.; Lefaure, C.; Vaillant, L.

    2006-01-01

    In the beginning of the 1980's, the problem of radiological protection of workers belonging to contracted companies (undertakings) within nuclear facilities was raised. In most of the nuclear facilities, the so-called outside workers received 80% (and even more) of the collective dose, and quite often higher individual doses than workers permanently employed by the nuclear operators. Since the outside workers radiation protection issue was not explicitly taken into account by the 1980 European Basic Safety Standards Directive, there was a need for an additional piece of European radiation protection legislation. In this context, the European Union adopted in 1990 the Council Directive 90/641/EURATOM on the radiological protection of outside workers. This Directive shall ensure at European Union level that the radiological protection situation for the outside workers is equivalent to that offered to those workers permanently employed by the operators of nuclear facilities. Since the adoption of the Directive in 1990 the geographical situation of the European Union has changed significantly. At the same time, an evolution took place in the industrial structures of the nuclear industry followed by changes of employment conditions. Furthermore, new European radiation protection requirements were issued considering scientific and technical developments in the radiological protection field and laid down in the new radiation Protection Basic Safety Standards Directive 96/29/EURATOM. Taking into account these aspects the Radiation Protection Unit of the European Commission Directorate General for Energy and Transport decided to investigate the current situation and the future status of the Outside Workers Directive 90/641/EURATOM. The European Commission Radiation Protection Unit thus awarded the CEPN with a contract in order to evaluate through a survey the level of regulatory, administrative and operational implementation of Directive 90/641/EURATOM into Member States

  9. Radiation Protection Of Outside Workers: Implementation Of The EC Council Directive 90/641/EURATOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannsens, A.; Schnuer, K.; Naegele, J. [European Commission, DG Energy and Transport B. EUROFORUM, 4455, L-2920 (Luxembourg); Lefaure, C.; Vaillant, L. [Nuclear Protection Evaluation Centre (CEPN) Batiment Expansion 10000, 28 rue de la Redoute, 92263 Fontenay-aux- Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    In the beginning of the 1980's, the problem of radiological protection of workers belonging to contracted companies (undertakings) within nuclear facilities was raised. In most of the nuclear facilities, the so-called outside workers received 80% (and even more) of the collective dose, and quite often higher individual doses than workers permanently employed by the nuclear operators. Since the outside workers radiation protection issue was not explicitly taken into account by the 1980 European Basic Safety Standards Directive, there was a need for an additional piece of European radiation protection legislation. In this context, the European Union adopted in 1990 the Council Directive 90/641/EURATOM on the radiological protection of outside workers. This Directive shall ensure at European Union level that the radiological protection situation for the outside workers is equivalent to that offered to those workers permanently employed by the operators of nuclear facilities. Since the adoption of the Directive in 1990 the geographical situation of the European Union has changed significantly. At the same time, an evolution took place in the industrial structures of the nuclear industry followed by changes of employment conditions. Furthermore, new European radiation protection requirements were issued considering scientific and technical developments in the radiological protection field and laid down in the new radiation Protection Basic Safety Standards Directive 96/29/EURATOM. Taking into account these aspects the Radiation Protection Unit of the European Commission Directorate General for Energy and Transport decided to investigate the current situation and the future status of the Outside Workers Directive 90/641/EURATOM. The European Commission Radiation Protection Unit thus awarded the CEPN with a contract in order to evaluate through a survey the level of regulatory, administrative and operational implementation of Directive 90/641/EURATOM into Member

  10. An analysis of the awareness and performance of radiation workers' radiation/radioactivity protection in medical institutions : Focused on Busan regional medical institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Koo [Dept. of Radiological Science, Graduate School of Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Chul Hwan [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate safety management awareness and behavioral investigation of radiation/radioactivity performance defenses of radiation workers' in medical institutions. Data collection consisted of 267 radiation workers working in medical institutions using structured questionnaires. As a result, it was analyzed that radiation safety management awareness and performance were high in 40s, 50s group and higher education group. The analysis according to the radiation safety management knowledge was analyzed that the 'Know very well' group had higher scores on awareness and performance scores. The analysis according to the degree of safety management effort showed the high awareness scale and the performance scale in the group 'Receiving various education or studying the safety management contents through book'. The correlations between the sub-factors showed the highest positive correlation between perceived practician and personal perspective and perceived by patient and patient's caretaker perspective. Therefore, radiation safety management for workers, patients, and patient's caretaker should be conducted through continuous education of radiation safety management through various routes of radiation workers working at medical institutions.

  11. Assessing the health effects associated with occupational radiation exposure in Korean radiation workers: protocol for a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Songwon; Lim, Wan Young; Lee, Dal Nim; Kim, Jung Un; Cha, Eun Shil; Bang, Ye Jin; Lee, Won Jin; Park, Sunhoo; Jin, Young Woo

    2018-03-30

    The cancer risk of radiation exposure in the moderate-to-high dose range has been well established. However, the risk remains unclear at low-dose ranges with protracted low-dose rate exposure, which is typical of occupational exposure. Several epidemiological studies of Korean radiation workers have been conducted, but the data were analysed retrospectively in most cases. Moreover, groups with relatively high exposure, such as industrial radiographers, have been neglected. Therefore, we have launched a prospective cohort study of all Korean radiation workers to assess the health effects associated with occupational radiation exposure. Approximately 42 000 Korean radiation workers registered with the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission from 2016 to 2017 are the initial target population of this study. Cohort participants are to be enrolled through a nationwide self-administered questionnaire survey between 24 May 2016 and 30 June 2017. As of 31 March 2017, 22 982 workers are enrolled in the study corresponding to a response rate of 75%. This enrolment will be continued at 5-year intervals to update information on existing study participants and recruit newly hired workers. Survey data will be linked with the national dose registry, the national cancer registry, the national vital statistics registry and national health insurance data via personal identification numbers. Age-specific and sex-specific standardised incidence and mortality ratios will be calculated for overall comparisons of cancer risk. For dose-response assessment, excess relative risk (per Gy) and excess absolute risk (per Gy) will be estimated with adjustments for birth year and potential confounders, such as lifestyle factors and socioeconomic status. This study has received ethical approval from the institutional review board of the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (IRB No. K-1603-002-034). All participants provided written informed consent prior to enrolment. The findings

  12. Cytogenetic monitoring of hospital workers exposed to low-level ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigatti, P.; Lamberti, L.; Ardito, G.; Armellino, F.

    1988-01-01

    In the present study the cytogenetic effects in hospital workers exposed to low-level radiation were evaluated. Samples of peripheral blood were collected from 63 subjects working in radiodiagnostics and from 30 subjects, working in the same hospitals, who were used as controls. A higher number of cells with chromosome-type aberrations (CA) was observed in the exposed workers vs. the controls and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). No correlation was, on the contrary, found between CA and years of exposure. A significant difference was observed in the incidence of cells with CA between smokers and non-smokers, but in the control group only. In contrast, in the workers exposed to ionizing radiation, the frequency of cells with CA was very similar in smokers and non-smokers. 13 refs.; 4 tabs

  13. Radiation dose to workers due to the inhalation of dust during granite fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwack, L M; Stewart, J H; McCarthy, J F; Allen, J G; McCarthy, W B

    2014-01-01

    There has been very little research conducted to determine internal radiation doses resulting from worker exposure to ionising radiation in granite fabrication shops. To address this issue, we estimated the effective radiation dose of granite workers in US fabrication shops who were exposed to the maximum respirable dust and silica concentrations allowed under current US regulations, and also to concentrations reported in the literature. Radiation doses were calculated using standard methods developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The calculated internal doses were very low, and below both US occupational standards (50 mSv yr −1 ) and limits applicable to the general public (1 mSv yr −1 ). Workers exposed to respirable granite dust concentrations at the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) respirable dust permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 5 mg m −3 over a full year had an estimated radiation dose of 0.062 mSv yr −1 . Workers exposed to respirable granite dust concentrations at the OSHA silica PEL and at the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Value for a full year had expected radiation doses of 0.007 mSv yr −1 and 0.002 mSv yr −1 , respectively. Using data from studies of respirable granite dust and silica concentrations measured in granite fabrication shops, we calculated median expected radiation doses that ranged from <0.001 to 0.101 mSv yr −1 . (paper)

  14. Radioactivity and dangerous radiation: safety and worker protection. 1. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Termizi Ramli

    1988-01-01

    This book discussed the aspects of radiological protection for radiation workers and working place in details. It covered all aspect in this subject, from the basic information of radiations which is dangerous for whom did not know much about it, to specific recommendations and procedures in order to work safely with it

  15. Analysis of questionnaires carried out on the annual education and training course for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroi, Tomoko; Tatsunami, Shinobu; Kuwabara, Rie; Masuda, Youko; Kouyama, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hiroaki

    2005-01-01

    Questionnaires relating to the usage of hand-foot-clothes radiation monitor and the safety handling of wastes were carried out in the education and training course for radiation workers in 2003 and 2004, in the Institute of Radioisotope Research, Graduate School of Medicine, St. Marianna University. Responses from 77 workers were analyzed. The pattern of the frequency of questionnaire of the hand-foot-clothes radiation monitor usage was almost identical between men and women and between workers in two different radiation-controlled areas. However, there was a statistically significant difference (p<0.01, by the chi-square test) between the two groups of workers; that is, workers who either used radioisotopes or not. Similarly, different patterns in right/wrong responses for the handling of radioactive and non-radioactive wastes were observed between these two groups by the method of quantification 3. Therefore, it is suggested that there is a noticeable difference in the behavior between the two groups. We will take into consideration about these two groups in the future education and training courses. (author)

  16. U.S. Department of Energy Workers' mental models of radiation and chemical hazards in the workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadrel, M.J.; Blanchard, K.A.; Lundgren, R.E.; McMakin, A.H.; Mosley, M.T.; Strom, D.J.

    1994-05-01

    A pilot study was performed to test the mental models methodology regarding knowledge and perceptions of U.S. Department of Energy contractor radiation workers about ionizing radiation and hazardous chemicals. The mental models methodology establishes a target population's beliefs about risks and compares them with current scientific knowledge. The ultimate intent is to develop risk communication guidelines that address information gaps or misperceptions that could affect decisions and behavior. In this study, 15 radiation workers from the Hanford Site in Washington State were interviewed about radiation exposure processes and effects. Their beliefs were mapped onto a science model of the same topics to see where differences occurred. In general, workers' mental models covered many of the high-level parts of the science model but did not have the same level of detail. The following concepts appeared to be well understood by most interviewees: types, form, and properties of workplace radiation; administrative and physical controls to reduce radiation exposure risk; and the relationship of dose and effects. However, several concepts were rarely mentioned by most interviewees, indicating potential gaps in worker understanding. Most workers did not discuss the wide range of measures for neutralizing or decontaminating individuals following internal contamination. Few noted specific ways of measuring dose or factors that affect dose. Few mentioned the range of possible effects, including genetic effects, birth defects, or high dose effects. Variables that influence potential effects were rarely discussed. Workers rarely mentioned how basic radiation principles influenced the source, type, or mitigation of radiation risk in the workplace

  17. Radiobiological basis for setting neutron radiation safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, T.

    1985-01-01

    Present neutron standards, adopted more than 20 yr ago from a weak radiobiological data base, have been in doubt for a number of years and are currently under challenge. Moreover, recent dosimetric re-evaluations indicate that Hiroshima neutron doses may have been much lower than previously thought, suggesting that direct data for neutron-induced cancer in humans may in fact not be available. These recent developments make it urgent to determine the extent to which neutron cancer risk in man can be estimated from data that are available. Two approaches are proposed here that are anchored in particularly robust epidemiological and experimental data and appear most likely to provide reliable estimates of neutron cancer risk in man. The first approach uses gamma-ray dose-response relationships for human carcinogenesis, available from Nagasaki (Hiroshima data are also considered), together with highly characterized neutron and gamma-ray data for human cytogenetics. When tested against relevant experimental data, this approach either adequately predicts or somewhat overestimates neutron tumorigenesis (and mutagenesis) in animals. The second approach also uses the Nagasaki gamma-ray cancer data, but together with neutron RBEs from animal tumorigenesis studies. Both approaches give similar results and provide a basis for setting neutron radiation safety standards. They appear to be an improvement over previous approaches, including those that rely on highly uncertain maximum neutron RBEs and unnecessary extrapolations of gamma-ray data to very low doses. Results suggest that, at the presently accepted neutron dose limit of 0.5 rad/yr, the cancer mortality risk to radiation workers is not very different from accidental mortality risks to workers in various nonradiation occupations

  18. The capability set for work - correlates of sustainable employability in workers with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gorp, D A M; van der Klink, J J L; Abma, F I; Jongen, P J; van Lieshout, I; Arnoldus, E P J; Beenakker, E A C; Bos, H M; van Eijk, J J J; Fermont, J; Frequin, S T F M; de Gans, K; Hengstman, G J D; Hupperts, R M M; Mostert, J P; Pop, P H M; Verhagen, W I M; Zemel, D; Heerings, M A P; Reneman, M F; Middelkoop, H A M; Visser, L H; van der Hiele, K

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether work capabilities differ between workers with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and workers from the general population. The second aim was to investigate whether the capability set was related to work and health outcomes. A total of 163 workers with MS from the MS@Work study and 163 workers from the general population were matched for gender, age, educational level and working hours. All participants completed online questionnaires on demographics, health and work functioning. The Capability Set for Work Questionnaire was used to explore whether a set of seven work values is considered valuable (A), is enabled in the work context (B), and can be achieved by the individual (C). When all three criteria are met a work value can be considered part of the individual's 'capability set'. Group differences and relationships with work and health outcomes were examined. Despite lower physical work functioning (U = 4250, p = 0.001), lower work ability (U = 10591, p = 0.006) and worse self-reported health (U = 9091, p ≤ 0.001) workers with MS had a larger capability set (U = 9649, p ≤ 0.001) than the general population. In workers with MS, a larger capability set was associated with better flexible work functioning (r = 0.30), work ability (r = 0.25), self-rated health (r = 0.25); and with less absenteeism (r = - 0.26), presenteeism (r = - 0.31), cognitive/neuropsychiatric impairment (r = - 0.35), depression (r = - 0.43), anxiety (r = - 0.31) and fatigue (r = - 0.34). Workers with MS have a larger capability set than workers from the general population. In workers with MS a larger capability set was associated with better work and health outcomes. This observational study is registered under NL43098.008.12: 'Voorspellers van arbeidsparticipatie bij mensen met relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerose'. The study is registered at the Dutch CCMO register ( https

  19. Radiation Dose Contribution To The Worker Health Level At Serpong Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuwono, Indro

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of internal and external radiation doses received for radiation and non-radiation workers of P2TBDU have been done. In the period of 1997/1998 and 1998/1999 there were no significant increasing level of radiation doses received that was 0.55 mSv and highest received radiation dose was 2.66% from dose limit value. Increasing of healthy difference on the same period was 5.76%. Increasing of healthy difference no cause by increasing of radiation dose received but maybe the food consumption design

  20. Surveillance of health care workers exposed to ionising radiation: Rimed pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The project so-called RIMED aimed to set up epidemiological surveillance of health care workers exposed to ionizing radiation. A pilot study was conducted in a sample of hospital personnel to examine the possibility of identifying exposed subjects in order to analyse mortality patterns according to occupational characteristics such as medical departments or occupations in a historical cohort. Seven hospitals participated in this pilot study. Health-care workers who had worn a dosimeter up to December 2003 were to be included in this cohort. The subjects' identification data were obtained from the SISERI (Systeme d'information de la surveillance de l'exposition aux rayonnements ionisants - Ionizing Radiation Exposure Monitoring Information System) database managed by the Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire - Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Institute (IRSN). The SISERI system was in a 'pilot' phase in 2004. According to SISERI database, a total of 5126 subjects were found to have worn a dosimeter up to December 2003. The subjects' identification data were completed by the administrative services of the hospitals and occupational physicians searched for subjects' occupational data. Information required for the vital status search was satisfactorily completed only for 38% of the cohort subjects. This pilot study showed that obtaining data from SISERI database completed by hospital administrative data in 2004 led to a database of insufficient quality for epidemiological surveillance. The Institut de veille sanitaire (French Institute of Public Health Surveillance) recommends that transmission by the employers of some specific personal or occupational data of the exposed subjects should be made compulsory. In this way, SISERI system should be able to constitute any database with required quality for epidemiological surveillance of ionizing radiation exposed subjects. (authors)

  1. Epidemiological studies of radiation workers in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Satoshi; Semba, Tsuyoshi; Ishida, Kenji; Takagi, Syunji; Igari, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    Regarding workers at nuclear facilities, this paper described INWORKS epidemiological research published in 2015, cooperative cohort epidemiological research of IARC 15 countries 10 years before that (15-country study), and the flow of radiation epidemiological research in the period from 15-country study to INWORKS. INWORKS is a retrospective cohort study to investigate the correlation between mortality due to solid cancer, blood cancer, and cardiovascular diseases in workers in three countries of France / the U.K. / the U.S. and low dose exposure through long-term photon external exposure. It obtained the data showing the statistical significance of increased cancer death rate. However, from the subjects of the analysis, no significant evaluation was made on neutron exposure and internal exposure. Statistically significant cancer mortality was confirmed in 15-country study at low dose, low dose rate, and prolonged exposure, but significant cancer mortality rate could not be confirmed excluding Canadian data, which had problems in dose evaluation. In the epidemiological studies of cancer mortality rates of radiation workers in nuclear power industries performed in France / the U.K. / the U.S. in the period ranging from 15-country study to INWORKS, significant difference was not recognized between cancer death rate and excessive relative risk (ERR) compared with LSS epidemiological research studies that handled acute exposure. Several tasks are still remaining. (A.O.)

  2. A review of cancer mortality data of radiation workers of Nuclear Power Plant, Paks, Hungary, in the light the international radiation epidemiology study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turai, I.; Kerekes, A.; Otos, M.; Veress, K.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: To give a review of cancer mortality data among Hungarian radiation workers in nuclear industry in comparison with the results of the international nuclear workers' study prevailing the size of the study group of all former studies. Methods: Retrospective cohort study including 598,068 workers of 154 nuclear establishments in 15 countries (AUS, BEL, CAN, FIN, FRA, GER, HUN, JAP, LIT, ROK, SLK, SPA, SWE, UK, USA) coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC, Lyon, France). The national study was extended for an additional 4-year period. Results: In the international study 407,391 persons in 13 years of average employment received 19.4 mSv mean cumulative dose, while in the national study 3322 radiation workers of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Paks, Hungary, in 14 years of follow-up period accumulated in average 5.13 mSv, only. There were 5233 cancer deaths registered in the international study, associated with an estimated ERR of 0.97 per Sv. Thus, 19.4 mSv recorded cumulative dose can explain 1 to 2% of cancer death cases. In radiation workers of NPP, Paks, during the period of 1985-1998 there were 40 cancer deaths observed against the expected 58.8 cases. In a further four year period (1999-2002) 29 cancer death cases were identified vs. the expected 65.5 cases. The SMR for the cancer death cases registered in recent and former radiation workers of NPP, Paks in the 18-year follow-up period is 56%. The SMR from all causes was even lower, 40% only. Conclusions: In the international study the mean accumulated radiation dose received by nuclear workers in 13 years is below of the recent annual dose limit (20 mSv/yr of the effective dose). The average value for the whole of radiation workers in 15 countries is almost 4-times higher of that registered in Hungary. The 'healthy worker effect' in the nuclear industry, and particularly in Hungary has been proven, once again. Nevertheless, the results

  3. Workers radiation protection. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiations in France: 2015 results. 2016 Mission report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    National results of the individual monitoring of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation are reported for all civilian and military activities subject to authorization or declaration (i.e. medical and veterinary activities, nuclear industry, defence, non-nuclear industry and research), as well as for activities concerned by the enhanced exposure to natural radiation. 365 830 workers within activities subject to authorization or declaration were monitored by passive dosimetry in 2015, which represents an increase by 1.7 % compared to 2014. The average individual dose in 2015 was very close to the value in 2014. Furthermore, 14 138 workers received more than 1 mSv (i.e. the legal dose limit for the public), and 2 606 workers received more than 5 mSv. 2 workers received more than 20 mSv (i.e. the dose limit for the workers in the French regulation). As a result, the collective dose increased from 56.3 to 61.9 man.Sv (10 %), thus reaching the same level as in the years 2009 to 2013. Important differences are noticed according to the occupational activities: the average dose in the medical and veterinary field (which represents 62.4 % of the monitored workers) and that in the research field (3.6 % of the monitored workers) are less than 0.4 mSv; the average doses are higher in the nuclear field and in the non-nuclear industry (representing together 30.1 % of the monitored workers), respectively 1.17 mSv and 1.38 mSv. Concerning internal dosimetry, 279 877 individual examinations have been performed in 2015, 52 % of which are radio-toxicological analysis of excreta and 48 % are direct body counting. In 2015, 2 workers had a committed effective dose greater than or equal to 1 mSv and the maximum dose was 3 mSv. Data or trends relative to workers exposed to natural radioactivity are also dealt with in this report (air crews, personnel subjected to radon exposure). In particular, results of aircrew dosimetry are reported: in 2015, the average individual dose of 19 565

  4. Data linkage of inpatient hospitalization and workers' claims data sets to characterize occupational falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Terry L; Slavova, Svetla; Bathke, Arne

    2007-07-01

    The identification of industry, occupation, and associated injury costs for worker falls in Kentucky have not been fully examined. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations between industry and occupation and 1) hospitalization length of stay; 2) hospitalization charges; and 3) workers' claims costs in workers suffering falls, using linked inpatient hospitalization discharge and workers' claims data sets. Hospitalization cases were selected with ICD-9-CM external cause of injury codes for falls and payer code of workers' claims for years 2000-2004. Selection criteria for workers'claims cases were International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions Electronic Data Interchange Nature (IAIABCEDIN) injuries coded as falls and/or slips. Common data variables between the two data sets such as date of birth, gender, date of injury, and hospital admission date were used to perform probabilistic data linkage using LinkSolv software. Statistical analysis was performed with non-parametric tests. Construction falls were the most prevalent for male workers and incurred the highest hospitalization and workers' compensation costs, whereas most female worker falls occurred in the services industry. The largest percentage of male worker falls was from one level to another, while the largest percentage of females experienced a fall, slip, or trip (not otherwise classified). When male construction worker falls were further analyzed, laborers and helpers had longer hospital stays as well as higher total charges when the worker fell from one level to another. Data linkage of hospitalization and workers' claims falls data provides additional information on industry, occupation, and costs that are not available when examining either data set alone.

  5. Personal radiation monitoring and assessment of doses received by radiation workers (1991)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, N.D.

    1992-06-01

    The Australian Radiation Laboratory has operated a Personal Radiation Monitoring Service since the early 1930's so that people working with radiation can determine the radiation doses that they receive due to their occupation. Since late 1986, all persons monitored by the Service have been registered on a data base which maintains records of the doses received by each individual wearer. Ultimately, this data base will become a National Register of the doses received within Australia. At present, the Service regularly monitors approximately 20,000 persons, which is roughly 70 percent of those monitored in Australia, and maintains dose histories of over 35,000 people. The skin dose for occupationally exposed workers can be measured by using one of the four types of monitor issued by the Service: 1. Thermoluminescent Dosemeter (TLD monitor) 2. Finger TLD 3. Neutron Monitor 4. Special TLD. The technical description of the monitors is provided along with the method for calculating the radiation dose. 5 refs., 7 tabs., 4 figs

  6. Risks associated with low level ionizing radiation (with special reference to nuclear power workers)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This document describes a project to use epidemiological studies of workers in the nuclear industry to estimate the cancer risk associated with low-dose chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. The project aims both to improve the basis for radiation risk assessment and to test the validity of currently used models for the extrapolation of radiation risk. This report focusses on the former aim, and summarizes discussions at two meetings held in June 1988. One of these was a small working group consisting mainly of epidemiologists who had carried out studies of nuclear workers; the other included nominees of the nuclear industries of eleven countries as well as epidemiologists and radiation physicists and biologists. As a result of the meetings, efforts are underway to pool existing data and a feasibility study is addressing the possibility of an international collaborative study of unstudied groups of nuclear workers

  7. Statutory Instruments No 144 of 1994. European Communities (Protection of outside workers from ionising radiation) Regulations, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    These Regulations implement Council Directive 90/641 EURATOM of 4 December, 1990 on the operational protection of outside workers exposed to the risk of ionising radiation during their activities in controlled areas. The Regulations provide for the radiation protection of workers liable to receive an exposure of high radiation levels while working away from their employers' premises. The Regulations also apply to workers who come from, or who go to work in, another Member State of the European Community

  8. The uniform application of ALARA to all radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomroy, C.

    1988-05-01

    New information on the dosimetry and epidemiology of atomic bomb survivors suggests that risk estimates may have to be revised upwards. This has focussed increased attention on the ALARA principle. The ICRP believes that ALARA principle is the driving force in keeping average radiation doses low. In practice, the optimization process required for ALARA varies between different sectors of the nuclear industry. For instance, the power utilities have developed procedures for comparing different dose reduction options. Similarly, uranium mine operators have applied optimization techniques to questions concerning ventilation and shielding of ore trucks. Missing from this list however, is the use of a formal optimizing technique in medical and research uses of radioactivity or radiation. Nonetheless, average annual doses to these workers are quite low. An alternative approach to optimization calculation has been suggested, entailing the identification of sub-groups of workers with substantially higher doses to discover the reasons for the higher doses, and to develop means to reduce them to the overall average. Thus maintenance mechanics in nuclear reactors, by the very nature of their jobs, have more potential for higher dose. The utilities are developing procedures to reduce the maintenance mechanics' doses. If the same analysis is applied to medical workers, it is seen that isotope technicians and therapeutic radiology technicians have average doses well above the overall average. The feasibility of some form of optimization process for these categories of workers is discussed

  9. VI Congress of Spanish Radiation Protection Society, Cordoba, 24-27 Set 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This special issue of the journal Radioprotection compiles the sessions of VI Congress of Spanish Radiation Protection Society. The sessions were: 1.- Radiation protection and the environment. 2.- Radiation protection of the workers. 3.- Natural radiation. 4.- Biological effects of the radiations. 5.- Radiation protection of patients. 6.- Dosimetry. 7.- Quality control. 8.- Training on radiation protection. 9.- Legislation. (Author)

  10. Assessment of DNA damage in radiation workers by using single cell gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Lili; Zhang Tao; Yang Yonghua; Wang Yan; Du Liqing; Cao Jia; Wang Hong; Liu Qiang; Fan Feiyue

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the DNA damage of radiation workers in different grade hospitals, and to explore the correlation between the types of work or work time and the levels of DNA damage. Methods: DNA single strand break were detected by using alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE), and the comet was analyzed with CASP (Comet Assay Software Project). TDNA%, TL, TM and OTM were calculated. Results: The parameters of SCGE in the radiation group were higher than those of control group (F=3.93, P<0.01). The significant difference was found not only among the different types of work or different work time, but also among the different grade hospitals (F=1.83, 1.91, P<0.05). Conclusions: Various levels of DNA damage could be detected in the radiation workers of the two hospitals. DNA damage of radiation workers is less serious in the higher-grade hospital than the lower grade one. Different types of work or work time might affect the DNA damage level. (authors)

  11. Occupational radiation exposure and mortality: second analysis of the National Registry for Radiation Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muirhead, C.R.; Goodill, A.A.; Haylock, R.G.E.; Vokes, J.; Little, M.P.; Jackson, D.A.; O'Hagan, J.A.; Thomas, J.M.; Kendall, G.M.; Silk, T.J.; Bingham, D.; Berridge, G.L.C.

    1999-01-01

    The National Registry for Radiation Workers (NRRW) is the largest epidemiological study of UK radiation workers. Following the first analysis published in 1992, a second analysis has been conducted using an enlarged cohort of 124 743 workers, updated dosimetry and personal data for some workers, and a longer follow-up. Overall levels of mortality were found to be less than those expected from national rates; the standardised mortality ratio for all causes was 82, increasing to 89 after adjusting for social class. This 'healthy worker effect' was particularly strong for lung cancer and for some smoking-related non-malignant diseases. Analysis of potential radiation effects involved testing for any trend in mortality risk with external dose, after adjusting for likely confounding factors. For leukaemia, excluding chronic lymphatic leukaemia (CLL), the central estimate of excess relative risk (ERR) per Sv was similar to that estimated for the Japanese atomic bomb survivors at low doses (without the incorporation of a dose-rate correction factor); the corresponding 90% confidence limits for this trend were tighter than in the first analysis, ranging from just under four times the risk estimated at low doses from the Japanese atomic bomb survivors to about zero. For the grouping of all malignancies other than leukaemia, the central estimate of the trend in risk with dose was closer to zero than in the first analysis; also, the 90% confidence limits were tighter than before and included zero. Since results for lung cancer and non-malignant smoking-related diseases suggested the possibility of confounding by smoking, an examination was made, as in the first analysis, of all malignancies other than leukaemia and lung cancer. In this instance the central estimate of the ERR per Sv was similar to that from the A-bomb data (without the incorporation of a dose-rate correction factor), with a 90% confidence interval ranging from about four times the A-bomb value to less than

  12. Selected methodological aspects of routine medical supervision of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettmann, W.

    1981-01-01

    Examinations of the blood, skin, chromosomes, eyes and lungs provide an important means for detecting biological radiation effects in occupationally exposed workers. The diagnostic value of these five methods is discussed. (author)

  13. Chromosome aberrations in workers with exposure to α-particle radiation from internal deposits of plutonium: expectations from in vitro studies and comparisons with workers with predominantly external γ-radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curwen, Gillian B.; Tawn, E.J. [The University of Manchester, Centre for Integrated Genomic Medical Research (CIGMR), School of Population Health, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sotnik, Natalia V.; Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region 456780 (Russian Federation); Cadwell, Kevin K. [Medical School, Newcastle University, Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Hill, Mark A. [University of Oxford, CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    mFISH analysis of chromosome aberration profiles of 47 and 144 h lymphocyte cultures following exposure to 193 mGy α-particle radiation confirmed that the frequency of stable aberrant cells and stable cells carrying translocations remains constant through repeated cell divisions. Age-specific rates and in vitro dose-response curves were used to derive expected translocation yields in nine workers from the Mayak nuclear facility in Russia. Five had external exposure to γ-radiation, two of whom also had exposure to neutrons, and four had external exposure to γ-radiation and internal exposure to α-particle radiation from incorporated plutonium. Doubts over the appropriateness of the dose response used to estimate translocations from the neutron component made interpretation difficult in two of the workers with external exposure, but the other three had translocation yields broadly in line with expectations. Three of the four plutonium workers had translocation yields in line with expectations, thus supporting the application of the recently derived in vitro α-particle dose response for translocations in stable cells. Overall this report demonstrates that with adequate reference in vitro dose-response curves, translocation yield has the potential to be a useful tool in the validation of red bone marrow doses resulting from mixed exposure to external and internal radiation. (orig.)

  14. The comparison of health status between male and female medical radiation workers in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Guochao; Tian, Youjia; Zhang, Fengmei; Feng, Zhihui; Chen, Qianshu; Qu, Jianying; Lim, David

    2017-01-01

    To assess the health statue of chronically exposed Chinese medical radiation workers. A cross-sectional study of 530 medical radiation workers in a city of China was conducted to document the health status and the monitored annually absorbed doses. Long-term and low-dose radiation exposure can affect a number of health indicators in the individuals, which covered the cardiovascular system, hematologic system, ophthalmology, liver and kidney s functions, chromosome aberration and micronucleus. The differences in the health status between male and female individuals were associated with job types and exposed years of service. The monitored doses of individuals were lower than the limit value of the national standard. The health status in chronically exposed individuals demonstrated some gender difference associated with length of exposure and work type. This study provides some evidence to understand the health status of medical radiation workers in China and have the potentially to inform screening and clinical diagnosis. (authors)

  15. Updated mortality analysis of radiation workers at Rocketdyne (Atomics International), 1948-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boice, John; Cohen, Sarah; Mumma, Michael; Ellis, Elizabeth D.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Boecker, Bruce; Brill, Bertrand; Henderson, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Updated analyses of mortality data are presented on 5,801 radiation workers, including 2,232 monitored for radionuclide intakes, and 41,169 non-radiation workers employed 1948-1999 at Rocketdyne (Atomics International). The worker population is unique in that lifetime occupational doses from all places of employment were sought and incorporated into the analyses. Further, radiation doses from intakes of 14 different radionuclides were calculated for 16 organs or tissues using biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). The mean dose from external radiation was 13.5 mSv (maximum 1 Sv), and the mean lung dose from external and internal radiation combined was 19.0 mSv (maximum 3.6 Sv). An additional nine years of follow-up, from December 31,1999 through 2008, increased the person-years of observation by 21.7% to 196,674 (mean 33.9 years) and the number of cancer deaths by 50% to 684. Analyses included comparisons with the general population and the computation of standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), and internal comparisons using proportional hazards models. All cancers taken together (SMR 0.88; 95% CI 0.81-0.95), lung cancer (SMR 0.87; 95% CI 0.76-1.00) and leukemia other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (SMR 1.04; 95% 0.67-1.53) were not significantly elevated. Cox regression analyses revealed no significant dose-response trends for any cancer. For all cancers excluding leukemia, the relative risk (RR) at 100 mSv was estimated as 0.98 (95% CI 0.82-1.17) and for all leukemia other than CLL it was 1.06 (95% CI 0.50-2.23). Uranium was the primary radionuclide contributing to internal exposures, but significant increases in lung and kidney disease were not seen. The extended follow-up re-enforces the findings in the previous study in failing to observe a detectable increase in cancer deaths associated with radiation, but strong conclusions still cannot be drawn because of small numbers and relatively low career doses. Larger

  16. Occupational Exposure to Diagnostic Radiology in Workers without Training in Radiation Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, Enrique; Enriquez, Jesus G. Franco

    2004-01-01

    The physicians, technicians, nurses, and others involved in radiation areas constitute the largest group of workers occupationally exposed to man-made sources of radiation. Personnel radiation exposure must be monitored for safety and regulatory considerations, this assessment may need to be made over a period of one month or several months. The purpose of this study was to carry out an exploratory survey of occupational exposures associated with diagnostic radiology. The personnel dosimeters used in this study were thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The reported number of monitored workers was 110 of different departments of radiology of the Mexican Republic without education in radiation safety, included general fluoscopic/radiographic imaging, computed tomography and mammography procedures. Physicians and X-ray technologist in diagnostic radiology receive an average annual effective dose of 2.9 mSv with range from 0.18 to 5.64 mSv. The average level of occupational exposures is generally similar to the global average level of natural radiation exposure. The annual global per capita effective dose due to natural radiation sources is 2.4 mSv (UNSCEAR 2000 Report). There is not significant difference between average occupational exposures and natural radiation exposure for p < 0.05

  17. Estimation of radiation dose received by the radiation worker during 18F FDG injection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Zade, Anand; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2011-01-01

    The radiation dosimetric literature concerning the medical and non-medical personnel working in nuclear medicine departments are limited, particularly radiation doses received by radiation worker in nuclear medicine department during positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceutical injection process. This is of interest and concern for the personnel. To measure the radiation dose received by the staff involved in injection process of Fluorine-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). The effective whole body doses to the radiation workers involved in injections of 1511 patients over a period of 10 weeks were evaluated using pocket dosimeter. Each patient was injected with 5 MBq/kg of 18 F FDG. The 18 F-FDG injection protocol followed in our department is as follows. The technologist dispenses the dose to be injected and records the pre-injection activity. The nursing staff members then secure an intravenous catheter. The nuclear medicine physicians/residents inject the dose on a rotation basis in accordance with ALARA principle. After the injection of the tracer, the nursing staff members flush the intravenous catheter. The person who injected the tracer then measures the post-injection residual dose in the syringe. The mean effective whole body doses per injection for the staff were the following: Nurses received 1.44 ± 0.22 μSv/injection (3.71 ± 0.48 nSv/MBq), for doctors the dose values were 2.44 ± 0.25 μSv/injection (6.29 ± 0.49 nSv/MBq) and for technologists the doses were 0.61 ± 0.10 μSv/injection (1.58 ± 0.21 nSv/MBq). It was seen that the mean effective whole body dose per injection of our positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) staff who were involved in the 18 F-FDG injection process was maximum for doctors (54.34% differential doses), followed by nurses (32.02% differential doses) and technologist (13.64% differential doses). This study confirms that low levels of radiation dose are received by staff during 18 F-FDG injection and

  18. External radiation dose and cancer mortality among French nuclear workers: considering potential confounding by internal radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, L; Laurent, O; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Laroche, P; Le Guen, B; Laurier, D; Leuraud, K

    2016-11-01

    French nuclear workers have detailed records of their occupational exposure to external radiation that have been used to examine associations with subsequent cancer mortality. However, some workers were also exposed to internal contamination by radionuclides. This study aims to assess the potential for bias due to confounding by internal contamination of estimates of associations between external radiation exposure and cancer mortality. A cohort of 59,004 workers employed for at least 1 year between 1950 and 1994 by CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique), AREVA NC, or EDF (Electricité de France) and badge-monitored for external radiation exposure were followed through 2004 to assess vital status and cause of death. A flag based on a workstation-exposure matrix defined four levels of potential for internal contamination. Standardized mortality ratios were assessed for each level of the internal contamination indicator. Poisson regression was used to quantify associations between external radiation exposure and cancer mortality, adjusting for potential internal contamination. For solid cancer, the mortality deficit tended to decrease as the levels of potential for internal contamination increased. For solid cancer and leukemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia, adjusting the dose-response analysis on the internal contamination indicator did not markedly change the excess relative risk per Sievert of external radiation dose. This study suggests that in this cohort, neglecting information on internal dosimetry while studying the association between external dose and cancer mortality does not generate a substantial bias. To investigate more specifically the health effects of internal contamination, an effort is underway to estimate organ doses due to internal contamination.

  19. External radiation dose and cancer mortality among French nuclear workers. Considering potential confounding by internal radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, L.; Laurent, O.; Samson, E.; Caer-Lorho, S.; Laurier, D.; Leuraud, K. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay aux Roses (France). Ionizing Radiation Epidemiology Lab.; Laroche, P. [AREVA, Paris (France); Le Guen, B. [EDF, Saint Denis (France)

    2016-11-15

    French nuclear workers have detailed records of their occupational exposure to external radiation that have been used to examine associations with subsequent cancer mortality. However, some workers were also exposed to internal contamination by radionuclides. This study aims to assess the potential for bias due to confounding by internal contamination of estimates of associations between external radiation exposure and cancer mortality. A cohort of 59,004 workers employed for at least 1 year between 1950 and 1994 by CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique), AREVA NC, or EDF (Electricite de France) and badge-monitored for external radiation exposure were followed through 2004 to assess vital status and cause of death. A flag based on a workstation-exposure matrix defined four levels of potential for internal contamination. Standardized mortality ratios were assessed for each level of the internal contamination indicator. Poisson regression was used to quantify associations between external radiation exposure and cancer mortality, adjusting for potential internal contamination. For solid cancer, the mortality deficit tended to decrease as the levels of potential for internal contamination increased. For solid cancer and leukemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia, adjusting the dose-response analysis on the internal contamination indicator did not markedly change the excess relative risk per Sievert of external radiation dose. This study suggests that in this cohort, neglecting information on internal dosimetry while studying the association between external dose and cancer mortality does not generate a substantial bias. To investigate more specifically the health effects of internal contamination, an effort is underway to estimate organ doses due to internal contamination.

  20. Cytogenetic Monitoring By Use Of The Micronucleus Assay Among Nuclear Malaysia Radiation Workers-A Preliminary Result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimah Abdul Rahim; Mohd Rodzi Ali; Noraisyah Mohd Yusof; Juliana Mahamad Napiah; Yahaya Talib; Rehir Dahalan

    2014-01-01

    Biological dosimetry based on the analysis of micronuclei in the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay can be used as an alternative method for scoring dicentric chromosomes in the field of radiation protection. Bio dosimetry is mainly performed, in addition to physical dosimetry, with the aim of individual dose assessment. Aim of this study was to assess occupationally induced chromosomal damage in radiation workers exposed to ionizing radiation. The CBMN assay was used in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 50 exposed workers. Number of bi-nucleated cell and micronuclei were scored and statistical analysis was done to see the effect and correlation of micronuclei with gender, age and time of worked. In conclusion, scoring of micronuclei is a useful cytogenetic monitoring for radiation workers. (author)

  1. Integrated Worker Radiation Dose Assessment for the K Basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NELSON, J.V.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents an assessment of the radiation dose workers at the K Basins are expected to receive in the process of removing spent nuclear fuel from the storage basins. The K Basins (K East and K West) are located in the Hanford 100K Area

  2. Radiation Protection Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (RP-KAP) as Predictors of Job Stress Among Radiation Workers in Tehran Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, S Shohreh; Taghizadeh Dabbagh, Sima; Abbasi, Mahya; Mehrdad, Ramin

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to occupational stress, but relatively little or no research has been conducted on the influence of knowledge, attitude, and practice of radiation protection (RP-KAP) on job stress among radiation workers. This study aims to assess job stress among health care workers in Iran who are occupationally exposed to radiation in order to determine the effects of KAP on self-protection against radiation on their job stress. The population in this descriptive cross-sectional study comprised 670 healthcare workers, including 428 staff with a degree in radiology and 242 other medical personnel who were working in 16 hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in Tehran, Iran. The census method was used to sample the workers. In total, 264 staff with a degree in radiology and 149 other medical personnel completed the job content questionnaire (JCQ) and the RP-KAP questionnaire from May to November 2014. The prevalence rate of job stress was 22.5% based on calculation formulas and possible scores on the JCQ. Sex, RP-knowledge, attitude, practice, and in-service training predicted 41.8% of the variance in job stress. According to the results of the binary logistic regression, workers with higher scores on knowledge (OR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.75 - 0.90), attitude (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.63 - 0.82), and practice (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.72 - 0.86) and those who had participated in training programs had significantly lower rates of job stress (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.28 - 0.93). The effects of RP knowledge, attitude, and practice on job stress were significant. In order to reduce job stress in radiation environments, ongoing training programs related to self-care and protection principles are recommended.

  3. Study on ionizing radiation to the workers' lymphocyte micronucleus rate and chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianhua; Wang Linchao; He Wei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study lymphocyte genetic material of an iron and steel enterprise workers exposed to the ionizing radiation, find out measures to protect their health and reduce ionizing radiation occupation harm. Methods: 342 workers were choseh as the exposed group who worked in an iron and steel enterprise in the beam installment operation, to examine their circumference blood lymphocyte micronucleus rate and the chromosome aberrations, simultaneously select 280 chefs as the control group, The irradiation dosage was determined and statistical analysis was carded out wich the consideration of their length of work and differences in work post. Results: Exposed group: the micronucleus rate masculine gender (MNR), 4 people, the masculine gender pick out rate is 12.87%. The chromosome aberration factor masculine gender (CAF), 12 people, the masculine rate is 3.51%. Control group: MNR 3 people, the asculine gender pick out rate is 1.07%; CAF 2 people, masculine gender rate is 0.72%. Comparing the two groups, every item has the significant difference. Workers in is the exposed group workers have the average exposure dose of 6.73mSv/a, MNR,CAF are illuminated to the dosage have a positive line correlation. They become increased as the job lenght prolongs. The nucleon name, the material calculation and the medical X-radial are responsible for the highest ratio. Conclusion: In iron and steel enterprises, long-time ionizing radiation can cause the workers' circumference blood lymphocyte micronucleus rate and the chromosome aberrations obvious to rise. The beam protection measures strengthened so as to reduce the harms to workers. (authors)

  4. Explanation of test and assessment of chromosomal aberrations on occupational health examinations for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yumin; Fu Baohua; Han Lin; Wang Xi'ai; Zhao Fengling

    2012-01-01

    Test and Assessment of Chromosomal Aberrations on Occupational Health Examinations for Radiation Workers was formulated for standardizing analysis and outcome assessment of chromosomal aberrations on occupational health examinations for radiation workers. In order to provide experimental and theoretical basis for implementation and extension of this standard, this paper interpreted the standard comprehensively, including some existed problems that methods on detection and outcome assessment of chromosomal aberrations is not unified in different laboratories in China, and related criteria,laws and regulations at home and abroad are not fit for the detection of chromosomal aberrations for radiation workers very well; some introduction on methods of chromosomal slide preparation, discriminant analysis and outcome assessment of chromosomal aberration; and some influencing factors in the quality of chromosomal aberration detection. (authors)

  5. Guidelines for approved medical officers on health surveillance of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donovan, N.; Hone, C.

    1988-11-01

    As a result of the adoption of the Council of the European Communities Directive No. 80/836 Euratom which lays down the basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionizing radiation, there is a need for nominating Approved Medical Officers whose functions in respect of hospital workers are outlined in the Department of Health Circular, Oct. 1983 (Appendix 1), and which are considered applicable to all other workers. This document outlines the role of the Approved Medical Officer and proides information to aid him/her in this work (author)

  6. Health effects of low-level radiation in shipyard workers: report of previous work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanoski, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Progress over the course of the Nuclear Shipyard Workers Study is reported. The derivation of the study population, the gathering of health histories, the US Navy radiation protection program, and the determination of radiation exposures is described

  7. Identification of risk aversion factor for radiation workers in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadul, Abdulbagi; Na, Seong H.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation aversion factor reflects the degree of avoidance of radiation exposure which is considered a fundamental element in the optimization of radiation protection and a key factor in determining the real monetary value of the man-Sievert (Sv). This study provides an adjusted risk aversion factor, which was prescribed by the Korea Institute for Nuclear Safety (KINS), a regulatory body in Korea. Specifically, the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) evaluated the monetary value of the man-Sv for Korean Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) workers. This monetary value was assessed by the radiation aversion factor. Consequently, identifying the monetary value of the man-Sv in this study will enhance not only the effectiveness of optimization of radiation protection in Korea but also contribute to reduce doses to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) when accounting for economic and societal aspects. The primary purpose of this study is to obtain the risk aversion factor for radiation workers in medical and industrial facilities in Korea. The secondary purpose is to evaluate the real monetary value of the man-Sv.These objectives will be accomplished by collecting data from surveys that consider a variety of socio-economic conditions. The value of 1.45 represents considerable avoidance of radiation risk for the majority of NDT radiographers due to familiarity and work experience with radiation hazards. On the other hand, the value 1.57 indicates that most of radiation medical practitioners, in particular, interventional radiologists have a strong will to avoid radiation risk. However, they will accept more risk with incremental salary increases. For international comparison, the concept of Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) should be adopted to obtain the alpha values in real term. Certainly, this monetary value of the man-Sv is expected to contribute effectively in optimization of radiation protection in both medical and industrial fields. The findings of this study

  8. Identification of risk aversion factor for radiation workers in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadul, Abdulbagi [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Na, Seong H. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Radiation aversion factor reflects the degree of avoidance of radiation exposure which is considered a fundamental element in the optimization of radiation protection and a key factor in determining the real monetary value of the man-Sievert (Sv). This study provides an adjusted risk aversion factor, which was prescribed by the Korea Institute for Nuclear Safety (KINS), a regulatory body in Korea. Specifically, the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) evaluated the monetary value of the man-Sv for Korean Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) workers. This monetary value was assessed by the radiation aversion factor. Consequently, identifying the monetary value of the man-Sv in this study will enhance not only the effectiveness of optimization of radiation protection in Korea but also contribute to reduce doses to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) when accounting for economic and societal aspects. The primary purpose of this study is to obtain the risk aversion factor for radiation workers in medical and industrial facilities in Korea. The secondary purpose is to evaluate the real monetary value of the man-Sv.These objectives will be accomplished by collecting data from surveys that consider a variety of socio-economic conditions. The value of 1.45 represents considerable avoidance of radiation risk for the majority of NDT radiographers due to familiarity and work experience with radiation hazards. On the other hand, the value 1.57 indicates that most of radiation medical practitioners, in particular, interventional radiologists have a strong will to avoid radiation risk. However, they will accept more risk with incremental salary increases. For international comparison, the concept of Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) should be adopted to obtain the alpha values in real term. Certainly, this monetary value of the man-Sv is expected to contribute effectively in optimization of radiation protection in both medical and industrial fields. The findings of this study

  9. Progress in radiation protection techniques for workers in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradel, J.; Zettwoog, P.; Rouyer, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The increasingly stringent safety requirements of workers and the general public in the face of occupational and in particular nuclear risks call for continual improvements in radiation protection techniques. The Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN), especially the Technical Protection Services belonging to the Protection Department, and also the various radiation protection services of the French Atomic Energy Commission's nuclear centres and Electricite de France (EDF) are carrying out substantial research and development programmes on the subject. For this reason, IPSN organized a specialists' meeting to take stock of the efforts being made and to try to identify what steps seem most promising or should have priority at the national level. The authors summarize the presentations and discussions on three topics: (1) Progress in the analysis of the mechanism of exposure of workers; (2) Progress achieved from the radiation protection standpoint in the field of facility design and instrumentation; and (3) Application of the optimization principle

  10. Personal Dosimetry for Radiation Workers Upgrading an Old Petroleum Oil Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation protection consultations and services were carried out over the last 15 years in Egypt at several petroleum companies. Egypt issued its first NORM Regulation in 2000; this was subsequently modified in 2006. The main aim of the present work was to report dosimetric experience gained during the handling of contaminated equipment in the upgrading of an old oilfield. Optimization of radiation protection was carried out using lead blankets. Film badges were distributed to workers. Films were redistributed to personnel every few weeks. More than 700 film badges were distributed during the working period and workers' health surveillance was carried out, including complete blood analysis. For the 5 month period, individual doses were estimated. The average effective dose was less than 1 mSv. (author)

  11. Summary of data held by the National Registry for Radiation Workers

    CERN Document Server

    Darby, S C

    1982-01-01

    This supplement to NRPB-R116 (Protocol for the National Registry for Radiation Workers) summarises the data held by the National Registry for Radiation Workers at the end of 1981. At this time the total population for which agreement had been reached with the participating organisations was about 54,000. The actual number registered, approximately 40,000, was about three quarters of this study population although for many individuals the data were still incomplete. The coverage of the study population is shown for each of the participating organisations. This summary is intended as a supplement to be used in conjunction with the main protocol for the study. It will be reissued from time to time as more data are received.

  12. Characteristics Of Oral Condition Among Workers In The Field Of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallam, R.A.I.

    2012-01-01

    disturbance (Blatt, 1976). Throughout the years, most of the studies focused on the damaging effects of high levels of radiation on dental, oral structures and salivary glands and its oral complications which is manifested clinically. Oral complications of radiotherapy in the head and neck region are the result of the deleterious effects of radiation on, salivary glands, oral mucosa, bone, dentition, masticatory musculature, and temporomandibular joints. The clinical consequences of radiotherapy include mucositis, hypo salivation, taste loss, osteoradionecrosis, radiation caries, and trismus. Mucositis and taste loss are reversible consequences that usually subside early post irradiation, while hypo salivation is normally irreversible. Furthermore, the risk of developing radiation caries and osteoradionecrosis is a life long threat. Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation is a fact of life in certain occupational settings, long-term effects of low-dose exposures may be real and should be given serious consideration however, the effects of low levels of radiation are more difficult to determine because the deterministic effects do not occur at these levels. Consequently, the risk values at occupational levels are estimates based on risk factors measured at high doses and the risks of low dose radiation effects are not directly measurable in populations of exposed workers (Bethesda,1993, Godekmerdan et al., 2004). Accordingly, further studies should be conducted to determine the risk factors of the exposure of low doses of radiation for long durations.

  13. Closing the protection gap: setting health standards for nuclear power workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasperson, R.E.; Lundblad, J.

    1982-01-01

    The article discusses the current and proposed standards for protecting workers from ionizing radiation. It reviews the 1981 EPA proposals put forth to this end, identifying the issues at stake and possible alternatives, and considers whether closing the protection gap is feasible and socially desirable - and, if so, how it best should be accomplished

  14. Hanford-worker health study: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, S.; Tolley, H.D.; Gilbert, E.S.; Petersen, G.R.

    1983-02-01

    Analysis of the workers' health at the Hanford plant produced no startling changes. Multiple myeloma is the only cancer type that shows a statistically significant trend of mortality with increasing radiation exposure. The study populations will be augmented by the addition of a group of construction workers in the future. Methodologic studies based on this data set are continuing

  15. The workers and public radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.; Roupioz, A.; Rabu, B.

    2003-01-01

    Six texts develop the question of the radiation protection of workers and public. Monitoring of the exposure risk to alpha emitters during the unit outage of nuclear power plant of Cattenom is the first one, the second article concerns the ALARA approach applied to the yard that controls the welding of vapor generators of the Phenix reactor. The third one treats the evaluation of impact in environment of tritium releases associated to a fusion reactor accident. Some systems of radiological detection are studied, the notion of dose constraint is discussed, and what about the cooperation around nuclear and non nuclear installations. (N.C.)

  16. Ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Since July 2015 the study ''ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS) - an international cohort study'' is available. INWORKS comprised data from 300.000 occupational exposed and dosimetric monitored persons from France, USA and UK. The contribution is a critical discussion of this study with respect to the conclusion of a strong evidence of positive associations between protracted low-dose irradiation exposure and leukemia.

  17. Personal radiation monitoring and assessment of doses received by radiation workers (1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, N.D.

    1996-12-01

    Since late 1986, all persons monitored by the Australian Radiation Laboratory have been registered on a data base which maintains records of the doses received by each individual wearer. At present, the Service regularly monitors approximately 30,000 persons, which is roughly 90 percent of those monitored in Australia, and maintains dose histories of over 75,000 people. The skin dose for occupationally exposed workers can be measured by using one of the five types of monitor issued by the Service: Thermoluminescent Dosemeter (TLD monitor), Finger TLD 3, Neutron Monitor, Special TLD and Environmental monitor. The technical description of the monitors is provided along with the method for calculating the radiation dose. 5 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs

  18. Determination of intake and internal radiation dose for occupationally exposed workers to iodine 131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Maghrabi, M.; Sadyya, A.

    2004-12-01

    Workers who prepare and inject radioactive Iodine I 131 doses at the medical centers in Syria are potentially exposed to the radioactive intake by ingestion or inhalation during preparation or injection processes. The received amount of the radioactive intake differs according to the amount of the I 131 that released during the preparation or injection processes, and to the work conditions and the applying ways of the radiation protection principles. Because of this radioactive intake, the thyroid gland may expose to amounts of I 131 which may negatively affect the health of the workers, so it is necessary to make routine monitoring for all workers who receive an intake of more than 10% of the annual intake limit which is (2*10 6 Bq/y) for I 131 . To make this monitoring process, it is necessary to use either the thyroid gland counter in order to know the concentrated amount of the radioactivity in the gland, or the analysis of a 24 hours urine sample of the exposed workers to determine the eliminated amount of the radioactivity using gamma spectrometry, also the two processes can be applied at the same time. Since the thyroid gland counter is not available, the analysis of urine sample was done to determine the concentrated amount of the radioactivity in urine, then to estimate the radioactive intake and the internal radioactive dose. The results of applying this method dictated that some workers work in safe conditions according to the radiation protection and there is no need for them to make routine monitoring . But the other workers receive a radioactive intake of about 10% yearly of the annual intake limit and that requires a routine periodical monitoring for those workers in addition to the necessity of applying the principles of the radiation protection during the work with I 131 . These principles and systems should indicate the basic requirement of radiation protection that must be available in the laboratory that deal with I 131 either for therapy or for

  19. Radiation measurements in Egyptian pyramids and tombs -- occupational exposure of workers and the public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigu, J; Hussein, Mohamed I; Hussein, A Z

    2000-02-01

    A radiation survey of seven archaeological sites within Egyptian pyramids and tombs has been conducted in the Saggara area. Measurements were made of radon ({sup 222}Rn) and its short-lived decay products (progeny), as well as thoron ({sup 220}Rn) progeny and {gamma}-radiation. The results of these measurements have been used to calculate the maximum annual effective dose (MAD) and other important occupational radiation exposure variables. It was found that for the limited time to which occupational workers and visitors were exposed, their respective MAD values were lower than that recommended by the regulatory agency (i.e., 20 mSv per year for occupational workers and 1 mSv in a year for the public). However, it is shown that if the exposure times for occupational workers were to increase to 'normal' working schedules their MAD would be exceeded at three archaeological sites. Implementation of improved ventilation practices is recommended in those sites to reduce the exposure to occupational workers were their working schedules to be significantly increased. It is also recommended that further monitoring be conducted in the future to verify these results.

  20. Radiation measurements in Egyptian pyramids and tombs -- occupational exposure of workers and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.; Hussein, Mohamed I.; Hussein, A.Z.

    2000-01-01

    A radiation survey of seven archaeological sites within Egyptian pyramids and tombs has been conducted in the Saggara area. Measurements were made of radon ( 222 Rn) and its short-lived decay products (progeny), as well as thoron ( 220 Rn) progeny and γ-radiation. The results of these measurements have been used to calculate the maximum annual effective dose (MAD) and other important occupational radiation exposure variables. It was found that for the limited time to which occupational workers and visitors were exposed, their respective MAD values were lower than that recommended by the regulatory agency (i.e., 20 mSv per year for occupational workers and 1 mSv in a year for the public). However, it is shown that if the exposure times for occupational workers were to increase to 'normal' working schedules their MAD would be exceeded at three archaeological sites. Implementation of improved ventilation practices is recommended in those sites to reduce the exposure to occupational workers were their working schedules to be significantly increased. It is also recommended that further monitoring be conducted in the future to verify these results

  1. Logistic analysis on influencing factors of radiation workers' anxiety and depression in some city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Xueyuan; Liu Yulong; Zhang Bingjie; Li Yuan; Chen Xiyun; Qiu Mengyue; Bian Huahui; Chen Weibo; Wang Youyou

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To provide theoretical basis for making the psychological support scheme and to explore the radiation workers' anxiety and depression status in some communities of a city and the influence factors. Methods: A total of 424 workers from 32 units of the city were sampled and required to provide the general demographic data for self-evaluation of anxiety scale (SAS) and depression self rating scale (SDS). Personal dose data was collected. The influence factors were analyzed by use of binary logistic regression procedure. Results: The radiation workers in this city had obvious anxiety and depression mood. Both SAS and SDS scores were significantly higher compared with Chinese norm (t = 10.55, 20.17, P < 0.05). Multiple factors logistic regression showed that their gender, personal dose and training situation were the factors influencing anxiety mood(χ"2 = 47.21, P < 0.05), while their educational background, personal dose and training situation had influence on depression mood(χ"2 = 329.83, P < 0.05). Conclusions: The anxiety and depression mood of radiation workers are obviously high in comparison with the Chinese norm, and are influenced by gender and personal dose. (authors)

  2. Scientific colloquium on medical supervision of workers exposed to ionizing and non ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The general principles of medical surveillance for workers exposed to ionizing radiation were defined in the Euratom Basic Standards in 1959. These principles, which are in accordance with the early IGRP publications, have been adopted by the national authorities and implemented without difficulty. However, because of the forthcoming publication of the revised Basic Standards- in accordance with recent IGRP recommendations, the Commission decided to organize a meeting of doctors responsible for the medical surveillance of workers exposed to ionizing radiation in order to disseminate as widely as possible the results of experience gained in the field of radiological protection and to pinpoint the practical difficulties which might arise when the principles were applied. The Commission also considered it important to inform doctors specializing in radiological protection about the principles to be followed by those responsible for the health protection of workers exposed to non-ionizing radiation, particularly microwaves and Laser beams. The complete text of each report in the original language is given in this volume

  3. Haematological evaluation in workers exposed to ionizing radiation from a radiotherapy service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Pumar, G.M.; Frometa Suarez, I.

    1997-01-01

    Evaluation of haematological indicators is carried out as routing in medical surveillance of workers exposed to ionizing radiation, in order to assest the initial and continuing fitness for their intended tasks. The purpose of this work is to analize the behaviour of haematological parametsrs in relation with the time of exposure as well as received doses for workers. It was stabilished a 8 years follw up for the 74 workers of the radiotherapy service in the Oncological Hospital in Havana City. As result were observed no significant changes on mean number of leucocytes, platelets an haemoglobin, which oscillate within normal limits stablished for adult people. Allthought it was incountered an increase in the number of cases with leucopenia, in direct relation with the increase of time of exposure an cumulative doses. The incidence of those cases was 2,3 times higher in the 8th year of the follow up, in relation with the begining of the exposition to ionizing radiation

  4. Decree No 67-228 of 15 March 1967 regulating the protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    This Decree, together with its implementing Orders, contains the basic provisions for the protection of workers. However, it does not cover large nuclear installations and mainly applies to establishments dealing with sealed or unsealed sources and X-ray devices. It lays down the measures to be complied with by employers in such establishments to ensure the protection of staff and also sets out the maximum permissible equivalent radiation doses. (NEA) [fr

  5. Summary of data held by the National Registry for Radiation Workers

    CERN Document Server

    Kendall, G M; O'Hagen, J A; Rees, S; Walker, S M

    1988-01-01

    This report summarises the data held by the National Registry for Radiation Workers at the end of 1985. Agreement has been reached with the participating organisations for transfer of records on 97,000 individuals. However, some individuals have been employed by more than one participating organisation and a few (2%) have refused to participate, so the final study population will be somewhat smaller. Over 95% of participants have been registered and arrangements are in hand to include most of the remainder. Although some information is still outstanding, there has been a considerable improvement since the publication of the second supplement to NRPB-R116 (Protocol for the National Registry for Radiation Workers) which described the database at the end of 1983. Details are given for each of the participating organisations.

  6. Practical application of computer program Panthere for workers' radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlier, Pierre; Michoux, Xavier; Lereculey, Clement

    2014-01-01

    The civil engineering operations to strengthen the raft of Fessenheim's nuclear plant were carried out by EDF. This technical modification has two principles objectives: 1) to increase the thickness of the reactor pit's concrete and 2) to create a new spreading area for corium (by creating a penetration through the wall of the reactor pit). Behind the complex technical operations two radioprotection issues were studied using the computer program 'PANTHERE': 1) Workers' radiation protection during the execution of the work (because of high dose rates in the reactor pit) and 2) operators' radiation protection after the execution of the work. Results contributed to decrease personal and collective dosimetry of operations and to model and design a biological shield to protect workers during Fessenheim reactor operation. (authors)

  7. Summary of data held by the National Registry for Radiation Workers

    CERN Document Server

    Saw, G M A

    1985-01-01

    This supplement to NRPB-R116 (Protocol for the National Registry for Radiation Workers) summarises the data held by the National Registry for Radiation Workers) at the end of 1983. It follows the form of the first supplement which described the data base at the end of 1981. The total population for which agreement has been reached with the participating organisations is about 68,000. Over 86% of these have ben registered, arrangements are in hand to include most of the remainder. Only 2% of the population have refused to participate as individuals. Although some information is still outstanding, there has been a considerable improvement since 1981. More details are given for each of the participating organisations. Further supplements will be issued from time to time as more data are received.

  8. Cytological and histological changes in lymphocytes influence of ionizing radiation on health workers

    OpenAIRE

    Gorgieva, Pale; Nedeljkovik, Bojana; Velickova, Nevenka

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Ionizing radiation can originate from natural and artificial sources and ionization may be direct or indirect. Depending on the dose and intensity of radiation radiobiological effect may be different. Acute radiation sickness occurs as a result of irradiation of the whole body with large doses of radiation in a short time. While chronic radiation damages arise in professional workers due to exposure to small doses over a long time. Depending on the type of tissue and cell proper...

  9. Radiation monitoring and dose distribution of medical workers in A.P. state 1999-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.R.; Reddy, K.S.; Kamble, M.K.; Roy, Madhumita

    2001-01-01

    Individual monitoring for external ionizing radiation is being conducted for all radiation workers in Andhra Pradesh State by TLD Unit located in Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad.The Unit comes under Personnel Monitoring Section of Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai. The aim of monitoring is to confirm that the radiation safety standards are strictly adhered in the institutions and also to investigate excessive exposures, if any. Personnel monitoring also provides data for epidemiological studies. In view of ICRP/AERB recommendations of 100 mSv dose limit for the five years block of 1994-98, the dose distribution among radiation workers in Andhra Pradesh State is analyzed for the period 1994-98. In continuation of above work, we have analyzed the data for the year 1999-2000 for various medical diagnostic procedures and these are presented

  10. The use of the case study method in radiation worker continuing training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    Typical methods of continuing training are often viewed by employees as boring, redundant and unnecessary. It is hoped that the operating experience lesson in the required course, Radiation Worker Requalification, will be well received by employees because actual RFP events will be presented as case studies. The interactive learning atmosphere created by the case study method stimulates discussion, develops analytical abilities, and motivates employees to use lessons learned in the workplace. This problem solving approach to continuing training incorporates cause and effect analysis, a technique which is also used at RFP to investigate events. A method of designing the operating experience lesson in the Radiation Worker Requalification course is described in this paper. 7 refs., 2 figs

  11. Mortality and career radiation doses for workers at a commercial nuclear power plant: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, R.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Hrubec, Z.; Hurwitz, P.E.; Goff, T.E.; Wilson, J.

    1989-01-01

    Career radiation doses for 8,961 male workers at the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) were determined for both utility (n = 4,960) and contractor (n = 4,001) employees. Workers were followed from the time of first employment at CCNPP (including plant construction) to the end of 1984 (mean follow-up = 5.4 y). Plant operation began in 1975. The mean duration of employment was 1.9 y at CCNPP and 3.1 y in the nuclear industry. Career radiation doses were determined from dosimetry records kept by the utility company and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). For all exposed workers, the average career dose was 21 mSv and was higher for contractor (30 mSv) than utility (13 mSv) workers. Career doses were also higher among those employed in the nuclear industry for greater than or equal to 15 y (111 mSv) and among workers classified as health physicists (56 mSv). Cumulative doses of greater than or equal to 50 mSv were received by 12% of the workers; the maximum career dose reported was 470 mSv. The availability of social security numbers for practically all employees facilitated record-linkage methods to determine mortality; 161 deaths were identified. On average the workers experienced mortality from all causes that was 15% less than that of the general population of the U.S., probably due to healthier members of the population being selected for employment. Our investigation demonstrates that historical information is available from which career doses could be constructed and that, in principle, it is feasible to conduct epidemiologic studies of nuclear power plant workers in the U.S. Although difficult, the approach taken could prove useful until such time as a comprehensive registry of U.S. radiation workers is established

  12. Estimating the whole-body exposure annual dose of radiation workers of petroleum nuclear well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yizong; Gao Jianzheng; Liu Wenhong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: By imitating experiment of radioactive sources being installed, to estimate the annual whole-body exposure dose of radiation workers of petroleum nuclear determining wells; Methods: To compre the values of the theory, imitating experiment and γ individual dose monitor calculations. Results: The three values measured above tally with one anather. Conclusion: The annual whole-body exposure doses of radiation workers of petroleum nuclear determining wells are no more than 5 mSv. (authors)

  13. Implantation and Evaluation of a Training Program in Radiation Protection of the Exposed Workers in our Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil Agudo, A.; Ruiz Rodriguez, J. C.; Zapata Jimenez, J. C.; Munoz Cuevas, R.; Gil Tomas, S.

    2004-01-01

    The object of this work is to introduce the training program in Radiation Protection implemented in our Hospital, and its evaluation and follow-up. Material AND Methods: The training program in Radiation Protection implanted by the Department of Radiation Protection in the Hospital de la Ribera consists of three types of training modalities: Annual Seminars: applicable to all the exposed workers and divided in a general part and a specific one for each area; Informative lectures: applicable to a specific department, deal with specific issues of interest without predetermined frequency; Individualised training: applicable to pregnant, new workers, job moves and duties change. The follow-up of the program is carried out by mean of inquiries about general and site-specific knowledge on radiation protection. Results The results of the inquiries are analysed and related with the continuous training program. Conclusion: It is remarkable that departments with workers without academic training in radiation protection (Intensive Care Unit, Surgery, Endoscopy,) need a more dedicated training. The results confirm the validity of the three training modalities: The annual seminar provides a continuous training to all exposed workers; the informative lecture is useful to handle immediately issues of current interest in a specific department and the individual training are useful to acquire specific knowledge about radiation risks and radiation protection rules in new working situations. (Author)

  14. Health status of radiation workers in an institute of nuclear research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, F.; Paunescu, G.; Stroe, F. [Inst. of Public Health, Bucharest (Romania); Andrei, N.

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this study was the identification of the changes in health condition of workers from an institute of nuclear research. Thirty-five workers (25 male and 10 female) radiation exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation were admitted in the Radiopathology Centre Bucharest, after a selection performed during the annual check-up. The workers have had different professions: nuclear fuel processor, engineer laboratory technician, electrician, instrument technician. The time of exposure to ionizing radiation was between 6 to 25 years. Medical specialists in occupational health, dermatology, ophthalmology, O.R.L., endocrinology, haematology, neurology and psychology investigated them. The following lab tests were performed: haematological examination, biochemical examination, immunology tests, alergology skin tests, functional lung tests and cardiogram. No special problems concerning the exposure to ionizing radiation were found, but the following diseases were detected in some extent: neurasthenia, high blood pressure, ischemic heart disease, digestive system disorders, endocrinology disorders and anaemia. High blood pressure, ischemic heart disease and digestive system disorders were related with stress or job strain. Anaemia occurred in connection with gynaecological disorders. Some thyroid dysfunction appeared because of low dietary iodine content in the Sub-Carpathian region. The focus of the psychological exam was the identification of the effect of different factors (exogenous, endogenous or multidimensional) over a person, that could influence the psychological potential. The psychological exam reveals the following disturbances: asthenia, tiredness, chronic fatigue, psycho-emotional impairment, lapses of attention, anxiety. These disturbances may be in relation both with job strain (especially a substantial stress factor for nuclear fuel processor and engineer laboratory technician) and the syndrome of workplace. (author)

  15. Health status of radiation workers in an institute of nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, F.; Paunescu, G.; Stroe, F.; Andrei, N.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was the identification of the changes in health condition of workers from an institute of nuclear research. Thirty-five workers (25 male and 10 female) radiation exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation were admitted in the Radiopathology Centre Bucharest, after a selection performed during the annual check-up. The workers have had different professions: nuclear fuel processor, engineer laboratory technician, electrician, instrument technician. The time of exposure to ionizing radiation was between 6 to 25 years. Medical specialists in occupational health, dermatology, ophthalmology, O.R.L., endocrinology, haematology, neurology and psychology investigated them. The following lab tests were performed: haematological examination, biochemical examination, immunology tests, alergology skin tests, functional lung tests and cardiogram. No special problems concerning the exposure to ionizing radiation were found, but the following diseases were detected in some extent: neurasthenia, high blood pressure, ischemic heart disease, digestive system disorders, endocrinology disorders and anaemia. High blood pressure, ischemic heart disease and digestive system disorders were related with stress or job strain. Anaemia occurred in connection with gynaecological disorders. Some thyroid dysfunction appeared because of low dietary iodine content in the Sub-Carpathian region. The focus of the psychological exam was the identification of the effect of different factors (exogenous, endogenous or multidimensional) over a person, that could influence the psychological potential. The psychological exam reveals the following disturbances: asthenia, tiredness, chronic fatigue, psycho-emotional impairment, lapses of attention, anxiety. These disturbances may be in relation both with job strain (especially a substantial stress factor for nuclear fuel processor and engineer laboratory technician) and the syndrome of workplace. (author)

  16. Medical examination of the workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    The hazardous effects of ionizing radiation to man are well recognized, and they are divided into two groups, the stochastic effects (hereditary and carcinogenic effect) and non-stochastic effects (somatic effects such as depression of hematopoiesis, chronic dermatitis and cataracta). The basic framework of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is intended to prevent the occurrence of non-stochastic effects, by keeping doses below the relevant thresholds, and to ensure that all reasonable aspects are taken to reduce the incidence of stochastic effects. In Japan, the regulatory provisions of radiological protection of the workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation are based on the recommendation of ICRP adopted in 1977. According to these regulations, the dose equivalent limits of occupational exposure of man has been decided at 50 mSv/year. The monitoring of exposure to the individual and the procedure of medical examination of the workers are briefly described and discussed. (author)

  17. Future needs in radiation protection training for NPP workers of Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozelj, M.; Bogovic, T.

    1999-01-01

    Short review of history of radiation protection training for NPP workers in Slovenia and legal requirements regarding this field are presented. Courses developed in co-operation between Milan Copic Nuclear Training Centre and Krsko Nuclear Power Plant are briefly described and their implementation presented. Using available data we have predicted probable number of courses and participants in forthcoming years. Some results from inquiry on courses for regularly exposed workers are presented, enabling us to modify courses according to participants' needs.(author)

  18. Compensation for damage to workers health exposed to ionizing radiation in Argentina; Compensacion por danios a la salud de los trabajadores ocupacionalmente expuestos a las radiaciones ionizantes en la Republica Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobehart, Leonardo J

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this report is to analyze the possibility to establish a scheme to compensate damage to workers health exposed to ionizing radiation in Argentina for those cases in which it is possible to assume that the exposure to ionizing radiation is the cause of the cancer suffered by the worker. The proposed scheme is based on the recommendations set out in the 'International Conference on Occupational Radiation Protection: Protecting Workers against Exposure to Ionization Radiation, held in Geneva, Switzerland, August 26-30, 2002. To this end, the study analyzes the present state of scientific knowledge on cancer causation due to genotoxic factors, and the accepted form of the doses-response curve, for the human beings exposure to ionization radiation at low doses with low doses rates. Finally, the labor laws and regulations related to damage compensation; in particular the present Argentine Labor Law; the National Russian Federal Occupational Radiological Health Impairment and Workmen Compensation, the United Kingdom Compensation Scheme for Radiation-linked Diseases and the United States Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program are described. (author)

  19. Survey of ionizing radiations to workers in Carlos Andrade Hospital during March 1998 and December 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Pino Albuja, Norma Josefina

    2005-01-01

    Ionizing radiation represents a daily risk for the people who work occupationally exposed to radiations at Carlos Andrade Marin hospital. For that reason, the knowledge of the basic concepts of the physical phenomenon of ionizing radiation and the study of dosimetry that is carried out to occupationally exposed workers at Carlos Andrade Marin hospital are very important to manage ionizing radiations as a risk factor. This study shows the system of dosimetry of Carlos Andrade Marin hospital. Moreover, it includes an analysis between the doses received by workers occupationally exposed of Carlos Andrade Marin hospital and the limit dose internationally recommended. For this investigation, it was used bibliographical revision, descriptive, historical, and inductive study, and descriptive statistics with the software Microsoft Office Excel 2003. The hypothesis of this research is that the workplaces exposed to ionizing radiations at Carlos Andrade Marin hospital have an appropriate dosimetry system. Furthermore, it considers superficial and deep doses of occupationally exposed workers of both genders and age. The obtained results of the studied period 1998 to 2000 are: i) The 99% of the occupationally exposed workers used the dosimeter. ii) The higher superficial dose -13,34mSv - corresponds to a Hemodynamic doctor. iii) The higher deep dose -7,1mSv - corresponds to a Nuclear Medicine medical technologist. iv) The higher doses mentioned above are under the limits internationally recommended by the International Commission on International Protection. These limits are 20mSv per year and 100mSv per 5 years respectively. The conclusions of the investigation are: i) Carlos Andrade Marin hospital has an adequate Dosimetry system and the occupationally exposed workers are permanently monitored with the dosimeter. ii) The Nuclear Medicine workers have the higher doses of exposition related to the other areas of Carlos Andrade Marin hospital. iii) The most exposed

  20. Dose assessment of radiation workers at atomic energy authority (Inchas site) 1964-1994. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gommaa, M A; Youssed, S K [Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The present study reports the 1994 radiation exposure of workers at the nuclear research center, of the at atomic energy authority of egypt. Results indicated that 50% of the workers receive annual exposure of 3 mSv, 15% of workers received annual exposure less than 1 mSv, 28% of the workers received annual exposure of 7.5 mSv, and 7% of the workers received annual exposure in the range 10 to 20 mSv. The average annual exposure was estimated as 4.8 mSv. This result is comparable with the 1988-1993 results for nuclear research center workers. 3 tabs.

  1. Evaluation of the genotoxic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure on nuclear medicine workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Ali [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)], E-mail: alibabam2001@yahoo.com; Tatar, Abdulgani; Oztas, Sitki [Department of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Seven, Bedri; Varoglu, Erhan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Yesilyurt, Ahmet [Department of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Ayan, Arif Kursad [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2009-07-15

    Introduction: Nuclear medicine workers are occupationally exposed to chronic ionizing radiation. It is known that ionizing radiation may have damaging effects on chromosomes. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on nuclear medicine workers. We used two different indicators of genotoxicity methods: sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus (MN). Methods: The present research was carried out using 21 nuclear medicine workers (11 females and 10 males) during two periods: during normal working conditions and after a 1-month vacation. The radiation dose varied from 1.20 to 48.56 mSv, which accumulated during the occupational exposure time between two vacations. Peripheral blood samples were taken from each subject for two distinct lymphocyte cultures (SCE and MN) in each period. Results: In nearly all subjects, SCE values increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Similarly, MN frequencies in most of the subjects increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Conclusions: This study revealed that both SCE and MN frequencies in most of the subjects were significantly higher during exposure to ionizing radiation than after a 1-month vacation period. However, this genotoxic effect was reversible in most of the subjects.

  2. Evaluation of the genotoxic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure on nuclear medicine workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Ali; Tatar, Abdulgani; Oztas, Sitki; Seven, Bedri; Varoglu, Erhan; Yesilyurt, Ahmet; Ayan, Arif Kursad

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Nuclear medicine workers are occupationally exposed to chronic ionizing radiation. It is known that ionizing radiation may have damaging effects on chromosomes. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on nuclear medicine workers. We used two different indicators of genotoxicity methods: sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus (MN). Methods: The present research was carried out using 21 nuclear medicine workers (11 females and 10 males) during two periods: during normal working conditions and after a 1-month vacation. The radiation dose varied from 1.20 to 48.56 mSv, which accumulated during the occupational exposure time between two vacations. Peripheral blood samples were taken from each subject for two distinct lymphocyte cultures (SCE and MN) in each period. Results: In nearly all subjects, SCE values increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Similarly, MN frequencies in most of the subjects increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Conclusions: This study revealed that both SCE and MN frequencies in most of the subjects were significantly higher during exposure to ionizing radiation than after a 1-month vacation period. However, this genotoxic effect was reversible in most of the subjects.

  3. mFISH analysis of chromosome aberrations in workers occupationally exposed to mixed radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotnik, Natalia V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Scherthan, Harry [Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology Affiliated to the University of Ulm, Munich (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    We performed a study on the presence of chromosome aberrations in a cohort of plutonium workers of the Mayak production association (PA) with a mean age of 73.3 ± 7.2 years to see whether by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) translocation analysis can discriminate individuals who underwent occupational exposure with internal and/or external exposure to ionizing radiation 40 years ago. All Mayak PA workers were occupationally exposed to chronic internal alpha-radiation due to incorporated plutonium-239 and/or to external gamma-rays. First, we obtained the translocation yield in control individuals by mFISH to chromosome spreads of age-matched individuals and obtained background values that are similar to previously published values of an international study (Sigurdson et al. in Mutat Res 652:112-121, 2008). Workers who had absorbed a total dose of >0.5 Gy external gamma-rays to the red bone marrow (RBM) displayed a significantly higher frequency of stable chromosome aberrations relative to a group of workers exposed to <0.5 Gy gamma-rays total absorbed RBM dose. Thus, the translocation frequency may be considered to be a biological marker of external radiation exposure even years after the exposure. In a group of workers who were internally exposed and had incorporated plutonium-239 at a body burden >1.48 kBq, mFISH revealed a considerable number of cells with complex chromosomal rearrangements. Linear associations were observed for translocation yield with the absorbed RBM dose from external gamma-rays as well as for complex chromosomal rearrangements with the plutonium-239 body burden. (orig.)

  4. Survey of radiation doses and health effects in medical diagnostic X-ray workers in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jixian; Zhang Liangan; Liu Jinzhong; Zhang Jingyuan

    1984-01-01

    The results of a nationwide survey of radiation doses and health effects in 26983 medical diagnostic X-ray workers in 28 provinces of China were reported. The control group was composed of 25785 non-X-ray medical workers in the same hospitals where the investigated X-ray workers worked. Of the radiological workers surveyed 75.3% received cumulative radiation doses below 50 mGy, only 2.7% received doses greater than 500 mGy, the average cumulative dose being 45.0 mGy. The average length of service was 11 years. The main radiation effects relating to radiation doses were the increase of frequencies of both chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes, which were 0.362% and 0.0358% in the irradiated group, and 0.122% and 0.0138% in the control group, respectively. The incidence and mortality rate of leukemias increased significantly in the irradiated group. The incidence and standardized incidence of leukemias were 9.61 . 10 -5 and 9.67 . 10 -5 in the irradiated group and 2.74 . 10 -5 and 2.77 . 10 -5 in the control group. The leukemia mortality rates in the two groups were 8.60 . 10 -5 and 1.24 . 10 -5 respectively, and the standardized mortality rates were 8.60 . 10 -5 and 1.27 . 10 -5 respectively. (Author)

  5. Commonalty initiatives in US nuclear power plants to improve radiation protection culture and worker efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, W.; Miller, D.

    2003-01-01

    Many US nuclear power plants have learned that common procedures, policies, instrumentation, tools and work practices achieve improvements to the radiation protection culture. Significant worker efficiency achievements are accomplished especially during refuelling outages. This paper discusses commonalty initiatives currently being implemented at many US Plants to address management challenges presented by deregulation of the US electric industry, reduction in the pool of outage contractors and aging of the experienced radiation worker population. The new INPO 2005 dose goals of 650 person-mSv/year for PWRs and 1200 person-mSv/yr for PWRs will require new approaches to radiation protection management to achieve these challenging goals by 2005. (authors)

  6. Effect of radiation on the health of workers associated with oil drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Zafar, M.M.; Zafar, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    Study of the radiation effects on the health of employees involved in the oil drilling are reported in this paper. The data obtained from different oil fields of Pakistan shows that some of the workers activity engaged in oil drilling suffer from vomiting fever, leukemia and lung cancer, most probably due to the effects of radiation on the body. (author)

  7. Occupational radiation protection legislation in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.; Schlesinger, T.; Lemesch, C.

    1980-01-01

    A committee of experts appointed by the Minister of Labour and Social Affairs has proposed a comprehensive draft regulation, concerning the legal aspects of occupational radiation protection in Israel. The first section of the proposed regulation sets forth guidelines for control in facilities where workers handle radioactive materials or radiation equipment. This includes the duties of the managers of such places to ensure adequate radiation protection and also the maximum recommended doses (whole body and individual organs) for radiation workers. The second section deals with the monitoring regulations for radiation workers who may be exposed to doses in excess of 500 mRem/y. The third section outlines the nature of the mechanical supervision required, i.e. routine and special examinations. Finally the committee also proposed six miscellaneous recommendations for radiation protection. (UK)

  8. Radiation protection standards for the occupational workers and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkin, S.C.; Dickson, R.L.; Halford, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    Federal Regulations concerning radiation protection standards have been undergoing significant changes within the last decade. In addition to these changes, a proliferation in the number of Federal radiation standards has also occurred. A tabulation of these regulations aids in the understanding of which current standards apply to the nuclear industry with respect to environmental contamination and exposure to workers, and the public. Furthermore, most of the current regulations, proposed revisions, and proposed new rulings fall into several major categories. A tabulation of these categories illustrates common public, occupational, and environmental needs for which the DOE, NRC, and EPA have developed their specific radiation standards. Finally, risk based systems for radiation protection have been proposed by the DOE, NRC, and EPA, although these agencies are not entirely consistent in the application of this methodology. 2 tables

  9. The protection of workers against the dangers of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The text of this decree covers the following points: scope; definitions; worker classification; occupational exposure limits; general measures related to all operations involving a risk of exposure to ionizing radiations; special measures applicable to certain radiation sources and to the establishments referred to in Article L.131-1 of the French Labour Code, where medicine or dentistry is practised. Extensive appendices, which are not reproduced here, cover definitions, radionclide classification, quality factor, limit values for annual intake by ingestion and inhalation, and derived concentration limits for occupational exposure to airborne radionuclides [fr

  10. Concern over radiation exposure and psychological distress among rescue workers following the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuoka Yutaka

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On March 11, 2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami that followed caused severe damage along Japans northeastern coastline and to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. To date, there are few reports specifically examining psychological distress in rescue workers in Japan. Moreover, it is unclear to what extent concern over radiation exposure has caused psychological distress to such workers deployed in the disaster area. Methods One month after the disaster, 424 of 1816 (24% disaster medical assistance team workers deployed to the disaster area were assessed. Concern over radiation exposure was evaluated by a single self-reported question. General psychological distress was assessed with the Kessler 6 scale (K6, depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, fear and sense of helplessness with the Peritraumatic Distress Inventory (PDI, and posttraumatic stress symptoms with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R. Results Radiation exposure was a concern for 39 (9.2% respondents. Concern over radiation exposure was significantly associated with higher scores on the K6, CES-D, PDI, and IES-R. After controlling for age, occupation, disaster operation experience, duration of time spent watching earthquake news, and past history of psychiatric illness, these associations remained significant in men, but did not remain significant in women for the CES-D and PDI scores. Conclusion The findings suggest that concern over radiation exposure was strongly associated with psychological distress. Reliable, accurate information on radiation exposure might reduce deployment-related distress in disaster rescue workers.

  11. Radiation resistance of microorganisms on unsterilized infusion sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, E. Ahrensburg; Kristensen, H.; Hoborn, J.

    1991-01-01

    Three different methods were used for detecting and isolating microorganisms with high radiation resistance from the microbial contamination on infusion sets prior to sterilization. By all three methods, microorganisms with a radiation resistance high enough to be a critical factor in a steriliza......Three different methods were used for detecting and isolating microorganisms with high radiation resistance from the microbial contamination on infusion sets prior to sterilization. By all three methods, microorganisms with a radiation resistance high enough to be a critical factor...

  12. Worker radiation doses in the United States at the dawn of the atomic era (1940--1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, D.J.; Smith, M.H.; Swinth, K.L.; Pettengill, H.J.

    1994-06-01

    Radiation doses to workers at the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) sites due to external irradiation during 1940--1960 are reviewed. Categorized radiation dose data were available from AEC annual reports for some years. Annual individual radiation dose data for ten MED/AEC sites for all years were available from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR). These data are combined to produce an estimate of external collective dose equivalent to 172,000 person-rems (1720 person-Sv) for 1940--1960. During this period there were 41 overexposures, 19 criticality incidents, and 3 deaths due to acute radiation syndrome among several hundred thousand workers

  13. The work of the ILO in the field of protection of workers against ionising and non-ionising radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppee, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    A chronological account since 1934 of the activities of the International Labour Organization (ILO) in the protection of workers against risks due to ionising and non-ionising radiations is given. Several ILO publication on safety standards and codes of practice for protection against mainly ionising radiation in various occupational situations are indicated. A more intensive study by the ILO on the protection of workers against non-ionising radiation was proposed for 1980-81. (UK)

  14. Adjustment for smoking reduces radiation risk: fifth analysis of mortality of nuclear industry workers in Japan, 1999-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, S.; Ishida, J.; Yoshimoto, K.; Mizuno, S.; Ohshima, S.; Kasagi, F., E-mail: s_kudo@rea.or.jp [Instituto of Radiation Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Association, 1-9-16 Kajicho, Chiyoda-ku, 101-0044 Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Many cohort studies among nuclear industry workers have been carried out to determine the possible health effects of low-level radiation. In those studies, confounding factors, for example, age was adjusted to exclude the effect of difference of mortality by age to estimate radiation risk. But there are few studies adjusting for smoking that is known as a strong factor which affects mortality. Radiation Effects Association (Rea) initiated a cohort study of nuclear industry workers mortality in 1990. To examine non-radiation factors confounding on the mortality risk among the radiation workers, Rea have performed life-style questionnaire surveys among the part of workers at 1997 and 2003 and found the correlation between radiation dose and smoking rate. Mortality follow-up were made on 75,442 male respondents for an average of 8.3 years during the observation period 1999-2010. Estimates of Excess Relative Risk percent (Err %) per 10 mSv were obtained by using the Poisson regression. The Err for all causes was statistically significant (1.05 (90 % CI 0.31 : 1.80)), but no longer significant after adjusting for smoking (0.45 (-0.24 : 1.13)). The Err for all cancers excluding leukemia was not significant (0.92 (-0.30 : 2.16)), but after adjusting for smoking, it decreased (0.36 (-0.79 : 1.50)). Thus smoking has a large effect to obscure a radiation risk, so adjustment for smoking is important to estimate radiation risk. (Author)

  15. Adjustment for smoking reduces radiation risk: fifth analysis of mortality of nuclear industry workers in Japan, 1999-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, S.; Ishida, J.; Yoshimoto, K.; Mizuno, S.; Ohshima, S.; Kasagi, F.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Many cohort studies among nuclear industry workers have been carried out to determine the possible health effects of low-level radiation. In those studies, confounding factors, for example, age was adjusted to exclude the effect of difference of mortality by age to estimate radiation risk. But there are few studies adjusting for smoking that is known as a strong factor which affects mortality. Radiation Effects Association (Rea) initiated a cohort study of nuclear industry workers mortality in 1990. To examine non-radiation factors confounding on the mortality risk among the radiation workers, Rea have performed life-style questionnaire surveys among the part of workers at 1997 and 2003 and found the correlation between radiation dose and smoking rate. Mortality follow-up were made on 75,442 male respondents for an average of 8.3 years during the observation period 1999-2010. Estimates of Excess Relative Risk percent (Err %) per 10 mSv were obtained by using the Poisson regression. The Err for all causes was statistically significant (1.05 (90 % CI 0.31 : 1.80)), but no longer significant after adjusting for smoking (0.45 (-0.24 : 1.13)). The Err for all cancers excluding leukemia was not significant (0.92 (-0.30 : 2.16)), but after adjusting for smoking, it decreased (0.36 (-0.79 : 1.50)). Thus smoking has a large effect to obscure a radiation risk, so adjustment for smoking is important to estimate radiation risk. (Author)

  16. Exposure of ionizing radiation to non-radiation workers from nuclear medicine patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, J.; Smart, R.C.; McKay, E.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Occasionally, patients are required to have several tests in one day. They may be injected with radio-isotopes in the morning, have other investigations during the absorption period and then return to nuclear medicine for imaging later in the day. Recently, the NSW Department of Health issued a circular concerning exposure to sonographers from ionizing radiation emitted from nuclear medicine patients. The object of this study is to establish a model of emissions from nuclear medicine patients and to measure the exposure to other health workers who may be in close contact with these patients. Dose rate measurements were acquired for patients injected with 99 Tc m and 67 Ga for the following studies: heart, thyroid, lung, bone, biliary and lymphoma. Measurements were taken at 10 cm increments to 1 m and at time intervals of 0,1,2 and 24 h post-injection. In addition, 5 sonographers were issued with TLDs to be worn on the waist and fingers for a period of 3 months. The dose limit for a non-radiation worker is 1000 μSv (ICRP 60). The external dose rate measurements indicate that, assuming a sonographer is seated approximately 30 cm from a patient injected with 800 MBq 99 Tc m -HDP for a bone scan, 1 h post-injection, the sonographer would receive a dose of 11 μSv for a 30 min ultrasound scan. In practice, only 4 nuclear medicine patients were scanned in the ultrasound department during the 5 week monitoring period and the sonographers' TLDs recorded no radiation dose. In conclusion, the average exposure to sonographers from nuclear medicine patients is well within the limits recommended by the ICRP. However, in accordance with the ALARA principle where practicable, any ultrasound examination should be performed prior to nuclear medicine studies

  17. Critical review of the Hanford worker studies: cancer risk and low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitz, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Current estimates of cancer risks attributable to low-level radiation exposure are extrapolated from effects observed at higher doses. The inherent uncertainties in this approach make direct study of low-dose effects in human populations of great significance. Employees of the Hanford works in Richland, Washington constitute a large group of workers exposed to low-level radiation. The cancer mortality patterns in relation to radiation dose have been discussed by numerous investigators beginning with Mancuso, Stewart, and Kneale in 1977 and continuing to the present. These studies and their published critiques are summarized, with an effort to account for discrepant results by careful review of the analytic methods. Detailed consideration is given to exposure definition, classification of health outcomes, latency, the statistical methods employed, and selection biases. From this, it is concluded that (a) total cancers are unrelated to radiation exposure among these workers; (b) multiple myeloma and pancreatic cancer show a positive association with radiation dose based upon a few highly exposed cases; and (c) the relationship of radiosensitive cancers in the aggregate to radiation exposure is unresolved. Further study of the temporal course of exposure and latency in a classical cohort analysis of radiosensitive cancers might be informative, with special attention to the possibility of selection for jobs within the cohort

  18. The problematic on the cancer development in occupationally exposed workers to ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouailhetas, Y.; Mezrahi, A.; Heilbron Filho, P.F.L.; Oliveira, S.M.V.

    1996-01-01

    Frequently and in an increasing perspective, the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission is inquired on the development of cancer in occupationally exposed workers to ionizing radiation. These workers try to compensate their state of ill health juridically. Taking into account that cancer is a probabilistic effect of radiation, it could be only detected by an increase in cases that normally occur in a particular population. Whether or not the occurrence of the illness is identified as having occupational origin misses scientific consistence. Regarding the probabilistic effect of low level radiation doses, radiation protection is founded on the linear dose-effect without threshold hypothesis. Thus, it could be call into a question: is it possible that the illness, presented by an individual, derives from occupational causes. If the answer is positive, the responsibility can be imputed, at first, to the employer and the link of causality turns out to be fundamented not any more in measurable objective facts but in social, economic, ethic and moral aspects, which arise from the radiological protection quality and measures offered by the employer. (author)

  19. Toxicity and oxidative stress induced by chromium in workers exposed from different occupational settings around the globe: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaid, Muhammad; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Pei, De-Sheng

    2016-10-01

    The present review focused on the levels and toxicological status of heavy metals especially chromium (Cr) in the exposed workers from different occupational settings around the globe and in Pakistan. It was found that exposed workers from leather tanning and metal plating units showed elevated levels of Cr than the workers from other occupational settings. Cr and other heavy metals level in biological matrices of the exposed workers in different occupational settings revealed that developing countries are severely contaminated. Occupational settings from the Sialkot district, Pakistan exhibited elevated level of Cr in biological entities of the exposed workers. Review suggested that higher level of Cr exposure to the workers enhance the oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hydroxyl (OH) radical generation) which may cause; cellular and molecular damage such as genotoxicity and chromosomal aberration formations, and carcinogenic effects. This review will help to understand the Cr contamination mechanisms and associated health implications in different occupational settings around the globe in general and particularly to Pakistan. This study will also assist occupational health and safety management authorities to devise or change the Cr recommended exposure limits (REL) for different occupational settings.

  20. Influence of radiation and non-radiation factors on pancreatic cancer incidence among Mayak PA workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D. [Southern Ural Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Syrchikov, V.A.; Grigoryeva, E.S. [Mayak Production Association (Mayak PA), Ozyorsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The finding of this nested case-control study suggests that high levels of 239 Pu incorporation (239 Pu body burden > 3.7), alcohol abuse and smoking were associated with increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer among Mayak PA workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation. The contribution of non radiation factors (alcohol abuse and smoking) to pancreatic tumor incidence is greater (AR=51%) than 239 Pu incorporation kBq; AR = 7%). No significant effect of external gamma rays ({<=} 6.8 Gy), prior exposure to chemical agents, or chronic digestive diseases was found on the incidence of pancreatic tumor. Evaluation of the absorbed alpha-radiation pancreatic dose will permit to make more exact the 239 Pu risk estimation in the further extended study.

  1. Influence of radiation and non-radiation factors on pancreatic cancer incidence among Mayak PA workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D.; Syrchikov, V.A.; Grigoryeva, E.S.

    2006-01-01

    The finding of this nested case-control study suggests that high levels of 239 Pu incorporation (239 Pu body burden > 3.7), alcohol abuse and smoking were associated with increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer among Mayak PA workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation. The contribution of non radiation factors (alcohol abuse and smoking) to pancreatic tumor incidence is greater (AR=51%) than 239 Pu incorporation kBq; AR = 7%). No significant effect of external gamma rays (≤ 6.8 Gy), prior exposure to chemical agents, or chronic digestive diseases was found on the incidence of pancreatic tumor. Evaluation of the absorbed alpha-radiation pancreatic dose will permit to make more exact the 239 Pu risk estimation in the further extended study

  2. Carcinogenic risk for workers exposed to ionizing radiation. A critical review of present epidemiologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirmarche, M.

    1987-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies on workers who have been exposed to ionizing radiation have allowed to demonstrate certain cancer risks associated with elevated, often retrospectively reconstituted exposures. Present studies on still active workers or workers having worked for the last 15 years are indispensable to define the risk associated with low irradiation doses; they must, however, take into account confounding factors that may play a role in the etiology of the cancer studied

  3. Radiation exposure of sewer workers associated with radioactive discharges from hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, C.E.; Wilkins, S.

    1991-07-01

    Models have been developed to estimate the dispersion of radionuclides discharged into the sewer system serving a hospital where nuclear medicine and other techniques are used, and to assess the radiation doses to sewer workers and maintenance staff who may be exposed to these discharges. The dispersion model has been tested in a practical situation for the radionuclide 131 I. For a typical combination of hospital and sewer works, the estimated critical group doses arising from discharges of four selected radionuclides, 32 P, 99m Tc, 125 I and 131 I, are 30 μSv y -1 and 20 μSv y -1 respectively for a worker at the sewer works and for a sewer maintenance worker exposed for prolonged periods in the region of the sewer system adjacent to the hospital discharge point. (author)

  4. Self-efficacy and Perceived Organizational Support by Workers in a Youth Development Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rockow

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy levels of workers in the youth development field can significantly impact the work done with youth.  These levels may be impacted by workers’ perceptions of administrative occupational support at their organization.  To date, limited research exists that examines youth work efficacy levels, and no research studies exist analyzing the relationship between youth workers’ efficacy levels and perceived organizational support.  The current study examined the relationship between self-efficacy and the perceived organizational support felt by workers in a youth development setting.  A total of 198 surveys were completed; results indicated that youth work efficacy was significantly related to perceived organizational support.  This study is important to enhancing the body of knowledge regarding self-efficacy levels of workers in a youth development setting, as well as understanding motivation and self-confidence of youth development professionals.

  5. Assessment of dose to the expected overexposed radiation workers in Malaysia using dicentric technique from 2005 - 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noraisyah Mohd Yusof; Mohd Rodzi Ali; Noriah Jamal; Rehir Dahalan

    2008-08-01

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency is recognized by the Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) as a National Biodosimetry Laboratory for performing the chromosome aberration tests in Malaysia. The test is to be done for radiation workers who received doses of more than the annual dose limit of 50 mSv or losses of film badge. This paper aims at presenting results of assessment of dose to the expected overexposed radiation workers in Malaysia using dicentric technique from year 2005 to 2006. Between that period of time, 20 blood samples (loss of film badge: 5 samples, overexposed: 13 samples and follow-up cases: 2 samples) were received from the AELB and the assessment of chromosome aberration were performed. The information on whole body exposure (WBE) was also received together with the samples for overexposed worker. We used the gold standard technique, which is the dicentric assay to analyze the blood samples. The technique is described in the IAEA Technical Report Series No. 405. The results were then analyzed and compared with the respective WBE for the overexposed worker. We found that no doses were observed for workers who loss their film badges and for follow-up cases. 30.8% of the overexposed workers show doses of more than 50 mSv. However, 69.2% shows doses lower than the annual limit. Variation of results may be due to delayed blood sampling from the workers. This technique is especially useful for immediate assessment of radiation exposure. (Author)

  6. Spectrum of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of hospital workers occupationally exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maffei, Francesca; Angelini, Sabrina; Forti, Giorgio Cantelli; Violante, Francesco S.; Lodi, Vittorio; Mattioli, Stefano; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations frequency was estimated in peripheral lymphocytes from hospital workers occupationally exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation and controls. Chromosome aberrations yield was analyzed by considering the effects of dose equivalent of ionizing radiation over time, and of confounding factors, such as age, gender and smoking status. Frequencies of aberrant cells and chromosome breaks were higher in exposed workers than in controls (P=0.007, and P=0.001, respectively). Seven dicentric aberrations were detected in the exposed group and only three in controls, but the mean frequencies were not significantly different. The dose equivalent to whole body of ionizing radiation (Hwb) did appear to influence the spectrum of chromosomal aberrations when the exposed workers were subdivided by a cut off at 50 mSv. The frequencies of chromosome breaks in both subgroups of workers were significantly higher than in controls (≤50 mSv, P=0.041; >50 mSv, P=0.018). On the other hand, the frequency of chromatid breaks observed in workers with Hwb >50 mSv was significantly higher than in controls (P=0.015) or workers with Hwb ≤50 mSv (P=0.046). Regarding the influence of confounding factors on genetic damage, smoking status and female gender seem to influence the increase in chromosome aberration frequencies in the study population. Overall, these results suggested that chromosome breaks might provide a good marker for assessing genetic damage in populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation

  7. Radiological protection of workers. The IRSN proposes new functionalities to the users of the national information system for the radiological follow-up of workers exposed to ionizing radiations (SISERI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portes, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    After a brief definition of the SISERI (national information system for the radiological follow-up of workers exposed to ionizing radiations) and of its new arrangements introduced in 2014, this document outlines that the radiological follow-up of workers is one of the national missions of the IRSN in different ways: risk prevention (regulatory support, certification, workstation studies), individual control of workers exposed to ionizing radiations (internal and external dosimetry), follow-up of all exposed workers (SISERI, annual assessment, follow-up of incidents and events), expertise in case of anomalies or crisis, sharing of knowledge and know-how. It describes the traceability of the individual dosimetric follow-up of workers exposed to ionizing radiations in France (regulatory requirement, centralization of data). It comments the evolutions introduced in 2014 in the modalities of follow-up of worker exposure: publication of a new order, evolution of the SISERI information system with new functionalities, totally dematerialised signature of the access protocol, pages of the SISERI specifically dedicated to the CSE (SISERI correspondent of the employer), a sheet of medical follow-up, access rights for the competent radiological protection person. It gives an overview of regulation on worker control: present context with threshold exposure values, past evolution, follow-up principles. A diagram indicates these evolutions (dates of orders, concerned personnel, and dose thresholds)

  8. Regulation on radiation protection health care of workers exposed to ionizing radiation. - Regulation on radiation protection health care - of the 25 Mar 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The present regulation will be in force on 1 July 1986 and supersedes a regulation from 29 September 1970. It regulates the medical surveillance with regard to radiation protection for all kinds of workers with an increased risk of being exposed to ionizing radiation such as e.g. reactor operators and miners. Examinations have to be performed according to directions of the SAAS including further measures if necessary regarding clinical occupational and radiation protection medicine. The task of the firms, the managers, the medical officers, and the SAAS are distinctly marked

  9. Cytogenetic and hematological studies in the workers occupationally exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakeri, F.; Honarjoo, M.; Rajab pour, M.; Zahadat, A.; Ahmad pour, M.J.; Asghari, K.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: This study was aimed at detecting both the incidence of chromosomal aberrations and changes in the hematological parameters as biomarkers of possible radiation injury among workers occupationally exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation and detecting the dose-effect relationship. Methods: Samples of peripheral blood were collected from 38 male industrial radiographers exposed to ionizing radiation for 1-16 years and from 24 age- and sex-matched healthy blood donors without radiation history served as control group. All radiation workers were routinely monitored with film badge. Cytogenetic analysis in peripheral blood lymphocytes assessed by the conventional chromosome aberration assay and at least 200 metaphases for each person were scored. The collected blood samples were analyzed for hematological assay using an automatic analyzer Sysmex KX-21, where 14 different parameters were computerized. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the frequencies of the unstable aberrations and hematological parameters between test and control groups. Dose-effect relationship and the influence of age and duration of employment was tested by regression analysis. Results and conclusion: The mean frequencies of dicentric and acentric chromosome aberrations were significantly higher in the exposed group than in the control group (P< 0.0005). No correlation between chromosomal aberrations and physical dose and age was observed in the exposed group. Also there is no clear relation between chromosome damage and duration of exposure. However, the increase in chromosome aberrations in the exposed group was not followed by a corresponding hematological depression. The average values of hematological indices were within the reference levels and did not show any significant differences with control group. A tendency of decreasing the absolute lymphocyte count within the referential levels was the only hematological effect in radiation

  10. Issues behind Radiation management of workers at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company. From the viewpoint of radiation exposure of the ocular lens and the biological effects to the lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Toshiyuki; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Hatsusaka, Natsuko; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Akahane, Keiichi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2017-01-01

    In March 2011, the accident occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company. During recovery from critical situations, the radiation dose for some emergency workers exceeded the effective dose limit recommended for an emergency situation. A month after the accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection issued a statement on tissue reactions recommending significant reduction of the equivalent dose limit to the lens of the eye. Many radiation workers will need to be involved in treatment of water contaminated with radionuclides, fuel debris retrieval, and decommissioning of reactors for a long period of time. Thus, the optimized radiation control in the fields, exposure reduction, prevention of tissue reactions, and reduction of stochastic risks for workers becomes necessary. This paper discusses issues in relation to radiation protection of the ocular lens in such recovery workers, from the viewpoint of radiation exposure of workers, its management, manifestations and mechanisms of the lens effects. (author)

  11. Knowledge of Radiation Hazards, Radiation Protection Practices and Clinical Profile of Health Workers in a Teaching Hospital in Northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awosan, K J; Ibrahim, Mto; Saidu, S A; Ma'aji, S M; Danfulani, M; Yunusa, E U; Ikhuenbor, D B; Ige, T A

    2016-08-01

    Use of ionizing radiation in medical imaging for diagnostic and interventional purposes has risen dramatically in recent years with a concomitant increase in exposure of patients and health workers to radiation hazards. To assess the knowledge of radiation hazards, radiation protection practices and clinical profile of health workers in UDUTH, Sokoto, Nigeria. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 110 Radiology, Radiotherapy and Dentistry staff selected by universal sampling technique. The study comprised of administration of standardized semi-structured pre-tested questionnaire (to obtain information on socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge of radiation hazards, and radiation protection practices of participants), clinical assessment (comprising of chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasound and laboratory investigation on hematological parameters), and evaluation of radiation exposure of participants (extracted from existing hospital records on their radiation exposure status). The participants were aged 20 to 65 years (mean = 34.04 ± 8.83), most of them were males (67.3%) and married (65.7%). Sixty five (59.1%) had good knowledge of radiation hazards, 58 (52.7%) had good knowledge of Personal Protective Devices (PPDs), less than a third, 30 (27.3%) consistently wore dosimeter, and very few (10.9% and below) consistently wore the various PPDs at work. The average annual radiation exposure over a 4 year period ranged from 0.0475mSv to 1.8725mSv. Only 1 (1.2%) of 86 participants had abnormal chest X-ray findings, 8 (9.4%) of 85 participants had abnormal abdominal ultrasound findings; while 17 (15.5%) and 11 (10.0%) of 110 participants had anemia and leucopenia respectively. This study demonstrated poor radiation protection practices despite good knowledge of radiation hazards among the participants, but radiation exposure and prevalence of abnormal clinical conditions were found to be low. Periodic in-service training and monitoring on radiation safety was

  12. Register of legislative and regulatory dispositions relative to the radiation protection of the population and workers against the dangers of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-12-01

    This collection of legislative arrangements concerns the protection of population and workers against the risks of ionizing radiations. Each chapter is divided in two parts: a legislative part and a statutory or regulation part. We find the different chapters in relation with protection of populations, protection of workers, public health and labour laws. (N.C.)

  13. Relationship between radiation dose and changes of blood cells in medical diagnostic X-ray workers in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wenzheng

    1984-01-01

    The hematological changes of 2867 cases of medical X-ray workers and 1152 cases of non-X-ray medical workers were compared. It was shown that the total number of leukocytes, the numbers of neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets were significantly lower in X-ray workers than those in controls. However, the percentages of monocytes, eosinophils, basophils and the concentration of hemoglobin were higher in the irradiated group. the difference between the two groups was statistically significant. The degree of changes in the number of blood cells was dose-dependent. A negative correlation could be found between the changes of leukocyte and neutrophil counts and cumulative dose (<250 mGy), annual dose (<15 mGy/a) and length of service of the X-ray workers; and a positive correlation existed between the percentages of basophils, eosinophils and monocytes, and the radiation dose. The abnormality rate of blood picture in the irradiated group was higher than that in the control group. Most X-ray workers with abnormal blood picture were distributed in low-dose group. The data also showed that radiation effect on male X-ray workers was greater than that on female workers. (Author)

  14. Occupational radiation exposure and its health effects on interventional medical workers: study protocol for a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seulki; Chung, Hwan Hoon; Cho, Sung Bum; Jin, Young Woo; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Ha, Mina; Bang, Ye Jin; Ha, Yae Won; Lee, Won Jin

    2017-12-15

    Although fluoroscopically guided procedures involve a considerably high dose of radiation, few studies have investigated the effects of radiation on medical workers involved in interventional fluoroscopy procedures. Previous research remains in the early stages and has not reached a level comparable with other occupational studies thus far. Furthermore, the study of radiation workers provides an opportunity to estimate health risks at low doses and dose rates of ionising radiation. Therefore, the objectives of this study are (1) to initiate a prospective cohort study by conducting a baseline survey among medical radiation workers who involve interventional fluoroscopy procedures and (2) to assess the effect of occupational radiation exposure and on the overall health status through an in-depth cross-sectional study. Intervention medical workers in Korea will be enrolled by using a self-administered questionnaire survey, and the survey data will be linked with radiation dosimetry data, National Health Insurance claims data, cancer registry and mortality data. After merging these data, the radiation organ dose, lifetime attributable risk due to cancer and the risk per unit dose will be estimated. For the cross-sectional study, approximately 100 intervention radiology department workers will be investigated for blood tests, clinical examinations such as ultrasonography (thyroid and carotid artery scan) and lens opacity, the validation of badge dose and biodosimetry. This study was reviewed and approved by the institutional review board of Korea University (KU-IRB-12-12-A-1). All participants will provide written informed consent prior to enrolment. The findings of the study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed scientific journals, conference presentations, and a report will be submitted to the relevant public health authorities in the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help with the development of appropriate research and management policies.

  15. Radiation protection and fuzzy set theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Y.

    1993-01-01

    In radiation protection we encounter a variety of sources of uncertainties which are due to fuzziness in our cognition or perception of objects. For systematic treatment of this type of uncertainty, the concepts of fuzzy sets or fuzzy measures could be applied to construct system models, which may take into consideration both subjective or intrinsic fuzziness and objective or extrinsic fuzziness. The theory of fuzzy sets and fuzzy measures is still in a developing stage, but its concept may be applied to various problems of subjective perception of risk, nuclear safety, radiation protection and also to the problems of man-machine interface and human factor engineering or ergonomic

  16. The 15-Country Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardis, E; Vrijheid, M; Blettner, M

    2007-01-01

    A 15-Country collaborative cohort study was conducted to provide direct estimates of cancer risk following protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. Analyses included 407,391 nuclear industry workers monitored individually for external radiation and 5.2 million person-years of follow-up. A sign...

  17. Monitoring and radiation dose estimation for internal contamination of occupational workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kol, R; Laichter, Y [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Beersheba (Israel). Nuclear Research Center-Negev

    1996-12-01

    The assessment of interval radiation doses due to intake of radionuclides differs totally from external dosimetry. External dosimetry is relatively straight forward: Workers are equipped with appropriate dosimeters that give the dose upon direct reading. Internal dosimetry is actually an assessment of the dose based on results of personnel and environmental monitoring (authors).

  18. Ionizing radiation and risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the 15-country study of nuclear industry workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrijheid, Martine; Cardis, Elisabeth; Ashmore, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to other types of leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has long been regarded as non-radiogenic, i.e. not caused by ionizing radiation. However, the justification for this view has been challenged. We therefore report on the relationship between CLL mortality and external...... ionizing radiation dose within the 15-country nuclear workers cohort study. The analyses included, in seven countries with CLL deaths, a total of 295,963 workers with more than 4.5 million person-years of follow-up and an average cumulative bone marrow dose of 15 mSv; there were 65 CLL deaths....... In conclusion, the largest nuclear workers cohort study to date finds little evidence for an association between low doses of external ionizing radiation and CLL mortality. This study had little power due to low doses, short follow-up periods, and uncertainties in CLL ascertainment from death certificates...

  19. Basic principles for occupational radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Safety Guide sets forth the objectives of an adequate strategy for monitoring internal and external radiation exposures of workers. It covers individual monitoring, and workplace monitoring to the extent required for assessment and control of individual radiation doses. The responsibilities of authorities for organizing the monitoring of radiation workers are discussed, and brief descriptions are given of the rules governing the implementation of monitoring methods. The general principles to be considered in selecting instrumentation and appropriate monitoring techniques are described, as well as calibrating techniques, methods of record keeping and related aspects

  20. Experiences in the monitoring of radiation workers in industry and hospitals in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateo, A.J.

    1976-08-01

    The task of monitoring of radiation doses among radiation workers employed either in industry and hospitals in the Philippines is presently being undertaken by the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission. These radiation monitoring devices cover not only radioactive materials or sources but also x-ray machines. The most common dosimetry used is the film badge. This paper presents some of the experiences gained in the use of the film badge and other dosimeters

  1. Medical management of three workers following a radiation exposure incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, R.A.; Sax, S.E.; Rumack, E.R.; Holness, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    The medical management of three individuals involved in an exposure incident to whole-body radiation at a nuclear generating plant of a Canadian electrical utility is described. The exposure incident resulted in the two highest whole-body radiation doses ever received in a single event by workers in a Canadian nuclear power plant. The individual whole-body doses (127.4 mSv, 92.0 mSv, 22.4 mSv) were below the threshold for acute radiation sickness but the exposures still presented medical management problems related to assessment and counseling. Serial blood counting and lymphocyte cytogenetic analysis to corroborate the physical dosimetry were performed. All three employees experienced somatic symptoms due to stress and one employee developed post-traumatic stress disorder. This incident indicates that there is a need in such radiation exposure accidents for early and continued counseling of exposed employees to minimize the risk of development of stress-related symptoms

  2. Medical management of three workers following a radiation exposure incident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    House, R.A.; Sax, S.E.; Rumack, E.R.; Holness, D.L. (Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, St. Michael' s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1992-01-01

    The medical management of three individuals involved in an exposure incident to whole-body radiation at a nuclear generating plant of a Canadian electrical utility is described. The exposure incident resulted in the two highest whole-body radiation doses ever received in a single event by workers in a Canadian nuclear power plant. The individual whole-body doses (127.4 mSv, 92.0 mSv, 22.4 mSv) were below the threshold for acute radiation sickness but the exposures still presented medical management problems related to assessment and counseling. Serial blood counting and lymphocyte cytogenetic analysis to corroborate the physical dosimetry were performed. All three employees experienced somatic symptoms due to stress and one employee developed post-traumatic stress disorder. This incident indicates that there is a need in such radiation exposure accidents for early and continued counseling of exposed employees to minimize the risk of development of stress-related symptoms.

  3. Radiological Worker Training: Radiological Worker 2 study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    Upon completion of this training course, the participant will have the knowledge to work safely in areas controlled for radiological purposes using proper radiological practices. Radiological Worker H Training, for the worker whose job assignment involves entry into Radiological Buffer Areas and all types of Radiation Contamination and Airborne Radioactivity Areas. This course is designed to prepare the worker to work safely in and around radiological areas and present methods to use to ensure individual radiation exposure is maintained As Low As Reasonably Achievable

  4. A 10-year review of the dose history of radiation workers in the University of Surrey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parami, V.K.

    1991-09-01

    This thesis presents data on internally and externally received doses for radiation workers whose records are kept at the Safety Office of the University of Surrey for the period 1981-1990. The distribution of doses by range is presented and analysed. The patterns of the collective equivalent dose (CED) and the average individual equivalent dose (IED) over the 10-year period are presented. The annual CED is very low, so that even the total for the 10-year period is less than 1 man-Sv. Likewise, the annual average IED is extremely low, well below the average annual dose to the U.K. population from overall sources of ionising radiation. Some relevant aspects of the 1990 ICRP Recommendations are examined and the impact of these to the 'practices' and sources of ionising radiation in the University is given consideration. The results of the 10-year review provide more evidence of over designation of radiation workers in the University. A recommendation is made to reduce the number of workers who are routinely monitored and justification and options are presented. This study is viewed as a useful database which could be of particular importance in the procedure of optimisation of radiation protection in the University of Surrey and U.K. establishments for higher education as a whole. (author)

  5. Health Care Workers and Researchers Traveling to Developing-World Clinical Settings: Disease Transmission Risk and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    INVITED ARTICLE James M. Hughes and Mary E. Wilson, Section Editors Health Care Workers and Researchers Traveling to Developing-World Clinical...for risk mitigation. Few data on the epidemiology of infectious diseases occurring among traveling health care workers (HCWs) exist. Surveillance... Health Care Workers and Researchers Traveling to Developing-World Clinical Settings: Disease Transmission Risk and Mitigation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  6. First assessment of individual monitoring of medical workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation in Burkina Faso

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakoro, A.; Nobila Ouédraogo, Salimata Traoré

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of monitoring of medical workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation as a consequence of exposure to X-rays, from 2007 to 2010, in Burkina Faso. The radiation exposure monitoring was made with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) type 0110 and the reader used was Harshaw 4500. The medical establishments. subscribers were provided with personal dosimeters (measuring Hp (10) and Hp (0.07)) and dosimeters for background and workplace exposure (H*10) measurement. The dosimeters have been worn for periods of 2 months each. The number of establishments subscribed and workers monitored has gradually increased from 4 radiology establishments with 13 workers monitored at September 2007 to 23 subscribers with 121 workers monitored at the end of April 2010. 13 establishments were still working without monitoring. From September 2007 to April 2010, no individual annual dose limit has really been reached. 88.16% of the 2 months dose values of personal dosimeters were below 0.1mSv, the detection limit and 96.61% of Hp (10) bimonthly values were below 3.33mSv. The workplace exposure monitoring values were often low (varying from 0.00mSv to 40.45mSv). 87.08% of the values of H*(10) were below 3.33mSv, the upper limit of Hp (10) for a period of 2 months. Low values of individual dose have also been recorded despite of high values of workplace monitoring. This allowed to state that the workers monitored were not exposed to a major risk. Nevertheless, 13 TLD have been lost and 3 damaged by subscribers (out of 1504 TLD provided). 26 times (out of 240), background measurement and workplace exposure monitoring dosimeters have been placed at the improper location. Therefore, sensitization of the establishments using ionizing radiation should be reinforced and the national regulations should impose radiation monitoring (author)

  7. The management of workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    In Canada, the regulation of radiation protection is a shared responsibility between the federal body (the Atomic Energy Control Board) and the appropriate provincial body (usually the Department of Health, or Department of Labour). The AECB is responsible, for example, for regulating the development, application and use of nuclear energy and radioisotopes, and the provinces are responsible for the regulation of all other forms of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations and for naturally-occurring radioactive material (NORM). Although there is consultation between the federal and provincial regulatory agencies, the division of jurisdictional authority has resulted in considerable differences in the approach towards implementation radiation protection programs in Canada. This is especially true in the management of workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. These differences have produced unwarranted discrepancies in operating procedures and practices in the allocation of resources and manpower, and in the requirements governing radiological training, personnel monitoring and medical surveillance. In light of the General Amendments to the AEC Regulations, the 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP, and the IAEA recommendations on safety culture, the ACRP has considered it timely to undertake a study to examine the feasibility of establishing a more coherent approach to harmonize radiation protection practices within Canada. This study comprised an examination of the regulatory approach used in several countries: a review of the nature of radiation safety programs in various types of licensed institutions and facilities in Canada; and a review of recommendations of internationally-recognized authorities in radiation protection

  8. role of some transition metals and metalloproteins on oxidative stress formation among ionizing radiation exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, M.I.

    2004-01-01

    this study was established to evaluate the role of working in radiation field for different prolonged periods on some oxidant/antioxidant parameters and to estimate the role of other additional factors such as age, smoking and inflammation on the progress of oxidative stress on the chosen volunteers. one hundred and twenty six male volunteers working in the nuclear research center and hot laboratories center were assessed in the present study, they were arranged as 70 radiation exposed workers and 56 control individuals. the radiation exposed workers were rearranged into 50 non-smokers, non-hypertensive and non-diabetics; 10 individuals were smokers, non-hypertensive, non-diabetic and other 10 volunteers with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (esr), non-smokers, non-hypertensive and non-diabetics

  9. Analysis of occupational doses of workers on the dose registry of the Federal Radiation Protection Service in 2000 and 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogundare, F.O.; Balogun, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    In 2000 and 2001 about 279 and 221 radiation workers, respectively, were monitored by the Federal Radiation Protection Service, University of Ibadan, in Nigeria. The distribution of the occupational doses shows that the majority of workers received doses below 4 mSv in each of the two years. The radiation workers in the two years are classified into two occupational categories: medicine and industry. The mean annual effective doses, collective doses and the collective dose distribution ratios for workers in each category and the entire monitored workers were calculated. The mean annual effective doses were compared with their corresponding worldwide values quoted by UNSCEAR. In each of the two years, a few workers in industry received doses higher than 50 mSv. The collective dose distribution ratio was found to be about 0.49, which is very close to the highest value of 0.5 in the range of values considered by UNSCEAR as normal for this parameter. This suggests that extra measures have to be taken, particularly in industry, to ensure that the proportion of workers at risk does not go outside this normal range. The occupational doses were also modelled by both the log-normal and Weibull distributions. Both distributions were found to describe the data in almost the same way. (author)

  10. [Effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation on cardiovascular system of workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Long-yu; Song, Chun-xiao; Yu, Duo; Liu, Xiao-liang; Guo, Jian-qiu; Wang, Chuan; Ding, Yuan-wei; Zhou, Hong-xia; Ma, Shu-mei; Liu, Xiao-dong; Liu, Xin

    2012-03-01

    To observe the exposure levels of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields in workplaces and to analyze the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation on cardiovascular system of occupationally exposed people. Intensity of electromagnetic fields in two workplaces (control and exposure groups) was detected with EFA-300 frequency electromagnetic field strength tester, and intensity of the noise was detected with AWA5610D integral sound level. The information of health physical indicators of 188 controls and 642 occupationally exposed workers was collected. Data were analyzed by SPSS17.0 statistic software. The intensity of electric fields and the magnetic fields in exposure groups was significantly higher than that in control group (P 0.05). The results of physical examination showed that the abnormal rates of HCY, ALT, AST, GGT, ECG in the exposure group were significantly higher than those in control group (P 0.05). Exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation may have some effects on the cardiovascular system of workers.

  11. Elimination of quarterly urinalysis of radiation workers based on detection capability of portal monitors for internal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanuja, Jayalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Covidien is a radiopharmaceutical manufacturing company in Missouri, USA. The facility produces radionuclides for diagnostic and therapeutic use. The radionuclides of interest, 123 I, 67 Ga, 99 Mo, 99m Tc, 201 Tl, 111 In, and 131 I are fairly short lived with the exception of 51 Cr. The operating license document for the company mandated quarterly urinalysis (bioassay) of all radiation workers in the facility. This was labor intensive and did not enhance the quality of radiation protection program. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) required a technical basis to prove that there was no compromise in the radiological safety and accurate dose assessment in the event of internal contamination of radiation workers if quarterly urinalysis was discontinued. Measurements in a phantom, gamma spectroscopy analysis, as well as calculations showed that there was no need to perform quarterly urinalysis and that portal monitors and other radiological controls were sufficient to detect any chronic or acute intake of radioactivity by radiation workers. Technical evaluation showed Portal monitors can detect an Effective Dose Equivalent of 0.1 mSv (10 mrem) in a year. NRC allowed revision of operating license document and operating procedures to discontinue quarterly urinalysis. (author)

  12. Summary of recorded external radiation doses for Hanford workers 1944--1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buschbom, R.L.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1993-10-01

    This report summarizes recorded external radiation doses for the years 1944 through 1989 received by operations workers who were included in the Hanford Mortality Study. This study population includes all operations workers who were initially employed at the Hanford site from 1944 through 1978. Descriptive summaries are provided for both annual and cumulative whole body penetrating doses. Although the main emphasis of the report is on recorded whole body penetrating dose, summary tables are included for the components of whole body penetrating dose, non-penetrating dose, and extremity dose. Summaries are provided for the entire study population and for subgroups of the population defined by sex, age, number of years since first monitoring, and socioeconomic groups

  13. Health effects of low dose exposures to external ionizing radiation in the French cohort of nuclear workers CEA-AREVA-EDF - 5287

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuraud, K.; Fournier, L.; Samson, E.; Caer-Lorho, S.; Laurier, D.; Laroche, P.; Le Guen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Populations of nuclear workers are particularly relevant to study health effects of low dose and low dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation. In France, a cohort of nuclear workers employed by CEA, AREVA NC, or EDF, and badge-monitored for radiation exposure, has been followed-up. Annual exposure to penetrating photons was reconstructed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios were calculated using national mortality rates as the reference. Estimates of radiation dose-mortality associations were obtained using a linear excess relative risk (ERR) model. A total of 59,004 workers were followed-up between 1968 and 2004, for an average of 25 years. The mean cumulative photons dose was 16.1 mSv. At the end of the follow-up, workers were 56 years old and 6,310 workers had died. A strong healthy worker effect was observed. Positive but imprecise estimates of ERR/Sv were observed for all solid cancers and leukemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A significant ERR/Sv was found for myeloid leukemia. This cohort study is the most informative ever conducted in France among nuclear workers. Results confirmed a healthy worker effect due to selection at hiring and health monitoring from occupational medicine. Observed dose-risk relationships were consistent with risks estimated in other studies, even if they remained associated to a large uncertainty. (authors)

  14. Non-radiation risk factors for leukemia: A case-control study among chornobyl cleanup workers in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudzenko, N.; Hatch, M.; Bazyka, D.; Dyagil, I.; Reiss, R.F.; Brenner, A.; Chumak, V.; Babkina, N.; Zablotska, L.B.; Mabuchi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Occupational and environmental exposure to chemicals such as benzene has been linked to increased risk of leukemia. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have also been found to affect leukemia risk. Previous analyses in a large cohort of Chornobyl clean-up workers in Ukraine found significant radiation-related increased risk for all leukemia types. We investigated the potential for additional effects of occupational and lifestyle factors on leukemia risk in this radiation-exposed cohort. Methods: In a case-control study of chronic lymphocytic and other leukemias among Chornobyl cleanup workers, we collected data on a range of non-radiation exposures. We evaluated these and other potential risk factors in analyses adjusting for estimated bone marrow radiation dose. We calculated Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals in relation to lifestyle factors and occupational hazards. Results: After adjusting for radiation, we found no clear association of leukemia risk with smoking or alcohol but identified a two-fold elevated risk for non-CLL leukemia with occupational exposure to petroleum (OR=2.28; 95% Confidence Interval 1.13, 6.79). Risks were particularly high for myeloid leukemias. No associations with risk factors other than radiation were found for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Conclusions: These data – the first from a working population in Ukraine – add to evidence from several previous reports of excess leukemia morbidity in groups exposed environmentally or occupationally to petroleum or its products. - Highlights: • A unique population – a cohort of 110,645 Chernobyl clean-up workers from Ukraine. • Followed 1986–2006 for leukemia, interviewed about non-radiation risk factors. • Petroleum exposure increased risk for non-CLL leukemias, particularly CML. • No risk factor other than radiation was found for CLL.

  15. Non-radiation risk factors for leukemia: A case-control study among chornobyl cleanup workers in Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudzenko, N., E-mail: gudznat@gmail.com [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Hatch, M., E-mail: hatchm@mail.nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (United States); Bazyka, D., E-mail: Bazyka@yahoo.com [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Dyagil, I., E-mail: leuk@ukr.net [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Reiss, R.F., E-mail: rfr1@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Brenner, A., E-mail: brennera@mail.nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (United States); Chumak, V., E-mail: Chumak.vadim@gmail.com [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Babkina, N., E-mail: natalie.babkina@gmail.com [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Zablotska, L.B., E-mail: lydia.zablotska@ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Mabuchi, K., E-mail: mabuchik@mail.nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Background: Occupational and environmental exposure to chemicals such as benzene has been linked to increased risk of leukemia. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have also been found to affect leukemia risk. Previous analyses in a large cohort of Chornobyl clean-up workers in Ukraine found significant radiation-related increased risk for all leukemia types. We investigated the potential for additional effects of occupational and lifestyle factors on leukemia risk in this radiation-exposed cohort. Methods: In a case-control study of chronic lymphocytic and other leukemias among Chornobyl cleanup workers, we collected data on a range of non-radiation exposures. We evaluated these and other potential risk factors in analyses adjusting for estimated bone marrow radiation dose. We calculated Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals in relation to lifestyle factors and occupational hazards. Results: After adjusting for radiation, we found no clear association of leukemia risk with smoking or alcohol but identified a two-fold elevated risk for non-CLL leukemia with occupational exposure to petroleum (OR=2.28; 95% Confidence Interval 1.13, 6.79). Risks were particularly high for myeloid leukemias. No associations with risk factors other than radiation were found for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Conclusions: These data – the first from a working population in Ukraine – add to evidence from several previous reports of excess leukemia morbidity in groups exposed environmentally or occupationally to petroleum or its products. - Highlights: • A unique population – a cohort of 110,645 Chernobyl clean-up workers from Ukraine. • Followed 1986–2006 for leukemia, interviewed about non-radiation risk factors. • Petroleum exposure increased risk for non-CLL leukemias, particularly CML. • No risk factor other than radiation was found for CLL.

  16. Workshop on radiation protection of patient. Workshop on radiation protection of worker in nuclear medicine and biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In these workshops, information on the following subjects was presented: biological and prenatal effects of ionizing radiation, excretion of radiopharmaceuticals in human breast milk, fetal doses assessment, final disposal of radioactive waste in medical applications, regulatory functions for installations in nuclear medicine, workers doses in nuclear medicine and biomedicine, radioprotection of their nuclear installations, programs of quality assurance, etc

  17. Effect of ionizing radiation on biochemical variable in blood of workers and cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwan, I. F.; Mohamed, H. A.; Mohamed, N.A

    2012-12-01

    This research is concerned threw on the possible between the chemical evidence of life on the process of oxidative stress malonaldehyde (MDA) and the glutathione -S- transfers (GST) enzyme as the concentration of amount of hemoglobin, and the proportion of (packed cell volume) PCV and concentration of the amount (fibrinogen) as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation of the isotope technetium-99 m, is used for treatment and imaging up to (10-30 m ci) and the serum of the three groups were used. Were divided the three groups to group one (50) for the radiation patient who has cancer and the second group (50) of workers in the nuclear medicine centers and third groups (50) healthy volunteers of non-exposed to radiation (control group). The oxidative peroxides rate was determined (MDA), also the activity of (GST) enzyme and some blood physiological compared with the control group. This study indicated that there was a significant difference at (p<0.01) on the action of GST enzyme and MDA and concentration of amount of hemoglobin, (fibrinogen) and PCV in the blood of workers in the nuclear medicine centers and the radiations patient groups compared with the control group. (Author)

  18. SU-E-T-241: Design and Implement of An Information Management System for Radiation Workers in a Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q; Wu, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To meet the special needs of Medical Administration Division, an information management system for radiation workers in a hospital(IMSRWH) has been developed. Methods: There are about 200 radiation workers in 20 departments, such as department of radiology, department of radiation oncology, department of nuclear medicine, and so on. An IMSRWH server was used to run a database and web service of Apache+PHP+MySQL. The IMSRWH web service could be accessed with Internet Explorer(IE) to input, search, count, and print the radiation workers’ data. Every worker’s data information includes the following tables: registration, personal dose monitoring records, personnel certificate, training certificate, personnel license, medical examination, etc, and each table includes more optional detail information. Results: In the past year, the IMSRWH has been successfully developed and implemented in the hospital. According to the needs, the user rights are divided into: the system administrator, office manager, department manager and radiation worker. The different users have the different interfaces, and the appropriate authority permissions mean corresponding operations. The administrator and office manager could manage all personnel information, department manager could manage the staff information of his department, and the workers could view or modify their own information. Because information updates, involving hundreds of each entry and modification are complicated, each table information of all workers can be batch import from or export to a Microsoft Excel CSV format file, to update all together. However, it has only Chinese version now. Conclusion: It was demonstrated to be user-friendly and was proven to significantly improve the efficiency of the hospital management. Since it is an in-house developed system, more functions can be added or modified to further enhance its potentials in research and clinical practice

  19. SU-E-T-241: Design and Implement of An Information Management System for Radiation Workers in a Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q; Wu, M [Beijing Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To meet the special needs of Medical Administration Division, an information management system for radiation workers in a hospital(IMSRWH) has been developed. Methods: There are about 200 radiation workers in 20 departments, such as department of radiology, department of radiation oncology, department of nuclear medicine, and so on. An IMSRWH server was used to run a database and web service of Apache+PHP+MySQL. The IMSRWH web service could be accessed with Internet Explorer(IE) to input, search, count, and print the radiation workers’ data. Every worker’s data information includes the following tables: registration, personal dose monitoring records, personnel certificate, training certificate, personnel license, medical examination, etc, and each table includes more optional detail information. Results: In the past year, the IMSRWH has been successfully developed and implemented in the hospital. According to the needs, the user rights are divided into: the system administrator, office manager, department manager and radiation worker. The different users have the different interfaces, and the appropriate authority permissions mean corresponding operations. The administrator and office manager could manage all personnel information, department manager could manage the staff information of his department, and the workers could view or modify their own information. Because information updates, involving hundreds of each entry and modification are complicated, each table information of all workers can be batch import from or export to a Microsoft Excel CSV format file, to update all together. However, it has only Chinese version now. Conclusion: It was demonstrated to be user-friendly and was proven to significantly improve the efficiency of the hospital management. Since it is an in-house developed system, more functions can be added or modified to further enhance its potentials in research and clinical practice.

  20. Commercial airline crews. A new group of occupational radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Aircrews on regular commercial flights are not generally regarded as occupationally exposed radiation workers. Although several studies have indicated that they may receive radiation doses in excess of the ICRP recommended limit for members of the public, the same is true of individuals living at ground level in one of the areas of abnormally high background gamma radiation; and in the past it has been general practice to avoid regarding either of these situations as coming within the radiation dose control practices of the venous regulatory agencies. Furthermore it must be recognized that in areas prone to high background radon levels. even greater unregulated radiation exposures of many individuals take place. ICRP 65 recommends an action level for correcting high radon concentrations in dwellings which comes in the range corresponding to effective doses of between 3 and 10 mSv/y but experience has shown that few homeowners voluntarily carry out remedial work even at these levels. An aircrew member living in a home with abnormally high radon levels may well experience lower effective dose rates whilst in flight than whilst relaxing at home. (author)

  1. Legal instruments for controlling exposure of workers to ionizing radiations in mining and its associated industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusoff Ismail

    1994-01-01

    Briefly, the existing legal instruments for protection of workers in mining and its associated activities are given. Further, major provisions of the laws relevant to the protection of workers against ionizing radiations in mining and its associated activities are detailed. Finally, practical framework developed by the Atomic Energy Licensing Board, for implementation and enforcement is described

  2. ECG changes in factory workers exposed to 27.2  MHz radiofrequency radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingsong; Xu, Guoyong; Lang, Li; Yang, Aichu; Li, Shilin; Yang, Liwen; Li, Chaolin; Huang, Hanlin; Li, Tao

    2013-05-01

    To research the effect of 27.2 MHz radiofrequency radiation on electrocardiograms (ECG), 225 female workers operating radiofrequency machines at a shoe factory were chosen as the exposure group and 100 female workers without exposure from the same factory were selected as the control group. The 6 min electric field strength that the female workers were exposed to was 64.0 ± 25.2 V/m (mean ± SD), which exceeded 61 V/m, the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection reference root mean square levels for occupational exposure. A statistical difference was observed between the exposed group and the control group in terms of the rate of sinus bradycardia (χ(2)  = 11.48, P = 0.003). When several known risk factors for cardiovascular disease were considered, including smoking, age, alcohol ingestion habit, and so on, the exposure duration was not an effective factor for ECG changes, sinus arrhythmia, or sinus bradycardia according to α = 0.05, while P = 0.052 for sinus arrhythmia was very close to 0.05. We did not find any statistical difference in heart rate, duration of the QRS wave (ventricular depolarization), or corrected QT intervals (between the start of the Q wave and end of the T wave) between the exposed and control groups. Occupational exposure to radiofrequency radiation was not found to be a cause of ECG changes after consideration of the confounding factors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. EDF FARN (fast action force in case of nuclear accident) - Focus on radiation protection of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    fully operational in an autonomous manner within 24 hours. Within this emergency response context, the radiological risk for the public, incorporated in the ability to reinstate the environmental measurement networks if they have been destroyed is factored into design, mainly with construction of the new emergency response management centre. In addition to the site equipment and human resources, the FARN has personnel trained in RP and stress management in emergency situations, personnel specialised in radiation protection in the field, an RP expert who coordinates response actions in radiation protection terms and a site doctor. Concerning equipment resources, EDF has opted for robust RP equipment common to all its personnel, factoring in Fukushima operating experience, both for worker protection and monitoring and for equipment and procedures appropriate to a high level of background noise. In order to reinstate environmental measurements, modular equipment enables the networks to be increasingly set up as and when the external emergency services arrive. The principle of radiological risk management is based on progressive scheduled enhancement of the different items of RP equipment provided for monitoring and optimum protection of the public and all the emergency response teams, right from the very start and throughout response. The shift crews present on site thus take the first radiation protection actions: worker protection, partial reinstatement of the radiation monitoring network providing the public authorities with information so that they can fulfil their remit of public protection. This approach is supplemented with assessment of release into the atmosphere and analysis of radiological impact using predictive tools at corporate level. Deployment of the FARN with additional input of equipment enables a complete environmental monitoring network to be reinstated within 24 hours, if need be, and additional radiological monitoring equipment to be deployed. Lastly

  4. Estimated Nutritive Value of Low-Price Model Lunch Sets Provided to Garment Workers in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Makurat

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The establishment of staff canteens is expected to improve the nutritional situation of Cambodian garment workers. The objective of this study is to assess the nutritive value of low-price model lunch sets provided at a garment factory in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Methods: Exemplary lunch sets were served to female workers through a temporary canteen at a garment factory in Phnom Penh. Dish samples were collected repeatedly to examine mean serving sizes of individual ingredients. Food composition tables and NutriSurvey software were used to assess mean amounts and contributions to recommended dietary allowances (RDAs or adequate intake of energy, macronutrients, dietary fiber, vitamin C (VitC, iron, vitamin A (VitA, folate and vitamin B12 (VitB12. Results: On average, lunch sets provided roughly one third of RDA or adequate intake of energy, carbohydrates, fat and dietary fiber. Contribution to RDA of protein was high (46% RDA. The sets contained a high mean share of VitC (159% RDA, VitA (66% RDA, and folate (44% RDA, but were low in VitB12 (29% RDA and iron (20% RDA. Conclusions: Overall, lunches satisfied recommendations of caloric content and macronutrient composition. Sets on average contained a beneficial amount of VitC, VitA and folate. Adjustments are needed for a higher iron content. Alternative iron-rich foods are expected to be better suited, compared to increasing portions of costly meat/fish components. Lunch provision at Cambodian garment factories holds the potential to improve food security of workers, approximately at costs of <1 USD/person/day at large scale. Data on quantitative total dietary intake as well as physical activity among workers are needed to further optimize the concept of staff canteens.

  5. Analysis of female radiation workers dose records in the DAE Units of Andhra Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padma Savitri, P.; Kamble, M.K.; Reddy, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    Basis for control of occupational exposures of women is same as that of men except for pregnant women. Percentage of women working in radiation areas of DAE has marginally increased in the last three decades. This paper analysed the data on the externally received personal dose equivalent for female radiation workers who have been exposed ti ionizing radiation in different occupations of DAE units in Andhra Pradesh. From this study we can say confidently that it is equally safe for women to work in radiation areas as long as they follow radiation protection principles. Hence, women in India should be made aware that it is safe to work in radiation areas and DAE is taking their care by periodical medical checkups, maintaining dose records, etc

  6. Radioactive PTT as part of screening protocol for prospecting radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nato, Alejandro Q. Jr.; Deocaris, Custer; Sajise, Sheila C.

    2002-04-01

    Heterozygous mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (breast cancer)have been found to be associated with enhanced cellular radiosensitivity with impaired proliferative capacity after irradiation and could predispose increased risk of radiation-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis (1,2). Deficient repair mechanism exhibited by lymphocytes from breast cancer patients provides associated vulnerability to genotoxicity of ionizing radiation. Other genes ay also play a role in terms o clinical radiation hypersensitivity needed in predicting response to radiotherapy. However, relaxation of cell cycle checkpoints, production of micronuclei, and loss of proliferative capacity which have been exhibited by impairment of irradiated cells lacking functional BRCA1 and BRCA2, accentuate the notion that heterozygous women may respond differently to radiation. The radioactive protein truncation test (PTT), utilized as screening procedures to detect frameshift mutations, can be employed to clarify radiosensitivity of individuals carrying a mutated BRCA1 gene. It can therefore, be incorporated in the series of clinical assays used in standard screening protocols for prospective nuclear facility workers. (author)

  7. Development of a stand-alone microcomputer based DOE contractor generic radiation worker safety course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klos, D.B.; Gardner, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed Computer Based Training (CBT) materials for radiation and industrial safety. First released for general Fast Flux Test Facility in November, 1984. This course has now been taken by nearly 350 people. Completion times for new personnel average around eight hours. The next project undertaken was construction of a Radiation Worker Safety course generic enough for use by all contractors at the Hanford site. The design process of the Hanford site course indicated that the quantity of ''DOE common material'' may be sufficient to warrant consideration of a larger target population. Specifically, the course will be designed to run on an IBM-PC or compatible computer having 256K RAM, a standard IBM color graphics card or equivalent, a color graphics monitor, and two floppy disk drives or one hard disk. The target student population includes those who routinely work in Radiation Areas, especially crafts people. We are not targeting Health Physics personnel, except, possibly, for introductory training, nor are we directing the course toward ''casual'' or escorted workers

  8. The role of radiation regulatory agencies of the Republic of the Philippines in the education and training of workers occupationally exposed to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perio Peralta, Agnette de

    2008-01-01

    In the Republic of the Philippines, there are two national radiation regulatory agencies. One is the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) which has the regulatory mandate over radioactive materials. The other one is the Bureau of Health Devices and Technology (BHDT) which has the regulatory mandate over radiation devices. Since a major requirement in regulating use of radiation sources is the appropriate qualification of the workers occupationally exposed to radiation, the paper discusses the strategies and activities of these two agencies to ensure that these workers have the necessary education and training to do their work properly. Some of these are the conduct of training courses in cooperation with the relevant professional societies, conduct of distance aided training in cooperation with the IAEA, initiation and active involvement in the establishment and continued existence of the masteral degree program in medical physics which was established with IAEA technical assistance, assistance to lawmakers in drafting pertinent legislation, and creation of joint technical working groups to ensure harmonization of standards and regulations, among others. The Philippines has adopted a national policy that users of radiation and radioactive materials have the primary responsibility for radiation safety. The PNRI and the BHDT have adopted strategies which have been very useful in the effective implementation of their regulations. (author)

  9. Radiation doses and cause-specific mortality among workers at a nuclear materials fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checkoway, H.; Pearce, N.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Cragle, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    A historical cohort mortality study was conducted among 6781 white male employees from a nuclear weapons materials fabrication plant for the years 1947-1979. Exposures of greatest concern are alpha and gamma radiation emanating primarily from insoluble uranium compounds. Among monitored workers, the mean cumulative alpha radiation dose to the lung was 8.21 rem, and the mean cumulative external whole body penetrating dose from gamma radiation was 0.96 rem. Relative to US white males, the cohort experienced mortality deficits from all causes combined, cardiovascular diseases, and from most site-specific cancers. Mortality excesses of lung and brain and central nervous system cancers were seen from comparisons with national and state rates. Dose-response trends were detected for lung cancer mortality with respect to cumulative alpha and gamma radiation, with the most pronounced trend occurring for gamma radiation among workers who received greater than or equal to 5 rem of alpha radiation. These trends diminished in magnitude when a 10-year latency assumption was applied. Under a zero-year latency assumption, the rate ratio for lung cancer mortality associated with joint exposure of greater than or equal to 5 versus less than 1 rem of both types of radiation is 4.60 (95% confidence limits (CL) 0.91, 23.35), while the corresponding result, assuming a 10-year latency, is 3.05 (95% CL 0.37, 24.83). While these rate ratios, which are based on three and one death, respectively, lack statistical precision, the observed dose-response trends indicate potential carcinogenic effects to the lung of relatively low-dose radiation. There are no dose-response trends for mortality from brain and central nervous system cancers

  10. Knowledge of outdoor workers on the effects of natural UV radiation and methods of protection against exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hault, K; Rönsch, H; Beissert, S; Knuschke, P; Bauer, A

    2016-04-01

    The most important but influenceable risk factor in the development of skin cancer is the unprotected exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. In order to assure adequate and effective protection against UV exposure, a level of knowledge about solar radiation and its effects is required. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of workers in outdoor professions on the effects of natural UV radiation and methods of protection against exposure. Forty outdoor workers were given a standardized questionnaire designed to ascertain their level of knowledge. The majority of participants knew exposure to solar radiation can be detrimental depending on exposure time. Eighty-three percentage recognized that people working regularly in an outdoor environment may be at risk due to high exposure. Long-sleeved clothing plus headgear and sunscreen containing sun-protecting substances were deemed adequate methods of protection by 83% and 85% respectively. Seventy percentage of the outdoor workers were familiar with the definition of the sun protection factor (SPF), yet only 25% correctly identified the amount of sunscreen needed to achieve the SPF as indicated on the product. A mere 8% of participants knew that symptoms of a sunburn first became apparent 3 h after sun exposure and only 18% were able to accurately gauge the amount of time they could spend in the sun before developing one. Although 30% had heard of the ultraviolet index (UVI), only 13% understood that protecting your skin using additional measures is recommended as of UVI 3. Overall, 30% of the outdoor workers thought themselves sufficiently protected against the harmful effects of the sun. While the participants of this study had a basic fundamental understanding of the effects of solar radiation and methods of protection against exposure, there remains an urgent need for further clarification across all demographic groups. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  11. Mortality among workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Evidence of radiation effects in follow-up through 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wing, S.; Shy, C.M.; Wood, J.L.; Wolf, S.; Cragle, D.L.; Frome, E.L.

    1991-01-01

    White men hired at the Oak Ridge (Tenn) National Laboratory between 1943 and 1972 were followed up for vital status through 1984 (N = 8318, 1524 deaths). Relatively low mortality compared with that in US white men was observed for most causes of death, but leukemia mortality was elevated in the total cohort (63% higher, 28 deaths) and in workers who had at some time been monitored for internal radionuclide contamination (123% higher, 16 deaths). Median cumulative dose of external penetrating radiation was 1.4 mSv; 638 workers had cumulative doses above 50 mSv (5 rem). After accounting for age, birth cohort, a measure of socioeconomic status, and active worker status, external radiation with a 20-year exposure lag was related to all causes of death (2.68% increase per 10 mSv) primarily due to an association with cancer mortality (4.94% per 10 mSv). Studies of this population through 1977 did not find radiation-cancer mortality associations, and identical analyses using the shorter follow-up showed that associations with radiation did not appear until after 1977. The radiation-cancer dose response is 10 times higher than estimates from the follow-up of survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, but similar to one previous occupational study. Dose-response estimates are subject to uncertainties due to potential problems, including measurement of radiation doses and cancer outcomes. Longer-term follow-up of this and other populations with good measurement of protracted low-level exposures will be critical to evaluating the generalizability of the results reported herein

  12. Development of radiation alarm monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myung Jae Song; Myung Chan Lee; Jung Kwan Son

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Alarm Monitor is developed domestically in order to protect radiation workers from over exposure. The Radiation Alarm Monitor with microprocessor installed can record the information of radiation field before and after accidents. It can also provide the data to analyze the accident and to set a counterplan. It features a wide detection range of radiation (I OmR/h - I OOR/h), radiation work and data storage, portability, high precision (5%) due to calibration, and adaptation of a powerful alarm system. In order to protect workers from over exposure, light and sound alarm had been designed to initiate when accident occurs such as an unexpected change of radiation field such as radiation rate and accumulated dosed between 90 min. before the alarm and 30 min. after the alarm. In addition, the Radiation Alarm Monitor interfaces with computer so that the accident can be analyzed. After the testing conditions in other countries for the Radiation Alarm Monitor were compared, the most stringent test, ANSI N42. 17-A, was selected. The performance testing was car-ried out under various conditions of temperature, humidity, vibration and electromagnetic wave hindrance by Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS). As a result, the Radiation Alan-n Monitor passed all test. Also, for the Radiation Alarm Monitor, environmental adaptability tests under the environmental conditions of NPP sites had been performed. The Radiation Alan-n Monitor had been reviewed by radiation workers at NPPs and their opinions had been collected. Operating procedure will be written and distributed to every NPP sites. Radiation Alarm Monitor will be modified for use under the specific environmental conditions of each site. It will be distributed to NPP sites and will be used by radiation workers

  13. Training in radiation protection of workers at Electricite de France nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aye, Louis

    1980-01-01

    The safety of workers and the population is a major concern of the nuclear industry. In order to carry out its programme of PWR power plants, Electricite de France has largely developed the training in radiation protection of its personnel. Operation workers now represent some 5000 persons; they first receive a formation organized at the national level consisting in training courses, which are completed and continued on the spot. The training makes a wide use of audiovisuals; it is checked by tests and leads to better qualification. Close coordination is sought with outside competent organizations [fr

  14. Measurement and research of the exposure doses of the animal guardians and radiation workers in the animal hospital in Gwangju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ji Seung; Yun, Seon Yeong; Yeo, Hwa Yeon; Dong, Kyung Rae

    2016-01-01

    In modern society, having companion animals as family members is getting popular. According to the data from National Statistical Office, the population of people with companion animals and pets is now over 10 million. The increase of companion animals led to an increase of animal hospitals. Accordingly, radiation generating devices for diagnosis are being used frequently. In addition, as animal hospitals are increasingly using radiation generating devices, in order to protect the related workers and promote animal cares, the government enacted the regulations relating to operations and installations of the devices at animal hospitals. Therefore, this study handles the radiation safety management related stuffs by measuring and assessing radiation dose to the animal guardians and radiation workers in the animal hospitals in Gwangju

  15. Measurement and research of the exposure doses of the animal guardians and radiation workers in the animal hospital in Gwangju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji Seung; Yun, Seon Yeong; Yeo, Hwa Yeon [Dept. of Radiology, Nambu University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    In modern society, having companion animals as family members is getting popular. According to the data from National Statistical Office, the population of people with companion animals and pets is now over 10 million. The increase of companion animals led to an increase of animal hospitals. Accordingly, radiation generating devices for diagnosis are being used frequently. In addition, as animal hospitals are increasingly using radiation generating devices, in order to protect the related workers and promote animal cares, the government enacted the regulations relating to operations and installations of the devices at animal hospitals. Therefore, this study handles the radiation safety management related stuffs by measuring and assessing radiation dose to the animal guardians and radiation workers in the animal hospitals in Gwangju.

  16. Cytogenetic monitoring of nuclear workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griciene, B.; Slapsyte, G.; Mierauskiene, J.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome aberration (CA) analysis using Giemsa techniques was performed in blood lymphocytes of 84 nuclear workers with cumulative doses of 1-632 mSv during employment periods of 1-25 y. The control group comprised 82 healthy male donors. An estimated CA frequency in the total radiation-exposed group was significantly higher when compared with the controls (2.27 vs. 1.76 CA/100 cells, p 0.05). However, significant increase in the total CA frequency was determined in workers with additional internal exposure (2.54 CA/100 cells, p < 0.05) and those with registered neutron doses (2.95 CA/100 cells, p < 0.01). No correlation was found between CA frequency and occupational exposure dose. Borderline significant correlation was found between duration of employment and total CA (r = 0.218, p = 0.046, Fig. 2) and chromosome-type aberration (r = 0.265, p = 0.015) frequency. (authors)

  17. Development of the national register of radiation workers: subsystem for individual monitoring of external exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Haitao; Niu Haowei; Sun Quanfu; Fu Yinghua; Fan Yaohua; Yue Baorong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop a national registry and reporting system of individual monitoring for workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Methods: In accordance with the relevant law, regulations, standards and the current health supervision practice for radiation workers in China, to ensure more effective collection of information on individual monitoring from all levels of service providers across the country and an easy query and analysis of the collected information for both service providers and administrative institutions, the register consisted of an offline-system and a web-based information system. The off-line system consisted of 8 tables, which could easily make annual and period monitoring reports, and upload individual monitoring data in compressed and encrypted format. Web-based system consisted of 6 modules, could easily make S customized tabulations of monitoring data and show 2 trend figures. SSLVPN secure remote access was used in the system. Arranged by the Ministry of Health, training courses provided to all individual monitoring service providers and provincial administrative institutions. Results: A new and individual-based national register and reporting system of individual monitoring for workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation was successfully developed, and would be officially run soon. Conclusions: The establishment and running of the register would be great improvement on the national radiological health reports and produce a far-reaching impact on the individual monitoring in China. (authors)

  18. Compliation of summary statistics for radiation worker exposure for the 200 Areas: 1978--1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides estimates of average annual radiation worker exposures for the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site for various facilities. The period of exposures extends from calendar year 1978 through 1993. These estimates were extracted from annual dosimetry reports

  19. Concerning control of radiation exposure to workers in nuclear reactor facilities for testing and nuclear reactor facilities in research and development phase (fiscal 1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear reactor operator is required by the Nuclear Reactor Control Law to ensure that the radiation dose to workers engaged in the operations of his nuclear reactor is controlled below the permissible exposure doses that are specified in notifications issued based on the Law. The present note briefly summarizes the data given in the Reports on Radiation Control, which have been submitted according to the Nuclear Reactor Control Law by the operators of nuclear reactor facilities for testing and those in the research and development phase, and the Reports on Control of Radiation Exposure to Workers submitted in accordance with the applicable administrative notices. According to these reports, the measured exposure to workers in 1987 were below the above-mentioned permissible exposure doses in all these nuclear facilities. The 1986 and 1987 measurements of radiation exposure dose to workers in nuclear reactor facilities for testing are tabulated. The measurements cover dose distribution among the facilities' personnel and workers of contractors. They also cover the total exposure dose for all workers in each of four plants operated under the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. (N.K.)

  20. Effect of age and social connection on perceived anxiety over radiation exposure among decontamination workers in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Tomoo; Kakamu, Takeyasu; Hayakawa, Takehito; Kumagai, Tomohiro; Jinnouchi, Takanobu; Sato, Sei; Tsuji, Masayoshi; Nakano, Shinichi; Koyama, Kikuo; Fukushima, Tetsuhito

    2016-05-25

    To reveal the effect of age and other factors on perceived anxiety over radiation exposure among decontamination workers in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. A survey questionnaire was sent to 1505 workers, with questions regarding age, presence of a written employment contract, previous residence, radiation passbook ownership, presence of close persons for consultation, knowledge of how to access public assistance, and a four-point scale of radiation-related anxiety (1= "Very much," 2= "Somewhat," 3= "A little bit," and 4= "None" ). The relationships between the degree of anxiety and variables were analyzed using the chi-square test and residual analysis. In all, 512 participants responded to the questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 46.2 years (SD: 13.1, range: 18-77). Of them, 50, 233, 168, and 61 workers chose "Very much," "Somewhat," "A little bit," and "None," respectively, on the anxiety scale. Chi-square test showed that participants aged 61 years and over had higher degrees of anxiety (panxiety increased if they did not have a written contract (p=0.042) or persons to consult (p=0.034) and if they routinely checked the dose rate (p=0.046). Decontamination workers who do not have a written contract or who are in socially isolated situations have greater anxiety over radiation exposure. Thus, it is important to both create supportive human relationships for consultation and enhance labor management in individual companies.

  1. Biological effect produced by ionizing radiations on occupational workers in Carlos Andrade Marin Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias Pullaguari, Ines Yolanda

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the biological effects on occupational workers. In this study, have made a bibliographic review of the changes on skin of 217 professionals; between 21 and 70 years radiologists, X-ray technicians, radioisotope workers, nurses and others, which were exposed to ionizing radiation, in the departments of Diagnosis and Treatment of the Hospital Carlos Andrade Marin of the Quito city. From this universe 133 workers were excluded of the analysis. From the totality of lesions produced on the skin; the depilation constituted 40.18%, hyper pigmentation 19.34%, hypo pigmentation 9 %, capillary fragility 13.39%, erythema 13.39%, alopecia 5.37%. From the totality of lesions produced in blood: the leukopenia constituted 20.23% between all workers. The percentage method was used for statical calculation. A bibliographic update is done and the most relevant clinical aspects are reviewed. (The author)

  2. Radiation protection of workers in radiological emergency situation. Proceedings of the technical day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannou, Alain; Gosset, Eric; Lahaye, Thierry; Foucher, Laurent; Couasnon, Olivier; Bouchery, Pascal; Gaillard-Lecanu, Emmanuelle; Pectorin, Xavier; Fusil, Laurence; Boudergui, Karim; Adhemar, Bruno; Devin, Patrick; Mace, Jean-Reynald; Chevallier, Michel; Leautaud, Jean-Marc; LANCE, Benoit

    2015-03-01

    Following the Fukushima-Daichi accident, several actions have been taken in France from the lessons learnt from the accident: the elaboration of a national plan for the management of a major nuclear or radiological accident, and the safety complementary evaluations to be carried out by nuclear operators. As a complement to the measures to be implemented for the protection of the overall population in emergency radiological situation, the protection of workers mobilized for the management of the crisis has also to be taken into account in the framework of these measures. The French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) has organized a technical day to take stock of this question. The program comprises 4 topical sessions dealing with: the main actions taken at the national scale after the Fukushima-Daichi accident, the strategies and intervention means of nuclear operators in case of radiological emergency, the radiation protection R and D for the protection of intervenors in case of radiological emergency, and the main actions implemented at the international scale and their perspectives. This document brings together the abstracts and the presentations (slides) of the different talks given at the meeting: 1 - Health status and lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident - workers (Alain RANNOU, IRSN); 2 - National response plan to a major nuclear or radiologic accident (Eric GOSSET, SGDSN); 3 - Legal framework applicable to intervenors (Thierry LAHAYE, DGT); 4 - Prescriptions linked with complementary safety and liability studies (Laurent FOUCHER, ASN); 5 - EDF: radiological risk management in emergency situation (Pascal BOUCHERY, EDF); 6 - CEA: intervention strategy, means and radiation protection (Xavier PECTORIN, Laurence FUSIL - CEA); 7 - AREVA: FINA's Intervention and workers' radiation protection (Bruno ADHEMAR, Patrick DEVIN - AREVA); 8 - Intervention in radiological emergency situation: the INTRA (Robots intervention on accidents) economic

  3. Medical surveillance of occupationally exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-05-01

    The guide covers medical surveillance of workers engaged in radiation work and their fitness for this work, protection of the foetus and infant during the worker's pregnancy or breastfeeding, and medical surveillance measures to be taken when the dose limit has been exceeded. The guide also covers recognition of practitioners responsible for medical surveillance of category A workers, medical certificates to be issued to workers, and preservation and transfer of medical records. The medical surveillance requirements specified in this Guide cover the use of radiation and nuclear energy. The guide also applies to exposure to natural radiation in accordance with section 28 of the Finnish Radiation Decree

  4. Medical surveillance of occupationally exposed workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-05-15

    The guide covers medical surveillance of workers engaged in radiation work and their fitness for this work, protection of the foetus and infant during the worker's pregnancy or breastfeeding, and medical surveillance measures to be taken when the dose limit has been exceeded. The guide also covers recognition of practitioners responsible for medical surveillance of category A workers, medical certificates to be issued to workers, and preservation and transfer of medical records. The medical surveillance requirements specified in this Guide cover the use of radiation and nuclear energy. The guide also applies to exposure to natural radiation in accordance with section 28 of the Finnish Radiation Decree

  5. Epidemiological survey of radiation workers. Risk of leukemia and solid cancer by low level radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, Kouichi

    2011-01-01

    An interim report on the epidemiological survey of cohort involving radiation workers in the nuclear power plants in Japan was introduced. It consists of eight chapters such as introduction, the objects of mortality rate survey from death causes and creating a cohort, the method of tracking the life and death, analytical methods of mortality rate, analytical results, confounded effects of life style, discussion: contrast the report on the mortality rate of solid cancer except leukemia in Japan and other countries and the conclusions. The subjects of mortality rate of the forth survey were about 277,000 workers including from the first to the third survey. In a prospective cohort study, 203,904 workers were screened for analytical study, and they included 14,224 deaths (5,711 from malignant neoplasm, 6,310 from nonmalignant neoplasm and 1,995 from extrinsic death). The analytical results were shown by three types of death caused from leukemia, malignant neoplasm except for leukemia and nonmalignant neoplasm. Analytical results of the mortality rate from death caused in third and forth study, change of analytical results from the first to the forth observation period were illustrated. (S.Y.)

  6. Decree No 449 - Regulations on the conditions for keeping records of physical and medical surveillance relating to protection against ionizing radiation and medical surveillance of workers exposed to hazards from such radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The 1964 Decree on radiation protection (DPR No. 185 of 1964) provides that the competent authorities may lay down specific conditions for keeping documentation on physical and medical surveillance of workers exposed to ionizing radiation. This Decree establishes where such documents must be kept, the information they should provide on irradiation and contamination, the relevant obligations of qualified experts, and employers according to Euratom Directive No. 80/836 on the health protection of workers against ionizing radiation [fr

  7. Phonetic physical feature formula for identification of radiation auxiliary workers and security applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.N.; Srivastava, M.K.; Kher, R.K.

    1997-08-01

    This report gives a review of human physical features with the aim of evolving a simple and practical formula which can be used to identify radiation auxiliary workers even if they do not reveal their radiation work history either due to ignorance or intentionally. To have the formula short, the phonetic number system of radix 128 has been employed. The formula finally arrived at consists of three phonetic digits representing 17 features and age in blocks of 8 years. There are four main advantages of this formula. The first is binary division which has more surety and better accuracy. The second is expert redundancy, that is expert examination is not required. Third is very large number of categories (128K=131072). And the fourth is nearly equal probabilities of all categories which make the number of people in each category very few and that simplifies the search. Hence by the scan of a few records, it is easily possible to ascertain whether a person is a new entrant or an old timer. Its application ensures better monitoring of the radiation exposure of auxiliary workers. This formula can also be used by police department and investigating agencies to classify the records of suspected persons for the ease of their identification when they give misleading information

  8. Radiation surveillance of exposed workers during activities of moving of the earth area of Montecillo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, M. T.; Alvarez, A.; Garcia, E.; Diaz, P.; Quinones, J.

    2013-01-01

    One of the objectives of this study was to limit the doses received by exposed workers and the public (in this case the workers of the CIEMATs buildings next to the work) by setting the appropriate criteria of optimization and protection.In addition was a theoretical evaluation of the dose inhalation, workers would have received if ALARA study protection measures has not been established. (Author)

  9. Mortality studies of Hanford workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1986-04-01

    Radiation exposures at Hanford have been deliberately limited as a protection to the worker. This means that if current estimates of radiation risks, which have been determined by national and international groups, are correct, it's highly unlikely that noticeable radiation-induced health effects will be identified among Hanford workers. 1 fig., 4 tabs

  10. [Investigation of occupational hazards of ultraviolet radiation and protective measures for workers in electric welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Gong, Man-man; Wang, Jiao; He, Li-hua; Wang, Sheng; Du, Wei-wei; Zhang, Long-lian; Lin, Sen; Dong, Xue-mei; Wang, Ru-gang

    2012-06-18

    To investigate and analyze the occupational hazards of ultraviolet radiation, protective measures and related factors for typical symptoms among workers in electric welding, and to provide basic information for revision of the occupational standards of UV. Questionnaires and physical examinations were used in this investigation. A total of 828 workers from four vehicle manufacturers in Beijing and Guangdong Province were selected. Corresponding analyses were conducted with SPSS 16.0 statistic software. The top three injuries of faces and hands were burning tingling (48.7% & 41.3%), itch of skin (39% & 34.9%) and pigmentation (31.9% & 24.5%).The major injuries of eyes were ophthalmodynia (61.5%) , photophobia and tearing (61.4%), and blurred vision (50.2%). The incidences of facial and hands burning tingling, hands flushing, hands macula and papula were significantly different between the welders and auxiliary workers (Pwelding masks (87.2%), gloves (84.3%) and glasses (65.9%). Except for UV cut cream, the usages of other protective equipments in the auxiliary workers were significantly lower than those in the welders (Pwelding, using argon arc welding and CO(2) gas shielded arc welding, not wearing welding masks, and not using UV cut cream was significantly associated with the increased risk of face burning tingling, and the ORs were 3.894 (6 h to 8 h), 2.665 (4 h to 6 h), 2.052, 1.765, 1.759, 1.833, respectively; working years might be a protective factor, and the OR was 0.440, respectively. The study suggested that the UV radiation produced during welding operations not only caused harm to welders, but also to the auxiliary workers. Protection should be strengthened,for example, wearing welding masks, glasses, etc. Meanwhile automatic welding machines should be adopted by the factories to reduce the exposure time for workers.

  11. Implications of ICRP recommendations on the management of radiation protection of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    The new ICRP recommendations [1] give a slightly revised definition of occupational exposure. Guidance is given with respect to the exposure at work related no natural radiation sources. Where ICRP recommends a source related definition of occupational exposure, the Basic Safety Standards of the European Communities [3] and consequently legislation in member states depart from an effect related definition of workers. Mutual divergence regarding this identification issue will be discussed in this paper. Operational radiation protection is commonly based on the principles of classification of workers, classification of working conditions and classification of places of work. From the management view point, the rationale for applying classification is to balancing the nature and the scale of control measures, monitoring and surveillance, using resources in the most appropriate way. In previous recommendations [2] ICRP has given criteria for classification, based on the projected level of individual annual dose, relative to the recommended dose limits for occupational exposure. This guidance is now regarded as crude and arbitrary and therefore withdrawn. This paper will address some consequences of the revised recommendations as well as options for implementation in the European Community basic safety standards. (author)

  12. Study of feasibility of detecting effects of low-dose radiation in shipyard workers. Final report, May 15-August 15, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanoski, G.M.

    1982-12-01

    There is very little information available on the chronic health effects from repeated low-level doses of radiation. This study examines the adequacy of determining radiation exposure doses in shipyard workers, the procedures used in the radiation control programs, and the feasibility of establishing an appropriate population of nuclear and non-nuclear shipyard workers for long-term studies of low-level radiation. The availability of records and the methods of population identification and of measurement of radiation dose were determined during initial visits to the yards. Personnel, industrial hygiene, radiation and medical records were examined for suitability, completeness and accuracy. It was necessary to assure that no possible errors or omissions in personnel and radiation records existed in order that the final data will have validity. Preliminary investigations on the methods of follow-up in the Portsmouth population and the time required for each procedure were also undertaken in order to have a better estimate of the total cost for a long term study

  13. Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management of radiation workers in medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Eun Ok

    2007-01-01

    Radiation safety managements in medical institutions are needed to protect certain radiation damages as a part of National Coalition. This study investigates the characteristics of self-efficacy that become the major factor on the knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the radiation safety management of radiation workers as an approach of educational aspects and analyzes the relationship between such factors to provide basic materials for improving the activity level of radiation safety managements. In order to implement the goal of this study, a survey was performed for 1,200 workers who were engaged in radiation treatments in medical centers, such as general hospital, university hospital, private hospital, and public health center for 42 days from July 23, 2006. Then, the results of the analysis can be summarized as follows: 1. Average scores on knowledge, attitude, and behavior in the radiation safety management were presented as 75.76±11.20, 90.55±8.59, 80.58±11.70, respectively. Also, the average score of self-efficacy was recorded as 73.55±9.82. 2. Knowledge levels in the radiation safety management showed significant differences according to the sex, age, marriage, education, and experience. Also, males of married, older, highly educated, and largely experienced represented high knowledge levels. Attitude levels in the radiation safety management showed certain significant differences according to the type of medical centers in which private hospitals showed a relatively low level compared to that of high levels in university hospitals. Behavior levels in the radiation safety management also represented significant differences according to the age, marriage, education, experience, and types of medical centers. Factors in married, general hospital, older, highly educated, and largely experienced showed high behavior levels. In addition, the self-efficacy showed certain differences according to the marriage and types of medical centers. Factors in married

  14. Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management of radiation workers in medical institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok [Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    Radiation safety managements in medical institutions are needed to protect certain radiation damages as a part of National Coalition. This study investigates the characteristics of self-efficacy that become the major factor on the knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the radiation safety management of radiation workers as an approach of educational aspects and analyzes the relationship between such factors to provide basic materials for improving the activity level of radiation safety managements. In order to implement the goal of this study, a survey was performed for 1,200 workers who were engaged in radiation treatments in medical centers, such as general hospital, university hospital, private hospital, and public health center for 42 days from July 23, 2006. Then, the results of the analysis can be summarized as follows: 1. Average scores on knowledge, attitude, and behavior in the radiation safety management were presented as 75.76{+-}11.20, 90.55{+-}8.59, 80.58{+-}11.70, respectively. Also, the average score of self-efficacy was recorded as 73.55{+-}9.82. 2. Knowledge levels in the radiation safety management showed significant differences according to the sex, age, marriage, education, and experience. Also, males of married, older, highly educated, and largely experienced represented high knowledge levels. Attitude levels in the radiation safety management showed certain significant differences according to the type of medical centers in which private hospitals showed a relatively low level compared to that of high levels in university hospitals. Behavior levels in the radiation safety management also represented significant differences according to the age, marriage, education, experience, and types of medical centers. Factors in married, general hospital, older, highly educated, and largely experienced showed high behavior levels. In addition, the self-efficacy showed certain differences according to the marriage and types of medical centers. Factors in

  15. Low dose ionizing radiation exposure and cardiovascular disease mortality: cohort study based on Canadian national dose registry of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, J. M.; Band, P. R.; Ashmore, P. J.; Jiang, H.; Shilnikova, N. S.; Tait, V. K.; Krewski, D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in a Canadian cohort of 337 397 individuals (169 256 men and 168 141 women) occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and included in the National Dose Registry (NDR) of Canada. Material and Methods: Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, such as those received during radiotherapy, leads to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The emerging evidence of excess risk of CVDs after exposure to doses well below those previously considered as safe warrants epidemiological studies of populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the cohort consisted of employees at nuclear power stations (nuclear workers) as well as medical, dental and industrial workers. The mean whole body radiation dose was 8.6 mSv for men and 1.2 mSv for women. Results: During the study period (1951 - 1995), as many as 3 533 deaths from cardiovascular diseases have been identified (3 018 among men and 515 among women). In the cohort, CVD mortality was significantly lower than in the general population of Canada. The cohort showed a significant dose response both among men and women. Risk estimates of CVD mortality in the NDR cohort, when expressed as excess relative risk per unit dose, were higher than those in most other occupational cohorts and higher than in the studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Conclusions: The study has demonstrated a strong positive association between radiation dose and the risk of CVD mortality. Caution needs to be exercised when interpreting these results, due to the potential bias introduced by dosimetry uncertainties, the possible record linkage errors, and especially by the lack of adjustment for non-radiation risk factors. (authors)

  16. Adjustment of lifetime risks of space radiation-induced cancer by the healthy worker effect and cancer misclassification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif E. Peterson

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions. The typical life table approach for projecting lifetime risk of radiation-induced cancer mortality and incidence for astronauts and radiation workers can be improved by adjusting for HWE while simulating the uncertainty of input rates, input excess risk coefficients, and bias correction factors during multiple Monte Carlo realizations of the life table.

  17. Cytogenetic Analysis In Blood Lymphocyte From Workers Occupationally Exposed To Low Levels Of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimah Abdul Rahim; Mohd Rodzi Ali; Noraisyah Mohd Yusof; Juliana Mahamad Napiah; Yahaya Talib; Shafii Khamis

    2016-01-01

    Whether it comes from the ground, the sky, or medical treatment, humans are constantly exposed to ionizing radiation from the world around them. This is a normal occurrence, and has always been the case. According to the IAEA International Basic Safety Standard, the radiation dose for public is not more than 1 mSv per year. That is just an average though, and the actual figure may fluctuate widely per person depending on where they live and the medical procedures they had that year. The international standard is to allow people who work with and around radioactive material (researchers, nuclear power plant workers, X-ray technicians and others) to have exposures of not more than 20 mSv total per year. The 20 mSv annual dose is considered to be safe and not significantly increase the risk for radiation-related health effects. Biological dosimetry based on the analysis of micronuclei in the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay can be used as an alternative method for scoring dicentric chromosomes in the field of radiation protection. Bio dosimetry is mainly performed, in addition to the physical dosimetry, with the aim of individual dose assessment. The aim of the present study was to perform a cytogenetic analysis in peripheral blood lymphocyte of 30 individuals occupationally exposed to low level of ionizing radiation and compare the result with 30 controls using CBMN assay. Number of bi-nucleated cell and micronuclei were scored and statistical analysis was done to see the effect of micronuclei with gender, age and occupation. In conclusion, scoring of micronuclei is a useful cytogenetic monitoring for radiation workers and assessment of genetic damage. (author)

  18. The evaluation of radiation level and dose of workers in Guangzhou metro line 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lin; Hu Canyun; Meng Xiaolian; He Zhan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To find out the level of radiation and effective dose of workers in Guangzhou Metro line 1. Methods: In metro stations, external Gamma-ray exposure rates were obtained by FD-71A radiance measurer, 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations were obtained by using Rn-Tn solid state nuclear track detectors developed by The National Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Chinese Centre for Disease Control. The annual Effective dose from Gamma, 222 Rn and 220 Rn were calculated. Results: The external Gamma-ray exposure average rate is 17.74 x 10 -8 Gy/h. The average concentration of 222 Rn is 59.8 Bq/m 3 . The average concentration of 220 Rn is 32.1 Bq/m 3 . The total annual effective dose from Gamma, 222 Rn and 220 Rn is 2.878 mSv/a. Conclusion: In the stations of Guangzhou in metro line 1, no more effective radiation dose to the workers has measured. (authors)

  19. Verification by the FISH translocation assay of historic doses to Mayak workers from external gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotnik, Natalia V.; Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Darroudi, Firouz [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); College of North Atlantic, Department of Health Science, Centre for Human Safety and Environmental Research, Doha (Qatar); Ainsbury, Elizabeth A.; Moquet, Jayne E.; Lloyd, David C.; Hone, Pat A.; Edwards, Alan A. [Public Health England, Chilton, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Fomina, Janna [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study was to apply the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) translocation assay in combination with chromosome painting of peripheral blood lymphocytes for retrospective biological dosimetry of Mayak nuclear power plant workers exposed chronically to external gamma radiation. These data were compared with physical dose estimates based on monitoring with badge dosimeters throughout each person's working life. Chromosome translocation yields for 94 workers of the Mayak production association were measured in three laboratories: Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Leiden University Medical Center and the former Health Protection Agency of the UK (hereinafter Public Health England). The results of the study demonstrated that the FISH-based translocation assay in workers with prolonged (chronic) occupational gamma-ray exposure was a reliable biological dosimeter even many years after radiation exposure. Cytogenetic estimates of red bone marrow doses from external gamma rays were reasonably consistent with dose measurements based on film badge readings successfully validated in dosimetry system ''Doses-2005'' by FISH, within the bounds of the associated uncertainties. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of the quality of life in a sample of workers with potential risk to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Ivani M.; Silva, Amanda J. da; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Carneiro, Janete C.G. Gaburo

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the Quality of life (QOL) in a sample of workers of IPEN/CNEN-SP, with potential risk to ionizing radiation; It aims also identify the social-demographic factors related to the workers and its influence on QOL as well to draw the workers profile who handling radioactive material. A quantitative, descriptive and exploratory study was carried out from March to April, 2009 at Radiopharmacy Directory of IPEN. The data were collected by a questionnaire with questions about social-demographic characteristics, working conditions the participants and the WHOQOL-Bref tool. The sample resulted in 86 answered questionnaires; representing 83.5% of the studied population which 80.2% of individuals were male. The mean age of individuals was 47.8 +- 7.0 years and the educational level was high, 55.8% with graduation. Regarding marital status, 74.4% were married. The average score on each domain of the WHOQOL-Bref was: physical (75.2), psychological (75.9), social (72.8) and environmental (62.5). The WHOQOL-Bref showed to be an adequate instrument with easy application for evaluation the QOL of workers exposed to ionizing radiation. The study provided an overview of the perception of QOL of the studied group based on the interviewees as reported by workers. (author)

  1. Industrial radiography in the State of Bahia, Brazil: The health protection of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Ana Emilia Oliveira de

    1997-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the Regulatory and Inspection Authority for actions developed by industrial radiography enterprises in the State of Bahia, Brazil, concerning health protection of workers exposed to ionizing radiation in industry. Institutions which legislate about this matter at international, national and State level were identified. These legislations were analysed according to recommendations by the Basic Safety Standards from the Atomic Energy International Agency. Medical Supervision is proposed as a factor to warrant protection to worker's health. This is a service evaluation study, encompassing results, processes and structural components. Emphasis is given to the process component which investigated the adequacy of which is performed by employees and workers. Five enterprises which provide industrial radiography services in the State of Bahia were identified, employing forty workers on a temporary basis. This study also observed: intense workforce, a complete process of contracting out in the sector; inadequate conditions of work organization (long work journey, night work, lack of days-off schedule); inefficiency of medical services responsible by worker's protection concerning radiation specific risks as well as other occupational risks, unrelated to main activity. There is a legal basis for Authorities actions, although it has not been completely implemented. These findings embased the elaboration of a proposal of a Surveillance Program for the Worker Exposed to Industrial Radiation, which includes the setting of safety standards and monitoring of workers exposed to ionization radiation in the occupational environment, accident prevention in this activity and the specialized health care to those affected by radio accidents. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the space scattered dose according to the position of the radiation workers in mammography room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Yeon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Dongnam Inst. of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University Heaundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the dose of the space to the controller located within the mammography room conducted a research on ways to the reduction exposure to the radiation workers. Results, the dose of 6.18 mGy/year was measured when there is no difference in the hilar area of the controller position, the dose of 2.35E-11 mGy/year was measured when installing the Shielding door. In addition, when the direction of the X-ray tube anode be heading this direction controller, low average level measured was 0.30 mGy/year. Based on this study, the mammography should be considered when installing the anode and cathod directions. And, by installing the shielding door, it must be able to completely separate shooting space and control room. This is the best way radiation protection method in radiation workers.

  3. Code of practice for conducting radiation work at PINSTECH (revised 1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Atta, M.A.; Orfi, S.D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary objective of this code is to achieve standard of radiation protection and safety set by Pakistan Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection (PNSRP) ordinance 1984 and PNSRP regulations 1990. Secondary objective remains to make all best efforts to implement latest ICRP recommendations. The revised code of practice sets forth the objective of adequate system radiological safety of radiation workers, environment and general public. The code provides the guidance to persons and authorities who are responsible for the protection of workers and those who are concerned with the planning and management of personnel monitoring services. The procedures set forth in the code are mandatory and in no case should any of them be deviated under normal conditions. All those supervising and performing any kind of radiation work are required to study and adhere to those procedures and shell make all possible efforts to keep the exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), social and economic factor being taken into account. (author)

  4. Cancer mortality among nuclear workers in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, H.; Holmstock, L.; Mieghem, E. Van; Swaen, G.M.; Wambersie, A.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate long term health effects of chronic exposure to low doses of ionising radiation, the Nuclear Research Center (SCK.CEN) in Mol set up a retrospective cohort study in 5 nuclear facilities in Belgium (SCK.CEN, Belgonucleaire, Belgoprocess, 2 Electrabel nuclear power plants). Cancer mortality among nuclear workers is studied in relation to occupational exposure to ionising radiation. This study is part of the 'International Collaborative Study on Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers', coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), pooling data of 14 countries. During the period 1953-1994, all workers registered in one of the participating facilities were included in the study (n=7361). Data have been collected from different information sources: personnel registries (identification, occupational history), dosimetry records (e.g. annual effective dose), National Population Registry and local authorities (vital status). National Institute of Statistics (causes of death from the death certificates), National Radiation Registry/Ministry of Labour (transfer doses), questionnaires (e.g. smoking habits). Retrospective collection of data and privacy protection regulations specific to Belgium hampered the conduct of this study, causing labour intensive and time consuming procedures. Written informed consent of next-of-kin is required to obtain information from the death certificates. Before 1969 only family reported causes of death are available. Despite the above mentioned constraints, first results of Standardised Mortality Ratio (SMR) calculations are now available for SCK.CEN workers for the period 1969-1994 (n=3270, vital status ascertainment: 95%, underlying cause of death ascertainment: 80%). Available SMR's can be summarised as follows: male workers, no measurable dose (n=785): SMR all causes=75% (95%CI: 61-91), SMR all tumours=64% (95%CI: 42-93), 2 leukemia deaths were observed, whereas 1 is expected, male workers, measurable

  5. Radiation exposures of workers and the public associated with the transport of radioactive material in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, G.; Fett, H.J.; Lange, F.

    2004-01-01

    Most radioactive material packages transported emit penetrating ionising radiation and radiation exposures of transport workers and the public may occur during their transport. The radiation exposures incurred by transport workers and members of the public can vary significantly depending on a number of factors: most important is the type of radiation emitted (primarily gamma and neutron radiation), the radiation field intensity in the surrounding of a package and conveyance and the duration of exposure to ionising radiation. The information and guidance material on occupational exposures has primarily been derived from a survey and analysis of personal monitoring data provided by a number of commercial transport operators in Germany known as major carrier and handler organisations of fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle material (in terms of the number of pack-ages and the activity carriaged). To some extent advantage was taken of compilations of statistical transport and exposure data collated within other transport safety analysis studies including research projects funded by the European Commission. The exposure data collected cover the time period of the last 4 - 8 years and are most representative for routine transport operations closely related to the movement phase of packaged radioactive material, i.e. receipt, vehicle loading, carriage, in-transit storage, intra-/intermodal transfer, vehicle unloading and delivery at the final destination of loads of radioactive material and packages and the related supervisory and health physics functions. Radiation dose monitoring of members of the public, however, is generally impracticable and, consequently, the information available relies on employing dose assessment models and reflects radiation exposures incurred by hypothetical or critical group individuals of members of the public under normal conditions of transport

  6. State of radioactive waste management is power reactor facilities and state of radiation exposure of workers who engaged in radiation works in fiscal 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report is the summary of the reports on radiation control and others submitted by those who installed practical power reactor facilities based on the relevant law in fiscal 1993. The amounts of release of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes were sufficiently smaller than the target value of the yearly release control for attaining the target value of dose that the public around the facilities receive. As to the state of control of radioactive solid waste, the amount of drum generation tended to decrease year by year, and the cumulative amount to be preserved tended to level off. The dose equivalent that the individuals who engaged in radiation works received was smaller than the limit value in all nuclear power stations. The total dose equivalent for those workers in fiscal 1993 was 86.65 man Sv. Hereafter, the automation and remote operation of works, the water quality control for reducing crud and so on will be promoted to reduce radiation exposure. The reference data on the state of control of gaseous, liquid and solid wastes, and the state of control of radiation exposure of workers are attached. (K.I.)

  7. Use of molecular cytogenetic analysis as bio marker in assessment of DNA damage in radiation workers at Al-Twuathia site Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulsahib, K. A.; Amel, J. M.; Abdullah, A.K.; Haider, Y.L.; Ali, H.F.; Khawla, A.B.

    2012-12-01

    The present study aims to use the biological techniques in a genotoxicity assessment of low doses of radiation in samples of workers in Al-Tuwatha site due to decommissioning to radioactive contamination as a result of work. Used three molecular genetic techniques as included micronuclei in cytoplasm of reticulocytes cells, buccal micronuclei cymate assay and alkaline comet assay. this study including 50 blood samples, aged (35 - 63) as well as 50 blood samples which are not smokers and alcohol as control group which including (35 and 15) aged (25 - 57 year) for the test of micronuclei in cytoplasm of reticulocytes. While the comet assay and buccal micronuclei cymate assay which including blood and cheek swab samples from 25 aged (30 - 56), as well as 25 blood and cheek swab samples which are not smokers and alcohol as control group which including (15 and 10) aged (25 - 57 year). The frequencies of micronuclei in cytoplasm of reticulocytes observed for the radiation workers at Tl-Tuwaith site were significantly (P<0.05) higher than in the control group. Similarly, the comet parameter were statistically higher (P<0.05) in the radiation workers group in comparison with the control group. Also, the results obtained showed statistically significant differences (P-<0.05 between comet tail length and tail moment values measured in radiation worker and control groups. In the case of buccal micronuclei assay, no significant (P<0.05) differences between both group was found. In conclusion, the results indicated that there is a possibility of using the changes in the levels of micronuclei in cytoplasm of reticulocytes, and comet assay useful as results obtained confirmed usefulness of the alkaline comet assay as a sensitive additional bio marker in the regular health screening of workers occupationally exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation.(Author)

  8. Primer on radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rados, B.

    1979-01-01

    Sources of anthropogenic radiation and their relative risk are discussed. Natural radiation accounts for more than half the exposure most U.S. citizens receive; the average citizen is exposed to about 100 mrem/yr. Medical and dental X-rays and radioactive material used to diagnose and treat illness account for 90% of all anthropogenic exposure. The remaining 10% comes from nuclear weapons testing, nuclear power plants, industrial uses of radioactive materials, and minute emissions from consumer products, such as color television sets. Occupationally exposed workers face greater risks from radiation. Means of calculating health risks are explained. Mechanisms of biological damage from ionizing radiation are outlined

  9. Radiation exposure monitoring and control in front-end fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    The front end nuclear fuel cycle facilities presently operational in India are the mining and processing of beach mineral sands along the southern coast of Kerala, Tamilnadu and Orissa, mining and processing of uranium ore in Singhbhum-East in Jharkhand and refining and fuel fabrication at Hyderabad and Trombay. Dedicated Health Physics Units set up at each site regularly carry out in-plant and personnel monitoring to ensure safe working conditions and evaluate radiation exposure of workers and advise appropriate control measures. External gamma radiation, radon, thoron, their progeny and airborne long-lived activity due to radioactive dust are monitored. Personal dosimeters are also issued to workers. The total radiation exposure of workers from external and internal sources is evaluated from the plant and personal monitoring data. Provision of adequate ventilation, control of dust and spillage of active solutions, prompt decontamination, use of personal protective appliances and worker education are the key factors in keeping the doses to the workers well within the regulatory limits. It has been observed that the total radiation dose to workers has been well below 20 mSv.y - 1 at all stages of operations. The monitoring methodologies and summary of radiation exposure data for different facilities during the last few years are presented in the paper. (author)

  10. Methodology for comprehensive patient, worker and public radiation protection considerations while introducing new medical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neeman, E.; Keren, M.

    2001-01-01

    Patient protection is a major consideration while introducing new medical procedure. But protection of the workers and the public should be considered too. A methodology of combining non-patient radiation protection considerations with the introduction of new medical procedures is described. The new medical procedure was the Intracoronary Gamma Irradiation for the Prevention of Restenosis by using Iridium 192 gamma radiation sources. The usual authors' responsibility is the licensing of the use of radioactive materials while keeping public protection. According to this responsibility, the methodology's original orientation is public protection. As a result of coordination between several competent authorities, managed by the authors, the methodology was adopted for patient and worker protection too. Applicants, actually possible users (hospitals) of the new procedure, were obliged to plan medical procedures and working area according to dose limits and constrains as recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency and local competent authorities. Exposure calculations had to consider the usual parameters as sources types and activity, dose rate and dose levels, duration and number of treatments. Special attention was given to the presence workers and public by chance presence in or near treatment area. A usual condition to give a license was the installation of continuous (during treatment) radiation monitoring systems. But a special attention was given to physical barriers and procedures in order to stop unauthorized personal to arrive near to working area. Satisfactory staff training for normal operation and emergency situations are essential, including appropriate safety procedures and the presence of safety assistance team while executing treatment. (author)

  11. Social Work Involvement in Advance Care Planning: Findings from a Large Survey of Social Workers in Hospice and Palliative Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Gary L; Cagle, John G; Christ, Grace H

    2017-03-01

    Few data are available describing the involvement and activities of social workers in advance care planning (ACP). We sought to provide data about (1) social worker involvement and leadership in ACP conversations with patients and families; and (2) the extent of functions and activities when these discussions occur. We conducted a large web-based survey of social workers employed in hospice, palliative care, and related settings to explore their role, participation, and self-rated competency in facilitating ACP discussions. Respondents were recruited through the Social Work Hospice and Palliative Care Network and the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. Descriptive analyses were conducted on the full sample of respondents (N = 641) and a subsample of clinical social workers (N = 456). Responses were analyzed to explore differences in ACP involvement by practice setting. Most clinical social workers (96%) reported that social workers in their department are conducting ACP discussions with patients/families. Majorities also participate in, and lead, ACP discussions (69% and 60%, respectively). Most respondents report that social workers are responsible for educating patients/families about ACP options (80%) and are the team members responsible for documenting ACP (68%). Compared with other settings, oncology and inpatient palliative care social workers were less likely to be responsible for ensuring that patients/families are informed of ACP options and documenting ACP preferences. Social workers are prominently involved in facilitating, leading, and documenting ACP discussions. Policy-makers, administrators, and providers should incorporate the vital contributions of social work professionals in policies and programs supporting ACP.

  12. Non-radiation risk factors for leukemia: A case-control study among chornobyl cleanup workers in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudzenko, N; Hatch, M; Bazyka, D; Dyagil, I; Reiss, R F; Brenner, A; Chumak, V; Babkina, N; Zablotska, L B; Mabuchi, K

    2015-10-01

    Occupational and environmental exposure to chemicals such as benzene has been linked to increased risk of leukemia. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have also been found to affect leukemia risk. Previous analyses in a large cohort of Chornobyl clean-up workers in Ukraine found significant radiation-related increased risk for all leukemia types. We investigated the potential for additional effects of occupational and lifestyle factors on leukemia risk in this radiation-exposed cohort. In a case-control study of chronic lymphocytic and other leukemias among Chornobyl cleanup workers, we collected data on a range of non-radiation exposures. We evaluated these and other potential risk factors in analyses adjusting for estimated bone marrow radiation dose. We calculated Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals in relation to lifestyle factors and occupational hazards. After adjusting for radiation, we found no clear association of leukemia risk with smoking or alcohol but identified a two-fold elevated risk for non-CLL leukemia with occupational exposure to petroleum (OR=2.28; 95% Confidence Interval 1.13, 6.79). Risks were particularly high for myeloid leukemias. No associations with risk factors other than radiation were found for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. These data - the first from a working population in Ukraine - add to evidence from several previous reports of excess leukemia morbidity in groups exposed environmentally or occupationally to petroleum or its products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 78 FR 38346 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  14. Radioactivity and dangerous radiation: safety and worker protection; 1. ed; Keradioaktifan dan sinaran bahaya: keselamatan dan perlindungan pekerja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramli, Ahmad Termizi [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor Bahru (Malaysia). Dept of Physics

    1988-12-31

    This book discussed the aspects of radiological protection for radiation workers and working place in details. It covered all aspect in this subject, from the basic information of radiations which is dangerous for whom did not know much about it, to specific recommendations and procedures in order to work safely with it.

  15. Radiation Safety (General) Regulations 1983 (Western Australia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The provisions of the Regulations cover, inter alia, the general precautions and requirements relating to radiation safety of the public and radiation workers and registration of irradiating apparatus or premises on which such apparatus is operated. In addition, the Regulations set forth requirements for the operation of such apparatus and for the premises involved. (NEA) [fr

  16. Radiation exposure during ESWL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, D.L.; Van Swearingen, F.L.; Dyer, R.B.; Appel, B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses exposure to ionizing radiation by the ESWL patient and for health professionals. Although the patient is exposed acutely to the highest level of radiation, the lithotripter team is chronically exposed to ionizing radiation at varying levels. Attention to detail is important in reducing that exposure. The operator should follow the guidelines set forth in this chapter in order to minimize exposure to the patient, himself or herself, and to all co-workers. At the present time, investigation of an alternative modality for stone localization, ultrasound, is being investigated

  17. Development of database management system for monitoring of radiation workers for actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyane, G.N.; Mishra, L.; Nadar, M.Y.; Singh, I.S.; Rao, D.D.

    2012-01-01

    Annually around 500 radiation workers are monitored for estimation of lung activities and internal dose due to Pu/Am and U from various divisions of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (Trombay) and from PREFRE and A3F facilities (Tarapur) in lung counting laboratory located at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre hospital under Routine and Special monitoring program. A 20 cm diameter phoswich and an array of HPGe detector were used for this purpose. In case of positive contamination, workers are followed up and monitored using both the detection systems in different geometries. Management of this huge data becomes difficult and therefore an easily retrievable database system containing all the relevant data of the monitored radiation workers. Materials and methods: The database management system comprises of three main modules integrated together: 1) Apache server installed on a Windows (XP) platform (Apache version 2.2.17) 2) MySQL database management system (MySQL version 5.5.8) 3) PHP (Preformatted Hypertext) programming language (PHP version 5.3.5). All the 3 modules work together seamlessly as a single software program. The front end user interaction is through an user friendly and interactive local web page where internet connection is not required. This front page has hyperlinks to many other pages, which have different utilities for the user. The user has to log in using username and password. Results and Conclusions: Database management system is used for entering, updating and management of lung monitoring data of radiation workers, The program is having following utilities: bio-data entry of new subjects, editing of bio-data of old subjects (only one subject at a time), entry of counting data of that day's lung monitoring, retrieval of old records based on a number of parameters and filters like date of counting, employee number, division, counts fulfilling a given criterion, etc. and calculation of MEQ CWT (Muscle Equivalent Chest Wall Thickness), energy

  18. 76 FR 38183 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  19. 76 FR 11483 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  20. 78 FR 19268 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  1. 75 FR 78998 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  2. 78 FR 78965 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  3. 77 FR 40890 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  4. 77 FR 15761 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  5. 78 FR 732 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  6. 78 FR 78963 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  7. 78 FR 62635 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  8. 75 FR 39029 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  9. 76 FR 77235 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  10. Malignant pleural mesothelioma risk among nuclear workers: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, C; Guseva Canu, I; Laurier, D

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to ionising radiation has been suggested as a causal risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Studies of patients treated by radiotherapy for primary cancers have suggested that radiation contributes to the development of secondary MPM. Here we examined the risk to nuclear workers of MPM related to exposure to low doses of occupational radiation at low dose rates. All results concerning MPM risk in published studies of nuclear workers were examined for their association with radiation exposure and potential confounders. We found 19 relevant studies. Elevated risks of pleural cancer were reported in most (15/17) of these studies. Eight reported risks higher for radiation monitored workers than for other workers. However, of 12 studies that looked at associations with ionising radiation, only one reported a significant dose-risk association. Asbestos was an important confounder in most studies. We conclude that studies of nuclear workers have not detected an association between ionising radiation exposure and MPM. Further investigations should improve the consideration of asbestos exposure at the same time as they address the risk of MPM related to occupational exposure of nuclear workers to low doses of ionising radiation at low dose rates. (review)

  11. Malignant pleural mesothelioma risk among nuclear workers: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz-Flamant, C; Guseva Canu, I; Laurier, D, E-mail: camille.metz@irsn.fr [Laboratory of Epidemiology, Institute of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to ionising radiation has been suggested as a causal risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Studies of patients treated by radiotherapy for primary cancers have suggested that radiation contributes to the development of secondary MPM. Here we examined the risk to nuclear workers of MPM related to exposure to low doses of occupational radiation at low dose rates. All results concerning MPM risk in published studies of nuclear workers were examined for their association with radiation exposure and potential confounders. We found 19 relevant studies. Elevated risks of pleural cancer were reported in most (15/17) of these studies. Eight reported risks higher for radiation monitored workers than for other workers. However, of 12 studies that looked at associations with ionising radiation, only one reported a significant dose-risk association. Asbestos was an important confounder in most studies. We conclude that studies of nuclear workers have not detected an association between ionising radiation exposure and MPM. Further investigations should improve the consideration of asbestos exposure at the same time as they address the risk of MPM related to occupational exposure of nuclear workers to low doses of ionising radiation at low dose rates. (review)

  12. Quantitative evaluation of personal exposure to UV radiation of workers and general public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisto, R.; Borra, M.; Casale, G. R.; Militello, A.; Siani, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Due to meteorological conditions variability and to the variability of exposure patterns, which can be largely different during a working day, personal dosemeters use can be necessary to obtain a correct quantitative evaluation of the radiation dose absorbed by an exposed worker. Different classes of personal dosemeters exist and, among them, electronic dosemeters and poly-sulphone film dosemeters. An experimental campaign is presented conduced in a cultivated area of Tuscany and some aspects are discussed about an experimental campaign performed on a population of volunteers on a central Italy beach near Rome. The aim of the present work is to show some relevant issues in a dosimetric approach to the exposure evaluation of outdoor workers and, in general, of the public during recreational activities. (authors)

  13. Association between sperm DNA integrity and seminal plasma antioxidant levels in health workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Dayanidhi; Salian, Sujith Raj; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Uppangala, Shubhashree; Kumari, Sandhya; Challapalli, Srinivas; Chandraguthi, Shrinidhi Gururajarao; Jain, Navya; Krishnamurthy, Hanumanthappa; Kumar, Pratap; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the association between occupational radiation exposure and risk to human fertility. Recently, we provided the first evidence on altered sperm functional characteristics, DNA damage and hypermethylation in radiation health workers. However, there is no report elucidating the association between seminal plasma antioxidants and sperm chromatin integrity in occupationally exposed subjects. Here, we assessed the seminal plasma antioxidants and lipid peroxidation level in 83 men who were occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and then correlated with the sperm chromatin integrity. Flow cytometry based sperm chromatin integrity assay revealed a significant decline in αt value in the exposed group in comparison to the non-exposed group (P<0.0001). Similarly, both total and reduced glutathione levels and total antioxidant capacity in the seminal plasma were significantly higher in exposed group than the non-exposed group (P<0.01, 0.001 and 0.0001, respectively). However, superoxide dismutase level and malondialdehyde level, which is an indicator of lipid peroxidation in the seminal plasma, did not differ significantly between two groups. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and GSH level exhibited a positive correlation with sperm DNA integrity in exposed subjects. To conclude, this study distinctly shows that altered sperm chromatin integrity in radiation health workers is associated with increase in seminal plasma antioxidant level. Further, the increased seminal plasma GSH and TAC could be an adaptive measure to tackle the oxidative stress to protect genetic and functional sperm deformities in radiation health workers. - Highlights: • Seminal plasma antioxidants were measured in men occupationally exposed to radiation. • Sperm chromatin integrity was significantly affected in the exposed group. • Glutathione and total antioxidant capacity was significantly higher in exposed group. • Sperm DNA damage in exposed subjects

  14. Association between sperm DNA integrity and seminal plasma antioxidant levels in health workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dayanidhi; Salian, Sujith Raj; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Uppangala, Shubhashree; Kumari, Sandhya [Division of Clinical Embryology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal 576104 (India); Challapalli, Srinivas [Department of Radiotherapy, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore (India); Chandraguthi, Shrinidhi Gururajarao [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal (India); Jain, Navya; Krishnamurthy, Hanumanthappa [National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore (India); Kumar, Pratap [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal (India); Adiga, Satish Kumar, E-mail: satish.adiga@manipal.edu [Division of Clinical Embryology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal 576104 (India)

    2014-07-15

    There is a paucity of data regarding the association between occupational radiation exposure and risk to human fertility. Recently, we provided the first evidence on altered sperm functional characteristics, DNA damage and hypermethylation in radiation health workers. However, there is no report elucidating the association between seminal plasma antioxidants and sperm chromatin integrity in occupationally exposed subjects. Here, we assessed the seminal plasma antioxidants and lipid peroxidation level in 83 men who were occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and then correlated with the sperm chromatin integrity. Flow cytometry based sperm chromatin integrity assay revealed a significant decline in αt value in the exposed group in comparison to the non-exposed group (P<0.0001). Similarly, both total and reduced glutathione levels and total antioxidant capacity in the seminal plasma were significantly higher in exposed group than the non-exposed group (P<0.01, 0.001 and 0.0001, respectively). However, superoxide dismutase level and malondialdehyde level, which is an indicator of lipid peroxidation in the seminal plasma, did not differ significantly between two groups. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and GSH level exhibited a positive correlation with sperm DNA integrity in exposed subjects. To conclude, this study distinctly shows that altered sperm chromatin integrity in radiation health workers is associated with increase in seminal plasma antioxidant level. Further, the increased seminal plasma GSH and TAC could be an adaptive measure to tackle the oxidative stress to protect genetic and functional sperm deformities in radiation health workers. - Highlights: • Seminal plasma antioxidants were measured in men occupationally exposed to radiation. • Sperm chromatin integrity was significantly affected in the exposed group. • Glutathione and total antioxidant capacity was significantly higher in exposed group. • Sperm DNA damage in exposed subjects

  15. Hematology evaluation in workers exposed to ionizing radiation of a radiotherapy service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez P, G.; Frometa S, I.

    1996-01-01

    The verification of hematology indicators is performed as a routine at the initial and periodic evaluation of the health of workers which are exposed to ionizing radiation. In order to analyze the behavior of such indicators in connection with the exposure time and the received dose, a sample (n=74) of workers of the Radiotherapy Service in the Cancer Hospital in La Habana has been studied during 8 years. It was observed that the mean number of leucocytes, blood platelet and hemoglobin did not show meaningful variations and oscillated into normal limits; however an increase in the number of leukopenia cases was detected when the exposure time and the accumulated dose increased. This increase was two, three times higher in the last year of pursuit in connection with the initial value. (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Association between shift work and being overweight or obese among health care workers in a clinical setting in Medellin, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Parra, Myrna; Romero-Arrieta, Lydis; Vasquez-Trespalacios, Elsa Maria; Palacio-Jaramillo, Veronica; Valencia-Martinez, Andrea

    2016-11-22

    Shift work is common in health care settings and has been hypothesized as a risk factor for being overweight or obese. We examined the relation between shift work and being overweight or obese, adjusting for stress and lifestyle habits in Colombian health care workers. The aim of this study was to assess the association between shift work and being overweight/obese in employees of a health care setting in Medellin, Colombia. This cross-sectional study was carried out among 200 workers in a health care setting. Participants completed a demographic, occupational, work-related stress and life style questionnaire. Their Body Mass Index (BMI) and waist to hip ratio were also measured. The study sample consisted of 160 (80%) females and 40 (20%) males. Mean age was 35.1±9.1 years and mean BMI was 25±3.9. After adjusting for potential confounders, multivariate logistic regression revealed no statistically significant association between being overweight, being obese or waist to hip ratio and shift work; 95% CI OR: 1.08 (0.62-1.89), 1.33 (0.44-3.99) and 1.2 (0.8-1.9), respectively. Day workers were statistically more likely to smoke, work more hours, and have a higher educational level than shift workers. No significant associations between shift work and being overweight/obese were observed in health care workers in a Colombian setting. These findings need to be confirmed through longitudinal studies.

  17. Average annual doses, lifetime doses and associated risk of cancer death for radiation workers in various fuel fabrication facilities in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, P.S.; Dhond, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    Lifetime doses based on average annual doses are estimated for radiation workers in various fuel fabrication facilities in India. For such cumulative doses, the risk of radiation-induced cancer death is computed. The methodology for arriving at these estimates and the assumptions made are discussed. Based on personnel monitoring records from 1966 to 1978, the average annual dose equivalent for radiation workers is estimated as 0.9 mSv (90 mrem), and the maximum risk of cancer death associated with this occupational dose as 1.35x10 -5 a -1 , as compared with the risk of death due to natural causes of 7x10 -4 a -1 and the risk of death due to background radiation alone of 1.5x10 -5 a -1 . (author)

  18. Frequencies of micronuclei in lymphocytes and complete blood picture of radiation worker at Al-Twuathia Site Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amel, J.M.; Abdulsahib, K. A.; Abdullah, A.G.; Haider, Y.L.; Ali, H.F.

    2012-12-01

    The present study aims to use the frequency of micronuclei in lymphocyte and complete blood picture as a bio markers for detection of the effects of the low radiation doses in to decommissioning to radioactive contamination (Lama and Geo- Pilot) as a result of work, during January 2009 to November 2011 present study including collected 113 blood samples, including (103 male and female) aged (25 - 65) year for the exam of compete blood picture analysis, included 69 blood samples as first time before work in Al-Twuathia site, 22 blood samples as a second and third exam. While the cytogenetic analysis including 78 male blood samples aged (35 - 63) year, included 30 blood samples as first time be for work in Al-Twuathia site, 30 blood samples as a second exam and 18 blood samples as third exam, as well as 50 blood samples which are not smokers and alcohol as control group which including (40 male and 10 female) aged (30 - 55 year). Three cytogenetic parameter were employed such as frequency of micronuclei, mitotic index an nuclear and nuclear division index, which used for detection of biological effects of ionizing radiation. Also the current study included the detection of the effect of radiation in complete blood picture analysis of workers at Al-Tuwaitha site, which included (Hb, PCV, WBC count, differential count of WBCs, platelets count of WBCs, platelets count and ESR). From the study no significant differences in the rate of micronuclei and division index of workers in the first and second examination compared with the group of workers in the third exam, while observed a significant increase slightly at level (P <0.05) in these rates compared with the control group, as well as were recorded no significant differences in the rate of mitotic index for workers compared with the control group. Also, found no significant difference in complete blood picture analysis for workers compared with the control group. In conclusion, the significant slightly increase at the

  19. Mortality among workers exposed to external ionizing radiation at a nuclear facility in Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggs, L.D.; Cox-DeVore, C.A.; Wilkinson, G.S.; Reyes, M.

    1991-01-01

    In a cohort mortality study of white men employed by the Mound Facility (1947 through 1979), observed deaths did not exceed those expected based on US death rates for the overall cohort or for the subcohort monitored for external ionizing radiation. Among the radiation-monitored subcohort, mortality for workers with cumulative radiation doses of at least 10 mSv was not significantly increased when compared with mortality for coworkers with cumulative doses of less than 10 mSv. A significant dose-response based on a Mantel-Haenszel test of trend was observed for all leukemias. However, when a death from chronic lymphatic leukemia, a type of leukemia generally not regarded as radiogenic, was removed from the analyses, the strength of the dose-response was reduced

  20. Diffusion of e-health innovations in 'post-conflict' settings: a qualitative study on the personal experiences of health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Aniek; Fyfe, Molly; Handuleh, Jibril; Patel, Preeti; Godman, Brian; Leather, Andrew; Finlayson, Alexander

    2014-04-23

    Technological innovations have the potential to strengthen human resources for health and improve access and quality of care in challenging 'post-conflict' contexts. However, analyses on the adoption of technology for health (that is, 'e-health') and whether and how e-health can strengthen a health workforce in these settings have been limited so far. This study explores the personal experiences of health workers using e-health innovations in selected post-conflict situations. This study had a cross-sectional qualitative design. Telephone interviews were conducted with 12 health workers, from a variety of cadres and stages in their careers, from four post-conflict settings (Liberia, West Bank and Gaza, Sierra Leone and Somaliland) in 2012. Everett Roger's diffusion of innovation-decision model (that is, knowledge, persuasion, decision, implementation, contemplation) guided the thematic analysis. All health workers interviewed held positive perceptions of e-health, related to their beliefs that e-health can help them to access information and communicate with other health workers. However, understanding of the scope of e-health was generally limited, and often based on innovations that health workers have been introduced through by their international partners. Health workers reported a range of engagement with e-health innovations, mostly for communication (for example, email) and educational purposes (for example, online learning platforms). Poor, unreliable and unaffordable Internet was a commonly mentioned barrier to e-health use. Scaling-up existing e-health partnerships and innovations were suggested starting points to increase e-health innovation dissemination. Results from this study showed ICT based e-health innovations can relieve information and communication needs of health workers in post-conflict settings. However, more efforts and investments, preferably driven by healthcare workers within the post-conflict context, are needed to make e-health more

  1. Assessment of DNA Damage in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes of Radiation Workers at Al-Tuwaitha Site by Using the Sister Chromatid Exchange and the Comet Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.K.; Muttar, A.J.; Khayon, S.K.; Haider, Y.L.; Ali, H.F.; Abdullah, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    The sister chromatid exchange was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from 40 individuals of workers occupationally exposed to low ionizing radiation doses in Al-Tuwaitha site due to decommissioning to radioactive contamination then compared with 40 control individuals living in Baghdad. SCEs were scored in metaphase chromosomes were identified by fluorescent plus Giemsa staining (Figure 2).The mean frequencies of SCEs per cell differed significantly (p≺0 0.05) between individuals of radiation workers and control, being 7.78 0.45 SCE/cells and 6.28 0.22 SCE/cells , respectively. However SCE frequency was statistically significant (P≺0 0.05) among radiation workers as compared to control individuals.

  2. Risk of lower extremity arterial disease in a cohort of workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation over a prolonged period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azizova, Tamara V.; Bannikova, Maria V.; Grigorieva, Evgenia S.; Bagaeva, Yaroslava P.; Azizova, Elena V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Ozyorsk Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    In this study the incidence risk of lower extremity arterial disease (LEAD; international classification of diseases version 9 code 440.2) was assessed in a cohort of workers occupationally exposed to radiation over a prolonged period. The study cohort includes 22,377 workers of the Mayak Production Association (25 % of whom are females) first employed at one of the main facilities in 1948-1982 and followed up to the end of 2008. Dose estimates used in the study are provided by Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008. The mean total dose from external gamma-rays is 0.54 Gy for males and 0.44 Gy for females. The mean absorbed liver dose from internal alpha-radiation due to incorporated plutonium is 0.23 Gy in males and 0.44 Gy in females. Relative risks and excess relative risks per unit dose (ERR/Gy) are calculated based on maximum likelihood. A total of 943 cases of LEAD are registered in the study cohort during the follow-up of 512,801 person-years. A significant association of LEAD incidence with total dose from external gamma-rays (based on a linear model) was revealed, and the ERR/Gy is 0.27 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.11; 0.48). It turned out that a linear-exponential model provides a better fit of the data (∇AIC = 9.957). Inclusion of an adjustment for internal alpha-radiation dose resulted in the reduction of the ERR/Gy to 0.19 (95 % CI 0.05; 0.39), but the risk remains significant. No association of LEAD incidence with dose from internal alpha-radiation was found in the study worker cohort. It is concluded that this study provides evidence for an association of LEAD incidence with dose from external gamma-rays taking non-radiation factors into account. (orig.)

  3. Persistence of translocations detected by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization in peripheral lymphocytes of accidentally exposed radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressl, S.; Stephan, G.

    1997-01-01

    The translocation frequency in lymphocytes of radiation workers accidentally exposed a number of years earlier was determined by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization. Chromosomes 2, 4 and 8 were painted, and simultaneously the centromeres. The genomic frequency of translocations is between 1.7 and 17.9 per 1000 cells. This variation is not significantly different from the level in healthy control subjects. Therefore, no radiation exposure could be detected retrospectively. On the other hand, the frequency of dicentrics in these radiation workers measured by means of fluorescence plus Giemsa staining shortly after the exposure was significantly increased, and whole body doses between 0.2 and 0.3 Gy could be calculated. Consequently, it would seem that dicentrics measured shortly after an exposure are a more sensitive indicator than translocations which are determined years later. (author)

  4. Equipping Social Workers to Address Spirituality in Practice Settings: AModel Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Hodge

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available While there is growing interest in incorporating clients’ spiritual beliefs and values into social work practice, several studies have shown that social workers lack the necessary training to address spiritual issues in a culturally competent manner. This paper addresses this need by providing an annotated spirituality training course for use in various settings. Topics or domains covered in the curriculum include ethics and values, research and theory on spirituality, the nation’s spiritual demographics, the cultures of major spiritual traditions, value conflicts, spiritual interventions, assessment approaches, and the rights of spiritual believers. A number of potential assignments are offered,which are designed to promote practitioner self-awareness, respect for spiritual diversity, and an enhanced ability to assess and operationalize spiritual strengths to ameliorate problems in practice settings.

  5. Doses to road transport workers from radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, B.E.; van der Vooren, A.

    1988-12-01

    Each year approximately 750,000 packages of radioactive materials are shipped throughout Canada. Regulatory controls on these shipments are designed to keep radiation doses received by transport workers well within acceptable limits. Since many of these workers are not monitored for radiation exposure, however, little factual information has been available in Canada to support theoretical estimates. A study to document actual radiation doses received by a select group of transport workers that is actively involved in the shipment of radioactive materials, was carried out in 1987 and 1988. This study involved the monitoring of 31 candidates from nine transport companies from across the country that handle medical isotopes, industrial isotopes, uranium fuel cycle materials and associated radioactive wastes. Each of the candidates (consisting of driver, dock workers, sorters, and supervisors) was issued personal thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badges that were worn each day during the six month monitoring period. Some of the candidates were also issued cab or area dosimeters that were left in the cabs of the vehicles or in work areas so that the dose received in these areas could be differentiated from total personal exposure. During the monitoring program, the candidates filled out reporting sheets at the end of each working day to document information such as the quantity of materials handled, handling times and vehicle size. This information and the dosimetry data were used in the development of correlations between materials handled and doses reported so that doses for other handling similar materials could be estimated. Based on the results of the study, it was learned that while most of the transport workers receive doses that are at or near background levels, other (particularly those handling medical isotopes) are exposed to levels of radiation that may result in their receiving doses above the 5 mSv per annum limit set for members of the general public. On

  6. Worker Alienation and Compensation at the Savannah River Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwood, Loka; Wing, Steve

    2016-05-01

    Corporations operating U.S. nuclear weapons plants for the federal government began tracking occupational exposures to ionizing radiation in 1943. However, workers, scholars, and policy makers have questioned the accuracy and completeness of radiation monitoring and its capacity to provide a basis for workers' compensation. We use interviews to explore the limitations of broad-scale, corporate epidemiological surveillance through worker accounts from the Savannah River Site nuclear weapons plant. Interviewees report inadequate monitoring, overbearing surveillance, limited venues to access medical support and exposure records, and administrative failure to report radiation and other exposures at the plant. The alienation of workers from their records and toil is relevant to worker compensation programs and the accuracy of radiation dose measurements used in epidemiologic studies of occupational radiation exposures at the Savannah River Site and other weapons plants. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Cancer mortality risk of nuclear power workers due to the exposure of ionising radiation in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehringer, F.; Seitz, G.; Hammer, G.P.; Blettner, M.

    2006-01-01

    A cohort study of German nuclear power workers was set up to investigate overall and cancer mortality risk related to a chronic exposure to ionising radiation of low-level dose. The German study was performed as a part of an international study carried out by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon. First results of the international study have been published recently [1]. German data are not yet included in this analysis. The German cohort consists of 4844 employees from 10 nuclear power plants. All persons who worked in these nuclear power plants in 1991 or started employment between 1991 und 1997 are included (except for employees of one plant, whose observation period started in 1992). These persons accumulated about 31,000 person years. Overall, 68 deaths were observed in the observation period between 1.1.1991-31.12.1997. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were computed for all causes of death, all cancers, cardiovascular diseases, external causes, and all other causes. Overall, a strong healthy worker effect was observed (SMR=0.52 [95% CI: 0.41;0.67]). No increase in total cancer mortality was seen (SMR=0.85 [95% CI: 0.53;1.30]). However, numbers are too small for stable risk estimates and further effort is under way to complete the cohort in terms of power plants and to extend the follow-up until 2005. (authors)

  8. Cancer mortality risk of nuclear power workers due to the exposure of ionising radiation in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehringer, F.; Seitz, G. [Berufsgenossenschaft der Feinmechanik und Elektrotechnik, Koln (Germany); Hammer, G.P.; Blettner, M. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitat Mainz, Institut fur Medizinische Biometrie, Epidemiologie und Informatik des Klinikums (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    A cohort study of German nuclear power workers was set up to investigate overall and cancer mortality risk related to a chronic exposure to ionising radiation of low-level dose. The German study was performed as a part of an international study carried out by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon. First results of the international study have been published recently [1]. German data are not yet included in this analysis. The German cohort consists of 4844 employees from 10 nuclear power plants. All persons who worked in these nuclear power plants in 1991 or started employment between 1991 und 1997 are included (except for employees of one plant, whose observation period started in 1992). These persons accumulated about 31,000 person years. Overall, 68 deaths were observed in the observation period between 1.1.1991-31.12.1997. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were computed for all causes of death, all cancers, cardiovascular diseases, external causes, and all other causes. Overall, a strong healthy worker effect was observed (SMR=0.52 [95% CI: 0.41;0.67]). No increase in total cancer mortality was seen (SMR=0.85 [95% CI: 0.53;1.30]). However, numbers are too small for stable risk estimates and further effort is under way to complete the cohort in terms of power plants and to extend the follow-up until 2005. (authors)

  9. Development of CaSO4:Dy based ring dosemeter for extremity monitoring of radiation workers in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Kshama; Meenal, P.; Bhagat, R.V.; Singh, R.; Kolambe, D.H.; Chougaonkar, M.P.; Sapra, B.K.

    2014-01-01

    Extremity dosemeters are required to be worn in cases where the dose to extremities is expected to be significantly greater than the dose to the whole body. In India, CaSO 4 :Dy based three element personnel monitoring TLD badge worn at chest and wrist level are used for whole body and extremity monitoring, respectively. Presently no official/legal finger dosemeter is available for extremity monitoring for radiation workers in the country. To cater to the long standing requirement of finger dosimeter, a new compact three-element Extremity Ring Badge Dosemeter (ERBD) has been developed for measurement of the equivalent doses received by the extremities of radiation workers in terms of operational quantity Hp(0.07). It was aimed to meet the performance requirement of IEC/ISO standards. This paper gives the design detail and result of experimental studies of ERB dosemeter

  10. Dose Data Analysis of the Occupational Exposed Workers in Slovenia in 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Breznik, B.; Jovanovic, P.; Zdesar, U.; Rojc, J.; Stuhec, M.; Vaupotic, J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Central State Dose Register at the Health Inspectorate includes dosimetry data of all occupationally exposed workers in the year 2000 in Slovenia. The register contains a comprehensive set of data related to the registered dose of around 4500 workers. The set includes among others the following parameters: type of workplaces based on the extended UNSCEAR form, classification of sources based on the ICPR 60 weighting factors, employer identification, licensee identification, personal data of workers, worker cumulative dose received in the past, data related to the worker education concerning radiation protection and data related to the worker health surveillance. The analysis of the external and internal dose data for the year 2000 regarding the dose limits given in 96/29/Euratom and the state legislation will be given. The dose analysis of the annual doses as well of monthly doses measured in different branches of industry, medicine, education and state institutions will be presented. The comparison of the doses received by different categories of workers will be shown. The measured doses above 4 mSv per month will be discussed. The common problems related to the assurance of the correct measurements of the doses will be also briefly discussed. (author)

  11. Part I. Emergency workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This monograph deals with assessment of radiological health effects of the Chernobyl accident for emergency workers (part 1) and the population of the contaminated areas in Russia (part 2). The Chernobyl emergency workers and people living in the contaminated areas of Russia received much lower doses than the population of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and it was unclear whether risks of radiation-induced cancers derived with the Japanese data could be extrapolated to the low dose range However, it was predicted as early as in 1990 that the thyroid cancer incidence might be increasing due to incorporated 131 irradiation. What conclusions can be drawn from regarding cancer incidence among emergency workers and residents of the contaminated areas in Russia and the role of the radiation factor on the basis of the registry data? Leukemia incidence. Leukemia incidence is known to be one of principal indications of radiation effects. The radiation risk for leukemias is 3-4 times higher that for solid cancers and its latent period is estimated to be 2-3 years after exposure. Results of the radiation epidemiological studies discussed in this book show that in the worst contaminated Bryansk region the leukemia incidence rate is not higher than in the country in general. Even though some evidence exists for the dose response relationship, the radiation risks appear to be not statistically significant. Since risks of leukemia are known to be higher for those who were children at exposure, long-term epidemiological studies need to be continued. The study of leukemias among emergency workers strongly suggest the existence of dose response relationship. In those who received external doses more than 0.15 Gy the leukemia incidence rate is two time higher and these emergency workers should be referred to as a group of increased radiation risk. Solid cancers. The obtained results provide no evidence to a radiation-induced increase in solid cancers among residents of the contaminated areas

  12. Ionizing radiation dose control for workers in a nuclear plant working with unsealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerulis, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    With the liberation of the use of the nuclear energy for peaceful applications, International Commission Radiological Protection, ICRP, founded in 1928, created a system of protection of the undesirable doses of ionizing radiation in 1958. This has been received by workers, members of the public and environment and hence it became possible for the introduction of these applications. This protection system is adopted by the International Agency of Energy Atomic, IAEA, that publishes recommendations in safety series, 88 and by the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, CNEN, which publishes these regulations. The international recommendations and national regulations were adapted and they need to be applied in this way. The present paper uses recommendations of the publication 75 from ICRP, of the publication 115 from 88 and regulations of the regulation NN 3.01 from CNEN to present, through radiological protection measures, the ionizing radiation dose control for workers in a nuclear plant that works in the research, production, division and packing of unsealed sources to be used in clinical applications. In that way it is possible to prevent appropriately the undesirable doses and to confirm the received doses. (author)

  13. Order of the 8 december 2003 fixing the modalities of implementing of the ionizing radiation protection for workers working in aircraft in flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-02-01

    This order concerns the cosmic radiation exposure for workers working in aircraft in flight. The individual exposure of any workers to an effective dose of more than 1 mSv per year, have to be evaluated. (A.L.B.)

  14. Dose Record Analysis of External Exposure of Workers in Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriambololona, R.; Ratovonjanahary, J. F.; Randriantsizafy, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    External personnel monitoring of workers in diagnostic radiology in Madagascar using thermoluminescence techniques has been studied in previous work for the period of 1990 to 2000. The study was based on the average of Hp(0.07) and Hp(10) and on the annual dose distribution. The results showed that mean doses are very low compared with the annual dose limits for workers of 20 mSv per year and are comparable with natural contribution of telluric X and gamma exposure which is evaluated as 3.21 mSv per year in Antananarivo. No trend in the average was observed, however, the last 4 years, the results showed a substantial decrease in the average from 2 mSv to 1 mSv. It was assumed that this was the impact of the implementation by radiation staff in their workplace of the in force regulation which is in compliance with the new basic safety standards. Indeed, since 1996, Madagascar-Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (Madagascar-INSTN) and the Association Nationale de Radioprotection de Madagascar (ANARAPMAD), the Madagascar radiation protection society and associate member of IRPA, set up a national program for training of radiation workers. The number of workers trained during this period is evaluated as 50% of the total number of radiation workers in Madagascar. The present work is a continuation of the above mentioned survey during the period of 2001 to 2003. The training program was upgraded to involve personnel who will be in charge of radiation protection and safety in workplace and the training cycle lasts 2 years instead of 3 days in the previous program. The survey has been extended to include all radiation workers in Madagascar though the medical field is still the main application and represents more than 90 percent of the latter. The results shows that for this last 3 years, an other substantial decrease from 1 mSv to 0.5 mSv was observed in the average. In the dose distribution, more than 98 percent of the Hp(0.07) and more than 99

  15. Radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxier, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Data available on the biological effects of radiation on man are reviewed, with emphasis on dose response to low LET and high LET radiation sources, and the effects of dose rate. Existing guides for radiation protection were formulated largely on the basis of tumor induction in the bone of radium dial painters, but the ICRP/NCRP annual dose guides of 5 rem/yr are of the same general magnitude as the doses received in several parts of the world from the natural radiation environment. Because of the greater sensitivity of rapidly dividing cells and the assumption that radiation occupations would not begin before the age of eighteen, maximum exposure levels were set as 5 (N-18) rem/yr, where N is the exposed worker's age in years. However, in the case of the natural radiation environment, exposure commences, in a sense, with the exposure of the ovum of the individual's mother; and the ovum is formed during the fetal development of the mother. In occupational exposures, the professional health physicist has always practiced the as low as practical philosophy, and exposures have generally averaged far below the guidelines. The average annual exposure of the radiation worker in modern plants and laboratories is approximately equal to the average natural radiation environment exposure rate and far lower than the natural radiation environment in many parts of the world. There are numerous complications and uncertainties in quantifying radiation effects on humans, however, the greatest is that due to having to extrapolate from high dose levels at which effects have been measured and quantified, to low levels at which most exposures occur but at which no effects have been observed

  16. DNA repair gene polymorphisms in relation to chromosome aberration frequencies in retired radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilding, Craig S.; Relton, Caroline L.; Rees, Gwen S.; Tarone, Robert E.; Whitehouse, Caroline A.; Tawn, E. Janet

    2005-01-01

    Polymorphic variation in DNA repair genes was examined in a group of retired workers from the British Nuclear Fuels plc facility at Sellafield in relation to previously determined translocation frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Variation at seven polymorphisms in four genes involved in the base excision repair (XRCC1 R194W, R399Q and a [AC] n microsatellite in the 3' UTR) and double strand break repair (XRCC3 T241M and a [AC] n microsatellite in intron 3 of XRCC3, XRCC4 I134T, and a GACTAn microsatellite located 120kb 5' of XRCC5) pathways was determined for 291 retired radiation workers who had received cumulative occupational external radiation doses of between 0 and 1873mSv. When the interaction between radiation dose and each DNA repair gene polymorphism was examined in relation to translocation frequency there was no evidence for any of the polymorphisms studied influencing the response to occupational exposure. A positive interaction observed between genotype (individuals with at least one allele >=20 repeat units) at a microsatellite locus in the XRCC3 gene and smoking status should be interpreted cautiously because interactions were investigated for seven polymorphisms and two exposures. Nonetheless, further research is warranted to examine whether this DNA repair gene variant might be associated with a sub-optimal repair response to smoking-induced DNA damage and hence an increased frequency of translocations

  17. Radiological protection worker: occupational medical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora Ramirez, Erick

    2008-01-01

    International Organizations involved with radiation protection are presented in the first part. Also some documents related to the radiation that have been published by these organizations. Among the analyzed contents are the radiation and their patients, how to avoid the damage of radiation, pregnancy and exposure to medical radiation, effects of radiation, recommendations for the protection and safety standards. Occupational exposure is defined as the exposure received and understood by a worker during a period of work. In addition, it shows the types of occupational exposure, the protection that workers must have with the radiation, regulations, laws and the regulatory authority that protects the medical personnel in the uses of radiology [es

  18. Occupational radiation exposure in Germany in 2006. Report of the radiation protection register

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasch, G.; Fritzsche, E.; Kammerer, L.; Karofsky, R.; Spiesl, J.; Stegemann, R.

    2008-06-01

    In Germany, persons occupationally exposed to radiation are monitored by several official dosimetric services who transmit their records about individual radiation doses to the Radiation Protection Register of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). The number of dose recordings reported to the Radiation Protection Register has annually increased to more than three million records per year and thus accumulated to more than 34 million dose records at the end of 2006. The purpose of the Radiation Protection Register is to supervise the keeping of the dose limits by each radiation worker and to monitor the compliance with the radiation protection principle ''optimisation'' by performing detailed annual statistical analyses of the monitored persons and their radiation exposure. Amongst others, the annual report of the Radiation Protection Register provides information about status and development of occupational radiation exposure in Germany. In 2006, about 312,000 workers were monitored with dosimeters for occupational radiation exposure. About 18 % of the monitored persons received a measurable personal dose. The average annual dose of these exposed workers was 0.75 mSv. This value is the lowest average annual dose since dose monitoring for occupational worker was introduced. It remains below the dose limit of 1 mSv for the general public and amounts only 4 % of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv for radiation workers. Since 2003 aircraft crew personnel is subject to dose monitoring if it is employed in accordance with the German employment act and likely to receive an effective dose of at least 1 mSv per year from cosmic radiation during flight operation. This accounts for about 33.000 pilots and flight attendants. 45 airlines report the monthly accumulated dose values of their personnel via the Federal Office for Civil Aviation (''Luftfahrt-Bundesamt, LBA'') to the BfS. The collective dose of the aircraft crew personnel is 71 Person-Sv and thus

  19. Aseptic necrosis in caisson workers: a new set of decompression tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, G J; Kindwall, E P

    1986-06-01

    There is a high incidence of aseptic necrosis and decompression sickness among caisson workers due to inadequate decompression using the current OSHA decompression tables (1-7). Because of this, a new set of tables--Autodec III-O2--was developed which more effectively eliminates nitrogen from the body and, therefore, should decrease the incidence of both bends and aseptic necrosis. The Autodec III-O2 schedule's superiority was statistically significant at a level of 0.08 compared to the OSHA table. It is our conclusion that OSHA should adopt the Autodec III-O2 schedule as a replacement for the current decompression tables.

  20. Federal guidelines for estimating external exposure of radiation workers in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chizhov, K.; Kryuchkov, V.; Mark, N.K.; Szoeke, I.; Sneve, M.K.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an overview of Russian federal guidelines for optimizing work procedures in terms of radiation protection for planned field work is presented. The general provisions, procedures and methods for applying the principles of optimization are provided in accordance with the Radiation Safety Standards (NRB-99/2009) and Basic sanitary rules of radiation safety (OSPORB-99/2010). Jobs in environments with actual or potential radiation hazards shall be planned on the basis of the principle of optimization in order to prevent unexpected exposure of the personnel. Control and optimization of dose to workers is a continuous process, which is carried out at various stages of radiation-hazardous work under constant involvement of the personnel in the planning procedure. Implementation of the principle of optimization should include considerations for human and organizational aspects for ensuring high level safety. The planning and optimization process includes education and training of personnel, estimation of radiation doses for the upcoming work, preparations for unplanned situations, and implementation of practical safety measures within the targeted radiation-hazardous works. The optimization principle is most important in the planning phase where uncertainties in planned exposure must be considered. Variability of radiation risks related to different scenarios (choices) can be managed by modern simulation technology, and use of advanced tools (software) for simulating planned activities and conditions in digital models including the environment (premises of an industrial complex) with dynamic visualization of the radiation exposure conditions. Existing hardware and emerging information technologies allow practical application of such techniques. Application of advanced information technology can reduce uncertainties related to the radiation environment by turning invisible radiation into directly perceivable risk information. In addition, virtual reality

  1. Combined effects of radiation and other agents on the stomach cancer incidence among Mayak Atomic Plant workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D.; Rovny, S.I.; Sirchikov, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    The gravity of a problem of the combined action of radiation and other factors again was confirmed sessions UNSCEAR in May, 1998. It especially is important at study of cancer diseases in connection with the polyetiology and multistage of them development. The estimation of radiation, medico-biological factors and condition of life in occurrence of a stomach cancer among Mayak personnel was specified by case-cohort research. For a quota 503 men (157 cases of a stomach cancer, 346 men of the healthy personnel) attributive risk of the radiation factors was 8.8%, medico-biological - 57,2% (from them by greatest was influence chronic gastritis with secreting insufficiency - 35.4%), tobacco consumption - 31,6%. At an estimation of risk of a stomach cancer depending on external γ-irradiation best fitting was received at use of square-law model. The excess relative risk was 0,27 Gr -2 (F=44,5; P=0,007). For 239 Pu incorporation was not revealed of distinct connection with stomach cancer incidences. Interaction of the radiation and non-radiation factors also was appreciated. The interaction of gastritis with external γ-irradiation or 239 Pu was multiplicate. The interaction of smoking with γ-irradiation or 239 Pu incorporation was multiplicate also. The distribution histological types of a stomach cancer among the workers of Mayak plant differed in comparison with not working. Among the workers the increase poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was observed. (author)

  2. Combined effects of radiation and other agents on the stomach cancer incidence among Mayak Atomic Plant workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D. [Branch No 1 of State Research Center of Public Health Ministry of the Russian Federation, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation). Biophysics Inst.; Rovny, S.I.; Sirchikov, V.A.

    2000-05-01

    The gravity of a problem of the combined action of radiation and other factors again was confirmed sessions UNSCEAR in May, 1998. It especially is important at study of cancer diseases in connection with the polyetiology and multistage of them development. The estimation of radiation, medico-biological factors and condition of life in occurrence of a stomach cancer among Mayak personnel was specified by case-cohort research. For a quota 503 men (157 cases of a stomach cancer, 346 men of the healthy personnel) attributive risk of the radiation factors was 8.8%, medico-biological - 57,2% (from them by greatest was influence chronic gastritis with secreting insufficiency - 35.4%), tobacco consumption - 31,6%. At an estimation of risk of a stomach cancer depending on external {gamma}-irradiation best fitting was received at use of square-law model. The excess relative risk was 0,27 Gr{sup -2} (F=44,5; P=0,007). For {sup 239}Pu incorporation was not revealed of distinct connection with stomach cancer incidences. Interaction of the radiation and non-radiation factors also was appreciated. The interaction of gastritis with external {gamma}-irradiation or {sup 239}Pu was multiplicate. The interaction of smoking with {gamma}-irradiation or {sup 239}Pu incorporation was multiplicate also. The distribution histological types of a stomach cancer among the workers of Mayak plant differed in comparison with not working. Among the workers the increase poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was observed. (author)

  3. Latvian Chernobyl clean-up workers dynamics of morbidity 15 years of the post radiation period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvagule, T.; Eglite, M.; Bruvere, R.; Gabruseva, N.; Feldmane, G.

    2003-01-01

    Nearly 1.0% of the male population of Latvia were sent (1986-1991) to Chernobyl to assist in the clean-up activities after the nuclear power plant accident (1986). The prevalence of all types of diseases, dynamic of breaking out of the key symptoms and interferon status were evaluated in respect to date of work, duration of work and kind of work in the whole clean-up workers group and in the particular group with seizures of unconsciousness. The disease incidence in clean-up workers from Latvia exceeds that observed in age and sex matched male population. Most had several diseases each and their poly-symptomatic sicknesses exhibited tendency to progress even 10-14 years after the exposure (during 1996-2000). Diseases of nervous, digestive and circulatory system, mental disorders and diseases of muscles and connective tissue were the most frequent. The primary outset of symptoms being low in the first 2-3 years after the work gradually increased during the following 10 years. Leukopenia was predominant in 1990-1993 and leucocytosis in 1997-2000. Ability of leukocytes to produce interferons was significantly decreased. Since the external radiation doses did not exceed 50 centyGy (cGy) there is sufficient reasons to believe that the principal cause of the gradually increased frequency of health problems is the long-life radioisotopes incorporated in the clean-up workers bodies as permanent radiation and toxic compounds source. (authors)

  4. Radiation factors and smoking interaction at lung cancer incidence for workers at a nuclear enterprise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Khokhryakov, V.F.; Okladnikova, N.D.; Belyaeva, Z.D.; Zhuntova, G.V.

    1997-01-01

    It was shown on the basis of retrospective investigation of 500 workers at a nuclear enterprise (162 cases of lung cancer, 338 persons as matching control) that the interaction of external gamma-irradiation (> 2.0 Gy) and the body - burden of 239 Pu (> 9.3 kBq) at lung cancer is characterized as the multiplicative effect. Combined influence of smoking and radiation factors dependent on smoking index (SI): it changed from additive up to multiplicative and than to antagonistic with the increase of the smoking effect. The received results could be explained on the basis of a two - mutation model of radiation carcinogenesis

  5. Cataract frequency and subtypes involved in workers assessed for their solar radiation exposure: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modenese, Alberto; Gobba, Fabriziomaria

    2018-04-16

    Cataract is currently the primary cause of blindness worldwide, and one of its main risk factors is solar ultraviolet radiation exposure. According to the localization of lens opacities, three main subtypes of cataract are recognized: nuclear, cortical and posterior subcapsular cataract. One of the main determinants of individual long-term solar radiation exposure is outdoor work. We systematically reviewed scientific literature from the last 20 years to update the recent development of research on the risk of cataract in outdoor workers and on the specific subtypes involved, also investigating the methods applied to evaluate the occupational risk. A total of 15 studies were included in the review, of which 12 showed a positive association. The studies confirm the relationship of long-term occupational solar radiation exposure with cortical cataract and give new support for nuclear cataract, although no substantial new data were available to support a relation with the posterior subcapsular subtype. In most of the studies, the exposure assessment was not adequate to support a representative evaluation of the ocular risk; however, outdoor work is clearly a relevant risk factor for cataract. Further research providing a better evaluation of the relation between solar radiation exposure levels and lens damage in workers is needed and aimed to establish adequate occupational exposure limits and better preventive measures, studying also their effectiveness. © 2018 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A national computerized system for monitoring operational radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canipelle, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    In parallel to the expansion of the number of French nuclear power plant units in operation, maintenance actions have multiplied, which has meant calling upon the services of a growing number of increasingly specialized workers. It has therefore proved necessary to reinforce the radiation dose rate surveillance of these workers. As a result, certain companies decided to set up their own occupational radiation dose monitoring system, in addition to mandatory monitoring by the OPRI, using dosemeters, generally electronic or thermoluminescent film badges, supplied by the subcontractor companies or nuclear facility operators. This enables acquiring fast and accurate knowledge of the radiation doses received by the workers. For this type of surveillance to be fully efficient, a data centralization system was required, able to provide frequent, even daily readings if necessary, of the dose received during the current month or for any period of time, up to the sum of the doses accumulated over five years. (author)

  7. Remote control and data processing for measurement of radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yu; Luo Yisheng; Guo Yong; Ji Gang; Wang Xinggong; Zhang Hong; Zhang Wenzhong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To protect the workers from the reactor radiation and to improve the accuracy and efficiency of neutron dose measurement. Methods: With the application of remote control technology, a remote control and automatic measurement system for radiation dose measurement(especially for neutron dose) was set up. A Model 6517A electrometer was operated all automatically over RS-232 serial interface using SCPI commands with a computer. Results: The workers could stay far from the reactor and be able to control the portable computer in site though internet or LAN and then to control the 6517A electrometer to implement the dose measurement. After the measurement, the data were transferred to the remote computer near the workers and shared by many experts at the first time through the net. Conclusion: This is the first time that the remote control technology is applied in radiation dose measurement, which has so far been considered can only be performed at a near place. This new system can meet the need of neutron radiobiology researches as well as of the safety and health of the workers. (author)

  8. Estimation of radiation exposure for hot cell workers during DUPIC fuel fabrication process in IMEF M6 cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Yong Bum; Baek, Sang Yeol; Park, Dae Kyu

    1997-06-01

    DUPIC(Direct Use of spent PWR fuel In CANDU) fuel cycle to utilize the PWR spent fuel in fabricating CANDU fuel, which is expected to reduce not only the total amount of high level radwastes but the energy sources is underway. IMEF M6 cell to be used as DUPIC fuel fabrication facility is refurbished and retrofitted. Radiation exposure for the hot cell worker by dispersion of the radioactive materials during the DUPIC process were estimated on the basis of the hot cell design information. According to the estimation results, DUPIC fuel fabrication process could be run without any severe impacts to the hot cell workers when the ventilation system to maintain the sufficient pressure difference between hotcell and working area and radiation monitoring system is supports the hot cell operation properly. (author). 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  9. Change of annual collective dose equivalent of radiation workers at KURRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1994-01-01

    The change of exposure dose equivalent of radiation workers at KURRI (Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute) in the past 30 years is reported together with the operational accomplishments. The reactor achieved criticality on June 24, 1964 and reached the normal power of 1000 kW on August 17 of the same year, and the normal power was elevated to 5000 kW on July 16, 1968 until today. The change of the annual effective dose equivalent, the collective dose equivalent, the average annual dose equivalent and the maximum dose equivalent are indicated in the table and the figure. The chronological table on the activities of the reactor is added. (T.H.)

  10. Space Radiation Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deme, S.

    2003-01-01

    Although partly protected from galactic and solar cosmic radiation by the Earth's magnetosphere in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) astronauts exposure levels during long-term missions (90 days to 180 days) by far exceed with exposures of up to more than 100 mSv the annual exposure limits set for workers in the nuclear industry, but are still below the yearly exposure limits of 500 mSv for NASA astronauts. During solar particle events the short-term limits (300 mSv) may be approached or even exceeded. In the interplanetary space, outside the Earth's magnetic field even relatively benign Solar Particle Events (SPEs) can produce 1 Sv skin-absorbed doses. Although new rocket technologies could reduce astronauts' total exposure to space radiation during a human Mars mission, the time required for the mission, which is now in the order of years. Therefore mission planners will need to consider a variety of countermeasures for the crew members including physical protection (e.g. shelters), active protection (e.g. magnetic protection), pharmacological protection, local protection (extra protection for critical areas of the body) etc. With full knowledge of these facts, accurate personal dose measurement will become increasingly important during human missions to Mars. The new dose limits for radiation workers correspond to excess lifetime risk of 3% (NCRP) and 4% (ICRP). While astronauts accept the whole variety of flight risks they are taking in mission, there is concern about risks that may occur later in life. A risk no greater than the risk of radiation workers would be acceptable. (author)

  11. Risks of circulatory diseases among Mayak PA workers with radiation doses estimated using the improved Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moseeva, Maria B.; Azizova, Tamara V.; Grigoryeva, Evgenia S. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Haylock, Richard [Public Health of England, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    The new Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008 (MWDS-2008) was published in 2013 and supersedes the Doses-2005 dosimetry system for Mayak Production Association (PA) workers. It provides revised external and internal dose estimates based on the updated occupational history data. Using MWDS-2008, a cohort of 18,856 workers first employed at one of the main Mayak PA plants during 1948-1972 and followed up to 2005 was identified. Incidence and mortality risks from ischemic heart disease (IHD) (International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 codes 410-414) and from cerebrovascular diseases (CVD) (ICD-9 codes 430-438) were examined in this cohort and compared with previously published risk estimates in the same cohort based on the Doses-2005 dosimetry system. Significant associations were observed between doses from external gamma-rays and IHD and CVD incidence and also between internal doses from alpha-radiation and IHD mortality and CVD incidence. The estimates of excess relative risk (ERR)/Gy were consistent with those estimates from the previous studies based on Doses-2005 system apart from the relationship between CVD incidence and internal liver dose where the ERR/Gy based on MWDS-2008 was just over three times higher than the corresponding estimate based on Doses-2005 system. Adjustment for smoking status did not show any effect on the estimates of risk from internal alpha-particle exposure. (orig.)

  12. Radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Riessen, A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Experience has shown that modem, fully enclosed, XRF and XRD units are generally safe. This experience may lead to complacency and ultimately a lowering of standards which may lead to accidents. Maintaining awareness of radiation safety issues is thus an important role for all radiation safety officers. With the ongoing progress in technology, a greater number of radiation workers are more likely to use a range of instruments/techniques - eg portable XRF, neutron beam analysis, and synchrotron radiation analysis. The source for each of these types of analyses is different and necessitates an understanding of the associated dangers as well as use of specific radiation badges. The trend of 'suitcase science' is resulting in scientists receiving doses from a range of instruments and facilities with no coordinated approach to obtain an integrated dose reading for an individual. This aspect of radiation safety needs urgent attention. Within Australia a divide is springing up between those who work on Commonwealth property and those who work on State property. For example a university staff member may operate irradiating equipment on a University campus and then go to a CSIRO laboratory to operate similar equipment. While at the University State regulations apply and while at CSIRO Commonwealth regulations apply. Does this individual require two badges? Is there a need to obtain two licences? The application of two sets of regulations causes unnecessary confusion and increases the workload of radiation safety officers. Radiation safety officers need to introduce risk management strategies to ensure that both existing and new procedures result in risk minimisation. A component of this strategy includes ongoing education and revising of regulations. AXAA may choose to contribute to both of these activities as a service to its members as well as raising the level of radiation safety for all radiation workers. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical

  13. Identification of occupational mortality risks for Hanford workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneale, G.W.; Mancuso, T.F.; Stewart, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Though most of the production work at Hanford is done by manual workers, 46% of the most dangerous jobs are performed by people who have professional or technical qualifications. For these privileged workers occupational mortality risks are positively correlated with radiation doses but for manual workers, who have relatively high death rates, there is an inverse relation with dose. The high ratio of professional to manual workers is clearly the reason for the industry having fewer observed than expected deaths and the inverse relation with dose for less privileged workers is probably a sign that there has been selective recruitment of the most highly paid manual workers-that is, skilled craftsmen into the more dangerous occupations. Evidence of this selective recruitment was obtained by equating danger levels with levels of monitoring for internal radiation. Therefore, there should be some control for these levels in any analysis of cancer effects of the measured dose of radiation. (author)

  14. Radiation exposures of workers resulting from the transport of gamma radiography sources in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentuc, F.N.; Schwarz, G.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma radiation sources are widely used for industrial purposes e.g. for non-destructive material testing. Many of these sources are permanently installed at a facility within instruments e.g. for level or thickness gauging. Other radioactive sources are implemented in portable devices for industrial gamma radiography which have to be carried to the various remote usage sites. In Germany, approximately 20 000 - 25 000 shipments of gamma radiography sources are proceeding annually on public transport routes. Since routine radiation monitoring programmes do not permit task-specific determination of occupational doses e.g. doses incurred during the movement phase and handling related doses, work has been carried out with the objective to determine the radiation exposures of the personnel attributable to transportation. For this purpose, a survey was launched in 2005 collecting data about e.g. the number and conditions of transports, the activity and type of transported radiation sources and the radiation level within the driver's cab to allow a dose assessment to be made for transport workers. The results of this survey covering the most important companies for gamma radiography services in Germany are presented in this paper. (authors)

  15. Exposure potential to neutrons of the Brazilian workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Marcelo M.; Almeida, Carlos E. de

    1995-01-01

    Nowadays, there are 222 neutron radioactive sources registered in use in Brazil, in addition to several neutron fields, power and research reactors and neutron generators. Secondary neutron fields can also be generated in particle accelerators by nuclear reactions with its shielding, the experimental set up and the conversion target. These neutron fields are very different, not only in their spectra but also in their fluences. Around 200 radiation workers are monthly monitored since 1983 by an albedo system. Of the evaluated dosimeters 4% only have shown neutron doses, being 13 mSv the maximum measured value. Most of these doses were received by workers of the oil-well logging and research activities users of 241 Am-Be sources. (author). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  16. Skin cancer in rural workers: nursing knowledge and intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Regina Cezar-Vaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVETo identify the exposure of rural workers to the sun's ultraviolet radiation and pesticides; to identify previous cases of skin cancer; and to implement clinical and communicative nursing actions among rural workers with a previous diagnosis of skin cancer.METHODObservational-exploratory study conducted with rural workers exposed to ultraviolet radiation and pesticides in a rural area in the extreme south of Brazil. A clinical judgment and risk communication model properly adapted was used to develop interventions among workers with a previous history of skin cancer.RESULTSA total of 123 (97.7% workers were identified under conditions of exposure to the sun's ultraviolet radiation and pesticides; seven (5.4% were identified with a previous diagnosis of skin cancer; four (57.1% of these presented potential skin cancer lesions.CONCLUSIONThis study's results enabled clarifying the combination of clinical knowledge and risk communication regarding skin cancer to rural workers.

  17. An overview of equivalent doses in eye lens of occupational radiation workers in medical, industrial and nuclear areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, A.R.; Silva, F.C.A. da; Hunt, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Some epidemiological evidences were recently reviewed by the ICRP and it was suggested that, for the eye lens, the absorbed dose threshold for induction of late detriments is about 0.5 Gy. On this basis, on 2011, the ICRP has recommended changes to the occupational dose limit in planned exposure situations, reducing the eye lens dose equivalent limit of 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year, on average, during the period of 5 years, with exposure not exceeding 50 mSv in a single year. Following the ICRP recommendation, the Brazilian Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) adopted immediately the new limit to the eyes lens. This study aimed to show an overview about the doses in eye lens of occupational radiation workers in situations of planned exposures in the medical, industrial and nuclear areas, emphasizing the greatest radiological risks applications. It was observed that there are some limitations, such as example, to use individual monitor calibrated on Hp(3), to assess the equivalent dose in the eye lens. This limitation obstructs some experimental studies and monitoring of the levels of radiation received in the eye lens of radiation workers. Recent studies have showed that the lenses of eyes monitoring of workers, mainly in the planned exposure, must be follow-up. However, such researches were obtained only in medical exposures, mainly in interventional medicine procedures. Studies with planned exposure on nuclear and industrial areas are really needed and will be very important due to the new recommended by ICRP dose limits. (author)

  18. 5th December 1990 - Royal Order amending the provisions of the General Regulations for protection at work, concerning the protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This Royal Order amending the 1946 General Regulations for the protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiation implements on a national level the European Community Directives No. 80/836 Euratom of 15 July 1980 laying down basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the hazards of ionizing radiations and No. 84/466 Euratom of 3 September 1984 laying down basic measures for the radiation protection of persons undergoing medical examination or treatment [fr

  19. Effects of radiation and apolipoprotein E on lipid profile among workers of nuclear power plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki-Eun Moon; Mee-Seon Jung; Suk-Hee Sung; Youn-Koun Chang; Il-Keun Park; Yun-Mi Paek; Tae-In Choi; Soo-Geun Kim

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Several studies reported that the radiation was positively related to fatty liver, low HDL cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia. Genetic polymorphism affect prevalence of chronic disease by molecular epidemiology studies. Apolipoprotein E is an important genetic determinant of cardiovascular disease (CVD), namely through its influence on lipid metabolism. Thus, we investigated whether radiation and apo E polymorphism, and environmental factors contribute to the lipid profile in workers of nuclear power plants in Korea. DNA was extracted from the whole blood of 6896 study subjects (6357 males and 359 females), and apo E polymorphism was investigated using PCR. Plasma lipid profiles were measured by standardized enzymatic procedures and radiation dose was measured by the thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD). Environmental factors such as exercise, smoking were measured from health management database of KHNP. Total of 6802 subjects (aged 20-58) were investigated and radiation exposure dose was 168.51±463.94 mSv in the recent 1-year dose and 248.24±559.21 mSv in the total accumulative dose. In addition, Apo E polymorphism was associated with significant differences in total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, radiation dose, AI but others no significant. The multiple regression model showed that total cholesterol was positively correlated with age, SBP, BMI, AI, fasting glucose. HDL cholesterol was negatively correlated with AI. LDL cholesterol was positively correlated with age, BMI, fasting glucose. And triglyceride was significantly correlated in the BMI, AI, somking dose, vegetables but others no significant. Metabolic syndrome did not show any relation to the others; only age, SBP, DBP, BMI, fasting glucose, HOMA-IR influenced. However, there was no significant association between radiation dose and lipid profile. In conclusion, Apo E and well-known variables such as SBP, BMI were significantly associated with lipid profile level

  20. Implementation of radiation safety program in a medical institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palanca, Elena D.

    1999-01-01

    A medical institution that utilizes radiation for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of malignancies develops and implements a radiation safety program to keep occupational exposures of radiation workers and exposures of non-radiation workers and the public to the achievable and a more achievable minimum, to optimize the use of radiation, and to prevent misadministration. The hospital radiation safety program is established by a core medical radiation committee composed of trained radiation safety officers and head of authorized users of radioactive materials and radiation machines from the different departments. The radiation safety program sets up procedural guidelines of the safe use of radioactive material and of radiation equipment. It offers regular training to radiation workers and radiation safety awareness courses to hospital staff. The program has a comprehensive radiation safety information system or radsis that circularizes the radiation safety program in the hospital. The radsis keeps the drafted and updated records of safety guides and policies, radioactive material and equipment inventory, personnel dosimetry reports, administrative, regulatory and licensing activity document, laboratory procedures, emergency procedures, quality assurance and quality control program process, physics and dosimetry procedures and reports, personnel and hospital staff training program. The medical radiation protection committee is tasked to oversee the actual implementation of the radiation safety guidelines in the different radiation facilities in the hospital, to review personnel exposures, incident reports and ALARA actions, operating procedures, facility inspections and audit reports, to evaluate the existing radiation safety procedures, to make necessary changes to these procedures, and make modifications of course content of the training program. The effective implementation of the radiation safety program provides increased confidence that the physician and

  1. Development of education and training system for radiation workers with virtual reality technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Saito, Tadashi; Inoue, Kazuma

    2006-01-01

    A virtual reality education and training system was developed for radiation workers. The function of the system is designed as a scenario which is programmed with a proprietary script language capable of defining motion of objects created by three-dimensional (3D) modeling soft-ware, user interaction, sounds and text strings displayed in the scene. Combining these functions enables the system to provide lectures and to judge the user's action. The system consists of the 3D model of the radiation facilities and three modes of scenarios (guidance, training and end-of-course examination) including the procedure to enter and exit, experiment, measurement, radioactive waste classification and accidents. By combining these modes, the trainee of education and training is possible to learn safety handling and how to act in the case of fire or earthquake. (author)

  2. Chernobyl clean-up workers` perception of radiation threat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarabrina, N.; Lazebnaya, E.; Zelenova, M. [Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Psychology; Lasko, N. [Harvard Medical School, Manchester, NH (United States). VA Research Service

    1996-12-31

    The goals of this study were: (1) to compare the psychometric profiles of male Chernobyl liquidators who met DSM-III-R criteria for current PTSD with those who did not, and (2) to explore liquidators` perception and assessment of the `invisible` stressor of the radioactive hazard. Results of t-test comparisons between the PTSD and non-PTSD groups for the various psychometric measures are shown. Both diagnostic groups were similar in regard to their mean ages and education levels. The PTSD group scored significantly higher than the non-PTSD group on all the measures of PTSD and general psychiatric symptomatology, state and trait anxiety, depression. On the whole, results of this study demonstrate the determining role of individual perception and assessment of radioactive hazard in the development of post-traumatic stress and place this problem among the most important in studying the psychological consequences of experiencing radioactive threat. The real working conditions and the level of information also affected workers` estimate of the severity of the radiation hazard in Chernobyl. (author).

  3. Chernobyl clean-up workers' perception of radiation threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarabrina, N.; Lazebnaya, E.; Zelenova, M.; Lasko, N.

    1996-01-01

    The goals of this study were: (1) to compare the psychometric profiles of male Chernobyl liquidators who met DSM-III-R criteria for current PTSD with those who did not, and (2) to explore liquidators' perception and assessment of the 'invisible' stressor of the radioactive hazard. Results of t-test comparisons between the PTSD and non-PTSD groups for the various psychometric measures are shown. Both diagnostic groups were similar in regard to their mean ages and education levels. The PTSD group scored significantly higher than the non-PTSD group on all the measures of PTSD and general psychiatric symptomatology, state and trait anxiety, depression. On the whole, results of this study demonstrate the determining role of individual perception and assessment of radioactive hazard in the development of post-traumatic stress and place this problem among the most important in studying the psychological consequences of experiencing radioactive threat. The real working conditions and the level of information also affected workers' estimate of the severity of the radiation hazard in Chernobyl. (author)

  4. Ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    After having recalled some fundamental notions and measurement units related to ionizing radiations, this document describes various aspects of natural and occupational exposures: exposure modes and sources, exposure levels, biological effects, health impacts. Then, it presents prevention principles aimed at, in an occupational context of use of radiation sources (nuclear industry excluded), reducing and managing these exposures: risk assessment, implementation of safety from the front end. Some practical cases illustrate the radiation protection approach. The legal and regulatory framework is presented: general notions, worker exposure, measures specific to some worker categories (pregnant and breast feeding women, young workers, temporary workers). A last part describes what is to be done in case of incident or accident (dissemination of radioactive substances from unsealed sources, anomaly occurring when using a generator or a sealed source, post-accident situation)

  5. Radium organisation and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, D.R.; Negi, P.S.; Dutta, T.K.; Gupta, B.D.

    1977-01-01

    In India, the brachytherapy sources used are mostly 226 Ra, 137 Cs and 60 CO. Radiotherapy of patients with these sources may also result in some degree of radiation exposure of radiologists, technologists, radiation source porters and even other workers in rooms around radiotherapy unit. Proper organization of radiotherapy unit leads to accuracy in treatment and protection to patients as well as medical and paramedical personnel. With this objective in view, a set of instructions to be followed while working with radiation sources, particularly radium; guidelines for the physical layout of the unit and staffing and a list of essential monitoring instruments are given. (M.G.B.)

  6. The ''healthy worker effect'' and other determinants of mortality in workers in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beral, V.; Carpenter, L.; Booth, M.; Inskip, H.; Brown, A.

    1987-01-01

    Workers in the nuclear industry has been found to have lower mortality rates than the national average. This is in part due to the ''healthy worker effect'' - the recruitment of healthy individuals into the workforce. Employees of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority had especially low mortality rates in the 15 years following first employment. Thereafter mortality rates remained about 20% below the national average. Social class was a clear predictor of mortality, the professional and executive classes (Social Classes I and II) having mortality rates about 40% below the national average. Mortality was not related to duration of employment. Radiation and non-radiation workers generally showed similar patterns of mortality. (author)

  7. Code of Practice for the Use of Ionizing Radiations in Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Health and Medical Research Council, Canberra (Australia).

    The appreciation of the potential hazard of ionizing radiation led to the setting up of national, and later, international commissions for the defining of standards of protection for the occupationally exposed worker in the use of ionizing radiation. However, in the last twenty years, with the large scale development of nuclear energy, the need…

  8. Deterministic Effects of Occupational Exposures in the Mayak Nuclear Workers Cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azinova, T. V.; Okladnikova, N. D.; Sumina, M. V.; Pesternikova, V. S.; Osovets, V. S.; Druzhimina, M. B.; Seminikhina, N. g.

    2004-01-01

    A wide spread and utilization of nuclear energy in the recent decade leads to a stable increasing of contingents exposed to ionizing radiation sources. in order to predict radiation risks it's important to have and apply all the experience in assessment of health effects due to radiation exposures generated by now in different countries. the proposed report will present results of the long-term follow-up for a cohort of nuclear workers at the Mayak Production Association, with was the first nuclear facility in Russia. The established system of individual dosimetry of external exposure, monitoring of internal radiation and special system of medical follow-up of healthy nuclear workers during the last 50 years allowed collecting of the unique primary data to study radiation effects, their patterns and mechanisms specific of exposure dose. The study cohort includes 61 percent of males and 39 percent of females. The vital status is known for 90 percent of cases, 44 percent of workers are still alive and undergo regular medical examination in our Clinic. Unfortunately, by now 50 percent of workers have died. 6 percent of workers were lost for the follow-up. total doses from chronic external gamma rays in the cohort ranged from 0.6 to 10.8 Gy (annual exposure doses were from 0.001 to 7.4 Gy), Pu body burden was from 0.3 to 72.3 kBq. Most intensive chronic exposure of workers was registered during 1948 to 1958. At this time, 19 radiation accidents occurred at the Mayak PA. Thus, the highest incidence of deterministic effects was observed right at this period. In the cohort of Mayak nuclear workers there were diagnosed 60 cases of acute radiation syndrome (I to IV degrees of severity); 2079 cases of chronic radiation sickness; 120 cases of plutonium pneumoscelarosis; 5 cases of radiation cataracts; and over 400 cases of local radiation injuries. The report will present dependences of the observed effects on absorbed radiation dose and dose rate in terms of acute radiation

  9. Cancer mortality among two different populations of French nuclear workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, Eric; Telle-Lamberton, Maylis; Caer-Lorho, Sylvaine [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). DRPH, SRBE, LEPID; and others

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this paper is to study the effect of external photon radiation on the mortality of two populations of French nuclear workers: workers exposed only to external photon radiation and workers potentially exposed also to internal contamination or to neutrons. External photon radiation has been measured through individual dosimeters. Potential exposure to internal contamination or to neutrons has been assessed by experts on the basis of quantitative measurements or of worksite and type of activity. The mortality observed in each population was compared with that expected from national mortality statistics, by computing standardized mortality ratios. Dose-effect relationships were analyzed through trend tests and log-linear Poisson regressions. 14,796 workers were exposed only to external photon radiation; 14,408 workers were also potentially exposed to internal radiation or to neutrons. Between 1968 and 1994, the number of deaths is respectively, 645 and 1,197. The mean external photon dose was respectively, 3.7 and 12.9 mSv. Similar Healthy Worker Effects were observed in the two populations (SMR = 0.59). SMR of 2.41 90% CI [1.39-3.90] was observed for malignant melanoma among workers of the second population. Significant dose-effect relationships were observed: among workers exposed only to external photon radiation for leukemia except CLL and in the other population, for cancers and other diseases related to tobacco or alcohol consumption. Results differed between the two populations. The increase in leukemia risk with dose in the first population will have to be confirmed with extended follow-up. In the other population, results may have been confounded by alpha-emitters inhalation, tobacco, or alcohol consumption.

  10. Cancer mortality among two different populations of French nuclear workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, Eric; Telle-Lamberton, Maylis; Caer-Lorho, Sylvaine

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the effect of external photon radiation on the mortality of two populations of French nuclear workers: workers exposed only to external photon radiation and workers potentially exposed also to internal contamination or to neutrons. External photon radiation has been measured through individual dosimeters. Potential exposure to internal contamination or to neutrons has been assessed by experts on the basis of quantitative measurements or of worksite and type of activity. The mortality observed in each population was compared with that expected from national mortality statistics, by computing standardized mortality ratios. Dose-effect relationships were analyzed through trend tests and log-linear Poisson regressions. 14,796 workers were exposed only to external photon radiation; 14,408 workers were also potentially exposed to internal radiation or to neutrons. Between 1968 and 1994, the number of deaths is respectively, 645 and 1,197. The mean external photon dose was respectively, 3.7 and 12.9 mSv. Similar Healthy Worker Effects were observed in the two populations (SMR = 0.59). SMR of 2.41 90% CI [1.39-3.90] was observed for malignant melanoma among workers of the second population. Significant dose-effect relationships were observed: among workers exposed only to external photon radiation for leukemia except CLL and in the other population, for cancers and other diseases related to tobacco or alcohol consumption. Results differed between the two populations. The increase in leukemia risk with dose in the first population will have to be confirmed with extended follow-up. In the other population, results may have been confounded by alpha-emitters inhalation, tobacco, or alcohol consumption.

  11. Mortality through 1990 among white male workers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory: Considering exposures to plutonium and external ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggs, L.D.; Johnson, E.R.; Cox-DeVore, C.A.; Voelz, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    A cohort mortality study was conducted of 15,727 white men employed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a nuclear research and development facility. Some of the workers at this facility have been exposed to various forms of ionizing radiation and other potentially hazardous materials. These analyses focused on whole-body ionizing radiation exposures and internal depositions of plutonium. The results indicated that overall mortality among this cohort is quite low, even after nearly 30 y of follow-up. No cause of death was significantly elevated among plutonium-exposed workers when compared with their unexposed coworkers; however, a rate ratio for lung cancer of 1.78 (95% CI = 0.79-3.99) was observed. A case of osteogenic sarcoma, a type of cancer related to plutonium exposure in animal studies, was also observed. Dose-response relationships for whole-body dose from external ionizing radiation and tritium were observed for cancers of the brain/central nervous system, the esophagus, and Hodgkin's disease. 34 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs

  12. G2 repair and chromosomal damage in lymphocytes from workers occupationally exposed to low-level ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J PINCHEIRA

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the G2 repair of chromosomal damage in lymphocytes from workers exposed to low levels of X- or g-rays was evaluated. Samples of peripheral blood were collected from 15 radiation workers, 20 subjects working in radiodiagnostics, and 30 healthy control donors. Chromosomal aberrations (CA were evaluated by scoring the presence of chromatid and isochromatid breaks, dicentric and ring chromosomes in lymphocytes with/without 5mM caffeine plus 3mM-aminobenzamide (3-AB treatment during G2. Our results showed that the mean value of basal aberrations in lymphocytes from exposed workers was higher than in control cells (p< 0.001. The chromosomal damage in G2, detected with caffeine plus 3-AB treatment was higher than the basal damage (untreated conditions, both in control and exposed populations (p< 0.05. In the exposed workers group, the mean value of chromosomal abnormalities in G2 was higher than in the control (p< 0.0001. No correlation was found between the frequency of chromosome type of aberrations (basal or in G2, and the absorbed dose. Nevertheless, significant correlation coefficients (p< 0.05 between absorbed dose and basal aberrations yield (r = 0.430 or in G2 (r = 0.448 were detected when chromatid breaks were included in the total aberrations yield. Under this latter condition no significant effect of age, years of employment or smoking habit on the chromosomal aberrations yield was detected. However, analysis of the relationship between basal aberrations yield and the efficiency of G2 repair mechanisms, defined as the percentage of chromosomal lesions repaired in G2, showed a significant correlation coefficient (r = -0.802; p< 0.001. These results suggest that in addition to the absorbed dose, the individual G2 repair efficiency may be another important factor affecting the chromosomal aberrations yield detected in workers exposed to low-level ionizing radiation

  13. Psychological attitudes of nuclear industry workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faes, M.; Stoppie, J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was carried out within the frame of occupational medicine on the psychological attitudes of workers in the nuclear industry towards ionizing radiations. Three aspects were considered: awareness of the danger; feeling of safety in the working environment; workers' feelings following incidents or accidents; satisfaction level felt by the workers in the plant [fr

  14. The Training Requirements for the Workers a Legal Instrument to Ensure the Safety Use of the Ionizing Radiation Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosca, G.; Coroianu, A.; Stanescu, G.

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing the need for a graded and commensurate with the practice associated risk approach, the Romanian Regulatory Authority developed the legal framework for defining the roles, duties and responsibilities for the radiation workers (RWs) and the radiological safety officer (RPO). The licensee is responsible to provide for the RWs basic knowledge and understanding of radiation proprieties, good knowledge of the local rules and the operational radiation protection methods and the safety features of the devices, on the job training under the supervision of a RPO or a qualified expert (RPE). Every 5 years the participation to a refresher course is required

  15. External effective radiation dose to workers in the restricted area of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant during the third year after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakumi, Akira; Miyagawa, Ryu; Tamari, Yuki; Nawa, Kanabu; Sakura, Osamu; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Since the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011, Iitate Village has continued to be classified as a deliberate evacuation area, in which residents are estimated to receive an annual additional effective radiation dose of >20 mSv. Some companies still operate in Iitate Village, with a special permit from the Cabinet Office Team in Charge of Assisting the Lives of Disaster Victims. In this study, we measured the annual effective radiation dose to workers in Iitate Village from 15 January to 13 December 2013. The workers stayed in Iitate for 10 h and left the village for the remaining 14 h each working day. They worked for 5 days each week in Iitate Village, but stayed outside of the village for the remaining 2 days each week. We found that the effective radiation dose of 70% of the workers was <2 mSv, including natural radiation; the maximum dose was 3.6 mSv. We estimated the potential annual additional effective radiation dose if people returned full-time to Iitate. Our analysis supports the plan for people to return to their home village at the end of 2017

  16. Thyroid measurements of Iodine-125 workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, P.A.; Peggie, J.R.

    1979-02-01

    The accumulation of 125 I in the thyroid presents real hazards to workers who use this radionuclide. Recent assessments of the maximum permissible thyroid burden for 125 I have tended to be lower than those previously adopted. Workers using 125 I may receive small doses to a film badge monitor from external radiation while accumulating significant doses to the thyroid from internal contamination. It is therefore necessary to perform some form of thyroid monitoring on such workers. In the past two years the Australian Radiation Laboratory has monitored 125 I workers from six different institutations in the Melbourne area to determine the activity of 125 I in their thyroids. Most of the levels monitored were less than one tenth of the most recently recommended thyroid burden of 400 nanocurie. The highest levels were measured in workers who actually perform iodinations. Workers who handle the iodinate generally had lower levels than those performing the iodinations. Only a very small number of the workers measured were below the detectable limit of the system indicating that even when low activities of 125 I are handled in relatively stable forms it is still possible to accumulate 125 I in the thyroid

  17. Background radiation levels and standards for protection from ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farai, I.

    1999-01-01

    Apart from the amount of radiation which a worker may receive while he performs his work, he is also exposed to radiation because of the nature of his environment. In other words, all individuals are subject to some irradiation even though they may not work with radioactive substances. This source of radiation exposure is often referred to as background radiation. In most environments, it is low-level and can be grouped into two natural and man-made. Background radiation provides the basis on which allowable exposure limits for workers are drawn

  18. Chromosome aberrations in workers of ignalina nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griciene, B.; Januskeviciute, I.; Mierauskiene, J.; Slapsyte, G. [Vilnius Univ. (Lithuania)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (I.N.P.P.) workers and outside workers including visitors constitute the largest occupational group exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in Lithuania. In 2004, the annual collective dose to these workers (4392 persons) was 6,83 man Sv. The maximum annual individual dose of I.N.P.P. workers was 19,16 mSv, and of outside workers was 29,41 mSv. However, according to calculations performed by the Lithuanian Radiation Protection Centre, the decommissioning of I.N.P.P. (the I.N.P.P. is to be shut down by 2009) will result in collective dose of 35 man Sv. Therefore, a special attention should be given to implementation of radiation protection programme. The importance of cytogenetic studies in the medical surveillance of radiation-exposed persons is generally acknowledged. The aim of the present study was to analyse chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of I.N.P.P. workers. The blood sampling of 27 male workers was performed in October 2004, after planned outage of I.N.P.P.. It was estimated that outages of I.N.P.P. Units contributed 84% to all annual occupational collective dose. Average cumulative dose of 18 workers was 290,7 mSv (group A), and of 9 workers - 71,7 mSv (group B). The mean annual doses averaged over the three-year-period were 15,2 mSv and 0,76 mSv, respectively. None of the exposed workers had ever exceeded the permissible dose limit. The average age of group A workers was 45,2 years, and group B 48,2 years. A questionnaire form with details on age, occupational history, smoking habit and alcohol intake, medication, history of recent illness was completed for each person at the time of blood collection. 64 non-exposed male donors approximately matched by age were used as controls (group C). Heparinized venous blood samples were taken and cultures were initiated within 24 h according to the standard procedures. At least 500 first cycle metaphases were analysed from each

  19. Chromosome aberrations in workers of ignalina nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griciene, B.; Januskeviciute, I.; Mierauskiene, J.; Slapsyte, G.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (I.N.P.P.) workers and outside workers including visitors constitute the largest occupational group exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in Lithuania. In 2004, the annual collective dose to these workers (4392 persons) was 6,83 man Sv. The maximum annual individual dose of I.N.P.P. workers was 19,16 mSv, and of outside workers was 29,41 mSv. However, according to calculations performed by the Lithuanian Radiation Protection Centre, the decommissioning of I.N.P.P. (the I.N.P.P. is to be shut down by 2009) will result in collective dose of 35 man Sv. Therefore, a special attention should be given to implementation of radiation protection programme. The importance of cytogenetic studies in the medical surveillance of radiation-exposed persons is generally acknowledged. The aim of the present study was to analyse chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of I.N.P.P. workers. The blood sampling of 27 male workers was performed in October 2004, after planned outage of I.N.P.P.. It was estimated that outages of I.N.P.P. Units contributed 84% to all annual occupational collective dose. Average cumulative dose of 18 workers was 290,7 mSv (group A), and of 9 workers - 71,7 mSv (group B). The mean annual doses averaged over the three-year-period were 15,2 mSv and 0,76 mSv, respectively. None of the exposed workers had ever exceeded the permissible dose limit. The average age of group A workers was 45,2 years, and group B 48,2 years. A questionnaire form with details on age, occupational history, smoking habit and alcohol intake, medication, history of recent illness was completed for each person at the time of blood collection. 64 non-exposed male donors approximately matched by age were used as controls (group C). Heparinized venous blood samples were taken and cultures were initiated within 24 h according to the standard procedures. At least 500 first cycle metaphases were analysed from each

  20. Occupational radiation exposure in Germany in 2011. Report of the radiation protection register

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasch, Gerhard; Kammerer, Lothar; Karofsky, Ralf; Mordek, Else; Schlosser, Andrea; Spiesl, Josef

    2013-04-01

    In Germany, persons who are occupationally exposed to ionising radiation are monitored by several official dosimetry services that transmit the dose records about individual radiation monitoring to the Radiation Protection Register of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). The purpose of the Radiation Protection Register is to supervise the keeping of the dose limits and to monitor the compliance with the radiation protection principle ''Optimisation'' by performing detailed annual statistical analyses of the monitored persons and their radiation exposure. The annual report of the Radiation Protection Register provides information about status and development of occupational radiation exposure in Germany. In 2011, about 350,000 workers were monitored with dosemeters for occupational radiation exposure. The number increased during the past five years continuously by 10 %. Only 19 % of the monitored persons received measurable personal doses. The average annual dose of these exposed workers was 0.58 mSv corresponding to 3 % of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv for radiation workers. In total, 7 persons exceeded the annual dose limit of 20 mSv, i.e. two cases per 100,000 monitored persons. The collective dose of the monitored persons decreased to 38.5 Person-Sv, the lowest value since the last fifty years of occupational dose monitoring. In 2010, 45 airlines calculated the route doses of 39,000 members of the aircraft crew personnel by using certified computer programmes for dose calculation and sent the accumulated monthly doses via the Federal Office for Civil Aviation (''Luftfahrt-Bundesamt, LBA'') to the BfS. The collective dose of the aircraft crew personnel is 83 person-Sv, and thus significantly higher than the total collective dose of the workers monitored with personal dosemeters (38.5 person-Sv). The annual average dose of aircraft crew personnel was 2.12 mSv and decreased compared to 2010 (2,30 mSv). In 2011, about 70,000 outside-workers were in

  1. Occupational radiation exposure in Korea: 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Je Ho; Kwon, Jeong Wan; Lee, Jai Ki

    2005-01-01

    Dose distribution of Korean radiation workers classified by occupational categories was analyzed. Statistics of the Occupational Radiation Exposure(ORE) in 2002 of the radiation workers in diagnostic and dental radiology were obtained from the Korea Food and Drug Agency(KFDA) who maintains the database for individual radiation dose records. Corresponding statistics for the rest of radiation workers were obtained by processing the individual annual doses provided by the Korea RadioIsotope Association(KRIA) after deletion of individual information. The ORE distribution was classified in term of 28 occupational categories, annual individual dose levels, age groups and gender of 52733 radiation workers as of the year of 2002. The total collective dose was 66.4 man-Sv and resulting average individual ORE was 1.26 mSv. Around 80% of the workers were exposed to minimal doses less than 1.2 mSv. However, it appeared that the recorded doses exceeded 20 mSv for 43 workers in the industrial radiography and for 147 workers in the field of radiology. Particularly, recorded doses of 23 workers in radiology exceeded the annual dose limits of 50 mSv, which is extraordinary when the working environment is considered. It is uncertain whether those doses are real or caused by careless placing of dosimeters in the imaging rooms while the X-ray units are in operation. No one in the workforce of 16 operating nuclear power plant units was exposed over 20 mSv in 2002. Number of workers was the largest in their 30's of age and the mean individual dose was the highest in their 20's. Women were around 20% of the radiation workers and their average dose was around one half of that of man workers

  2. The first phase epidemiological study on the workers engaged in radiation business in facilities for atomic power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Tamiko; Kumatori, Toshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    Recently, the influence of long-lasting exposure to low-dose radiation on human bodies, especially on carcinogenesis have been attracting considerable attentions, however, there are few data available for the estimation of such risks. An epidemiological survey study on the workers for radiation business in atomic power stations was started in 1990 and its first phase study (1990-1994) was finished. This report describes the outlines of the results from the study, which has been made public by the Science and Technology Agency. The correlation between the exposure dose and carcinogenicity was observed only for the cancer in pancreas, but not in other organs. But, the previous studies in other countries and the data from the persons exposed to atomic bomb indicated that there was no significant correlation between the radiation and the incidence of pancreatic cancer. This causal relation found should be coped with carefully. The standardized mortality ratio, SMR for all kinds of death cause in the subjects was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82-0.96), significantly lower than that in all Japanese men. This fact was consistent with the data in other countries, suggesting that the decreased SMR compared with the whole people would be due to so called 'healthy worker's effects'. (M.N.)

  3. Publication of new results from the INWORKS epidemiological study about the risk of cancer among nuclear industry workers chronically exposed to low ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    In this cohort study, 308297 workers in the nuclear industry from France, the United Kingdom, and the United States with detailed monitoring data for external exposure to ionising radiation were linked to death registries. Excess relative rate per Gy of radiation dose for mortality from cancer was estimated. Follow-up encompassed 8.2 million person years. Of 66632 known deaths by the end of follow-up, 17?957 were due to solid cancers. Results suggest a linear increase in the rate of cancer with increasing radiation exposure. The average cumulative colon dose estimated among exposed workers was 20.9 mGy (median 4.1 mGy). The estimated rate of mortality from all cancers excluding leukaemia increased with cumulative dose by 48% per Gy (90% confidence interval 20% to 79%), lagged by 10 years. Similar associations were seen for mortality from all solid cancers (47% (18% to 79%)), and within each country. The estimated association over the dose range of 0-100 mGy was similar in magnitude to that obtained over the entire dose range but less precise. Smoking and occupational asbestos exposure are potential confounders; however, exclusion of deaths from lung cancer and pleural cancer did not affect the estimated association. Despite substantial efforts to characterise the performance of the radiation dosimeters used, the possibility of measurement error remains. The study provides a direct estimate of the association between protracted low dose exposure to ionising radiation and solid cancer mortality. Although high dose rate exposures are thought to be more dangerous than low dose rate exposures, the risk per unit of radiation dose for cancer among radiation workers was similar to estimates derived from studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Quantifying the cancer risks associated with protracted radiation exposures can help strengthen the foundation for radiation protection standards

  4. Personnel monitoring of DAE workers in Andhra Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padma Savitri, P.; Bhattacharya, Madhumita; Reddy, K.S.; Chourasiya, G.

    2008-01-01

    Occupational exposure to radiation occurs in an organization, which involves work with radioactive sources directly or indirectly. It is recognized that radiation protection is only one component that must be addressed to protect the overall health and safety of the workers. Radiation monitoring is one of the key issues in radiological protection. TLD Unit, Hyderabad is part of the Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, HS and E group, BARC and has been functioning at Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad since 1985. The unit monitors external dose to 1800 occupation workers from six Department of Atomic Energy units namely Nuclear Fuel Complex, Atomic Minerals Division, Electronic Corporation of India Limited, National Centre for Composition and Characterization of Materials, JONAKI, Hospital in Heavy Water Plant, Manuguru of Andhra Pradesh. This paper analyses dose distribution of radiation workers working in DAE facilities of Andhra Pradesh since the services started to the respective institutions. Excessive exposures of radiation cases are also presented in this paper. (author)

  5. Radiation dose to construction workers at operating nuclear power plant sites. Volume 2. Appendices A--F. Final report, September 1975--September 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Shipler, D.B.

    1978-12-01

    These appendices contain the dosimetry procedures and details of the personnel and environmental dosimeters used for the Radiation Dose to Construction Workers at Operating Nuclear Power Plant Sites Study. A printout of the computer codes used to analyze dosimeter data is included along with all the raw data obtained. Appendices C through F contain computer output and log-normal plots of dosimetry data for environmental location and construction worker groups

  6. Thumba X-ray plant: Are radiation fears justified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhvanath, U.

    1978-01-01

    Technical facts about the X-ray unit located at Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thumba (India) are set down to explain that it is not posing any radiation hazard as reported in a newspaper and thus radiation fears are not justifiable. It is stated that, after thorough checking, X-ray installations in this space centre cause negligible exposure even to workers who handle these units, and others practically do not get any exposure at all. (B.G.W.)

  7. The workers and public radiation protection; La radioprotection des travailleurs et du public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF), Lab. d' Analyses Medicales et de Radiotoxicologie, SCAST, 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Roupioz, A. [Electricite de France (EDF Industrie), DPN, 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Rabu, B. [CEA Cadarache, Lab. de Transfert de Contamination, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)] [and others

    2003-07-01

    Six texts develop the question of the radiation protection of workers and public. Monitoring of the exposure risk to alpha emitters during the unit outage of nuclear power plant of Cattenom is the first one, the second article concerns the ALARA approach applied to the yard that controls the welding of vapor generators of the Phenix reactor. The third one treats the evaluation of impact in environment of tritium releases associated to a fusion reactor accident. Some systems of radiological detection are studied, the notion of dose constraint is discussed, and what about the cooperation around nuclear and non nuclear installations. (N.C.)

  8. Estimation of the effects of a lead vest on dose reduction for radiation workers using Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young-khi, Lim; Byoung-il, Lee; Jeong-in, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the field of medical diagnosis or treatments using radiations, lead vests or aprons are widely used to protect the patients or workers from unwanted irradiation. Also, in nuclear power plants, it is recommended that the workers should wear a lead vest to reduce the dose for working in high radiation area. Generally, personal dosimeters were used to estimate the doses of workers but these cannot give the absolute values. So, measured values should be modified by comparing the reference conditions with conversion factors. Many trials to estimate the doses of workers with lead shield using two or more dosimeters at different locations were done but these had limitations. Through this study the personal dose with/without a lead vest and the effectiveness were evaluated by Monte Carlo methods. A lead vest which had been used at several nuclear sites was modelled with MIRD-V and typical Korean voxel phantom using MCNP-5 transport code. Organ doses were calculated in AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT irradiation geometry for several parallel photon beams. Also irradiation experiments were carried out using real typical Korean phantom with the lead vest and the results were compared with those calculated by simulations. In most cases, the lead vest decreases the organ doses about 30%. For low energy, the lead vest is very effective to reduce the dose but it is not so good for high energy photon shielding. For thyroids, the doses to high energy photons increased by 5% on the contrary. This study may be applied to the better design of personal shielding and dose estimation procedures for practical use. (author)

  9. Mortality among plutonium and other workers at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, G.S.; Acquavella, J.F.; Reyes, M.; Tietjen, G.L.; Wiggs, L.d.; Voelz, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed study of mortality and radiation exposure for Rocky Flats workers was reported at the Sixteenth Mid-Year Topical Symposium of the Health Physics Society in January 1983. Significantly fewer deaths were found than were expected due to all causes, all malignant neoplasms, lung cancer, and cancer of the digestive organs. No bone cancers were observed and cancers commonly associated with radiation exposure were not more frequent than expected. Significantly more deaths than expected were observed for two causes, cancer of the prostate and benign and unspecified neoplasms. Further investigation revealed that the deaths from benign and unspecified neoplasms all involved intracranial tumors. A case control study found no association between these brain tumors and exposure to radiation, including plutonium depositions or type of occupation. The excess deaths from intracranial tumors remain unexplained but do not appear to be associated with employment at Rocky Flats. Relative risks among Rocky Flats workers with cumulative plutonium depositions of 2 nCi or more did not indicate a significantly greater risk of death among workers exposed to plutonium than among unexposed workers. Similar results were found for workers with cumulative radiation exposure of at least 1 rem. 2 references, 3 tables

  10. Safety Culture on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sollet, E.

    1996-01-01

    It can be defined radiation protection culture as the set of technical and social standards applied to the management of the operation of a nuclear facility concerning the reduction of the exposure to radiation of workers and members of the public, together with the behaviour and attitudes of the individuals from the organization towards that objective. Because the basic principles of radiation protection are self-evident and are totally justified, and the thesis drawn from the article is that no effective radiation protection culture yet exists within the organization, it must be concluded that what is wrong from the system are the attitudes and behavior of the individuals. In this article some factors and elements needed to motivate all persons within the organization towards the creation of a radiation protection culture are delineated and presented. (Author)

  11. Detection of the effects of the radiation doses on the genetic material in lymphocytes of samples of workers in Al-Tuwaitha site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muttar, A.G.; Ali, A.K.; Khayon, Sh.K.; Gadban, A.A.; Haider, Y.L.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to use the cytogenetic analysis as a bio marker for detection of the effects of the radiation doses on the genetic material in lymphocytes of samples of workers in nuclear facilities destroyed at Al-Tuwaitha site due to decommissioning of radioactive contamination during January to December 2011. Blood samples were collected from workers ,including ( males and females) , aged (25 - 63 years).First test included 35 samples containing 27 males and 8 females, aged ( 34- 63 years) , second test included 27 samples containing 25 males and females, aged (29 - 63 years) and third test included 23 males only .Control group includes 35 samples containing 25 males and 10 females' , aged (30-57 years) who were non smokers and non alcoholics .Four cytogenetic parameters were studied such as chromosomal aberrations, frequency of micronuclei, Mitotic and nuclear division index. The chromosomal aberrations, includes fragment, ring and dicentric chromosome as cytogenetic parameters for biological effects of ionizing radiation. This study showed no significant difference in the rate of chromosomal and chromatid aberrations. Micronuclei and nuclear division index of the workers in the first and second test compared with the groups of workers in the third test, while slightly significant increase at the level (p ≺0.05) when compared with the control group was observed , as well as no significant differences in the rate of mitotic index for workers as compared with the control group was recorded

  12. Mobile learning for HIV/AIDS healthcare worker training in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolfo Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present an innovative approach to healthcare worker (HCW training using mobile phones as a personal learning environment. Twenty physicians used individual Smartphones (Nokia N95 and iPhone, each equipped with a portable solar charger. Doctors worked in urban and peri-urban HIV/AIDS clinics in Peru, where almost 70% of the nation's HIV patients in need are on treatment. A set of 3D learning scenarios simulating interactive clinical cases was developed and adapted to the Smartphones for a continuing medical education program lasting 3 months. A mobile educational platform supporting learning events tracked participant learning progress. A discussion forum accessible via mobile connected participants to a group of HIV specialists available for back-up of the medical information. Learning outcomes were verified through mobile quizzes using multiple choice questions at the end of each module. Methods In December 2009, a mid-term evaluation was conducted, targeting both technical feasibility and user satisfaction. It also highlighted user perception of the program and the technical challenges encountered using mobile devices for lifelong learning. Results With a response rate of 90% (18/20 questionnaires returned, the overall satisfaction of using mobile tools was generally greater for the iPhone. Access to Skype and Facebook, screen/keyboard size, and image quality were cited as more troublesome for the Nokia N95 compared to the iPhone. Conclusions Training, supervision and clinical mentoring of health workers are the cornerstone of the scaling up process of HIV/AIDS care in resource-limited settings (RLSs. Educational modules on mobile phones can give flexibility to HCWs for accessing learning content anywhere. However lack of softwares interoperability and the high investment cost for the Smartphones' purchase could represent a limitation to the wide spread use of such kind mLearning programs in RLSs.

  13. Cytogenetic analysis for radiation dose assessment in the medical nuclear workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milacic, S.; Jovicic, D.; Rakic, B.; Djokovic, J.

    2009-01-01

    Radionuclide is used in medicine for laboratory research, laboratory testing for enzymes, hormones, medicines in vitro and in vivo in nuclear medicine (NM) for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Commissioners, who performed the application radionuclide (RN), are nuclear medicine specialists, senior medical and radiological technicians, nurses and laboratory technicians. They are daily exposed to ionizing irradiations, from outside sources, as well as inside if they were to contamination. Medical nuclear workers (MNW) are exposed to ionizing irradiation, working with radio nuclides. MNW are periodically reviewed for contamination verified. Cytogenetic analysis of peripheral-blood lymphocytes (Ly) is the most sensitive tests for detecting a clinical biologic response to ionizing radiation. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations (f ca) in peripheral circulating lymphocytes (Ly) correlates with the dose received. (author) [sr

  14. Write up of TIS seminar on effects of low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    Data that was presented at two recent conferences on the effects on humans of low levels of radiation, as well as data that has been used by the ICRP when setting dose limits is reviewed. The data comes from cancer mortality studies of A-bomb survivors and radiation workers, as well as from studies on populations exposed to varying levels of naturally occurring radiation. The problems of using the data to make realistic risk projections on which radiation safety norms can be based are discussed. (author)

  15. Write up of TIS seminar on effects of low doses of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, A H [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1989-06-05

    Data that was presented at two recent conferences on the effects on humans of low levels of radiation, as well as data that has been used by the ICRP when setting dose limits is reviewed. The data comes from cancer mortality studies of A-bomb survivors and radiation workers, as well as from studies on populations exposed to varying levels of naturally occurring radiation. The problems of using the data to make realistic risk projections on which radiation safety norms can be based are discussed. (author)

  16. Evaluation of 40K and studies of its variation in occupational radiation workers of TAPS 1-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaraju, G.; Rao, D.D.; Baburajan, A.

    2014-01-01

    Tarapur Maharashtra Site consists of two units (TAPS 1 and 2) of 160 MW(e) BWRs and two units (TAPS 3 and 4) of 540 MW(e) PHWRs in operation. Monitoring and dose assessment of all radiation workers is a regulatory requirement as per radiation safety procedures of operating stations based on AERB guidelines. Internal contamination and committed effective dose (CED) due to internally deposited gamma radionuclides is evaluated based on whole body counting measurements. The predominant nuclides of potential internal contamination continued to be 60 Co, 134+137 Cs and 131 I. Apart from these, natural radionuclide 40 K is also detected in the body of occupational workers. It is one of the most important nutrients distributed throughout the body, mainly in muscle and is an essential element in life process. It is under close homeostatic control in the body and is not influenced by the environmental levels. The daily intake of natural radionuclides of uranium and thorium series is almost negligible compared with that of 40 K, a radioisotope of potassium present to the extent of 0.012 % of natural Potassium. It has a halflife of 1.28 x 10 9 Y and decays by beta emission and electron capture accompanied by 1.46 MeV gamma ray emission with 10.7 % abundance. The specific activity of potassium is 31.5 Bq 40 K per gram of potassium. The paper presents the analysis of 40 K concentration in the workers of vegetarian and Non-vegetarian diet categories

  17. Documentation of medical findings in radiation workers in the GDR to meet the requirements of ICRP publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, H.R.; Neumeister, K.

    1979-01-01

    Based on ICRP Publication 26, the future organization of the medical surveillance system for radiation workers in the GDR is considered in this paper. These radiation workers will also in future be medically supervised by means of pre-employment and routine examinations. It is considered necessary to have as extensive a registration as possible of information on medical examinations, working place analyses and incidents. Such data have to be collected and stored to be compared with other national and international projects (e.g. in the field of occupational health). In addition, they should permit epidemiological studies to be internationally co-ordinated. For this purpose, a documentation system has been prepared in the German Democratic Republic which is based on GDR experiences and makes it possible to specify the requirements of ICRP Publication 26. This system forms a new basis for mass examinations of occupationally exposed persons. Uniform examination methods tailored to meet the task of assuring occupational health in the GDR will be introduced. The documentation cards are meant to be used as clear-text cards suited for automatic reading by optical character recognition. The examination form consists of ten parts and comprises all details from working place situation to medical findings to laboratory results. It is felt that this new documentation system permits registration of all relevant data required for the effective radiation protection of man. On the basis of this documentation of findings, participation is scheduled in the respective international IAEA programmes and the studies proposed by the ICRP for problems of radiation-induced carcinogenesis and radiogenetics

  18. Low level radiation: how low can you get?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsley, M.

    1990-01-01

    Information stored on the world's largest data bank concerning the health of nuclear industry workers is to be handed over to researchers at Birmingham University by the US Department of Energy. The data bank contains detailed information on 300,000 nuclear employees, going back to the 1940s. Such a large sample size will allow the results of a previous study conducted on workers in the US nuclear industry to be verified. That study was concluded in 1978 and showed that the risk estimates set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were between 10 and 30 times too low. The current ICRP estimate allows workers up to 50mSv of exposure to low level radiation per year. Risk estimates have been derived from data relating to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. However in those cases the radiation doses were relatively high but over a short period. In the nuclear industry the doses are lower but are long term and this may account for the apparent anomalies such as the incidence of leukaemia amongst children whose fathers have worked in the nuclear industry compared with that for the children whose fathers received radiation doses from the atomic bombings. It is expected the study will show that low-level radiation is more damaging than has previously been thought. (author)

  19. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ures Pantazi, M.

    1994-01-01

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection

  20. The CRADLE vital signs alert: qualitative evaluation of a novel device designed for use in pregnancy by healthcare workers in low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Hannah L; Boene, Helena; Munguambe, Khatia; Sevene, Esperança; Akeju, David; Adetoro, Olalekan O; Charanthimath, Umesh; Bellad, Mrutyunjaya B; de Greeff, Annemarie; Anthony, John; Hall, David R; Steyn, Wilhelm; Vidler, Marianne; von Dadelszen, Peter; Chappell, Lucy C; Sandall, Jane; Shennan, Andrew H

    2018-01-05

    Vital signs measurement can identify pregnant and postpartum women who require urgent treatment or referral. In low-resource settings, healthcare workers have limited access to accurate vital signs measuring devices suitable for their environment and training. The CRADLE Vital Signs Alert (VSA) is a novel device measuring blood pressure and pulse that is accurate in pregnancy and designed for low-resource settings. Its traffic light early warning system alerts healthcare workers to the need for escalation of care for women with hypertension, haemorrhage or sepsis. This study evaluated the usability and acceptability of the CRADLE VSA device. Evaluation was conducted in community and primary care settings in India, Mozambique and Nigeria and tertiary hospitals in South Africa. Purposeful sampling was used to convene 155 interviews and six focus groups with healthcare workers using the device (n = 205) and pregnant women and their family members (n = 41). Interviews and focus groups were conducted in the local language and audio-recorded, transcribed and translated into English for analysis. Thematic analysis was undertaken using an a priori thematic framework, as well as an inductive approach. Most healthcare workers perceived the CRADLE device to be easy to use and accurate. The traffic lights early warning system was unanimously reported positively, giving healthcare workers confidence with decision-making and a sense of professionalism. However, a minority in South Africa described manual inflation as tiring, particularly when measuring vital signs in obese and hypertensive women (n = 4) and a few South African healthcare workers distrusted the device's accuracy (n = 7). Unanimously, pregnant women liked the CRADLE device. The traffic light early warning system gave women and their families a better understanding of the importance of vital signs in pregnancy and during the postpartum period. The CRADLE device was well accepted by healthcare workers

  1. Decree n.06-488 /P-RM of 23 november 2006 determining the rules related to the protection against ionizing radiation, safety and security of ionizing radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This decree determine the r(ules of protection of workers, public, patients and environment against the risks of ionizing radiation. The scope of these rules is defined as well as the definitions of some terms and concepts used in the field such as raioelement, radiopactive waste, dose, level of intervention, etc. The responsability for Malian Agency for radioprotection and for different stakeholders are clarified and those of workers as well. The condition of declaration, obtaining authorization and exemption are set. Instructions related to radioprotection, safety and security ofn ionizing radiation are stated regarding occupational, madical and public exposure and in case of emergency. instructions related to inventory and inspec tion are also defined

  2. Workers doses in central European PWR NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2003-01-01

    As is stated, the ISOE database which was established in 1992 forms an excellent basis for studies and comparisons of occupational exposure data between nuclear power plants. In the year 2001, 69% of all participating reactors were pressurised water reactors. The ISOE database presents workers' exposure from 213 participating pressurised reactors (PWR) from 27 countries in that year. Among these 32 PWRs belong to six Central European Countries. The analysis of the exposure of workers based on radiation protection performance indicators (collective dose, average dose etc.) in these PWRs could be related to some nuclear safety performance indicators for recent years using ISOE database. The comparison is made to ISOE world - wide data. In the six Central European Countries altogether 32 PWR operated in the year 2001.The international databases of performance indicators related to radiation protection as for example the ISOE or the UNSCEAR database can be use as an efficient tool in the management of radiation protection of workers in a nuclear facilities and regulatory bodies. The databases enable the study of performance trends and the improvement of radiation protection. (authors)

  3. The Assessment of I-131 Internal Doses of Nuclear Medicine Workers in Korea Using Thyroid uptake system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Young Kag; Oh, Gi Back; Lee, Chang Ho; Lee, Jong Doo; Yeom, Yu Sun; Hwang, Young Muk

    2012-01-01

    There are possibilities the radiation workers could intake the radiation when workers deal with radiation-materials. Therefore, internal radiation doses of radiation workers need to be assessed. Although an application of the nuclear medicine is continuously increased in Korea, there is not a proper tool and form to monitor the internal doses of nuclear medicine workers. However, it is possible to attain the internal doses of I-131 to evaluate using thyroid uptake and well count system. In this study, we measured and evaluated the I-131 internal doses of nuclear medicine workers in Korea using thyroid uptake and well count system and performed an air sampling

  4. Determination of the Radiation Cancer Risk for Workers in Some Factories of Building Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madbouly, A.M.; Ibrahim, M.S.E.; Diab, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this work is to estimate the concentrations of natural radionuclides: 228 U-series, 232 Th-series and 40 k in raw materials of ceramic (zirconium silicate and glaze sample), ceramic tiles, tile, lime stone, granite, marble, gypsum and cement, in order to determine the dose received and health risk of the workers in building materials industries, the specific activities of those radionuclides, in all samples collected were measured. High resolution γ-ray spectroscopy measurements were done using hyper pure germanium (Hp Ge) detector. The measured activity concentrations for these radionuclides were compared with the data of other countries. As a measure of radiation hazard to the workers, the radium equivalent activities, the external hazard index (H e x), internal hazard index (H i n) representative level index (Iγ) and total annual effective dose associated with the radionuclides were estimated. The calculated total annual effective dose and the activity concentration index of all types of building materials were -I and 1 mSv y -I , respectively

  5. Myelodysplastic syndromes in Chernobyl clean-up workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluzman, Daniil F; Sklyarenko, Lilia M; Koval, Stella V; Rodionova, Nataliia K; Zavelevich, Michael P; Ivanivskaya, Tetiana S; Poludnenko, Liudmyla Yu; Ukrainskaya, Nataliia I

    2015-10-01

    The studies of the recent decades posed the question of the association between radiation exposure and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). This association has been proved in secondary MDS originating upon exposure to chemotherapeutics and/or radiation therapy. The long-term study in Japanese atomic (A)-bomb survivors demonstrated the significant linear dose-response for MDS confirming the link between radiation exposure and this form of hematopoietic malignancies. All these findings provide the strong basis for studying MDS in the persons exposed to radiation following the Chernobyl disaster, especially those in the cohort of Chernobyl clean-up workers of 1986-1987. The data on MDS among Chernobyl clean-up workers (1986-1987) diagnosed in 1996-2012 at the reference laboratory of RE Kavetsky Institute of Experimental Pathology, Oncology and Radiobiology are summarized. MDS cases were diagnosed in 23 persons (21 males and 2 females) having been exposed to radiation as clean-up workers of 1986-1987. Refractory anemia (RA) has been detected in 13, refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS)-in 2, and refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB)-in 8 patients. The median age of those MDS patients was 62.0 years. In addition, 5 cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) were recorded in the group of Chernobyl clean-up workers with the median time of 14.8 years from 1986-1987 to diagnosis. The association between radiation exposure and MDS is discussed. The suggested life-long risk for myelodysplastic syndromes among A-bomb survivors in Japan highlights the importance of the continuing follow-up studies in the affected populations in the post-Chernobyl period.

  6. Code of practice : safe use of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    Ionizing radiation is used extensively in the field of scientific research. The risk of uncontrolled exposure to both the worker and the environment is ever present. The purpose of this Code is to set out practices considered by the CSIRO Health and Safety Committee to be appropriate for CSIRO staff and, if followed, they will result in appropriate protection for research staff and the environment. The Code does not cover sources of non-ionizing radiation such as microwave ovens, RF generators and laser sources

  7. Supervisor's experiments on radiation safety trainings in school of engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Kiyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Radiation safety training courses in School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, were introduced. The number of radiation workers and the usage of radiation and radioisotopes have been surveyed for past 14 years. The number of radiation workers in School of Engineering has increased due to the treatment of X-ray analysis of materials, recently. It is important for workers to understand the present situation of School of Engineering before the treatment of radiation and radioisotopes. What the supervisor should tell to radiation workers were presented herewith. The basic questionnaires after the lecture are effective for radiation safety trainings. (author)

  8. Real-time measurement of outdoor worker's exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation in Pretoria, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmathapelo Makgabutlane

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The city of Pretoria in South Africa receives considerable solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR because of its low latitude (22–35°S and relatively clear skies. Certain meteorological factors affect the amount of solar UVR that reaches the ground; the most dominant factors being stratospheric ozone, cloud cover and solar zenith angle. It is known that overexposure to solar UVR may lead to the development of adverse health conditions, the most significant being skin cancer. Outdoor workers spend a significant amount of time outside and are thus susceptible to this risk. In this case study, we estimated, for the first time, the real-time solar UVR exposure of an outdoor worker in Pretoria. Measurements were made on 27 and 28 May 2013 using a handheld ultraviolet index (UVI meter calibrated against a science-grade biometer at the South African Weather Service in Pretoria. Personal exposure estimation was used to discern the pattern in diurnal and annual sunburn risk for the outdoor worker. Ambient UVR levels ranged from 0 UVI to 4.66 UVI and the outdoor worker’s potential exposure estimates regularly exceeded 80% of these levels depending on the time of day. The risk of sunburn was evident; however, actual incidents would depend on individual skin photosensitivity and melanin content, as well as sun protection used. Further research is needed to determine the personal exposure estimations of outdoor workers in other provinces in which solar UVR levels may be equally high, or higher than those in Pretoria.

  9. Sports injuries, drowning and exposure to radiation concern Canada Safety Council meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Caroline.

    1979-01-01

    Hazards associated with surface sports, aquatic sports and exposure to radiation were considered at a meeting of the Canada Safety Council in late 1979. The session on radiation noted that 6 of 20000 radiation workers wearing dosimeters were exposed to a dose in excess of 5 rem, the annual limit set by the Atomic Energy Control Board. Radiographers were in the job classification receiving the highest doses of ionizing radiation. Concern was expressed for the emission of damaging radiation from broken mercury vapour lamps. Increased regulation rather than training was seen as the most effective solution. (T.I.)

  10. Scientific literacy in hospital workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerci, Alba M.; Pinero, Adalberto; Zubiria, M. Guillermina; Sanz, Vanesa; Larragueta, Nicolas; Puntigliano, Diego

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Previous studies realized by our group have demonstrated radio-induction of genotoxic damage in peripheral blood of hospital workers exposed to chronic X-ray. The cytogenetic and cytomolecular damage was significant in the radiologists evaluated. Accordingly, we have researched the knowledge of risk radiation in 57 workers to different health centres, private and public, in La Plata city. Most of respondents (96.4%) answered to know the risk of working with radiation ionizing, but a large portion do not carry out with the appropriate safety rules. The workers have not interest in this rules, it is evidenced by negligence in the use of protective clothing and personal dosimeters. These results suggested that individuals could be sensitising to minimize their risk. For this purpose we are working in scientific literacy conferences which are organized by 'Asociacion de Tecnicos Radiologos y de Diagnostico por Imagenes de La Plata (ASTEDIRLP)'. (author)