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Sample records for radiation treated patients

  1. Radiation exposure estimation from patient treated by I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahfi, Y.; Anjak, O.

    2012-09-01

    Radioactive iodine is the main radiopharmaceutical substance in the nuclear medicine field which used in diagnosis and treatment of patients suffering from thyroid cancer; thus it can be considered as the main source of the public and patient relative exposure. In this study, 192 patients were selected randomly and their radiation dose rate was measured at different levels of the patient's body (thyroid, knee, bladder) after one, twenty four and forty eight hours from availing the prescript quantity of the I-131. The collected data may serve in estimating the worker and public exposure related to the patient treated by I-131. (authors)

  2. Secondary malignancy among seminoma patients treated with adjuvant radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Clifford K.S.; Lai, Peter P; Michalski, Jeff M; Perez, Carlos A

    1995-11-01

    interval, 1.22-11.63) than expected. The median duration for developing a second cancer was 11 years for tumors arising from tissues outside the irradiated field and 14 years for those within or near the irradiated area. Conclusions: The overall observed incidence of second nontesticular malignancy among patients with early-stage testicular seminoma treated with adjuvant radiation therapy was not significantly increased in comparison with the expected incidence. Clinical implications are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of QOL in cancer patients treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari; Hosono, Makoto; Murata, Osamu; Osada, Hisato; Omichi, Masahide

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients is an important theme. However, we do not have an established method to assess QOL in cancer patients during radiotherapy in Japan. We evaluated both the changes of QOL and the factors affecting QOL in radiotherapy patients. Three hundred fifty-five cancer patients, who filled in a questionnaire at the beginning, middle, and end of radiotherapy between 1998 and 2001, were studied. We used The QOL Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs (QOL-ACD)'' devised by Kurihara et al, the Ministry of Health and Welfare. The QOL Questionnaire had five categories: physical activity, physical condition, mental state, social interaction, and face scale. The total score, sum of the score of five categories, were established synthetically (maximum score is 110). The mean of total QOL scores were 75.8, 77.6, and 78.2 at the beginning, middle, and end of radiotherapy respectively. Patients with symptoms related to cancer had apparent improvement of QOL score. Patients receiving chemotherapy had a decreased QOL score at the end of radiotherapy. The score of physical condition was reduced improvement. It was suggested that radiotherapy could be performed without losing QOL of cancer patients, including older patients. However, patients receiving chemotherapy and those with head and neck cancer may lose their QOL, therefore, we should treat such patients carefully. (author)

  4. Radiation dose to relations of patients treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, G.S.; Sharma, S.K.; Bal, C.S.; Rakesh Kumar; Rath, G.K.

    2003-01-01

    Due to its efficacy and simplicity, radioiodine treatment of thyrotoxicosis and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) has become extremely popular. A large number of such patients are getting benefit with this treatment modality. Though the radiation dose to the relations of these patients, who may be in close proximity for some time after treatment have been mentioned as within safe limits but we do have sufficient data of our own in India. The life style and social conditions in India are very different than in the developed world. We have been measuring external dose in relations/attendants of these patients who have enough chance to come in close contacts with patients during and after their radioiodine treatment. The TL discs of CaSO 4 (Renentech Laboratories) were exposed to graded doses of gamma photons from 131 I for establishing a dose response relationship. The annealed discs from a given lot were measured for background counts and issued to the relations of patients who have maximum chance of being in proximity with the patient for 2 weeks. The TLDs were collected after a use of 2 weeks for dose estimation. We have so far studied 60 families with a total of 71 attendants. The external doses in all the persons attending the patients at home are well within safe prescribed limits. However, due to varied social and practical circumstances 5 persons exceeded 1 mSv dose. This is possibly due to travelling long distance by train immediately after discharge from the hospital when the accompanying person remains in close proximity throughout the journey. There are situations for non-ambulatory patients, when the attendants have to attend them for relatively longer period. (author)

  5. Genetic Modeling of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0681 TITLE: Genetic Modeling of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0681Genetic Modeling of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated...effects, urinary morbidity, rectal injury, sexual dysfunction 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF

  6. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

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    Chung, Christine S., E-mail: chungc1@sutterhealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Berkeley, California (United States); Yock, Torunn I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nelson, Kerrie [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Xu, Yang [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Keating, Nancy L. [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of General Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Office of the Executive Dean, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study

  7. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Christine S.; Yock, Torunn I.; Nelson, Kerrie; Xu, Yang; Keating, Nancy L.; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study

  8. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Zhang Xu; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T 10 and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V 10 -V 40 and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 ≤65% before SABR (P=.012), V 20 ≥30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 ≤65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V 20 ≥30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

  9. Long-term prognosis of maxillary sinus malignant tumor patients treated by fast neutron radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishi, Hirohisa; Numata, Tsutomu; Yuza, Jun; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Konno, Akiyoshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Miyamoto, Tadaaki

    1995-03-01

    From 1976 through 1990, 19 patients with maxillary sinus malignant tumor were treated with combination therapy consisting of maxillectomy and radiation of fast neutron. Fast neutron radiotherapy was performed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. Eight patients had adenoid cystic carcinomas, three patients squamous cell carcinomas, one patient a carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma, four patients fibrosarcomas, one patient osteosarcoma, one patient chondrosarcoma and one patient rhabdomyosarcoma. Fast neutron therapy after/before surgery was effective in fresh cases with T2-3N0M0 adenoid cystic carcinomas and sarcomas (except for fibrosarcoma). Nine patients were alive more than three years after treatment. And serious complications of fast neutron radiation therapy appeared in six of these nine patients. Visual impairment of opposite side occurred in four patients. Bone necrosis occured in one patient and brain dysfunction in one patient. (author).

  10. Long-term prognosis of maxillary sinus malignant tumor patients treated by fast neutron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Hirohisa; Numata, Tsutomu; Yuza, Jun; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Konno, Akiyoshi; Miyamoto, Tadaaki.

    1995-01-01

    From 1976 through 1990, 19 patients with maxillary sinus malignant tumor were treated with combination therapy consisting of maxillectomy and radiation of fast neutron. Fast neutron radiotherapy was performed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. Eight patients had adenoid cystic carcinomas, three patients squamous cell carcinomas, one patient a carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma, four patients fibrosarcomas, one patient osteosarcoma, one patient chondrosarcoma and one patient rhabdomyosarcoma. Fast neutron therapy after/before surgery was effective in fresh cases with T2-3N0M0 adenoid cystic carcinomas and sarcomas (except for fibrosarcoma). Nine patients were alive more than three years after treatment. And serious complications of fast neutron radiation therapy appeared in six of these nine patients. Visual impairment of opposite side occurred in four patients. Bone necrosis occured in one patient and brain dysfunction in one patient. (author)

  11. Radiation therapy for endometrial cancer in patients treated for postoperative recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, Kimberly B.; Han, Ihn; Shamsa, Falah; Court, Wayne S.; Chuba, Paul; Deppe, Gunter; Malone, John; Christensen, Carl; Porter, Arthur T.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and risk factors in patients treated with radiation for endometrial cancer at time of recurrence. Materials and Methods: Three hundred ninety-nine women were treated with radiation therapy for endometrial cancer at KCI/WSU from January 1980 to December 1994. Of these, 26 patients treated primarily with surgery received radiation therapy at the time of recurrence. Median time to recurrence after surgery was 8 months, with all recurrences occurring within 24 months. Twenty-four patients had recurrences in the vaginal cuff, vagina, or pelvis. These patients received external-beam radiation to the pelvis (45.00-50.40 Gy) and periaortic lymph nodes (45.00-50.00 Gy), along with a boost given by external-beam radiation or brachytherapy (16.00-30.00 Gy). Mean follow-up was 15 months (range 1-85 months). Results: The 2-year survival was 50% and median survival was 16 months (survival range 1-85 months). Of 26 patients, 54% (14) failed locally following radiation therapy. Factors indicative of poor survival included histology (sarcoma, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma), grade, and lymph node positivity. Histological differentiation influenced local control; lymphovascular space invasion was of borderline significance with regard to local control. Conclusion: Local control and survival for surgically treated endometrial cancer patients who receive radiation at the time of recurrence are poor, with the exception of those patients with recurrent disease limited to the vagina. Early detection of recurrence may improve outcome. Pathologic risk factors may identify those patients at risk for extrapelvic recurrence. Alternative treatment modalities need to be developed for this high-risk group of patients

  12. Radiation Exposure to Relatives of Patients Treated with Iodine-131 for Thyroid Cancer at Siriraj Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonnonchiang, S.; Sritongkul, N.; Chaudakshetrin, P.; Tuntawiroon, M.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid carcinoma patients treated with I-131 are potential source of high radiation exposure to relatives who are knowingly and willingly exposed to ionizing radiation as a result of providing support and comfort to patients undergoing radionuclide therapy. The purpose of this study is to present the results of measurements of radiation doses to relatives who designated to care fornon self-supporting patients treated with radioiodine at Radionuclide Therapy Ward, Siriraj Hospital. Twenty caregivers of 20 patients underwent radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancers with a standard protocol were given specific instructions with regard to radiation safety and provided with electronic digital dosimeter (PDM 112) to continuously measure radiation dose received on the daily basis, during three days in the hospital. On the day of patients' release, in vivo bioassays were performed on caregivers to determine the thyroid uptake estimates. The 3-day accumulative doses to caregivers to patients receiving 5.55 GBq (n=11) and 7.4 GBq (n=9) of I-131 ranged from 37 to 333 μSv and 176 to 1920 μSv respectively depending on the extent and level of supports required. The thyroid uptake estimates in all caregivers were undetectable. Electronic dosimeters indicated a maximum whole-body effective dose of 1920 μSv was more than the public dose limit of 1 mSv but within the general dose constraint of 5 mSv. Radiation dose to caregivers of a non self-supporting hospitalized patient undergoing radioiodine therapy were well below the limits recommended by the ICRP and the IAEA. The patients can be comforted with confidence that dose to caregivers will be below the 5- mSv limit. This study provides guidance for medical practitioners to obtain practical radiation safety concerns associated with hospitalized patients receiving I-131 therapy especially when patients are comforted in the hospital ward by caregivers. (author)

  13. Salivary gland function of nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated by simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qi; Li Huanbin; Wang Ling

    2007-01-01

    The work was to study protective effect of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART) on salivary function of nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Forty-six patients were treated by SMART with 2.5Gy/fraction at gross tumor volume to a total does of 70 Gy, and 2.0 Gy/fraction at the clinical treatment volume to a total does of 56 Gy. The SMART was practiced in step-and-shoot mode, one time a day, and five times each week. Fourteen patients were treated by conventional radiation therapy. All the patients received salivary gland function imaging for their uptake index, excretive index and excretive speed, so as to evaluate their degree of salivary function injury. Meanwhile, the dry discomfort in mouth of the patients was recorded and classified. The results showed that the functional indexes of the SMART group were significantly higher than those of the conventional radiation therapy group (P 2 =23.52, P<0.005). Therefore, SMART can play a key role in protecting salivary gland function of naso- pharyngeal cancer patients. (authors)

  14. Experiences of 23 patients ≥ 90 years of age treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Masahiko; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Toshikazu; Shikama, Naoto; Ohata, Takeo; Okazaki, Youichi; Kiyono, Kunihiro; Sone, Shusuke

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To present 23 patients ≥ 90 years old treated with radiotherapy, and to retrospectively evaluate the results of radiotherapy and tolerance in these patients. Methods and Materials: The clinical records of 27 patients over 90 years of age who were treated with radiotherapy at the Department of Radiology, Shinshu University Hospital, and eight affiliated general hospitals from 1990 until 1995 were reviewed. The strategy of radiotherapy was individually planned depending on the stage of the disease and performance status (PS) of the patient; however, it was not modified, based solely on chronologic age. The overall survival rate and disease-free survival rate were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring criteria of acute and late reactions of radiation therapy were used. Results: This group of patients accounted for 0.37% of all patients treated with radiotherapy in these hospitals. Of these, 23 patients in whom cancer was pathologically confirmed and whose follow-up data were available for retrospective analysis were included in the final evaluation of data. The age of the 23 patients ranged from 90 to 96 years (median 93). Tumor was untreated and in the early stage in five patients, locoregionally advanced in 13, recurrent in four, and systemic in one. Definitive radiation therapy was administered in 12 patients (13 sites), preoperative intent in one, and palliative intent in 10. The period of observation ranged from 2.5 to 6 years (median 18 months). Seven patients were alive for 15-67 months. Fourteen patients died because of intercurrent diseases or senility associated with active cancer, and two because of senility without evidence of cancer. The overall and relapse-free survival rates were 65% and 30% at 1 year and 30% and 21% at 2 years, respectively. Definitive radiation therapy was completed in 13 of 13 patients (100%), and local control was attained in 9 of 13 patients at 6 months (62%). Palliative

  15. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali; Ketonen, Leena; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Boehling, Nicholas S.; Khatua, Soumen; Adesina, Adekunle; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E.; Mahajan, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem

  16. Investigation of a valuable biochemical indicator as objective measurement in radiation treated cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, M.; Rode, I.L.

    1978-01-01

    In the investigation of a valuable biochemical indicator in radiotherapy applied in the treatment of cancer patients, plasma hemoglobin, serum haptoglobin, total LDH enzyme and LDH isoenzyme distribution levels were measured. In immunological studies immunoproteins were determined quantitatively by immunodiffusion. Patients were irradiated generally by 2 Gy daily doses and measurements of the above factors were made weekly, during a radiation treatment for 4-6 weeks. In most of the cases examined, increase in hemoglobin and haptoglobin values were observed and the time-dependent curves of the changes showed a characteristic shape. The immunosuppressive effect of irradiation was found to be no universe phenomenon, as in some percentage of the cases an increase in the values of the immunoproteins was observed during radiation treatment, especially in grid-irradiation. Cancer patients treated by different type of radiation sources were compared. The effects of 200 kV X-ray, high-energy X-ray, electron and 60-Co-gamma radiation were evaluated and their effectivity compared. A trial was made to differentiate between type of radiation treatment in radiotherapy of cancer and to find the most promising method. (orig.) [de

  17. Safety and Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in Advanced Melanoma Patients Treated With Ipilimumab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Rosie [School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Olson, Adam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Singh, Bhavana [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Thomas, Samantha; Wolf, Steven [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Bhavsar, Nrupen A. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Hanks, Brent A. [Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Salama, April K.S., E-mail: april.salama@duke.edu [Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Ipilimumab and radiation therapy (RT) are standard treatments for advanced melanoma; preclinical models suggest the potential for synergy. However, limited clinical information exists regarding safety and optimal timing of the combination. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of consecutive patients with unresectable stage 3 or 4 melanoma treated with ipilimumab. Patients were categorized as having received RT or not. Differences were estimated between these 2 cohorts. Results: We identified 88 patients treated with ipilimumab. At baseline, the ipilimumab-plus-RT group (n=44) had more unfavorable characteristics. Despite this, overall survival, progression-free survival, and both immune-related and non–immune-related toxicity were not statistically different (P=.67). Patients who received ipilimumab before RT had an increased duration of irradiated tumor response compared with patients receiving ipilimumab after RT (74.7% vs 44.8% at 12 months; P=.01, log-rank test). In addition, patients receiving ablative RT had non–statistically significantly improved median overall survival (19.6 vs 10.2 months), as well as 6-month (95.1% vs 72.7%) and 12-month (79.7% vs 48.5%) survival rates, compared with those treated with conventionally fractionated RT. Conclusions: We found that both ablative and conventionally fractionated RT can be safely administered with ipilimumab without a clinically apparent increase in toxicity. Patients who received ipilimumab before RT had an increased duration of irradiated tumor response.

  18. Reporting Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Curative Radiation Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Souhami, Luis; Joshua, Bosede; Vuong, Te; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Long-term rectal toxicity is a concern for patients with prostate cancer treated with curative radiation. However, comparing results of late toxicity may not be straightforward. This article reviews the complexity of reporting long-term side effects by using data for patients treated in our institution with hypofractionated irradiation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy alone to a dose of 66 Gy in 22 fractions were prospectively assessed for late rectal toxicity according to the Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3, scoring system. Ninety percent of patients had more than 24 months of follow-up. Results are compared with data published in the literature. Results: We found an actuarial incidence of Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity of 27% at 30 months and a crude incidence of Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity of 18%. This was mostly severe toxicity documented during follow-up. The incidence of Grade 3 rectal toxicity at the last visit was 3% compared with 13% documented at any time during follow-up. Conclusion: Comparison of late toxicity after radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer must be undertaken with caution because many factors need to be taken into consideration. Because accurate assessment of late toxicity in the evaluation of long-term outcome after radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer is essential, there is a need to develop by consensus guidelines for assessing and reporting late toxicity in this group of patients

  19. Dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyan, Arthur; Chen, Josephine; Shugard, Erin; Lambert, Louise; Quivey, Jeanne M; Yom, Sue S

    2014-01-01

    Radiation to the neck has long been associated with an elevated risk of hypothyroidism development. The goal of the present work is to define dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Data for 123 patients, with a median follow up of 4.6 years, were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone levels or with a clinical diagnosis were categorized as hypothyroid. Patient demographic parameters, thyroid volume, mean thyroid dose, the percent of thyroid volume receiving minimum specified dose levels (VxxGy), and the absolute thyroid volume spared from specified dose levels (VSxxGy) were analyzed. Normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) was also calculated using several recently published models. Thyroid volume and many radiation dosimetric parameters were statistically different in the hypothyroid group. For the patients with initial thyroid volumes of 8 cc or greater, several dosimetric parameters were found to define subgroups at statistically significant lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Patients with VS45 Gy of at least 3 cc, VS50 Gy at least 5 cc, VS50 Gy at least 6 cc, V50 Gy below 45%, V50 Gy below 55%, or mean thyroid dose below 49 Gy had a 28-38% estimated risk of hypothyroidism at 3 years compared to a 55% risk for the entire study group. Patients with a NTCP of less than 0.75 or 0.8, calculated using recently published models, were also observed to have a lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Based on long-term follow up data for OPC patients treated with IMRT, we recommend plan optimization objectives to reduce the volume of thyroid receiving over 45 Gy to significantly decrease the risk of developing hypothyroidism. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-014-0269-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. Radiation exposure to family members of patients with thyrotoxicosis treated with iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappelen, Tone; Amundsen, Anne Lise; Kravdal, Gunnhild; Unhjem, Jan Frede; Foelling, Ivar

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to measure the radiation exposure to family members of out-patients with thyrotoxicosis treated with radioiodine, 131 I, using the recommendations from the European Commission (EC) guidance and age-specific periods for behaviour restrictions; (2) to use the results to identify necessary restrictions to ensure recommended dose constraints. The study population comprised 76 family members (46 adults and 30 children below the age of 18) of 42 patients. The patients were treated with an average activity of 417 MBq (range 260-600 MBq). They received oral and written EC recommendations about behaviour restrictions (translated into Norwegian). On the day of treatment we repeated the oral instructions to the patient and an adult family member. The time periods for restrictions were 14 days for children aged 0-10 years, 7 days for persons aged 11-59 years and 3 days for persons aged 60 years and older. Family members wore a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) on each wrist day and night for 2 weeks. The doses received were adjusted to give an estimate of the expected values if the TLDs had been worn indefinitely. Radiation doses well below the recommended dose constraints were measured for all adult family members and children, except one 2-year-old child; in the latter case the mother probably did not comply with the instructions given. The radiation dose to family members of thyrotoxic patients treated with up to 600 MBq of radioiodine is well below recommended dose constraints if EC instructions are given and compliance is adequate. The duration of restrictions for various age groups used in this study may be considered when establishing guidelines in Norway. (orig.)

  1. Estimation of radiation burden to relatives of patients treated with radioiodine for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, Pankaj; Rohatgi, Rupali; Gaur, P.K.; Rao, B.S.; Gill, B.S.; Hari Babu, T.; Venkatesh, Meera

    2005-01-01

    Patients treated with radioiodine present a radiation hazard and precautions are necessary to limit the radiation dose to family members, nursing staff and members of the public. The precautions advised are usually based on the instantaneous dose rates or iodine retention and do not take into account the time spent in close proximity with a patient. The purpose of this study was to draw guidelines based on the actual measurements and confirm if the present guidelines for discharge of the 131 I-treated thyroid cancer patients are adequate or not. External exposure rates were measured on 37 patients using a calibrated ionization survey meter. The patients' exposure rates were measured at the time of the discharge from the hospital. The patient and their relatives were given lockets embedded with CaSO 4 :Dy dosimeters at the time of discharge from the hospital. These lockets were given with a chain to be worn in the neck for 15 days. These lockets were collected after a fortnight and read out in a conventional TLD reader. These dose estimates can be used to calculate the limits for the patient movements so as to limit doses received to less than 1 mSv for the family members. This study dealt only with the external exposure; the problem of internal contamination was not considered. In our study the doses to the patient have also been measured in order to estimate the percentage of dose received by their relatives. In our study, most of the cases the dose received by the relatives of the patients are more than 1 mSv, which is more than the limit prescribed by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the general public. (author)

  2. Measurement of radiation exposure in relatives of thyroid cancer patients treated with (131)I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Garzón, Y T; Ávila, O; Medina, L A; Gamboa-deBuen, I; Rodríguez-Laguna, A; Buenfil, A E; Ruíz-Trejo, C; Estrada, E; Brandan, M E

    2014-11-01

    This work evaluates the radiological risk that patients treated with I for differentiated thyroid cancer could present to relatives and occupationally exposed workers. Recently, the International Atomic Energy Agency issued document K9010241, which recommends that patient discharge from the hospital must be based on the particular status of each patient. This work measures effective dose received by caregivers of patients treated with I at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Mexico City. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were carried during a 15-d period by 40 family caregivers after patient release from hospital. Relatives were classified into two groups, ambulatory and hospitalized, according to the release mode of the patient, and three categories according to the individual patient home and transport facilities. Categories A, B, and C were defined going from most to least adequate concerning public exposure risk. Measurements were performed for 20 family caregivers in each group. The effective dose received by all caregivers participating in this study was found to be less than 5 mSv, the recommended limit per event for caregivers suggested by ICRP 103. In addition, 70 and 90% of ambulatory and hospitalized groups, respectively, received doses lower than 1 mSv. Caregivers belonging to category C, with home situations that are not appropriate for immediate release, received the highest average doses; i.e., 2.2 ± 1.3 and 3.1 ± 1.0 mSv for hospitalized and ambulatory patients, respectively. Results of this work have shown that the proper implementation of radiation protection instructions for relatives and patients can reduce significantly the risk that differentiated thyroid cancer patients treated with I can represent for surrounding individuals. The results also stress the relevance of the patient's particular lifestyle and transport conditions as the prevailing factors related to the dose received by the caregiver. Therefore, the patient's status should be

  3. Smell and taste in patients with neoplasms tumors of palatine tonsils treated by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korytowska, A.; Szmeja, Z.; Wojtowicz, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    The smell and taste investigations were made in group of 47 subjects with neoplasms of palatine tonsils surgical treated with radiation and in group of 7 subjects treated only by radiation. The investigation presents mostly quantitative disturbance of smell in both groups but with temporary character. (author)

  4. Incidence, causative mechanisms, and anatomic localization of stroke in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy versus surgery alone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sattler, Margriet; Vroomen, Patrick; Sluiter, Wim J.; Schers, Henk J.; van den Berg, Gerrit; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; van den Bergh, Alphons C. M.; van Beek, Andre P.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical

  5. Extracranial stereotactic radiation therapy: set-up accuracy of patients treated for liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herfarth, K.K.; Debus, J.; Lohr, F.; Bahner, M.L.; Fritz, P.; Hoess, A.; Schlegel, W. Ph.D.; Wannenmacher, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with liver metastases might benefit from high-dose conformal radiation therapy. A high accuracy of repositioning and a reduction of target movement are necessary for such an approach. The set-up accuracy of patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic single dose radiation was evaluated. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with liver metastases were treated with single dose radiation therapy on 26 occasions using a self-developed stereotactic frame. Liver movement was reduced by abdominal pressure. The effectiveness was evaluated under fluoroscopy. CT scans were performed on the planning day and directly before treatment. Representative reference marks were chosen and the coordinates were calculated. In addition, the target displacement was quantitatively evaluated after treatment. Results: Diaphragmal movement was reduced to median 7 mm (range: 3-13 mm). The final set-up accuracy of the body was limited to all of median 1.8 mm in latero-lateral direction (range: 0.3-5.0 mm) and 2.0 mm in anterior-posterior direction (0.8-3.8 mm). Deviations of the body in cranio-caudal direction were always less than the thickness of one CT slice (<5 mm). However, a repositioning was necessary in 16 occasions. The final target shift was median 1.6 mm (0.2-7.0 mm) in latero-lateral and 2.3 mm in anterior-posterior direction (0.0-6.3 mm). The median shift in cranio-caudal direction was 4.4 mm (0.0-10.0 mm). Conclusions: In patients with liver metastases, a high set-up accuracy of the body and the target can be achieved. This allows a high-dose focal radiotherapy of these lesions. However, a control CT scan should be performed directly before therapy to confirm set-up accuracy and possibly prompt necessary corrections

  6. The incidence of other primary cancers in patients with an oral cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizutani, Kiminari; Koseki, Yonoshin; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    From January 1980 through April 1990, a total of 317 patients with an oral cancer were treated with radiation therapy at Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital. Twenty-seven (8.5%) of these 317 patients had other primary cancers. For statistical purposes, the expected number of other primary cancers was estimated by multiplying the age-sex specific incidence rates among Osaka residents with the Person-year at risk figures, based on the Osaka Prefectural Cancer Registry. The observed/expected [0/E] ratios were 16.00 (p<0.01) for the esophagus and 28.42 (p<0.01) for the oropharynx. The present study suggested the necessity of following up oral cancer patients, especially those who have had carcinoma of the mouth floor, in order to enable the early diagnosis of upper digestive tract cancer. (author)

  7. Osteoclastome-like giant cell thyroid carcinoma controlled by intensive radiation and adriamycin, in a patient with meningioma and multiple myeloma treated by radiation and cytoxan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizel-Schwartz, M.

    1981-01-01

    The eighth cases of osteoclastome-like giant cell carcinoma of the thyroid, and the first one to be treated with adriamycin in addition to surgery and radiation, is reported. This rare variant of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma appeared in a patient operated on for meningioma and treated for multiple myeloma with cranial radiation and chronic administration of cytoxan

  8. Proposed protocol for imaging breast carcinoma patients treated with lumpectomy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelson, E.B.; Bhagwanani, D.G.; Bohm-Velez, M.; Rishi, U.S.

    1989-01-01

    Alterations in conservatively treated breasts have been described and include masses (hematomas, seromas), spiculated densities, architectural distortion, increased breast density and edema, skin thickening, and calcifications. Misinterpretations of these findings might result in unnecessary biopsy or delayed diagnosis of tumor recurrence. Changes after lumpectomy and radiation therapy must be evaluated within a temporal context, best defined from a careful review of sequential follow-up studies. From a review of interval studies of 110 cases of conservatively treated breast cancer during a 4-year period, the chronology of findings after lumpectomy and radiation therapy was determined. Of particular importance is the evolution of changes at the lumpectomy site, which was the location of the six recurrences in our series, all developing 36--48 months after surgery. Based on the sequential findings that the authors observed as well s the reported frequency of tumor recurrence over time, the authors propose a protocol for follow-up mammography and offer indications for supplemental sonography in managing patients with conservatively treated breast cancer

  9. Prognosis of patients treated with whole brain radiation therapy for metastatic gestational trophoblastic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechter, Naomi R.; Mychalczak, Borys; Jones, Walter; Spriggs, David

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate the effect of multiple treatment and disease related variables on the local control and survival of patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy for metastatic gestational trophoblastic disease. Materials and Methods: Between November 1967 and December 1994, 21 patients were treated at our institution for gestational trophoblastic disease metastatic to the brain. 29% ((6(21))) were diagnosed with their brain metastases before the onset of chemotherapy (early group). 79% ((15(21))) developed their brain metastases during or after the administration of first-line chemotherapy (late group). All patients were treated with whole brain radiation therapy. The total dose ranged from 200 cGy to 3600 cGy (median 2200 cGy). Sixteen patients (76%) received concurrent systemic chemotherapy. None of the patients received intrathecal chemotherapy as a component of their initial treatment. Survival and local control were calculated from the date of diagnosis of brain metastases. Follow-up ranged from 11 months to 170 months with a median of 77 months. Results: The median overall survival was 21 months, with 2- and 5-year actuarial survivals of 46% and 31%, respectively. Neither survival nor local control was significantly affected by age at diagnosis of brain metastases (<35 vs. ≥35 years), time of presentation of brain metastases (early vs. late), or use of concurrent chemotherapy. The total dose of radiation (<2200 cGy vs. ≥2200 cGy) significantly affected initial local control, but not survival. The 5-year actuarial local control of the initial brain metastases with ≥2200 cGy was 91%, as compared to 24% with <2200 cGy (p=0.05). Survival was significantly affected by control of disease at extracranial sites. The 2- and 5-year actuarial survivals of the 9 patients whose disease was controlled at extracranial sites were 100% and 83%, respectively, as compared to 8% and 0% for the 12 whose extracranial disease was not controlled (p=0

  10. Acupuncture in Treating Dry Mouth Caused By Radiation Therapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: Acupuncture may help relieve dry mouth caused by radiation therapy. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying to see how well one set of acupuncture points work in comparison to a different set of acupuncture points or standard therapy in treating dry mouth caused by radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. |

  11. Lung deformations and radiation-induced regional lung collapse in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diot, Quentin, E-mail: quentin.diot@ucdenver.edu; Kavanagh, Brian; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Garg, Kavita [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To differentiate radiation-induced fibrosis from regional lung collapse outside of the high dose region in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods: Lung deformation maps were computed from pre-treatment and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) scans using a point-to-point translation method. Fifty anatomical landmarks inside the lung (vessel or airway branches) were matched on planning and follow-up scans for the computation process. Two methods using the deformation maps were developed to differentiate regional lung collapse from fibrosis: vector field and Jacobian methods. A total of 40 planning and follow-ups CT scans were analyzed for 20 lung SBRT patients. Results: Regional lung collapse was detected in 15 patients (75%) using the vector field method, in ten patients (50%) using the Jacobian method, and in 12 patients (60%) by radiologists. In terms of sensitivity and specificity the Jacobian method performed better. Only weak correlations were observed between the dose to the proximal airways and the occurrence of regional lung collapse. Conclusions: The authors presented and evaluated two novel methods using anatomical lung deformations to investigate lung collapse and fibrosis caused by SBRT treatment. Differentiation of these distinct physiological mechanisms beyond what is usually labeled “fibrosis” is necessary for accurate modeling of lung SBRT-induced injuries. With the help of better models, it becomes possible to expand the therapeutic benefits of SBRT to a larger population of lung patients with large or centrally located tumors that were previously considered ineligible.

  12. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini, Arya; Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan; McBurney, Michelle L.; Erasmus, Jeremy; Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James; Dong, Lei; Welsh, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56–87.5 Gy; 1.5–2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade ≥2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4–37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512–67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm 3 of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966–24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267–17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future

  13. Radiation exposure of relatives of patients treated with Ra-223 dichloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanke, C.; Szermerski, B.; Solle, A.; Geworski, L.; Kranert, W.T.; Andreeff, M.; TU Dresden

    2015-01-01

    Since November 2013, a radiopharmaceutical containing Ra-223 dichloride as active substance is approved in the European Union for patients with castration resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases and no known visceral metastases. Ra-223 (T 1/2 = 11.43 d) decays via a chain of 4 alpha and 2 beta decays. This therapy is presently the only application of an alpha emitter in clinical routine therapy. To show that the exposure of relatives and caregivers of patients treated with Ra-223 dichloride in an outpatient setting does not exceed a value of 1 mSv, the multicenter study ''RAPSODY'' was conducted. As Ra-223 and most of its progeny emit alpha particles, the internal exposure had to be evaluated in particular. Within this study, measurements of the radiation emitted from the patient were performed using standard dose-rate meters. Wipe-tests were taken in the patients' homes to identify significant contaminations and evaluated by liquid scintillation counting. Samples of saliva and sweat were taken and measured using gamma spectrometry. Ra-223 disintegrates to the noble gas Rn-219 and was measured in the exhaled breath from the patients using conventional Radon Monitors. Furthermore, a computational fluid dynamics simulation (CFD) was performed to assess the radioactivity in the air, which could be inhaled by persons close to the patient. Conclusions: The potential exposure of relatives and caregivers by external irradiation and incorporation of radioactivity exhaled or excreted by the patient with saliva or sweat is well below 1 mSv. No objections are seen regarding outpatient treatment. This paper summarizes contents of a poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  14. Radiation dose to family members of hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer patients treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, G. S.; Sharma, S. K.; Bal, C. S.; Kumar, R.; Rath, G. K.

    2006-01-01

    The thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) was used for measuring radiation dose to family members of thyrotoxicosis and thyroid cancer patients treated with 131 I using CaSO 4 :Dy discs. There were 45 family members of thyrotoxicosis patients, who were divided into two groups with 22 in the first and 23 in the second group. Radiation safety instructions were the same for both the groups except in the second group where the patients were advised to use a separate bed at home for the first 3 d of dose administration. An activity ranging from 185 to 500 MBq was administered to these patients. The whole-body dose to family members ranged from 0.4 to 2.4 mSv (mean 1.1 mSv) in the first group and 0-1.9 mSv (mean 0.6 mSv) in the second group. A total of 297 family members of thyroid cancer patients were studied for whole-body dose estimation. An activity ranging from 0.925 to 7.4 GBq was administered to the thyroid cancer patients. The family members were divided into three groups depending upon the mode of transport and facilities available at home to avoid close proximity with the patient. Group A with 25 family members received a dose ranging from 0 to 0.9 mSv (mean 0.4 mSv), group B with 96 family members received a dose ranging from 0 to 8.5 mSv (mean 0.8 mSv) and group C with 176 family members received a dose ranging from 0 to 5.0 mSv (mean 0.8 mSv). The thyroid monitoring was also done in 103 family members who attended the patients in isolation wards for >2 d. Thyroid dose in them ranged from 0 to 2.5 mGy (mean 0.1 mGy). (authors)

  15. Effect of vitamin E on protein bound carbohydrate complexes in radiation treated oral squamous cell carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitra, S.; Shyamala Devi, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    Serum glycoproteins were evaluated in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy and also the effect of vitamin E was studied. Cell surface glycoconjugates are important parameters in the detection of malignancy. Thus, the objective of the present study is to evaluate the efficacy of vitamin E on glycoproteins in oral cavity cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. The study includes 26 age and sex matched normal healthy individuals and 26 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity. These patients were divided into two groups, one for radiotherapy alone (at a dosage of 6000 cGy in five fractions per week for a period of six weeks) and the other for radiotherapy plus vitamin E supplementation (at a dosage of 400 IU/day of vitamin E) for the entire period of radiotherapy. Levels of hexose, hexosamine, fucose and sialic acid were increased in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients and a significant decrease was observed in radiation treated patients when compared to control. The levels of glycoconjugates were significantly decreased in radiation treated patients supplemented with vitamin E. This measurement may be useful in assessing disease progression and identifying patients resistant to therapy and a possible role of vitamin E on reduction in glycoconjugate levels of radiation treated oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. (author)

  16. Constitutive STAT5 Activation Correlates With Better Survival in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Helen H.W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chou, Cheng-Yang [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Wu, Yuan-Hua; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Chiung-Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Guo, How-Ran [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Wen-Ying, E-mail: 7707@so-net.net.tw [Department of Pathology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan (China) and Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Wu-Chou, E-mail: sunnysu@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Constitutively activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) factors, in particular STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, have been detected in a wide variety of human primary tumors and have been demonstrated to directly contribute to oncogenesis. However, the expression pattern of these STATs in cervical carcinoma is still unknown, as is whether or not they have prognostic significance. This study investigated the expression patterns of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in cervical cancer and their associations with clinical outcomes in patients treated with radical radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 165 consecutive patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stages IB to IVA cervical cancer underwent radical radiation therapy, including external beam and/or high-dose-rate brachytherapy between 1989 and 2002. Immunohistochemical studies of their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify and to evaluate the effects of these factors affecting patient survival. Results: Constitutive activations of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 were observed in 11%, 22%, and 61% of the participants, respectively. While STAT5 activation was associated with significantly better metastasis-free survival (p < 0.01) and overall survival (p = 0.04), STAT1 and STAT3 activation were not. Multivariate analyses showed that STAT5 activation, bulky tumor ({>=}4 cm), advanced stage (FIGO Stages III and IV), and brachytherapy (yes vs. no) were independent prognostic factors for cause-specific overall survival. None of the STATs was associated with local relapse. STAT5 activation (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.63) and advanced stage (odds ratio = 2.54; 95% confidence interval = 1.03-6.26) were independent predictors of distant metastasis. Conclusions: This is the first report to provide the overall expression patterns and prognostic significance of

  17. Should vestibular schwannoma in patients with useful hearing be treated with radiation? A comparison of patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and those not treated with SRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, H.; Sakamoto, T.; Kagei, K.; Satoh, N.; Hashimotok, S.; Aoyama, H.; Kitahara, H.; Inuyama, Y.; Miyasaka, K.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Prognostic factors for hearing preservation after SRT in patients with vestibular schwannoma are investigated, and hearing change is compared to that of the matched control group of patients whose hearing was observed historically. Material and Methods: Of 41 patients with vestibular schwannoma treated from 1991 through 1997 by SRT, 24 with measurable hearing, given 36 Gy in 20 fractions to 48 Gy in 23 fractions were investigated. Tumor sizes ranged from 5 mm to 30 mm with a median of 15 mm. Nine patients had episodes of sudden hearing loss and 12 suffered from progressive hearing loss. Follow-up time after SRT ranged from 4 to 70 months, resulting in a median follow-up time of 21 months. Twelve patients with vestibular schwannoma who were followed without any treatment were selected as a matched control. Results: Eighty-three percent showed a less than 20dB change in pure tone average (PTA), and 43.5% showed a less than 10dB change after SRT. Tumor size was not related to the change in PTA. A higher preservation rate was suggested in subjects younger than 50 years of age. Good pre-treatment PTA (less than 42dB) was related in hearing preservation after RT (p< 0.05). A change in PTA of less than 10 dB was observed in 67.5% of those patients who experienced a sudden onset of hearing loss and in 25.0% of those patients with progressive hearing loss (p< 0.05). Worsening in PTA more than 10dB was observed in no patients with normal type of audiogram before SRT, 33.3% of valley type impairment (drop in 1-2kHz), 63.6% of a high-tone impariment type and 66.7% of horizontal impairment type. No change in PTA between 14 and 32 months after the treatment was observed in 3 patients who were given 36 Gy in 20 fractions. Tumor size did not increase in 97.6% of patients by SRT and in 66.7% by follow-up policy. In patients who received SRT, PTA hearing loss recorded from their first visit was a little worse at 1 year, but at 2 and 3 years became the same as

  18. Localized Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiation Therapy: A Long-Term Outcome in 86 Patients With 104 Treated Eyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Ken, E-mail: keharada@ncc.go.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Murakami, Naoya; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro; Inaba, Koji; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Sumi, Minako [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Shigenobu [Department of Ophthalmic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tobinai, Kensei [Department of Hematologic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Uno, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Chiba University School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Itami, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history, behavior of progression, prognostic factors, and treatment-related adverse effects of primary ocular adnexal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma (POAML). Methods and Materials: Eighty-six patients with histologically proven stage I POAML treated with radiation therapy at National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo between 1990 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age was 56 years (range, 18-85 years). The median dose administered was 30 Gy (range, 30-46 Gy). Seventy-seven patients (90%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Results: The median follow-up duration was 9 years (range, 0.9-22 years). The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 97.6% and 93.5%, respectively, and no patients died of lymphoma. Patients with tumor sizes ≥4 cm showed a greater risk of contralateral relapse (P=.012). Six patients with contralateral relapse were seen and treated by radiation therapy alone, and all the lesions were controlled well, with follow-up times of 3 to 12 years. There was 1 case of local relapse after radiation therapy alone, and 3 cases of relapse occurred in a distant site. Cataracts developed in 36 of the 65 eyes treated without lens shielding and in 12 of the 39 patients with lens shielding (P=.037). Conclusions: The majority of patients with POAML showed behavior consistent with that of localized, indolent diseases. Thirty gray of local irradiation seems to be quite effective. The initial bilateral involvement and contralateral orbital relapses can be also controlled with radiation therapy alone. Lens shielding reduces the risk of cataract.

  19. Localized Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiation Therapy: A Long-Term Outcome in 86 Patients With 104 Treated Eyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Ken; Murakami, Naoya; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro; Inaba, Koji; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Sumi, Minako; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Tobinai, Kensei; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history, behavior of progression, prognostic factors, and treatment-related adverse effects of primary ocular adnexal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma (POAML). Methods and Materials: Eighty-six patients with histologically proven stage I POAML treated with radiation therapy at National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo between 1990 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age was 56 years (range, 18-85 years). The median dose administered was 30 Gy (range, 30-46 Gy). Seventy-seven patients (90%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Results: The median follow-up duration was 9 years (range, 0.9-22 years). The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 97.6% and 93.5%, respectively, and no patients died of lymphoma. Patients with tumor sizes ≥4 cm showed a greater risk of contralateral relapse (P=.012). Six patients with contralateral relapse were seen and treated by radiation therapy alone, and all the lesions were controlled well, with follow-up times of 3 to 12 years. There was 1 case of local relapse after radiation therapy alone, and 3 cases of relapse occurred in a distant site. Cataracts developed in 36 of the 65 eyes treated without lens shielding and in 12 of the 39 patients with lens shielding (P=.037). Conclusions: The majority of patients with POAML showed behavior consistent with that of localized, indolent diseases. Thirty gray of local irradiation seems to be quite effective. The initial bilateral involvement and contralateral orbital relapses can be also controlled with radiation therapy alone. Lens shielding reduces the risk of cataract

  20. Survival Outcomes of Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Parotid Gland Tumors: a Retrospective Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, Sana D.; Snider, James W.; Wang, Hongkun; Wooster, Margaux; Lominska, Christopher; Deeken, John; Newkirk, Kenneth; Davidson, Bruce; Harter, K. William

    2012-01-01

    Background: to review a single-institution experience with the management of parotid malignancies treated by fractionated stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT). Findings: Between 2003 and 2011, 13 patients diagnosed with parotid malignancies were treated with adjuvant or definitive SBRT to a median dose of 33 Gy (range 25–40 Gy). There were 11 male and two female patients with a median age of 80. Ten patients declined conventional radiation treatment and three patients had received prior unrelated radiation therapy to neighboring structures with unavailable radiation records. Six patients were treated with definitive intent while seven patients were treated adjuvantly for adverse surgical or pathologic features. Five patients had clinical or pathologic evidence of lymph node disease. Conclusion: at a median follow-up of 14 months only one patient failed locally, and four failed distantly. The actuarial 2-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and local-regional control rates were 46, 84, and 47%, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed surgery as a positive predictor of overall survival while presence of gross disease was a negatively correlated factor (p < 0.05).

  1. Outcome of Patients Treated With a Single-Fraction Dose of Palliative Radiation for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Tarita O.; Agrawal, Priya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Guitart, Joan [Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rosen, Steven T. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rademaker, Alfred W. [Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Querfeld, Christiane [Department of Medicine/Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hayes, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Kuzel, Timothy M. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Mittal, Bharat B., E-mail: bmittal@nmh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a radiosensitive tumor. Presently, treatment with radiation is given in multiple fractions. The current literature lacks data that support single-fraction treatment for CTCL. This retrospective review assesses the clinical response in patients treated with a single fraction of radiation. Methods and Materials: This study reviewed the records of 58 patients with CTCL, primarily mycosis fungoides, treated with a single fraction of palliative radiation therapy (RT) between October 1991 and January 2011. Patient and tumor characteristics were reviewed. Response rates were compared using Fisher's exact test and multiple logistic regressions. Survival rates were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to assess the cost of a single vs a multifractionated treatment regimen. Results: Two hundred seventy individual lesions were treated, with the majority (97%) treated with ≥700 cGy; mean follow-up was 41.3 months (range, 3-180 months). Response rate by lesion was assessed, with a complete response (CR) in 255 (94.4%) lesions, a partial response in 10 (3.7%) lesions, a partial response converted to a CR after a second treatment in 4 (1.5%) lesions, and no response in 1 (0.4%) lesion. The CR in lower extremity lesions was lower than in other sites (P=.0016). Lesions treated with photons had lower CR than those treated with electrons (P=.017). Patients with lesions exhibiting large cell transformation and tumor morphology had lower CR (P=.04 and P=.035, respectively). Immunophenotype did not impact response rate (P=.23). Overall survival was significantly lower for patients with Sézary syndrome (P=.0003) and erythroderma (P<.0001). The cost of multifractionated radiation was >200% higher than that for single-fraction radiation. Conclusions: A single fraction of 700 cGy-800 cGy provides excellent palliation for CTCL lesions and is cost effective and convenient for the patient.

  2. Cytokine levels as biomarkers of radiation fibrosis in patients treated with breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbury, Charlotte B; Yarnold, John R; Haviland, Joanne; Davies, Sue; Gothard, Lone; Abdi, Bahja Ahmed; Sydenham, Mark; Bowen, Jo; Stratton, Richard; Short, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    Radiation fibrosis is not easily measurable although clinical scores have been developed for this purpose. Biomarkers present an alternative more objective approach to quantification, and estimation in blood provides accessible samples. We investigated if blood cytokines could be used to measure established fibrosis in patients who have undergone radiotherapy for breast cancer. We studied two cohorts treated by breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy in the UK START Trial A, one with breast fibrosis (cases) and one with no or minimal fibrosis (controls). Two candidate cytokines, plasma connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and serum interleukin-6 (IL6) were estimated by ELISA. Comparisons between cases and controls used the t-test or Mann–Whitney test and associations between blood concentration and clinical factors were assessed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Seventy patients were included (26 cases, 44 controls). Mean time since radiotherapy was 9.9 years (range 8.3-12.0). No statistically significant differences between cases and controls in serum IL6 (median (IQR) 0.84 pg/ml (0.57-1.14), 0.75 pg/ml (0.41-1.43) respectively) or plasma CTGF (331.4 pg/ml (234.8-602.9), 334.5 pg/ml (270.0-452.8) were identified. There were no significant associations between blood cytokine concentration and age, fibrosis severity, breast size or time since radiotherapy. No significant difference in IL6 or CTGF concentrations was detected between patients with breast fibrosis and controls with minimal or no fibrosis

  3. Analysis of toxicity in a group of patients treated for pancreatic cancer with combined modality 3D radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, Robert M.; Fernandez-Vicioso, Eduardo; Higgins, Patrick; Schell, Michael; Sohn, Jason; Pelley, Robert; Walsh, R. M.; Vogt, David; Hermann, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute toxicity of a group of 37 pancreatic cancer patients treated with noncoplanar, nonopposed, conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy (5-FU). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated a group of initially nonadvanced 37 pancreatic cancer patients treated with combined concurrent chemotherapy and 3D radiation therapy treated between 1992 until 1995. During this period we began treating the initially unresectable patients with preoperative chemo-RT (50.4 Gy) after treating an initial group of unresectable patients to a higher dose of 66.6 Gy. We also include a group of patients who received postop chemo-RT after Whipple resection (59.4 Gy). All radiation was delivered at a 1.8 Gy per fraction dose rate. The total group was made up of 37 patients of whom 21 were male (57%) and 16 female (43%). There were 22 (59%) head of pancreas lesions, 10 (27%) body of pancreas lesions, and 5 (14%) head and body of pancreas cancers. Of these 37 patients 7 (19%) were treated with chemo-RT as their only treatment, 10 patients (29%) were treated post Whipple resection, and 20 patients (54%) were treated with preoperative intent. Results: Three patients (8%) required a treatment break, one with a body and 2 with head lesions. Two of these patients stopped RT short of planned dose (32.56 and 46.8 Gy) both suffering from nausea, vomiting, and anorexia with the third, who finished a planned 66.6 Gy dose, after a 4 day rest for leukopenia. One of 20 patients (5%) preop patients underwent the planned post chemo-RT Whipple resection, while 4 of the 20 patients (20%), remained unresectable, but without disease progression and had Iodine 125 interstitial implants at exploration delivering a minimal tumor dose of 120 Gy on top or the 50.4 Gy delivered preoperatively. Four patients (11%) maintained a minimal Karnofsky score of 100, 23 patients (62%) maintained a minimal KPS of 90, 6 patients (16%) maintained a minimal KPS of 80, and 4

  4. Outcome of Patients Treated With a Single-Fraction Dose of Palliative Radiation for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Tarita O.; Agrawal, Priya; Guitart, Joan; Rosen, Steven T.; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Querfeld, Christiane; Hayes, John P.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Mittal, Bharat B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a radiosensitive tumor. Presently, treatment with radiation is given in multiple fractions. The current literature lacks data that support single-fraction treatment for CTCL. This retrospective review assesses the clinical response in patients treated with a single fraction of radiation. Methods and Materials: This study reviewed the records of 58 patients with CTCL, primarily mycosis fungoides, treated with a single fraction of palliative radiation therapy (RT) between October 1991 and January 2011. Patient and tumor characteristics were reviewed. Response rates were compared using Fisher's exact test and multiple logistic regressions. Survival rates were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to assess the cost of a single vs a multifractionated treatment regimen. Results: Two hundred seventy individual lesions were treated, with the majority (97%) treated with ≥700 cGy; mean follow-up was 41.3 months (range, 3-180 months). Response rate by lesion was assessed, with a complete response (CR) in 255 (94.4%) lesions, a partial response in 10 (3.7%) lesions, a partial response converted to a CR after a second treatment in 4 (1.5%) lesions, and no response in 1 (0.4%) lesion. The CR in lower extremity lesions was lower than in other sites (P=.0016). Lesions treated with photons had lower CR than those treated with electrons (P=.017). Patients with lesions exhibiting large cell transformation and tumor morphology had lower CR (P=.04 and P=.035, respectively). Immunophenotype did not impact response rate (P=.23). Overall survival was significantly lower for patients with Sézary syndrome (P=.0003) and erythroderma (P 200% higher than that for single-fraction radiation. Conclusions: A single fraction of 700 cGy-800 cGy provides excellent palliation for CTCL lesions and is cost effective and convenient for the patient

  5. Radiation dose and second cancer risk in patients treated for cancer of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boice, J.D. Jr.; Engholm, G.; Kleinerman, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The risk of cancer associated with a broad range of organ doses was estimated in an international study of women with cervical cancer. Among 150,000 patients reported to one of 19 population-based cancer registries or treated in any of 20 oncology clinics, 4188 women with second cancers and 6880 matched controls were selected for detailed study. Radiation doses for selected organs were reconstructed for each patient on the basis of her original radiotherapy records. Very high doses, on the order of several hundred gray, were found to increase the risk of cancers of the bladder [relative risk (RR) = 4.0], rectum (RR = 1.8), vagina (RR = 2.7), and possibly bone (RR = 1.3), uterine corpus (RR = 1.3), cecum (RR = 1.5), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (RR = 2.5). For all female genital cancers taken together, a sharp dose-response gradient was observed, reaching fivefold for doses more than 150 Gy. Several gray increased the risk of stomach cancer (RR = 2.1) and leukemia (RR = 2.0). Although cancer of the pancreas was elevated, there was no evidence of a dose-dependent risk. Cancer of the kidney was significantly increased among 15-year survivors. A nonsignificant twofold risk of radiogenic thyroid cancer was observed following an average dose of only 0.11 Gy. Breast cancer was not increased overall, despite an average dose of 0.31 Gy and 953 cases available for evaluation (RR = 0.9); there was, however, a weak suggestion of a dose response among women whose ovaries had been surgically removed. Doses greater than 6 Gy to the ovaries reduced breast cancer risk by 44%. A significant deficit of ovarian cancer was observed within 5 years of radiotherapy; in contrast, a dose response was suggested among 10-year survivors

  6. Patterns of Radiation Therapy Practice for Patients Treated for Intact Cervical Cancer in 2005 to 2007: A Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eifel, Patricia J., E-mail: peifel@mdanderson.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ho, Alex; Khalid, Najma [American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Erickson, Beth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Owen, Jean [American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess practice patterns and compliance with clinical performance measures for radiation therapy (RT) for patients with intact carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: Trained research associates reviewed the records of 261 randomly selected patients who received RT for cervix carcinoma between 2005 and 2007 from 45 facilities randomly selected after stratification by practice type. National estimates of patient and treatment characteristics were calculated from survey data using SUDAAN statistical software. Results: From the survey data, we estimated that only 8% of US facilities treated on average more than 3 eligible patients per year. No small or medium nonacademic facilities in the survey treated more than 3 eligible patients per year. Approximately 65.5% of patients began treatment in a facility that treated 3 or fewer eligible patients per year. Although 87.5% of patients had brachytherapy as part of their treatment, the proportion treated with external beam RT only was about double that estimated from the 1996 to 1999 survey. The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy sharply increased, particularly in small nonacademic facilities. Overall, patients treated in nonacademic facilities were more likely to have incomplete or protracted treatment; 43% of patients treated in small nonacademic facilities did not have treatment completed within 10 weeks. Also, patients treated in facilities that treated 3 or fewer eligible patients per year were significantly less likely to receive concurrent chemotherapy than were patients treated in other facilities. Conclusion: Survey results indicate a disturbingly high rate of noncompliance with established criteria for high-quality care of patients with cervical cancer. Noncompliance rates are particularly high in nonacademic facilities, especially those that treat relatively few patients with intact cervical cancer.

  7. Emergency preparedness of Research Center for Radiation medicine and its hospital to admit and treat the patients with signs of acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyi, D. A.; Khomenko, V. I.; Bebeshko, V. G.

    2009-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, the Research Center for Radiation Medicine (RCRM) was established in Kiev (Ukraine). Its main task was to maintain a high level of emergency preparedness and be ready to examine and treat patients who suffer as a result of hypothetical radiation accident. Based on the previous experience, this institution's specialists worked out new diagnostic criteria and drug treatment schemata for acute radiation sickness, created a database on 75 patients with this diagnosis and improved educational programmes for medical students and physicians working in the field of radiation medicine. RCRM collaborates fruitfully with western partners through the joint research projects and connects with the World Health Organisation's Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network centre. Collaboration with Kiev Center for Bone Marrow Transplantation allows RCRM to use aseptic wards having highly filtered air for the treatment of most severely irradiated patients. (authors)

  8. XRCC3 polymorphisms are associated with the risk of developing radiation-induced late xerostomia in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with intensity modulation radiated therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yan; Song, Tao; Yu, Wei; Zhao, Ruping; Wang, Yong; Xie, Ruifei; Chen, Tian; Wu, Bo; Wu, Shixiu

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of radiation-induced late xerostomia varies greatly in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy. The single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA repair and fibroblast proliferation may be correlated with such variability. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the association between the risk of developing radiation-induced late xerostomia and four genetic polymorphisms: TGFβ1 C-509T, TGFβ1 T869C, XRCC3 722C>T and ATM 5557G>A in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with Intensity Modulation Radiated Therapy. The severity of late xerostomia was assessed using a patient self-reported validated xerostomia questionnaire. Polymerase chain reaction-ligation detection reaction methods were performed to determine individual genetic polymorphism. The development of radiation-induced xerostomia associated with genetic polymorphisms was modeled using Cox proportional hazards, accounting for equivalent uniform dose. A total of 43 (41.7%) patients experienced radiation-induced late xerostomia. Univariate Cox proportional hazard analyses showed a higher risk of late xerostomia for patients with XRCC3 722 TT/CT alleles. In multivariate analysis adjusted for clinical and dosimetric factors, XRCC3 722C>T polymorphisms remained a significant factor for higher risk of late xerostomia. To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrated an association between genetic polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced late xerostomia in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with Intensity Modulation Radiated Therapy. Our findings suggest that the polymorphisms in XRCC3 are significantly associated with the risk of developing radiation-induced late xerostomia.

  9. Impact of Pretreatment Body Mass Index on Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, Ping-Ching; Chuang, Chi-Cheng; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Chang, Kai-Ping; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liao, Chun-Ta; Hong, Ji-Hong; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association of pretreatment body mass index (preT BMI) with outcomes of head-and-neck cancer in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: All 1,562 patients diagnosed with head-and-neck cancer and treated with curative-intent RT to a dose of 60 Gy or higher were retrospectively studied. Body weight was measured both at entry and at the end of RT. Cancer-specific survival (CSS), overall survival (OS), locoregional control (LRC), and distant metastasis (DM) were analyzed by preT BMI ( 2 vs. ≥25 kg/m 2 ). The median follow-up was 8.6 years. Results: Patients with lower preT BMI were statistically significantly associated with poorer CSS and OS than those with higher preT BMI. There was no significant difference between preT BMI groups in terms of LRC and DM. Body weight loss (BWL) during radiation did not influence survival outcomes. However, in the group with higher preT BMI, CSS, OS, and DM-free survival of patients with less BWL during radiation were statistically longer when compared with greater BWL. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that higher preT BMI positively influenced survival outcomes for patients with head-and-neck cancer. Patients with higher preT BMI who were able to maintain their weight during radiation had significantly better survival than patients with greater BWL.

  10. Measurement of radiation exposure in attendants of thyroid cancer patients treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez G, Y. T.

    2012-01-01

    Patients treated with 131 I for differentiated thyroid cancer present radiological risk to relatives, occupational exposed workers and general public. Recently, the IAEA issued document K-9010241, 2010, which recommends that patient discharge from hospital must be based on the particular status of each patient, unlike the current criteria applied in Mexico based on the exposure rate at a 1 m distance. In this work thermoluminescent dosimeters were used during a 15 day period to measure the effective dose received by 40 family caregivers of patients treated with 131 I, after their release from hospital 'Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia', Mexico. Relatives were classified in two groups, ambulatory (outpatients) and hospitalized (inpatients), according to the release mode of the patient. Measurements were performed for 20 family caregivers in each group. The effective dose received by all family members of outpatient and inpatient groups was found to be smaller that 5 mSv. In addition, 70 and 90% of inpatient and outpatient groups, respectively, received doses lower than 1 mSv. These data provide information which allow to give recommendations of possible modifications to current regulations in Mexico regarding discharge from hospital of patients treated with radiopharmaceuticals. (Author)

  11. Temporal Cerebral Microbleeds Are Associated With Radiation Necrosis and Cognitive Dysfunction in Patients Treated for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Qingyu; Lin, Focai; Rong, Xiaoming; Yang, Wuyang; Li, Yi; Cai, Zhaoxi; Xu, Pengfei; Xu, Yongteng; Tang, Yamei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be complicated with radiation-induced brain necrosis (RN), resulting in deteriorated cognitive function. However, the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon remains unclear. This study attempts to elucidate the association between cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) and radiation necrosis and cognitive dysfunction in NPC patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This cross-sectional study included 106 NPC patients who were exposed to radiation therapy (78 patients with RN and 28 without RN). Sixty-six patients without discernable intracranial pathology were included as the control group. CMBs were confirmed using susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Cognitive function was accessed using Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Patients with a total score below 26 were defined as cognitively dysfunction. Results: Seventy-seven patients (98.7%) in the RN group and 12 patients (42.9%) in the non-RN group had at least 1 CMB. In contrast, only 14 patients (21.2%) in the control group had CMBs. In patients with a history of radiation therapy, CMBs most commonly presented in temporal lobes (76.4%) followed by cerebellum (23.7%). Patients with RN had more temporal CMBs than those in the non-RN group (37.7 ± 51.9 vs 3.8 ± 12.6, respectively; P<.001). The number of temporal lobe CMBs was predictive for larger volume of brain necrosis (P<.001) in multivariate linear regression analysis. Although cognitive impairment was diagnosed in 55.1% of RN patients, only 7.1% of non-RN patients sustained cognitive impairment (P<.001). After adjusting for age, sex, education, period after radiation therapy, CMBs in other lobes, and RN volume, the number of temporal CMBs remained an independent risk factor for cognitive dysfunction (odds ratio [OR]: 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.04; P=.003). Conclusions: CMBs is a common radiological manifestation in NPC patients with RN

  12. Temporal Cerebral Microbleeds Are Associated With Radiation Necrosis and Cognitive Dysfunction in Patients Treated for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Qingyu [Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Neurology, Zengcheng People' s Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Focai; Rong, Xiaoming [Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Yang, Wuyang [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Li, Yi; Cai, Zhaoxi; Xu, Pengfei; Xu, Yongteng [Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Yamei, E-mail: yameitang@hotmail.com [Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Gene Regulation and Target Therapy of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be complicated with radiation-induced brain necrosis (RN), resulting in deteriorated cognitive function. However, the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon remains unclear. This study attempts to elucidate the association between cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) and radiation necrosis and cognitive dysfunction in NPC patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This cross-sectional study included 106 NPC patients who were exposed to radiation therapy (78 patients with RN and 28 without RN). Sixty-six patients without discernable intracranial pathology were included as the control group. CMBs were confirmed using susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Cognitive function was accessed using Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Patients with a total score below 26 were defined as cognitively dysfunction. Results: Seventy-seven patients (98.7%) in the RN group and 12 patients (42.9%) in the non-RN group had at least 1 CMB. In contrast, only 14 patients (21.2%) in the control group had CMBs. In patients with a history of radiation therapy, CMBs most commonly presented in temporal lobes (76.4%) followed by cerebellum (23.7%). Patients with RN had more temporal CMBs than those in the non-RN group (37.7 ± 51.9 vs 3.8 ± 12.6, respectively; P<.001). The number of temporal lobe CMBs was predictive for larger volume of brain necrosis (P<.001) in multivariate linear regression analysis. Although cognitive impairment was diagnosed in 55.1% of RN patients, only 7.1% of non-RN patients sustained cognitive impairment (P<.001). After adjusting for age, sex, education, period after radiation therapy, CMBs in other lobes, and RN volume, the number of temporal CMBs remained an independent risk factor for cognitive dysfunction (odds ratio [OR]: 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.04; P=.003). Conclusions: CMBs is a common radiological manifestation in NPC patients with RN

  13. Incidence, Causative Mechanisms, and Anatomic Localization of Stroke in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Treated With Postoperative Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery Alone

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    Sattler, Margriet G.A., E-mail: g.a.sattler@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Vroomen, Patrick C. [Department of Neurology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Sluiter, Wim J. [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schers, Henk J. [Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (Netherlands); Berg, Gerrit van den [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R. [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Beek, André P. van [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical Center Groningen in The Netherlands was studied. Radiation therapy was administered in 236 patients. The TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) and the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification methods were used to determine causative mechanism and anatomic localization of stroke. Stroke incidences in patients treated with RT were compared with that observed after surgery alone. Risk factors for stroke incidence were studied by log–rank test, without and with stratification for other significant risk factors. In addition, the stroke incidence was compared with the incidence rate in the general Dutch population. Results: Thirteen RT patients were diagnosed with stroke, compared with 12 surgery-alone patients. The relative risk (RR) for stroke in patients treated with postoperative RT was not significantly different compared with surgery-alone patients (univariate RR 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-1.35, P=.23). Stroke risk factors were coronary or peripheral artery disease (univariate and multivariate RR 10.4, 95% CI 4.7-22.8, P<.001) and hypertension (univariate RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.8, P=.002). There was no difference in TOAST and Oxfordshire classification of stroke. In this pituitary adenoma cohort 25 strokes were observed, compared with 16.91 expected (standard incidence ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.00-1.96, P=.049). Conclusions: In pituitary adenoma patients, an increased incidence of stroke was observed compared with the general population. However, postoperative RT was not associated with an increased incidence of stroke or differences in causative mechanism or anatomic localization of stroke compared with surgery alone. The primary stroke risk

  14. Incidence, Causative Mechanisms, and Anatomic Localization of Stroke in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Treated With Postoperative Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery Alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattler, Margriet G.A.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Schers, Henk J.; Berg, Gerrit van den; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den; Beek, André P. van

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical Center Groningen in The Netherlands was studied. Radiation therapy was administered in 236 patients. The TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) and the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification methods were used to determine causative mechanism and anatomic localization of stroke. Stroke incidences in patients treated with RT were compared with that observed after surgery alone. Risk factors for stroke incidence were studied by log–rank test, without and with stratification for other significant risk factors. In addition, the stroke incidence was compared with the incidence rate in the general Dutch population. Results: Thirteen RT patients were diagnosed with stroke, compared with 12 surgery-alone patients. The relative risk (RR) for stroke in patients treated with postoperative RT was not significantly different compared with surgery-alone patients (univariate RR 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-1.35, P=.23). Stroke risk factors were coronary or peripheral artery disease (univariate and multivariate RR 10.4, 95% CI 4.7-22.8, P<.001) and hypertension (univariate RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.8, P=.002). There was no difference in TOAST and Oxfordshire classification of stroke. In this pituitary adenoma cohort 25 strokes were observed, compared with 16.91 expected (standard incidence ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.00-1.96, P=.049). Conclusions: In pituitary adenoma patients, an increased incidence of stroke was observed compared with the general population. However, postoperative RT was not associated with an increased incidence of stroke or differences in causative mechanism or anatomic localization of stroke compared with surgery alone. The primary stroke risk

  15. Predictors of Dysgeusia in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated With Chemotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapir, Eli [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Tao, Yebin [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Felix; Samuels, Stuart; El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Murdoch-Kinch, Carol A. [School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Objective(s): Dysgeusia is a significant factor reducing quality of life and worsening dysphagia in patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer. The factors affecting dysgeusia severity are uncertain. We investigated the effects on patient-reported dysgeusia of doses to the oral cavity, salivary output (required to dissolve food particles), and patient-reported xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) (N=73) receiving definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy concurrently with chemotherapy participated in a prospective, longitudinal study of quality of life (QOL), including assessment of patient-reported gustatory function by taste-related questions from the Head and Neck QOL instrument (HNQOL) and the University of Washington Head and Neck-related QOL instrument (UWQOL), before therapy and periodically after treatment. At these intervals, patients also completed a validated xerostomia-specific questionnaire (XQ) and underwent unstimulated and stimulated major salivary gland flow rate measurements. Results: At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment, dysgeusia improved over time: severe dysgeusia was reported by 50%, 40%, 22%, and 23% of patients, respectively. Significant associations were found between patient-reported severe dysgeusia and radiation dose to the oral cavity (P=.005) and tongue (P=.019); normal tissue complication probability for severe dysgeusia at 3 months showed mean oral cavity D{sub 50} doses 53 Gy and 57 Gy in the HNQOL and WUQOL questionnaires, respectively, with curve slope (m) of 0.41. Measured salivary output was not statistically significantly correlated with severe taste dysfunction, whereas patient-reported XQ summary scores and xerostomia while eating scores were correlated with severe dysgeusia in the UWQOL tool (P=.04). Conclusions: Taste impairment is significantly correlated with mean radiation dose to the oral cavity. Patient

  16. Predictors of Dysgeusia in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated With Chemotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapir, Eli; Tao, Yebin; Feng, Felix; Samuels, Stuart; El Naqa, Issam; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol A.; Feng, Mary; Schipper, Matthew; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Dysgeusia is a significant factor reducing quality of life and worsening dysphagia in patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer. The factors affecting dysgeusia severity are uncertain. We investigated the effects on patient-reported dysgeusia of doses to the oral cavity, salivary output (required to dissolve food particles), and patient-reported xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) (N=73) receiving definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy concurrently with chemotherapy participated in a prospective, longitudinal study of quality of life (QOL), including assessment of patient-reported gustatory function by taste-related questions from the Head and Neck QOL instrument (HNQOL) and the University of Washington Head and Neck-related QOL instrument (UWQOL), before therapy and periodically after treatment. At these intervals, patients also completed a validated xerostomia-specific questionnaire (XQ) and underwent unstimulated and stimulated major salivary gland flow rate measurements. Results: At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment, dysgeusia improved over time: severe dysgeusia was reported by 50%, 40%, 22%, and 23% of patients, respectively. Significant associations were found between patient-reported severe dysgeusia and radiation dose to the oral cavity (P=.005) and tongue (P=.019); normal tissue complication probability for severe dysgeusia at 3 months showed mean oral cavity D_5_0 doses 53 Gy and 57 Gy in the HNQOL and WUQOL questionnaires, respectively, with curve slope (m) of 0.41. Measured salivary output was not statistically significantly correlated with severe taste dysfunction, whereas patient-reported XQ summary scores and xerostomia while eating scores were correlated with severe dysgeusia in the UWQOL tool (P=.04). Conclusions: Taste impairment is significantly correlated with mean radiation dose to the oral cavity. Patient

  17. Studies on the chromosome aberrations and isozyme patterns in cancer patients treated with therapeutic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.J.

    1979-09-01

    The chromosome aberration yield of peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from cancer patients who had been locally irradiated with therapeutic radiation seems to be largely influenced by total dose, loss of cell with aberration, irradiation interval and dose per day. When treatment period from 7 to 21 days and total dose range from 1000 to 3000 rad, the aberration yield is considered to change according to total dose and accumulated effect by continued existence of damaged chromosomes. However, loss of cell with aberration might play important role in chromosome aberration yield of peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from those who had received radiation above 3000 rad. In case that other conditions make little difference, dose per day and irradiation interval are looked upon as important factors in aberration yield of lymphocyte chromosomes

  18. Estimation of doses of ionizing radiation from patients treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaban, Y.; Matusevich, E.S.; Roziev, R.A.; Mileshin, O. A.; Shishkanov, N.G.; Klyopov, A.N.

    2001-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy currently is the principal direction of medical care delivered to population. Normative documents of the Russian Federation, that regulate radiation safety in nuclear medicine, govern the durable hospitalization of patients, undertaken the treatment with 131 I for thyroid gland disorders, such as diffuse toxic goitre and differentiated thyroid cancer. How showed the results of the processing of dosimetric information for 335 patients, at reasonable social behavior patients after radio-therapeutical procedures do not present real hazard for population and relatives. On the grounds of received data, authors came to the conclusion that, domestic norms are very strict, that can bring to rise of the cost of treatment, to reduction of the frequencies of radio-therapeutical procedures. (authors)

  19. A clinical study of 14 patients with radiation colitis; A case of radiation colitis treated by abdominoperineal resection of the rectum and lumbar plasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futamura, Manabu; Tanaka, Sengai; Oshita, Hiroo; Nagao, Naritoshi (Gifu City Hospital (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    Clinical study of 14 patients with radiation colitis who were treated surgically at our clinic in the past 16-year period and a patient whose treatment was very difficult are reported. Primary lesions included 13 cervical carcinomas and one ovarian cancer. Ten cases received surgery combined with radiation and 4 did radiation. Radiation dose was 6055 rad on average. Latent time ranged from 6 months to 25 years with the average of 8 years and 9 months. No significant correlation between radiation dose and latent time was noted. Symptoms included obstruction and stenosis in 56% (8/14), hematoemesis in 46% (5/14), and fistula in 46% (5/14). All lesions presented as remarkably adhesion and stenosis, and resection with anastomosis was performed in 9 (64%), colostomy in 5 (46%), and urostomy in 2 (14%). Lumbar plasty was added in one case. A 65-year-old female patient who had undergone radiation therapy 13 years before had a rectal perforation and pelvic fistula. Abdominoperineal resection of the rectum and closure of the fistula by transferring the major gluteal muscle pedicle were performed. The patient is followed on ambulant basis for more than one year, and no evidence of recurrence has been observed. (author).

  20. Using machine learning to predict radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Solberg, Timothy D.; Heskel, Marina; Ungar, Lyle; Simone, Charles B., II

    2016-08-01

    To develop a patient-specific ‘big data’ clinical decision tool to predict pneumonitis in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 61 features were recorded for 201 consecutive patients with stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT, in whom 8 (4.0%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Pneumonitis thresholds were found for each feature individually using decision stumps. The performance of three different algorithms (Decision Trees, Random Forests, RUSBoost) was evaluated. Learning curves were developed and the training error analyzed and compared to the testing error in order to evaluate the factors needed to obtain a cross-validated error smaller than 0.1. These included the addition of new features, increasing the complexity of the algorithm and enlarging the sample size and number of events. In the univariate analysis, the most important feature selected was the diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO adj%). On multivariate analysis, the three most important features selected were the dose to 15 cc of the heart, dose to 4 cc of the trachea or bronchus, and race. Higher accuracy could be achieved if the RUSBoost algorithm was used with regularization. To predict radiation pneumonitis within an error smaller than 10%, we estimate that a sample size of 800 patients is required. Clinically relevant thresholds that put patients at risk of developing radiation pneumonitis were determined in a cohort of 201 stage I NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. The consistency of these thresholds can provide radiation oncologists with an estimate of their reliability and may inform treatment planning and patient counseling. The accuracy of the classification is limited by the number of patients in the study and not by the features gathered or the complexity of the algorithm.

  1. Evaluation of permanent alopecia in pediatric medulloblastoma patients treated with proton radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Chul Hee; Paganetti, Harald; Winey, Brian A; Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M; Tarbell, Nancy J; Yock, Torunn I

    2014-01-01

    To precisely calculate skin dose and thus to evaluate the relationship between the skin dose and permanent alopecia for pediatric medulloblastoma patients treated with proton beams. The dosimetry and alopecia outcomes of 12 children with medulloblastoma (ages 4-15 years) comprise the study cohort. Permanent alopecia was assessed and graded after completion of the entire therapy. Skin threshold doses of permanent alopecia were calculated based on the skin dose from the craniospinal irradiation (CSI) plan using the concept of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) and accounting for chemotherapy intensity. Monte Carlo simulations were employed to accurately assess uncertainties due to beam range prediction and secondary particles. Increasing the dose of the CSI field or the dose given by the boost field to the posterior fossa increased total skin dose delivered in that region. It was found that permanent alopecia could be correlated with CSI dose with a threshold of about 21 Gy (relative biological effectiveness, RBE) with high dose chemotherapy and 30 Gy (RBE) with conventional chemotherapy. Our results based on 12 patients provide a relationship between the skin dose and permanent alopecia for pediatric medulloblastoma patients treated with protons. The alopecia risk as assessed with gEUD could be predicted based on the treatment plan information

  2. Estimated radiation doses to different organs among patients treated for ankylosing spondylitis with a single course of X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, C.A.; Smith, P.G.; Stratton, I.M.; Darby, S.C.; Doll, R.

    1988-01-01

    A follow-up study of over 14000 patients treated with a single course of X rays for ankylosing spondylitis demonstrated substantial excess risk of developing cancer. Previously the excess risk of leukaemia has been related to the estimated mean radiation dose to active bone marrow but detailed estimates were not made of the radiation doses to other organs. Data extracted from the original treatment records of a random sample of one in 15 patients have been used to make dose estimates, using Monte Carlo methods, for 30 specific organs or body regions and 12 bone marrow sites. Estimates of mean and median organ doses, standard deviations and ranges have been tabulated. Detailed distributions are presented for six organs (lung, bronchi, stomach, oesophagus, active bone marrow and total body). Comparison with the earlier bone marrow estimates and more recent theoretical estimates shows good agreement. (author)

  3. Radiation treated propylene polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, W.A. III; Baum, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    A method is provided for imparting improved strength and discoloration resistance to a stabilized propylene polymer that is to be exposed to a sterilizing dose of radiation. From 200 to 400 ppm of a phenolic antioxidant containing an isocyanurate group in its molecular structure, and a thiosynergist in an amount at least 6 times the weight of the antioxidant, are incorporated into the polymer before irradiation

  4. Electrophysiological Monitoring in Patients With Tumors of the Skull Base Treated by Carbon-12 Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carozzo, Simone [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Schardt, Dieter [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Narici, Livio [Department of Physics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Combs, Stephanie E.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Sannita, Walter G., E-mail: wgs@dism.unige.it [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report the results of short-term electrophysiologic monitoring of patients undergoing {sup 12}C therapy for the treatment of skull chordomas and chondrosarcomas unsuitable for radical surgery. Methods and Materials: Conventional electroencephalogram (EEG) and retinal and cortical electrophysiologic responses to contrast stimuli were recorded from 30 patients undergoing carbon ion radiation therapy, within a few hours before the first treatment and after completion of therapy. Methodologies and procedures were compliant with the guidelines of the International Federation for Clinical Neurophysiology and International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision. Results: At baseline, clinical signs were reported in 56.6% of subjects. Electrophysiologic test results were abnormal in 76.7% (EEG), 78.6% (cortical evoked potentials), and 92.8% (electroretinogram) of cases, without correlation with neurologic signs, tumor location, or therapy plan. Results on EEG, but not electroretinograms and cortical responses, were more often abnormal in patients with reported clinical signs. Abnormal EEG results and retinal/cortical responses improved after therapy in 40% (EEG), 62.5% (cortical potentials), and 70% (electroretinogram) of cases. Results on EEG worsened after therapy in one-third of patients whose recordings were normal at baseline. Conclusions: The percentages of subjects whose EEG results improved or worsened after therapy and the improvement of retinal/cortical responses in the majority of patients are indicative of a limited or negligible (and possibly transient) acute central nervous system toxicity of carbon ion therapy, with a significant beneficial effect on the visual pathways. Research on large samples would validate electrophysiologic procedures as a possible independent test for central nervous system toxicity and allow investigation of the correlation with clinical signs; repeated testing over time after therapy would demonstrate, and may

  5. ATM Polymorphisms Predict Severe Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Huihua; Liao, Zhongxing; Liu, Zhensheng; Xu, Ting; Wang, Qiming; Liu, Hongliang; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel; Wang, Li-E; Wei, Qingyi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mediates detection and repair of DNA damage. We investigated associations between ATM polymorphisms and severe radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: We genotyped 3 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ATM (rs1801516 [D1853N/5557G>A], rs189037 [-111G>A] and rs228590) in 362 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who received definitive (chemo)radiation therapy. The cumulative severe RP probabilities by genotypes were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. The associations between severe RP risk and genotypes were assessed by both logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard model with time to event considered. Results: Of 362 patients (72.4% of non-Hispanic whites), 56 (15.5%) experienced grade ≥3 RP. Patients carrying ATM rs189037 AG/GG or rs228590 TT/CT genotypes or rs189037G/rs228590T/rs1801516G (G-T-G) haplotype had a lower risk of severe RP (rs189037: GG/AG vs AA, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.83, P=.009; rs228590: TT/CT vs CC, HR=0.57, 95% CI, 0.33-0.97, P=.036; haplotype: G-T-G vs A-C-G, HR=0.52, 95% CI, 0.35-0.79, P=.002). Such positive findings remained in non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions: ATM polymorphisms may serve as biomarkers for susceptibility to severe RP in non-Hispanic whites. Large prospective studies are required to confirm our findings

  6. The influence of infiltrating lobular carcinoma on the outcome of patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornstein, Bruce A.; Peiro, Gloria; Connolly, James L.; Gelman, Rebecca; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Hetelekidis, Stella; Nixon, Asa J.; Recht, Abram; Silver, Barbara; Harris, Jay R.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the clinical characteristics of patients with lobular or mixed lobular-ductal histology in relation to those with pure ductal histology and to compare treatment outcome in patients in these histologic groups treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 1970 and 1986, 1863 patients were treated for clinical Stage I or II invasive breast cancer with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. The original slides were reviewed in 1536 cases (82%). Of these, 1089 patients had pure invasive ductal carcinoma, 93 had invasive lobular carcinoma, and 59 had mixed histology; these constitute the study population. The median follow-up time was 133 months. RESULTS: The distribution of clinical stage I or II, tumor stage T1 or T2, and clinical nodal stage N0 or N1 was similar in all three groups. Positive lymph nodes were found in 31% of patients with lobular cancer compared to 38% of those with ductal cancer and 48% of patients with mixed lobular-ductal histology (p=0.05). The use of adjuvant chemo/hormonal therapy followed the same pattern (20%, 29%, 37%, respectively [p=0.07]). Lymphatic vessel invasion was more common in patients with ductal cancer (38%) than in those with mixed histology (27%) or pure lobular cancer (15%, p<0.0001). Patients with ductal carcinoma tended to be younger, with a median age of 50 years compared to 51 years for patients with mixed lobular-ductal histology and 58 years for patients with lobular histology (p=0.0001). Among 410 patients with evaluable margins, margins were less likely to be positive in patients with ductal histology (39% versus 66% for pure lobular and 67% for mixed lobular-ductal histology [p=0.0004]). The 5- and 10-year crude results by site of first failure for patients evaluable at those times were similar for patients with lobular, mixed and ductal carcinomas. In a multivariate analysis for survival including established prognostic factors, neither

  7. Brachial plexus dose tolerance in head and neck cancer patients treated with sequential intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Tarita O; Refaat, Tamer; Choi, Mehee; Bacchus, Ian; Sachdev, Sean; Rademaker, Alfred W; Sathiaseelan, Vythialingam; Karagianis, Achilles; Mittal, Bharat B

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to study the radiation induced brachial plexopathy in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with Sequential Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (S-IMRT). This IRB approved study included 68 patients with HNSCC treated consecutively. Detailed dose volume histogram data was generated for ipsilateral and contralateral brachial plexus (BP) volumes receiving a specified dose (Vds) i.e. V50-V75 and dose in Gray covering specified percent of BP volume (Dvs) i.e. D5-D30 and maximum point doses (Dmax). To assess BP injury all patients’ charts were reviewed in detail for sign and symptoms of BP damage. Post-hoc comparisons were done using Tukey-Kramer method to account for multiple significance testing. The mean and maximum doses to BP were significantly different (p < .05) based on tumor site, nodal status and tumor stage. The mean volume to the ipsilateral BP for V50, V60, V70, and V75 were 7.01 cc, 4.37 cc, 1.47 cc and 0.24 cc, respectively. The mean dose delivered to ≤5% of ipsilateral BP was 68.70 Gy (median 69.5Gy). None of the patients had acute or late brachial plexopathy or any other significant neurological complications, with a minimum follow up of two years (mean 54 months). In this study cohort, at a minimum of two-years follow up, the mean dose of 68.7Gy, a median dose to 69.5Gy to ≤5% of ipsilateral BP, and a median Dmax of 72.96Gy did not result in BP injury when patients were treated with S-IMRT technique. However, longer follow up is needed

  8. Radiation-induced esophageal structure in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Itoh, Hisao; Kawamura, Masashi

    1989-01-01

    Five out 165 cases (3.0%) which were treated for non-small cell lung cancer with radiotherapy (98 cases were treated with chemoradiotherapy, and the other 67 case, radiotherapy alone) developed esophageal stricture. Their clinical courses, the relationship among radiation dosage, combination with chemotherapy, the length of the irradiated esophagus, and the occurrence of esophageal stricture were reviewed. One of the 5 cases was a case with lung cancer in Bloom's syndrome, which developed an esophageal stricture after receiving only 30.6 Gy (the TDF value was 46.2) to the esophagus. This case suggests the possibility that a patient with Bloom's syndrome is more radiosensitive than normal controls. The other 4 cases were treated with combined chemoradiotherapy. One of the 4 cases was treated with concomitant use of bleomycin (BLM), while the TDF value was not more than 100 (75.4). The concomitant use of BLM was almost certainly the cause of the esophageal stricture. The other 3 cases were treated with chemoradiotherapy, the TDF values of which were more than 100 (108.7, 112.5, and 129.3). The chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy and the overdosage were considered to be the cause of the esophageal stricture in these 3 cases. These data suggest that in Bloom's syndrome, radiotherapy should be performed carefully and that BLM should not be used simultaneously with irradiation to the esophagus. It is also believed that a radiation dose over 100 in TDF value to the esophagus should be discouraged when chemotherapy is codmbined. (author)

  9. Analysis of late toxicity in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, YingJie; Han, Fei; Xiao, WeiWei; Xiang, YanQun; Lu, LiXia; Deng, XiaoWu; Cui, NianJi; Zhao, Chong

    2015-01-01

    To observe the late toxicities in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who achieved long-term survival after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). 208 untreated NPC patients who received IMRT and survived more than five years with locoregional disease control and no metastasis were evaluated in this study. The prescription dose to the gross target volume of nasopharynx (GTVnx), positive neck lymph nodes (GTVnd), clinical target volume 1 (CTV1) and 2 (CTV2) was 68Gy/30f, 60-66Gy/30f, 60 Gy/30f and 54Gy/30f, respectively. The nasopharynx and upper neck targets were irradiated using IMRT, and the lower neck and supraclavicular fossae targets were irradiated using the half-beam technique with conventional irradiation. The late toxicities were evaluated according to the LENT/SOMA criteria of 1995. The median follow-up time was 78 months (60–96 months). The occurrence rates of cervical subcutaneous fibrosis, hearing loss, skin dystrophy, xerostomia, trismus, temporal lobe injury, cranial nerve damage, cataract, and brain stem injury induced by radiotherapy were 89.9%, 67.8%, 47.6%, 40.9%, 7.21%, 4.33%, 2.88%, 1.44%, and 0.48%, respectively. No spinal cord injury and mandible damage were found. Grade 3–4 late injuries were observed as follows: 1 (0.48%) skin dystrophy, 4 (1.92%) cervical subcutaneous fibrosis, 2 (0.96%) hearing loss, 2 (0.96%) cranial nerve palsy, and 1 (0.48%) temporal lobe necrosis. No grade 3–4 late injuries occurred in parotid, temporomandibular joints and eyes. Xerostomia decreased gradually over time and then showed only slight changes after 4 years. The change in the incisor distance stabilised by 1 year after RT, however, the incidence of hearing loss, skin dystrophy, subcutaneous fibrosis and nervous system injuries increased over time after RT. The late injuries in most NPC patients who had long-term survivals after IMRT are alleviated. Within the 5 years of follow-up, we found xerostomia decreased gradually; The change in the

  10. Xerostomia in patients treated for oropharyngeal carcinoma: comparing linear accelerator-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy with helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Israël; Fortin, Bernard; Lambert, Louise; Clavel, Sébastien; Alizadeh, Moein; Filion, Edith J; Soulières, Denis; Bélair, Manon; Guertin, Louis; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2014-09-01

    In comparison to sliding-window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (sw-IMRT), we hypothesized that helical tomotherapy (HT) would achieve similar locoregional control and, at the same time, decrease the parotid gland dose, thus leading to a xerostomia reduction. The association between radiation techniques, mean parotid dose, and xerostomia incidence, was reviewed in 119 patients with advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma treated with concurrent chemoradiation using sw-IMRT (n = 59) or HT (n = 60). Ipsilateral and contralateral parotid mean doses were significantly lower for patients treated with HT versus sw-IMRT: 24 Gy versus 32 Gy ipsilaterally and 20 Gy versus 25 Gy contralaterally. The incidence of grade ≥2 xerostomia was significantly lower in the HT group than in the sw-IMRT group: 12% versus 78% at 6 months, 3% versus 51% at 12 months, and 0% versus 25% at 24 months. Total parotid mean dose xerostomia at 6, 12, and 24 months. This retrospective series suggests that using HT can better spare the parotid glands while respecting quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic (QUANTEC)'s criteria. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Which prognostic factors influence the outcome of patients with surgically staged endometrial cancer treated with adjuvant radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greven, Kathryn M.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Case, Douglas; Purser, Phillip; Lanciano, Rachelle M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the fact that retrospective reviews have documented pelvic failure rates ranging from 15-20% in patients with high-risk uterine-confined endometrial cancer who have received no or 'inadequate' RT, the role of RT has been questioned. We sought to analyze pelvic control and disease-free survival for a large data base of women with corpus cancers managed with initial surgery followed by adjuvant irradiation. Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 1993, 294 patients received adjuvant postoperative RT from one of three academic radiation practices. RT consisted of vaginal brachytherapy alone in 28 patients, pelvic RT in 173 patients, pelvic RT with vaginal brachytherapy in 97 patients, and whole abdominal RT in 2 patients. Lymph nodes were evaluated in 49%. The median number of pelvic and periaortic LN in the pathology specimen were 6 and 4, respectively. Median follow up was 63 months. Results: 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate and pelvic control rates were 86 and 95%, respectively. Patient-related, treatment-related, and tumor-related characteristics were assessed for the effect on time to relapse. Unfavorable histology, older age, and capillary space invasion were univariately associated with decreased DFS and pelvic control. Pathologic Stage II patients had significantly worse DFS than Stage I patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that age, capillary space invasion, and histology were jointly predictive of disease free survival. Conclusion: The excellent pelvic control and disease-free survival of patients with uterine-confined disease in this series suggest that adjuvant RT should continue for patients with high risk disease. This analysis of a large group of postoperatively treated patients will provide a basis for determining alternative treatment strategies for patients who have an increased risk of disease recurrence despite RT

  12. Patients with brain metastases from gastrointestinal tract cancer treated with whole brain radiation therapy:Prognostic factors and survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susanne Bartelt; Felix Momm; Christian Weissenberger; Johannes Lutterbach

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To identify the prognostic factors with regard to survival for patients with brain metastasis from primary tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.METHODS: Nine hundred and sixteen patients with brain metastases, treated with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) between January 1985 and December 2000 at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Freiburg, were analyzed retrospectively.RESULTS: Fifty-seven patients presented with a primary tumor of the gastrointestinal tract (esophagus: n = 0, stomach:n = 10, colorectal: n = 47). Twenty-six patients had a solitary brain metastasis, 31 patients presented with multiple brain metastases. Surgical resection was performed in 25 patients.WBRTwas applied with daily fractions of 2 Gray (Gy) or 3 Gy to a total dose of 50 Gy or 30 Gy, respectively. The interval between diagnoses of the primary tumors and brain metastases was 22.6 mo vs8.0 mo for patients with primary tumors of the colon/rectum vs other primary tumors,respectively (P<0.01, log-rank). Median overall survival for all patients with brain metastases (n = 916) was 3.4 mo and 3.2 mo for patients with gastrointestinal neoplasms.Patients with gastrointestinal primary tumors presented significantly more often with a solitary brain metastasis than patients with other primary tumors (P<0.05, log-rank). In patients with gastrointestinal neoplasms (n = 57), the median overall survival was 5.8 mo for patients with solitary brain metastasis vs 2.7 mo for patients with multiple brain metastases (P<0.01, log-rank). The median overall survival for patients with a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥70was 5.5 mo vs2.1 mo for patients with KPS <70 (P<0.01,log-rank). At multivariate analysis (Cox Model) the performance status and the number of brain metastases were identified as independent prognostic factors for overall survival.CONCLUSION: Brain metastases occur late in the course of gastrointestinal tumors. Pretherapeutic variables like KPS and the

  13. Patterns of failure and survival in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maklad AM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed Marzouk Maklad,1,2 Yasser Bayoumi,2,3 Mohamed Abdalazez Senosy Hassan,2,4 AbuSaleh A Elawadi,5,6 Hussain AlHussain,2 Ashraf Elyamany,7,8 Saleh F Aldhahri,9 Khalid Hussain Al-Qahtani,10 Mubarak AlQahtani,11 Mutahir A Tunio12 1Clinical Oncology, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt; 2Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3Radiation Oncology, NCI, Cairo University, Cairo, 4Radiation Oncology, Minia Oncology Center, Minia, 5Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt; 6Medical Physics, Comprehensive Cancer Center, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 7Medical Oncology, SECI-Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt; 8Medical Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, King Fahad Medical City, 9Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, King Saud University, 10Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, King Saud University, 11Department of ENT, King Fahad Medical City, 12Radiation Oncology, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: We aimed to investigate the patterns of failure (locoregional and distant metastasis, associated factors, and treatment outcomes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT combined with chemotherapy. Patients and methods: From April 2006 to December 2011, 68 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients were treated with IMRT and chemotherapy at our hospital. Median radiation doses delivered to gross tumor volume and positive neck nodes were 66–70 Gy, 63 Gy to clinical target volume, and 50.4–56 Gy to clinically negative neck. The clinical toxicities, patterns of failures, locoregional control, distant metastasis control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were observed. Results: The median follow-up time was 52.2 months (range: 11–87 months. Epstein–Barr virus infection was positive in 63.2% of

  14. Risk of hypothyroidism among patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with radiation therapy: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chao-Yueh; Lin, Chun-Shu; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Huang, Wen-Yen; Su, Yu-Fu; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Tsai, I-Ju; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the incidence and risk of hypothyroidism among patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) after radiation therapy (RT). We identified 14,893 NPC patients and 16,105 other head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with RT without thyroidectomy from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan between 2000 and 2011. Each NPC patient was randomly frequency-matched with four individuals without NPC by age, sex, and index year. Competing-risk regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of hypothyroidism requiring thyroxin associated with NPC after RT. The risk of developing hypothyroidism was significantly higher in the NPC cohort than in the matched cohort (adjusted HR=14.35, 95% CI=11.85-17.37) and the HNC cohort (adjusted HR=2.06, 95% CI=1.69-2.52). Independent risk factors for hypothyroidism among NPC patients included younger age, female sex, higher urbanization level, autoimmune disease, and receipt of chemotherapy. The risk of hypothyroidism requiring thyroxin was significantly higher in NPC patients after RT than in the general Taiwanese population and HNC patients. Regular clinical and serum thyroid function tests are essential among NPC survivors after RT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Expansive hematoma in delayed cerebral radiation necrosis in patients treated with T-DM1: a report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuya, Koichi; Watanabe, Junichiro; Nakasu, Yoko; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Harada, Hideyuki; Ito, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Multiple new targeted agents have been developed for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) – positive breast cancer. Patients with HER2– positive breast cancer will develop brain metastases with greater incidence than patients with non-HER2 cancers, and many of them will undergo stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or other CNS radiotherapy. The interaction between radiation effects and new targeted agents is not well understood. We report two cases suggesting a novel adverse effect of T-DM1 (trastuzumab emtansine) on symptomatic enlargement of radiation necrosis (RN) after SRS. Two patients with HER2-positive breast cancer had received SRS for single brain metastasis more than 5-years ago. They had been heavily treated for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (trastuzumab and pacritaxel, lapatinib and capecitabine). They initiated T-DM1 therapy for progressive systematic disease 5.5 years after stereotactic irradiation, when a small RN was recognized on brain MR images of each patient. The RN lesions increased in size and became symptomatic during 13 or 14 months of T-DM1 treatment. The patients underwent surgical resection of the lesion. Pathological examination revealed necrosis, hematoma, granulation tissue and telangiectasia without neoplastic cells. A potential enhancement of RN by T-DM1 in the brain may be one of important adverse events associated with the use of T-DM1 for patients after SRS. These cases highlight the need of careful follow-up when combining new systemic targeted therapies and SRS for brain metastases

  16. Increased Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With a Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitor (VEGFI) After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barney, Brandon M., E-mail: barney.brandon@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Markovic, Svetomir N. [Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Laack, Nadia N.; Miller, Robert C.; Sarkaria, Jann N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Macdonald, O. Kenneth [Therapeutic Radiologists Incorporated, Kansas City, Kansas (United States); Bauer, Heather J.; Olivier, Kenneth R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Gastrointestinal injury occurs rarely with agents that affect the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and with abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). We explored the incidence of serious bowel injury (SBI) in patients treated with SBRT with or without vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor (VEGFI) therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six patients with 84 primary or metastatic intra-abdominal lesions underwent SBRT (median dose, 50 Gy in 5 fractions). Of the patients, 20 (26%) received VEGFI within 2 years after SBRT (bevacizumab, n=14; sorafenib, n=4; pazopanib, n=1; sunitinib, n=1). The incidence of SBI (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0, grade 3-5 ulceration or perforation) after SBRT was obtained, and the relationship between SBI and VEGFI was examined. Results: In the combined population, 7 patients (9%) had SBI at a median of 4.6 months (range, 3-17 months) from SBRT. All 7 had received VEGFI before SBI and within 13 months of completing SBRT, and 5 received VEGFI within 3 months of SBRT. The 6-month estimate of SBI in the 26 patients receiving VEGFI within 3 months of SBRT was 38%. No SBIs were noted in the 63 patients not receiving VEGFI. The log–rank test showed a significant correlation between SBI and VEGFI within 3 months of SBRT (P=.0006) but not between SBI and radiation therapy bowel dose (P=.20). Conclusions: The combination of SBRT and VEGFI results in a higher risk of SBI than would be expected with either treatment independently. Local therapies other than SBRT may be considered if a patient is likely to receive a VEGFI in the near future.

  17. Medulloblastoma: long-term results for patients treated with definitive radiation therapy during the computed tomography era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Wang, M.-H.; Haida, Toni; Lindsley, Karen L.; Finlay, Jonathan; Dunkel, Ira J.; Rosenblum, Marc K.; Leibel, Steven A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: We performed a retrospective evaluation of the patterns of failure and outcome for medulloblastoma patients treated with craniospinal irradiation therapy during the computed tomography (CT) era. Materials and Methods: The records of 100 patients treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1979 and 1994 were reviewed. CT scans or magnetic resonance imaging were used to guide surgical intervention and evaluate the extent of resection postoperatively. All patients were treated with conventional fractionation (1.8 Gy/day) and the majority received full-dose neuraxis radiation therapy and > 50 Gy to the primary site. Results: With a median follow-up of 100 months, the median, 5-year, and 10-year actuarial overall survival for the entire group were 58 months, 50%, and 25%, respectively. The median, 5- and 10-year actuarial disease-free survivals were 37 months, 41%, and 27%, respectively. Patients with localized disease (no evidence of disease beyond the primary site) had significantly improved overall (p < 0.02) and disease-free (p < 0.02) survivals compared to those with non localized disease. For patients with localized disease, the 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 59% and 31%, whereas the disease-free survivals were 49% and 31%, respectively. Disease-free and overall survivals at similar intervals for patients with non localized disease were 29% and 30% (5 years), and 29% and 20% (10 years), respectively. Sixty-four of 100 patients failed treatment. Local failure as any component of first failure occurred in 35% of patients or 55% (35 of 64) of all failures and as the only site of first failure in 14% or 22% (14 of 64) of all failures. For patients presenting with localized disease (n = 68), local failure as any component of first failure occurred in 32% (22 of 68) and in 18% (12 of 68) as the only site. A multivariate analysis showed that M stage was the only prognostic factor to influence overall survival. For disease-free survival

  18. Ototoxicity evaluation in medulloblastoma patients treated with involved field boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT): a retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Wilson Albieri; Nadalin, Wladimir; Odone Filho, Vicente; Petrilli, Antonio Sergio; Weltman, Eduardo; Chen, Michael Jenwei; Silva, Nasjla Saba da; Cappellano, Andrea Maria; Pereira, Liliane Desgualdo; Gonçalves, Maria Ines Rabelo; Ferrigno, Robson; Hanriot, Rodrigo Morais

    2014-01-01

    Ototoxicity is a known side effect of combined radiation therapy and cisplatin chemotherapy for the treatment of medulloblastoma. The delivery of an involved field boost by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may reduce the dose to the inner ear when compared with conventional radiotherapy. The dose of cisplatin may also affect the risk of ototoxicity. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the impact of involved field boost using IMRT and cisplatin dose on the rate of ototoxicity. Data from 41 medulloblastoma patients treated with IMRT were collected. Overall and disease-free survival rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method Hearing function was graded according to toxicity criteria of Pediatric Oncology Group (POG). Doses to inner ear and total cisplatin dose were correlated with hearing function by univariate and multivariate data analysis. After a mean follow-up of 44 months (range: 14 to 72 months), 37 patients remained alive, with two recurrences, both in spine with CSF involvement, resulting in a disease free-survival and overall survival of 85.2% and 90.2%, respectively. Seven patients (17%) experienced POG Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Cisplatin dose was a significant factor for hearing loss in univariate analysis (p < 0.03). In multivariate analysis, median dose to inner ear was significantly associated with hearing loss (p < 0.01). POG grade 3 and 4 toxicity were uncommon with median doses to the inner ear bellow 42 Gy (p < 0.05) and total cisplatin dose of less than 375 mg/m 2 (p < 0.01). IMRT leads to a low rate of severe ototoxicity. Median radiation dose to auditory apparatus should be kept below 42 Gy. Cisplatin doses should not exceed 375 mg/m 2

  19. Skin dose for head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy(IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hsiao-Ju; Li, Chi-Wei; Tsai, Wei-Ta; Chang, Chih-Chia; Tsang, Yuk-Wah

    2017-11-01

    The reliability of thermoluminescent dosimeters (ultrathin TLD) and ISP Gafchromic EBT2 film to measure the surface dose in phantom and the skin dose in head-and-neck patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique(IMRT) is the research focus. Seven-field treatment plans with prescribed dose of 180 cGy were performed on Eclipse treatment planning system which utilized pencil beam calculation algorithm(PBC). In calibration tests, the variance coefficient of the ultrathin TLDs were within 3%. The points on the calibration curve of the Gafchromic film was within 1% variation. Five measurements were taken on phantom using ultrathin TLD and EBT2 film respectively. The measured mean surface doses between ultrathin TLD or EBT2 film were within 5% deviation. Skin doses of 6 patients were measured for initial 5 fractions and the mean dose per-fraction was calculated. If the extrapolated doses for 30 fractions were below 4000 cGy, the skin reaction grading observed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) was either grade 1 or grade 2. If surface dose exceeded 5000 cGy in 32 fractions, then grade 3 skin reactions were observed.

  20. Post-radiation mucocele in two patients treated for nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mnejja, M.; Hammami, B.; Achour, I.; Chakroun, A.; Charfeddine, I.; Ghorbel, A.; Frikha, M.; Daoud, J.

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman, with a history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which was treated by radiotherapy nine years previously, presented with occasional diplopia and recent headaches. A nasopharyngeal biopsy showed no recurrence. The imaging revealed a sphenoidal sinus mucocele. Endoscopic marsupialization of the mucocele allowed clinical improvement. A 56-year-old woman presented, five years after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, with a fronto-orbital mass. CT-scan revealed a fronto-ethmoidal mucocele. Nasopharyngeal biopsy showed tumour recurrence. Marsupialization of mucocele was performed. Recurrence of the carcinoma was treated by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Sphenoidal sinus mucocele developing after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma has rarely been reported. CT scan and MRI are useful tools in making the diagnosis. Biopsy is required to diagnose recurrence or associated radio-induced tumor. Endoscopic approach gives good results. (authors)

  1. Survival of nonsurgically staged patients with negative lymphangiograms who had Stage IIB carcinoma of the cervix treated by pelvic radiation plus hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piver, M.S.; Krishnamsetty, R.M.; Emrich, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty patients with Stage IIB carcinoma of the cervix who did not undergo pretherapy para-aortic lymphadenectomy, but who had negative preradiation therapy lymphangiograms, were treated with pelvic radiation plus hydroxyurea. Patients received a median of 5020 rads of pelvic radiation plus 4000 rads of radium to point A. During radiation therapy and for a total of 12 weeks, patients received hydroxyurea administered at a dose of 80 mg/kg of body weight every 3 days if the white blood cell count was greater than or equal to 2,500/mm3 and platelets were greater than or equal to 75,000/mm3. The median follow-up time was 28 months (6 to 83 months). The estimated 5-year survival rate was 92%. Seventeen patients are alive with no evidence of disease (median, 28 months); one died of intercurrent disease with no evidence of disease (17 months); one is alive with no evidence of disease after recurrence (18 months); and one died of cervical cancer (22 months). The survival rate of patients with nonsurgically staged negative pretherapy lymphangiograms who had Stage IIB cervical cancer treated by pelvic radiation therapy plus hydroxyurea approximated the improved survival rate reported for patients with negative pretherapy para-aortic lymphadenectomy who were treated with pelvic radiation therapy plus hydroxyurea. Both studies would suggest that pelvic radiation plus hydroxyurea improves the rate of survival in patients with Stage IIB cervical cancer

  2. Long-term follow-up observation of patients with chronic radiation sickness due to external irradiation treated with thymopeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shenyong; Sun Wenji; Zhang Aizhen; Ye Anfang

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To provide the clinical data and prognosis judgement, the authors observed the results and progression of 11 cases of chronic radiation sickness due to external irradiation treated with thymopeptide. Methods: The clinical symptoms, hematopoiesis, T lymphocyte percentage and chromosome aberration rate were used as the judgement indexes for recovery from the chronic radiation sickness. Results: Thymopeptide treatment greatly improved the neurasthenic syndrome and increased the T lymphocyte percentage (P 0.05), and improvement of neurasthenic syndrome occurred 3.5 years after they left radiation work or diminished the exposure level. 5 to 8 years after, bone marrow hematopoiesis also restored to the normal level. However, the chromosome aberration rate restored to the normal level 10 years after. Conclusion: According to the judgement criteria, the chronic radiation sickness due to external radiation exposure can recover and thymopeptide is a helpful and simple means to treat it

  3. Radiation pneumonitis in non‑small‑cell lung cancer patients treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: We found that ... lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who underwent radiotherapy with HT in our ..... might have a different effect on lung toxicity in the subject undergoing the ...

  4. SU-F-T-117: A Pilot Study of Organ Dose Reconstruction for Wilms Tumor Patients Treated with Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makkia, R; Pelletier, C; Jung, J [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Gopalakrishnan, M [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mille, M; Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Kalapurakal, J [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To reconstruct major organ doses for the Wilms tumor pediatric patients treated with radiation therapy using pediatric computational phantoms, treatment planning system (TPS), and Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation methods. Methods: A total of ten female and male pediatric patients (15–88 months old) were selected from the National Wilms Tumor Study cohort and ten pediatric computational phantoms corresponding to the patient’s height and weight were selected for the organ dose reconstruction. Treatment plans were reconstructed on the computational phantoms in a Pinnacle TPS (v9.10) referring to treatment records and exported into DICOM-RT files, which were then used to generate the input files for XVMC MC code. The mean doses to major organs and the dose received by 50% of the heart were calculated and compared between TPS and MC calculations. The same calculations were conducted by replacing the computational human phantoms with a series of diagnostic patient CT images selected by matching the height and weight of the patients to validate the anatomical accuracy of the computational phantoms. Results: Dose to organs located within the treatment fields from the computational phantoms and the diagnostic patient CT images agreed within 2% for all cases for both TPS and MC calculations. The maximum difference of organ doses was 55.9 % (thyroid), but the absolute dose difference in this case was 0.33 Gy which was 0.96% of the prescription dose. The doses to ovaries and testes from MC in out-of-field provided more discrepancy (the maximum difference of 13.2% and 50.8%, respectively). The maximum difference of the 50% heart volume dose between the phantoms and the patient CT images was 40.0%. Conclusion: This study showed the pediatric computational phantoms are applicable to organ doses reconstruction for the radiotherapy patients whose three-dimensional radiological images are not available.

  5. Evidence for increased failure in patients with perineural invasion treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, S.R.; Hanlon, A.L.; Lee, W.R.; Movsas, B.; Al-Saleem, T.I.; Hanks, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The detection of perineural invasion (PNI) on diagnostic transrectal biopsy of the prostate is associated with a 93% frequency of extracapsular disease extension in patients treated by prostatectomy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. This finding is associated with a worse outcome compared with those who have organ confined disease. This study examines the association of PNI and treatment failure in a consecutive series of patients treated by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) alone. Materials and Methods: We report actuarial biochemical NED (bNED) survival rates for 484 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer diagnosed by transrectal needle biopsy who have completed 3DCRT alone between May 1989 and December 1994. The median follow-up time is 28 months (range 2-75 months), and median dose to the center of the prostate was 7368 cGy (range 6316-8074 cGy). Patients were subdivided into two groups according to pretreatment PSA levels (<20 ngm/ml vs ≥20 ngm/ml). Pathology records were reviewed for the presence or absence of PNI. bNED failure is defined as PSA ≥ 1.5 ngm/ml and rising on two consecutive values. bNED survival rates were calculated using Kaplan-Meier methodology and comparisons of survival curves were accomplished using the log-rank test. Results: There was no difference in the bNED survival rates for all patients, or for the subgroup of patients with pretreatment PSA values ≥20. However, figure 1 shows the bNED survival rates for patients with pretreatment PSA below 20 ngm/ml based on PNI. This subgroup demonstrates a highly significant decrease in bNED survival (65% vs 88% at 3 yrs, 39% vs 65% at 5 yrs; p=.0009 for overall curve comparison) if PNI is present. For patients with pretreatment PSA below 20 ngm/ml, multivariate analysis of prognostic variables demonstrated a significant association between bNED survival and PNI (p=.04), Gleason score (p=.02) and pretreatment PSA (p=.003

  6. Dose-volume histogram analysis as predictor of radiation pneumonitis in primary lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, Michael; Tan, Alex; Fisher, Richard; Mac Manus, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Ball, David

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between various parameters derived from lung dose-volume histogram analysis and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients undergoing radical radiotherapy for primary lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 156 patients with lung cancer who had been treated with radical radiotherapy (≥45 Gy) and for whom dose-volume histogram data were available were reviewed. The incidence of symptomatic RP was correlated with a variety of parameters derived from the dose-volume histogram data, including the volume of lung receiving 10 Gy (V 10 ) through 50 Gy (V 50 ) and the mean lung dose (MLD). Results: The rate of RP at 6 months was 15% (95% confidence interval 9-22%). On univariate analysis, only V 30 (p = 0.036) and MLD (p = 0.043) were statistically significantly related to RP. V 30 correlated highly positively with MLD (r = 0.96, p 30 and MLD can be used to predict the risk of RP in lung cancer patients undergoing radical radiotherapy

  7. Dosimetric verification for primary focal hypermetabolism of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yong; Wang, Jia-Yang; Li, Liang; Tang, Tian-You; Liu, Gui-Hong; Wang, Jian-She; Xu, Yu-Mei; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Long-Zhen

    2012-01-01

    To make sure the feasibility with (18F)FDG PET/CT to guided dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients, by dosimetric verification before treatment. Chose 11 patients in III~IVA nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with functional image-guided IMRT and absolute and relative dosimetric verification by Varian 23EX LA, ionization chamber, 2DICA of I'mRT Matrixx and IBA detachable phantom. Drawing outline and making treatment plan were by different imaging techniques (CT and (18F)FDG PET/CT). The dose distributions of the various regional were realized by SMART. The absolute mean errors of interest area were 2.39%±0.66 using 0.6 cc ice chamber. Results using DTA method, the average relative dose measurements within our protocol (3%, 3 mm) were 87.64% at 300 MU/min in all filed. Dosimetric verification before IMRT is obligatory and necessary. Ionization chamber and 2DICA of I'mRT Matrixx was the effective dosimetric verification tool for primary focal hyper metabolism in functional image-guided dynamic IMRT for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Our preliminary evidence indicates that functional image-guided dynamic IMRT is feasible.

  8. Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.klein@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jiang, Haiyan [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kim, John; Dinniwell, Rob; Brierley, James; Wong, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lockwood, Gina [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ringash, Jolie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate quality of life (QoL), an important outcome owing to poor long-term survival, after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the liver. Methods and Materials: Patients (n=222) with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), liver metastases, or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and Child-Pugh A liver function received 24-60 Gy of 6-fraction image-guided SBRT. Prospective QoL assessment was completed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) and/or Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep, version 4) questionnaires at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Ten HCC patients with Child-Pugh B liver function were also treated. Results: The QLQ-C30 was available for 205 patients, and 196 completed the FACT-Hep. No difference in baseline QoL (P=.17) or overall survival (P=.088) was seen between the HCC, liver metastases, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients. Appetite loss and fatigue measured by the QLQ-C30 clinically and statistically worsened by 1 month after treatment but recovered by 3 months. At 3 and 12 months after treatment, respectively, the FACT-Hep score had improved relative to baseline in 13%/19%, worsened in 36%/27%, and remained stable in 51%/54%. Using the QLQ-C30 Global Health score, QoL improved in 16%/23%, worsened in 34%/39%, and remained stable in 50%/38% at 3 and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 17.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.3-19.8 months). Higher baseline scores on both FACT-Hep and QLQ-C30 Global Health were associated with improved survival. Hazard ratios for death, per 10-unit decrease in QoL, were 0.90 (95% CI 0.83-0.98; P=.001) and 0.88 (95% CI 0.82-0.95; P=.001), respectively. Tumor size was inversely correlated with survival. Conclusions: Liver SBRT temporarily worsens appetite and fatigue, but not overall QoL. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is well tolerated and warrants

  9. Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Jonathan; Dawson, Laura A.; Jiang, Haiyan; Kim, John; Dinniwell, Rob; Brierley, James; Wong, Rebecca; Lockwood, Gina; Ringash, Jolie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate quality of life (QoL), an important outcome owing to poor long-term survival, after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the liver. Methods and Materials: Patients (n=222) with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), liver metastases, or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and Child-Pugh A liver function received 24-60 Gy of 6-fraction image-guided SBRT. Prospective QoL assessment was completed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) and/or Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep, version 4) questionnaires at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Ten HCC patients with Child-Pugh B liver function were also treated. Results: The QLQ-C30 was available for 205 patients, and 196 completed the FACT-Hep. No difference in baseline QoL (P=.17) or overall survival (P=.088) was seen between the HCC, liver metastases, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients. Appetite loss and fatigue measured by the QLQ-C30 clinically and statistically worsened by 1 month after treatment but recovered by 3 months. At 3 and 12 months after treatment, respectively, the FACT-Hep score had improved relative to baseline in 13%/19%, worsened in 36%/27%, and remained stable in 51%/54%. Using the QLQ-C30 Global Health score, QoL improved in 16%/23%, worsened in 34%/39%, and remained stable in 50%/38% at 3 and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 17.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.3-19.8 months). Higher baseline scores on both FACT-Hep and QLQ-C30 Global Health were associated with improved survival. Hazard ratios for death, per 10-unit decrease in QoL, were 0.90 (95% CI 0.83-0.98; P=.001) and 0.88 (95% CI 0.82-0.95; P=.001), respectively. Tumor size was inversely correlated with survival. Conclusions: Liver SBRT temporarily worsens appetite and fatigue, but not overall QoL. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is well tolerated and warrants

  10. Neuroimaging and neuropsychological follow-up study in a pediatric brain tumor patient treated with surgery and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Adam T; Martin, Rebecca B; Ozturk, Arzu; Kates, Wendy R; Wharam, Moody D; Mahone, E Mark; Horska, Alena

    2010-02-01

    Intracranial tumors are the most common neoplasms of childhood, accounting for approximately 20% of all pediatric malignancies. Radiation therapy has led directly to significant increases in survival of children with certain types of intracranial tumors; however, given the aggressive nature of this therapy, children are at risk for exhibiting changes in brain structure, neuronal biochemistry, and neurocognitive functioning. In this case report, we present neuropsychological, magnetic resonance imaging, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, and diffusion tensor imaging data for two adolescents (one patient with ependymal spinal cord tumor with intracranial metastases, and one healthy, typically developing control) from three time points as defined by the patient's radiation schedule (baseline before the patient's radiation therapy, 6 months following completion of the patient's radiation, and 27 months following the patient's radiation). In the patient, there were progressive decreases in gray and white matter volumes as well as early decreases in mean N-acetyl aspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) ratios and fractional anisotropy (FA) in regions with normal appearance on conventional MRI. At the last follow-up, NAA/Cho and FA tended to change in the direction to normal values in selected regions. At the same time, the patient had initial reduction in language and motor skills, followed by return to baseline, but later onset delay in visuospatial and visual perceptual skills. Results are discussed in terms of sensitivity of the four techniques to early and late effects of treatment, and avenues for future investigations.

  11. Prevention and control of sequels in the mouth of patients treated with radiation therapy for head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Maria de Fatima Aparecida; Novikoff, Silviene; Tresso, Adriana; Segreto, Roberto Araujo; Cervantes, Onivaldo

    2005-01-01

    Surgery and radiation therapy are de main treatments for head and neck cancer. The side effects of the interaction of ionizing radiation on the tissues include dermatitis, mucositis, xerostomia, candidiasis, dysgeusia, dysphagia, caries, trismus, osteoradionecrosis. Objective: To assess dental condition of the patients using a protocol which allows avoiding or reducing the effects of radiation in the tissues of the oral cavity. Materials And Methods: Dental follow-up was performed before, during and up to 180 days after radiation therapy in 12 patients submitted to surgery and radiation therapy or radiation therapy alone. Results: The proportion of effects such as dermatitis, mucositis, dysgeusia, and dysphagia increased from the second week of the treatment until the end of the administrations. There was a clear decrease at the end of the treatment which was close to baseline values after 180 days. The reduction of xerostomia was slower and less effective. No case of caries, trismus, and osteoradionecrosis were observed during the assessment period. Conclusion: Regular dental follow-up associated with preventive measures such as prophylactic management of dental and oral diseases, adequate hygiene, mouth-washing with bicarbonate water and chamomile tea, and topic fluorine application contributed to improve the recovery conditions of patients with cancer of head and neck submitted to radiation therapy. (author)

  12. The Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) in patients treated with external beam radiation therapy: Evaluation and optimization in patients at higher risk of relapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halverson, Schuyler; Schipper, Matthew; Blas, Kevin; Lee, Vivien; Sabolch, Aaron; Olson, Karin; Sandler, Howard M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) was developed to predict freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) following radical prostatectomy (RP). Its utility following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has not been externally evaluated. Methods: A retrospective study of 612 patients treated with dose-escalated EBRT at University of Michigan Medical Center. Results: Compared to the derivation cohort, EBRT treated patients had higher-risk disease (28% with CAPRA of 6–10 vs. 5%, respectively). A total of 114 patients (19%) had BF with 5-year BF ranging from 7% with CAPRA 0–3 to 35% with CAPRA 7–10. For RT patients the risk of BF at 5-year was similar to 4 surgical cohorts for CAPRA scores 0–2 but lower for all CAPRA scores ⩾ 3. The difference favoring RT increased with increasing CAPRA score reaching a 27–50% absolute improved at 5-years for CAPRA scores of 6–10. On multivariate analysis each CAPRA point increased the risk of BF (p < 0.0001) while Gleason pattern 5 in the biopsy also increased BF (p = 0.01) and long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) significantly reduced the risk of BF (p = 0.015). Conclusions: Compared to surgical series the risk of BF was lower with dose-escalated EBRT with the greatest difference at the highest CAPRA scores.

  13. Radiation protection of people in contact with patient treated with metabolic radiotherapy using iodine-131 in nuclear medicine - case of the Laboratoire des Radio-Isotopes(LRI) Anpandrianomby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAMAROJAONA, H.

    2008-01-01

    In the aim to propose recommendations for radiation protection of those in contact with patients, simulations were performed for restricting the radiation hazards to the family and the members of the public coming into contact with a patient treated with 131 Iode for a thyroid pathology. The simulated dose constraint was 0,3 mSv for the family. According to the regulation in radiation protection in Madagascar, annual dose limit for the public is 1mSv and 20 mSv for the workers. Several contact patterns were tested: contact to the workers, daily visits, public transports, return to work, sleeping with partner and close contact with children. The recommendations duration was evaluated both as a function of the administered activity (out-patient) or the residual activity (discharged inpatient) by measuring the dose rate at 1 m distance from the patient. [fr

  14. Sexual Functioning Among Endometrial Cancer Patients Treated With Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Intra-Vaginal Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damast, Shari, E-mail: shari.damast@yale.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldfarb, Shari [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Eaton, Anne; Patil, Sujata [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mosenkis, Jeffrey [Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bennett, Antonia [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Atkinson, Thomas [Department of Psychiatry, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jewell, Elizabeth; Leitao, Mario; Barakat, Richard; Carter, Jeanne [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Basch, Ethan [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: We used the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD) and factors associated with diminished sexual functioning in early stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with simple hysterectomy and adjuvant brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 104 patients followed in a radiation oncology clinic completed questionnaires to quantify current levels of sexual functioning. The time interval between hysterectomy and questionnaire completion ranged from <6 months to >5 years. Multivariate regression was performed using the FSFI as a continuous variable (score range, 1.2-35.4). SD was defined as an FSFI score of <26, based on the published validation study. Results: SD was reported by 81% of respondents. The mean ({+-} standard deviation) domain scores in order of highest-to-lowest functioning were: satisfaction, 2.9 ({+-}2.0); orgasm, 2.5 ({+-}2.4); desire, 2.4 ({+-}1.3); arousal, 2.2 ({+-}2.0); dryness, 2.1 ({+-}2.1); and pain, 1.9 ({+-}2.3). Compared to the index population in which the FSFI cut-score was validated (healthy women ages 18-74), all scores were low. Compared to published scores of a postmenopausal population, scores were not statistically different. Multivariate analysis isolated factors associated with lower FSFI scores, including having laparotomy as opposed to minimally invasive surgery (effect size, -7.1 points; 95% CI, -11.2 to -3.1; P<.001), lack of vaginal lubricant use (effect size, -4.4 points; 95% CI, -8.7 to -0.2, P=.040), and short time interval (<6 months) from hysterectomy to questionnaire completion (effect size, -4.6 points; 95% CI, -9.3-0.2; P=.059). Conclusions: The rate of SD, as defined by an FSFI score <26, was prevalent. The postmenopausal status of EC patients alone is a known risk factor for SD. Additional factors associated with poor sexual functioning following treatment for EC included receipt of laparotomy and lack of vaginal lubricant use.

  15. Sexual Functioning Among Endometrial Cancer Patients Treated With Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Intra-Vaginal Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damast, Shari; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Goldfarb, Shari; Eaton, Anne; Patil, Sujata; Mosenkis, Jeffrey; Bennett, Antonia; Atkinson, Thomas; Jewell, Elizabeth; Leitao, Mario; Barakat, Richard; Carter, Jeanne; Basch, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We used the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD) and factors associated with diminished sexual functioning in early stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with simple hysterectomy and adjuvant brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 104 patients followed in a radiation oncology clinic completed questionnaires to quantify current levels of sexual functioning. The time interval between hysterectomy and questionnaire completion ranged from 5 years. Multivariate regression was performed using the FSFI as a continuous variable (score range, 1.2-35.4). SD was defined as an FSFI score of <26, based on the published validation study. Results: SD was reported by 81% of respondents. The mean (± standard deviation) domain scores in order of highest-to-lowest functioning were: satisfaction, 2.9 (±2.0); orgasm, 2.5 (±2.4); desire, 2.4 (±1.3); arousal, 2.2 (±2.0); dryness, 2.1 (±2.1); and pain, 1.9 (±2.3). Compared to the index population in which the FSFI cut-score was validated (healthy women ages 18-74), all scores were low. Compared to published scores of a postmenopausal population, scores were not statistically different. Multivariate analysis isolated factors associated with lower FSFI scores, including having laparotomy as opposed to minimally invasive surgery (effect size, −7.1 points; 95% CI, −11.2 to −3.1; P<.001), lack of vaginal lubricant use (effect size, −4.4 points; 95% CI, −8.7 to −0.2, P=.040), and short time interval (<6 months) from hysterectomy to questionnaire completion (effect size, −4.6 points; 95% CI, −9.3-0.2; P=.059). Conclusions: The rate of SD, as defined by an FSFI score <26, was prevalent. The postmenopausal status of EC patients alone is a known risk factor for SD. Additional factors associated with poor sexual functioning following treatment for EC included receipt of laparotomy and lack of vaginal lubricant use.

  16. Radiation Therapy Risk Factors for Development of Lymphedema in Patients Treated With Regional Lymph Node Irradiation for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Ravi A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Miller, Cynthia L. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Skolny, Melissa N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Warren, Laura E.G. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Horick, Nora [Department of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jammallo, Lauren S.; Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); O' Toole, Jean [Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle C. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: We previously evaluated the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE) with the addition of regional lymph node irradiation (RLNR) and found an increased risk when RLNR is used. Here we analyze the association of technical radiation therapy (RT) factors in RLNR patients with the risk of LE development. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively screened 1476 women for LE who underwent surgery for breast cancer. Among 1507 breasts treated, 172 received RLNR and had complete technical data for analysis. RLNR was delivered as supraclavicular (SC) irradiation (69% [118 of 172 patients]) or SC plus posterior axillary boost (PAB) (31% [54 of 172]). Bilateral arm volume measurements were performed pre- and postoperatively. Patients' RT plans were analyzed for SC field lateral border (relative to the humeral head), total dose to SC, RT fraction size, beam energy, and type of tangent (normal vs wide). Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze associated risk factors for LE. Results: Median postoperative follow-up was 29.3 months (range: 4.9-74.1 months). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LE was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15%-32%) for SC and 20% (95% CI: 11%-37%) for SC plus PAB (SC+PAB). None of the analyzed variables was significantly associated with LE risk (extent of humeral head: P=.74 for <1/3 vs >2/3, P=.41 for 1/3 to 2/3 vs >2/3; P=.40 for fraction size of 1.8 Gy vs 2.0 Gy; P=.57 for beam energy 6 MV vs 10 MV; P=.74 for tangent type wide vs regular; P=.66 for SC vs SC+PAB). Only pretreatment body mass index (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15, P=.0007) and the use of axillary lymph node dissection (HR: 7.08, 95% CI: 0.98-51.40, P=.05) were associated with risk of subsequent LE development. Conclusions: Of the RT parameters tested, none was associated with an increased risk of LE development. This study underscores the need for future work investigating alternative RLNR risk factors for LE.

  17. Systemic effects of ionizing radiation at the proteome and metabolome levels in the blood of cancer patients treated with radiotherapy: the influence of inflammation and radiation toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelonek, Karol; Pietrowska, Monika; Widlak, Piotr

    2017-07-01

    Blood is the most common replacement tissue used to study systemic responses of organisms to different types of pathological conditions and environmental insults. Local irradiation during cancer radiotherapy induces whole body responses that can be observed at the blood proteome and metabolome levels. Hence, comparative blood proteomics and metabolomics are emerging approaches used in the discovery of radiation biomarkers. These techniques enable the simultaneous measurement of hundreds of molecules and the identification of sets of components that can discriminate different physiological states of the human body. Radiation-induced changes are affected by the dose and volume of irradiated tissues; hence, the molecular composition of blood is a hypothetical source of biomarkers for dose assessment and the prediction and monitoring of systemic responses to radiation. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview on the available evidence regarding molecular responses to ionizing radiation detected at the level of the human blood proteome and metabolome. It focuses on patients exposed to radiation during cancer radiotherapy and emphasizes effects related to radiation-induced toxicity and inflammation. Systemic responses to radiation detected at the blood proteome and metabolome levels are primarily related to the intensity of radiation-induced toxicity, including inflammatory responses. Thus, several inflammation-associated molecules can be used to monitor or even predict radiation-induced toxicity. However, these abundant molecular features have a rather limited applicability as universal biomarkers for dose assessment, reflecting the individual predisposition of the immune system and tissue-specific mechanisms involved in radiation-induced damage.

  18. [Formula: see text]Working memory and attention in pediatric brain tumor patients treated with and without radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghubar, Kimberly P; Mahone, E Mark; Yeates, Keith Owen; Cecil, Kim M; Makola, Monwabisi; Ris, M Douglas

    2017-08-01

    Children are at risk for cognitive difficulties following the diagnosis and treatment of a brain tumor. Longitudinal studies have consistently demonstrated declines on measures of intellectual functioning, and recently it has been proposed that specific neurocognitive processes underlie these changes, including working memory, processing speed, and attention. However, a fine-grained examination of the affected neurocognitive processes is required to inform intervention efforts. Radiation therapy (RT) impacts white matter integrity, likely affecting those cognitive processes supported by distributed neural networks. This study examined working memory and attention in children during the early delayed stages of recovery following surgical resection and RT. The participants included 27 children diagnosed with pediatric brain tumor, treated with (n = 12) or without (n = 15) RT, who completed experimental and standardized measures of working memory and attention (n-back and digit span tasks). Children treated with radiation performed less well than those who did not receive radiation on the n-back measure, though performance at the 0-back level was considerably poorer than would be expected for both groups, perhaps suggesting difficulties with more basic processes such as vigilance. Along these lines, marginal differences were noted on digit span forward. The findings are discussed with respect to models of attention and working memory, and the interplay between the two.

  19. Contralateral breast cancer and other second malignancies in patients treated by breast-conserving therapy with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, J.M.; Amalric, R.; Brandone, H.; Ayme, Y.; Spitalier, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Metachronous contralateral breast cancers and other second malignancies were evaluated in 2,850 patients treated between 1960 and 1981 primarily with radiotherapy (RT) either alone or following breast-conserving surgery. One hundred eighty-four contralateral cancers were observed in 22,491 patient-years of observation (818 per 10(5) patient-years), with a cumulative probability of 4.5% at 5, 7.9% at 10, and 11% at 15 and 20 years. Compared to patients with unilateral tumors, those destined to develop contralateral cancers were younger (mean age 51.9 vs 56.6) and more often gave a family history of breast cancer. Contralateral breast cancers were more frequent for more extensive tumors (T3 10% vs T1-26%; with inflammatory signs 10.6% without 6%), and in patients with ipsilateral local recurrence (with 9.1%, without 5.6%). Patients with contralateral cancers had a significantly less favorable survival experience (15-year actuarial survival after primary therapy 42%) than patients without contralateral cancer (15-year survival 65.5%). In early stage patients treated with conservative surgery and RT, contralateral cancer was not prognostically more favorable than ipsilateral breast recurrence. Among 72 other second malignancies (320 per 10(5) patient-years) were 2 soft tissue sarcomas in the irradiated area. This corresponds to an incidence of 21 cases per 10(5) patient-years for survivors beyond the fifth year. The possible influence of RT on contralateral cancers and other second malignancies is discussed

  20. Association between skin phototype and radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Suntan reaction could be a good predictor for radiation pigmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Nishimura, Takuya; Kobayashi, Kana; Tsubokura, Takuji; Kodani, Naohiro; Aibe, Norihiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Yoshida, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of skin phototype (suntan or sunburn type) in association with radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer who underwent postoperative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery because phototype could predict sunlight reaction. We divided patients into two phototypes (58 suntan/darkening and 28 sunburn/reddening types) according to self-reports before radiotherapy. We examined skin color changes in 86 patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery followed by 50 Gy/25 fractions (median) of radiotherapy with or without boost radiation (10 Gy/5 fractions). Color change was assessed according to CIE L*a*b* space, which is defined by the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) in 1976 for quantitative color assessment. The patients were also assessed by individual typology angle (ITA deg; indicator of skin color calculated by L*a*b* space) and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event v3.0 (CTCAE v3). Radiation therapy changed all values except the b* value, and the suntan type showed a greater darkening response associated with radiation dermatitis than did the sunburn type in terms of ITA deg value change (p=0.04), whereas the sunburn type did not show higher a* value (reddening). By CTCAE v3 classifications, a Grade 2 reaction appeared in 14% sunburn patients and in 31% of the suntan group, respectively (p=0.16). Suntan type predicted higher pigmentation associated with radiation dermatitis. Self-reported phototype has the potential to be a good predictor of skin sensitivity to radiation exposure for clinical screening. (author)

  1. Sorafenib Increases Tumor Hypoxia in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy: Results of a Phase 1 Clinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milosevic, Michael F., E-mail: mike.milosevic@rmp.uhn.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Townsley, Carol A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Chaudary, Naz [Department of Advanced Molecular Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Clarke, Blaise [Department of Pathology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Pintilie, Melania [Department of Clinical Study Coordination and Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Fan, Stacy; Glicksman, Rachel [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Haider, Masoom [Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Kim, Sunmo [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); MacKay, Helen [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Yeung, Ivan [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Hill, Richard P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Advanced Molecular Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); and others

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have shown that angiogenesis inhibition can improve response to radiation therapy (RT). The purpose of this phase 1 study was to examine the angiogenesis inhibitor sorafenib in patients with cervical cancer receiving radical RT and concurrent cisplatin (RTCT). Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with stage IB to IIIB cervical cancer participated. Sorafenib was administered daily for 7 days before the start of standard RTCT in patients with early-stage, low-risk disease and also during RTCT in patients with high-risk disease. Biomarkers of tumor vascularity, perfusion, and hypoxia were measured at baseline and again after 7 days of sorafenib alone before the start of RTCT. The median follow-up time was 4.5 years. Results: Initial complete response was seen in 12 patients. One patient died without achieving disease control, and 4 experienced recurrent disease. One patient with an extensive, infiltrative tumor experienced pelvic fistulas during treatment. The 4-year actuarial survival was 85%. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity developed in 4 patients. Sorafenib alone produced a reduction in tumor perfusion/permeability and an increase in hypoxia, which resulted in early closure of the study. Conclusions: Sorafenib increased tumor hypoxia, raising concern that it might impair rather than improve disease control when added to RTCT.

  2. Global survival in patients with glioblastoma treated with hypofractionated radiation therapy at Hospital Mexico of Costa Rica during the period from January 2010 to February 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Zamora, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Survival is analyzed in patients with glioblastoma treated with hypofractionated radiation therapy at Hospital Mexico. The characteristics of the patients are determined within the study. Survival is stableshed in patients who have received hypofractionated regimen. Functional status according to ECOG scale and Karnofsky index is known prior to radiotherapy. The degree of resection to which these patients were submitted is diagnosed before being referred to radiotherapy. The RPA scale adapted from the EORTC of patients is related to overall survival. The mean survival time of the patients have been 5,8 months, and a greater overall survival in the first 6 months. Survival has been more favorable for patients with predicted RPA IV, those older than 60 years and with a degree of complete resection [es

  3. Preliminary analysis of the risk factors for radiation pneumonitis in patients with non- small-cell lung cancer treated with concurrent erlotinib and thoracic radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang H

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hongqing Zhuang,* Hailing Hou,* Zhiyong Yuan, Jun Wang, Qingsong Pang, Lujun Zhao, Ping WangDepartment of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, and Tianjin Lung Cancer Center, Tianjin, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate radiation pneumonitis and its associated risk factors in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with concurrent erlotinib and thoracic radiotherapy.Materials and methods: We conducted an analysis of patients with nonoperable stage IIIA–IV non-small-cell lung cancer who were treated with concurrent thoracic radiotherapy and erlotinib (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00973310. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 grading system was applied to evaluate the incidence of radiation pneumonitis. The lung dosimetric parameters were recorded in accordance with the treatment plan, and the study endpoint was radiation pneumonitis at grade 2 or more.Results: Among the 24 selected clinical cases, nine were identified with radiation pneumonitis of grade 2 or above (37.5%. This included four cases with grade 2 (16.7%, two cases with grade 3 (8.3%, and three cases with grade 5 (12.5%. The results showed that the planning target volume was a significant factor affecting the incidence of radiation pneumonitis. All lung dosimetric parameters exhibited statistically significant differences between patients with pneumonitis and patients without pneumonitis. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis showed that all lung dosimetric parameters were useful in predicting the incidence of radiation pneumonitis. In addition, the threshold values of V5, V10, V15, V20, V30, and mean lung dose were >4%, >29%, >27%, >22%, >17% and >1,027 cGy, respectively.Conclusion: Special attention

  4. Assessment of radiation dermatitis using objective analysis for patients with breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Influence of body weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Kobayashi, Kana; Tsubokura, Takuji; Kodani, Naohiro; Aibe, Norihiro; Ikeno, Hiroyasu; Nishimura, Takuya; Yoshida, Ken

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of patient factors on radiation dermatitis for patients with breast cancer who underwent postoperative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. The study population comprised 87 patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery followed by 50 Gy/25 fractions (median) of radiotherapy with or without boost radiation (10 Gy/5 fractions). We examined their treated and contralateral breast skin color by use of an objective analyzer, and expressed findings as L*, a*, b* ratios by dividing by pre-radiotherapy (RT) values. Next, we examined correlation between patient factors (age, height, body weight, and body mass index, BMI) and change of L* and a* values by use of correlation coefficients. Radiation therapy caused changes in a* and L* ratios (p<0.0001) but not in b* ratio. The a* ratio (reddish) increased 1.4-fold and peaked after radiotherapy. The L* ratio (darkening) decreased by 10% and reached a minimum value between completion of radiotherapy and 1 month after treatment. Although, age and height did not affect Δ value, body weight and BMI correlated significantly with Δa* value (p=0.0012 and 0.0017) not with ΔL* value. Body weight and BMI predict degree of radiation dermatitis, and more reddish dermatitis was observed for heavier patients than for their lighter counterparts. (author)

  5. Long term follow-up in patients with four or more positive lymph nodes treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kiran; Haffty, Bruce G

    1995-07-01

    metastases-free rate of 67%, 10-year nodal recurrence-free rate of 97% and a 10-year breast recurrence-free rate of 82%. All five patients who sustained a breast relapse were successfully salvaged with mastectomy. Of the 40 patients treated to the supraclavicular fossa (omitting axillary radiation), none failed in the dissected axilla. Both patients with nodal relapses failed within the irradiated volume. With a median follow-up of 9.29 years, 29 of the 51 patients (57%) remain alive without evidence of disease, 15 (29%) have died with disease, two (4%) remain alive with disease and five (10%) have died without evidence of disease. Overall actuarial 5- and 10-year survival for these 51 patients is 86% and 58%, respectively. Conclusions: We conclude that in patients found to have four or more positive lymph nodes at the time of axillary lymph node dissection, CS+RT with standard adjuvant systemic therapy results in a realistic probability of long term survival and a high rate of local regional control with minimal morbidity. Omission of axillary radiation in this subset of patients appears appropriate since there were no axillary failures among the 41 dissected but unirradiated axillae. The favorable long term results achieved in this high risk patient population treated with CS, RT and standard systemic CTX may serve as a basis for evaluating newer more aggressive treatment programs employing dose-intensive CTX with or without bone marrow or stem cell transplantation.

  6. A comparison of physical and cytogenetic estimates of radiation dose in patients treated with iodine-131 for thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.C.; Purrott, R.J.; Dolphin, G.W.; Horton, P.W.; Halnan, K.E.; Scott, J.S.; Mair, G.

    1976-01-01

    Physical and cytogenetic estimates of the whole-body radiation doses have been compared in 11 patients receiving large doses of iodine-131 for the treatment of thyroid carcinoma. The physical estimate was based on the measurement of thyroid uptake, of the plasma activity variation, and of urinary activity. The cytogenetic estimate was obtained from the analysis of chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Good agreement between the estimates was observed in patients whose thyroid glands had previously be ablated by radioiodine. In patients who had varying degrees of thyroid function, there were considerable differences between the estimates with the cytogenetic value always being higher. It is suggested that these differences might be due in part to non-uniform irradiation of lymphocytes by local sources of activity in the thyroid and in the liver. (author)

  7. Incidence of radiation-induced Graves' disease in patients treated with radioiodine for thyroid autonomy before and after introduction of a high-sensitivity TSH receptor antibody assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkelmann, Simone; Wolf, Ricarda; Koch, Annedore; Kittner, Christian; Groth, Peter; Schuemichen, Carl

    2004-01-01

    Autoimmune hyperthyroidism may occur several months after radioiodine therapy (RIT) for functional thyroid autonomy. Exacerbation of pre-existing subclinical Graves' disease (GD) has been held responsible for this phenomenon. Determination of TSH receptor antibody using solubilised porcine epithelial cell membranes is insensitive and may have failed to diagnose GD in these patients before RIT. Following the introduction of a more sensitive assay, using the human TSH receptor as an antigen, it has been expected that the incidence of radiation-induced GD after RIT for functional thyroid autonomy will be reduced. In a first group of 1,428 patients treated between November 1993 and March 1997 (group I) we used the porcine TRAb assay to exclude GD, while in a second group comprising 1,408 patients treated between January 2000 and December 2001 (group II), GD was excluded using the human TRAb assay. A matched control group of 231 patients was derived from group II. In group I a total of 15 (1.05%) patients developed obvious or suspected radiation-induced GD, while in group II 17 (1.2%) did so; the interval until development of GD was 8.4 and 8.8 months, respectively, after RIT. Serum anti-thyroid peroxidase levels before RIT were elevated in 36.4% of group I patients and 47.1% of group II patients, but in only 5.6% of the control group. Other non-specific signs of mild immunopathy of the thyroid were seen retrospectively in 73.3%, 64.7% and 16.0% of the patients in these three groups, respectively. In conclusion, the introduction of a high-sensitivity TRAb assay did not reduce the incidence of autoimmune hyperthyroidism occurring late after RIT for functional thyroid autonomy, but mild immunopathy of the thyroid is seen more frequently in these patients and seems to be a predisposing factor in the development of radiation-induced GD. (orig.)

  8. Prostate specific antigen in the diagnosis and treatment of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. III. Radiation treated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamey, T.A.; Kabalin, J.N.; Ferrari, M.

    1989-01-01

    Serum prostate specific antigen was determined (Yang polyclonal radioimmunoassay) in 183 men after radiation therapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. A total of 163 men had received 7,000 rad external beam radiotherapy and 20 had been implanted with iodine-125 seeds. Only 11 per cent of these 183 patients had undetectable prostate specific antigen levels at a mean interval of 5 years since completion of radiotherapy. Prostate specific antigen levels after radiotherapy were directly related to initial clinical stage and Gleason score before treatment. Multiple prostate specific antigen determinations were performed with time in 124 of 183 patients. During year 1 after radiotherapy prostate specific antigen levels were decreasing in 82 per cent of the patients but only 8 per cent continued to decrease beyond year 1. Of 80 patients observed greater than 1 year after completion of radiotherapy 51 per cent had increasing values and 41 per cent had stable values. Increasing prostate specific antigen values after radiotherapy were correlated with progression to metastastic disease and residual cancer on prostate biopsy. Total serum acid phosphatase levels were poorly related to prostate specific antigen levels, were less effective in discriminating patients with metastatic disease and provided no additional information beyond that provided by prostate specific antigen

  9. The role of Ki67 proliferation assessment in predicting local control in bladder cancer patients treated by radical radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, P.C.; Gonzalez, G.; Rey, A.; Apolinario, R.; Santana, C.; Afonso, J.L.; Diaz, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether tumour proliferation as measured by Ki67 immunostaining has any predictive value for local control in bladder cancer patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods: Fifty-five patients suffering from infiltrating bladder carcinoma recommended for radical radiotherapy (66 Gy/6-7weeks) were included in this study. Paraffin-embedded pre-treatment tumour sections were stained with the Ki67 antibody. The percentage of Ki67-positive nuclei was correlated with established prognostic factors, local control and survival. Results27%) Ki67 expression indices (31.5%) (P<0.05; log-rank test). Conclusions: Ki67 immunostaining was a feasible method to estimate tumour proliferation. Patients with very low proliferating tumours seemed to achieve better local control after fractionated radiotherapy compared to other patients. Further studies are needed with a greater number of patients to accurately define the role of Ki67 expression in predicting tumour repopulation during fractionated radiotherapy. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. Real-life radiation burden to relatives of patients treated with iodine-131: a study in eight centres in Flanders (Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsieurs, M.; Thierens, H.; Dierckx, R.A.; Casier, K.; Simons, M.; Baere, E. de; Ridder, L. de; Saedeleer, C. de; Winter, H. de; Lippens, M.; Imschoot, S. van; Wulfrank, D.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the EURATOM 96/29 regulations, a prospective multicentre study was performed to evaluate the present guidelines given to relatives of patients treated with iodine-131 for both thyroid carcinoma and thyrotoxicosis, based on the real-life radiation burden. This study comprised 166 measurements carried out on a group of 94 relatives of 65 patients. All relatives wore a thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) on the wrist for 7 days. Sixty-one relatives agreed to wear another TLD for an additional 7 days. TLD were placed on nine patients' bedside tables. The eight participating centres were arbitrarily divided into three groups according to the period of time they advised their patients to sleep separately. Groups I, II and III respectively advised their patients to sleep separately for 0, 7-10 and 14-21 days. The median dose received by in-living relatives of thyroid carcinoma patients during the 14 days following hospital discharge was 281 μSv (doses to infinity not calculated); the median dose to infinity received by in-living relatives of ambulatory treated thyrotoxicosis patients was 596 μSv, as compared with 802 μSv for in-living relatives of hospitalised thyrotoxicosis patients. In general the children of patients received a significantly (P 131 I, while still following the ALARA principle. (orig.)

  11. Broncho-pulmonary toxicity in stage III non small cell lung cancer patients treated with taxol containing chemotherapy and concurrent preoperative or definitive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, M. Maddie; Gupta-Burt, Shalina; Recine, Diane C.; Faber, L. Penfield; Warren, William H.; LaFollette, Suzanne; Lincoln, Sarah T.; Bonomi, Philip D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The objective of this trial was to test the feasibility of taxol containing combination chemotherapy and concurrent radiation as preoperative or definitive treatment for stage III non small cell lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients were treated on this trial. The initial regimen was (Group 1 pts.): paraplatin (P) (AUC of 4) on day 2, etoposide (E) 50 mg po days 1-5 and 8-12, cisplatin (C) 50 mg/m2 on day 21 and taxol (T) 35 mg/m2 escalated to 45 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8, 24 hr. infusion. After treatment of 10 pts., the regimen was modified as follows (Group 2 pts.): P (AUC of 4) on day 1, E 40 mg/m2 IV daily and days 2-5, and T 80 mg/m2 escalated to 120 mg/m2 on day 1, 3 hr. infusion. After the next 16 pts., the regimen was modified again as follows (Group 3 pts.): P (AUC of 4) on day 1 and T 120 mg/m2 escalated to 140 mg/m2 on day 1, 3 hr. infusion. Seven patients were treated on the latest version of the regimen for a total of 33 pts. The radiation given was uniform throughout the 3 groups. A dose of 4000 cGy in 20 fxs was given in the surgical arm and 6000 cGy in 30 fxs in the non surgical arm. Treatments were given at 200 cGy/fx. once a day, on a 2 weeks on, 2 weeks off basis. The RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria was used to grade pneumonitis. Post-operative complications were defined as occurring early (less than or equal to 30 days) or late (greater than 30 days) following surgery. Results: Sixteen of the 33 patients went to surgery. Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis developed in 4 of the 33 patients (12%). There were no episodes of Grade 4 pneumonitis. Grade 3 pneumonitis occured in: One patient in Group 1, (RT dose 5800 cGy), 2 pts in Group 2 (RT dose 4000 cGy and 6000 cGy, respectively), and 1 pt in Group 3 (RT dose 6000 cGy). Major post-operative complications occurred in 6 of the 16 patients (37.5%) who went to surgery. In Group 1, 1 pt. required oxygen supplementation secondary to a significant

  12. Sensorineural hearing loss in patients treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a prospective study of the effect of radiation and cisplatin treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwong, Dora L.W.; Wei, William I.; Sham, Jonathan S. T.; Ho, W.K.; Yuen, P.W.; Chua, Daniel T.T.; Au, Dennis K.K.; Wu, P.M.; Choy, Damon T.K.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The pattern of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) after primary treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) was studied, and the effect of cisplatin, radiotherapy dose, and fractionation were evaluated. Methods and Materials: One hundred thirty-two patients, 227 ears, and 1100 audiogram reports were analyzed. Methods and Materials: One hundred thirty-two patients, 227 ears, and 1100 audiogram reports were analyzed. Radiotherapy dose ranged from 59.5 to 76.5 Gy. Fifty-two patients received preirradiation cisplatin, total dose 100-185 mg/m 2 . Serial postirradiation bone conduction thresholds at 0.5 kHz, 1 kHz, 2 kHz, and 4 kHz were compared with pretreatment thresholds at respective frequencies. Increase of at least 15 dB was considered as significant and was further grouped as transient or persistent SNHL. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predicting factors for persistent SNHL. Results: At median follow-up of 30 months, 24.2% of ears developed persistent SNHL. High frequency was more affected than low frequencies, 22 vs. 5.3%. Males were more affected than females, 29.4 vs. 15.5%, p = 0.0132. Incidence of persistent SNHL increased with age, with 0, 17.2, and 37.4% of patients aged under 30, between 30-50 and over 50 affected, respectively, p = 0.0001. High incidence was found in patient with postirradiation serous otitis media (SOM), 46.9%. Chemotherapy with cisplatin and radiation dose or fractionation had no significant effect. Multivariate analysis confirmed age, sex, and postirradiation SOM as significant prognostic factors for persistent SNHL. Conclusions: Transient and persistent SNHL occurred after radiotherapy, more commonly affecting high frequency. A low dose of preirradiation cisplatin did not increase the risk. A dose fractionation effect of radiotherapy was not confirmed in this study

  13. Long-term follow-up in patients treated with larynx preservation approach using sequential chemotherapy and radiation therapy: the Memorial Hospital experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maluf, Fernando; Sherman, Eric J.; Bosl, George J.; Pfister, David G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Medicine. Div. of Solid Tumor Oncology; Kraus, Dennis H.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States).Dept. of Surgery. Head and Neck Service; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology]. E-mail: pfisterd@mskcc.org

    2000-06-01

    While many combined modality, organ preservation programs are reported in the literature, few provide long-term follow-up with functional outcomes. The goal of this report is to provide this outcome data for patients treated with a sequential chemotherapy/radiotherapy (CT/RT) approach - the only strategy successfully compared to surgery and RT in randomized trials to date - treated at our institution with a median follow-up of over 10 years. Eligible patients had advanced, resectable, histologically-confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of larynx or pharynx for which standard surgical management would have jeopardized the larynx. Treatment occurred as part of three consecutive larynx preservation protocols and consisted of three cycles of induction, cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed, if the primary site had a major response, by definitive dose radiation therapy (65-70 Gy to sites of initial disease bulk) via conventional fractionation (1.8-2 Gy fraction). If the tumor did not respond to the induction chemotherapy or persisted after radiation therapy, appropriate locoregional treatment was pursued. Response to induction chemotherapy, initial rendered disease-free rate, local control with a functional larynx (without any surgery except biopsy to the primary site, permanent tracheostomy or gastrostomy - LCLP), and actuarial survival rates were calculated. A multivariate assessment of prognostic variables was performed using Cox-proportional hazards model to evaluate for predictors of successful larynx preservation. One hundred and ten patients (109 evaluable) with cancer of the larynx (40%), hypopharynx (29%), and oropharynx (30%) were enrolled from 1983 to 1990. The median age was 60 years With a median Karnofsky Performance Status of 80%. The stage of the patients consisted of 33% T4, 74% node positive, and 69% stage IV. The major response rate at the primary site to induction chemotherapy was 74% (complete response in 36%). Seventy-eight percent were rendered

  14. Long-term follow-up in patients treated with larynx preservation approach using sequential chemotherapy and radiation therapy: the Memorial Hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maluf, Fernando; Sherman, Eric J.; Bosl, George J.; Pfister, David G.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    While many combined modality, organ preservation programs are reported in the literature, few provide long-term follow-up with functional outcomes. The goal of this report is to provide this outcome data for patients treated with a sequential chemotherapy/radiotherapy (CT/RT) approach - the only strategy successfully compared to surgery and RT in randomized trials to date - treated at our institution with a median follow-up of over 10 years. Eligible patients had advanced, resectable, histologically-confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of larynx or pharynx for which standard surgical management would have jeopardized the larynx. Treatment occurred as part of three consecutive larynx preservation protocols and consisted of three cycles of induction, cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed, if the primary site had a major response, by definitive dose radiation therapy (65-70 Gy to sites of initial disease bulk) via conventional fractionation (1.8-2 Gy fraction). If the tumor did not respond to the induction chemotherapy or persisted after radiation therapy, appropriate locoregional treatment was pursued. Response to induction chemotherapy, initial rendered disease-free rate, local control with a functional larynx (without any surgery except biopsy to the primary site, permanent tracheostomy or gastrostomy - LCLP), and actuarial survival rates were calculated. A multivariate assessment of prognostic variables was performed using Cox-proportional hazards model to evaluate for predictors of successful larynx preservation. One hundred and ten patients (109 evaluable) with cancer of the larynx (40%), hypopharynx (29%), and oropharynx (30%) were enrolled from 1983 to 1990. The median age was 60 years With a median Karnofsky Performance Status of 80%. The stage of the patients consisted of 33% T4, 74% node positive, and 69% stage IV. The major response rate at the primary site to induction chemotherapy was 74% (complete response in 36%). Seventy-eight percent were rendered

  15. Combining Physical and Biologic Parameters to Predict Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, Matthew H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cai Xuwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Shedden, Kerby [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Yuan Shuanghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shangdong Cancer Hospital, Jinan (China); Ritter, Timothy [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong Fengming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the plasma dynamics of 5 proinflammatory/fibrogenic cytokines, including interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-{beta}1) to ascertain their value in predicting radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT), both individually and in combination with physical dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: Treatments of patients receiving definitive conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) on clinical trial for inoperable stages I-III lung cancer were prospectively evaluated. Circulating cytokine levels were measured prior to and at weeks 2 and 4 during RT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT, defined as grade 2 and higher radiation pneumonitis or symptomatic pulmonary fibrosis. Minimum follow-up was 18 months. Results: Of 58 eligible patients, 10 (17.2%) patients developed RILT. Lower pretreatment IL-8 levels were significantly correlated with development of RILT, while radiation-induced elevations of TGF-ss1 were weakly correlated with RILT. Significant correlations were not found for any of the remaining 3 cytokines or for any clinical or dosimetric parameters. Using receiver operator characteristic curves for predictive risk assessment modeling, we found both individual cytokines and dosimetric parameters were poor independent predictors of RILT. However, combining IL-8, TGF-ss1, and mean lung dose into a single model yielded an improved predictive ability (P<.001) compared to either variable alone. Conclusions: Combining inflammatory cytokines with physical dosimetric factors may provide a more accurate model for RILT prediction. Future study with a larger number of cases and events is needed to validate such findings.

  16. Mean esophageal radiation dose is predictive of the grade of acute esophagitis in lung cancer patients treated with concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozgen, A.; Hayran, M.; Kahraman, F.

    2012-01-01

    The intention of this research was to define the predictive factors for acute esophagitis (AE) in lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The data for 72 lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy between 2008 and 2010 were prospectively evaluated. Mean lung dose, mean dose of esophagus, volume of esophagus irradiated and percentage of esophagus volume treated were analysed according to esophagitis grades. The mean esophageal dose was associated with an increased risk of esophageal toxicity (Kruskal-Wallis test, P<0.001). However, the mean lung dose and the volume of esophagus irradiated were not associated with an increased risk of esophageal toxicity (Kruskal-Wallis test, P=0.50 and P=0.41, respectively). The mean radiation dose received by the esophagus was found to be highly correlated with the duration of Grade 2 esophagitis (Spearman test, r=0.82, P<0.001). The mean dose of esophagus ≥28 Gy showed statistical significance with respect to AE Grade 2 or worse (receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.929-1.014). In conclusion, the mean esophageal dose was significantly associated with a risk of esophageal toxicity in patients with lung cancer treated with concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy. (author)

  17. Risk of Severe Toxicity According to Site of Recurrence in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Diane C.; Vargo, John A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Ohr, James; Clump, David A.; Yau, Wai-Ying Wendy; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T.; Bauman, Julie E.; Branstetter, Barton F.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a 10-year update of our institutional experience with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for reirradiation of locally recurrent head and neck cancer, focusing on predictors of toxicity. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 291 patients treated with SBRT for recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck cancer between April 2002 and March 2013. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of severe acute and late toxicity. Patients with <3 months of follow-up (n=43) or who died within 3 months of treatment (n=21) were excluded from late toxicity analysis. Results: Median time to death or last clinical follow-up was 9.8 months among the entire cohort and 53.1 months among surviving patients. Overall, 33 patients (11.3%) experienced grade ≥3 acute toxicity and 43 (18.9%) experienced grade ≥3 late toxicity. Compared with larynx/hypopharynx, treatment of nodal recurrence was associated with a lower risk of severe acute toxicity (P=.03), with no significant differences in severe acute toxicity among other sites. Patients treated for a recurrence in the larynx/hypopharynx experienced significantly more severe late toxicity compared with those with oropharyngeal, oral cavity, base of skull/paranasal sinus, salivary gland, or nodal site of recurrence (P<.05 for all). Sixteen patients (50%) with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal recurrence experienced severe late toxicity, compared with 6-20% for other sites. Conclusions: Salvage SBRT is a safe and effective option for most patients with previously irradiated head and neck cancer. However, patients treated to the larynx or hypopharynx experience significantly more late toxicity compared with others and should be carefully selected for treatment, with consideration given to patient performance status, pre-existing organ dysfunction, and goals of care. Treatment toxicity in these patients may be mitigated with more conformal plans to allow for increased

  18. Risk of Severe Toxicity According to Site of Recurrence in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Diane C.; Vargo, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ferris, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ohr, James [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Clump, David A.; Yau, Wai-Ying Wendy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bauman, Julie E. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Branstetter, Barton F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Heron, Dwight E., E-mail: herond2@umpc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To report a 10-year update of our institutional experience with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for reirradiation of locally recurrent head and neck cancer, focusing on predictors of toxicity. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 291 patients treated with SBRT for recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck cancer between April 2002 and March 2013. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of severe acute and late toxicity. Patients with <3 months of follow-up (n=43) or who died within 3 months of treatment (n=21) were excluded from late toxicity analysis. Results: Median time to death or last clinical follow-up was 9.8 months among the entire cohort and 53.1 months among surviving patients. Overall, 33 patients (11.3%) experienced grade ≥3 acute toxicity and 43 (18.9%) experienced grade ≥3 late toxicity. Compared with larynx/hypopharynx, treatment of nodal recurrence was associated with a lower risk of severe acute toxicity (P=.03), with no significant differences in severe acute toxicity among other sites. Patients treated for a recurrence in the larynx/hypopharynx experienced significantly more severe late toxicity compared with those with oropharyngeal, oral cavity, base of skull/paranasal sinus, salivary gland, or nodal site of recurrence (P<.05 for all). Sixteen patients (50%) with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal recurrence experienced severe late toxicity, compared with 6-20% for other sites. Conclusions: Salvage SBRT is a safe and effective option for most patients with previously irradiated head and neck cancer. However, patients treated to the larynx or hypopharynx experience significantly more late toxicity compared with others and should be carefully selected for treatment, with consideration given to patient performance status, pre-existing organ dysfunction, and goals of care. Treatment toxicity in these patients may be mitigated with more conformal plans to allow for increased

  19. Are the American Society for Radiation Oncology Guidelines Accurate Predictors of Recurrence in Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Balloon-Based Brachytherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira K. Christoudias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO consensus statement (CS provides guidelines for patient selection for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI following breast conserving surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate recurrence rates based on ASTRO CS groupings. A single institution review of 238 early stage breast cancer patients treated with balloon-based APBI via balloon based brachytherapy demonstrated a 4-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR rate of 5.1%. There were no significant differences in the 4-year actuarial IBTR rates between the “suitable,” “cautionary,” and “unsuitable” ASTRO categories (0%, 7.2%, and 4.3%, resp., P=0.28. ER negative tumors had higher rates of IBTR than ER positive tumors. The ASTRO groupings are poor predictors of patient outcomes. Further studies evaluating individual clinicopathologic features are needed to determine the safety of APBI in higher risk patients.

  20. Immunological factors correlated in radiation effect in cancer patients treated by radiotherapy alone or radiotherapy with combined chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Shuji

    1981-01-01

    Local immunological factors are thought to be parenchymal reaction of normal and tumor tissues. Those were studied by morphological changes of angiographic findings and histological methods which included photomicroscopic, electromicroscopic and enzymic-histochemical studies. It was demonstrated that the effect of radiotherapy depended on not only local blood supply but also parenchymal reaction of the host. Especially, the parenchymal reaction at 2000 or 3000 rad irradiation was regarded as nonspecific tissue repair as well as immunological protective reactions brought about by enhancement of the tumor antigenicity. It was proved that T-cell system played a main role in this parenchymal reaction. Changes of systemic immunological factors were studied in 17 laryngeal cancer and 80 lung cancer patients treated by radiotherapy alone or radiotherapy with combined chemotherapy. Due to the fact that damages of the host before treatment were not so serious and integral dose given to the patients was a little in cases of laryngeal cancer immunological parameters such as absolute lymphocyte counts, PHA and PPD skin test activities, lymphocyte blastoid transformation with PHA, PWM and Con A, did not show significant change. However, as for lung cancer treated by large integral dose irradiation combined with chemotherapy, immunological parameters were depressed in inverse proportion to the dose of irradiation and chemotherapeutic agents. Moreover T-cell subsets (early E-rosette forming cells, IgG Fc-receptor positive cells), lymphocyte sub-populations, ADCC activity, serum immunoglobulins, and serum protein were also investigated in cases of lung cancer. We have evaluated the immunological parameters in relation to the therapeutic effect. As a result, it was suggested that several parameters should be needed to forecast the prognosis. (author)

  1. A Radiation Badge Survey for Family Members Living With Patients Treated With a 103Pd Permanent Breast Seed Implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Brian M.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Rakovitch, Eileen; Sankreacha, Raxa; O'Brien, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Sixty-seven patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated in a Phase I/II clinical trial using a 103 Pd permanent breast seed implant as adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. We report the dose received by family members living with these patients and compare measured doses with theoretical worst-case scenario estimates. Methods and Materials: Exposure-rate measurements were taken at 1 m from the patient by using a calibrated low-energy survey meter. Landauer (Landauer Inc., Glenwood, IL) Luxel badges, with sensitivity of 0.01 mSv, were given to family members to wear after the implantation. Badge readings for 33 spouses and 28 other family members were used to estimate effective doses, and these were compared with theory. Results: Average preimplantation planning target volume from computed tomography was 50.3 ml (range, 18.0-96.7 ml), and average preimplantation distance between the skin and the most anterior planning target volume margin was 0.57 cm. The average maximum exposure rate was measured to be 2.4 ± 1.1 mR/h, and average measured dose to a spouse was 0.99 ± 1.0 mSv. The calculated exposure rates and spousal doses using preimplantation computed tomography scan data overestimated those measured. Average measured family member dose (excluding spouses) was 0.20 ± 0.58 mSv. Conclusions: Based on measured and calculated spousal doses, a permanent breast seed implant using 103 Pd is safe for the public. However, it is recommended that extra precautions in the way of a breast patch be used when patients with an implant will be in the vicinity of toddlers or pregnant women

  2. Spot-Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma: Clinical Outcome of 26 Patients Treated at Paul Scherrer Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rombi, Barbara [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); ATreP (Provincial Agency for Proton Therapy), Trento (Italy); Ares, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.ares@psi.ch [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hug, Eugen B. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Schneider, Ralf; Goitein, Gudrun; Staab, Adrian; Albertini, Francesca; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Timmermann, Beate [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); WestGerman Proton Therapy Center Essen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical results of fractionated spot-scanning proton radiation therapy (PT) in 26 pediatric patients treated at Paul Scherrer Institute for chordoma (CH) or chondrosarcoma (CS) of the skull base or axial skeleton. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and June 2010, 19 CH and 7 CS patients with tumors originating from the skull base (17) and the axial skeleton (9) were treated with PT. Mean age at the time of PT was 13.2 years. The mean prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) for CH and 66 Gy (RBE) for CS, at a dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy (RBE) per fraction. Results: Mean follow-up was 46 months. Actuarial 5-year local control (LC) rates were 81% for CH and 80% for CS. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) was 89% for CH and 75% for CS. Two CH patients had local failures: one is alive with evidence of disease, while the other patient succumbed to local recurrence in the surgical pathway. One CS patient died of local progression of the disease. No high-grade late toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Spot-scanning PT for pediatric CH and CS patients resulted in excellent clinical outcomes with acceptable rates of late toxicity. Longer follow-up time and larger cohort are needed to fully assess tumor control and late effects of treatment.

  3. Radiation therapy for early stage seminoma of testis. Analysis of survival and gastrointestinal toxicity in patients treated with modern megavoltage techniques over 10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeoh, E.; O'Brein, P.C.; Razali, M.

    1993-01-01

    Seventy-seven patients treated with megavoltage irradiation to the paraaortic and/or pelvic nodal areas, for stage I and non-bulky ( 34 years), stage (I vs II) and dose of radiation (≤ 30 Gy vs > 30 Gy), showed none of these variables to have a significant influence on overall survival or on the incidence of late complications. The results of these findings are discussed in the light of recent studies of a surveillance policy following orchidectomy for stage I seminoma of the testis. Given that gastrointestinal toxicity is the major toxicity associated with the treatment of stage I patients, the data from this study should assist clinicians and their patients to arrive at an informed decision regarding adjuvant radiotherapy. 15 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  4. Effect of HMB/Arg/Gln on the prevention of radiation dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takayuki; Matsuura, Kazuto; Asada, Yukinori; Sagai, Shun; Katagiri, Katsunori; Ishida, Eiichi; Saito, Daisuke; Sadayasu, Rei; Wada, Hitoshi; Saijo, Shigeru

    2014-05-01

    This prospective randomized Phase II study was designed to evaluate the preventive effect of an oral nutrition supplement composed of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, arginine and glutamine (beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate/arginine/glutamine) on radiation dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients. Forty patients with histologically proven head and neck cancer, treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy involving cisplatin were recruited. They were randomly assigned to the beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate/arginine/glutamine supplement treatment group (Group A) or the control group that received no supplement (Group B). The primary endpoint of this study was the percentage of patients developing ≥Grade 3 dermatitis. The secondary endpoints were the percentage of patients developing ≥Grade 2 dermatitis, and the duration of each grade of dermatitis relative to the observation period. The incidence of ≥Grade 3 dermatitis did not differ between the two groups. However, as secondary endpoints of this study, the incidence of ≥Grade 2 dermatitis was lower in Group A than B (62.6 vs. 94.4%; P < 0.05), and the duration of ≥Grade 1 dermatitis was shorter in Group A than B (44.8 vs. 56.7%; P < 0.01), as was the duration of ≥Grade 2 dermatitis (16.5 vs. 26.5%; P < 0.05). Our study indicated that beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate/arginine/glutamine supplementation was potentially effective in the prevention of radiation dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients.

  5. Change in Diffusing Capacity After Radiation as an Objective Measure for Grading Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Treated for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain); Gomez, Daniel, E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Eapen, George [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liu Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Scoring of radiation pneumonitis (RP), a dose-limiting toxicity after thoracic radiochemotherapy, is subjective and thus inconsistent among studies. Here we investigated whether the extent of change in diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) after radiation therapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) could be used as an objective means of quantifying RP. Patients and Methods: We analyzed potential correlations between DLCO and RP in 140 patients who received definitive RT ({>=}60 Gy) with or without chemotherapy for primary NSCLC. All underwent DLCO analysis before and after RT. Post-RT DLCO values within 1 week of the RP diagnosis (Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3) were selected and compared with that individual's preradiation values. Percent reductions in DLCO and RP grade were compared by point biserial correlation in the entire patient group and in subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Results: Patients experiencing Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3 RP had median percentage changes in DLCO after RT of 10.7%, 13%, 22.1%, or 35.2%. Percent reduction in DLCO correlated with RP Grade {<=}1 vs. {>=}2 (p = 0.0004). This association held for the following subgroups: age {>=}65 years, advanced stage, smokers, use of chemotherapy, volume of normal lung receiving at least 20 Gy {>=}30%, and baseline DLCO or forced expiratory volume in 1 second {>=}60%. Conclusions: By correlating percent change in DLCO from pretreatment values at the time of diagnosis of RP with RP grade, we were able to identify categories of RP based on the change in DLCO. These criteria provide a basis for an objective scoring system for RP based on change in DLCO.

  6. Change in Diffusing Capacity After Radiation as an Objective Measure for Grading Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Treated for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Gomez, Daniel; Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B.; Eapen, George; Liu Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Scoring of radiation pneumonitis (RP), a dose-limiting toxicity after thoracic radiochemotherapy, is subjective and thus inconsistent among studies. Here we investigated whether the extent of change in diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) after radiation therapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) could be used as an objective means of quantifying RP. Patients and Methods: We analyzed potential correlations between DLCO and RP in 140 patients who received definitive RT (≥60 Gy) with or without chemotherapy for primary NSCLC. All underwent DLCO analysis before and after RT. Post-RT DLCO values within 1 week of the RP diagnosis (Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3) were selected and compared with that individual’s preradiation values. Percent reductions in DLCO and RP grade were compared by point biserial correlation in the entire patient group and in subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Results: Patients experiencing Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3 RP had median percentage changes in DLCO after RT of 10.7%, 13%, 22.1%, or 35.2%. Percent reduction in DLCO correlated with RP Grade ≤1 vs. ≥2 (p = 0.0004). This association held for the following subgroups: age ≥65 years, advanced stage, smokers, use of chemotherapy, volume of normal lung receiving at least 20 Gy ≥30%, and baseline DLCO or forced expiratory volume in 1 second ≥60%. Conclusions: By correlating percent change in DLCO from pretreatment values at the time of diagnosis of RP with RP grade, we were able to identify categories of RP based on the change in DLCO. These criteria provide a basis for an objective scoring system for RP based on change in DLCO.

  7. Low ERCC1 mRNA and protein expression are associated with worse survival in cervical cancer patients treated with radiation alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, Corinne M.; Prystajecky, Michael; Eliasziw, Misha; Klimowicz, Alexander C.; Petrillo, Stephanie K.; Craighead, Peter S.; Hao, Desiree; Diaz, Roman; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Magliocco, Anthony M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the association of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) expression, using both mRNA and protein expression analysis, with clinical outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with radical radiation therapy (RT). Experimental design: Patients (n = 186) with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated with radical RT alone from a single institution were evaluated. Pre-treatment FFPE biopsy specimens were retrieved from 112 patients. ERCC1 mRNA level was determined by real-time PCR, and ERCC1 protein expression (FL297, 8F1) was measured using quantitative immunohistochemistry (AQUA (registered) ). The association of ERCC1 status with local response, 10-year disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) was analyzed. Results: ERCC1 protein expression levels using both FL297 and 8F1 antibodies were determined for 112 patients; mRNA analysis was additionally performed in 32 patients. Clinical and outcome factors were comparable between the training and validation sets. Low ERCC1 mRNA expression status was associated with worse OS (17.9% vs 50.1%, p = 0.046). ERCC1 protein expression using the FL297 antibody, but not the 8F1 antibody, was significantly associated with both OS (p = 0.002) and DFS (p = 0.010). After adjusting for pre-treatment hemoglobin in a multivariate analysis, ERCC1 FL297 expression status remained statistically significant for OS [HR 1.9 (1.1-3.3), p = 0.031]. Conclusions: Pre-treatment tumoral ERCC1 mRNA and protein expression, using the FL297 antibody, are predictive factors for survival in cervical cancer patients treated with RT, with ERCC1 FL297 expression independently associated with survival. These results identify a subset of patients who may derive the greatest benefit from the addition of cisplatin chemotherapy.

  8. Low locoregional recurrence rates in patients treated after 2000 with doxorubicin based chemotherapy, modified radical mastectomy, and post-mastectomy radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenbaum, Michael P.; Strom, Eric A.; Allen, Pamela K.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of locoregional recurrence (LRR) associated with modern tri-modality therapy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from 291 consecutive PMRT patients treated from 1999 to 2001. These patients were compared to an historical group of 313 patients treated from 1979 to 1988 who had fluoroscopic simulation and contour-generated 2D planning. 1999-2001 spans the adoption of CT simulators for breast radiation therapy and a comparison was made between patients simulated before and after the implementation of CT simulation. Five-year actuarial rates for LRR, distal metastasis (DM), and overall survival (OS) between the pre and post CT simulation cohorts were compared as well. Results: Compared to a 2D planned historic control, the combined contemporary patients had improved outcomes at 5 years for all endpoints studied; LRR 3.0% vs. 11.5%, DM 29.2% vs. 39.2%, and OS 79.2% vs. 70.6% (p = 0.0004, 0.0052, 0.0012, respectively). Significant factors in a multivariate analysis for LRR were: advanced T-stage (RR = 2.14, CI = 1.11-4.11, p = 0.023), and percent positive nodes (RR = 1.01, CI = 1.00-1.02, p = 0.012). The comparison of the pre and post CT-simulated PMRT patients (1999-2001) found no significant difference in any endpoint. Conclusions: The rate of locoregional control for PMRT patients treated with modern radiotherapy is outstanding and has improved significantly compared to historical controls.

  9. Predictors for long-term survival free from whole brain radiation therapy in patients treated with radiosurgery for limited brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eGorovets

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify predictors for prolonged survival free from salvage whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT in patients with brain metastases treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS as their initial radiotherapy approach. Material and Methods: Patients with brain metastases treated with SRS from 2001-2013 at our institution were identified. SRS without WBRT was typically offered to patients with 1-4 brain metastases, Karnofsky Performance Status ≥70, and life expectancy ≥3 mo. Three hundred and eight patients met inclusion criteria for analysis. Medical records were reviewed for patient, disease, and treatment information. Two comparison groups were identified: those with ≥1-yr WBRT-free survival (N=104, and those who died or required salvage WBRT within 3 mo of SRS (N=56. Differences between these groups were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses.Results: Median survival for all patients was 11 mo. Among patients with ≥1-yr WBRT-free survival, median survival was 33 mo [12-107 mo] with only 21% requiring salvage WBRT. Factors significantly associated with prolonged WBRT-free survival on univariate analysis (p<0.05 included younger age, asymptomatic presentation, RTOG RPA class I, fewer brain metastases, surgical resection, breast primary, new or controlled primary, absence of extracranial metastatic disease, and oligometastatic disease burden (≤5 metastatic lesions. After controlling for covariates, asymptomatic presentation, breast primary, single brain metastasis, absence of extracranial metastases, and oligometastatic disease burden remained independent predictors for favorable WBRT-free survival.Conclusions: A subset of patients with brain metastases can achieve long-term survival after upfront SRS without the need for salvage WBRT. Predictors identified in this study can help select patients that might benefit most from a treatment strategy of SRS alone.

  10. Predictors of radiation-induced esophageal toxicity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anurag K.; Lockett, Mary Ann; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and clinical/dosimetric predictors of acute and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 207 consecutive patients with NSCLC who were treated with high-dose, definitive 3D-CRT between March 1991 and December 1998. This population consisted of 107 men and 100 women. The median age was 67 years (range 31-90). The following patient and treatment parameters were studied: age, gender, race, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of subcarinal nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy. All doses are reported without heterogeneity corrections. The median prescription dose to the isocenter in this population was 70 Gy (range 60-74) delivered in 2-Gy daily fractions. All patients were treated once daily. Acute and late esophageal toxicities were graded by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Patient and clinical/dosimetric factors were coded and correlated with acute and late Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Of 207 patients, 16 (8%) developed acute (10 patients) or late (13 patients) Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity. Seven patients had both acute and late Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity. One patient died (Grade 5 esophageal toxicity) of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy, maximal point dose to the esophagus >58 Gy, and a mean dose to the entire esophagus >34 Gy were significantly associated with a risk of Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity on univariate analysis. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus >58 Gy retained significance on multivariate analysis. Of 207 patients

  11. Multi-Institutional Experience of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Black vs White Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole Breast Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Carl; Bai, Harrison; Neboori, Hanmanth; Takita, Cristiane; Motwani, Sabin; Wright, Jean L.; Hobeika, Georges; Haffty, Bruce G.; Jones, Tiffanie; Goyal, Sharad; Moran, Meena S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Given the paucity of data on racial disparities in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the data from a multi-institutional cohort of DCIS patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast radiation therapy (RT) were analyzed to determine whether racial disparities or differences exist. Methods and Materials: A total of 533 white and 76 black DCIS patients from 3 university-based cancer centers were uniformly treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT. All patient data were collected and analyzed as a function of race. Results: The median follow-up was 5.2 years. No significant racial differences were seen in tumor size, age at diagnosis, estrogen receptor status, necrosis, or grade (all P>.05). Of the treatment parameters, the RT dose delivered, boost, positive margin rates, frequency of hormone receptor status assessment, and receipt of hormonal therapy for the 2 cohorts did not significantly differ (all P>.05). The local relapse-free survival was similar at 5 years (96.1% and 98.1%, P=.399) and 10 years (92.8% vs 95.8%, P=.360), with no significant overall survival difference at 10 years (94.0% vs 88.9%, P=.290) between the white and black patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, race was not an independent predictor of local relapse-free survival or overall survival when accounting for age, grade, and margin status. Conclusion: In our large cohort of DCIS patients uniformly treated at 3 institutions with breast conservation without any apparent differences in treatment delivery parameters, we demonstrated that the clinical and pathologic features and local survival outcomes did not differ as a function of race. Our results suggest that when black patients with DCIS are appropriately selected for breast conservation and receive adjuvant RT without racial disparities in the treatment parameters, differences in the outcomes as a function of race do not exist.

  12. Interval to Biochemical Failure Predicts Clinical Outcomes in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated by Combined-Modality Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilkrut, Mark; McLaughlin, P. William; Merrick, Gregory S.; Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the prognostic value of interval to biochemical failure (IBF) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (HiRPCa) treated with combined-modality radiation therapy (CMRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of HiRPCa (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score [GS] 8-10, or clinical T stage T3-T4) treated with either dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or CMRT. Interval to biochemical failure was classified as ≤18 or >18 months from the end of all therapy to the date of biochemical failure (BF). Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the prognostic value of IBF ≤18 months for distant metastasis (DM) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: Of 958 patients with a median follow-up of 63.2 months, 175 patients experienced BF. In those with BF, there were no differences in pretreatment clinical characteristics between the EBRT and CMRT groups, except for a higher proportion of patients with GS 8-10 in the CMRT group (70% vs 52%, P=.02). Median IBF after all therapy was 24.0 months (interquartile range 9.6-46.0) in the EBRT group and 18.9 months (interquartile range 9.2-34.5) in the CMRT group (P=.055). On univariate analysis, IBF ≤18 months was associated with increased risk of DM and PCSM in the entire cohort and the individual EBRT and CMRT groups. On multivariate analysis, only GS 9-10 and IBF ≤18 months, but not the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use, predicted DM (hazard ratio [HR] 3.7, P<.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-10.3 for GS 9-10; HR 3.9, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-6.5 for IBF ≤18 months) and PCSM (HR 14.8, P<.009, 95% CI 2.0-110 for GS 9-10; HR 4.4, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-8.1 for IBF ≤18 months). Conclusions: Short IBF was highly prognostic for higher DM and PCSM in patients with HiRPCa. The prognostic value of IBF for DM and PCSM was not affected by the radiation

  13. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  14. Definitive treatment of anal canal carcinoma with radiotherapy: Adverse impact of a pre-radiation resection. A retrospective study of 57 patients treated with curative intent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquard, R.; Cenni, J.C.; Artru, P.; Lledo, G.; Chalabreysse, P.; Queneau, P.E.; Taieb, S.; Alessio, A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To describe retrospectively the overall survival, the cancer specific survival and the tumor control in an homogeneous series of patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal treated with definitive radiotherapy; to assess the impact of brachytherapy, chemotherapy and pre-radiotherapy resection on the risk of recurrence. Patients and methods From 1997 to 2007, 57 patients (pts) presenting with an epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal (T1: 14, T2: 33, T3-4: 10, N0: 31, N1: 19, N2: 3, N3: 4, M0: 57) were treated with definitive radiotherapy by the same radiation oncologist. The treatment included an external beam irradiation (E.B.R.T.) given to the posterior pelvis (45 Gy/25 fractions) and, six weeks later, a boost delivered with interstitial brachytherapy (37/57) or external beam irradiation (20/57). Twelve pts had undergone a surgical resection of the tumour before radiotherapy. A belly board was used for E.B.R.T. in 13 pts. A concurrent platinum based chemotherapy was done in 42 pts. The mean follow-up was 57 months. Results The overall survival rate at 5 years was 89% with a cause specific survival of 96%. Five patients recurred (5-year rate: 12%: four had local relapse (5-year rate: 8%), four had groin recurrence, and distant metastases were seen in two. In univariate analysis, the risk of relapse was higher in patients who had undergone a pre-radiation excision (p = 0.018), in those who did not receive chemotherapy (p = 0.076) and in those who were irradiated on a belly board (p = 0.049). In multivariate analysis, a pre-radiotherapy resection (p = 0.084) had an inverse impact on the tumour control reaching the level of statistical significance and the use of a belly board was of marginal influence (p = 0.13). Conclusion Radiotherapy and chemo radiation with cisplatin-based chemotherapy cure a vast majority of patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal. Therapeutic factors that may interfere with the definition of the target volume and

  15. DOC-2/DAB2 Interacting Protein Status in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Correlates With Outcome for Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Corbin; Tumati, Vasu; Kapur, Payal; Yan, Jingsheng; Hong, David; Bhuiyan, Manzerul; Xie, Xian-Jin; Pistenmaa, David; Yu, Lan; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Saha, Debabrata; Kim, D. W. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This pilot study investigates the role of DOC-2/DAB2 Interacting Protein (DAB2IP) and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) as prognostic biomarkers in high-risk prostate cancer patients receiving definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry was performed and scored by an expert genitourinary pathologist. Clinical endpoints evaluated were freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), castration resistance–free survival (CRFS), and distant metastasis–free survival (DMFS). Log-rank test and Cox regression were used to determine significance of biomarker levels with clinical outcome. Results: Fifty-four patients with high-risk prostate cancer (stage ≥T3a, or Gleason score ≥8, or prostate-specific antigen level ≥20 ng/mL) treated with radiation therapy from 2005 to 2012 at our institution were evaluated. Nearly all patients expressed EZH2 (98%), whereas 28% of patients revealed DAB2IP reduction and 72% retained DAB2IP. Median follow-up was 34.0 months for DAB2IP-reduced patients, 29.9 months for DAB2IP-retained patients, and 32.6 months in the EZH2 study. Reduction in DAB2IP portended worse outcome compared with DAB2IP-retained patients, including FFBF (4-year: 37% vs 89%, P=.04), CRFS (4-year: 50% vs 90%, P=.02), and DMFS (4-year: 36% vs 97%, P=.05). Stratified EZH2 expression trended toward significance for worse FFBF and CRFS (P=.07). Patients with reduced DAB2IP or highest-intensity EZH2 expression exhibited worse FFBF (4-year: 32% vs 95%, P=.02), CRFS (4-year: 28% vs 100%, P<.01), and DMFS (4-year: 39% vs 100%, P=.04) compared with the control group. Conclusion: Loss of DAB2IP is a potent biomarker that portends worse outcome despite definitive radiation therapy for patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 is expressed in most high-risk tumors and is a less potent discriminator of outcome in this study. The DAB2IP status in combination with degree of EZH2 expression may be useful for

  16. DOC-2/DAB2 Interacting Protein Status in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Correlates With Outcome for Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Corbin; Tumati, Vasu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Kapur, Payal [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Yan, Jingsheng [Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Hong, David; Bhuiyan, Manzerul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Xie, Xian-Jin [Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Pistenmaa, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Yu, Lan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Hsieh, Jer-Tsong [Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Saha, Debabrata [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Kim, D. W. Nathan, E-mail: Nathan.Kim@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: This pilot study investigates the role of DOC-2/DAB2 Interacting Protein (DAB2IP) and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) as prognostic biomarkers in high-risk prostate cancer patients receiving definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry was performed and scored by an expert genitourinary pathologist. Clinical endpoints evaluated were freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), castration resistance–free survival (CRFS), and distant metastasis–free survival (DMFS). Log-rank test and Cox regression were used to determine significance of biomarker levels with clinical outcome. Results: Fifty-four patients with high-risk prostate cancer (stage ≥T3a, or Gleason score ≥8, or prostate-specific antigen level ≥20 ng/mL) treated with radiation therapy from 2005 to 2012 at our institution were evaluated. Nearly all patients expressed EZH2 (98%), whereas 28% of patients revealed DAB2IP reduction and 72% retained DAB2IP. Median follow-up was 34.0 months for DAB2IP-reduced patients, 29.9 months for DAB2IP-retained patients, and 32.6 months in the EZH2 study. Reduction in DAB2IP portended worse outcome compared with DAB2IP-retained patients, including FFBF (4-year: 37% vs 89%, P=.04), CRFS (4-year: 50% vs 90%, P=.02), and DMFS (4-year: 36% vs 97%, P=.05). Stratified EZH2 expression trended toward significance for worse FFBF and CRFS (P=.07). Patients with reduced DAB2IP or highest-intensity EZH2 expression exhibited worse FFBF (4-year: 32% vs 95%, P=.02), CRFS (4-year: 28% vs 100%, P<.01), and DMFS (4-year: 39% vs 100%, P=.04) compared with the control group. Conclusion: Loss of DAB2IP is a potent biomarker that portends worse outcome despite definitive radiation therapy for patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 is expressed in most high-risk tumors and is a less potent discriminator of outcome in this study. The DAB2IP status in combination with degree of EZH2 expression may be useful for

  17. Dosimetric comparison to the heart and cardiac substructure in a large cohort of esophageal cancer patients treated with proton beam therapy or Intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Yutaka; Xu, Cai; Yang, Jinzhong; Komaki, Ritsuko; Lin, Steven H

    2017-10-01

    To compare heart and cardiac substructure radiation exposure using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with mid- to distal esophageal cancer who received chemoradiation therapy. We identified 727 esophageal cancer patients who received IMRT (n=477) or PBT (n=250) from March 2004 to December 2015. All patients were treated to 50.4Gy with IMRT or to 50.4 cobalt Gray equivalents with PBT. IMRT and PBT dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the whole heart, atria, ventricles, and four coronary arteries were compared. For PBT patients, passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT; n=237) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT; n=13) DVHs were compared. Compared with IMRT, PBT resulted in significantly lower mean heart dose (MHD) and heart V5, V10, V20, V30, and V40as well as lower radiation exposure to the four chambers and four coronary arteries. Compared with PSPT, IMPT resulted in significantly lower heart V20, V30, and V40 but not MHD or heart V5 or V10. IMPT also resulted in significantly lower radiation doses to the left atrium, right atrium, left main coronary artery, and left circumflex artery, but not the left ventricle, right ventricle, left anterior descending artery, or right coronary artery. Factors associated with lower MHD included PBT (Pheart and cardiac substructures than IMRT. Long-term studies are necessary to determine how this cardiac sparing effect impacts the development of coronary artery disease and other cardiac complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of treatment modality on the hypothalamic-pituitary function of patients treated with radiation therapy for pituitary adenomas: Hypothalamic dose and endocrine outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eElson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Both fractionated external beam radiotherapy and single fraction radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas are associated with the risk of hypothalamic-pituitary (HP axis dysfunction.Objective: To analyze the effect of treatment modality (Linac, TomoTherapy, or Gamma Knife on hypothalamic dose and correlate these with HP-Axis deficits after radiotherapy.Methods:Radiation plans of patients treated postoperatively for pituitary adenomas using Linac-based 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT (n=11, TomoTherapy-based Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT (n=10, or Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS(n=12 were retrospectively reviewed. Dose to the hypothalamus was analyzed and postradiotherapy hormone function including growth hormone (GH, thyroid (TSH, adrenal (ACTH, prolactin (PRL, and gonadotropins (FSH/LH were assessed. Results:Post-radiation, 13 of 27 (48% patients eligible for analysis developed at least one new hormone deficit, of which 8 of 11 (72% occurred in the Linac group, 4 of 8 (50% occurred in the TomoTherapy group, and 1 of 8 (12.5% occurred in the Gamma Knife group. Compared with fractionated techniques, Gamma Knife showed improved hypothalamic sparing for DMax Hypo, and V12Gy. For fractionated modalities, TomoTherapy showed improved dosimetric characteristics over Linac-based treatment with hypothalamic DMean (44.8 Gy vs. 26.8 Gy p=0.02, DMax (49.8 Gy vs. 39.1 Gy p=0.04, and V12Gy (100% vs. 76% p=0.004.Conclusion:Maximal dosimetric avoidance of the hypothalamus was achieved using Gamma Knife-based radiosurgery followed by TomoTherapy-based IMRT, and Linac-based 3D conformal radiation therapy, respectively.

  19. Clinicopathologic Significance of Excision Repair Cross-Complementation 1 Expression in Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Sharad; Parikh, Rahul R.; Green, Camille; Schiff, Devora B.S.; Moran, Meena S.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The excision repair cross-complementation 1 (ERCC1) enzyme plays a rate-limiting role in the nucleotide excision repair pathway and is associated with resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy in cancers of the head and neck and the lung. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathologic and prognostic significance of ERCC1 expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast conservation therapy. Methods and Materials: Paraffin specimens from 504 women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conservation therapy were constructed into tissue microarrays. The array was stained for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and ERCC1. This was then correlated with clinicopathologic factors and outcomes data. Results: ERCC-1 expression was evaluable in 366 cases (72%). In this group, 32% and 38% of patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, respectively. Increased ERCC-1 expression was found to be correlated with ER positivity (p 50 (p 50. To our knowledge, this is the first study investigating ERCC1 expression in patients receiving adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer.

  20. Outcomes in a Multi-institutional Cohort of Patients Treated With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Advanced or Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paly, Jonathan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Biggs, Peter J.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Roeder, Falk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Martínez-Monge, Rafael [Radiation Oncology Division, University of Navarre, Pamplona (Spain); Whitson, Jared [Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Calvo, Felipe A. [Departamento de Oncología, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Fastner, Gerd; Sedlmayer, Felix [Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Salzburg (Austria); Wong, William W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Ellis, Rodney J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seidman Cancer Center University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Haddock, Michael G.; Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A., E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study aimed to analyze outcomes in a multi-institutional cohort of patients with advanced or recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 2010, 98 patients received IORT for advanced or locally recurrent RCC at 9 institutions. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 3.5 years. Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Chained imputation accounted for missing data, and multivariate Cox hazards regression tested significance. Results: IORT was delivered during nephrectomy for advanced disease (28%) or during resection of locally recurrent RCC in the renal fossa (72%). Sixty-nine percent of the patients were male, and the median age was 58 years. At the time of primary resection, the T stages were as follows: 17% T1, 12% T2, 55% T3, and 16% T4. Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a visibly complete resection of tumor. Preoperative or postoperative external beam radiation therapy was administered to 27% and 35% of patients, respectively. The 5-year OS was 37% for advanced disease and 55% for locally recurrent disease. The respective 5-year DSS was 41% and 60%. The respective 5-year DFS was 39% and 52%. Initial nodal involvement (hazard ratio [HR] 2.9-3.6, P<.01), presence of sarcomatoid features (HR 3.7-6.9, P<.05), and higher IORT dose (HR 1.3, P<.001) were statistically significantly associated with decreased survival. Adjuvant systemic therapy was associated with decreased DSS (HR 2.4, P=.03). For locally recurrent tumors, positive margin status (HR 2.6, P=.01) was associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: We report the largest known cohort of patients with RCC managed by IORT and have identified several factors associated with survival. The outcomes for patients receiving IORT in the setting of local recurrence compare favorably to

  1. Superior metastasis-free survival for patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy compared to radical prostatectomy: A propensity score-matched analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Markovina, MD, PhD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: For high-risk prostate cancer (HR-PCa in men with a life expectancy of at least 10 years, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends radiation therapy (RT plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with category 1 evidence or radical prostatectomy (RP as an acceptable initial therapy. Randomized evidence regarding which therapy is optimal for disease control is lacking for men with HR-PCa. We performed a propensity-score-matched comparison of outcomes for men with localized HR-PCa treated with primary RT or RP. Methods and materials: The medical records of patients with localized HR-PCa who were treated at our institution between 2002 and 2011 were reviewed. Patient and disease characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were collected. A combination of nearest-neighbor propensity score matching on age, Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27 comorbidity index, prostate-specific antigen, biopsy Gleason scores, and clinical T-stage as well as exact matching on prostate-specific antigen, biopsy Gleason scores, and clinical T-stage was performed. Outcomes were measured from diagnosis. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare metastasis-free and overall survival. Results: A total of 246 patients were identified with 62 propensity-score-matched pairs. ADT was administered to 6.5% and 80.6% of patients receiving RP and RT, respectively. Five-year rates of metastasis for RP and RT were 33% and 8.9%, respectively (P = .003. Overall survival was not different. Delay of salvage therapy was longer for patients undergoing primary RT (P < .001. Findings were similar when only those patients who did not receive ADT were compared. Conclusions: At our institution, treatment with primary RT resulted in superior metastasis-free survival over RP. This was not accompanied by an improvement in OS.

  2. SU-F-T-432: Magnetic Field Dose Effects for Various Radiation Beam Geometries for Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim-Reinders, S [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Physics (Canada); Keller, B; McCann, C; Sahgal, A; Lee, J; Kim, A [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated partial breast irradiation (HPBI) is being used at our clinic to treat inoperable breast cancer patients who have advanced disease. We are investigating how these patients could benefit from being treated in an MRI-linac, where real-time daily MRI tumor imaging and plan adaptation would be possible. As a first step, this study evaluates the dosimetric impact of the magnetic field for different radiation beam geometries on relevant OARs. Methods: Five patients previously treated using HPBI were selected. Six treatment plans were generated for each patient, evaluating three beam geometries (VMAT, IMRT, 3DCRT) with and without B{sub 0}=1.5 T. The Monaco TPS was used with the Elekta MRI-Linac beam model, where the magnetic field is orthogonal to the radiation beam. All plans were re-scaled to the same isocoverage with a prescription of 40Gy/5 to the PTV. Plans were evaluated for the effect of the magnetic field and beam modality on skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}, lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} and mean heart dose. Results: Averaged over all patients, skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}for 3DCRT was higher than VMAT and IMRT (by +22% and +21%, with B{sub 0}-ON). The magnetic field caused larger increases in skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}for 3DCRT (+8%) than VMAT (+3%) and IMRT (+4%) compared with B{sub 0}-OFF. With B{sub 0}-ON, 3DCRT had a markedly lower mean heart dose than VMAT (by 538cGy) and IMRT (by 562cGy); for lung V{sub 2} {sub 0}, 3DCRT had a marginally lower dose than VMAT (by −2.2%) and IMRT (also −2.2%). The magnetic field had minimal effect on the mean heart dose and lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} for all geometries. Conclusion: The decreased skin dose in VMAT and IMRT can potentially mitigate the effects of skin reactions for HPBI in an MRI-linac. This study illustrated that more beam angles may result in lower skin toxicity and better tumor conformality, with the trade-off of elevated heart and lung doses. We are receiving funding support from Elekta.

  3. Targetting in atelectatic lung by positron emission tomography in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kai; Wang Luhua; Liang Jun; Ou Guangfei; Lu Jima

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potential benefit of incorporating fluorodeoxyglucose positron e- mission tomography (FDG PET) to delineate tire gross tumor volume(GTV) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) complicated with atelectasis who are to be treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). Methods: Fourteen patients histopathologically proven as having NSCLC with image diagnosed as complicated with various degrees were studied in this study. All patients were scanned with both thoracic CT and thoracic or whole body PET. The GTV was delineated basing on both CT image and PET image (CT-GTV, PET- GTV) and the volume of each GTV(designated CT-GTV and PET-GTV) was compared by 3DCRT plan. Results: Each paired CT-GTV and PET-GTV was different from each other. All patients' GTV was reduced to an average of 27 cm 3 (20.4%) with median CT-PET of 133 cm 3 (90-180 cm 3 ) and median PET-GTV of 106 cm 3 , with a in- crease of 16.9%, 22 cm 3 ). The reduction of PET-GTV was due to PET could so differ cancer-induced atelectasis from gross tumor that it reduced the tarbet volume and spared more surrounding normal tissues. Conclusions: The incorporation of FDG PET data with gross tumor delineation is able to improve the accuracy of 3DCRT for non-small cell lung cancer patients complicated with atelectasis. (authors)

  4. Importance of Local Control in Early-Stage Prostate Cancer: Outcomes of Patients With Positive Post-Radiation Therapy Biopsy Results Treated in RTOG 9408

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, Daniel J.; Hu, Chen; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Souhami, Luis; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Chafe, Susan Maria Jacinta; Leibenhaut, Mark H.; Narayan, Samir; Torres-Roca, Javier; Michalski, Jeff; Zeitzer, Kenneth L.; Donavanik, Viroon; Sandler, Howard; McGowan, David G.; Jones, Christopher U.; Shipley, William U.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the association between positive post-radiation therapy (RT) biopsy results and subsequent clinical outcomes in males with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group study 94-08 analyzed 1979 males with prostate cancer, stage T1b-T2b and prostate-specific antigen concentrations of ≤20 ng/dL, to investigate whether 4 months of total androgen suppression (TAS) added to RT improved survival compared to RT alone. Patients randomized to receive TAS received flutamide with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist. According to protocol, patients without evidence of clinical recurrence or initiation of additional endocrine therapy underwent repeat prostate biopsy 2 years after RT completion. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of positive post-RT biopsy results on clinical outcomes. Results: A total of 831 patients underwent post-RT biopsy, 398 were treated with RT alone and 433 with RT plus TAS. Patients with positive post-RT biopsy results had higher rates of biochemical failure (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-2.1) and distant metastasis (HR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.3-4.4) and inferior disease-specific survival (HR = 3.8; 95% CI = 1.9-7.5). Positive biopsy results remained predictive of such outcomes after correction for potential confounders such as Gleason score, tumor stage, and TAS administration. Prior TAS therapy did not prevent elevated risk of adverse outcome in the setting of post-RT positive biopsy results. Patients with Gleason score ≥7 with a positive biopsy result additionally had inferior overall survival compared to those with a negative biopsy result (HR = 1.56; 95% CI = 1.04-2.35). Conclusions: Positive post-RT biopsy is associated with increased rates of distant metastases and inferior disease-specific survival in patients treated with definitive RT and was associated with inferior overall

  5. The Impact of Pretreatment Prostate Volume on Severe Acute Genitourinary Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizer, Ayal A.; Anderson, Nicole S.; Oh, Steven C.; Yu, James B.; McKeon, Anne M.; Decker, Roy H.; Peschel, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of pretreatment prostate volume on the development of severe acute genitourinary toxicity in patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2007, a consecutive sample of 214 patients who underwent IMRT (75.6 Gy) for prostate cancer at two referral centers was analyzed. Prostate volumes were obtained from computed tomography scans taken during treatment simulation. Genitourinary toxicity was defined using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0 guidelines. Acute toxicity was defined as any toxicity originating within 90 days of the completion of radiation therapy. Patients were characterized as having a small or large prostate depending on whether their prostate volume was less than or greater than 50 cm 3 , respectively. Genitourinary toxicity was compared in these groups using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test, as appropriate. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to further assess the impact of prostate volume on severe (Grade 3) acute genitourinary toxicity. Results: Patients with large prostates (>50 cm 3 ) had a higher rate of acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity (p = .02). Prostate volume was predictive of the likelihood of developing acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity on bivariate (p = .004) and multivariate (p = .006) logistic regression. Every 27.0 cm 3 increase in prostate volume doubled the likelihood of acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Patients with larger prostates are at higher risk for the development of severe acute genitourinary toxicity when treated with IMRT for prostate cancer.

  6. Effect of HMB/Arg/Gln on the prevention of radiation dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Takayuki; Matsuura, Kazuto; Asada, Yukinori

    2014-01-01

    This prospective randomized Phase 2 study was designed to evaluate the preventive effect of an oral nutrition supplement composed of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, arginine and glutamine (beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate/arginine/glutamine) on radiation dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients. Forty patients with histologically proven head and neck cancer, treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy involving cisplatin were recruited. They were randomly assigned to the beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate/arginine/glutamine supplement treatment group (Group A) or the control group that received no supplement (Group B). The primary endpoint of this study was the percentage of patients developing ≥Grade 3 dermatitis. The secondary endpoints were the percentage of patients developing ≥Grade 2 dermatitis, and the duration of each grade of dermatitis relative to the observation period. The incidence of ≥Grade 3 dermatitis did not differ between the two groups. However, as secondary endpoints of this study, the incidence of ≥Grade 2 dermatitis was lower in Group A than B (62.6 vs. 94.4%; P < 0.05), and the duration of ≥Grade 1 dermatitis was shorter in Group A than B (44.8 vs. 56.7%; P < 0.01), as was the duration of ≥Grade 2 dermatitis (16.5 vs. 26.5%; P < 0.05). Our study indicated that beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate/arginine/glutamine supplementation was potentially effective in the prevention of radiation dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients. (author)

  7. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Treatment Response Evaluation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yunseon; Jung, Sang Hoon; Paik, Seung Woon; Kim, Seong Hyun; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Kim, Young Kon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) as a response evaluation indicator for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria of this retrospective study were DW MRI acquisition within 1 month before and 3 to 5 months after RT. In total, 48 patients were enrolled. Two radiation oncologists measured the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Possible predictive factors, including alteration of the ADC value before and 3 to 5 month after RT, in relation to local progression-free survival (LPFS) were analyzed and compared. Results: Three months after RT, 6 patients (12.5%) showed a complete response, and 27 patients (56.3%) showed a partial response when evaluated using the modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). The average ADC ± SD values were 1.21 ± 0.27 ( × 10 −3  mm 2 /s) before and 1.41 ± 0.36 ( × 10 −3  mm 2 /s) after RT (P<.001). The most significant prognostic factor related to LPFS was mRECIST (P<.001). The increment of ADC value (≥20%) was also a significant factor (P=.02), but RECIST (version 1.1; P=.11) was not. When RECIST was combined with the increment of ADC value (≥20%), the LPFS rates were significantly different between the groups (P=.004), and the area under the curve value (0.745) was comparable with that of mRECIST (0.765). Conclusions: ADC value change before and after RT in HCC was closely related to LPFS. ADC value and RECIST may substitute for mRECIST in patients who cannot receive contrast agents

  8. The volume effect in radiation-related late small bowel complications. Results of a clinical study of the EORTC Radiotherapy Cooperative Group in patients treated for rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letschert, J.G.J.; Lebesque, J.V.; Aleman, B.M.P.; Bartelink, H.; Bosset, J.F.; Horiot, J.C.; Cionini, L.; Hamers, J.P.; Leer, J.W.H.; van Glabbele, M.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the correlation between irradiated small bowel volume and late occurring small bowel complications. Methods: Small bowel volumes in the high-dose region were measured using orthogonal barium films for 203 patients treated for rectal carcinoma with pelvic postoperative radiotherapy to 50 Gy in an EORTC multicentric study. Results: The 5-year estimate of lat pelvic small bowel obstruction requiring surgery was 11%. No correlation between the irradiated small bowel volume and obstruction was detected. The actuarial 5-year estimate of chronic diarrhea varied from 31% in patients with irradiated small bowel volumes below 77 cm 3 to 42% in patients with volumes over 328 cm 3 . This correlation was significant in the univariate and multivariate analysis (p=0.025). The type of rectal surgery significantly influenced the incidence of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption, the actuarial 5-year estimate being 49% and 26% after low anterior resection and abdominoperineal resection, respectively (p=0.04). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that there is a volume-effect in radiation-induced diarrhea atr a dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. No volume-effect for small bowel obstruction was detected at this dose-level in pelvic postoperative radiotherapy. A review of the literature data on small bowel obstruction indicates that the volume effect at this dose level can only be demonstrated in patients who were treated with extended field radiotherapy (estimated small bowel volume 800 cm 3 ) after intra-abdominal surgery. (author). 22 refs., 5 tabs

  9. The efficacy of chlorhexidine gel in reduction of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species in patients treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, J.B.; McBride, B.C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Merilees, H.; Spinelli, J.

    1991-01-01

    Xerostomia may develop in patients with cancer who receive radiotherapy that includes the salivary glands in the field. These patients are at high risk of rampant dental caries. Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species have been associated with dental caries. Quantitative counts of these organisms demonstrated high caries risk due to streptococci in 66% and due to lactobacilli in 100% of patients studied. Use of chlorhexidine rinse was shown to reduce S. mutans counts 1.1 logs and lactobacilli 1.1 logs. The use of chlorhexidine gel resulted in a reduction of S. mutans 1.2 logs and lactobacilli 2.2 logs. In the subjects using the rinse, caries risk due to streptococci was reduced to low levels in 44% and due to lactobacilli in only one subject, with reduction to moderate risk in one third and no change in risk in the remaining patients. The use of chlorhexidine gel was found to reduce the caries risk associated with streptococci to low levels in all patients, and the risk associated with lactobacilli to low and moderate risk in two thirds of patients

  10. The efficacy of chlorhexidine gel in reduction of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species in patients treated with radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, J.B.; McBride, B.C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Merilees, H.; Spinelli, J. (Cancer Control Agency of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada))

    1991-02-01

    Xerostomia may develop in patients with cancer who receive radiotherapy that includes the salivary glands in the field. These patients are at high risk of rampant dental caries. Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species have been associated with dental caries. Quantitative counts of these organisms demonstrated high caries risk due to streptococci in 66% and due to lactobacilli in 100% of patients studied. Use of chlorhexidine rinse was shown to reduce S. mutans counts 1.1 logs and lactobacilli 1.1 logs. The use of chlorhexidine gel resulted in a reduction of S. mutans 1.2 logs and lactobacilli 2.2 logs. In the subjects using the rinse, caries risk due to streptococci was reduced to low levels in 44% and due to lactobacilli in only one subject, with reduction to moderate risk in one third and no change in risk in the remaining patients. The use of chlorhexidine gel was found to reduce the caries risk associated with streptococci to low levels in all patients, and the risk associated with lactobacilli to low and moderate risk in two thirds of patients.

  11. Outcomes and toxicities in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy alone or brachytherapy and supplemental external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlussel Markovic, Emily; Buckstein, Michael; Stone, Nelson N; Stock, Richard G

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the cancer control outcomes and long-term treatment-related morbidity of brachytherapy as well as combination brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. A retrospective review was conducted in a prospectively collected database of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who were treated either with brachytherapy or brachytherapy and EBRT, with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), in the period 1990-2014. Urinary and erectile dysfunction symptoms were measured using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the Mount Sinai erectile function scale and the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM). Cancer control endpoints included biochemical failure and development of distant metastases. All statistical analyses were carried out using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS). Survival curves were calculated using Kaplan-Meier actuarial methods and compared using log-rank tests. Cox regression multivariate analyses were used to test the effect of multiple variables on treatment outcomes. A total of 902 patients were identified, with a median follow-up of 91 months. Of these, 390 received brachytherapy and 512 received combination therapy with EBRT. In patients with one intermediate-risk factor, the addition of EBRT did not significantly affect freedom from biochemical failure or distant metastases. Among patients with two or three intermediate-risk factors, added EBRT did not improve freedom from biochemical failure. Significant differences in late toxicity between patients treated with brachytherapy vs combination brachytherapy and EBRT were identified including urge incontinence (P actuarial methods showed that patients receiving combination therapy more frequently experienced loss of potency, as measured by the Mount Sinai erectile function scale (P = 0.040). Brachytherapy monotherapy results in equal biochemical and distant control in both patients with

  12. SU-F-R-53: CT-Based Radiomics Analysis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, E; Coroller, T; Narayan, V; Agrawal, V; Hou, Y; Romano, J; Franco, I; Mak, R; Aerts, H [Brigham Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is the standard of care for medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and has demonstrated excellent local control and survival. However, some patients still develop distant metastases and local recurrence, and therefore, there is a clinical need to identify patients at high-risk of disease recurrence. The aim of the current study is to use a radiomics approach to identify imaging biomarkers, based on tumor phenotype, for clinical outcomes in SBRT patients. Methods: Radiomic features were extracted from free breathing computed tomography (CT) images of 113 Stage I-II NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. Their association to and prognostic performance for distant metastasis (DM), locoregional recurrence (LRR) and survival was assessed and compared with conventional features (tumor volume and diameter) and clinical parameters (e.g. performance status, overall stage). The prognostic performance was evaluated using the concordance index (CI). Multivariate model performance was evaluated using cross validation. All p-values were corrected for multiple testing using the false discovery rate. Results: Radiomic features were associated with DM (one feature), LRR (one feature) and survival (four features). Conventional features were only associated with survival and one clinical parameter was associated with LRR and survival. One radiomic feature was significantly prognostic for DM (CI=0.670, p<0.1 from random), while none of the conventional and clinical parameters were significant for DM. The multivariate radiomic model had a higher median CI (0.671) for DM than the conventional (0.618) and clinical models (0.617). Conclusion: Radiomic features have potential to be imaging biomarkers for clinical outcomes that conventional imaging metrics and clinical parameters cannot predict in SBRT patients, such as distant metastasis. Development of a radiomics biomarker that can identify patients at high-risk of

  13. SU-F-R-53: CT-Based Radiomics Analysis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huynh, E; Coroller, T; Narayan, V; Agrawal, V; Hou, Y; Romano, J; Franco, I; Mak, R; Aerts, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is the standard of care for medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and has demonstrated excellent local control and survival. However, some patients still develop distant metastases and local recurrence, and therefore, there is a clinical need to identify patients at high-risk of disease recurrence. The aim of the current study is to use a radiomics approach to identify imaging biomarkers, based on tumor phenotype, for clinical outcomes in SBRT patients. Methods: Radiomic features were extracted from free breathing computed tomography (CT) images of 113 Stage I-II NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. Their association to and prognostic performance for distant metastasis (DM), locoregional recurrence (LRR) and survival was assessed and compared with conventional features (tumor volume and diameter) and clinical parameters (e.g. performance status, overall stage). The prognostic performance was evaluated using the concordance index (CI). Multivariate model performance was evaluated using cross validation. All p-values were corrected for multiple testing using the false discovery rate. Results: Radiomic features were associated with DM (one feature), LRR (one feature) and survival (four features). Conventional features were only associated with survival and one clinical parameter was associated with LRR and survival. One radiomic feature was significantly prognostic for DM (CI=0.670, p<0.1 from random), while none of the conventional and clinical parameters were significant for DM. The multivariate radiomic model had a higher median CI (0.671) for DM than the conventional (0.618) and clinical models (0.617). Conclusion: Radiomic features have potential to be imaging biomarkers for clinical outcomes that conventional imaging metrics and clinical parameters cannot predict in SBRT patients, such as distant metastasis. Development of a radiomics biomarker that can identify patients at high-risk of

  14. Evaluation of effect of body mass index and weight loss on survival of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Kuo-Ping; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Chang, Ting-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies report body-mass index (BMI) and percent weight loss (WL) to have prognostic significance when treating patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, most of these investigations studied patients treated using different radiotherapeutic techniques. We evaluated the predictive effect of these two nutrition-related measurements on therapeutic outcome in NPC patients who only received intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as part of their total treatment program. We retrospectively studied NPC patients treated with IMRT from January 2006 to February 2012. Cox proportional hazards was used to test the association of pretreatment BMI (<23 kg/m 2 vs. ≥23 kg/m 2 ) and percent weight loss (≥5 % vs. <5 %) during therapy and related survival rates while controlling for various potential confounders. Eighty-one (34 %) of the 238 patients had BMIs ≥23 kg/m 2 at pretreatment and 150 (63 %) had significant (≥5 %) weight loss. Median follow-up time was 41.71 months; median radiotherapy was 7.46 ± 0.77 weeks. Those with BMIs ≥23 kg/m 2 did not have a better 3-year overall survival (p = 0.672), 3-year disease specific survival (p = 0.341), 3-year locoregional free survival (p = 0.281), or 3-year distant metastatic free survival (p = 0.134). Those with significant WL (≥5 %) did not have worse 3-year clinical endpoints, even after stratifying magnitude of weight loss by BMI category. In sensitivity test, the adjusted hazard ratio remained statistically insignificant using different cutoffs for BMIs and percent weight loss. This study found no significant relationship between BMI and percent weight loss on survival of NPC patients receiving IMRT based therapy. Further studies might want to consider other nutrition related factors as prognostic indicators when studying the correlate between malnutrition and survival in this population. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0443-3) contains supplementary material, which

  15. Salivary Cytokine Levels and Oral Mucositis in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, Paolo, E-mail: Paolo.bossi@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Bergamini, Cristiana [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Miceli, Rosalba [Clinical Epidemiology and Trial Organization Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Cova, Agata [Unity of Immunotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Orlandi, Ester [Radiotherapy 2 Unity, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Resteghini, Carlo; Locati, Laura; Alfieri, Salvatore; Imbimbo, Martina; Granata, Roberta [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Mariani, Luigi [Clinical Epidemiology and Trial Organization Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Iacovelli, Nicola Alessandro [Radiotherapy 2 Unity, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Huber, Veronica [Unity of Immunotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Cavallo, Anna [Department of Physics and Radiation Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Licitra, Lisa [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Rivoltini, Licia [Unity of Immunotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: We assessed the presence of salivary cytokines, their modulation during chemoradiation therapy (CTRT), and their association with oral mucositis severity in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: The present prospective observational study enrolled 55 patients with locally advanced HNC requiring CTRT. We also studied 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with other cancers. The salivary levels of 13 cytokines were analyzed. We constructed a cytokine predictive score of oral mucositis severity. Results: The baseline salivary cytokine levels were not associated with the severity of treatment-induced oral mucositis. The cytokine levels overall increased during treatment, especially in patients with worse mucositis. In particular, on univariable analysis, an increase of interleukin (IL)-1β (area under the curve [AUC] 0.733; P=.009), IL-6 (AUC 0.746; P=.005), and tumor necrosis factor-α (AUC 0.710; P=.005) at the third week of treatment was significantly associated with the development of severe oral mucositis. On multivariable analysis, the predictive score based on the IL-1β and IL-6 changes from baseline to week 3 was an early strong predictor of higher grade oral mucositis. Conclusions: The treatment of HNC patients with concurrent CTRT induces a significant increase in the salivary levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, all positively associated with the severity of mucosal toxicity. A greater increase of IL-1β and IL-6 3 weeks after treatment initiation is predictive of worse oral mucositis, representing a potential tool for the early identification of patients at risk.

  16. Long-Term Outcome and Quality of Life of Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma Treated With or Without Pelvic Radiotherapy in the Post Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Carcinoma 1 (PORTEC-1) Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nout, Remi A.; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V.; Lybeert, Marnix L. M.; Warlam-Rodenhuis, Carla C.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Lutgens, Ludy C. H. W.; Pras, Betty; van Putten, Wim L. J.; Creutzberg, Carien L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the long-term outcome and health-related quality of life (HRQL) of patients with endometrial carcinoma (EC) treated with or without pelvic radiotherapy in the Post Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Carcinoma 1 (PORTEC-1) trial. Patients and Methods Between 1990 and

  17. Evaluation of skin surface dose for head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy using in vivo dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon Sil; Lee, Dong Soo; Yoo, Mi Na; Hong, Joo Young; Yoon, Se Chul; Jang, Hong Suk

    2011-01-01

    Use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer is gradually increasing, because it could facilitate more sophsticated treatment of target volumes and reduction of acute and late sequelae. However, theoretically, there is a potential risk of increased skin surface dose resulting from multiple obliquity effects caused by multiple tangential beams. Moreover, we sometimes confronted with more skin reactions in the patients treated with IMRT than conventional techniques. In this study, we evaluated skin surface dose adjacent to the target volumes to verify whether the use of IMRT would increase the skin dose more than we predicted. This study had shown that the use of IMRT did not increase the skin surface hot point dose. The measured skin surface dose was 20 to 40 percent of the adjacent target prescription dose, and was within acceptable dose range. Our study had some limitations with small number of experimental patients and methodological problems. Potential risk of increasing skin dose with bolus effect of aquaplaster should be examined in the future trials. In addition, the accurate set-up verification should be maintained because of steep dose gradient between skin surface and target volumes within a short distance in the head and neck cancer patients.

  18. Adenocarcinoma of the rectum treated by radical external radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catton, Charles N; Brierley, James D; Cummings, Bernard J; Wong, C Shun; Keane, Thomas J; O' Sullivan, Brian; Goodman, Phyllis

    1995-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the long-term survival and response rates of patients with primary rectal cancer to radical radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1978 and 1987, 229 patients were treated at the Princess Margaret Hospital with radical external radiation therapy for adenocarcinoma of the rectum. Patients were treated with radiation either because they were considered to have unresectable tumors, were medically unfit, or refused surgery, or for a combination of these factors. Doses ranged from 40 Gy in 10 fractions by a split course over 6 weeks to 60 Gy in 30 fractions in 6 weeks. The most commonly prescribed treatment was 52 Gy target absorbed dose in 20 daily fractions over 4 weeks. Results: The overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 27%; for patients with mobile tumors, it was 48%, partially fixed 27%, and fixed tumor 4%. Forty-eight of the 97 patients (50%) with mobile tumors, 11 of the 37 patients (30%) with partially fixed tumors, and 7 of the 77 patients (9%) with fixed tumors had clinically complete tumor regression following radiation. Of these, 18 of the mobile, 6 of the partially fixed, and 5 of the fixed tumors later relapsed locally. Fifty patients had salvage surgery after failing to achieve complete remission or for local relapse, with a 5-year actuarial survival rate of 42% from the time of surgery. Conclusion: Although radiation therapy can cure some patients with mobile or partially fixed rectal adenocarcinomas who refuse or are unsuitable for surgery, local control remains a problem; salvage surgery should be considered in patients who relapse or fail to go into complete remission and who are fit to undergo surgery. For patients with fixed rectal cancers, high-dose external-beam radiation should be part of a planned preoperative regimen or be palliative in intent.

  19. Continued Benefit to Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Across Multiple Definitions of High-Risk Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schuyler; Sandler, Howard M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors in patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and androgen deprivation (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2008 at University of Michigan Medical Center, 718 men were consecutively treated with EBRT to at least 75 Gy. Seven definitions of high-risk prostate cancer, applying to 11–33% of patients, were evaluated. Biochemical failure (BF), salvage ADT use, metastatic progression, and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: Each high-risk definition was associated with increased BF (hazard ratio [HR] 2.8–3.9, p < 0.0001), salvage ADT use (HR 3.9–6.3, p < 0.0001), metastasis (HR 3.7–6.6, p < 0.0001), and PCSM (HR 3.7–16.2, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, an increasing number of high-risk features predicted worse outcome. Adjuvant ADT yielded significant reductions in both metastases (HR 0.19–0.38, p < 0.001) and PCSM (HR 0.38–0.50, p < 0.05) for all high-risk definitions (with the exception of clinical Stage T3–4 disease) but improved BF only for those with elevated Gleason scores (p < 0.03, HR 0.25–0.48). When treated with ADT and dose-escalated EBRT, patients with Gleason scores 8 to 10, without other high-risk features, had 8-year freedom from BF of 74%, freedom from distant metastases of 93%, and cause-specific survival of 92%, with salvage ADT used in 16% of patients. Conclusion: Adjuvant ADT results in a significant improvement in clinical progression and PCSM across multiple definitions of high-risk disease even with dose-escalated EBRT. There is a subset of patients, characterized by multiple high-risk features or the presence of Gleason Pattern 5, who remain at significant risk for metastasis and PCSM despite current treatment.

  20. BRCC3 acts as a prognostic marker in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy and mediates radiation resistance in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Ziwei; Xu, Bingqing; Qu, Chen; Tao, Yalan; Chen, Chen; Hua, Wenfeng; Feng, Guokai; Chang, Hui; Liu, Zhigang; Li, Guo; Jiang, Changbin; Yi, Wei; Zeng, Musheng; Xia, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    BRCC3 has been found to be aberrantly expressed in breast tumors and involved in DNA damage response. The contribution of BRCC3 to nasopharyngeal carcinoma prognosis and radiosensitivity is still unclear. Immunohistochemical analysis of BRCC3 was carried out in 100 nasopharyngeal carcinoma tissues, and the protein level was correlated to patient survival. BRCC3 expression of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines was determined by Western-blotting and real-time PCR. Additionally, the effects of BRCC3 knockdown on nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell clongenic survival, DNA damage repair, and cell cycle distribution after irradiation was assessed. The BRCC3 protein level was inversely correlated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma patient overall survival (P < 0.001) and 3-year loco-regional relapse-free survival (P = 0.034). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that BRCC3 expression was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.010). The expression of BRCC3 was much higher in radioresistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells than in radiosensitive cells. Knockdown of BRCC3 increased the cell survival fraction, attenuated DNA damage repair and resulted in G2/M cell cycle arrest in radioresistant NPC cells. High BRCC3 expression in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients is associated with poor survival. BRCC3 knockdown could abate the radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. These findings suggest the utility of BRCC3 as a prognostic biomarker and novel target for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  1. Effect of PS-K on long-term survival of primary lung cancer patients treated with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Atsushi; Nakajima, Nobuaki; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Saito, Yoshihiro; Mitomo, Osamu; Niibe, Hideo

    1984-01-01

    The effect of PS-K on long-term survival of primary lung cancer patients irradiated over 60 Gy through 1977 to 1982 was studied. PS-K was administrated orally 3.0 g, daily or intermittently in the pattern of 2 weeks per a month on patients of positive PPD skin test. All cases irradiated over 60 Gy were 174 (Group A) containing 62 cases with PS-K (Group B) and 112 cases without PS-K (Group C). Of group B, 44 cases were administrated within a month after curative irradiation (Group B1), 7 cases were administrated on time maintaining long-term good condition after irradiation (Group B2) and 11 cases were administrated after recognition of recurrence or metastasis (Group B3). Following results were obtained. 1. Obvious prolongation of survivals was recognized in the patients with PS-K after irradiation. (1) The cumulative 5 years survival rates of Group A, B 1 and C were 11.0%, 28.8% and 4.8%, respectively. (2) The cumulative 5 years survival rates of stage I,11 were 45.7% with PS-K and 10.7% without PS-K. (3) The cumulative 5 years survival rates of 21 cases matched age, sex, stage, histological type and tumor dose with and without PS-K were 37.8% and 7.2%. (4) In Group B 2, 5 cases out of 7 cases have been alived, but in Group B 3, satisfactory long-term survivals ware not obtained. 2. The necessary conditions which obtain long-term survival with PS-K were thought to be follows. One is that the tumor is brought almost to vanish by irradiation. Another is that the condition of host is superior to that of tumor in host-tumor relationship. 3. The possibility of intermittent administration of PS-K was suggested. (author)

  2. Measurement-based Monte Carlo simulation of high definition dose evaluation for nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated by using intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C.Y.; Tung, C.J.; Lee, C.C.; Lin, M.H.; Chao, T.C.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) simulation using a high definition (HD) phantom was used to evaluate the dose distribution in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Around nasopharyngeal cavity, there exists many small volume organs-at-risk (OARs) such as the optic nerves, auditory nerves, cochlea, and semicircular canal which necessitate the use of a high definition phantom for accurate and correct dose evaluation. The aim of this research was to study the advantages of using an HD phantom for MBMC simulation in NPC patients treated with IMRT. The MBMC simulation in this study was based on the IMRT treatment plan of three NPC patients generated by the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) of the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) using a calculation grid of 2 mm 2 . The NPC tumor was treated to a cumulative dose of 7000 cGy in 35 fractions using the shrinking-field sequential IMRT (SIMRT) method. The BEAMnrc MC Code was used to simulate a Varian EX21 linear accelerator treatment head. The HD phantom contained 0.5 × 0.5 × 1 mm 3 voxels for the nasopharyngeal area and 0.5 × 0.5 × 3 mm 3 for the rest of the head area. An efficiency map was obtained for the amorphous silicon aS1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to adjust the weighting of each particle in the phase-space file for each IMRT beam. Our analysis revealed that small volume organs such as the eighth cranial nerve, semicircular canal, cochlea and external auditory canal showed an absolute dose difference of ≥200 cGy, while the dose difference for larger organs such as the parotid glands and tumor was negligible for the MBMC simulation using the HD phantom. The HD phantom was found to be suitable for Monte Carlo dose volume analysis of small volume organs. - Highlights: • HD dose evaluation for IMRT of NPC patients have been verified by the MC method. • MC results shows

  3. Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation on Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Modern Systemic Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D., E-mail: tendulr@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rehman, Sana; Shukla, Monica E.; Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Moore, Halle; Budd, G. Thomas [Department of Solid Tumor Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Dietz, Jill; Crowe, Joseph P. [Department of General Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Macklis, Roger [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) remains controversial for patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes (LN+). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all 369 breast cancer patients with 1-3 LN+ who underwent mastectomy without neoadjuvant systemic therapy between 2000 and 2007 at Cleveland Clinic. Results: We identified 271 patients with 1-3 LN+ who did not receive PMRT and 98 who did receive PMRT. The median follow-up time was 5.2 years, and the median number of LN dissected was 11. Of those not treated with PMRT, 79% received adjuvant chemotherapy (of whom 70% received a taxane), 79% received hormonal therapy, and 5% had no systemic therapy. Of the Her2/neu amplified tumors, 42% received trastuzumab. The 5-year rate of locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 8.9% without PMRT vs 0% with PMRT (P=.004). For patients who did not receive PMRT, univariate analysis showed 6 risk factors significantly (P<.05) correlated with LRR: estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor negative (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6), lymphovascular invasion (HR 2.4), 2-3 LN+ (HR 2.6), nodal ratio >25% (HR 2.7), extracapsular extension (ECE) (HR 3.7), and Bloom-Richardson grade III (HR 3.1). The 5-year LRR rate was 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1%-6.8%] for patients with 0-1 risk factor vs 14.6% [95% CI, 8.4%-20.9%] for patients with {>=}2 risk factors (P=.0006), respectively. On multivariate analysis, ECE (HR 4.3, P=.0006) and grade III (HR 3.6, P=.004) remained significant risk factors for LRR. The 5-year LRR was 4.1% in patients with neither grade III nor ECE, 8.1% with either grade III or ECE, and 50.4% in patients with both grade III and ECE (P<.0001); the corresponding 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates were 91.8%, 85.4%, and 59.1% (P=.0004), respectively. Conclusions: PMRT offers excellent control for patients with 1-3 LN+, with no locoregional failures to date. Patients with 1-3 LN+ who have grade III disease and/or ECE should be strongly considered

  4. Does radiation dose to the salivary glands and oral cavity predict patient-rated xerostomia and sticky saliva in head and neck cancer patients treated with curative radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellema, Anke Petra; Doornaert, Patricia; Slotman, Ben J.; Rene Leemans, C.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To investigate the association between the mean salivary gland and oral cavity dose, with patient-rated moderate and severe xerostomia and sticky saliva. Patients and methods: One hundred and fifty-seven patients treated with bilateral irradiation for head and neck cancer were included. The parotid and submandibular glands and the oral cavity were delineated on plannings-CT scans. At baseline and 6 and 12 months self-reported xerostomia and sticky saliva were assessed using the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 questionnaire. Results: At 6 months a significant association between the mean parotid (MD par ) and mean submandibular dose (MD subm ) and xerostomia was observed (OR-MD par : 1.17; P=0.002 and OR-MD subm : 1.08; P=0.02). Between MD par and MD subm , a significant interaction term was present. No significant association was found with the oral cavity dose. Xerostomia was reversible depending on MD par and MD subm . Considering Sticky saliva, a significant association was found at 6 and 12 months with MD subm (OR: 1.03; P par and MD subm influence the risk of xerostomia in irradiated patients at 6 months. This probability as a function of the mean parotid dose significantly depended on the mean dose in the submandibular glands. Sticky saliva mainly depends on MD subm

  5. Health-Related Quality of Life in Elderly Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Treated With Short-Course Radiation Therapy Plus Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide

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    Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gminniti@ospedalesantandrea.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Scaringi, Claudia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Baldoni, Alessandra [Department of Medical Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Lanzetta, Gaetano [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); De Sanctis, Vitaliana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Esposito, Vincenzo [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To describe the quality of life (QOL) in elderly patients with glioblastoma (GBM) treated with an abbreviated course of radiation therapy (RT; 40 Gy in 15 fractions) plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: Health-related QOL (HRQOL) was assessed by European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30, version 3) and EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire Brain Cancer Module (QLQ-BN20). Changes from baseline in the score of 9 preselected domains (global QLQ, social functioning, cognitive functioning, emotional functioning, physical functioning, motor dysfunction, communication deficit, fatigue, insomnia) were determined 4 weeks after RT and thereafter every 8 weeks during the treatment until disease progression. The proportion of patients with improved HRQOL scores, defined as a change of 10 points or more, and duration of changes were recorded. Results: Sixty-five patients completed the questionnaires at baseline. The treatment was consistently associated with improvement or stability in most of the preselected HRQOL domains. Global health improved over time; mean score differed by 9.6 points between baseline and 6-month follow-up (P=.03). For social functioning and cognitive functioning, mean scores improved over time, with a maximum difference of 10.4 points and 9.5 points between baseline and 6-month follow-up (P=.01 and P=.02), respectively. By contrast, fatigue worsened over time, with a difference in mean score of 5.6 points between baseline and 4-month follow-up (P=.02). Conclusions: A short course of RT in combination with TMZ in elderly patients with GBM was associated with survival benefit without a negative effect on HRQOL until the time of disease progression.

  6. Health-Related Quality of Life in Elderly Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Treated With Short-Course Radiation Therapy Plus Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Scaringi, Claudia; Baldoni, Alessandra; Lanzetta, Gaetano; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Esposito, Vincenzo; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the quality of life (QOL) in elderly patients with glioblastoma (GBM) treated with an abbreviated course of radiation therapy (RT; 40 Gy in 15 fractions) plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: Health-related QOL (HRQOL) was assessed by European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30, version 3) and EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire Brain Cancer Module (QLQ-BN20). Changes from baseline in the score of 9 preselected domains (global QLQ, social functioning, cognitive functioning, emotional functioning, physical functioning, motor dysfunction, communication deficit, fatigue, insomnia) were determined 4 weeks after RT and thereafter every 8 weeks during the treatment until disease progression. The proportion of patients with improved HRQOL scores, defined as a change of 10 points or more, and duration of changes were recorded. Results: Sixty-five patients completed the questionnaires at baseline. The treatment was consistently associated with improvement or stability in most of the preselected HRQOL domains. Global health improved over time; mean score differed by 9.6 points between baseline and 6-month follow-up (P=.03). For social functioning and cognitive functioning, mean scores improved over time, with a maximum difference of 10.4 points and 9.5 points between baseline and 6-month follow-up (P=.01 and P=.02), respectively. By contrast, fatigue worsened over time, with a difference in mean score of 5.6 points between baseline and 4-month follow-up (P=.02). Conclusions: A short course of RT in combination with TMZ in elderly patients with GBM was associated with survival benefit without a negative effect on HRQOL until the time of disease progression

  7. The Impact of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction in Patients With Stage III Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Roshan; Godette, Karen; Carlson, Grant; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl; Fasola, Carolina; O’Regan, Ruth; Zelnak, Amelia; Torres, Mylin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non–SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%), IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM–IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM–IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer–specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.

  8. Verrucous carcinoma of the cervix and vagina treated by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.D.; Twiggs, L.B.; Okagaki, T.; Adcock, L.L.; Prem, K.A.; Potish, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Seven cases of verrocous carcinoma of the uterine cervix (five) and vagina (two) were reviewed. Four of the five patients managed primarily with radiation therapy have survived a median of 10 years. Of the two patients managed primarily with surgery, one experienced recurrence and was then successfully treated with radiation therapy; the other died of metastatic carcinoma. No anaplastic transformation of lesions or distant metastases occurred in the patients treated with radiation therapy. Human papilloma virus was isolated in two patients

  9. Risk and predictors for early radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent or sequential chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Jun; Li, Guang; Zang, Shuang; Zhang, Shuo; Yao, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The rate of radiation pneumonitis (RP) for patients receiving chemoradiotherapy has been various across studies. Whether it is related to different chemotherapy schedules used in combination with radiation therapy were evaluated in this study. New factors associated with RP were also investigated. A total of 369 consecutive patients with Stage III non small cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy were followed after radiotherapy (RT). Among them 262 patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy and 107 patients received only sequential chemotherapy after RT. RP was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. The rate of grade ≥ 2 were 39.7%, 31% and 33.6% in the concurrent DP (docetaxel/cisplatin), concurrent NP (vinorelbine/cisplatin) and sequential group, and grade ≥ 3 RP were 18.4%, 9.5%, and 11.2% respectively. The rate of grade ≥ 3 RP was significantly higher in concurrent DP group than that in concurrent NP group (p = 0.04). RP occurred earlier in concurrent DP group than that in the other two groups. There were no significant differences in response rate among the three groups. In the multivariate analysis, age (OR = 1.99, p = 0.038 and OR = 8.90, p < 0.001), chemotherapy schedule (OR = 1.45, p = 0.041 and OR = 1.98, p = 0.013), mean lung dose(OR = 1.42, p < 0.001 and OR = 1.64, p < 0.001), and planning target volume(OR = 1.004, p = 0.001 and OR = 1.005, p = 0.021) were predictors for both grade ≥ 2 and grade ≥ 3 RP. Response to treatment was a new predictor for grade ≥ 3 RP only (OR = 4.39, p = 0.034). Response to treatment was found to be a new predictor for grade ≥ 3 RP. Compared to concurrent NP schedule, concurrent DP schedule achieved similar response to treatment but resulted in a higher risk of grade ≥ 3 RP

  10. The Effect of Biologically Effective Dose and Radiation Treatment Schedule on Overall Survival in Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

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    Stahl, John M. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Ross, Rudi [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Harder, Eileen M.; Mancini, Brandon R. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E.; Shafman, Timothy D.; Dosoretz, Arie P. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Evans, Suzanne B.; Husain, Zain A.; Yu, James B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Decker, Roy H., E-mail: roy.decker@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of biologically effective dose (BED{sub 10}) and radiation treatment schedule on overall survival (OS) in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using data from 65 treatment centers in the United States, we retrospectively reviewed the records of T1-2 N0 NSCLC patients undergoing SBRT alone from 2006 to 2014. Biologically relevant covariates, including dose per fraction, number of fractions, and time between fractions, were used to quantify BED{sub 10} and radiation treatment schedule. The linear-quadratic equation was used to calculate BED{sub 10} and to generate a dichotomous dose variable of <105 Gy versus ≥105 Gy BED{sub 10}. The primary outcome was OS. We used the Kaplan-Meier method, the log–rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression with propensity score matching to determine whether prescription BED{sub 10} was associated with OS. Results: We identified 747 patients who met inclusion criteria. The median BED{sub 10} was 132 Gy, and 59 (7.7%) had consecutive-day fractions. Median follow-up was 41 months, and 452 patients (60.5%) had died by the conclusion of the study. The 581 patients receiving ≥105 Gy BED{sub 10} had a median survival of 28 months, whereas the 166 patients receiving <105 Gy BED{sub 10} had a median survival of 22 months (log–rank, P=.01). Radiation treatment schedule was not a significant predictor of OS on univariable analysis. After adjusting for T stage, sex, tumor histology, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, BED{sub 10} ≥105 Gy versus <105 Gy remained significantly associated with improved OS (hazard ratio 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.62-0.98, P=.03). Propensity score matching on imbalanced variables within high- and low-dose cohorts confirmed a survival benefit with higher prescription dose. Conclusions: We found that dose escalation to 105 Gy BED

  11. Comparison of risk of local-regional recurrence after mastectomy or breast conservation therapy for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation stratified according to a prognostic index score

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Eugene H.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Chen, Allen M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hunt, Kelly K.; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We previously developed a prognostic index that stratified patients treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy into groups with different risks for local-regional recurrence (LRR). The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of LRR as a function of prognostic index score for patients treated with BCT or mastectomy plus radiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 815 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation. Patients were assigned an index score from 0 to 4 and given 1 point for the presence of each factor: clinical N2 to N3 disease, lymphovascular invasion, pathologic size >2 cm, and multifocal residual disease. Results: The 10-year LRR rates were very low and similar between the mastectomy and BCT groups for patients with an index score of 0 or 1. For patients with a score of 2, LRR trended lower for those treated with mastectomy vs. BCT (12% vs. 28%, p = 0.28). For patients with a score of 3 to 4, LRR was significantly lower for those treated with mastectomy vs. BCT (19% vs. 61%, p = 0.009). Conclusions: This analysis suggests that BCT can provide excellent local-regional treatment for the vast majority of patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For the few patients with a score of 3 to 4, LRR was >60% after BCT and was <20% with mastectomy. If these findings are confirmed in larger randomized studies, the prognostic index may be useful in helping to select the type of surgical treatment for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation

  12. Thyroid V30 Predicts Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism in Patients Treated With Sequential Chemo-Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Lymphoma

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    Cella, Laura [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Conson, Manuel; Caterino, Michele; De Rosa, Nicola [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Liuzzi, Raffaele [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Picardi, Marco; Grimaldi, Francesco [Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Solla, Raffaele [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Farella, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Pacelli, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.pacelli@cnr.it [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Hypothyroidism (HT) is a frequent late side effect of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) therapy. The purpose of this study is to determine dose-volume constraints that correlate with functional impairment of the thyroid gland in HL patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 consecutive patients undergoing antiblastic chemotherapy and involved field radiation treatment (median dose, 32 Gy; range, 30-36 Gy) for HL were retrospectively considered. Their median age was 28 years (range, 14-70 years). Blood levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodo-thyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), and thyroglobulin antibody (ATG) were recorded basally and at different times after the end of therapy. For the thyroid gland, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), dosimetric parameters, and the percentage of thyroid volume exceeding 10, 20, and 30 Gy (V10, V20, and V30) were calculated in all patients. To evaluate clinical and dosimetric factors possibly associated with HT, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: Eight of 61 (13.1%) patients had HT before treatment and were excluded from further evaluation. At a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 6-99 months), 41.5% (22/53) of patients developed HT after treatment. Univariate analyses showed that all dosimetric factors were associated with HT (p < 0.05). On multivariate analysis, the thyroid V30 value was the single independent predictor associated with HT (p = 0.001). This parameter divided the patients into low- vs. high-risk groups: if V30 was {<=} 62.5%, the risk of developing HT was 11.5%, and if V30 was >62.5%, the risk was 70.8% (p < 0.0001). A Cox regression curve stratified by two levels of V30 value was created (odds ratio, 12.6). Conclusions: The thyroid V30 predicts the risk of developing HT after sequential chemo-radiotherapy and defines a useful constraint to consider for more accurate HL treatment

  13. Prognostic Value of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Beam Radiation Therapy for Locally Recurrent Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Multicentric Long-Term Outcome Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Felipe A. [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Sole, Claudio V., E-mail: cvsole@uc.cl [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Instituto de Radiomedicina, Santiago (Chile); Cambeiro, Mauricio [Service of Radiation Oncology, Clínica Universitaria, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Montero, Angel; Polo, Alfredo [Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Universidad de Alcala, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, Carmen [School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Instituto de Radiomedicina, Santiago (Chile); Service of Radiation Oncology, Clínica Universitaria, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Universidad de Alcala, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Cuervo, Miguel [Service of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); San Julian, Mikel [Service of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Clínica Universitaria, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); and others

    2014-01-01

    Background: A joint analysis of data from centers involved in the Spanish Cooperative Initiative for Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy was performed to investigate long-term outcomes of locally recurrent soft tissue sarcoma (LR-STS) patients treated with a multidisciplinary approach. Methods and Materials: Patients with a histologic diagnosis of LR-STS (extremity, 43%; trunk wall, 24%; retroperitoneum, 33%) and no distant metastases who underwent radical surgery and intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT; median dose, 12.5 Gy) were considered eligible for participation in this study. In addition, 62% received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT; median dose, 50 Gy). Results: From 1986 to 2012, a total of 103 patients from 3 Spanish expert IOERT institutions were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 57 months (range, 2-311 months), 5-year local control (LC) was 60%. The 5-year IORT in-field control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival were 73%, 43%, and 52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, no EBRT to treat the LR-STS (P=.02) and microscopically involved margin resection status (P=.04) retained significance in relation to LC. With regard to IORT in-field control, only not delivering EBRT to the LR-STS retained significance in the multivariate analysis (P=.03). Conclusion: This joint analysis revealed that surgical margin and EBRT affect LC but that, given the high risk of distant metastases, DFS remains modest. Intensified local treatment needs to be further tested in the context of more efficient concurrent, neoadjuvant, and adjuvant systemic therapy.

  14. Prognostic Value of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Beam Radiation Therapy for Locally Recurrent Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Multicentric Long-Term Outcome Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Montero, Angel; Polo, Alfredo; Gonzalez, Carmen; Cuervo, Miguel; San Julian, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    Background: A joint analysis of data from centers involved in the Spanish Cooperative Initiative for Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy was performed to investigate long-term outcomes of locally recurrent soft tissue sarcoma (LR-STS) patients treated with a multidisciplinary approach. Methods and Materials: Patients with a histologic diagnosis of LR-STS (extremity, 43%; trunk wall, 24%; retroperitoneum, 33%) and no distant metastases who underwent radical surgery and intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT; median dose, 12.5 Gy) were considered eligible for participation in this study. In addition, 62% received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT; median dose, 50 Gy). Results: From 1986 to 2012, a total of 103 patients from 3 Spanish expert IOERT institutions were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 57 months (range, 2-311 months), 5-year local control (LC) was 60%. The 5-year IORT in-field control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival were 73%, 43%, and 52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, no EBRT to treat the LR-STS (P=.02) and microscopically involved margin resection status (P=.04) retained significance in relation to LC. With regard to IORT in-field control, only not delivering EBRT to the LR-STS retained significance in the multivariate analysis (P=.03). Conclusion: This joint analysis revealed that surgical margin and EBRT affect LC but that, given the high risk of distant metastases, DFS remains modest. Intensified local treatment needs to be further tested in the context of more efficient concurrent, neoadjuvant, and adjuvant systemic therapy

  15. A potent steroid cream is superior to emollients in reducing acute radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. A randomised study of betamethasone versus two moisturizing creams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulff, Eva; Maroti, Marianne; Serup, Jörgen; Falkmer, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim was to investigate whether treatment with potent local steroids can reduce signs and symptoms of acute radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) compared to emollient creams. Material and methods: The study was randomised and double-blinded. Patients with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery were included when they started adjuvant 3-D planned RT. In all, 104 patients were randomised 2:1:1 to three treatment groups, i.e. betamethasone + Essex® cream, Essex® cream or Canoderm® cream. The patients themselves treated the irradiated area during the radiation period (5 weeks) and two weeks after cessation of RT. Signs of RT dermatitis were measured qualitatively with RTOG clinical scoring and quantitatively by colorimeter. In addition, the patients’ symptoms were recorded as well as the Fitzpatrick skin type. There was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.05) in skin reactions when assessed with RTOG in favour of the group treated with the potent steroid. Patient-related symptoms did not differ between the treatment groups. The effect of the steroid was prominent in three subgroups, i.e. (i) patients treated with ablation of the breast, (ii) patients receiving RT to the armpit and the supraclavicular fossa, and (iii) patients with Fitzpatrick skin type 1. Conclusions: Treatment with betamethasone cream is more efficient than moisturizers for the control of acute RT dermatitis in patients treated with adjuvant RT for breast cancer

  16. Treatment Related Cardiac Toxicity in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, Lawrence B

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence dose/time-dependence and functional significance of regional cardiac perfusion abnormalities in patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT...

  17. Assessment of early and late dysphagia using videofluoroscopy and quality of life questionnaires in patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yirmibeşoğlu Erkal, Eda; Canoğlu, Doğu; Kaya, Ahmet; Aksu, Görkem; Sarper, Binnaz; Akansel, Gür; Meydancı, Tülay; Erkal, Haldun Şükrü

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dysphagia in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) undergoing three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy using objective and subjective tools simultaneously and to associate the clinical correlates of dysphagia with dosimetric parameters. Twenty patients were included in the study. The primary tumor and the involved lymph nodes (LN) were treated with 66-70 Gy, the uninvolved LN were treated with 46-50 Gy. Six swallowing structures were identified: the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (SPCM), the middle pharyngeal constrictor muscle (MPCM), the inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (IPCM), the base of tongue (BOT), the larynx and the proximal esophageal sphincter (PES). Dysphagia was evaluated using videofluoroscopy and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QoL questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and supplemental EORTC QoL module for HNC (QLQ-H&N35). The evaluations were performed before treatment, at 3 months and at 6 months following treatment. On objective evaluation, the D max for the larynx and the sub-structures of the PCM were correlated with impaired lingual movement, BOT weakness and proximal esophageal stricture at 3 months, whereas the V 65 , the V 70 and the D max for the larynx was correlated with BOT weakness and the V 65 , the V 70 , the D max or the D mean for the sub-structures of the PCM were correlated with impaired lingual movement, BOT weakness, reduced laryngeal elevation, reduced epiglottic inversion and aspiration at 6 months following treatment. On subjective evaluation, the V 60 , the D max and the D mean for SPCM were correlated with QoL scores for HNSO at 3 months, whereas the V 70 for SPCM were correlated with QoL scores for HNPA and the V 60 , the V 65 , the V 70 , the D max and the D mean for SPCM were correlated with QoL scores for HNSO at 6 months following treatment. The use of multiple dysphagia-related endpoints to complement eachother rather than to overlap with

  18. Correlation Between Radiation Dose to 18F-FDG-PET Defined Active Bone Marrow Subregions and Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Brent S.; Liang Yun; Lau, Steven K.; Jensen, Lindsay G.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Hoh, Carl K.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiation dose to 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET)-defined active bone marrow (BM ACT ) subregions is correlated with hematologic toxicity in cervical cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The conditions of 26 women with cervical cancer who underwent 18 F-FDG-PET before treatment with concurrent cisplatin and intensity-modulated radiation therapy were analyzed. BM ACT was defined as the subregion of total bone marrow (BM TOT ) with a standardized uptake value (SUV) equal to or above the mean for that individual. Inactive bone marrow (BM INACT ) was defined as BM TOT − BM ACT . Generalized linear modeling was used to test the correlation between BM ACT and BM INACT dose–volume metrics and hematologic nadirs, particularly white blood cell count (WBC) and absolute neutrophil count (ANC). Results: Increased BM ACT mean dose was significantly associated with decreased log(WBC) nadir (β = −0.04; 95% CI, −0.07to −0.01; p = 0.009), decreased log(ANC) nadir (β = −0.05; 95% CI, −0.08 to −0.02; p = 0.006), decreased hemoglobin nadir (β = −0.16; 95% CI, −0.27 to −0.05; p = 0.010), and decreased platelet nadir (β = −6.16; 95% CI, −9.37 to −2.96; p INACT mean dose and log(WBC) nadir (β = −0.01; 95% CI, −0.06 to 0.05; p = 0.84), log(ANC) nadir (β = −0.03; 95% CI, −0.10 to 0.04; p = 0.40), hemoglobin nadir (β = −0.09; 95% CI, −0.31 to 0.14; p = 0.452), or platelet nadir (β = −3.47; 95% CI, −10.44 to 3.50; p = 0.339). Conclusions: Irradiation of BM subregions with higher 18 F-FDG-PET activity was associated with hematologic toxicity, supporting the hypothesis that reducing dose to BM ACT subregions could mitigate hematologic toxicity. Future investigation should seek to confirm these findings and to identify optimal SUV thresholds to define BM ACT .

  19. Prognostic value of pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen and squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels for patients with stage I-III non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiation therapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yoshihiro; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    1998-01-01

    Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC Ag) levels have been reported to be useful as prognostic factors, indicators of clinical response, and predictors for recurrence in patients with lung cancer treated by surgery or chemotherapy. We investigated whether pretreatment serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were useful as independent prognostic factors in patients with stage I to III non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with radiation therapy alone. The serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were measured in 158 and 47 patients, respectively, before radiation therapy. Serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were measured by sandwich radioimmunoassay using the CEA-RIA (radioimmunoassay) kit and the SCC-RIA kit. Serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were above reference values in 19% and 30% of the patients, respectively. The 5-year survival rates were significantly better for patients with a negative SCC Ag result than for those with positive SCC Ag levels (p=0.0001), though no significant difference in survival rates was seen by CEA positivity (p=0.25). SCC Ag positivity (p=0.0006) and stage (p=0.04) were the important prognostic factors, as determined by multivariate analyses. Pretreatment serum SCC Ag level may be useful as an independent prognostic factor in patients with stage I to III non-small cell lung cancer who are treated with radiation therapy alone. (author)

  20. Assessing The Effect Of Ionizing Radiation On Fetal Of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Pregnant Patients Who Have Been Treated By 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Kinh; Truong Quang Xuan; Phan Si An; Phung Nhu Toan; Bui Vo Minh Hoang

    2008-01-01

    1. Background: We tried to evaluate the female fertility and genetic risk to the offspring from the exposure to high-dose 131 I by assessing the pregnancy outcomes and chromosome aberrations ratio in the peripheral blood and amniotic fluid of female patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who had received therapeutic high - doses of 131 I. 2. Materials and Methods: From 2005 to march 2007, a total of 888 women had been treated with 131 I. Of these patients; 477 (53.71%) were in the reproductive age group (18 - 45 years). Twenty - two women had pregnancies after high-dose 131 I. Age at presentation ranged from 23 to 47 years (mean, 30 ± 5.2 years). Histopathology was papillary thyroid cancer in 21 cases and follicular thyroid cancer in 1 case. 3. Results: Single high-dose therapy was given in 2 cases, 2 doses were given in 12 cases, 3 doses were given in 3 cases, four and five doses were given in 5 cases in which lung metastases had occurred. In 22 patients (100%), disease was successfully ablated before pregnancy. Ovarian absorbed radiation dose calculated by MIRD method ranged from 4.2 to 95.2 cGy (mean, 32.25 ± 28.40 cGy). The interval between 131 I therapy and pregnancy varied from 3 to 48 months (16.6 ± 12.56 months). Chromosome aberrations ratio in peripheral blood (mean ± sem): Dicentric 0.905 ± 0.22%, Ring 0.29 ± 0.10%, Fragment 1.8 ± 0.33%, Translocation 3.95 ± 1.07%, inversion 0.238 ± 0.24%, deletion 1.57 ± 1.04%. Chromosome aberrations ratio in amniotic fluid: 19 case normal karyotyping, 01 case abnormal karyotype 47, XXY (Klinefelter) and one case had 0.15% delete q arm of 1 chromosome. Twenty - one babies (12 females and 9 males) were born, 01 case congenital malformation (4.5%). Twenty-one babies were healthy with birth weight had 3.26 ± 0.26 kg, TSH: 3.63 ± 2.38 μUI/ml, and normal developmental milestones. TSH concentration in the stage of the gestation had been in control 3 ± 4,72 μUI/ml. 4. Conclusions: Female fertility is not

  1. Quantitative Analysis of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Identifies Novel Prognostic Imaging Biomarkers in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Yi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Song, Jie; Pollom, Erqi; Alagappan, Muthuraman [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Shirato, Hiroki [Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Li, Ruijiang, E-mail: rli2@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To identify prognostic biomarkers in pancreatic cancer using high-throughput quantitative image analysis. Methods and Materials: In this institutional review board–approved study, we retrospectively analyzed images and outcomes for 139 locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The overall population was split into a training cohort (n=90) and a validation cohort (n=49) according to the time of treatment. We extracted quantitative imaging characteristics from pre-SBRT {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, including statistical, morphologic, and texture features. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was built to predict overall survival (OS) in the training cohort using 162 robust image features. To avoid over-fitting, we applied the elastic net to obtain a sparse set of image features, whose linear combination constitutes a prognostic imaging signature. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the association with OS, and concordance index (CI) was used to evaluate the survival prediction accuracy. Results: The prognostic imaging signature included 7 features characterizing different tumor phenotypes, including shape, intensity, and texture. On the validation cohort, univariate analysis showed that this prognostic signature was significantly associated with OS (P=.002, hazard ratio 2.74), which improved upon conventional imaging predictors including tumor volume, maximum standardized uptake value, and total legion glycolysis (P=.018-.028, hazard ratio 1.51-1.57). On multivariate analysis, the proposed signature was the only significant prognostic index (P=.037, hazard ratio 3.72) when adjusted for conventional imaging and clinical factors (P=.123-.870, hazard ratio 0.53-1.30). In terms of CI, the proposed signature scored 0.66 and was significantly better than competing prognostic indices (CI 0.48-0.64, Wilcoxon rank sum test P<1e-6

  2. Pre- and postoperative cellular immunology in patients treated by pancreatoduodenectomy and intraoperative radiation therapy for carcinoma of the head of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Eiji

    1993-01-01

    Purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD) subcutaneous reaction, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) responses, peripheral lymphocytes, and lymphocyte subsets were investigated in 21 patients with pancreatic head cancer (in stage 2: 2, stage 3: 9, stage 4: 10 according to the General Rules of the JPS) and compared with 6 patients with early gastric cancer. The percentages of cytotoxic T cells and helper T cells in the patients with stage 3 pancreatic cancer were higher than in the patients with gastric cancer, but lower in the stage 4 patients than in the stage 3 patients. The PPD subcutaneous reaction in the stage 4 patients was weaker than in the gastric cancer and stage 3 patients. The same immunological responses were monitored in 12 patients with pancreatic head cancer in the early period after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) with or without intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). PHA responses, lymphocyte counts and the percentages of T cells, cytotoxic T cells and helper T cells in the patients who underwent both PD and IORT were much lower than in the patients who underwent PD without IORT. These findings suggest that the level of cellular immunology in patients with stage 3 pancreatic cancer was higher than in the early gastric cancer and stage 4 patients preoperatively, but that postoperatively it had been suppressed by PD and IORT. Such suppression must be prevented to some degree to achieve a cure. The necessity of new combined modality treatment with immunotherapy may be indicated for a better prognosis. (author)

  3. Post-radiation mucocele in two patients treated for nasopharyngeal cancer; Mucocele apres radiotherapie chez deux patients traites pour cancer du nasopharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mnejja, M.; Hammami, B.; Achour, I.; Chakroun, A.; Charfeddine, I.; Ghorbel, A. [Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia); Frikha, M. [Service de carcinologie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia); Daoud, J. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-06-15

    A 30-year-old woman, with a history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which was treated by radiotherapy nine years previously, presented with occasional diplopia and recent headaches. A nasopharyngeal biopsy showed no recurrence. The imaging revealed a sphenoidal sinus mucocele. Endoscopic marsupialization of the mucocele allowed clinical improvement. A 56-year-old woman presented, five years after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, with a fronto-orbital mass. CT-scan revealed a fronto-ethmoidal mucocele. Nasopharyngeal biopsy showed tumour recurrence. Marsupialization of mucocele was performed. Recurrence of the carcinoma was treated by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Sphenoidal sinus mucocele developing after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma has rarely been reported. CT scan and MRI are useful tools in making the diagnosis. Biopsy is required to diagnose recurrence or associated radio-induced tumor. Endoscopic approach gives good results. (authors)

  4. Functional promoter rs2868371 variant of HSPB1 associates with radiation-induced esophageal toxicity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with radio(chemo)therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Wei Qingyi; Yuan Xianglin; Gomez, Daniel; Liu Zhensheng; Zhuang Yan; Yin Ming; Li Minghuan; Wang, Li-E; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1) gene and the risk of radiation-induced esophageal toxicity (RIET) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: The experimental dataset comprised 120 NSCLC patients who were treated with radio(chemo)therapy between 2005 and 2009, when novel radiation techniques were implemented at MD Anderson. The validation dataset comprised 181 NSCLC patients treated between 1998 and 2004. We genotyped two SNPs of the HSPB1 gene (rs2868370 and rs2868371) by TaqMan assay. Results: Univariate and multivariate analyses of the experimental dataset showed that the CG/GG genotypes of HSPB1 rs2868371 were associated with significantly lower risk of grade ⩾3 RIET than the CC genotype (univariate hazard ratio [HR] 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.10–0.91; P = 0.033; multivariate HR 0.29; 95% CI, 0.09–0.97; P = 0.045). This difference in risk was replicated in the validation cohort despite the different radiation techniques used during that period. Conclusions: The CG/GG genotypes of HSPB1 rs2868371 were associated with lower risk of RIET, compared with the CC genotype in patients with NSCLC treated with radio(chemo)therapy. This finding should be validated in large multi-institutional prospective trials.

  5. Impact of tumor extent and location on treatment outcome in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Saito, Yoshihiro

    1996-01-01

    The results of treatment of 141 patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive radiation therapy at Gunma University Hospital between 1976 and 1989 were retrospectively analyzed. Radiation was given with standard fractionation for a planned prophylactic dose of 40 Gy over 4 weeks and a definitive dose of 60 Gy over 6 weeks or more. The two- and five-year survival rates were 27% and 12% for stage IIIA, and 18% and 8% for stage IIIB, respectively (P=0.052). By univariate analysis, a primary tumor less than 5 cm in diameter was also an important predictor of survival (P=0.008). As for tumor location, the patients with primary tumors in the upper lobes or the superior segment of the lower lobes of the lung lived longer than those with primary tumors at any other site (P=0.032). Patients with epidermoid carcinoma had a higher survival rate at 5 years than those with other histologic types (14% vs 3%, P=0.074). Multivariate analysis showed that among tumor characteristics, the site of the primary tumor, the pattern of tumor spread and N stage were significantly associated with overall survival. Among the patients with stage III NSCLC, those with stage IIIA epidermoid carcinoma in the upper lobe or the superior segment of the lower lobe of the lung were considered to be the most favorable candidates for definitive radiation therapy. (author)

  6. Estimates of radiation doses in tissue and organs and risk of excess cancer in the single-course radiotherapy patients treated for ankylosing spondylitis in England and Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.

    1982-02-01

    The estimates of absorbed doses of x rays and excess risk of cancer in bone marrow and heavily irradiated sites are extremely crude and are based on very limited data and on a number of assumptions. Some of these assumptions may later prove to be incorrect, but it is probable that they are correct to within a factor of 2. The excess cancer risk estimates calculated compare well with the most reliable epidemiological surveys thus far studied. This is particularly important for cancers of heavily irradiated sites with long latent periods. The mean followup period for the patients was 16.2 y, and an increase in cancers of heavily irradiated sites may appear in these patients in the 1970s in tissues and organs with long latent periods for the induction of cancer. The accuracy of these estimates is severely limited by the inadequacy of information on doses absorbed by the tissues at risk in the irradiated patients. The information on absorbed dose is essential for an accurate assessment of dose-cancer incidence analysis. Furthermore, in this valuable series of irradiated patients, the information on radiation dosimetry on the radiotherapy charts is central to any reliable determination of somatic risks of radiation with regard to carcinogenesis in man. The work necessary to obtain these data is under way; only when they are available can more precise estimates of risk of cancer induction by radiation in man be obtained

  7. Heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, E L; Abrahamsen, B; Vestergaard, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates.......The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates....

  8. Posttreatment assessment of response using FDG-PET/CT for patients treated with definitive radiation therapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Regiane S.; Heron, Dwight E.; Degirmenci, Berna; Filho, Pedro A.A.; Branstetter, Barton F.; Seethala, Raja R.; Ferris, Robert L.; Avril, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate coregistered [ 18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for the detection of persistent disease after definitive radiation therapy in head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Posttreatment FDG-PET/CT was performed in 28 patients on average 8 weeks (range, 4 to 15.7 weeks) after completing definitive radiation therapy. FDG-PET/CT was visually analyzed for the entire patient group and at two time points (4-8 and >8 weeks) after treatment. The contrast-enhanced CT portion of PET/CT was separately analyzed blinded to the results of coregistered FDG-PET/CT and classified as negative or positive for residual locoregional disease. Pathologic findings and clinical follow-up served as the reference standard. Results: Follow-up data were available for all 28 patients (median, 17.6 months). Regarding the detection of residual disease, the overall sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT was 76.9% and 93.3%, respectively, compared with 92.3% and 46.7% for contrast-enhanced CT. The accuracy of FDG-PET/CT was 85.7%, compared with 67.9% for CT alone. All false-negative (n = 3) and false-positive (n = 1) FDG-PET/CT results occurred between 4 and 8 weeks after treatment. At 8 weeks or later after treatment, the specificity of CT was 28%, compared with 100% for FDG-PET/CT. Conclusions: The metabolic-anatomic information from coregistered FDG-PET/CT provided the most accurate assessment for treatment response when performed later than 8 weeks after the conclusion of radiation therapy. FDG-PET/CT excelled by a higher specificity and overall diagnostic performance than CT imaging alone. These results support a potential clinical role of FDG-PET/CT in the early assessment of therapy response after definitive radiation therapy

  9. Predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Jun; Li, Guang; Ma, Lianghua; Han, Chong; Zhang, Shuo; Yao, Lei [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)], e-mail: gl1963516@yahoo.cn; Diao, Rao [Dept. of Experimental Technology Center, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China); Zang, Shuang [Dept. of Nursing, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)

    2013-08-15

    Grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis (RP) is generally severe and life-threatening. Predictors of grade {>=}2 are usually used for grade {>=}3 RP prediction, but it is unclear whether these predictors are appropriate. In this study, predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP were investigated separately. The increased risk of severe RP in elderly patients compared with younger patients was also evaluated. Material and methods: A total of 176 consecutive patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were followed up prospectively after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. RP was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Mean lung dose (MLD), mean heart dose, ratio of planning target volume to total lung volume (PTV/Lung), and dose-volume histogram comprehensive value of both heart and lung were associated with both grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP in univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, age and MLD were predictors of both grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP; receipt of chemotherapy predicted grade {>=}3 RP only; and sex and PTV/Lung predicted grade {>=}2 RP only. Among patients who developed high-grade RP, MLD and PTV/Lung were significantly lower in patients aged {>=}70 years than in younger patients (p<0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions: The predictors were not completely consistent between grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP. Elderly patients had a higher risk of severe RP than younger patients did, possibly due to lower tolerance of radiation to the lung.

  10. The management of invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Results of definitive and preoperative radiation therapy in 390 patients treated at the Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameghan, H; Fisher, R J; Watt, W H; Meagher, M J; Rosen, I M; Mameghan, J; Brook, S; Tynan, A P; Korbel, E I; Millard, R J

    1992-06-01

    The treatment results for invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder were assessed in a series of 390 patients referred to the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia, during the period 1977 to 1988. These patients were managed by one of two strategies: cystectomy (87 patients) and radiation therapy (303 patients). Actuarial survival rates (death from any cause) were determined and comparisons were made using log-rank tests and Cox regression analyses. The mean follow-up time was 7.6 years. Independent prognostic factors for shorter survival were: the presence of a ureteric obstruction (P less than 0.001), increasing clinical stage (P less than 0.001), increasing patient age (P = 0.003), and earlier year of presentation (P = 0.008). Comparison of the two strategies indicated no significant difference in overall survival after adjusting for imbalances in prognostic factors (P = 0.007 unadjusted; P = 0.29 adjusted). The slightly longer survival of 46 patients from 1983 onward who received primary systemic chemotherapy (compared with 149 patients not given chemotherapy) was not statistically significant (P = 0.12 unadjusted; P = 0.56 adjusted for prognostic factors). The 5-year actuarial rates of severe complications were 8.0% after cystectomy and 5.3% after radiation therapy. In 303 patients treated by definitive radiation therapy, the 5-year actuarial rate of freedom from bladder failure for all clinical tumor stages was 44% (Tx, 67%; T1, 45%; T2, 56%; T3, 39%; and T4, 39%). These results suggest that definitive radiation therapy is a viable alternative to radical cystectomy for patients with invasive TCC of the bladder.

  11. The initial investigation of radiation dose rate at X-ray department and patients treating thyroid by I-131 at nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Kinh; Vo Thanh Cuong

    2000-01-01

    Survey meter NSM 150 Fuji with detector Geiger Muller has been used to assess for average annual exposure dose which affect radiographer ≤ 2 mSv per year, the staff involved with Fluoroscopy ≤ 19 mSv per year. Dose rate in waiting area of patient is a range from 0.2 to 0.8 μSv/h. Patients who have been treated by radioiodine, may be only discharged when the remaining activity is 400.2 ±368.8 MBq. Radioactivity of I-131 and Tc-99m in the sewage system of hospital is 0.4x10 -11 Ci/l. (author)

  12. Autopsy findings of malignant neoplasms treated with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Atsushi; Ito, Jun; Tatezawa, Takashi; Nishimura, Toshinobu; Niibe, Hideo.

    1984-01-01

    Autopsy findings in 26 cases of malignant neoplasms treated with radiation were analysed and following results were obtained. 1. Causes of death except for neoplastic extension were 58% (15/26) and infection was the single predominant cause of death (73% : 11/15) with 50% (4/8) in lung cancer. 2. Distant metastases were found in 73% (19/26). In 7 cases, no obvious metastasis was found before and after autopsy. On the other hand, the patients with metastases over 2 organs before autopsy revealed metastases in 82% (9/11) to the other organs at autopsy. 3. Radiation therapy was effective and the primary tumor disappeared completely in 71% (10/14) with curative irradiation. In metastatic lesions, tumor cells were almost disappeared with dosage over 40 Gy. (author)

  13. Incidence of radiation-induced Graves' disease in patients treated with radioiodine for thyroid autonomy before and after introduction of a high-sensitivity TSH receptor antibody assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkelmann, Simone; Wolf, Ricarda; Koch, Annedore; Kittner, Christian; Groth, Peter; Schuemichen, Carl [University of Rostock, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    Autoimmune hyperthyroidism may occur several months after radioiodine therapy (RIT) for functional thyroid autonomy. Exacerbation of pre-existing subclinical Graves' disease (GD) has been held responsible for this phenomenon. Determination of TSH receptor antibody using solubilised porcine epithelial cell membranes is insensitive and may have failed to diagnose GD in these patients before RIT. Following the introduction of a more sensitive assay, using the human TSH receptor as an antigen, it has been expected that the incidence of radiation-induced GD after RIT for functional thyroid autonomy will be reduced. In a first group of 1,428 patients treated between November 1993 and March 1997 (group I) we used the porcine TRAb assay to exclude GD, while in a second group comprising 1,408 patients treated between January 2000 and December 2001 (group II), GD was excluded using the human TRAb assay. A matched control group of 231 patients was derived from group II. In group I a total of 15 (1.05%) patients developed obvious or suspected radiation-induced GD, while in group II 17 (1.2%) did so; the interval until development of GD was 8.4 and 8.8 months, respectively, after RIT. Serum anti-thyroid peroxidase levels before RIT were elevated in 36.4% of group I patients and 47.1% of group II patients, but in only 5.6% of the control group. Other non-specific signs of mild immunopathy of the thyroid were seen retrospectively in 73.3%, 64.7% and 16.0% of the patients in these three groups, respectively. In conclusion, the introduction of a high-sensitivity TRAb assay did not reduce the incidence of autoimmune hyperthyroidism occurring late after RIT for functional thyroid autonomy, but mild immunopathy of the thyroid is seen more frequently in these patients and seems to be a predisposing factor in the development of radiation-induced GD. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of doses received by the hippocampus in patients treated with single isocenter– vs multiple isocenter–based stereotactic radiation therapy to the brain for multiple brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algan, Ozer; Giem, Jared; Young, Julie; Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Hossain, Sabbir

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiation therapy using a single isocenter (SI)–based or multiple isocenter (MI)–based treatment planning in patients with less than 4 brain metastases. In total, 10 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating 2-3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study, and 2 sets of stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans (SI vs MI) were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences, and doses received by the hippocampus and the brain were calculated and compared between the 2 treatment techniques. A total of 23 lesions in 10 patients were evaluated. The median tumor volume, the right hippocampus volume, and the left hippocampus volume were 3.15, 3.24, and 2.63 mL, respectively. In comparing the 2 treatment plans, there was no difference in the planning target volume (PTV) coverage except in the tail for the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve. The only statistically significant dosimetric parameter was the V_1_0_0. All of the other measured dosimetric parameters including the V_9_5, V_9_9, and D_1_0_0 were not significantly different between the 2 treatment planning techniques. None of the dosimetric parameters evaluated for the hippocampus revealed any statistically significant difference between the MI and SI plans. The total brain doses were slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose region, although this difference was not statistically different. The use of SI-based treatment plan resulted in a 35% reduction in beam-on time. The use of SI treatments for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain when compared with MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment.

  15. Comparison of doses received by the hippocampus in patients treated with single isocenter- vs multiple isocenter-based stereotactic radiation therapy to the brain for multiple brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algan, Ozer; Giem, Jared; Young, Julie; Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Hossain, Sabbir

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiation therapy using a single isocenter (SI)-based or multiple isocenter (MI)-based treatment planning in patients with less than 4 brain metastases. In total, 10 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating 2-3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study, and 2 sets of stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans (SI vs MI) were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences, and doses received by the hippocampus and the brain were calculated and compared between the 2 treatment techniques. A total of 23 lesions in 10 patients were evaluated. The median tumor volume, the right hippocampus volume, and the left hippocampus volume were 3.15, 3.24, and 2.63mL, respectively. In comparing the 2 treatment plans, there was no difference in the planning target volume (PTV) coverage except in the tail for the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve. The only statistically significant dosimetric parameter was the V100. All of the other measured dosimetric parameters including the V95, V99, and D100 were not significantly different between the 2 treatment planning techniques. None of the dosimetric parameters evaluated for the hippocampus revealed any statistically significant difference between the MI and SI plans. The total brain doses were slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose region, although this difference was not statistically different. The use of SI-based treatment plan resulted in a 35% reduction in beam-on time. The use of SI treatments for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain when compared with MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association of

  16. Comparison of doses received by the hippocampus in patients treated with single isocenter– vs multiple isocenter–based stereotactic radiation therapy to the brain for multiple brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algan, Ozer, E-mail: oalgan@ouhsc.edu; Giem, Jared; Young, Julie; Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Hossain, Sabbir

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiation therapy using a single isocenter (SI)–based or multiple isocenter (MI)–based treatment planning in patients with less than 4 brain metastases. In total, 10 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating 2-3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study, and 2 sets of stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans (SI vs MI) were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences, and doses received by the hippocampus and the brain were calculated and compared between the 2 treatment techniques. A total of 23 lesions in 10 patients were evaluated. The median tumor volume, the right hippocampus volume, and the left hippocampus volume were 3.15, 3.24, and 2.63 mL, respectively. In comparing the 2 treatment plans, there was no difference in the planning target volume (PTV) coverage except in the tail for the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve. The only statistically significant dosimetric parameter was the V{sub 100}. All of the other measured dosimetric parameters including the V{sub 95}, V{sub 99}, and D{sub 100} were not significantly different between the 2 treatment planning techniques. None of the dosimetric parameters evaluated for the hippocampus revealed any statistically significant difference between the MI and SI plans. The total brain doses were slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose region, although this difference was not statistically different. The use of SI-based treatment plan resulted in a 35% reduction in beam-on time. The use of SI treatments for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain when compared with MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment.

  17. Do Surgeons Treat Their Patients Like They Would Treat Themselves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Stein J.; Teunis, Teun; Guitton, Thierry G.; Ring, David; Spoor, Andy B.; Chauhan, Aakash; Shafritz, Adam B.; Wasterlain, Amy; Terrono, Andrew L.; Neviaser, Andrew S.; Schmidt, Andrew; Nelson, Andy; Miller, Anna N.; Kristan, Anze; Apard, Thomas; Berner, Arne; Ilyas, Asif; Jubel, Axel; Jost, Bernhard; Babis, George; Watkins, Barry; Kreis, Barbara; Nolan, Betsy M.; Crist, Brett D.; Cross, Brian J.; Wills, Brian P. D.; Barreto, Camilo Jose Romero; Ekholm, Carl; Swigart, Carrie; Spath, Catherine; Zalavras, Charalampos; Cassidy, Charles; Garnavos, Christos; Moreno-Serrano, Constanza L.; Rodner, Craig; Klostermann, Cyrus; Osei, Daniel A.; Rikli, Daniel A.; Haverkamp, Daniel; Polatsch, Daniel; Drosdowech, Darren; Edelstein, David M.; Eygendaal, Denise; Verbeek, Diederik O. F.; Doornberg, Job N.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Schep, Niels; Kloen, Peter; Haverlag, Robert; Schepers, Tim

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial unexplained geographical and surgeon-to-surgeon variation in rates of surgery. One would expect surgeons to treat patients and themselves similarly based on best evidence and accounting for patient preferences. (1) Are surgeons more likely to recommend surgery when choosing for

  18. A comparative study of set up variations and bowel volumes in supine versus prone positions of patients treated with external beam radiation for carcinoma rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, K R; Menon, Smrithy S; Beena, K; Holla, Raghavendra; Kumar, R Rajaneesh; Dinesh, M

    2014-01-01

    A prospective study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of patient positioning on the set up variations to determine the planning target volume (PTV) margins and to evaluate the clinical relevance volume assessment of the small bowel (SB) within the irradiated volume. During the period of months from December 2011 to April 2012, a computed tomography (CT) scan was done either in supine position or in prone position using a belly board (BB) for 20 consecutive patients. All the patients had histologically proven rectal cancer and received either post- or pre-operative pelvic irradiation. Using a three-dimensional planning system, the dose-volume histogram for SB was defined in each axial CT slice. Total dose was 46-50 Gy (2 Gy/fraction), delivered using the 4-field box technique. The set up variation of the study group was assessed from the data received from the electronic portal imaging device in the linear accelerator. The shift along X, Y, and Z directions were noted. Both systematic and random errors were calculated and using both these values the PTV margin was calculated. The systematic errors of patients treated in the supine position were 0.87 (X-mm), 0.66 (Y-mm), 1.6 (Z-mm) and in the prone position were 1.3 (X-mm), 0.59 (Y-mm), 1.17 (Z-mm). The random errors of patients treated in the supine positions were 1.81 (X-mm), 1.73 (Y-mm), 1.83 (Z-mm) and in prone position were 2.02 (X-mm), 1.21 (Y-mm), 3.05 (Z-mm). The calculated PTV margins in the supine position were 3.45 (X-mm), 2.87 (Y-mm), 5.31 (Z-mm) and in the prone position were 4.91 (X-mm), 2.32 (Y-mm), 5.08 (Z-mm). The mean volume of the peritoneal cavity was 648.65 cm 3 in the prone position and 1197.37 cm 3 in the supine position. The prone position using BB device was more effective in reducing irradiated SB volume in rectal cancer patients. There were no significant variations in the daily set up for patients treated in both supine and prone positions.

  19. Neurocognitive outcome in brain metastases patients treated with accelerated-fractionation vs. accelerated-hyperfractionated radiotherapy: an analysis from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Study 91-04

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regine, W.F.; Scott, C.; Murray, K.; Curran, W.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate neurocognitive outcome as measured by the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) among patients with unresectable brain metastases randomly assigned to accelerated fractionation (AF) vs. accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) accrued 445 patients with unresectable brain metastases to a Phase III comparison of AH (1.6 Gy b.i.d. to 54.4 Gy) vs. AF (3 Gy q.d. to 30 Gy). All had a KPS of ≥ 70 and a neurologic function status of 0-2. Three hundred fifty-nine patients had MMSEs performed and were eligible for this analysis. Changes in the MMSE were analyzed according to criteria previously defined in the literature. Results: The median survival was 4.5 months for both arms. The average change in MMSE at 2 and 3 months was a drop of 1.4 and 1.1, respectively, in the AF arm as compared to a drop of 0.7 and 1.3, respectively, in the AH arm (p=NS). Overall, 91 patients at 2 months and 23 patients at 3 months had both follow-up MMSE and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging documentation of the status of their brain metastases. When an analysis was performed taking into account control of brain metastases, a significant effect on MMSE was observed with time and associated proportional increase in uncontrolled brain metastases. At 2 months, the average change in MMSE score was a drop of 0.6 for those whose brain metastases were radiologically controlled as compared to a drop of 1.9 for those with uncontrolled brain metastases (p=0.47). At 3 months, the average change in MMSE score was a drop of 0.5 for those whose brain metastases were radiologically controlled as compared to a drop of 6.3 for those with uncontrolled brain metastases (p=0.02). Conclusion: Use of AH as compared to AF-WBRT was not associated with a significant difference in neurocognitive function as measured by MMSE in this patient population with unresectable brain metastases and

  20. Does race influence survival for esophageal cancer patients treated on the radiation and chemotherapy arm of RTOG no. 85-01?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, O.E.; Martz, K.L.; Gaspar, L.E.; Delrowe, J.D.; Asbell, S.O.; Salter, M.M.; Roach, Mack

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In reported retrospective non-randomized trials of treatment of esophageal carcinoma, blacks have a lower survival from esophageal cancer than whites. None of these studies has accounted for the extent of disease, or the methods and quality of treatment. We reviewed the data that included only patients treated on the chemoradiation arm of the RTOG-8501 esophageal carcinoma trial to see if there were differences in overall survival between black and white patients receiving the same standard of care. Methods and Materials: One hundred-nineteen patients, 37 blacks and 82 whites were evaluated who met the criteria for receiving chemoradiation of 5000 cGy and four courses of Cisplatin (75 mg/m 2 ) and Fluorouracil (1000 mg/m 2 for 4 days). Results: Blacks had squamous histology only, with 86% of blacks having weight loss of 10 lbs. or more compared to 56% of whites (p = 0.001). In addition, blacks had larger tumors and more difficulty eating (p = 0.010). Overall, there was no difference in the Kaplan-Meier median survival estimate by race (p = 0.2757). Only when we limited the analysis to the 'squamous histology' subgroup, stratified according to age >70 vs. 70 years) did poorly. Because of the dramatic differences in the age and histology distributions between blacks and whites, this issue could not be resolved in the subset of squamous only who received chemoradiation. Conclusions: The increasing incidence of adenocarcinoma among white patients without a corresponding increase of this histology in blacks reflects a difference in diet and or lifestyle compared to blacks that deserves additional study. When treated aggressively with chemoradiation, race did not appear to be a statistically significant factor for overall survival

  1. Long-Term Outcome After Radiotherapy in Patients With Atypical and Malignant Meningiomas—Clinical Results in 85 Patients Treated in a Single Institution Leading to Optimized Guidelines for Early Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeberg, Sebastian; Hartmann, Christian; Welzel, Thomas; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Deimling, Andreas von; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previously, we could show that the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of meningiomas significantly correlated with outcome in patients with atypical and anaplastic histology. In the present work, we analyzed our long-term experience in radiotherapy for atypical and malignant meningioma diagnosed according to the most recent WHO categorization system. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with atypical and 23 patients with malignant meningioma have been treated with radiotherapy. Sixty percent of all patients received radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection, 19% at disease progression and 8.3% as a primary treatment. Radiation was applied using different techniques including fractionated stereotactic RT (FSRT), intensity-modulated RT, and combination treatment with carbon ions. The median PTV was 156.0 mL. An average dose of 57.6 Gy (range, 30–68.4 Gy) in 1.8–3 Gy fractions was applied. All patients were followed regularly including clinical-neurological follow-up as well as computed tomographies or magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Overall survival was impacted significantly by histological grade, with 81% and 53% at 5 years for atypical or anaplastic meningiomas, respectively. This difference was significant at p = 0.022. Eighteen patients died of tumor progression during follow-up. Progression-free survival was 95% and 50% for atypical, and 63% and 13% for anaplastic histology at 2 and 5 years. This difference was significant at p = 0.017. Despite histology, we could not observe any prognostic factors including age, resection status, or Karnofsky performance score. However, preexisting clinical symptoms observed in 63 patients improved in 29.3% of these patients. Conclusion: RT resulted in improvement of preexisting clinical symptoms; outcome is comparable to other series reported in the literature. RT should be offered after surgical resection after initial diagnosis to increase progression-free survival as well as overall

  2. The role of stereotactic body radiation therapy in oligometastatic colorectal cancer: Clinical case report of a long-responder patient treated with regorafenib beyond progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Michela; Falcone, Rosa; Mazzuca, Federica; Archibugi, Livia; Castaldi, Nadia; Botticelli, Andrea; Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Marchetti, Paolo

    2017-12-01

    Regorafenib is the new standard third-line therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, the reported 1-year overall survival rate does not exceed 25%. A 55-year-old man affected by mCRC, treated with regorafenib combined with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), showing a durable response. After 6 months of regorafenib, a PET/CT scan revealed a focal uptake in a solid lung nodule which was treated with SBRT, whereas continuing regorafenib administration. Fourteen months later, the patient had further progression in a parasternal lymph node, but treatment with regorafenib was continued. The regorafenib-associated side effects, such us the hand-foot syndrome, were favorable managed by reducing the dose from 160 to 120 mg/day. Patient-reported outcome was characterized by a progression-free survival of approximately 3 years. in presence of oligometastatic progression, a local SBRT while retaining the same systemic therapy may be a better multidisciplinary approach. Moreover, disease progression is no longer an absolute contraindication for continuing the regorafenib treatment.

  3. Head and neck soft tissue sarcomas treated with radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas K. Vitzthum

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck soft tissue sarcomas (HNSTSs are rare and heterogeneous cancers in which radiation therapy (RT has an important role in local tumor control (LC. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes and patterns of treatment failure in patients with HNSTS treated with RT. A retrospective review was performed of adult patients with HNSTS treated with RT from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2012. LC, locoregional control (LRC, disease-free survival (DFS, overall survival (OS, and predictors thereof were assessed. Forty-eight patients with HNSTS were evaluated. Five-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of LC, LRC, DFS, and OS were 87, 73, 63, and 83%, respectively. Angiosarcomas were found to be associated with worse LC, LRC, DFS, and OS. Patients over the age of 60 had lower rates of DFS. HNSTSs comprise a diverse group of tumors that can be managed with various treatment regimens involving RT. Angiosarcomas have higher recurrence and mortality rates.

  4. Quality of life in T1-3N0 prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy with minimum 10-year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Gray, Christine; Powell, Curt R.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To describe patient-reported quality of life using a validated survey in a cohort of patients who are long-term survivors of definitive radiotherapy for T1-3N0 prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Survivors of a previously reported cohort of prostate cancer patients treated with staging pelvic lymphadenectomy and definitive radiotherapy between November 1974 and August 1988 were queried using a questionnaire incorporating the RAND 36-Item Health Survey and the University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index. Responses were reviewed and analyzed. Of the 146 N0 patients, 88 have survived for 10 years postdiagnosis. Fifty-six (64%) of these patients were still alive with valid addresses and were mailed copies of the questionnaires, of which 46 (82%) responded. Median potential follow-up from date of diagnosis was 13.9 years, with a median age of responders of 80 years. Results: The mean sexual function score was 15.4, with a bother score of 42. The mean urinary function score was 65, with a bother score of 61. The mean bowel function score was 72.6, with a bother score of 64.8. The amount of patient bother reported in the sexual category is similar to that previously reported for cohorts of prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy or observation. This is despite the fact that sexual function was similar to that previously reported for patients postprostatectomy. Patient-reported function and bother scores in urinary and bowel categories were somewhat more severe than a previously reported radiotherapy cohort with shorter follow-up. Conclusions: With long follow-up, most patients who underwent radiotherapy for prostate cancer in the era described exhibit somewhat worse bladder, bowel, and erectile function than recently published controls without prostate cancer. In this cohort of older men with long follow-up, erectile function is similar to reported prostatectomy series. However, patient bother related to erectile function is similar

  5. Abnormal P-53 suppressor gene expression predicts for a poorer outcome in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated by external beam radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation androgen ablation: results based on RTOG study 86-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Grignon, David; Caplan, Richard; Sarkar, Fazlul; Forman, Jeffrey; Mesic, John; Fu, Karen K.; Abrams, Ross

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study is to establish the effect of the abnormal expression of the P-53 suppressor gene on the results of locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation. Materials and Methods: Patients evaluated were part of a RTOG phase III multi-institutional trial. This trial assessed the value of pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation on patients with locally advanced disease (bulky stage B and stage C). Of the 471 patients registered, pre-treatment pathological material was available for 129 patients. P-53 status was determined immunohistochemically utilizing a commercially available antibody (D07). Clinical endpoints evaluated were overall survival and development of metastases. Results: Twenty-three of the 129 patients had abnormal expression of the P-53 suppressor gene. Presence of this abnormal expression significantly correlated with lower overall survival (p=0.03) and the development of distant metastases (p=0.03). Abnormal expression of the P-53 gene was an independent prognostic indicator when evaluated against clinical stage and Gleason score. Conclusion: This data from patients entered on a phase III multi-institutional, randomized clinical trial shows that abnormal P-53 suppressor gene expression as determined immunohistochemically is an independent predictor of poorer survival and the development of distant metastases in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation

  6. Out-of-field radiation organ dose measurements and associated secondary cancer risk estimation in patients treated with breast cancer in Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duhaini, Ibrahim; Ayoubi, Saad; Korek, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    According to the National Cancer Registry in Lebanon for the years 2003 till 2007, more than 40 % of registered cancers in females have breast cancer. According to the latest report published by the NCR, breast cancer remained the most relatively frequent cancer throughout the years (42-43%). The annual incidence rate for breast cancer has been increasing from 72/100,000 in 2005, to 87/100,000 in 2007. According to the World Health Organization 2003 Report, breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide in women under the age of 55 and more than one million women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. Breast cancer patients have different options of treatment depending on the age, type of cancer and other factors. These options include: Surgery, Chemotherapy, Hormonal Therapy, Radiation Therapy and other non-traditional therapies. In radiation therapy, our concern, the tumor in the Breast will be exposed to high-energy X-rays that destroy cancerous cells. It is often used as post-surgery therapy in an effort to kill any remaining undetectable cancer cells that may have invaded areas nearby the original site of the tumor

  7. Detection of food treated with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delincee, H.

    1998-01-01

    Treatment of food with ionizing energy-'food irradiation'- is finally becoming reality in many countries. The benefits include an improvement in food hygiene, spoilage reduction and extension of shelf-life. Although properly irradiated food is safe and wholesome, consumers should be able to make their own free choice between irradiated and non-irradiated food. For this purpose labelling is indispensable. In order to check compliance with existing regulations, detection of radiation treatment by analysing the food itself is highly desirable. Significant progress has been made in recent years in developing analytical detection methods utilizing changes in food originating from the radiation treatment

  8. Association of TGF-β1 and XPD polymorphisms with severe acute radiation-induced esophageal toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Yang Ming; Bi Nan; Ji Wei; Wu Chen; Tan Wen; Zhao Lujun; Yu Dianke; Lin Dongxin; Wang Luhua

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity (RIET) is a dose-limiting toxicity in lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA repair and the cytokine pathways play essential roles in radiation-induced diseases. Genetic polymorphisms of genes in these pathways may affect gene function and/or gene expression and lead to different treatment-related esophageal toxicity. Materials and methods: This study investigated the association of 21 polymorphisms in 14 genes, with the occurrence of ≥grade 2 acute RIET. Genotypes were analyzed among 213 stage III lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Results: We used Cox proportional hazard model to examine the effects of genotypes on ≥grade 2 acute RIET risk and Kaplan-Meier estimator to compare effects of different genotypes on such risk. Multivariate analysis showed that CT or TT genotype of TGF-β1-509C/T polymorphism was associated with a significantly higher RIET risk (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 2.47; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.17-5.24; P = 0.018, or HR = 3.86; 95% CI = 1.50-9.92; P = 0.005), respectively, compared with the CC genotype. Moreover, Lys/Gln+Gln/Gln genotypes of XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism were also associated with a significantly decreased RIET risk (adjusted HR = 0.55; 95% CI = 0.32-0.96; P = 0.030). Conclusions: This report, for the first time, examined the influence of inherited variation in the DNA repair and the cytokine pathways on RIET.

  9. Guidelines on the management of patients treated with iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of these guidelines is to assist health care institutions establish protocols for the management of patients treated with iodine-131. These guidelines are written primarily for the use of Na 131 I in the treatment of benign and malignant thyroid disease. The principles have some application for the use of complex 131 I-labelled radiopharmaceuticals in that the treated patient will become a temporary radiation source and since contamination with body fluids of treated patients must be guarded against. The document outlines radiation protection and logistical concerns associated with the management of 131 I patients before, during and after therapy. These concerns include the safety of health care personnel, visitors, and any other persons who are at risk; and protection of the environment. (L.L.) 23 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Comparative analysis of dosimetric parameters of three different radiation techniques for patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy treated with retro-orbital irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Victor HF; Ng, Sherry CY; Choi, Cheuk Wai; Luk, Mai Yee; Leung, To Wai; Au, Gordon KH; Kwong, Dora LW

    2012-01-01

    We would like to investigate the if IMRT produced better target coverage and dose sparing to adjacent normal structures as compared with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and lateral opposing fields (LOF) for patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy treated with retro-orbital irradiation. Ten consecutive patients diagnosed with Graves’ ophthalmopathy were prospectively recruited into this study. An individual IMRT, 3DCRT and LOF plan was created for each patient. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) and other dosimetric parameters of the targets and organs-at-risk (OAR) generated by IMRT were compared with the other two techniques. Mann–Whitney U test demonstrated that CI generated by IMRT was superior to that produced by 3DCRT and LOF (p=0.005 for both respectively). Similarly HI with IMRT was proven better than 3DCRT (p=0.007) and LOF (p=0.005). IMRT gave rise to better dose sparing to some OARs including globes, lenses and optic nerves as compared with 3DCRT but not with LOF. IMRT, as compared with 3DCRT and LOF, was found to have a better target coverage, conformity and homogeneity and dose sparing to some surrounding structures, despite a slight increase but clinically negligible dose to other structures. Dosimetrically it might be a preferred treatment technique and a longer follow up is warranted to establish its role in routine clinical use

  11. Comparative analysis of dosimetric parameters of three different radiation techniques for patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy treated with retro-orbital irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Victor HF

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We would like to investigate the if IMRT produced better target coverage and dose sparing to adjacent normal structures as compared with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and lateral opposing fields (LOF for patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy treated with retro-orbital irradiation. Methods Ten consecutive patients diagnosed with Graves’ ophthalmopathy were prospectively recruited into this study. An individual IMRT, 3DCRT and LOF plan was created for each patient. Conformity index (CI, homogeneity index (HI and other dosimetric parameters of the targets and organs-at-risk (OAR generated by IMRT were compared with the other two techniques. Results Mann–Whitney U test demonstrated that CI generated by IMRT was superior to that produced by 3DCRT and LOF (p=0.005 for both respectively. Similarly HI with IMRT was proven better than 3DCRT (p=0.007 and LOF (p=0.005. IMRT gave rise to better dose sparing to some OARs including globes, lenses and optic nerves as compared with 3DCRT but not with LOF. Conclusions IMRT, as compared with 3DCRT and LOF, was found to have a better target coverage, conformity and homogeneity and dose sparing to some surrounding structures, despite a slight increase but clinically negligible dose to other structures. Dosimetrically it might be a preferred treatment technique and a longer follow up is warranted to establish its role in routine clinical use.

  12. A prospective evaluation of treatment with Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIR-spheres) in patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer previously treated with 5-FU based chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, L; Gibbs, P; Yip, D; Shapiro, JD; Dowling, R; Smith, D; Little, A; Bailey, W; Liechtenstein, M

    2005-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of selective internal radiation (SIR) spheres in patients with inoperable liver metastases from colorectal cancer who have failed 5FU based chemotherapy. Patients were prospectively enrolled at three Australian centres. All patients had previously received 5-FU based chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Patients were ECOG 0–2 and had liver dominant or liver only disease. Concurrent 5-FU was given at investigator discretion. Thirty patients were treated between January 2002 and March 2004. As of July 2004 the median follow-up is 18.3 months. Median patient age was 61.7 years (range 36 – 77). Twenty-nine patients are evaluable for toxicity and response. There were 10 partial responses (33%), with the median duration of response being 8.3 months (range 2–18) and median time to progression of 5.3 mths. Response rates were lower (21%) and progression free survival shorter (3.9 mths) in patients that had received all standard chemotherapy options (n = 14). No responses were seen in patients with a poor performance status (n = 3) or extrahepatic disease (n = 6). Overall treatment related toxicity was acceptable, however significant late toxicity included 4 cases of gastric ulceration. In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that have previously received treatment with 5-FU based chemotherapy, treatment with SIR-spheres has demonstrated encouraging activity. Further studies are required to better define the subsets of patients most likely to respond

  13. Analysis of Incidental Radiation Dose to Uninvolved Mediastinal/Supraclavicular Lymph Nodes in Patients with Limited-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated Without Elective Nodal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Irfan; DeMarco, Marylou; Stevens, Craig W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Fulp, William J. [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Classic teaching states that treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) requires large treatment fields covering the entire mediastinum. However, a trend in modern thoracic radiotherapy is toward more conformal fields, employing positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine the gross tumor volume (GTV). This analysis evaluates the dosimetric results when using selective nodal irradiation (SNI) to treat a patient with L-SCLC, quantitatively comparing the results to standard Intergroup treatment fields. Sixteen consecutive patients with L-SCLC and central mediastinal disease who also underwent pretherapy PET/CT scans were studied in this analysis. For each patient, we created SNI treatment volumes, based on the PET/CT-based criteria for malignancy. We also created 2 ENI plans, the first without heterogeneity corrections, as per the Intergroup 0096 study (ENI{sub off}) and the second with heterogeneity corrections while maintaining constant the number of MUs delivered between these latter 2 plans (ENI{sub on}). Nodal stations were contoured using published guidelines, then placed into 4 'bins' (treated nodes, 1 echelon away, >1 echelon away within the mediastinum, contralateral hilar/supraclavicular). These were aggregated across the patients in the study. Dose to these nodal bins and to tumor/normal structures were compared among these plans using pairwise t-tests. The ENI{sub on} plans demonstrated a statistically significant degradation in dose coverage compared with the ENI{sub off} plans. ENI and SNI both created a dose gradient to the lymph nodes across the mediastinum. Overall, the gradient was larger for the SNI plans, although the maximum dose to the '1 echelon away' nodes was not statistically different. Coverage of the GTV and planning target volume (PTV) were improved with SNI, while simultaneously reducing esophageal and spinal cord dose though at the expense of modestly reduced dose to

  14. Analysis of incidental radiation dose to uninvolved mediastinal/supraclavicular lymph nodes in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer treated without elective nodal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Irfan; DeMarco, Marylou; Stevens, Craig W; Fulp, William J; Dilling, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Classic teaching states that treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) requires large treatment fields covering the entire mediastinum. However, a trend in modern thoracic radiotherapy is toward more conformal fields, employing positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine the gross tumor volume (GTV). This analysis evaluates the dosimetric results when using selective nodal irradiation (SNI) to treat a patient with L-SCLC, quantitatively comparing the results to standard Intergroup treatment fields. Sixteen consecutive patients with L-SCLC and central mediastinal disease who also underwent pretherapy PET/CT scans were studied in this analysis. For each patient, we created SNI treatment volumes, based on the PET/CT-based criteria for malignancy. We also created 2 ENI plans, the first without heterogeneity corrections, as per the Intergroup 0096 study (ENI(off)) and the second with heterogeneity corrections while maintaining constant the number of MUs delivered between these latter 2 plans (ENI(on)). Nodal stations were contoured using published guidelines, then placed into 4 "bins" (treated nodes, 1 echelon away, >1 echelon away within the mediastinum, contralateral hilar/supraclavicular). These were aggregated across the patients in the study. Dose to these nodal bins and to tumor/normal structures were compared among these plans using pairwise t-tests. The ENI(on) plans demonstrated a statistically significant degradation in dose coverage compared with the ENI(off) plans. ENI and SNI both created a dose gradient to the lymph nodes across the mediastinum. Overall, the gradient was larger for the SNI plans, although the maximum dose to the "1 echelon away" nodes was not statistically different. Coverage of the GTV and planning target volume (PTV) were improved with SNI, while simultaneously reducing esophageal and spinal cord dose though at the expense of modestly reduced dose to anatomically distant lymph nodes

  15. The cognitive profile of children treated with radiation for acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cognitive profile of children treated with radiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. ... to disrupt the myelination and integrity of white matter tracts in the brain. ... The current study focused on the assessment of memory and learning, two ...

  16. Radiation protection in BNCT patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaumann, Hernan R.; Scharnichia, E.; Levanon, I.; Fernandez, C.; Facchini, Guillermo; Longhino, J.; Calzetta, Osvaldo; Pereira, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a technique that selectively targets cancer cells while sparing normal tissues by virtue of the differential uptake of a 10 B carrier compound in tumor. The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) and the Oncology Institute 'Angel H. Roffo' (IOAR) began a BNCT programme in 2003 for treating cutaneous skin melanomas in extremities. The neutron beam used is the hyperthermal one developed at the RA-6 Reactor of the Bariloche Atomic Centre (CAB). The prescribed dose is delivered in one fraction and therefore patient positioning and knowledge of the dose received by normal tissue are crucial. 10 irradiations have been done since 2003, all of them in legs and feet and the dose prescription was determined by the maximum tolerable skin dose. Due to the characteristics of this treatment the patient body might be exposed not only to the primary beam but also to the secondary photon beam produced by neutron capture at the target itself. Thus a patient radiation-monitoring plan was implemented in order to evaluate the gamma dose delivered to sensible organs of each patient. An acrylic water-filled whole body phantom was used for preliminary gamma dose and thermal neutron flux measurements at positions related to patient's body sensible organs considering tentative patient positions. The beam port shielding was, in this way, optimized. TLD-700 and Manganese foils were used for gamma and thermal neutron detection. The TLD-700 thermal neutron response was previously evaluated by using the in-phantom beam dosimetry characterization. In-vivo dosimetry with TLD is routinely implemented in order to evaluate gamma dose to sensible organs of each patient. These organs are chosen depending on its distance from the zone to be irradiated and its radio-sensibility. All TLDs have been positioned well outside the irradiation field. Maximum gamma dose received outside the radiation field in healthy tissues was well below tolerance dose for

  17. Serum Proteome Signature of Radiation Response: Upregulation of Inflammation-Related Factors and Downregulation of Apolipoproteins and Coagulation Factors in Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy—A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlak, Piotr, E-mail: widlak@io.gliwice.pl [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice (Poland); Jelonek, Karol; Wojakowska, Anna; Pietrowska, Monika [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice (Poland); Polanska, Joanna [Institute of Automatics Control, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice (Poland); Marczak, Łukasz [Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Miszczyk, Leszek; Składowski, Krzysztof [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice (Poland)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation affects the proteome of irradiated cells and tissue, yet data concerning changes induced during radiation therapy (RT) in human blood are fragmentary and inconclusive. We aimed to identify features of serum proteome and associated processes involved in response to partial body irradiation during cancer treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and 20 patients with prostate cancer received definitive intensity modulated RT. Blood samples were collected before RT, just after RT, and 1 month after the end of RT. Complete serum proteome was analyzed in individual samples, using a shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach which allowed identification of approximately 450 proteins. Approximately 100 unique proteins were quantified in all samples after exclusion of immunoglobulins, and statistical significance of differences among consecutive samples was assessed. Processes associated with quantified proteins and their functional interactions were predicted using gene ontology tools. Results: RT-induced changes were marked in the HNSCC patient group: 22 upregulated and 33 downregulated proteins were detected in post-RT sera. Most of the changes reversed during follow-up, yet levels of some proteins remained affected 1 month after the end of RT. RT-upregulated proteins were associated with acute phase, inflammatory response, and complement activation. RT-downregulated proteins were associated with transport and metabolism of lipids (plasma apolipoproteins) and blood coagulation. RT-induced changes were much weaker in prostate cancer patients, which corresponded to differences in acute radiation toxicity observed in both groups. Nevertheless, general patterns of RT-induced sera proteome changes were similar in both of the groups of cancer patients. Conclusions: In this pilot study, we proposed to identify a molecular signature of radiation response, based on specific

  18. Recognition of food treated with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasem, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    This article speaks about the lack of food in the Arab World and the increase of food imports. To decrease the food gap, the Arab Countries can use new agricultural technologies and minimize the lost of food, especially,legumes, fruits and some of meet and fish products which is exposed to environmental and nutritional contamination as a result of incorrect methods for conservation and marketing.Using of irradiation techniques to conserve food means the exposure of food to a source of radiation energy either from radioisotopes or from instruments producing controlled amounts of electrons or x-rays

  19. The prognostic value of expression of HIF1α, EGFR and VEGF-A, in localized prostate cancer for intermediate- and high-risk patients treated with radiation therapy with or without androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Damien C

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Androgens stimulate the production of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1α and ultimately vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A. Additionally, epithelial growth factor (EGF mediates HIF1α production. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX expression is associated with tumor cell hypoxia in a variety of malignancies. This study assesses the prognostic relation between HIF1α, VEGF-A, EGF Receptor and CAIX expression by immunochemistry in diagnostic samples of patients with intermediate- and high-risk localized prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy, with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Materials and methods Between 1994 and 2004, 103 prostate cancer patients (mean age, 68.7 ± 6.2, with prostate cancer (mean PSA, 13.3 ± 3.7, were treated with radiation therapy (RT, median dose, 74 Gy. Fifty seven (55.3% patients received ADT (median duration, 6 months; range, 0 – 24. Median follow-up was 97.6 months (range, 5.9 – 206.8. Results Higher EGFR expression was significantly (p = 0.04 correlated with higher Gleason scores. On univariate analysis, HIF1α nuclear expression was a significant (p = 0.02 prognostic factor for biological progression-free survival (bPFS. A trend towards significance (p = 0.05 was observed with EGFR expression and bPFS. On multivariate analysis, low HIF1α nuclear (p = 0.01 and high EGFR (p = 0.04 expression remained significant adverse prognostic factors. Conclusions Our study suggests that high nuclear expression of HIF1α and low EGFR expression in diagnostic biopsies of prostate cancer patients treated with RT ± ADT is associated with a good prognosis.

  20. Endogenous and radiation-induced expression of γH2AX in biopsies from patients treated for carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, Peggy L.; Banuelos, C. Adriana; Durand, Ralph E.; Kim, Joo-Young; Aquino-Parsons, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The possibility of using γH2AX foci as a marker of DNA damage and as a potential predictor of tumour response to treatment was examined using biopsies from 3 sets of patients with advanced carcinoma of the cervix. The relation between endogenous γH2AX expression and hypoxia was also examined. Materials and methods: Set 1 consisted of 26 biopsies that included pre-treatment and 24 h post-radiation treatment samples. Pre-treatment biopsies from 12 patients in Set 2 were used to develop image analysis software while pre-treatment biopsies from 33 patients in Set 3 were examined for the relation between staining for the hypoxia marker pimonidazole and endogenous γH2AX expression. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were analyzed after antigen retrieval and fluorescence antibody labeling for the hypoxia markers CAIX or pimonidazole in combination with γH2AX staining. Results: Before treatment, 24 ± 19% of cells contained γH2AX foci, with most positive cells containing fewer than 5 foci per nucleus. Twenty-four hours after exposure to the first fraction of 1.8-2.5 Gy, 38 ± 19% contained foci. CAIX positive cells were 1.4 times more likely to exhibit endogenous γH2AX foci, and pimonidazole-positive cells were 2.8 times more likely to contain γH2AX foci. For 18 patients for whom both pre-treatment and 24 h post-irradiation biopsies were available, local control was unrelated to the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci. However, 24 h after irradiation, tumours that had received 2.5 Gy showed a significantly higher fraction of cells with residual γH2AX foci than tumours given 1.8 Gy. Conclusions: Endogenous γH2AX foci are enriched in hypoxic tumour regions. Small differences in delivered dose can produce quantifiable differences in residual DNA damage that can overshadow inter-tumour differences in response.

  1. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Xerostomia and trismus (Part 2). Literature review and consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Bossi, Paolo; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Berruti, Alfredo; Trippa, Fabio; Nicolai, Pietro; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is a well-known radical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Nevertheless acute side effects (such as moist desquamation, skin erythema, loss of taste, mucositis etc.) and in particular late toxicities (osteoradionecrosis, xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.) are often debilitating and underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for this consensus and external experts evaluated the conclusions. The paper contains 20 clusters of statements about the clinical definition and management of stomatological issues that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecrosis (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia (10 clusters of statements). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Dental pathologies and osteoradionecrosis (Part 1) literature review and consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Sottocornola, Lara; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Paganelli, Corrado; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Bossi, Paolo; Berruti, Alfredo; Pavanato, Giovanni; Nicolai, Piero; Maroldi, Roberto; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is the typical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Acute side effects (such as oral mucositis, dermatitis, salivary changes, taste alterations, etc.), and late toxicities in particular (such as osteo-radionecrosis, hypo-salivation and xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.), are often debilitating. These effects tend to be underestimated and insufficiently addressed in the medical community. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on clinical definitions and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for developing the consensus, and external experts evaluated the conclusions. This paper contains 10 clusters of statements about the clinical definitions and management of head and neck cancer treatment sequels (dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses) that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of Overall Treatment Time and Radiobiological Parameters on Biologically Effective Doses in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated with Radiation Therapy Alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasinska, Anna; Fowler, Jack F.; Lind, Bengt K.; Urbanski, Krzysztof

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the influence of overall treatment time (OTT) on the value of calculated biological effective doses (BEDs) for different biological variables. These variables were: tumour proliferation rate, different cell radiosensitivity (α=0. 2, 0. 3, and 0. 4 /Gy), and different start time for repopulation (Tk=21, 28, and 35 days). Also the influence of age (≤50 years>), Hb level (≤116 g/l>), tumor proliferation rate (bromodeoxyuridine labelling index; BrdUrdLI), and DNA ploidy on survival after shorter (= 60 days) or longer (>60 days) OTT was investigated. The study included 229 patients with cervix carcinoma treated entirely by standard radiotherapy (RT) (external beam RT plus low-medium dose-rate (LDR/MDR) brachytherapy (BT) at the Center of Oncology in Krakow. The linear quadratic equation was used to calculate BED, which is proportional to log cell kill. BEDs 10 (for tumours) were calculated with consideration of OTT for each patient and tumour proliferation rate (standardized potential doubling time; standardized Tpot) based on BrdUrdLI assessed on biopsy material before RT. Median OTT was 90 days (range 30-210). The mean calculated total BED for point A for tumour and 'early reactions' was equal to 103.0 Gy10. The longest median survival time--52 months--was seen for patients treated with OTT ≤60 days. If OTT exceeded 90 days to more than 120 days, loss in BED10 for relatively radiosensitive tumours (α=0. 3-0. 4/Gy and Tk=28 days) was equal to 0. 37-0. 26 Gy/day. However, for radioresistant tumours (α=0. 2/Gy) it was 0. 6 Gy/day. For fast proliferating tumours (BrdUrdLI >8. 8%) BED loss was 1. 4 Gy/day and for slowly proliferating tumours (BrdUrdLI = 8. 8%) it was 0. 2 Gy/day. Assuming shorter (21 days) or longer (35 days) periods for Tk and relatively radiosensitive tumours similar BED loss of 0. 38 Gy/day was observed. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that OTT = 60 days was a significant prognostic factor for overall survival

  4. Hematologic Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postprostatectomy Whole-Pelvis Irradiation With Different Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Techniques Is Not Negligible and Is Prolonged: Preliminary Results of a Longitudinal, Observational Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzarini, Cesare, E-mail: cozzarini.cesare@hsr.it [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Chiorda, Barbara Noris [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Sini, Carla; Fiorino, Claudio [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco [Department of Urology, Vita-Salute University, Milan (Italy); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To address the thus-far poorly investigated severity and duration of hematologic toxicity from whole-pelvis radiation therapy (WPRT) in a cohort of chemo-naïve patients treated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy including WPRT with different intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, doses, and fractionations. Methods and Materials: This analysis pertains to 125 patients (70 from a pilot study and 55 from an observational protocol) for whom 1 baseline and at least 3 subsequent blood samples (median 6), obtained at irradiation midpoint and end, and thereafter at 3, 6, and 12 months, were available. Patients were treated with adjuvant (n=73) or salvage intent; static-field IMRT (n=19); volumetric modulated arc therapy (n=60) or helical Tomotherapy (n=46); and conventional (n=39) or moderately hypofractionated (median 2.35 Gy per fraction, n=86) regimens. The median 2-Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) to the prostatic bed was 70.4 Gy with a lymph-nodal planning target volume of 50.2 Gy. Clinical and dosimetric data were collected. Results: Both leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were significant (median nadir count 65% and 67% of baseline, respectively), with leukopenia also persisting (1-year median count 75% of baseline). Lymphopenia was the major contributor to the severity and 1-year persistence of leukopenia; all patients developed acute grade ≥1 lymphopenia (61% and 26% grade 2 and ≥3, respectively), whereas 1-year grade ≥2 lymphopenia was still present in 16%. In addition to an independent predictive role of corresponding baseline values, multivariable analyses highlighted that higher EQD2 doses to lymph nodal planning target volume increased risk of acute neutropenia and hypofractionation for acute thrombocytopenia. Of note, patients of older age were at higher risk for acute grade 2 lymphopenia, and interestingly, increased risk of grade >2 lymphopenia for those who smoked at least one year. No role for different IMRT techniques

  5. Hematologic Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postprostatectomy Whole-Pelvis Irradiation With Different Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Techniques Is Not Negligible and Is Prolonged: Preliminary Results of a Longitudinal, Observational Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Chiorda, Barbara Noris; Sini, Carla; Fiorino, Claudio; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To address the thus-far poorly investigated severity and duration of hematologic toxicity from whole-pelvis radiation therapy (WPRT) in a cohort of chemo-naïve patients treated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy including WPRT with different intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, doses, and fractionations. Methods and Materials: This analysis pertains to 125 patients (70 from a pilot study and 55 from an observational protocol) for whom 1 baseline and at least 3 subsequent blood samples (median 6), obtained at irradiation midpoint and end, and thereafter at 3, 6, and 12 months, were available. Patients were treated with adjuvant (n=73) or salvage intent; static-field IMRT (n=19); volumetric modulated arc therapy (n=60) or helical Tomotherapy (n=46); and conventional (n=39) or moderately hypofractionated (median 2.35 Gy per fraction, n=86) regimens. The median 2-Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) to the prostatic bed was 70.4 Gy with a lymph-nodal planning target volume of 50.2 Gy. Clinical and dosimetric data were collected. Results: Both leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were significant (median nadir count 65% and 67% of baseline, respectively), with leukopenia also persisting (1-year median count 75% of baseline). Lymphopenia was the major contributor to the severity and 1-year persistence of leukopenia; all patients developed acute grade ≥1 lymphopenia (61% and 26% grade 2 and ≥3, respectively), whereas 1-year grade ≥2 lymphopenia was still present in 16%. In addition to an independent predictive role of corresponding baseline values, multivariable analyses highlighted that higher EQD2 doses to lymph nodal planning target volume increased risk of acute neutropenia and hypofractionation for acute thrombocytopenia. Of note, patients of older age were at higher risk for acute grade 2 lymphopenia, and interestingly, increased risk of grade >2 lymphopenia for those who smoked at least one year. No role for different IMRT techniques

  6. Perineural invasion and Gleason 7-10 tumors predict increased failure in prostate cancer patients with pretreatment PSA <10 ng/ml treated with conformal external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Penny R.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Patchefsky, Arthur; Al-Saleem, Tahseen; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: It has been well established that prostate cancer patients with pretreatment PSA<10 ng/ml enjoy excellent bNED control when treated with definitive external beam radiation therapy. This report identifies predictors of failure for patients with pretreatment PSA <10 ng/ml. These predictors are then used to define favorable and unfavorable prognostic subgroups of patients for which bNED control is compared. Methods and Materials: Between 3/87 and 11/94, 266 patients with T1-T3NXM0 prostate cancer and pretreatment PSA values <10 ng/ml were treated with definitive external beam radiation therapy. Median central axis dose and median follow-up for the entire group was 72 Gy (63-79 Gy) and 48 months (2-120 months). Predictors of bNED control were evaluated univariately using Kaplan-Meier methodology and the log-rank test and multivariately using Cox proportional hazards modeling. Covariates considered were pretreatment PSA, palpation stage, Gleason score, presence of perineual invasion (PNI) and central axis dose. Independent predictors based on multivariate results were then used to stratify the patients into two prognostic groups for which bNED control was compared. bNED failure is defined as PSA ≥ 1.5 ng/ml and rising on two consecutive determinations. Results: Univariate analysis according to pretreatment and treatment factors for bNED control demonstrates a statistically significant improvement in 5-year bNED control for patients with Gleason score 2-6 vs. 7-10, patients without evidence of perineural invasion (PNI) vs. those with PNI, and patients with palpation stage T1/T2AB vs. T2C/T3. Multivariate analysis demonstrates that Gleason score (p = 0.0496), PNI (p = 0.0008) and palpation stage (p = 0.0153) are significant independent predictors of bNED control. Based on these factors, patients are stratified into a more favorable prognosis group (Gleason 2-6, no PNI, and stage T1/T2AB, n = 172) and a less favorable prognosis group (Gleason 7-10 or PNI or T2C

  7. Relationship Between Radiation Therapy Dose and Outcome in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy and Surgery for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Population-Based, Comparative Effectiveness Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, David J.; Fidler, Mary Jo; Seder, Christopher W.; Liptay, Michael J.; Koshy, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare, using the National Cancer Database, survival, pathologic, and surgical outcomes in patients with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with differential doses of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, with the aim to discern whether radiation dose escalation was associated with a comparative effectiveness benefit and/or toxicity risk. Methods and Materials: Patients in the National Cancer Database with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and surgery between 1998 and 2005 were analyzed. Dose strata were divided between 36 to 45 Gy (low-dose radiation therapy, LD-RT), 45 to 54 Gy (inclusive, standard-dose, SD-RT), and 54 to 74 Gy (high-dose, HD-RT). Outcomes included overall survival, residual nodal disease, positive surgical margin status, hospital length of stay, and adverse surgical outcomes (30-day mortality or readmission). Results: The cohort consisted of 1041 patients: 233 (22%) LD-RT, 584 (56%) SD-RT, and 230 (22%) HD-RT. The median, 3-year, and 5-year overall survival outcomes were 34.9 months, 48%, and 37%, respectively. On univariable analysis, patients treated with SD-RT experienced prolonged overall survival (median 38.3 vs 31.8 vs 29.0 months for SD-RT, LD-RT, and HD-RT, respectively, P=.0089), which was confirmed on multivariable analysis (hazard ratios 0.77 and 0.81 vs LD and HD, respectively). Residual nodal disease was seen less often after HD-RT (25.5% vs 31.8% and 37.5% for HD-RT, LD-RT, and SD-RT, respectively, P=.0038). Patients treated with SD-RT had fewer prolonged hospital stays. There were no differences in positive surgical margin status or adverse surgical outcomes between the cohorts. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy between 45 and 54 Gy was associated with superior survival in comparison with doses above and below this threshold. Although this conclusion is limited by selection bias, clear candidates for trimodality therapy do not seem to

  8. Relationship Between Radiation Therapy Dose and Outcome in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy and Surgery for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Population-Based, Comparative Effectiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: david_sher@rush.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Fidler, Mary Jo [Section of Medical Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Seder, Christopher W.; Liptay, Michael J. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Koshy, Matthew [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To compare, using the National Cancer Database, survival, pathologic, and surgical outcomes in patients with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with differential doses of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, with the aim to discern whether radiation dose escalation was associated with a comparative effectiveness benefit and/or toxicity risk. Methods and Materials: Patients in the National Cancer Database with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and surgery between 1998 and 2005 were analyzed. Dose strata were divided between 36 to 45 Gy (low-dose radiation therapy, LD-RT), 45 to 54 Gy (inclusive, standard-dose, SD-RT), and 54 to 74 Gy (high-dose, HD-RT). Outcomes included overall survival, residual nodal disease, positive surgical margin status, hospital length of stay, and adverse surgical outcomes (30-day mortality or readmission). Results: The cohort consisted of 1041 patients: 233 (22%) LD-RT, 584 (56%) SD-RT, and 230 (22%) HD-RT. The median, 3-year, and 5-year overall survival outcomes were 34.9 months, 48%, and 37%, respectively. On univariable analysis, patients treated with SD-RT experienced prolonged overall survival (median 38.3 vs 31.8 vs 29.0 months for SD-RT, LD-RT, and HD-RT, respectively, P=.0089), which was confirmed on multivariable analysis (hazard ratios 0.77 and 0.81 vs LD and HD, respectively). Residual nodal disease was seen less often after HD-RT (25.5% vs 31.8% and 37.5% for HD-RT, LD-RT, and SD-RT, respectively, P=.0038). Patients treated with SD-RT had fewer prolonged hospital stays. There were no differences in positive surgical margin status or adverse surgical outcomes between the cohorts. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy between 45 and 54 Gy was associated with superior survival in comparison with doses above and below this threshold. Although this conclusion is limited by selection bias, clear candidates for trimodality therapy do not seem to

  9. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Wexler, Leonard H.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Happersett, Laura; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged ≤7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  10. Patient treatment in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanum, G.; Bruland, Oe.S.; Hjelle, D.; Reitan, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Accidental human injury due to ionizing radiation is rare. Industrial accidents are comparatively the most common. Life saving procedures should always have priority to any concern about radiation injury or contamination. The personal risks for emergency medial personnel is negligible when simple measures are taken. Repeated clinical examinations and blood lymphocyte counts should be performed on all patients with suspected radiation injury to allow a diagnosis. The radiation syndrome develops within days or weeks depending on total radiation dose, dose rate and dose distribution. Damage to the bone marrow and gut are the most important. Local radiation injuries to the hands are common in industrial accidents. The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority should always be called when a potential ionizing radiation accident takes place within Norway

  11. Fertility in patients treated for testicular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Erika; Skrbinc, Breda; Zakotnik, Branko

    2010-09-01

    Testicular cancer affects men mostly in their reproductive age with a cure rate over 90% and fertility is one of the main concerns of survivors. To further elucidate the question of fertility after treatment for testicular cancer, we performed a survey in patients treated in our institution. We sent a questionnaire to patients treated for testicular cancer at our institute from 1976 to 2002 (n = 490) of whom 297 (60.6%) responded. We considered the patients to have conserved fertility if they had children after treatment without assisted reproductive technologies. Before treatment 119/297 (40.1%) of patients and after treatment 150/297 (50.5%) of patients tried to have children (p = 0.019). Of 119 patients who tried to have children before treatment for testicular cancer 98 (82.4%) succeeded and 74/150 (49.3%) were successful after treatment (p years. The post-treatment fatherhood in patients treated with surgery only (orchidectomy +/- retroperitoneal lymphnode dissection-RPLND) was 59%, in those with additional radiotherapy 68%, and chemotherapy 50% (p = 0.233). Fertility rate in patients where a non nerve sparing RPLND was performed was only 37%, 62% in patients with nerve sapring RPLND, and 77% in patients where RPLND was not performed (p Fertility rate after treatment for testicular cancer is reduced. From our data, the most important treatment modality that influences fertility is non nerve sparing RPLND that should be avoided whenever possible in order improve the quality of life our patients.

  12. The relationship between the presence and extent of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and the risk of local recurrence (LR) in patients with infiltrating cancer of the breast treated with conservative surgery (CS) and radiation therapy (RT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abner, A.; Schnitt, S.; Connolly, J.; Recht, A.; Bornstein, B.; Nixon, A.; Hetelekidis, S.; Silver, B.; Harris, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Lobular carcinoma in situ, when found in an otherwise benign breast biopsy, is associated with an increased risk of developing a subsequent invasive breast cancer. Among patients with an infiltrating cancer resected without margin assessment, the extent of ductal carcinoma in situ is an established risk factor for LR after CS and RT. However, the association between the presence and extent of LCIS and the risk of recurrence in patients treated with CS and RT for infiltrating breast cancer remains at issue. Materials and Methods: Between 1968 and 1986, 1625 patients with clinical stage T1 and T2 invasive breast cancer were treated at the Joint Center for Radiation Therapy with complete gross tumor excision and RT to a total of ≥60 Gy. Of these, 1160 had infiltrating ductal cancer (IDC), infiltrating lobular cancer (ILC), or mixed IDC/ILC (IMC) and sufficient pathologic material for review by the study pathologists (SS and JC) to establish the presence or absence of LCIS and were evaluable at 10 years. LCIS was present adjacent to the invasive cancer in (43(1027)) IDC (4%), and either within or adjacent to the infiltrating tumor in (70(82)) ILC (85%) and (26(51)) IMC (51%). Margins were evaluable in 35% of LCIS-positive patients and 33% of LCIS-negative patients. The median follow-up time was 153 months for surviving patients. Results: The 10-year crude risk of recurrence by first site of failure for all patients was as follows: Furthermore, there was no significant relationship between the extent of the LCIS adjacent to the invasive tumor and the LR risk: The 10-year crude risk of contralateral breast cancer was 7% for the patients with LCIS and 7% for those without LCIS. CONCLUSION: We conclude that neither the presence nor the extent of LCIS is related to the risk of LR in patients with invasive breast cancer treated with CS and RT. Thus, LCIS should not be considered a contraindication to breast conservation with CS and RT

  13. Influence of low-dose daily cisplatin on the distant metastasis-free survival of patients with locally advanced nonmetastatic head and neck cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Milicic, Biljana

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the impact of low dose daily cisplatin on distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) in locally advanced head and neck cancer treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (77 Gy in 70 fractions in 35 treatment days). In locally controlled tumors cisplatin led to better DMFS (p = 0.0272); Cisplatin may have acted independently of micrometastasis in locally advanced H and N cancer

  14. Epidermoid carcinomas of the anal canal treated with definitive radiation therapy in a series of 305 patients; Carcinomes epidermoides du canal anal traites par irradiation a visee curative: a propos de 305 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deniaud-Alexandre, E.; Touboul, E.; Huang, R.; Qu, S.H.; Pene, F.; Schlienger, M. [Hopital Tenon, Service d' Oncologie-Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Tiret, E.; Parc, R. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service de Chirurgie Digestive, 75 - Paris (France); Sezeur, A. [Hopital des Diaconesses, Service de Chirurgie Generale, 75 - Paris (France); Houry, S. [Hopital Tenon AP-HP, Service de Chirurgie Digestive, 75 - Paris (France); Gallot, D. [Groupe Hospitalier Bichat-Claude-Bernard, Service de Chirurgie Generale et Digestive B, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-08-01

    Purpose. - To identify prognostic factors and treatment toxicity in a series of epidermoid cancers of the anal canal without evident metastasis. Patients and methods. - Between June 1972 and January 1997, 305 patients (pts) were treated with curative-intent radiation therapy (RT). The T-stages according to the 1987 UICC classification were: 26 T1, 141 T2, 104 T3, and 34 T4. There were 49 pts with nodal involvement at presentation. Pretreatment anal function scoring according to our in-house system was: 22 scored 0, 182 scored 1, 74 scored 2, 7 scored 3. 11 scored 4, and 9 not available pts. The treatment started with external beam RT (EBRT) in 303 pts (median dose: 45 Gy). After a rest period of 4 to 6 weeks, a boost of 20 Gy was delivered by EBRT in 279 pts and by interstitial {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy (Bcy) in 17 pts. Seven pts received only one course of EBRT (mean dose: 49.5 Gy) and 2 pts were treated with interstitial {sup 192}Ir Bcy alone (55 and 60 Gy, respectively). concomitant chemotherapy (5-fluoro-uracil and either mitomycin C or cisplatin) was delivered to 19 pts. Mean follow-up was 103 months. Results. - At the end of RT local tumor clinical complete response (cCR) rate was 80%. Out of 61 non responders or local progressive tumors 27 (44%) were salvaged with abdomino-perineal resection (APR). The rate of local tumor relapse (LR) was 12%. Out of 37 LTR, 20 (54%) were salvaged with APR and one with interstitial {sup 192}Ir Bcy. The overall local tumor control (LC) rate with or without salvage local treatment was 84%. LC rate with a good anal function scoring (score 0 and 1) was 56.5%0. Among 181/186 available pts who preserved their anus, 94% had a good anal function scoring. For a subgroup of 15 pts with length tumor <2 cm-N0, the LC rate after the end of RT was 100% the LC rate with or without local salvage treatment was 100%, and among 13 available pts who preserved their anus, the anal function scoring was good in 12 pts (92%). The 10-years disease

  15. Randomized study of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy versus nasogastric tubes for enteral feeding in head and neck cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corry, J.; Poon, W.; McPhee, N.; Milner, A. D.; Cruickshank, D.; Rischin, D.; Peters, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes have largely replaced nasogastric tubes (NGT) for nutritional support of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing curative (chemo)radiotherapy without any good scientific basis. A randomized trial was conducted to compare PEG tubes and NGT in terms of nutritional outcomes, complications, patient satisfaction and cost. The study was closed early because of poor accrual, predominantly due to patients' reluctance to be randomized. There were 33 patients eligible for analysis. Nutritional support with both tubes was good. There were no significant differences in overall complication rates, chest infection rates or in patients' assessment of their overall quality of life. The cost of a PEG tube was 10 times that of an NGT. The duration of use of PEG tubes was significantly longer, a median 139 days compared with a median 66 days for NGT. We found no evidence to support the routine use of PEG tubes over NGT in this patient group

  16. Local control and survival in patients with soft tissue sarcomas treated with limb sparing surgery in combination with interstitial brachytherapy and external radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhic, A.; Hovgaard, D.; Mork, Petersen M.

    2008-01-01

    %. Nineteen (49%) patients suffered from some degree of decreased force or function of the affected extremity, 16 (41%) suffered from oedema, 12 (31%) had persistent pain, 8 (21%) suffered from wound complications, and in 4 (10%) of these patients plastic surgery were required. CONCLUSION: Limb sparing...... surgery, combined with PDR BRT and EBRT can result in good local control in patients with soft tissue sarcomas. BRT is an effective modality with good cosmetic results and acceptable toxicity Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9...

  17. Validation of previously reported predictors for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy, a post hoc analysis from a Phase III randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertbutsayanukul, Chawalit; Kitpanit, Sarin; Prayongrat, Anussara; Kannarunimit, Danita; Netsawang, Buntipa; Chakkabat, Chakkapong

    2018-05-10

    This study aimed to validate previously reported dosimetric parameters, including thyroid volume, mean dose, and percentage thyroid volume, receiving at least 40, 45 and 50 Gy (V40, V45 and V50), absolute thyroid volume spared (VS) from 45, 50 and 60 Gy (VS45, VS50 and VS60), and clinical factors affecting the development of radiation-induced hypothyroidism (RHT). A post hoc analysis was performed in 178 euthyroid nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients from a Phase III study comparing sequential versus simultaneous-integrated boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy. RHT was determined by increased thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with or without reduced free thyroxin, regardless of symptoms. The median follow-up time was 42.5 months. The 1-, 2- and 3-year freedom from RHT rates were 78.4%, 56.4% and 43.4%, respectively. The median latency period was 21 months. The thyroid gland received a median mean dose of 53.5 Gy. Female gender, smaller thyroid volume, higher pretreatment TSH level (≥1.55 μU/ml) and VS60 treatment planning.

  18. Analysis of Biochemical Control and Prognostic Factors in Patients Treated With Either Low-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy or High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vora, Sujay A.; Wong, William W.; Schild, Steven E.; Ezzell, Gary A.; Halyard, Michele Y.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To identify prognostic factors and evaluate biochemical control rates for patients with localized prostate cancer treated with either high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy 3D-CRT. Methods: Four hundred sixteen patients with a minimum follow-up of 3 years (median, 5 years) were included. Two hundred seventy-one patients received 3D-CRT with a median dose of 68.4 Gy (range, 66-71 Gy). The next 145 patients received IMRT with a median dose of 75.6 Gy (range, 70.2-77.4 Gy). Biochemical control rates were calculated according to both American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus definitions. Prognostic factors were identified using both univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The 5-year biochemical control rate was 60.4% for 3D-CRT and 74.1% for IMRT (p < 0.0001, first ASTRO Consensus definition). Using the ASTRO Phoenix definition, the 5-year biochemical control rate was 74.4% and 84.6% with 3D-RT and IMRT, respectively (p = 0.0326). Univariate analyses determined that PSA level, T stage, Gleason score, perineural invasion, and radiation dose were predictive of biochemical control. On multivariate analysis, dose, Gleason score, and perineural invasion remained significant. Conclusion: On the basis of both ASTRO definitions, dose, Gleason score, and perineural invasion were predictive of biochemical control. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy allowed delivery of higher doses of radiation with very low toxicity, resulting in improved biochemical control

  19. Four cases of intracranial AVM successfully treated by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Mau-Nan; Imaya, Hisatoshi; Nakazawa, Shozo.

    1990-01-01

    We have treated three patients with conventional radiotherapy and one with stereotactic radiosurgery and report the follow-up results. A 63-year-old woman had a dural arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in the right cavernous sinus. She was irradiated using 10 MV X-ray with a total of 30 Gy. Post irradiation angiography showed a complete absence of dural AVM. A 62-year-old woman had a dural AVM fed by the left external carotid artery in the right cavernous sinus. Embolization by gelfoam was performed before irradiation. The irradiation was given with a total dose of 30 Gy. Post irradiation angiography showed disappearance of the dural AVM. A 26-year-old woman had a small AVM (about 20 x 15 x 15 mm) in the posterior corpus callosum. An operation was performed but the AVM was not excised completely. We irradiated to the residual AVM with a total of 30 Gy. The follow-up angiography one year after treatment, showed disappearance of the AVM. She had no neurological deficit two years after the treatment. A 14-year-old boy had a small AVM (about 20 x 15 x 10 mm) in the left anterior wall of the fourth ventricle. The AVM was located deeply, so an operation was not performed. Radiosurgery was undertaken four months after onset in Buenos Aires. The total dose was 36 Gy. The follow-up angiography one year after treatment, showed disappearance of the AVM. He also had no neurological deficit two years after the treatment. These four cases of AVM (two dural AVMs) were successfully treated by radiation therapy. No side effect was observed. (author)

  20. Genome Wide Association Study to Identify SNPs and CNPs Associated with Development of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    association tests, we obtained low genomic inflation factors of 1.02 for the ED patients and 1.00 for the urinary morbidity patients, suggesting...study (GWAS) to identify genetic factors associated with urinary morbidity following radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods: Prostate cancer...increased urinary frequency, incomplete bladder emptying, weak urinary stream and incontinence , as well as more serious events such as bladder necrosis or

  1. Dosimetric analysis of the brachial plexus among patients with breast cancer treated with post-mastectomy radiotherapy to the ipsilateral supraclavicular area: report of 3 cases of radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, San-Gang; Huang, Si-Juan; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Guo, Han; Li, Feng-Yan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huan-Xin; He, Zhen-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the brachial plexus (BP) dose of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) to the ipsilateral supraclavicular (ISCL) area, and report the characteristics of radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy (RIBPN). The BP dose of 31 patients who received adjuvant PMRT to the ISCL area and chest wall using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and the records of 3 patients with RIBPN were retrospectively analyzed based on the standardized Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-endorsed guidelines. The total dose to the ISCL area and chest wall was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Patients with a higher number of removed lymph nodes (RLNs) had a higher risk of RIBPN (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.189, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.005-1.406, p = 0.044). In 31 patients treated with 3DCRT, the mean dose to the BP without irradiation to the ISCL area was significantly less than that with irradiation to the ISCL area (0.97 ± 0.20 vs. 44.39 ± 4.13 Gy, t = 136.75, p <0.001). In the 3DCRT plans with irradiation to the ISCL area and chest wall, the maximum dose to the BP was negatively correlated with age (r = −0.40, p = 0.026), body mass index (BMI) (r = −0.44, p = 0.014), and body weight (r = −0.45, p = 0.011). Symptoms of the 3 patients with RIBPN occurred 37–65 months after radiotherapy, and included progressive upper extremity numbness, pain, and motor disturbance. After treatment, 1 patient was stable, and the other 2 patients’ symptoms worsened. The incidence of RIBPN was higher in patients with a higher number of RLNs after PMRT. The dose to the BP is primarily from irradiation of the ISCL area, and is higher in slim and young patients. Prevention should be the main focus of managing RIBPN, and the BP should be considered an organ-at-risk when designing a radiotherapy plan for the ISCL area

  2. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Dental pathologies and osteoradionecrosis (Part 1) literature review and consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Sottocornola, Lara; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Paganelli, Corrado; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Bossi, Paolo; Berruti, Alfredo; Pavanato, Giovanni; Nicolai, Piero; Maroldi, Roberto; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is the typical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Acute side effects (such as oral mucositis, dermatitis, salivary changes, taste alterations, etc.), and late toxicities in particular (such as osteo-radionecrosis,

  3. The Outcome for Patients With Pathologic Node-Positive Prostate Cancer Treated With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation Therapy: A Case-Matched Analysis of pN1 and pN0 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hemelryk, Annelies [Department of Urology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); De Meerleer, Gert; Ost, Piet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Poelaert, Filip [Department of Urology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); De Gersem, Werner [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Decaestecker, Karel [Department of Urology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); De Visschere, Pieter [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Fonteyne, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.fonteyne@uzgent.be [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: Improved outcome is reported after surgery or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for patients with lymph node (LN) positive (N1) prostate cancer (PC). Surgical series have shown that pathologic (p)N1 PC does not behave the same in all patients. The aim of this study was to perform a matched-case analysis to compare the outcome of pN1 and pN0 PC after high-dose EBRT plus ADT. Methods and Materials: Radiation therapy up to 80 Gy was delivered to the prostate with a minimal dose of 45 Gy to the pelvis for pN1 patients. After matching, Kaplan-Meier statistics were used to compare the 5-year biochemical and clinical relapse-free survival (bRFS and cRFS), prostate cancer–specific survival (PCSS), and overall survival (OS). Acute and late rectal and urinary toxicity was evaluated. Results: Sixty-nine pN1 PC patients were matched 1:1 with pN0 PC patients. The median follow-up time was 60 months. The 5-year bRFS and cRFS for pN1 versus pN0 PC patients were 65% ± 7% versus 79% ± 5% (P=.08) and 70% ± 6% versus 83% ± 5% (P=.04) respectively. No significant difference was found in bRFS or cRFS rates between low volume pN1 (≤2 positive LNs) and pN0 patients. The 5-year PCSS and OS were comparable between pN1 and pN0 PC patients: PCSS: 92% ± 4% versus 93% ± 3% (P=.66); OS: 82% ± 5% versus 80% ± 5% (P=.58). Severe toxicity was rare for both groups, although pN1 patients experienced significantly more acute grade 2 rectal toxicity. Conclusion: Primary EBRT plus 2 to 3 years of ADT is a legitimate treatment option for pN1 PC patients, especially those with ≤2 positive LNs, and this with bRFS and cRFS rates comparable to those in pN0 PC patients. For pN1 PC patients with >2 positive LNs, bRFS and cRFS are worse than in pN0 patients, but even in this subgroup, long-term disease control is obtained.

  4. The Outcome for Patients With Pathologic Node-Positive Prostate Cancer Treated With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation Therapy: A Case-Matched Analysis of pN1 and pN0 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hemelryk, Annelies; De Meerleer, Gert; Ost, Piet; Poelaert, Filip; De Gersem, Werner; Decaestecker, Karel; De Visschere, Pieter; Fonteyne, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Improved outcome is reported after surgery or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for patients with lymph node (LN) positive (N1) prostate cancer (PC). Surgical series have shown that pathologic (p)N1 PC does not behave the same in all patients. The aim of this study was to perform a matched-case analysis to compare the outcome of pN1 and pN0 PC after high-dose EBRT plus ADT. Methods and Materials: Radiation therapy up to 80 Gy was delivered to the prostate with a minimal dose of 45 Gy to the pelvis for pN1 patients. After matching, Kaplan-Meier statistics were used to compare the 5-year biochemical and clinical relapse-free survival (bRFS and cRFS), prostate cancer–specific survival (PCSS), and overall survival (OS). Acute and late rectal and urinary toxicity was evaluated. Results: Sixty-nine pN1 PC patients were matched 1:1 with pN0 PC patients. The median follow-up time was 60 months. The 5-year bRFS and cRFS for pN1 versus pN0 PC patients were 65% ± 7% versus 79% ± 5% (P=.08) and 70% ± 6% versus 83% ± 5% (P=.04) respectively. No significant difference was found in bRFS or cRFS rates between low volume pN1 (≤2 positive LNs) and pN0 patients. The 5-year PCSS and OS were comparable between pN1 and pN0 PC patients: PCSS: 92% ± 4% versus 93% ± 3% (P=.66); OS: 82% ± 5% versus 80% ± 5% (P=.58). Severe toxicity was rare for both groups, although pN1 patients experienced significantly more acute grade 2 rectal toxicity. Conclusion: Primary EBRT plus 2 to 3 years of ADT is a legitimate treatment option for pN1 PC patients, especially those with ≤2 positive LNs, and this with bRFS and cRFS rates comparable to those in pN0 PC patients. For pN1 PC patients with >2 positive LNs, bRFS and cRFS are worse than in pN0 patients, but even in this subgroup, long-term disease control is obtained.

  5. Characteristics of long-term survivors of lung cancer treated with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, D.M.; Weichselbaum, R.; Hellman, S.

    1981-01-01

    Between 1968 and 1974, 348 patients with lung cancer were primarily treated with radiation therapy. There were 66 such patients (19%) who survived a minimum of 18 months and are the subject of this report. Of this group, 30 patients have no evidence of disease from 18 to 96 months, with a median followup of 38 months. Thirty-three patients are dead of disease. The five-year acturial survival of the total group of 348 patients was 5.6%. There were 14 stage I and II patients who survived a minimum of 18 months, of whom 11 had no evidence of disease. Of the 42 Stage III patients, 18 presently show no evidence of disease. There were 13 patients who failed with locally recurrent disease; in this group a dose-response relationship was demonstrated. A local failure rate of 50% (4/8) was observed for patients who received fewer than 5000 rad, 22% (6/27) for patients receiving 5000 to 5500 rad, 18% (2/11) in patients receiving 5500 to 5900 rad, and 5% (1/20) for patients who received more than 5900 rad. Radiotherapeutic technique was a significant variable in local failure. Forty-six percent (6/13) of those patient failures may have been eliminated with the use of careful treatment planning with simulation. A statistically significant difference in dose was noted for patients with central recurrence, mean dose 4725 rad, 1561 RET, 81 TDF, when compared with patients with control of gross disease with radiation, mean dose 5740, 1880 RET, 108 TDF. There were four patients with marked early complications (6%) and eight patients with late complications (12%). There were no deaths attributable to radiation. Although most patients with advanced lung carcinoma die of distant disease, a significant number of patients can achieve long-term survival when radically treated with high-dose radiation therapy

  6. A case of radiation retinopathy treated with panretinal photocoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohde, Hisao; Ayaki, Masahiko; Fujimura, Hiromi; Yokoyama, Noriko

    1993-01-01

    A 29-year-old male developed radiation retinopathy one year and three months after 60 Gy of radiotherapy was delivered by a linear accelerator for a grade III astrocytoma. Fundus examination at the initial visit showed several dot and blot hemorrhages and cotton-wool patches. One month later, mascular edema developed due to increased capillary permeability in the left eye, while proliferative changes and preretinal hemorrhages were noted in the right eye. Since panretinal photocoagulation was effective in treating both eyes, it may be the treatment of choice for radiation retinopathy with extensive avascular areas. (author)

  7. Radiation therapy technology innovations applied to the treatment of head and neck patients: - Clinical results of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), - Contribution of Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) in the management of head and neck patients treated with IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff-Cailleaud, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Numerous and exciting technological innovations were recently developed in radiotherapy. We aimed to assess benefits in two specific fields. 1) Clinical results of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) applied to the treatment of Head and Neck (H and N) patients. The first study was a long-term mono-centric prospective registration of all H and N patients treated with IMRT in our institution. Locoregional control was excellent and toxicities limited. Recurrences were in-field. Dosimetric recommendations (parotids mean dose) were established. The second study assessed the impact of IMRT on health-related quality of life for H and N patients through a multicentric matched-pair comparison with conventional radiotherapy. Outstanding benefits were observed particularly in the fields of salivary dysfunction and oral discomfort. 2) Contribution of Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) in the management of H and N patients treated with IMRT. The first study was a monitoring of delivered dose, using 3D dose recalculation from Megavoltage Cone-Beam CT (CBCT), as a quality assurance measure of a panel of H and N IMRT patients aligned with IGRT. Dosimetric consequences of anatomical changes were assessed. Contribution of color-coded MVCBCT dose-difference maps was studied. The aim of the second study was to quantify the inherent relative mobility between anatomic regions of the H and N area and to assess the dosimetric impact of several different matching procedures. Recommendations for the use of CBCT images in a daily practice were established. (author) [fr

  8. Radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tract in Hodgkin's disease: the role of exploratory laparotomy and fractionation. A study of 19 cases observed in a series of 134 patients treated at the Institut Gustave Roussy from 1972 to 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallez-Marchal, D.; Fayolle, M.; Henry-Amar, M.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Rougier, P.; Cosset, J.M. (Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France))

    1984-01-01

    Out of 134 patients irradiated below the diaphragm to a dose of 40 Gy for Hodgkin's disease at the Institut Gustave-Roussy, 19 (14%) were subsequently found to present with radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tract. Since five patients presented with two different injuries, 24 radiolesions were observed. Most of them (17 out of 24) were gastric or duodenal. Twelve (out of 24) were ulcers. Nine patients required surgery. A complete cure of the radiation injuries was obtained in 15 out of 19 patients. Sex, age, stage, histology or initial chemotherapy were not found to play a role in the occurrence of radiation damage. On the contrary, the role of a previous exploratory laparotomy appeared important; for the patients who underwent laparotomy and irradiation, the complication rate was 23%. For the patients treated by irradiation alone, the complication rate was 7% (p < 0.01). Fractionation was found to be another important parameter: for 52 patients treated using 3 weekly fractions of 3.3 Gy, the complication rate was 25% compared to 8% (p < 0.01) for 76 patients treated using 4 weekly fractions of 2.5 Gy. Combining these two factors, the authors found a 42% complication rate for the group of patients who underwent laparotomy and who were treated by means of 3 fractions of 3.3 Gy per week, whereas patients irradiated using 4 weekly fractions of 2.5 Gy, without any previous laparotomy, has only a 5% complication risk (p < 0.001).

  9. Anxiety in Patients Treated with Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Scott D; Cukor, Daniel; Kimmel, Paul L

    2016-12-07

    Anxiety is a common yet frequently overlooked psychiatric symptom in patients with ESRD treated with hemodialysis (HD). Anxiety is characterized by disruptive feelings of uncertainty, dread, and fearfulness. A variety of common medical complaints may be manifestations of an anxiety disorder, including palpitations, tremors, indigestion, numbness/tingling, nervousness, shortness of breath, diaphoresis, and fear. It is essential for the clinician to rule out specific medical conditions, including cardiovascular, pulmonary, and neurologic diseases, before ascribing these symptoms to an anxiety disorder. In addition, there is considerable overlap between the symptoms of anxiety and those of depression and uremia. This psychiatric condition has a significant adverse impact on patients' perception of quality of life. Little is known regarding the prevalence and impact of anxiety disorders in patients with ESRD treated with HD; however, many of the seemingly irrational behaviors of patients, or behaviors which place them in conflict with staff and physicians, such as behavioral noncompliance, may be the expression of an underlying anxiety disorder. In this review, we present three clinical vignettes, highlighting the impact of anxiety disorders in patients with ESRD treated with HD. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  10. Modification of polypropylene with radiation-treated wood fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czvikovszky, T.; Tapolcai, I.

    1983-01-01

    The dispersed wood material is used not only as filler for thermosetting polymers but also as a new type of fibrous additive for thermoplastics e.g. polypropylene. Benefit of this additive (filler or reinforcement) is determined by the coupling between the wood and the synthetic resin. Fibrous, dispersed wood material was preirradiated in air, treated with vinyl monomer containing polyester resin and then mixed in polypropylene. Processability of such thermoplastic blends as well as reactivity of the mixed components were followed by measuring energy, absorbed during the kneading of the melt. The vinylmonomer vinylmonomer - polyester additive, activated at higher temperature by the radiation-formed peroxy groups on the wood fiber, results in good processability of the thermoplastic blend, and gives interesting mechanical properties. Calandering, extrusion, pressmoulding and mechanical testing demonstrated good workability and practical value of the polypropylene composite material containing radiation-treated wood fiber. (author)

  11. Radiation therapy for cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mileikowsky, C.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for irradiating a patient comprising: a source of a radiation beam directed along a radiation axis; means mounting the source for pivotal movement about a first horizontal axis which intersects the source, is stationary with respect to the apparatus, and extends in a direction substantially normal to the radiation axis, whereby the beam is capable of an angular scan in a vertical plane; table means adapted to support a patient to be irradiated; and suspension means mounted the table means for arcuate movement to any positions angularly spaced about the first horizontal axis and for pivoting movement about a second horizontal axis displacement from and substantially parallel to the first horizontal axis. The suspension means maintain the second horizontal axis in substantially intersecting relation to the radiation axis in each of the positions while maintaining a fixed angular position of the table means with respect to the environment

  12. Iodine 131 therapy patients: radiation dose to staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castronovo, F.P. Jr.; Beh, R.A.; Veilleux, N.M.

    1986-01-01

    Metastasis to the skeletal system from follicular thyroid carcinoma may be treated with an oral dose of 131 I-NaI. Radiation exposures to hospital personnel attending these patients were calculated as a function of administered dose, distance from the patient and time after administration. Routine or emergency patient handling tasks would not exceed occupational radiation protection guidelines for up to 30 min immediately after administration. The emergency handling of several patients presents the potential for exceeding these guidelines. (author)

  13. Transforming Growth Factor β-1 (TGF-β1) Is a Serum Biomarker of Radiation Induced Fibrosis in Patients Treated With Intracavitary Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: Preliminary Results of a Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothe, Dustin L. [Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Coplowitz, Shana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Greenwood, Eleni [Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Barney, Christian L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Christos, Paul J. [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Parashar, Bhupesh; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K. S. Clifford [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Wernicke, A. Gabriella, E-mail: gaw9008@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To examine a relationship between serum transforming growth factor β -1 (TGF-β1) values and radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF). Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective analysis of the development of RIF in 39 women with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0-I breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and accelerated partial breast irradiation via intracavitary brachytherapy (IBAPBI). An enzyme-linked immunoassay (Quantikine, R and D, Minneapolis, MN) was used to measure serum TGF-β1 before surgery, before IBAPBI, and during IBAPBI. Blood samples for TGF-β1 were also collected from 15 healthy, nontreated women (controls). The previously validated tissue compliance meter (TCM) was used to objectively assess RIF. Results: The median time to follow-up for 39 patients was 44 months (range, 5-59 months). RIF was graded by the TCM scale as 0, 1, 2, and 3 in 5 of 20 patients (25%), 6 of 20 patients (30%), 5 of 20 patients (25%), and 4 of 20 patients (20%), respectively. The mean serum TGF-β1 values were significantly higher in patients before surgery than in disease-free controls, as follows: all cancer patients (30,201 ± 5889 pg/mL, P=.02); patients with any type of RIF (32,273 ± 5016 pg/mL, P<.0001); and women with moderate to severe RIF (34,462 ± 4713 pg/mL, P<0.0001). Patients with moderate to severe RIF had significantly elevated TGF-β1 levels when compared with those with none to mild RIF before surgery (P=.0014) during IBAPBI (P≤0001), and the elevation persisted at 6 months (P≤.001), 12 months (P≤.001), 18 months (P≤.001), and 24 months (P=.12). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of TGF-β1 values predicting moderate to severe RIF was generated with an area under the curve (AUC){sub ROC} of 0.867 (95% confidence interval 0.700-1.000). The TGF-β1 threshold cutoff was determined to be 31,000 pg/mL, with associated sensitivity and specificity of 77.8% and 90.0%, respectively. Conclusions: TGF-β1 levels correlate with

  14. Value of dual time point F-18 FDG-PET/CT imaging for the evaluation of prognosis and risk factors for recurrence in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yoko, E-mail: pecampecam@yahoo.co.jp [PET Center, Kofu Neurosurgical Hospital, ZIP Code 400-0805, Sakaori 1-16-18, Kofu city, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Nambu, Atsushi, E-mail: nambu-a@gray.plala.or.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: honishi@yamanashi.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Sawada, Eiichi, E-mail: e_sawaday_61674@ybb.ne.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Tominaga, Licht, E-mail: lichtt@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Kuriyama, Kengo, E-mail: kuriyama@yamanashi.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Komiyama, Takafumi, E-mail: takafumi-ymu@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kofu Municipal Hospital, ZIP Code 400-0832, Masutsubo-cho 366, Kofu City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Marino, Kan, E-mail: marino-akrf@ych.pref.yamanashi.jp [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi Prefectural Hospital, ZIP Code 400-8506, Fujimi 1-1-1, Kofu City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); Aoki, Shinichi, E-mail: aokis@yamanashi.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, ZIP Code 409-3898, Yamanashi University Faculty of Medicine, Shimokato 1110, Chuo City, Yamanashi Prefecture (Japan); and others

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate prognostic and risk factors for recurrence after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), focusing on dual time point [18]F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). Materials and methods: We prospectively evaluated 57 patients with stage I NSCLC (45 T1N0M0 and 12 T2N0M0) who had undergone pretreatment FDG-PET/CT and were subsequently treated with SBRT. All patients received a whole-body PET/CT scan at 60 min and a whole-lung at 120 min after the injection. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) and retention index (RI) of the lesions were calculated. Local recurrence, regional lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and the recurrence pattern were evaluated. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were performed to evaluate prognostic factors or risk factors of recurrence. Results: During the median follow-up period of 27 months, local recurrence, regional lymph node metastasis, and distant metastasis were seen in 17 (30%), 12 (21%), and 17 (30%) of the 57 patients, respectively. The 3-year overall survival rate was 63.4%. SUV{sub max} did not affect any recurrence, DFS, OS, or CSS. RI significantly predicted higher distant metastasis (HR 47.546, p = 0.026). In contrast, RI tended to predict lower local recurrence (HR 0.175, p = 0.246) and regional lymph node metastasis (HR 0.109, p = 0.115). Conclusions: SUV{sub max} at staging FDG-PET does not predict any recurrence, DFS, OS or CSS. In contrast, higher RI predicts higher distant metastasis and tended to predict lower local or regional lymph node metastasis.

  15. Life Expectancy in Patients Treated for Osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Osmond, Clive; Cooper, Cyrus

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a chronic disease, carrying an elevated risk of fractures, morbidity, and death. Long-term treatment may be required, but the long-term risks with osteoporosis drugs remain incompletely understood. The competing risk of death may be a barrier to treating the oldest, yet this may...... not be rational if the risk of death is reduced by treatment. It is difficult to devise goal-directed long-term strategies for managing osteoporosis without firm information about residual life expectancy in treated patients. We conducted an observational study in Danish national registries tracking prescriptions...... for osteoporosis drugs, comorbid conditions, and deaths. We included 58,637 patients and 225,084 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Information on deaths until the end of 2013 was retrieved, providing a follow-up period of 10 to 17 years. In men younger than 80 years and women younger than 60 years...

  16. Functional Polymorphisms of Base Excision Repair Genes XRCC1 and APEX1 Predict Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Ming; Liao Zhongxing; Liu Zhensheng; Wang, Li-E; Gomez, Daniel; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Qingyi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To explore whether functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of base-excision repair genes are predictors of radiation treatment-related pneumonitis (RP), we investigated associations between functional SNPs of ADPRT, APEX1, and XRCC1 and RP development. Methods and Materials: We genotyped SNPs of ADPRT (rs1136410 [V762A]), XRCC1 (rs1799782 [R194W], rs25489 [R280H], and rs25487 [Q399R]), and APEX1 (rs1130409 [D148E]) in 165 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive chemoradiation therapy. Results were assessed by both Logistic and Cox regression models for RP risk. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated for the cumulative RP probability by the genotypes. Results: We found that SNPs of XRCC1 Q399R and APEX1 D148E each had a significant effect on the development of Grade ≥2 RP (XRCC1: AA vs. GG, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.97; APEX1: GG vs. TT, adjusted HR = 3.61, 95% CI, 1.64-7.93) in an allele-dose response manner (Trend tests: p = 0.040 and 0.001, respectively). The number of the combined protective XRCC1 A and APEX1 T alleles (from 0 to 4) also showed a significant trend of predicting RP risk (p = 0.001). Conclusions: SNPs of the base-excision repair genes may be biomarkers for susceptibility to RP. Larger prospective studies are needed to validate our findings.

  17. The Role of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy with Photons, Protons and Heavy Ions for Treating Extracranial Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Michael Laine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the ability to deliver large doses of ionizing radiation to a tumor has been limited by radiation induced toxicity to normal surrounding tissues. This was the initial impetus for the development of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy, where large volumes of healthy tissue received radiation and were allowed the time to repair the radiation damage. However, advances in radiation delivery techniques and image guidance have allowed for more ablative doses of radiation to be delivered in a very accurate, conformal and safe manner with shortened fractionation schemes. Hypofractionated regimens with photons have already transformed how certain tumor types are treated with radiation therapy. Additionally, hypofractionation is able to deliver a complete course of ablative radiation therapy over a shorter period of time compared to conventional fractionation regimens making treatment more convenient to the patient and potentially more cost-effective. Recently there has been an increased interest in proton therapy because of the potential further improvement in dose distributions achievable due to their unique physical characteristics. Furthermore, with heavier ions the dose conformality is increased and in addition there is potentially a higher biological effectiveness compared to protons and photons. Due to the properties mentioned above, charged particle therapy has already become an attractive modality to further investigate the role of hypofractionation in the treatment of various tumors. This review will discuss the rationale and evolution of hypofractionated radiation therapy, the reported clinical success with initially photon and then charged particle modalities, and further potential implementation into treatment regimens going forward.

  18. Malignant gliomas treated after surgery by combination chemotherapy and delayed radiation therapy. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poisson, M.; Mashaly, R.; Pertuiset, B.F.; Metzger, J.

    1979-01-01

    34 patients operated on for malignant gliomas were successively treated by combination chemotherapy with VM 26 and CCNU and conventional radiation therapy with an average dosage of 5,800 rads, six months after surgery. The general and haematological tolerance of delayed irradiation after chemotherapy was satisfactory. Twelve patients developed neurological complications during or after irradiation. The complications were early in 10 cases, and delayed in 2. They were probably due to tumour growth in five cases, and secondary to irradiation in seven. In four of the seven cases the preradiation chemotherapy seemed to potentiate the radiation effect on the central nervous system. (author)

  19. Subsequent Malignancies in Children Treated for Hodgkin's Disease: Associations With Gender and Radiation Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constine, Louis S.; Tarbell, Nancy; Hudson, Melissa M.; Schwartz, Cindy; Fisher, Susan G.; Muhs, Ann G. B.A.; Basu, Swati K.; Kun, Larry E.; Ng, Andrea; Mauch, Peter; Sandhu, Ajay; Culakova, Eva; Lyman, Gary; Mendenhall, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMNs) are a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality in children treated for Hodgkin's disease (HD). We evaluated select demographic and therapeutic factors associated with SMNs, specifically gender and radiation dose. Methods and Materials: A total of 930 children treated for HD at five institutions between 1960 and 1990 were studied. Mean age at diagnosis was 13.6 years, and mean follow-up was 16.8 years (maximum, 39.4 years). Treatment included radiation alone (43%), chemotherapy alone (9%), or both (48%). Results: We found that SMNs occurred in 102 (11%) patients, with a 25-year actuarial rate of 19%. With 15,154 patient years of follow-up, only 7.18 cancers were expected (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 14.2; absolute excess risk [AER] = 63 cases/10,000 years). The SIR for female subjects, 19.93, was significantly greater than for males, 8.41 (p < 0.0001). After excluding breast cancer, the SIR for female patients was 15.4, still significantly greater than for male patients (p = 0.0012). Increasing radiation dose was associated with an increasing SIR (p = 0.0085). On univariate analysis, an increased risk was associated with female gender, increasing radiation dose, and age at treatment (12-16 years). Using logistic regression, mantle radiation dose increased risk, and this was 2.5-fold for female patients treated with more than 35 Gy primarily because of breast cancer. Conclusions: Survivors of childhood HD are at risk for SMNs, and this risk is greater for female individuals even after accounting for breast cancer. Although SMNs occur in the absence of radiation therapy, the risk increases with RT dose

  20. Autopsy findings in 40 cases of esophageal cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Michitaka; Shiojima, Kazumi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed local control, lymph node metastases and distant metastases for autopsy cases of esophageal cancer treated with radiation therapy alone. Thirty-eight patients had squamous cell carcinoma, one had adenosquamous carcinoma and one had undifferentiated carcinoma. Sixteen patients received a total dose less than 60 Gy and 24 received 60 Gy or more. The 1-year, 3-year, 5-year overall survival rates by Kaplan-Meier method were 45.8%, 16.7%, 8.3%, respectively. Four patients (10%) were free of tumors, and another six (15%) had no primary tumor but metastases. Thirty patients had persistent or recurrent primary tumors. Local tumor control rates were 25% for all patients and 34% for patients who survived more than 3 months and 33% for patients irradiated with 60 Gy or more. Tumor type, tumor length and survival times were significantly related with tumor control rates. Perforations into neighboring organs were observed in eighteen patients (45%); 12 were perforated into respiratory systems, 4 into vascular systems, 1 into the mediastinum and 1 into the pleural cavity. Thirty-two patients (80%) had lymph node metastases. Twenty-seven patients (68%) had distant metastases; 20 in the lung, 19 in the liver, 10 in the stomach, 8 in the pancreas and the adrenal gland, 7 in the pleura, 6 in the bone and the heart and the diaphragm. Concurrent double cancer was observed at autopsy in six patients; 2 early gastric cancers, 2 latent hepatomas, 1 lung cancer, 1 latent thyroid cancer. Three patients had a history of resection of other cancer before radiation therapy to esophageal cancer; 2 had gastric cancer and 1 had submandibular cancer. One patient who had another esophageal cancer apart from the first esophageal cancer received radiation therapy 12 years ago. In conclusion, the local control rate was 33% for autopsy cases of esophageal cancer treated with radiation therapy of 60 Gy or more. (J.P.N.)

  1. Patient satisfaction in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zissiadis, Y.; Provis, A.; Dhaliwal, S.S.

    2003-01-01

    In this current economic climate where the costs of providing a good medical service are escalating, patients are demanding a higher level of service from the Radiation Oncology providers. This coupled with the rising level of patients' expectations make it absolutely paramount for Radiation Oncology providers to offer the best possible service to their patients. In order to do this, it is essential to assess the present level of patient satisfaction prior to deciding which aspects of the current service need to be changed. In this pilot study, we assess the level of patient satisfaction with aspects of the radiotherapy service and the level of patient anxiety both prior to and following radiotherapy at the Perth Radiation Oncology Centre. A questionnaire was created using a combination of the Information Satisfaction Questionnaire-1 (ISQ-1), the Very Short Questionnaire 9 (VSQ 9) and the State Trait Anxiety Index (STAI). One hundred new patients were studied, all of whom were to have radiotherapy with curative intent. The results of this study are reviewed in this presentation

  2. Suicide risk in patients treated with lithium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Søndergård, Lars; Kvist, Kajsa

    2005-01-01

    CONTEXT: Prior observational studies suggest that treatment with lithium may be associated with reduced risk of suicide in bipolar disorder. However, these studies are biased toward patients with the most severe disorders, and the relation to sex and age has seldom been investigated. OBJECTIVE......: To investigate whether treatment with lithium reduces the risk of suicide in a nationwide study. DESIGN: An observational cohort study with linkage of registers of all prescribed lithium and recorded suicides in Denmark during a period from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 1999. SETTING: All patients treated...... with lithium in Denmark, ie, within community psychiatry, private specialist practice settings, and general practice. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 13 186 patients who purchased at least 1 prescription of lithium and 1.2 million subjects from the general population. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: All suicides identified...

  3. Basics of Radiation Biology When Treating Hyperproliferative Benign Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Rödel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For decades, low- and moderate-dose radiation therapy (RT has been shown to exert a beneficial therapeutic effect in a multitude of non-malignant conditions including painful degenerative muscoloskeletal and hyperproliferative disorders. Dupuytren and Ledderhose diseases are benign fibroproliferative diseases of the hand/foot with fibrotic nodules and fascial cords, which determine debilitating contractures and deformities of fingers/toes, while keloids are exuberant scar formations following burn damage, surgery, and trauma. Although RT has become an established and effective option in the management of these diseases, experimental studies to illustrate cellular composites and factors involved remain to be elucidated. More recent findings, however, indicate the involvement of radiation-sensitive targets like mitotic fibroblasts/myofibroblasts as well as inflammatory cells. Radiation-related molecular mechanisms affecting these target cells include the production of free radicals to hamper proliferative activity and interference with growth factors and cytokines. Moreover, an impairment of activated immune cells involved in both myofibroblast proliferative and inflammatory processes may further contribute to the clinical effects. We here aim at briefly describing mechanisms contributing to a modulation of proliferative and inflammatory processes and to summarize current concepts of treating hyperproliferative diseases by low and moderate doses of ionizing radiation.

  4. Prevention and control of sequels in the mouth of patients treated with radiation therapy for head and neck tumors; Prevencao e controle das sequelas bucais em pacientes irradiados por tumores de cabeca e pescoco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Maria de Fatima Aparecida; Novikoff, Silviene; Tresso, Adriana; Segreto, Roberto Araujo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Setor de Odontologia; Cervantes, Onivaldo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina. Setor de Radioterapia

    2005-04-01

    Surgery and radiation therapy are de main treatments for head and neck cancer. The side effects of the interaction of ionizing radiation on the tissues include dermatitis, mucositis, xerostomia, candidiasis, dysgeusia, dysphagia, caries, trismus, osteoradionecrosis. Objective: To assess dental condition of the patients using a protocol which allows avoiding or reducing the effects of radiation in the tissues of the oral cavity. Materials And Methods: Dental follow-up was performed before, during and up to 180 days after radiation therapy in 12 patients submitted to surgery and radiation therapy or radiation therapy alone. Results: The proportion of effects such as dermatitis, mucositis, dysgeusia, and dysphagia increased from the second week of the treatment until the end of the administrations. There was a clear decrease at the end of the treatment which was close to baseline values after 180 days. The reduction of xerostomia was slower and less effective. No case of caries, trismus, and osteoradionecrosis were observed during the assessment period. Conclusion: Regular dental follow-up associated with preventive measures such as prophylactic management of dental and oral diseases, adequate hygiene, mouth-washing with bicarbonate water and chamomile tea, and topic fluorine application contributed to improve the recovery conditions of patients with cancer of head and neck submitted to radiation therapy. (author)

  5. Radiation therapy in old patients. Side effects and results of radiation therapy in old patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, H.; Zimmermann, F.B.; Molls, M.

    1999-01-01

    Background: Despite a growing number of elderly patients receiving radiation therapy little is known about side effects and outcome of irradiation in this section of the population. Methods: In a review article epidemiologic data, aspects of radiation-biology as well as side effects and outcome of radiation therapy of elderly patients are discussed. Results: Cancer incidence rises with age and is exceeding 3.5% for males older than 85 years. With a life expectancy of more than 4 years, curative therapy is indicated even at this age. Furthermore, several retrospective studies indicate that local control and disease-Specific survival after radiation therapy of elderly patients is comparable with that of younger persons. The exception contains elderly patients with grade-III to IV gliomas or with rectal carcinoma who show a reduced survival which is perhaps caused by less aggressive combined treatment (tumor resection). Although some biological and molecular data indicate a rise in radiation sensitivity with growing age like the reduction of the capacity of some DNA-repair enzymes, there is no convincing evidence in animal studies or in retrospective clinical studies that radiation therapy is generally less well tolerated by older individuals. Some age-depending differences in organ toxicities are described in 3 large studies, which evaluate the data of patients who were enrolled in different EORTC-trials: Older patients suffer more of functional mucositis in case of radiation therapy to the head and neck, they have an increased weight loss and a higher frequency of late esophageal damage when irradiated in the thorax, and they show a higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction when treated with radiation therapy to the pelvis. On the other hand younger patients suffer more from acute toxicity like skin damage, nausea, and deterioration of the performance status during pelvic radiotherapy. When discussing the dose intensity of radiation therapy concomitant disease which

  6. Quality of life of patients treated with radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianna Rożniecka-Hełmińska

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Radiotherapy is one of the most commonly used anticancer treatments. Despite continuous technological development it may cause adverse symptoms, and as a result reduce the quality of life in patients undergoing radiation therapy. Objective of the work: Analysis of the quality of life of patients treated with radiation therapy and the effect determination of selected factors and their clinical complications on the quality of life of oncological patients. Material and methods: The study included 100 patients diagnosed with cancer, including 47 (47% women and 53 (53% men, with an average age of 62.1 (± 9.47 years. The study used a standardized questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30, in assessing the quality of life of cancer patients and a questionnaire of our own design containing sociodemographic and clinical data. The collected empirical data were analyzed statistically. The level of significance was p <0.05. Results: In the group of patients tested the average rate the overall quality of life was 50.5 (± 16.28 with a median of 50. The highest quality of life in the test reported in the field of cognitive functioning, and the lowest in the area of social functioning. In 72% of patients experienced complications of radiotherapy. During the analysis, it was found that the overall quality of life and functioning in all domains is lower comparing to the results of patients with no side effects of treatment. The analysis also found that in patients with head and neck cancer, which are irradiated at the same area, the level of cognitive functioning is significantly lower than the level of functioning in the same domain patients irradiated in the chest area (p <0.008 and in the area of reproductive organs (p <0.007. Conclusions: There is a diversity of quality of life of patients with and without complications of treatment with ionizing radiation, which have a significant impact on the quality of life of cancer patients. Location area irradiated

  7. Radiation-induced cancer in laryngectomized patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Hiroshi; Tsuruta, Yoshihiro; Sato, Takeo; Yoshino, Kunitoshi; Umatani, Katunori

    1991-01-01

    Three patients developed hypopharyngo-cervical esophageal carcinoma, 6.5, 13, and 12 years after total laryngectomy. The first patient had received irradiation (60 Gy) for hypopharyngeal carcinoma. The recurrent tumor was removed with total pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy and reconstruction was performed with a local skin flap. After 6 years and 6 months, she developed progressive dysphagia. A new cervical esophageal skin cancer was diagnosed by pharyngoesophagography and treated. The second patient had had total laryngectomy for laryngeal carcinoma and received irradiation (100 Gy) post-operatively. After 13 years, he developed progressive dysphagia. Pharyngoesophagography revealed cervical esophageal carcinoma. The third patient had received irradiation for laryngeal carcinoma (60 Gy) and underwent total laryngectomy because of recurrence. After 12 years she developed dysphagia, and was treated for hypopharyngeal carcinoma. These three patients seemed to have radiation-induced carcinoma. Patients treated with total laryngectomy and irradiation who later complain of progressive dysphagia should be examined carefully to differentiate between postoperative stenosis due to scarring and a new carcinoma. (author)

  8. Polyneuropathy in levodopa-treated Parkinson's patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szadejko, Karol; Dziewiatowski, Krzysztof; Szabat, Krzysztof; Robowski, Piotr; Schinwelski, Michał; Sitek, Emilia; Sławek, Jarosław

    2016-12-15

    Recently published studies show that the prevalence of polyneuropathy (PNP) is higher in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) than in age-matched controls. Its pathogenesis, however is a matter of controversy. The major hypothesis is the toxicity of high concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy) possibly related to levodopa (LD) therapy. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of PNP, independent of other etiologies, and to determine the relationship to demographic and clinical factors in LD-treated Parkinson's patients. A total of 102 patients (51 patients with PD and 51 sex- and age-matched healthy controls) were enrolled in the study. The presence of any risk factors for PNP, ascertained from the history and laboratory tests, was an exclusion criterion. The Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) was used for clinical assessment of PNP. The objective assessment was based on electroneurography (ENG) studies in which motor nerves (peroneal and tibial nerves) as well as sensory nerves (sural and superficial peroneal nerves) were bilaterally examined. The severity of the disease was determined using the UPDRS scale (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale) and the Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y) scale. In the PD group, the clinical and neurophysiological indicators of PNP, manifested as a symmetrical and predominantly sensory axonal neuropathy, were more frequent then in the control group and observed in 43.1% vs. 13.7% and 15.7% vs. 2% of subjects respectively. The presence of PNP correlated with age and the severity of PD. Patients with PD and PNP had a higher level of Hcy as compared to PD patients without PNP, however the difference was not statistically significant. The frequency of PNP in PD patients is higher than in controls. The characteristics and discrepancy between the number of patients with clinical and ENG detected PNP may suggest the small fiber neuropathy (SFN) as the dominant form of neuropathy in PD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  9. Thermal analysis of used and radiation treated polycarbonate (L-MW) biomaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayabalan, M.; Sreenivasan, K.; Nair, P.D.; Jalajamani, K.V.

    1988-01-01

    γ-radiation treatment of radiation sterilized polycarbonate biomaterials has been carried out to ensure efficient disposal by incineration. Low molecular weight polycarbonate sterilized with 2.5 Mrad dose of γ-radiation was further treated with different doses of γ-radiation. The radiation-treated samples were subjected to thermogravimetry. The sterilized sample and the 7.5 Mrad-treated sample showed similar properties. These samples do not leave any residue during thermal decomposition. (author). 5 refs., 3 tables

  10. Radiation therapy in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durdux, C.; Boisserie, T.; Gisselbrecht, M.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is a disease that predominantly occurs in older patients who represent a quarter of the population in western countries. Numerous types of cancer are observed in elderly people. Radiotherapy is one of the most powerful treatment against cancer. Most of published studies have demonstrated feasibility of radiotherapy in curative or palliative intent whatever cancer types are considered. Complete geriatric assessment and a multidisciplinary approach are the key points. The purpose of this review is to highlight sights of radiation oncology specifically related to aging. Particular emphasis is placed on logistic and technical aspects of radiation, as dose, irradiated volume and fractionation. (authors)

  11. Why do patients drop out during radiation therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Seung Jae; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Chan; Chong, Won A; Kim, Hyun Joo; Wu, Hong Gyun

    1998-01-01

    This study is to see how much proportion of the patients receiving radiation therapy drop out during radiation therapy and to analyze the reason for the incomplete treatment. The base population of this study was 1,100 patients with registration numbers 901 through 2,000 at Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Authors investigated the incidence of incomplete radiation therapy, which was defined as less than 95% of initially planned radiation dose, and the reasons for incomplete radiation therapy. One hundred and twenty eight patients (12%) did not complete the planned radiation therapy. The performance status of the incompletely treated patients was generally poorer than that of the base population, and the aim of radiation therapy was more commonly palliative. The most common reason for not completing the planned treatment was the patients' refusal of further radiation therapy because of the distrust of radiation therapy and/or the poor economic status. Careful case selection for radiation therapy with consideration of the socioeconomic status of the patients in addition to the clinical indication would be necessary for the reduction of incomplete treatment, especially in the palliative setting

  12. Radiation-induced hyperprolactinaemia in a treated acromegalic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalet, S.M.; MacFarlane, I.A.; Beardwell, C.G.

    1979-01-01

    A 31-year-old acromegalic was normoprolactinaemic after partial removal of her pituitary tumour. The post-operative external pituitary irradiation lowered the mean growth hormone (GH) level from 75 mU/l to less than 1 mU/l within 2 years. However, at the same time hyperprolactinaemia developed. These changes in the GH and prolactin levels were confirmed 3 and 4 years after irradiation. The cause of the hyperprolactinaemia was radiation-induced hypothalamic damage. Therefore it is suggested that similar damage may occur in patients receiving external pituitary irradiation for 'prolactinomas' and that this mechanism may contribute to the persistent hyperprolactinaemia observed in such patients. (author)

  13. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma treated with surgery and radiation therapy -case report-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Young; Oh, Yoon Kyeong

    2006-01-01

    Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is an uncommon dura-based tumor and can recur not only locally but also distantly in the neural axis or extraneural sites. We report our experience of radiation therapy, one preoperative and one elective postoperative, in two patients with meningeal HPC and reviewed the role of radiation therapy. A 41-year-old man (Case 1) presented with a 3-month history of headache and right hemiparesis. The mass was nearly unresectable at the first and second operation and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Preoperative radiation therapy was given with a total dose of 55.8 Gy/31 fractions to the large residual mass of left frontoparietal area. Follow-up computerized tomography (CT) showed marked regression of tumor after radiation therapy. The third operation was performed to remove the residual tumor at 6 months after the radiation therapy and a 2 x 2 cm sized tumor was encountered. The mass was totally removed. The serial follow-up CT showed no evidence of recurrence and he is alive without distant metastasis for 4 years and 10 months after the first operation. A 45-year-old woman (Case 2) presented with suddenly developed headache and visual impairment. Tumor mass occupying right frontal lobe was removed with the preoperative diagnosis of meningioma. It was totally removed with attached sagittal sinus and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Elective postoperative radiation therapy was performed to reduce local recurrence with a total dose of 54 Gy/30 fractions to the involved area of right frontal lobe. She is alive for 5 years maintaining normal activity without local recurrence and distant metastasis

  14. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma treated with surgery and radiation therapy -case report-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Young; Oh, Yoon Kyeong [College of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is an uncommon dura-based tumor and can recur not only locally but also distantly in the neural axis or extraneural sites. We report our experience of radiation therapy, one preoperative and one elective postoperative, in two patients with meningeal HPC and reviewed the role of radiation therapy. A 41-year-old man (Case 1) presented with a 3-month history of headache and right hemiparesis. The mass was nearly unresectable at the first and second operation and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Preoperative radiation therapy was given with a total dose of 55.8 Gy/31 fractions to the large residual mass of left frontoparietal area. Follow-up computerized tomography (CT) showed marked regression of tumor after radiation therapy. The third operation was performed to remove the residual tumor at 6 months after the radiation therapy and a 2 x 2 cm sized tumor was encountered. The mass was totally removed. The serial follow-up CT showed no evidence of recurrence and he is alive without distant metastasis for 4 years and 10 months after the first operation. A 45-year-old woman (Case 2) presented with suddenly developed headache and visual impairment. Tumor mass occupying right frontal lobe was removed with the preoperative diagnosis of meningioma. It was totally removed with attached sagittal sinus and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Elective postoperative radiation therapy was performed to reduce local recurrence with a total dose of 54 Gy/30 fractions to the involved area of right frontal lobe. She is alive for 5 years maintaining normal activity without local recurrence and distant metastasis.

  15. Patient Radiation Protection in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegazy, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Role of Radiotherapy is treatment modalities for cancer which is generally assumed that 50 to 60% of cancer patients will benefit from radiotherapy. It constitutes a peaceful application of ionizing radiation and an essential part of cancer management. The two aims of radiation protection Prevention is of deterministic effect and Reduction of the probability of stochastic effects. The Shielding fundamentals is to limit radiation exposure of staff, patients, visitors and the public to acceptable levels it also optimize protection of patients, staff and the public. Diagnosis is important for target design and the dose required for cure or palliation while Simulator is often used twice in the radiotherapy process where Patient data acquisition - target localization, contours, outlines and Verification. The Prescription is the responsibility of individual clinicians, depending on the patient’s condition, equipment available, experience and training. An ultimate check of the actual treatment given can only be made by using in vivo dosimetry. Treatment records must be kept of all relevant aspects of the treatment – including Session and Summary Record information, Records all treatment parameters, Dose Calculations and Dose Measurements

  16. Outcome of thyroid associated ophthalmopathy treated by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abboud, Mirna; Arabi, Asma; Salti, Ibrahim; Geara, Fady

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid associated orbitopathy is a common manifestation of Graves disease. Many options can be considered for treatment. In this case series, we reviewed the medical records of 17 patients who received radiation therapy (RT) for GO in a tertiary care center between 1997 and 2007. All patients received 20 Gy to both orbits and 12 of them (71%) had already received one or more trials of steroid therapy prior to RT. After a median follow-up of 2 years, a subjective improvement in exophthalmos and vision was reported by all patients at the end of RT but only 3 patients reported a decrease in their diplopia immediately after therapy. Symptoms continued to improve with time in many patients: 22% had complete reversal of their symptoms and signs, and the remaining 78% had partial improvement. Two patients developed recurrent signs and symptoms, both of them were smokers who continued to smoke after treatment. About 60-65% of patients responded favorably to RT alone which increased to 87-97% when RT is combined with steroids. No patients developed late toxicity during the follow-up period. We conclude that RT is an effective treatment option in GO even in patients who failed previous treatment with steroids or surgical decompression. Based on our own clinical experiences and the literature data, the combination of RT and intravenous corticosteroid administration may improve the response rate

  17. Prediabetes in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manu, Peter; Correll, Christoph U; van Winkel, Ruud; Wampers, Martien; De Hert, Marc

    2012-04-01

    In 2010, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) proposed that individuals with fasting glucose level of 100-125 mg/dL (5.6-6.9 mmol/L) or glucose level of 140-199 mg/dL (7.8-11.0 mmol/L) 2 hours after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test or hemoglobin A(1c) 5.7%-6.4% be classified as prediabetic, indicating increased risk for the emergence of diabetes mellitus. At the same time, the ADA formulated guidelines for the use of metformin for the treatment of prediabetes. To determine the prevalence of prediabetes in a cohort of psychiatrically ill adults receiving antipsychotics and to compare the clinical and metabolic features of prediabetic patients with those of patients with normal glucose tolerance and those with diabetes mellitus. The 2010 ADA criteria were applied to a large, consecutive, single-site European cohort of 783 adult psychiatric inpatients (mean age: 37.6 years) without a history of diabetes who were receiving antipsychotics. All patients in this cross-sectional study underwent measurement of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, oral glucose tolerance test, and fasting insulin and lipids from November 2003 through July 2007. 413 patients (52.8%) had normal glucose tolerance, 290 (37.0%) had prediabetes, and 80 (10.2%) had diabetes mellitus. The fasting glucose and/or hemoglobin A(1c) criteria were met by 89.7% of prediabetic patients. A statistically significant intergroup gradient from normal glucose tolerance to prediabetes and from prediabetes to diabetes mellitus was observed for waist circumference, triglycerides, fasting insulin levels, and frequency of metabolic syndrome (P = .02 to P prediabetic patients (6.6%) met the 2010 ADA criteria for treatment with metformin. Prediabetes is highly prevalent in adults treated with antipsychotic drugs and correlates with markers of increased intraabdominal adiposity, enhanced lipolysis, and insulin resistance. Criteria for using metformin to prevent the emergence of diabetes mellitus may need to be

  18. Quantitative Analysis of "1"8F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Identifies Novel Prognostic Imaging Biomarkers in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Yi; Song, Jie; Pollom, Erqi; Alagappan, Muthuraman; Shirato, Hiroki; Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C.; Li, Ruijiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify prognostic biomarkers in pancreatic cancer using high-throughput quantitative image analysis. Methods and Materials: In this institutional review board–approved study, we retrospectively analyzed images and outcomes for 139 locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The overall population was split into a training cohort (n=90) and a validation cohort (n=49) according to the time of treatment. We extracted quantitative imaging characteristics from pre-SBRT "1"8F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, including statistical, morphologic, and texture features. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was built to predict overall survival (OS) in the training cohort using 162 robust image features. To avoid over-fitting, we applied the elastic net to obtain a sparse set of image features, whose linear combination constitutes a prognostic imaging signature. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the association with OS, and concordance index (CI) was used to evaluate the survival prediction accuracy. Results: The prognostic imaging signature included 7 features characterizing different tumor phenotypes, including shape, intensity, and texture. On the validation cohort, univariate analysis showed that this prognostic signature was significantly associated with OS (P=.002, hazard ratio 2.74), which improved upon conventional imaging predictors including tumor volume, maximum standardized uptake value, and total legion glycolysis (P=.018-.028, hazard ratio 1.51-1.57). On multivariate analysis, the proposed signature was the only significant prognostic index (P=.037, hazard ratio 3.72) when adjusted for conventional imaging and clinical factors (P=.123-.870, hazard ratio 0.53-1.30). In terms of CI, the proposed signature scored 0.66 and was significantly better than competing prognostic indices (CI 0.48-0.64, Wilcoxon rank sum test P<1e-6

  19. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  20. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  1. Radiation doses to children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmedal, Lise J. [Helse Fonna, Department of Radiology, Stord Hospital, Stord (Norway); Friberg, Eva G.; Boerretzen, Ingelin; Olerud, Hilde [The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway); Laegreid, Liv [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Bergen (Norway); Rosendahl, Karen [University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology Section, Bergen (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-15

    Children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus are still followed routinely with frequent head CT scans. To estimate the effective dose, brain and lens doses from these examinations during childhood, and to assess dose variation per examination. All children born between 1983 and 1995 and treated for hydrocephalus between 1983 and 2002 were included. We retrospectively registered the number of examinations and the applied scan parameters. The effective dose was calculated using mean conversion factors from the CT dose index measured free in air, while doses to the lens and brain were estimated using tabulated CT dose index values measured in a head phantom. A total of 687 CT examinations were performed in 67 children. The mean effective dose, lens dose and brain dose to children over 6 months of age were 1.2 mSv, 52 mGy and 33 mGy, respectively, and the corresponding doses to younger children were 3.2 mSv, 60 mGy and 48 mGy. The effective dose per CT examination varied by a factor of 64. None of the children was exposed to doses known to cause deterministic effects. However, since the threshold for radiation-induced damage is not known with certainty, alternative modalities such as US and MRI should be used whenever possible. (orig.)

  2. Shelf life of ground beef patties treated by gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W T; Weese, J O

    1998-10-01

    The effects of irradiation on microbial populations in ground beef patties vacuum package and irradiated frozen at target doses of 0.0, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0 kGy were determined. Irradiated samples were stored at 4 or -18 degrees C for 42 days, and mesophilic aerobic plate counts (APCs) were periodically determined. Fresh ground beef (initial APC of 10(2) CFU/g) treated with 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0 kGy was acceptable ( 10(7) CFU/g) by day 14 and 21, respectively, whereas patties treated at 5.0 kGy did not spoil until 42 days. The nonirradiated control samples for both batches of ground beef spoiled within 7 days. Microbial counts in ground beef patties stored at -18 degrees C did not change over the 42-day period. Shelf life of ground beef patties stored at 4 degrees C may be extended with gamma radiation, especially at 5.0 and 7.0 kGy. Initial microbial load in ground beef samples was an important shelf life factor.

  3. Radiological Risk for Patients Treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chas, J.; Janiak, M.K.; Kowalczyk, A.; Siekierzynski, M.; Dziuk, E.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Dose equivalents were measured during the three-day therapy with 131 I in patients treated at the Clinic of Endocrinology and Radioisotope Therapy, Central Clinical Hospital, Military University School of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland, for thyroid cancer (supplementary treatment; 21 cases), hyperthyroidism in the Graves-Basedov's disease (18 cases), and toxic nodular goiter (19 cases). The absorbed doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters placed above the jugular incisure and above the pubic symphysis; the readings were used for calculation of the dose equivalent over the thyroid and in the ovaries. Following the radical treatment of thyroid cancer iodine uptake in the thyroid gland was very low and most of the applied 131 I was excreted within one to three days. In our 21 patients who were given on average 2.8 GBq (76 mCi) 131 I and stimulated with TSH (approx. 60 μIU/mL) the mean dose equivalents over the thyroid and in the ovaries were 115±123 mSv and 56±19 mSv, respectively. In comparison, the calculated dose equivalents in the Graves-Basedov's disease patients (424 MBq mean activity of the applied 131 I) and the goiter patients (544 MBq mean activity of the applied 131 I) were approx. 3.5 times higher over the thyroid and approx. 2.5 times lower in the ovaries. No disfunctions of the ovaries were detected in the treated young women. Based on these results it is recommended to stimulate diuresis during the first two-three days after the injection of 131 I. The results also indicate that exposure to ionising radiation of patients treated for various thyroid disorders with 131 I does not lead to the development of clinically detectable non-stochastic effects. (author)

  4. Radiation exposure of the families of outpatients treated with radioiodine (iodine-131) for hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrington, S.F.; O`Doherty, M.J.; Seed, P. [Guy`s, King`s and St. Thomas` Schools of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Kettle, A.G. [Kent and Canterbury NHS Trust, Canterbury (United Kingdom); Thomson, W.H.; Harding, L.K. [City Hospitals NHS Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Mountford, P.J.; Farrell, R.J. [North Staffordshire Hospital NHS Trust, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Burrell, D.N. [University Hospital, Birmingham NHS Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Batchelor, S. [Guy`s and St. Thomas` Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    Patients who receive radioiodine (iodine-131) treatment for hyperthyroidism (195-800 MBq) emit radiation and represent a potential hazard to other individuals. Critical groups amongst the public are fellow travellers on the patient`s journey home from hospital and members of the patient`s family, particularly young children. The dose which members of the public are allowed to receive as a result of a patient`s treatment has been reduced in Europe following recently revised recommendations from ICRP. The annual public dose limit is 1 mSv, though adult members of the patient`s family are allowed to receive higher doses, with the proviso that a limit of 5 mSv should not be exceeded over 5 years. Unless the doses received during out-patient administration of radioiodine can be demonstrated to comply with these new limits, hospitalisation of patients will be necessary. The radiation doses received by family members (35 adults and 87 children) of patients treated with radioiodine at five UK hospitals were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters mounted in wrist bands. Families were given advice (according to current practice) from their treatment centre about limiting close contact with the patient for a period of time after treatment. Doses measured over 3-6 weeks were adjusted to give an estimate of values which might have been expected if the dosimeters had been worn indefinitely. Thirty-five passengers accompanying patients home after treatment also recorded the dose received during the journey using electronic (digital) personal dosimeters. For the ``adjusted`` doses to infinity, 97% of adults complied with a 5-mSv dose limit (range:0.2-5.8 mSv) and 89% of children with a 1-mSv limit (range: 0.2-7.2 mSv). However 6 of 17 children aged 3 years or less had an adjusted dose which exceeded this 1 mSv limit. The dose received by adults during travel was small in comparison with the total dose received. The median travel dose was 0.03 mSv for 1 h travel (range: 2 {mu

  5. Scatter Dose in Patients in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W. F. O.

    2003-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiation therapy are often treated with high energy radiation (bremsstrahlung) which causes scatter doses in the patients from various sources as photon scatter coming from collimator, gantry, patient, patient table or room (walls, floor, air) or particle doses resulting from gamma-particle reactions in the atomic nucleus if the photon energies are above 8 MeV. In the last years new treatment techniques like IMRT (esp the step-and-shoot- or the MIMIC-techniques) have increased interest in these topics again. In the lecture an overview about recent measurements on scatter doses resulting from gantry, table and room shall be given. Scatter doses resulting from the volume treated in the patient to other critical parts of the body like eyes, ovarii etc. have been measured in two diploma works in our institute and are compared with a program (PERIDOSE; van der Giessen, Netherlands) to estimate them. In some cases these scatter doses have led to changes of treatment modalities. Also an overview and estimation of doses resulting from photon-particle interactions is given according to a publication from Gudowska et al.(Gudowska I, Brahme A, Andreo P, Gudowski W, Kierkegaard J. Calculation of absorbed dose and biological effectiveness from photonuclear reactions in a bremsstrahlung beam of end point 50 MeV. Phys Med Biol 1999; 44(9):2099-2125.). Energy dose has been calculated with Monte Carlo-methods and is compared with analytical methods for 50 MV bremsstrahlung. From these data biologically effective doses from particles in different depths of the body can be estimated also for energies used in normal radiotherapy. (author)

  6. Measurement of radiation exposure in attendants of thyroid cancer patients treated with {sup 131}I; Medicion de la exposicion a la radiacion en familiares de pacientes tratados con {sup 131}I por patologia tiroidea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez G, Y. T.

    2012-07-01

    Patients treated with {sup 131}I for differentiated thyroid cancer present radiological risk to relatives, occupational exposed workers and general public. Recently, the IAEA issued document K-9010241, 2010, which recommends that patient discharge from hospital must be based on the particular status of each patient, unlike the current criteria applied in Mexico based on the exposure rate at a 1 m distance. In this work thermoluminescent dosimeters were used during a 15 day period to measure the effective dose received by 40 family caregivers of patients treated with {sup 131}I, after their release from hospital 'Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia', Mexico. Relatives were classified in two groups, ambulatory (outpatients) and hospitalized (inpatients), according to the release mode of the patient. Measurements were performed for 20 family caregivers in each group. The effective dose received by all family members of outpatient and inpatient groups was found to be smaller that 5 mSv. In addition, 70 and 90% of inpatient and outpatient groups, respectively, received doses lower than 1 mSv. These data provide information which allow to give recommendations of possible modifications to current regulations in Mexico regarding discharge from hospital of patients treated with radiopharmaceuticals. (Author)

  7. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Findings During Therapy Predict Outcome in Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated With Chemotherapy Alone but Not in Those Who Receive Consolidation Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabaja, Bouthaina S., E-mail: bdabaja@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hess, Kenneth [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shihadeh, Ferial [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Podoloff, Donald A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Medeiros, L. Jeffrey [Department of Hematopathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mawlawi, Osama [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Arzu, Isidora [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Oki, Yasuhiro; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Fayad, Luis E. [Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Reed, Valerie K.; Kedir, Aziza; Wogan, Christine F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rodriguez, Alma [Office of the Executive Vice President and Physician-in-Chief, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of mid-therapy positron emission tomography (PET) findings for predicting survival and disease progression in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, considering type of therapy (chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 294 patients with histologically confirmed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with respect to age, sex, disease stage, International Prognostic Index score, mid-therapy PET findings (positive or negative), and disease status after therapy and at last follow-up. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were compared according to mid-therapy PET findings. Results: Of the 294 patients, 163 (55%) were male, 144 (49%) were age >61 years, 110 (37%) had stage I or II disease, 219 (74%) had International Prognostic Index score ≤2, 216 (73%) received ≥6 cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, and 88 (30%) received consolidation radiation therapy. Five-year PFS and OS rates were associated with mid-therapy PET status: PFS was 78% for those with PET-negative (PET−) disease versus 63% for PET-positive (PET+) disease (P=.024), and OS was 82% for PET− versus 62% for PET+ (P<.002). These associations held true for patients who received chemotherapy only (PFS 71% for PET− vs 52% PET+ [P=.012], OS 78% for PET− and 51% for PET+ [P=.0055]) but not for those who received consolidation radiation therapy (PFS 84% PET− vs 81% PET+ [P=.88]; OS 90% PET− vs 81% PET+ [P=.39]). Conclusion: Mid-therapy PET can predict patient outcome, but the use of consolidation radiation therapy may negate the significance of mid-therapy findings.

  8. Psychological distress and intervention in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sostaric, M.; Sprah, L.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Common side effects of treatment with radiation therapy (RT) often cause psychophysical distress in cancer patients. Anxiety, adjustment disorders and depression (which are according to many studies experienced in about half of the oncological population) might originate some serious psychiatric forms of mood disorders and can even culminate in suicide, if not treated appropriately. There are some groups of cancer patients who are especially vulnerable and among them are cancer patients undergoing RT - they should receive special attention from medical staff. The purpose of this review is to present a variety of psychosocial interventions and illustrate some methods that are (or could be) used in psycho-oncology practice. Conclusions. A large body of literature suggests that the first intervention step should be effective screening for patients in distress. In regard to these proposals the development of (computerized) screening programmes is the first measure that ought to be taken. Moreover, further systematical research of traditional, non-traditional and complementary intervention strategies in cancer patients in distress would be necessary in order to provide reliable empirical results about the effectiveness of different approaches. (author)

  9. Radiation exposure of the families of outpatients treated with radioiodine (iodine-131) for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrington, S.F.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Seed, P.; Kettle, A.G.; Thomson, W.H.; Harding, L.K.; Mountford, P.J.; Farrell, R.J.; Burrell, D.N.; Batchelor, S.

    1999-01-01

    Patients who receive radioiodine (iodine-131) treatment for hyperthyroidism (195-800 MBq) emit radiation and represent a potential hazard to other individuals. Critical groups amongst the public are fellow travellers on the patient's journey home from hospital and members of the patient's family, particularly young children. The dose which members of the public are allowed to receive as a result of a patient's treatment has been reduced in Europe following recently revised recommendations from ICRP. The annual public dose limit is 1 mSv, though adult members of the patient's family are allowed to receive higher doses, with the proviso that a limit of 5 mSv should not be exceeded over 5 years. Unless the doses received during out-patient administration of radioiodine can be demonstrated to comply with these new limits, hospitalisation of patients will be necessary. The radiation doses received by family members (35 adults and 87 children) of patients treated with radioiodine at five UK hospitals were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters mounted in wrist bands. Families were given advice (according to current practice) from their treatment centre about limiting close contact with the patient for a period of time after treatment. Doses measured over 3-6 weeks were adjusted to give an estimate of values which might have been expected if the dosimeters had been worn indefinitely. Thirty-five passengers accompanying patients home after treatment also recorded the dose received during the journey using electronic (digital) personal dosimeters. For the ''adjusted'' doses to infinity, 97% of adults complied with a 5-mSv dose limit (range:0.2-5.8 mSv) and 89% of children with a 1-mSv limit (range: 0.2-7.2 mSv). However 6 of 17 children aged 3 years or less had an adjusted dose which exceeded this 1 mSv limit. The dose received by adults during travel was small in comparison with the total dose received. The median travel dose was 0.03 mSv for 1 h travel (range: 2

  10. Intranasal melanoma treated with radiation therapy in three dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Owen; Spencer, Sarah; Necova, Slavomira; Holmes, Emma; Taylor, Angela; Blackwood, Laura; Lara-Garcia, Ana

    2017-12-01

    Three dogs were investigated for chronic unilateral nasal discharge. In all cases CT imaging showed an intranasal mass causing turbinate lysis and no evidence of metastasis. Cytology in cases 1 (a 14-year-old neutered male crossbreed dog) and 2 (a five-year-old neutered male German Shepherd dog) demonstrated a pleomorphic cell population with variable intracellular pigment suspicious of melanocytic neoplasia. Histopathology with immunohistochemistry (Melan-A and vimentin, plus PNL-2 in one case) confirmed the diagnosis of melanoma in all dogs. All dogs were treated with megavoltage radiotherapy using linear accelerators. Cases 1 and 3 (a nine-year-old neutered female beagle dog) received a hypofractionated (4 × 8 Gy) protocol and case 2 received a definitive (12 × 4 Gy) protocol. Complete remission was demonstrated on repeat CT scan five months after diagnosis in case 1 and seven months in case 2. Stable disease was documented on CT at four months for case 3; however, clinical signs in this dog remained controlled for 10 months in total. Case 1 died of unrelated causes five months after diagnosis, case 2 was euthanased due to the development of seizures 13 months after diagnosis, and case 3 was lost to follow-up 12 months after diagnosis. Melanoma should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis for primary nasal neoplasia in the dog and radiation therapy can be used as effective local therapy.

  11. Incidence of cancer in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients treated 25 years previously

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simony, Ane; Hansen, Emil Jesper; Christensen, Steen Bach

    2016-01-01

    , is comparable to modern equipment. This is to our knowledge the first study to report increased rates of endometrial cancers in a cohort of AIS patients, and future attention is needed to reduce the radiation dose distributed to the AIS patients both pre-operatively and during surgery.......PURPOSE: To report the incidence of cancer in a cohort of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients treated 25 years previously. METHODS: 215 consecutive AIS patients treated between 1983 and 1990 were identified and requested to return for clinical and radiographic examination. The incidence....... RESULTS: From the original cohort of 215 consecutive AIS patients, radiation information was available in 211 of the patients, and medical charts were available in 209 AIS patients. 170 (83 %) of the 205 AIS patients participated in the follow-up study with questionnaires. The calculated mean total...

  12. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissouni Soundouss

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Case presentation A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. Conclusion We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders.

  13. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissouni, Soundouss; Raissouni, Ferdaous; Rais, Ghizlane; Aitelhaj, Meryem; Lkhoyaali, Siham; Latib, Rachida; Mohtaram, Amina; Rais, Fadoua; Mrabti, Hind; Kabbaj, Nawal; Amrani, Naima; Errihani, Hassan

    2012-08-09

    Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders.

  14. Clinical analysis on Shengmai Injection in treating radiation pneumonia and pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Chunxiao

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of Shengmai Injection in treating radiation pneumonia and pulmonary fibrosis in the course of radiotherapy. Methods: Altogether 96 cases were randomly and equally allocated into a treatment group and a control group, 48 cases each, All patients were treated with radical radiotherapy. The initial radiotherapy was using 10 MV X-rays at conventionally fractionated dose of 60-70 Gy. Patients of the control group were given conventional radiotherapy, and those of the treatment group were given both conventional radiotherapy and Shengmai Injection 40-60 ml by iv drip for 3-5 courses, 10 days for each course. Results: In the treatment group, the incidences of radiation pneumonia and pulmonary fibrosis were 18.8%, 16.7%, respectively, whereas in the control group they were 37.5% and 35.4%, respectively. There were significant differences between the two groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: Shengmai Injection can decrease the incidences of radiation pneumonia and pulmonary fibrosis

  15. Dental extractions in relation to radiation therapy of 224 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makkonen, T.A.; Kiminki, A.; Makkonen, T.K.; Nordman, E.

    1987-01-01

    The case histories of 224 patients treated with radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies at the Radiotherapy Clinic of the Univesity Central Hospital in Turku during the years 1974-77 are reviewed. Of the 92 patients surviving for 5 years, 90 were available for re-examination. The median radiation dosage was 61 Gy in 6 to 8 weeks in patients with squamous cell carcinoma and othe solid tumours and 43 Gy in 5 weeks in patients with lymphoma. The oral status of the patients was examined clinically and radiographically. From these pationts 45 teeth had been extracted before irradiation and 94 after irradiation. In no case had this resulted in osteoradionecrosis of the jaws. It is evident that the repairing of patient's teeth before radiation treatment, coupled with continuous preventive care of caries, will prevent serious complications from arising. (author)

  16. Thematic course: patient radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordoliani, Y.S.

    2009-01-01

    The ratio benefit/risk of radiological examinations, especially with the multislice scanner cannot be ensured only if the principles of justification and optimization are rigorously respected. The justification relies on the reference to the guide of the appropriate use of imaging examinations and compliance with the Public Health Code which requires a written information exchange between the applicant and who will realizes the examination. The optimization relies on the dosimetry evaluation of our practice and the comparison with the diagnosis reference levels, to realize the examinations at the radiation lowest cost. the stakes are the insurance does not harm our patients, the rehabilitation of the radiologist in his role of consultant rather than performer and the protection against eventual legal consequences. (N.C.)

  17. Carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with radiation therapy using a four-field box technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendenhall, W.M.; Million, R.R.; Bova, F.J.

    1982-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 16 patients with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with radiation therapy at the University of Florida between September 1966 and March 1979. There is a minimum 2-year followup. Analysis of local control revealed 1/1 T1, 0/3 T2, 2/8 T3, and 1/2 TX lesions that were controlled by radiation therapy for 33, 47, 55, and 80 months. Two patients died less than 2 years after treatment without evidence of cancer. Excluding the sole T1 lesion, there were no local controls below 6700 rad; 3 of 5 lesions were controlled at doses in excess of 6700 rad. Late complications were stenosis (2 patients) and Lhermitte's syndrome (1 patient). An external beam technique consisting of an isocentric four-field box with a beeswax compensator has been devised in an effort to solve the technical problems in delivering high-dose radiation to the primary and regional nodes without producing myelitis

  18. Progressive tumefactive fibroinflammatory lesion of the infratemporal fossa treated by radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian O’Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumefactive fibroinflammatory lesion (TFIL is a rare benign tumor in the head and neck region. We present a case of a 40-year-old female with a benign but progressive lesion of the infratemporal fossa, which was diagnosed as TFIL. Patient responded briefly to a course of steroid treatment but eventually showed progression and was unresponsive to further steroids. She was then treated with external beam radiation to a dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. After radiation a slow, gradual decrease in tumor size was noted over the course of years and she is free of disease after more than 11 years of follow-up. The major longterm side effect this patient developed was an expected unilateral radiation-induced retinopathy, due to the close proximity of the lesion to the orbit. The dilemma of treatment of benign disease with radiation with potential long-term complications is discussed and a review of the literature on TFIL is presented.

  19. Research about combination of Gamma Knife and cobalt-60 radiation therapy to treat hypophysoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yueming; Zhao Xinping; Song Xiang; Wu Wei; Huang Bai

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To probe the therapeutic effectiveness of combination of Gamma Knife and cobalt-60 radiotherapy. Methods: 80 Hypophysoma patients who have been randomly grouped into two groups. Combination of Gamma Knife and cobalt-60 radiotherapy group and single Gamma knife group. Results: The therapeutic effectiveness of combination of Gamma Knife and cobalt-60 radiation therapy group was higher than that of single Gamma Knife group. Conclusion: The hospital that treat Hypophysoma with single Gamma Knife should add cobalt-60 radiotherapy in order to increase the local Hypophysoma dose

  20. Where Do Patients With Cancer in Iowa Receive Radiation Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Marcia M.; Ullrich, Fred; Matthews, Kevin; Rushton, Gerard; Tracy, Roger; Goldstein, Michael A.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Kosty, Michael P.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Hanley, Amy; Jacobson, Geraldine M.; Lynch, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Multiple studies have shown survival benefits in patients with cancer treated with radiation therapy, but access to treatment facilities has been found to limit its use. This study was undertaken to examine access issues in Iowa and determine a methodology for conducting a similar national analysis. Patients and Methods: All Iowa residents who received radiation therapy regardless of where they were diagnosed or treated were identified through the Iowa Cancer Registry (ICR). Radiation oncologists were identified through the Iowa Physician Information System (IPIS). Radiation facilities were identified through IPIS and classified using the Commission on Cancer accreditation standard. Results: Between 2004 and 2010, 113,885 invasive cancers in 106,603 patients, 28.5% of whom received radiation treatment, were entered in ICR. Mean and median travel times were 25.8 and 20.1 minutes, respectively, to the nearest facility but 42.4 and 29.1 minutes, respectively, to the patient's chosen treatment facility. Multivariable analysis predicting travel time showed significant relationships for disease site, age, residence location, and facility category. Residents of small and isolated rural towns traveled nearly 3× longer than urban residents to receive radiation therapy, as did patients using certain categories of facilities. Conclusion: Half of Iowa patients could reach their nearest facility in 20 minutes, but instead, they traveled 30 minutes on average to receive treatment. The findings identified certain groups of patients with cancer who chose more distant facilities. However, other groups of patients with cancer, namely those residing in rural areas, had less choice, and some had to travel considerably farther to radiation facilities than urban patients. PMID:24443730

  1. Calcium metabolism in lithium-treated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baastrup, P.C.; Transboel, I.

    1978-01-01

    The bone mineral content (BMC) together with biochemical indices of calcium metabolism were measured in 83 manic-depressive patients on long-term lithium therapy. The patients were diagnosed and divided into a unipolar and a bipolar group according to strict symptomatic course criteria. The patients with bipolar course had a significantly decreased BMC (88% of normal, P < 0.001), while the unipolar patients had normal BMC. Both groups had biochemical changes consistent with primary hyperparathyroidism. (author)

  2. The effect of a supersaturated calcium phosphate mouth rinse on the development of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiation: a single-center, randomized, prospective study of a calcium phosphate mouth rinse + standard of care versus standard of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Maarten; Mercier, Carole; Geussens, Yasmyne; Nuyts, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    Mucosal damage is an important and debilitating side effect when treating head and neck cancer patients with (chemo-)radiation. The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to investigate whether the addition of a neutral, supersaturated, calcium phosphate (CP) mouth rinse benefits the severity and duration of acute mucositis in head and neck cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiation. A total of 60 patients with malignant neoplasms of the head and neck receiving (chemo)radiation were included in this study. Fifty-eight patients were randomized into two treatment arms: a control group receiving standard of care (n = 31) and a study group receiving standard of care + daily CP mouth rinses (n = 27) starting on the first day of (chemo-)radiation. Oral mucositis and dysphagia were assessed twice a week using the National Cancer Institute common toxicity criteria scale version 3, oral pain was scored with a visual analogue scale. No significant difference in grade III mucositis (59 vs. 71 %; p = 0.25) and dysphagia (33 vs. 42 %, p = 0.39) was observed between the study group compared to the control group. Also no significant difference in time until development of peak mucositis (28.6 vs. 28.7 days; p = 0.48), duration of peak mucositis (22.7 vs. 24.6 days; p = 0.31), recuperation of peak dysphagia (20.5 vs 24.2 days; p = 0.13) and occurrence of severe pain (56 vs. 52 %, p = 0.5). In this randomized study, the addition of CP mouth rinse to standard of care did not improve the frequency, duration or severity of the most common acute toxicities during and early after (chemo)radiation. There is currently no evidence supporting its standard use in daily practice.

  3. A case of radiation ulcer of the neck treated by a lower trapezius myocutaneous flap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimbashi, Takeshi; Satomi, Takao; Okuyama, Toshio.

    1981-01-01

    A case of radiation ulcer of the neck is reported. The patient is a 50-year-old male. He had been treated for a malignant parotid tumor 12 years earlier. Extirpation of the tumor and radical neck disection had been performed and after the operation he received radiation therapy. On 1979, erosion appeared and developed into an ulcer. On October 14, massive hemorrhage and cardiac arrest suddenly occurred. Immediate emergency treatment was administered and he was resuscitated. He was admitted to our division for the reconstruction of his ulcer. The operation was successfully performed on his ulcer using a lower trapezius myocutaneous flap. He has been followed up for 9 months. The effect of the operation is esthetically and functionally satisfactory. (author)

  4. Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Medulloblastoma and Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors: Outcomes for Very Young Children Treated With Upfront Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Rachel B., E-mail: rbjimenez@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sethi, Roshan [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Depauw, Nicolas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pulsifer, Margaret B. [Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); McBride, Sean M. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ebb, David [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fullerton, Barbara C.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; MacDonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the early outcomes for very young children with medulloblastoma or supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (SPNET) treated with upfront chemotherapy followed by 3-dimensional proton radiation therapy (3D-CPT). Methods and Materials: All patients aged <60 months with medulloblastoma or SPNET treated with chemotherapy before 3D-CPT from 2002 to 2010 at our institution were included. All patients underwent maximal surgical resection, chemotherapy, and adjuvant 3D-CPT with either craniospinal irradiation followed by involved-field radiation therapy or involved-field radiation therapy alone. Results: Fifteen patients (median age at diagnosis, 35 months) were treated with high-dose chemotherapy and 3D-CPT. Twelve of 15 patients had medulloblastoma; 3 of 15 patients had SPNET. Median time from surgery to initiation of radiation was 219 days. Median craniospinal irradiation dose was 21.6 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness); median boost dose was 54.0 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness). At a median of 39 months from completion of radiation, 1 of 15 was deceased after a local failure, 1 of 15 had died from a non-disease-related cause, and the remaining 13 of 15 patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence. Ototoxicity and endocrinopathies were the most common long-term toxicities, with 2 of 15 children requiring hearing aids and 3 of 15 requiring exogenous hormones. Conclusions: Proton radiation after chemotherapy resulted in good disease outcomes for a small cohort of very young patients with medulloblastoma and SPNET. Longer follow-up and larger numbers of patients are needed to assess long-term outcomes and late toxicity.

  5. A clinical assessment of antiretroviral-treated patients Referred from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HAART) on the immunological, virological and clinical status of two groups of patients in the South African government antiretroviral (ARV) programme in KwaZulu-Natal, viz. patients previously treated with ARVs in the private sector and then ...

  6. The complex relationship between lung tumor volume and survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy: A prospective, observational prognostic factor study of the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 99.05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, David L.; Fisher, Richard J.; Burmeister, Bryan H.; Poulsen, Michael G.; Graham, Peter H.; Penniment, Michael G.; Vinod, Shalini K.; Krawitz, Hedley E.; Joseph, David J.; Wheeler, Greg C.; McClure, Bev E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the hypothesis that primary tumor volume is prognostic independent of T and N stages in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by definitive radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Multicenter prospective observational study. Patient eligibility: pathologically proven stage I–III non-small cell lung cancer planned for definitive radiotherapy (minimum 50 Gy in 20 fractions) using CT-based contouring. Volumes of the primary tumor and enlarged nodes were measured according to a standardized protocol. Survival was adjusted for the effect of T and N stage. Results: There were 509 eligible patients. Five-year survival rates for tumor volume grouped by quartiles were, for increasing tumor volume, 22%, 14%, 15% and 21%. Larger primary tumor volume was associated with shorter survival (HR = 1.060 (per doubling); 95% CI 1.01–1.12; P = 0.029). However, after adjusting for the effects of T and N stage, there was no evidence for an association (HR = 1.029, 95% CI, 0.96–1.10, P = 0.39). There was evidence, however, that larger primary tumor volume was associated with an increased risk of dying, independently of T and N stage, in the first 18 months but not beyond. Conclusions: In patients treated by non-surgical means we were unable to show that lung tumor volume, overall, provides additional prognostic information beyond the T and N stage (TNM, 6th edition). There is evidence, however, that larger primary tumor volume adversely affects outcome only within the first 18 months. Larger tumor size alone should not by itself exclude patients from curative (chemo)radiotherapy

  7. A study on lung cancer cases treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    This study was carried out on 468 cases among total 4347 cancer cases which was confirmly diagnosed as malignant neoplasms at Yonsei Center Hospital, appended to Yonsei University, during 10 years from January 1, 1971 to December 31, 1980. The results of this study are as follows: 1. Total malignant neoplasm cases treated with radiation were 4347, 1685 of whom were males, and 2662 females (male to female ratio was 1:1.58). 2. Lung cancer were 10.8% of total malignant neoplasm cases(468 cases), 391 cases for the male and 77 cases for the female. So, average the male to female ratio was 8:1 and cases of the male were much more. 3. The age distribution of lung cancer cases was from 27 to 82 years old. The highest age distribution was 50-59 for males (37.9%) and 60-69 for females (41.6%); 77.1% of total lung cancer cases were over 50 years old. 4. In regard to stages, the distribution of the third stage was highest (49.3%). That of the first stage was much higher during the last period (11.8%) than the first period (2.7%), and that of the fourth stage was much lower during the last period (7.8%) than the first period (21.1%). 5. In regard to pathological type, the distribution was 51.3% for squamous cell carcinoma, 29.3% for undifferentiated cell carcinoma, 12.2% for adenocarcinoma, and 7.2% for bronchoalveolar cell carcinoma in order of frequency. In regard to adenocarcinoma, the male ratio was 1:3.7 and cases of the female were much more. 6. In regard to tumor location,the distribution of tumor location in the right-left lobe was 59.1% in the right lobe, 33.6% in the left lobe, and 7.3% in the both lobes in order of frequency. And that of tumor location in the upper and lower lobes was all higher in the upper in the upper lobe; especially, that of the right upper lobe was highest (31.2% of total cases). 7. For the main symptom, coughing was highest (64%), 50% for hemoptysis, and 41% for dyspnea. (Author)

  8. Skin cancer in patients with chronic radiation dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.M.; Hanke, C.W.; Zollinger, T.W.; Montebello, J.F.; Hornback, N.B.; Norins, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The cases of 76 patients with chronic radiation dermatitis resulting from low-dose ionizing radiation for benign disease were reviewed retrospectively for risk factors leading to the development of neoplasia. The patients were studied with respect to original hair color, eye color, sun reactive skin type, benign disease treated, area treated, age at treatment, and age at development of first skin cancer. Analysis of data showed 37% of patients had sun-reactive skin type I, 27% had type II, and 36% had type III. Types IV through VI were not represented. There appeared to be an overrepresentation of types I and II. Increased melanin pigmentation may therefore be either directly or indirectly protective against the development of skin cancers in patients who have received low-dose superficial ionizing radiation for benign disease. The sun-reactive skin type of patients with chronic radiation dermatitis may be used as a predictor of skin cancer risk when the total dose of ionizing radiation is not known

  9. Treating a physician patient with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Jacob L; Crow, Fredrick F; Gutheil, Thomas G; Sanchez, Luis T; Suzuki, Joji

    2012-06-01

    The authors present a case of a psychotic female patient who is a former graduate of a locally prestigious medical school and has subsequently been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The patient entered treatment in an outpatient clinic following discharge from her 11th hospitalization. This hospitalization was initiated after the patient's physician friend had called the police and notified them that the patient was significantly disorganized to warrant further evaluation. Treatment was characterized by significant transference and counter-transference reactions amongst her clinicians - both treatment-promoting and treatment-interfering - based on her status as a physician. The problem of insight was a significant hurdle in the treatment of the patient as her medical knowledge of mental illness was substantially greater than her insight into her own mental illness. Throughout treatment, a number of medical-legal and ethical issues arose. Initially, the question was raised as to the legality of the actions by the patient's friend-having made a clinical assessment without having a clinical role in the patient's care. As the patient's clinical status improved and she sought to re-enter the medical field as a resident, new medical legal issues surfaced. What were the roles of the patient's treaters in maintaining confidentiality and simultaneously ensuring the safety of patients that the psychotic physician might care for? This case highlights the universality of psychiatric vulnerability. Insight in psychosis as well as the transference and counter-transference issues involved in caring for a psychotic physician are discussed. Additionally, a thorough medical-legal discussion addresses the various complexities of caring for a psychotic physician. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Second malignancy in patients treated for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baccarani, M; Bosi, A.; Papa, G.

    1980-01-01

    Six hundred and thirteen consecutive patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD), with a follow-up of two to ten years, were reviewed with the aim of establishing the type and frequency of second malignancies. Acute non-lymphoid leukemia developed in 2 of 152 patients treated by chemotherapy (CHT), and in 5 of 344 patients treated by CHT and radiotherapy (RT). Leukemia developed 12 to 83 months after diagnosis of HD, was always preceded by a preleukemic phase (3 to 25 months), and was always fatal (after 1 to 12 months). The karyotype of leukemic cells was studied in 4 of 7 patients and was always abnormal. Solid tumors developed in 1 of 152 patients treated by CHT, and in 4 of 344 patients treated by CHT and RT. The tumors appeared 10 to 63 months after diagnosis of HD and killed all 5 patients after 10 to 16 months. For patients treated by CHT, the actuarial frequency of leukemia and other tumors seven years after diagnosis of HD was 2.0% and 1.26%, respectively. For patients treated by CHT and RT, the figures were 2.04% and 2.26%, respectively. Second malignancies were not recorded among 117 patients treated by RT alone. These data are consistent with a relationship of acute leukemia to therapy for HD

  11. Brain tumors in patients primarly treated psychiatrically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović-Ristić Dragana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Psychiatric symptoms are not rare manifestations of brain tumors. Brain tumors presented by symptoms of raised intracranial pressure, focal neurological signs, or convulsions are usually first seen by the neurologist or less frequently by the neurosurgeon in routine diagnostic procedures. On the other hand, when psychiatric symptoms are the first manifestation in “neurologically silent” brain tumors, the patients are sent to the psychiatrist for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms and brain tumors are left misdiagnosed for a long period of time. Case Report. We presented three patients with the diagnosed brain tumor where psychiatrist had been the first specialist to be consulted. In all three cases neurological examination was generally unremarkable with no focal signs or features of raised intracranial pressure. CT scan demonstrated right insular tumor in a female patient with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; right parietal temporal tumor in a patient with delusions and depression and left frontal tumor in a patient with history of alcohol dependency. Conclusion. Psychiatric symptoms/disorders in patients with brain tumors are not specific enough and can have the same clinical presentation as the genuine psychiatric disorder. Therefore, we emphasize the consideration of neuroimaging in patients with abrupt beginning of psychiatric symptoms, in those with a change in mental status, or when headaches suddenly appear or in cases of treatment resistant psychiatric disorders regardless the lack of neurological symptoms.

  12. High mortality among heart failure patients treated with antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veien, Karsten Tang; Videbæk, Lars; Schou, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to assess whether pharmacologically treated depression was associated with increased mortality risk in systolic heart failure (SHF) patients.......This study was designed to assess whether pharmacologically treated depression was associated with increased mortality risk in systolic heart failure (SHF) patients....

  13. Cardiotoxicity in cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polk, Anne; Vaage-Nilsen, Merete Bech; Vistisen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    To systematically review the incidence, manifestations and predisposing factors for cardiovascular toxicity in cancer patients treated with systemic 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine.......To systematically review the incidence, manifestations and predisposing factors for cardiovascular toxicity in cancer patients treated with systemic 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine....

  14. Acupuncture treatment of patients with radiation-induced xerostomia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, M.; Dawidson, I.; Johnson, G.; Angmar-Maansson, B.; Fernberg, J.-O.

    1996-01-01

    Xerostomia is a common and usually irreversible side effect in patients receiving radiation therapy (>50 Gy) for head and neck cancer. Of 38 patients with radiation-induced xerostomia, 20 in the experimental group were treated with classical acupuncture and 18 patients in the control group received superficial acupuncture as placebo. Within both groups the patients showed significantly increased salivary flow rates after the acupuncture treatment. In the experimental group 68% and in the control group 50% of the patients had increased salivary flow rates at the end of the observation period. Among those patients who had had all their salivary glands irradiated, 50% in both groups showed increased salivary flow rates (>20%) by the end of the observation period of 1 year. The study indicates that among the patients who had increased salivary flow rates already after the first 12 acupuncture sessions, the majority had high probability of continual improvement after the completion of acupuncture treatment. (Author)

  15. Acupuncture treatment of patients with radiation-induced xerostomia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, M.; Dawidson, I.; Johnson, G.; Angmar-Maansson, B. [Karolinska Inst., Huddinge (Sweden). Dept. of Cardiology; Fernberg, J.-O. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of General Oncology

    1996-05-01

    Xerostomia is a common and usually irreversible side effect in patients receiving radiation therapy (>50 Gy) for head and neck cancer. Of 38 patients with radiation-induced xerostomia, 20 in the experimental group were treated with classical acupuncture and 18 patients in the control group received superficial acupuncture as placebo. Within both groups the patients showed significantly increased salivary flow rates after the acupuncture treatment. In the experimental group 68% and in the control group 50% of the patients had increased salivary flow rates at the end of the observation period. Among those patients who had had all their salivary glands irradiated, 50% in both groups showed increased salivary flow rates (>20%) by the end of the observation period of 1 year. The study indicates that among the patients who had increased salivary flow rates already after the first 12 acupuncture sessions, the majority had high probability of continual improvement after the completion of acupuncture treatment. (Author).

  16. Radiation Dose-rate Reduction Pattern in Well-differentiated Thyroid Cancer Treated with I-131.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahbaz Ahmad; Khan, Muhammad Saqib; Arif, Muhammad; Durr-e-Sabih; Rahim, Muhammad Kashif; Ahmad, Israr

    2015-07-01

    To determine the patterns of dose rate reduction in single and multiple radioiodine (I-131) therapies in cases of well differentiated thyroid cancer patients. Analytical series. Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Physics, Multan Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy (MINAR), Multan, Pakistan, from December 2006 to December 2013. Ninety three patients (167 therapies) with well differentiated thyroid cancer treated with different doses of I-131 as an in-patient were inducted. Fifty four patients were given only single I-131 therapy dose ranging from 70 mCi (2590 MBq) to 150 mCi (5550 MBq). Thirty nine patients were treated with multiple I-131 radioisotope therapy doses ranging from 80 mCi (2960 MBq) to 250 mCi (9250 MBq). T-test was applied on the sample data showed statistically significant difference between the two groups with p-value (p < 0.01) less than 0.05 taken as significant. There were 68 females and 25 males with an age range of 15 to 80 years. Mean age of the patients were 36 years. Among the 93 cases of first time Radio Active Iodine (RAI) therapy, 59 cases (63%) were discharged after 48 hours. Among 39 patients who received RAI therapy second time or more, most were discharged earlier after achieving acceptable discharge dose rate i.e 25 µSv/hour; 2 out of 39 (5%) were discharged after 48 hours. In 58% patients, given single I-131 therapy dose, majority of these were discharged after 48 hours without any major complications. For well differentiated thyroid cancer patients, rapid dose rate reduction is seen in patients receiving second or subsequent radioiodine (RAI) therapy, as compared to first time receiving RAI therapy.

  17. Implanted Cardiac Defibrillator Care in Radiation Oncology Patient Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Amols, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To review the experience of a large cancer center with radiotherapy (RT) patients bearing implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) to propose some preliminary care guidelines as we learn more about the devices and their interaction with the therapeutic radiation environment. Methods and Materials: We collected data on patients with implanted ICDs treated with RT during a 2.5-year period at any of the five Memorial Sloan-Kettering clinical campuses. Information regarding the model, location, and dose detected from the device, as well as the treatment fields, fraction size, and treatment energy was collected. During this time, a new management policy for these patients had been implemented requiring treatment with low-energy beams (6 MV) and close surveillance of the patients in partnership with their electrophysiologist, as they received RT. Results: During the study period, 33 patients were treated with an ICD in place. One patient experienced a default of the device to its initial factory setting that was detected by the patient hearing an auditory signal from the device. This patient had initially been treated with a 15-MV beam. After this episode, his treatment was replanned to be completed with 6-MV photons, and he experienced no further events. Conclusion: Patients with ICDs and other implanted computer-controlled devices will be encountered more frequently in the RT department, and proper management is important. We present a policy for the safe treatment of these patients in the radiation oncology environment.

  18. How I treat CLL patients with ibrutinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer R

    2018-01-25

    Ibrutinib is a transformative therapy for high-risk and relapsed refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. In clinical trials in relatively healthy younger patients, ibrutinib has been well tolerated. As its use has become more widespread in the community, however, its full adverse event profile has emerged and proven more challenging than was initially anticipated. Reports of community-based use have estimated discontinuation rates as high as 40% in the first year of therapy. This article therefore reviews my approach to the evaluation and management of a CLL patient starting on ibrutinib, with the goal of minimizing and managing toxicity to maintain patients on ibrutinib. Key topics discussed include bleeding risk; cardiac complications, particularly atrial fibrillation; drug interactions; and infections. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. Long-Term Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9903: A Randomized Phase 3 Trial to Assess the Effect of Erythropoietin on Local-Regional Control in Anemic Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenouda, George, E-mail: George.shenouda@muhc.mcgill.ca [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Zhang, Qiang [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center (United States); Ang, K. Kian [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Machtay, Mitchell [University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Parliament, Matthew B. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Hershock, Diane [University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Suntharalingam, Mohan [University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lin, Alexander [University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Rotman, Marvin [Brooklyn Minority-based Community Clinical Oncology Program, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Nabid, Abdenour [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke (Québec), Québec (Canada); Hong, Susan [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Shehata, Sarwat [Northeastern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre, Sudbury, Ontario (Canada); Cmelak, Anthony J. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Sultanem, Khalil [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Le, Quynh-Thu [Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: This paper reports long-term results of RTOG 9903, to determine whether the addition of erythropoietin (EPO) would improve the outcomes of radiation therapy (RT) in mildly to moderately anemic patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCCa). Methods and Materials: The trial included HNSCCa patients treated with definitive RT. Patients with stage III or IV disease received concomitant chemoradiation therapy or accelerated fractionation. Pretreatment hemoglobin levels were required to be between 9.0 and 13.5 g/dL (12.5 g/dL for females). EPO, 40,000 U, was administered weekly starting 7 to 10 days before RT was initiated in the RT + EPO arm. Results: A total of 141 of 148 enrolled patients were evaluable. The baseline median hemoglobin level was 12.1 g/dL. In the RT + EPO arm, the mean hemoglobin level at 4 weeks increased by 1.66 g/dL, whereas it decreased by 0.24 g/dL in the RT arm. With a median follow-up of 7.95 years (range: 1.66-10.08 years) for surviving patients and 3.33 years for all patients (range: 0.03-10.08 years), the 5-year estimate of local-regional failure was 46.2% versus 39.4% (P=.42), local-regional progression-free survival was 31.5% versus 37.6% (P=.20), and overall survival was 36.9% versus 38.2% (P=.54) for the RT + EPO and RT arms, respectively. Late toxicity was not different between the 2 arms. Conclusions: This long-term analysis confirmed that despite the ability of EPO to raise hemoglobin levels in anemic patients with HNSCCa, it did not improve outcomes when added to RT. The possibility of a detrimental effect of EPO could not be ruled out.

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen - an effective tool to treat radiation morbidity in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Ramona; Klemen, Huberta; Quehenberger, Franz; Sankin, Oliver; Mayer, Elisabeth; Hackl, Arnulf; Smolle-Juettner, Freyja-Maria

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: We report the results of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) used in the treatment of radiation cystitis and proctitis following irradiation of prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Between June 1995 and March 2000, 18 men (median age 71 years) with radiation proctitis (n=7), cystitis (n=8), and combined proctitis/cystitis (n=3) underwent HBO therapy in a multiplace chamber for a median of 26 sessions (range 2-60). The treatment schedule (2.2-2.4 atmospheres absolute, 60 min bottom time, once-a-day, 7 days a week) was set at a lower limit of 20 sessions; the upper limit was left open to symptom-related adjustment. Prior to HBO treatment, RTOG/EORTC late genitourinal (GU) morbidity was Grade 2 (n=3), Grade 3 (n=6) or Grade 4 (n=2); modified RTOG/EORTC late gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity was either Grade 2 (n=4) or Grade 3 (n=6). Results: Sixteen patients underwent an adequate number of sessions. RTOG/EORTC late GU as well as modified GI morbidity scores showed a significant improvement after HBO (GI, P=0.004; GU, P=0.004; exact Wilcoxon signed rank test); bleeding ceased in five out of five patients with proctitis and in six out of eight patients with cystitis; one of those two patients, in whom an ineffective treatment outcome was obtained, went on to have a cystectomy. Conclusions: HBO treatment seems to be an effective tool to treat those patients with late GI and GU morbidity when conventional treatment has led to unsatisfactory results. Particularly in patients with radiation cystitis, HBO should not be delayed too long, as in the case of extensive bladder shrinkage improvement is hard to achieve

  1. Improving patient safety in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendee, William R.; Herman, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in the 1990s, and emphasized in 2000 with the release of an Institute of Medicine report, healthcare providers and institutions have dedicated time and resources to reducing errors that impact the safety and well-being of patients. But in January 2010 the first of a series of articles appeared in the New York Times that described errors in radiation oncology that grievously impacted patients. In response, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American Society of Radiation Oncology sponsored a working meeting entitled ''Safety in Radiation Therapy: A Call to Action''. The meeting attracted 400 attendees, including medical physicists, radiation oncologists, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, hospital administrators, regulators, and representatives of equipment manufacturers. The meeting was cohosted by 14 organizations in the United States and Canada. The meeting yielded 20 recommendations that provide a pathway to reducing errors and improving patient safety in radiation therapy facilities everywhere.

  2. God of the hinge: treating LGBTQIA patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Annie

    2017-11-01

    This paper looks at systems of gender within the context of analysis. It explores the unique challenges of individuation faced by transsexual, transgender, gender queer, gender non-conforming, cross-dressing and intersex patients. To receive patients generously we need to learn how a binary culture produces profound and chronic trauma. These patients wrestle with being who they are whilst simultaneously receiving negative projections and feeling invisible. While often presenting with the struggles of gender conforming individuals, understanding the specifically gendered aspect of their identity is imperative. An analyst's unconscious bias may lead to iatrogenic shaming. The author argues that rigorous, humble inquiry into the analyst's transphobia can be transformative for patient, analyst, and the work itself. Analysis may, then, provide gender-variant patients with their first remembered and numinous experience of authentic connection to self. Conjuring the image of a hinge, securely placed in the neutral region of a third space, creates a transpositive analytic temenos. Invoking the spirit of the Trickster in the construction of this matrix supports the full inclusion of gender-variant patients. Nuanced attunement scaffolds mirroring and the possibility of play. Being mindful that gender is sturdy and delicate as well as mercurial and defined enriches the analyst's listening. © 2017, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  3. Radiation protection of patients in epiescleral brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutos, J.M. de; Sanchez, G.; Sendon, J.R.; Castillo, A. del; Hernando, I.

    2001-01-01

    Introduction. Choroidal melanoma and other ophthalmic tumors are treated with episcleral plaques. Optimisation and other criteria are necessary to avoid damage in eye and visual function preservation. Purpose. To study the dosimetric phases to apply radiation protection criteria. To determine procedures for quality assurance of applicators, sources and treatment prescription and planning. Method. We have revised treatment procedure. First, aspects shared for all the patients. Then treatment planning and applicator assembling. After that, we study insertion and treatment. Finally, we check the chart flow to modify, if necessary. It necessary consider normative and recommendations. Results and conclusions. Quality assurance of sources (calibration, autoradiography), applicator (effects, dose distribution) and treatment planning are revised. Appropriate patient data acquisition is essential due the special characteristics of tumor and eye. Treatment planning involves optimisation as a factor. Seed selection is very important to avoid misadministration. Next procedure is applicator assembling. We must care to choose the same as dosimetry and to carry out its verification. Sources insertion is a surgical procedure. It is essential in accurate placement. Desinsertion is also surgical, and must be adapted to dosimetry and prescription. Flow chart is modified adding two staff meetings to discuss about patient data and doses. (author)

  4. Development and validation of a prognostic model using blood biomarker information for prediction of survival of non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation or radiotherapy alone (NCT00181519, NCT00573040, and NCT00572325).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehing-Oberije, Cary; Aerts, Hugo; Yu, Shipeng; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Menheere, Paul; Hilvo, Mika; van der Weide, Hiska; Rao, Bharat; Lambin, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Currently, prediction of survival for non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiotherapy is mainly based on clinical factors. The hypothesis of this prospective study was that blood biomarkers related to hypoxia, inflammation, and tumor load would have an added prognostic value for predicting survival. Clinical data and blood samples were collected prospectively (NCT00181519, NCT00573040, and NCT00572325) from 106 inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer patients (Stages I-IIIB), treated with curative intent with radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. Blood biomarkers, including lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein, osteopontin, carbonic anhydrase IX, interleukin (IL) 6, IL-8, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and cytokeratin fragment 21-1, were measured. A multivariate model, built on a large patient population (N = 322) and externally validated, was used as a baseline model. An extended model was created by selecting additional biomarkers. The model's performance was expressed as the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic and assessed by use of leave-one-out cross validation as well as a validation cohort (n = 52). The baseline model consisted of gender, World Health Organization performance status, forced expiratory volume, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume and yielded an AUC of 0.72. The extended model included two additional blood biomarkers (CEA and IL-6) and resulted in a leave-one-out AUC of 0.81. The performance of the extended model was significantly better than the clinical model (p = 0.004). The AUC on the validation cohort was 0.66 and 0.76, respectively. The performance of the prognostic model for survival improved markedly by adding two blood biomarkers: CEA and IL-6. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Skin dose differences between intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy and between boost and integrated treatment regimens for treating head and neck and other cancer sites in patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penoncello, Gregory P.; Ding, George X.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate dose to skin between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment techniques for target sites in the head and neck, pelvis, and brain and (2) to determine if the treatment dose and fractionation regimen affect the skin dose between traditional sequential boost and integrated boost regimens for patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 19 patients and 48 plans were evaluated. The Eclipse (v11) treatment planning system was used to plan therapy in 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 5 patients with prostate cancer, and 5 patients with brain cancer with VMAT and static-field IMRT. The mean skin dose and the maximum dose to a contiguous volume of 2 cm"3 for head and neck plans and brain plans and a contiguous volume of 5 cm"3 for pelvis plans were compared for each treatment technique. Of the 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 3 underwent an integrated boost regimen. One integrated boost plan was replanned with IMRT and VMAT using a traditional boost regimen. For target sites located in the head and neck, VMAT reduced the mean dose and contiguous hot spot most noticeably in the shoulder region by 5.6% and 5.4%, respectively. When using an integrated boost regimen, the contiguous hot spot skin dose in the shoulder was larger on average than a traditional boost pattern by 26.5% and the mean skin dose was larger by 1.7%. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin in the pelvis by an average of 36% compared with IMRT. For the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body, but more noticeably in the shoulders in patients with head and neck and pelvis cancer. We also found that using integrated boost regimens in patients with head and neck cancer leads to higher shoulder skin doses compared with traditional boost regimens.

  6. Skin dose differences between intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy and between boost and integrated treatment regimens for treating head and neck and other cancer sites in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penoncello, Gregory P; Ding, George X

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate dose to skin between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment techniques for target sites in the head and neck, pelvis, and brain and (2) to determine if the treatment dose and fractionation regimen affect the skin dose between traditional sequential boost and integrated boost regimens for patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 19 patients and 48 plans were evaluated. The Eclipse (v11) treatment planning system was used to plan therapy in 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 5 patients with prostate cancer, and 5 patients with brain cancer with VMAT and static-field IMRT. The mean skin dose and the maximum dose to a contiguous volume of 2cm(3) for head and neck plans and brain plans and a contiguous volume of 5cm(3) for pelvis plans were compared for each treatment technique. Of the 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 3 underwent an integrated boost regimen. One integrated boost plan was replanned with IMRT and VMAT using a traditional boost regimen. For target sites located in the head and neck, VMAT reduced the mean dose and contiguous hot spot most noticeably in the shoulder region by 5.6% and 5.4%, respectively. When using an integrated boost regimen, the contiguous hot spot skin dose in the shoulder was larger on average than a traditional boost pattern by 26.5% and the mean skin dose was larger by 1.7%. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin in the pelvis by an average of 36% compared with IMRT. For the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body, but more noticeably in the shoulders in patients with head and neck and pelvis cancer. We also found that using integrated boost regimens in patients with head and neck cancer leads to higher shoulder skin doses compared with traditional boost regimens. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by

  7. Brachial Plexopathy in Apical Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation: Dosimetric Analysis and Clinical Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eblan, Michael J.; Corradetti, Michael N.; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Mitra, Nandita; Christodouleas, John P.; Grover, Surbhi; Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Langer, Corey J.; Evans, Tracey L.; Stevenson, James; Rengan, Ramesh; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Data are limited on the clinical significance of brachial plexopathy in patients with apical non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy. We report the rates of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) and tumor-related brachial plexopathy (TRBP) and associated dosimetric parameters in apical NSCLC patients. Methods and Materials: Charts of NSCLC patients with primary upper lobe or superiorly located nodal disease who received ≥50 Gy of definitive conventionally fractionated radiation or chemoradiation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of brachial plexopathy and categorized as RIBP, TRBP, or trauma-related. Dosimetric data were gathered on ipsilateral brachial plexuses (IBP) contoured according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group atlas guidelines. Results: Eighty patients were identified with a median follow-up and survival time of 17.2 and 17.7 months, respectively. The median prescribed dose was 66.6 Gy (range, 50.4-84.0), and 71% of patients received concurrent chemotherapy. RIBP occurred in 5 patients with an estimated 3-year rate of 12% when accounting for competing risk of death. Seven patients developed TRBP (estimated 3-year rate of 13%), comprising 24% of patients who developed locoregional failures. Grade 3 brachial plexopathy was more common in patients who experienced TRBP than RIBP (57% vs 20%). No patient who received ≤78 Gy to the IBP developed RIBP. On multivariable competing risk analysis, IBP V76 receiving ≥1 cc, and primary tumor failure had the highest hazard ratios for developing RIBP and TRBP, respectively. Conclusions: RIBP is a relatively uncommon complication in patients with apical NSCLC tumors receiving definitive doses of radiation, while patients who develop primary tumor failures are at high risk for developing morbid TRBP. These findings suggest that the importance of primary tumor control with adequate doses of radiation outweigh the risk of RIBP in this population of

  8. Effective doses to family members of patients treated with radioiodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocovska, M Zdraveska; Vaskova, O; Majstorov, V; Kuzmanovska, S; Gjorceva, D Pop; Jokic, V Spasic

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effective dose to family members of thyroid cancer and hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine-131, and also to compare the results with dose constraints proposed by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). For the estimation of the effective doses, sixty family members of sixty patients, treated with radioiodine-131, and thermoluminiscent dosimeters (Model TLD 100) were used. Thyroid cancer patients were hospitalized for three days, while hyperthyroid patients were treated on out-patient basis. The family members wore TLD in front of the torso for seven days. The radiation doses to family members of thyroid cancer patients were well below the recommended dose constraint of 1 mSv. The mean value of effective dose was 0.21 mSv (min 0.02 - max 0.51 mSv). Effective doses, higher than 1 mSv, were detected for 11 family members of hyperthyroid patients. The mean value of effective dose of family members of hyperthyroid patients was 0.87 mSv (min 0.12 - max 6.79). The estimated effective doses to family members of hyperthyroid patients were higher than the effective doses to family members of thyroid carcinoma patients. These findings may be considered when establishing new national guidelines concerning radiation protection and release of patients after a treatment with radioiodine therapy.

  9. Radiation safety and care of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Noreen Norfaraheen Lee Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to acquaint the reader with radiation safety measures which can be pursued to minimize radiation load to the patient and staff. The basic principle is that all unnecessary administration should be avoided and a number of simple techniques be used to reduce radiation dose. For example, the kidney excretes many radionuclides. Drinking plenty of fluid and frequent bladder emptying can minimize absorbed dose to the bladder. Thyroid blocking agents must be used if radioactive iodine is being administered to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure to the thyroid gland. When it is necessary to administer radioactive substances to a female of childbearing age, the radiation exposure should be minimum and information whether the patient is pregnant or not must be obtained. Alternatives techniques, which do not involve ionizing radiation, should also be considered. (author)

  10. Radiation-induced damage to normal tissues after radiotherapy in patients treated for gynecologic tumors: Association with single nucleotide polymorphisms in XRCC1, XRCC3, and OGG1 genes and in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity in lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruyck, Kim de; Eijkeren, Marc van; Claes, Kathleen; Morthier, Rudy; Paepe, Anne de; Vral, Anne; Ridder, Leo de; Thierens, Hubert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the association of polymorphisms in XRCC1 (194Arg/Trp, 280Arg/His, 399Arg/Gln, 632Gln/Gln), XRCC3 (5' UTR 4.541A>G, IVS5-14 17.893A>G, 241Thr/Met), and OGG1 (326Ser/Cys) with the development of late radiotherapy (RT) reactions and to assess the correlation between in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity and clinical radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: Sixty-two women with cervical or endometrial cancer treated with RT were included in the study. According to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, scale, 22 patients showed late adverse RT reactions. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assays were performed to examine polymorphic sites, the G2 assay was used to measure chromosomal radiosensitivity, and patient groups were compared using actuarial methods. Results: The XRCC3 IVS5-14 polymorphic allele was significantly associated with the risk of developing late RT reactions (odds ratio 3.98, p = 0.025), and the XRCC1 codon 194 variant showed a significant protective effect (p = 0.028). Patients with three or more risk alleles in XRCC1 and XRCC3 had a significantly increased risk of developing normal tissue reactions (odds ratio 10.10, p = 0.001). The mean number of chromatid breaks per cell was significantly greater in patients with normal tissue reactions than in patients with no reactions (1.16 and 1.34, respectively; p = 0.002). Patients with high chromosomal radiosensitivity showed a 9.2-fold greater annual risk of complications than patients with intermediate chromosomal radiosensitivity. Combining the G2 analysis with the risk allele model allowed us to identify 23% of the patients with late normal tissue reactions, without false-positive results. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that clinical radiosensitivity is associated with an enhanced G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity and is significantly associated with a combination of different polymorphisms in

  11. Immunoreactivity examination of patients with testicular tumours treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanits, Klara; Kuhn, Endre; Csere, Tibor

    1985-01-01

    Results of the immunoreactivity study of 72 patients receiving radiotherapy are presented. Tuberculin and DNCB (2,4 dinitrochlorobenzol) reactivity tests were performed before, during and 3 years after the radiation therapy and at the time when metastases appeared. The number of positive reactions decreased slightly in both tuberculin and DNCB groups, though not significantly. Metastatic patients showed a significant decrease of reactivity against DNCB as compared with the results obtained before the treatment. In 5,6% of patients herpes zoster was registered. No other infections occured. It was found that immunosuppression caused by the radiation treatment does not influence the later fate of patients with testicular tumours. (author)

  12. Protection of the patient in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In the ICRP report (ICRP-Pub-44) a broad picture of radiotheraphy is presented useful to all involved in the care of cancer patients, for instance to physicians, including medical oncologists, and to medical physicists, radiographers, dosimetrists, and administrators. Information is given on the general principles of radiation therapy including external beam therapy and brachytherapy; the accuracy of radiation delivery and quality assurance; the biological radiation response; the expected risk to specific organs or tissues from therapeutic irradiation; the absorbed dose to tissues inside and outside the useful radiation beams; the organization and planning of radiation oncology services; radiation therapy staff education, training and duties; and finally medical research involving the use of radiation therapy. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Radiation dose to the patient in radionuclide studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedler, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    In medical radionuclide studies, the radiation risk has to be considered in addition to the general risk of administering a pharmaceutical. As radiation exposure is an essential factor in radiation risk estimation, some aspects of internal dose calculation, including radiation risk assessments, are treated. The formalism of current internal dose calculation is presented. The input data, especially the residence time and the absorbed dose per transformation, their origin and accuracy are discussed. Results of internal dose calculations for the ten most frequently used radionuclide studies are presented as somatically effective dose equivalents. The accuracy of internal dose calculation is treated in detail by considering the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical, the phantoms used for dose calculations, the absorbed dose per transformation, the administered activity, and the transfer of the dose, calculated for a phantom, to the patient. The internal dose calculated for a reference phantom may be assumed to be in accordance with the actual patient dose within a range described by a factor of about two to three. Finally, risk estimates for nuclear medicine procedures are quantified, being generally of sixth order. The radiation risk from the radioiodine test is comparably higher, but probably lower than calculated according to the UNSCEAR risk coefficients. However, further studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results and to improve the quantification of the radiation risk from the medical use of radionuclides. (author)

  14. Radiation-induced Pulmonary Damage in Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Su Mi; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Kang, Mi Mun; Kim, In Ah; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1993-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate the incidence of radiation induced lung damage after the radiation therapy for the patients with carcinoma of the lung. Method and Materials: Sixty-six patients with lung cancer (squamous cell carcinoma 27, adenocarcinoma 14, large cell carcinoma 2, small cell carcinoma 13, unknown 10) were treated with definitive, postoperative or palliative radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy between July 1987 and December 1991. There were 50 males and 16 females with median age of 63 years(range: 33-80 years). Total lung doses ranged from 500 to 6,660 cGy (median 3960 cGy) given in 2 to 38 fractions (median 20) over a range of 2 to 150 days (median 40 days) using 6 MV or 15 MV linear accelerator. To represent different fractionation schedules of equivalent biological effect, the estimated single dose(ED) model, ED=D·N-0.377·T-0.058 was used in which D was the lung dose in cGy, N was the number of fractions, and T was the overall treatment time in days. The range of ED was 370 to 1357. The endpoint was a visible increase in lung density within the irradiated volume on chest X-ray as observed independently by three diagnostic radiologists. Patients were grouped according to ED, treatment duration, treatment modality and age, and the percent incidence of pulmonary damage for each group was determined. Result: In 40 of 66 patients, radiation induced change was seen on chest radiographs between 11 days and 314 days after initiation of radiation therapy. The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was increased according to increased ED, which was statistically significant (p=0.001). Roentgenographic charges consistent with radiation pneumonitis were seen in 100% of patients receiving radiotherapy after lobectomy or pneumonectomy, which was not statistically significant. In 32 patients who also received chemotherapy, there was no difference in the incidence of radiation induced charge between the group with radiation

  15. Thyroid abnormalities in patients previously treated with irradiation for acne vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, D.B.; Grammes, C.F.; Starkey, R.H.; Monsaert, R.P.; Sunderlin, F.S.

    1984-01-01

    Of 1,203 patients who received radiation treatment for acne vulgaris between 1940 and 1968, 302 patients were recalled and examined, 121 at Geisinger Medical Center and the remainder by their local physicians. Radiation records were reviewed on all patients. Lead-rubber and cones had been used as shielding. Mean age at the time of exposure was 21 years and mean total exposure was 692 R. Palpable nodular thyroid disease was found in eight patients (2.6%). Of these, thyroid carcinoma was detected in two patients (0.66%). Although the number of patients examined was small, the incidence of carcinomas was unexpectedly high. We conclude that follow-up examination is worthwhile for patients previously treated by irradiation for acne vulgaris

  16. How I treat patients with massive hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Stensballe, Jakob; Oliveri, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Massive hemorrhage is associated with coagulopathy and high mortality. The transfusion guidelines up to 2006 recommended that resuscitation of massive hemorrhage should occur in successive steps using crystalloids, colloids and red blood cells (RBC) in the early phase, and plasma and platelets...... in the late phase. With the introduction of the cell-based model of hemostasis in the mid 1990ties, our understanding of the hemostatic process and of coagulopathy has improved. This has contributed to a change in resuscitation strategy and transfusion therapy of massive hemorrhage along with an acceptance...... outcome, although final evidence on outcome from randomized controlled trials are lacking. We here present how we in Copenhagen and Houston, today, manage patients with massive hemorrhage....

  17. Systemic mastocytosis in a patient with polycythemia vera treated with radioactive phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagan, J.W. Jr.; Baughman, K.L.; Miller, S.; Conley, C.L.; Eggleston, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis occurred as a fatal event in a patient with long-standing polycythemia vera. The patient had been treated over the course of 21 yr with radioactive phosphorus. Possible relationships between mastocytosis and polycythemia vera, and also between mastocytosis and treatment with ionizing radiation, are discussed. Histopathologic and electron microscopic findings are illustrated. Difficulties in establishing the diagnosis of mast cell disease in this setting are also described

  18. Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Atopic Patients Exposed to Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radwan, N.K.A.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease that arises most commonly during early infancy, and is characterized by severe pruritus, age-dependant skin manifestations, and a fluctuating clinical course. Hereditary, environmental and immunological factors are involved in the aetiopathogenesis of AD. Also the differentiation of helper T- cells, local cytokine profile, IgE, infectious agents and superantigens are factors identified as being involved in the pathogenesis of AD. One hundred patients with AD were selected from the outpatient clinic of the National Center for Radiation Research and Technology in Cairo, Egypt. They were divided into 2 groups; group 1 included radiation workers in the Hall of gamma irradiation unit and group 2 included workers outside controlled area and not exposed to radiation with comparable age and sex. The severity of the disease was evaluated according to the grade of atopic dermatitis. Total and specific serum IgE was measured and Complete Blood Count was also carried out. Four Malassezia species were isolated from AD patients M. globosa, M. furfur, M. sympodialis and M. obtusa. The clinical isolates consisted of two bacterial strains, S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The significant increase of AD severity seems to be more closely related to the prevalence of S. aureus and Malassezia on the skin of radiation workers. This was proved by the presence of high IgE and eosinophils in radiation workers. So, the interactions of low gamma radiation and skin seems to further complicate the risk of assessments of atopic dermatitis

  19. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Mohammad; Anbiaei, Robabeh; Zamani, Hanie; Fallahi, Babak; Beiki, Davood; Ameri, Ahmad; Emami-Ardekani, Alireza; Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan; Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Seid Ratki, Kazem Razavi; Roknabadi, Alireza Momen

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right-sided cancer. To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring) were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT) to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions) over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol) was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed) and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls)] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46). In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03) and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049) walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS) of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%), while in five of the controls (13.9%),(Odds ratio=1.3). There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. The risk of radiation induced myocardial perfusion abnormality in patients treated with CRT on the

  20. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Eftekhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right–sided cancer. Methods: To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. Results: A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46. In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03 and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049 walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%, while in five of the controls (13.9%,(Odds ratio=1.3. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusion: The risk of radiation induced myocardial

  1. Microsatellite Instability Predicts Clinical Outcome in Radiation-Treated Endometrioid Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, Cristina; Lara, Pedro Carlos; Ramirez, Raquel; Henriquez-Hernandez, Luis Alberto; Rodriguez, German; Falcon, Orlando; Leon, Laureano; Perucho, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To elucidate whether microsatellite instability (MSI) predicts clinical outcome in radiation-treated endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC). Methods and Materials: A consecutive series of 93 patients with EEC treated with extrafascial hysterectomy and postoperative radiotherapy was studied. The median clinical follow-up of patients was 138 months, with a maximum of 232 months. Five quasimonomorphic mononucleotide markers (BAT-25, BAT-26, NR21, NR24, and NR27) were used for MSI classification. Results: Twenty-five patients (22%) were classified as MSI. Both in the whole series and in early stages (I and II), univariate analysis showed a significant association between MSI and poorer 10-year local disease-free survival, disease-free survival, and cancer-specific survival. In multivariate analysis, MSI was excluded from the final regression model in the whole series, but in early stages MSI provided additional significant predictive information independent of traditional prognostic and predictive factors (age, stage, grade, and vascular invasion) for disease-free survival (hazard ratio [HR] 3.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-10.49; p = 0.048) and cancer-specific survival (HR 4.20, 95% CI 1.23-14.35; p = 0.022) and was marginally significant for local disease-free survival (HR 3.54, 95% CI 0.93-13.46; p = 0.064). Conclusions: These results suggest that MSI may predict radiotherapy response in early-stage EEC.

  2. Treatment results of non-pilocytic cerebral astrocytomas in adults treated by surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsutani, Masao; Nishikawa, Ryo; Sugiyama, Satoshi; Fujimaki, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Osamu

    1999-01-01

    Non-pilocytic cerebral astrocytomas in adults are oncopathologically defined as well-differentiated carcinoma of the brain. They grow invasively and can not be cured by extensive surgery followed by radiation therapy. We performed multidisciplinary treatments consisting of surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy in 26 adult patients with non-pilocytic cerebral astrocytomas. The 5- and 10-year survival rates of the patients were 90.9% and 75.6%, respectively; these were better than reported survival rates of patients treated by postoperative radiation therapy alone. Precise analysis of clinical findings of astrocytic tumors suggested that glioblastomas growing superficially might be derived from preexisting astrocytomas. This hypothesis proposes that multidisciplinary treatments for astrocytomas in early stages could cure the disease and could ultimately decrease a number of glioblastomas. (author)

  3. Low early ototoxicity rates for pediatric medulloblastoma patients treated with proton radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, Benjamin J; Chintagumpala, Murali; Philip, Jimmy J; Grosshans, David R; McAleer, Mary F; Woo, Shiao Y; Gidley, Paul W; Vats, Tribhawan S; Mahajan, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Hearing loss is common following chemoradiotherapy for children with medulloblastoma. Compared to photons, proton radiotherapy reduces radiation dose to the cochlea for these patients. Here we examine whether this dosimetric advantage leads to a clinical benefit in audiometric outcomes. From 2006-2009, 23 children treated with proton radiotherapy for medulloblastoma were enrolled on a prospective observational study, through which they underwent pre- and 1 year post-radiotherapy pure-tone audiometric testing. Ears with moderate to severe hearing loss prior to therapy were censored, leaving 35 ears in 19 patients available for analysis. The predicted mean cochlear radiation dose was 30 60 Co-Gy Equivalents (range 19-43), and the mean cumulative cisplatin dose was 303 mg/m 2 (range 298-330). Hearing sensitivity significantly declined following radiotherapy across all frequencies analyzed (P < 0.05). There was partial sparing of mean post-radiation hearing thresholds at low-to-midrange frequencies and, consequently, the rate of high-grade (grade 3 or 4) ototoxicity at 1 year was favorable (5%). Ototoxicity did not correlate with predicted dose to the auditory apparatus for proton-treated patients, potentially reflecting a lower-limit threshold for radiation effect on the cochlea. Rates of high-grade early post-radiation ototoxicity following proton radiotherapy for pediatric medulloblastoma are low. Preservation of hearing in the audible speech range, as observed here, may improve both quality of life and cognitive functioning for these patients

  4. Cognitive behavioral program in treating insomnia among elderly patients

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Kneginja; Miloseva, Lence; Niklewski, Günter; Piehl, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Insomnia is a most common in elderly patients. World wide experience showed that Cognitive behavioral program in treating insomnia is one of the best effective model. Objectives: The present study aim to present clinical experience from University Clinic Nuremberg, Centre for Sleeping Medicine with application of Cognitive behavioral program in treating insomnia among elderly. Material and Methods: The sample consists of 22 patients with chronic insomnia (10 primary insom...

  5. Effective doses to family members of patients treated with radioiodine 131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocovska, Marina Zdravevska; Ristevska, Svetlana Micevska; Nikolovski, Sasho; Jokic, Vesna Spasic

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effective dose to family members of thyroid cancer and hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine 131; also to compare the results with dose constraints proposed by International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and Basic Safety Standards (BSS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Material and methods: for estimation of effective doses at sixty family members of thirty thyroid cancer and thirty hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine 131, the thermoluminescent dosimeters, Model TLD 100, were used. Thyroid cancer patients were hospitalized for three days, while hyperthyroid patients were treated on out-patient basis. The family members wore thermoluminescent dosimeter in front of the torso for seven days. Results: The radiation doses to family members of thyroid cancer patients were well below recommended dose constraint of 1 mSv. The mean value of effective dose was 0.21 mSv (min 0.02 - max 0.51 mSv). Effective doses, higher than 1 mSv, were detected at 11 family members of hyperthyroid patients.. The mean value of effective dose at family members of hyperthyroid patients was 0.87 mSv (min 0.12 - max 6.79) Conclusion: After three days of hospitalization and detailed given oral and written instruction, thyroid carcinoma patients maintain not to exceed the proposed dose limits. Hyperthyroid patients present a greater radiation hazard than thyroid carcinoma patients. The estimated effective doses were higher than the effective doses at family members of thyroid carcinoma patients. These findings may be considered when establishing new national guidelines concerning radiation protection and release of patients after a treatment with radioiodine therapy.(Author)

  6. Thyroid abnormalities in patients previously treated with irradiation for acne vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, D.B.; Grammes, C.F.; Starkey, R.H.; Monsaert, R.P.; Sunderlin, F.S.

    1984-01-01

    Of 1203 patients who received radiation treatment for acne vulgaris between 1940 and 1968, 302 were recalled and examined, 121 at Geisinger Medical Center and the remainder by their local physicians. Radiation records were reviewed on all patients. Lead-rubber and cones had been used as shielding. Mean age at the time of exposure was 21 years and mean total exposure was 692 R. Palpable nodular thyroid disease was found in eight patients (2.6%). Of these, thyroid carcinoma was detected in two patients (0.66%). Although the number of patients examined was small, the incidence of carcinomas was unexpectedly high. The authors conclude that follow-up examination is worthwhile for patients previously treated by irradiation for acne vulgaris

  7. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-12-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application.

  8. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application

  9. The role of radiation therapy in the multidisciplinary treatment of patients with malignant tumors. Radiation pathological stand point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibe, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Estimations suggest that about 60% of all cancer patients will require some form of radiation therapy during their lifetime. Although 40 to 50% of cancer patients in Europe and the United States receive radiation therapy, only about 20% of patients with cancer in Japan undergo such treatment. This is largely due to the lack of understanding of the role of radiation therapy by many medical personnel in Japan, as well as to ''''radiation allergy'''' among many of the general population in Japan, a country that has been undergone atomic bombing. From our perspective as specialists in radiation therapy, the chronic shortage of radiation oncologist also poses a serious problem. Although there are approximately 700 hospitals throughout Japan where radiation therapy is available, no more than half this number of medical facilities have a full-time radiation oncologist. Perhaps the reason for this is that radiation therapy is perceived as unnecessary in Japan. However, it is absolutely essential. In our experience, the 5-year relative survival rate of patients with malignant tumors who have undergone radiation therapy in our clinic is 65 percent. Thus, radiation therapy has proven very useful in the treatment of malignant tumors. Moreover, better estimates of prognosis of cancer patients treated with radiation therapy are becoming possible. This article discusses the role of radiation therapy, from a radiation pathological perspective, in a multidisciplinary approach to treatment of cancer patients. I also emphasize the critical importance of training radiation oncologists who can function as part of multidisciplinary teams that care for patients with malignant tumors. (author). 50 refs

  10. Gelatin/piassava composites treated by Electron Beam Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takinami, Patricia Yoko Inamura; Shimazaki, Kleber; Moura, Esperidiana Augusta Barretos de; Mastro, Nelida Lucia del; Colombo, Maria Aparecida

    2010-01-01

    Piassava (Attalea funifera Mart) fiber has been investigated as reinforcement for polymer composites with potential for practical applications. The purpose of the present work was to assess the behavior of specimens of piassava fiber and gelatin irradiated with electron beam at different doses and percentage. The piassava/gelatin specimens were made with 5 and 10% (w/w) piassava fiber, gelatin 25% (w/w), glycerin as plasticizer and acrylamide as copolymer. The samples were irradiated up to 40 kGy using an electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in presence of air. Preliminary results showed mechanical properties enhancement with the increase in radiation dose. (author)

  11. Ovarian cancer: contribution of radiation therapy to patient management: Erskine Memorial Lecture, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    Ovarian cancer may be treated with radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, or a combination. To evaluate the contribution of radiation therapy to patient management the cure rate must be estimated; data are presented suggesting that the 5-year survival rate provides a reasonable estimate of the cure rate. A study of patients treated since 1971 showed that stage and postoperative residuum could be used to divide patients into two subgroups, a poor prognosis group and a good prognosis group; a multifactorial grouping of patients in the good prognosis group who were treated postoperatively with radiation therapy only was further able to divide patients into low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups. Studies of radiation therapy for different subgroups are discussed; abdominopelvic irradiation has been shown to improve survival for approximately one-third of patients with cancer of the ovary

  12. Patient care and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharko, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter deals with important aspects of patient care, which may become the radiographer's responsibility in the absence of dedicated nursing staff. Although large pediatric centers usually employ nurses for bedside patient management, the general radiographer should be familiar with some aspects of routine patient care. This knowledge guarantees the safety and well-being of children entrusted to the technologist

  13. Radiation pneumonitis in a patient exposed to asbestos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashford, R.F.U.; Maher, J.; Drury, A.; Pickering, D.

    1981-01-01

    A case report is presented of a 58 year old man who had for many years run an asbestos importing and fibreizing plant. He developed radiation pneumonitis following radiotherapy to a squamous cell carcinoma of the middle 3rd of the oesophagus. Detailed lung studies at autopsy revealed asbestos bodies associated with macrophages in many alveoli and areas of subpleural fibrosis typical of asbestos exposure. This was the most florid case of radiation seen in the Westminster Hospital for some years and the first seen in patients treated for carcinoma of the oesophagus using a three field technique. It is suggested that when planning radiotherapy to an asbestos-exposed patient, a possible increase in lung sensitivity to radiation should be considered when planning dosage. (U.K.)

  14. Comparative adequacy of surgery and radiation therapy in 175 T2 glottic carcinomas: 116 cases treated with surgery and 59 with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellai, E.; Olmi, P.; Chiavacci, A.; Fallai, C.; Aulisi, L.; Bottai, G.A.; De Meester, W.

    1991-01-01

    The results were analyzed of 175 patients with glottic squamous cell carcinomas who were treated with curative purposes (1970-1986). Overall 10-year local control rates were 74% for the surgical series and 69% for the cases treated by radiation therapy. After salvage therapy 10-year survival rates were 83% and 76% respectively. The analysis of the results showed no statistically significant difference. In the group treated by radical surgery 80% local control was observed, versus 66% in the cases treated with conservative surgery. 10-year survival rate was higher in the latter group (89% versus 81%) because of better results of salvage therapy: 7 of 10 recurrences were salvaged with the second treatment. Several prognostic factors were evaluated-i.e., T extent, anterior commissure involvement, subglottic invasion, vocal cord mobility impairment, and ventricular involvement. Anterior commissure involvement was the main factor affecting out-come in the surgical series: in the presence of this factor, 64% 10-year local control was observed versus 85% in the patients without commissure involvement. This factor proved more important in the patients treated with conservative surgery (10-year control: 42 versus 88%) than in those undergoing radical surgery (78% versus 85%). Anterior commissure involvement and the number of involved subsites were found to worsen prognosis in the serial treated by radiation therapy: cases with anterior commissure involvement had 59% 10-year local control versus 83%. The cases with a deeper spread had 60% local control versus 75%. Vocal cord mobility impairment was a less important prognosis factor in both series. Our results suggest radiation therapy as a valuable method in a treatment of the small T2 laryngeal cancers which are not suitable for conservative surgery

  15. Unresectable Retiform Hemangioendothelioma Treated with External Beam Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Z. Hirsh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Retiform hemangioendothelioma (RH is an infrequently encountered vascular neoplasm of intermediate or borderline malignancy. Treatment of RH is controversial. We present a case of a 44-year-old Asian male presenting with an unresectable RH of the pelvis. The patient was treated with concurrent low-dose Cisplatin and External beam Radiation (4140cGy in 180cGy per fraction. This is the first report of a clinical complete response and a long-term local control of this rare tumor. This has significant clinical implication, since it gives the first evidence of treatment of this rare tumor using concurrent low-dose chemotherapy and radiation.

  16. Cognitive function in patients with chronic pain treated with opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, G P; de Mattos Pimenta, C A; Braga, P E

    2012-01-01

    The paucity of studies regarding cognitive function in patients with chronic pain, and growing evidence regarding the cognitive effects of pain and opioids on cognitive function prompted us to assess cognition via neuropsychological measurement in patients with chronic non-cancer pain treated...

  17. Metabolic control of type 2 diabetic patients commonly treated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fasting insulin and glucose concentrations were used to assess insulin resistance and sensitivity (%S) using Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) method. Results: Of the 179 patients studied, 87% of male and 92% of female patients were treated with sulphonylurea drugs whereas 13% and 9% of male and female ...

  18. Health status in patients treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Angélique A; Denollet, Johan; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a promising treatment in chronic heart failure (CHF). However, a subgroup of patients still report impaired health status, cardiac symptoms, and feelings of disability following CRT. The aims of this study were to examine (1) whether CHF patients treated...

  19. Evaluation of lead in biological samples treated with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, O.M.

    1996-01-01

    The active dry yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae was able to remove lead successfully from the media. The yeast cells (5 g/100 ml) tolerated up to 8190 ppm lead. The most appropriate conditions for better uptake was when the yeast cells were incubated for 2 hours with different concentrations of lead. Both live and dead cells showed an uptake that exceeded 80% even when there was only 16% of the cells alive. The X RF technique proved that lead is associated with the cells, little, or no lead is found in the media after incubation. Lead bio sorption was investigated in concentrations ranging from 500 to 8000 ppm, the uptake followed the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models and was found to be 180 mg/g when the incubation was for 2 h rs. Increasing the concentration of peptone from 0 to 1.5% induced a significant increase in metal removal. Incubating the metal with the cells at 45% showed an uptake that reached 97.44%. Radiation affected the metal uptake to a great extent, increasing the dose of exposure to the cells incubated with lead. led to the increase in the uptake of the metal. When the dose of exposure was 8 kGy, the metal removal reached a maximum of 91% compared to 84 for non-irradiated samples. When the irradiated cells were incubated with lead a variable uptake capacity was observed. When the cells were exposed to 4 kGy, they were capable of removing the metal more efficiently, other exposure doses showed an uptake that was almost the same. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that lead was deposited as electron dense granules around the cells. The EDX identified the metal. The scanning electron microscopy showed that the morphology of the cells was affected when radiation was used, the cells shrunk and lost their ellipsoidal shape, while the addition of lead did not affect their morphology at all

  20. Outcomes of breast cancer patients with triple negative receptor status treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, J Ben; Reid, Robert E; Shaitelman, Simona F; Chen, Peter Y; Mitchell, Christine K; Wallace, Michelle F; Marvin, Kimberly S; Grills, Inga S; Margolis, Jeffrey M; Vicini, Frank A

    2011-11-01

    Triple negative receptor status (TNRS) of patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy treated with whole-breast irradiation has been associated with increased distant metastasis and decreased disease-free and overall survival. This paper reports the outcomes of TNRS patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). We studied 455 patients who received APBI at our institution, using interstitial, intracavitary, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. TNRS was assigned if a patient tested negative for all three (ER [estrogen receptor], PR [progesterone receptor], and HER2/neu) receptors. Of 202 patients with all receptor results available, 20 patients were designated TNRS, and 182 patients had at least one receptor positive (RP). We analyzed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), distant metastasis (DM), and overall survival (OS). Mean follow-up was 4.1 years for the TNRS group and 5.1 years for the RP cohort (p = 0.11). TNRS patients had a higher histologic grade (59% TNRS vs. 13% RP; p 0.52). OS for the RP cohort was 93% at 5 years (p > 0.28). In our patient population, TNRS conferred a clinical outcome similar to that of patients with RP disease treated with APBI. Further investigation with larger patient populations and longer follow-up periods is warranted to confirm that APBI is a safe and effective treatment for patients with localized TNRS breast cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Outcomes of Breast Cancer Patients With Triple Negative Receptor Status Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J. Ben; Reid, Robert E.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Chen, Peter Y.; Mitchell, Christine K.; Wallace, Michelle F.; Marvin, Kimberly S.; Grills, Inga S.; Margolis, Jeffrey M.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Triple negative receptor status (TNRS) of patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy treated with whole-breast irradiation has been associated with increased distant metastasis and decreased disease-free and overall survival. This paper reports the outcomes of TNRS patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: We studied 455 patients who received APBI at our institution, using interstitial, intracavitary, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. TNRS was assigned if a patient tested negative for all three (ER [estrogen receptor], PR [progesterone receptor], and HER2/neu) receptors. Of 202 patients with all receptor results available, 20 patients were designated TNRS, and 182 patients had at least one receptor positive (RP). We analyzed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), distant metastasis (DM), and overall survival (OS). Results: Mean follow-up was 4.1 years for the TNRS group and 5.1 years for the RP cohort (p = 0.11). TNRS patients had a higher histologic grade (59% TNRS vs. 13% RP; p 0.52). OS for the RP cohort was 93% at 5 years (p > 0.28). Conclusions: In our patient population, TNRS conferred a clinical outcome similar to that of patients with RP disease treated with APBI. Further investigation with larger patient populations and longer follow-up periods is warranted to confirm that APBI is a safe and effective treatment for patients with localized TNRS breast cancer.

  2. Comparison of dental health of patients with head and neck cancer receiving IMRT vs conventional radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Victor M; Liu, Yuan F; Rafizadeh, Sassan; Tajima, Tracey; Nabili, Vishad; Wang, Marilene B

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the dental health of patients with head and neck cancer who received comprehensive dental care after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared with radiation therapy (RT). Historical cohort study. Veteran Affairs (VA) hospital. In total, 158 patients at a single VA hospital who were treated with RT or IMRT between 2003 and 2011 were identified. A complete dental evaluation was performed prior to radiation treatment, including periodontal probing, tooth profile, cavity check, and mobility. The dental treatment plan was formulated to eliminate current and potential dental disease. The rates of dental extractions, infections, caries, mucositis, xerostomia, and osteoradionecrosis (ORN) were analyzed, and a comparison was made between patients treated with IMRT and those treated with RT. Of the 158 patients, 99 were treated with RT and 59 were treated with IMRT. Compared with those treated with IMRT, significantly more patients treated with RT exhibited xerostomia (46.5% vs 16.9%; P radiation treatment (32.2% vs 11.1%; P = .002; OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.65-8.73). Patients who were treated with IMRT had fewer instances of dental disease, more salivary flow, and fewer requisite posttreatment extractions compared with those treated with RT. The number of posttreatment extractions has been reduced with the advent of IMRT and more so with a complete dental evaluation prior to treatment.

  3. Internet utilization by radiation oncology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, J.M.; Devine, P.; DeNittis, A.; Stambaugh, M.; Jones, H.; Goldwein, J.; Whittington, R.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Studies describing the use of the Internet by radiation oncology patients are lacking. This multi-institutional study of cancer patients presenting to academic (AC), community (CO) and veterans (VA) radiation oncology centers was designed to analyze the use of the Internet, predictive factors for utilization, and barriers to access to the Internet. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire evaluating the use of the Internet was administered to 921 consecutive patients presenting to radiation oncology departments at AC, CO and VA Medical Centers. The study included 436 AC patients (47%), 284 CO patients (31%), and 201 VA patients (22%). A computer was available at home to 427 patients (46%) and 337 patients (37%) had Email access. The mean age of the patient population was 64 years (range=14-93). Males represented 70% of the patient population. The most common diagnoses included prostate cancer (33%), breast cancer (13%), and lung cancer (11%). Results: Overall, 265/921 patients (29%) were using the Internet to find cancer related information. The Internet was used by 42% of AC patients, 25% of CO patients and only 5% of VA patients (p<.0001). A computer was available at home in 62% AC vs. 45% CO vs. 12% VA patients (p<.0001). Patients < 60 years were much more likely to use the Internet than older patients (p<.0001). Most of the Internet users considered the information either very reliable (22%) or somewhat reliable (70%). Most patients were looking for information regarding treatment of their cancer (90%), management of side effects of treatment (74%), alternative/complementary treatments (65%) and clinical trials (51%). Unconventional medical therapies were purchased over the Internet by 12% of computer users. Products or services for the treatment or management of cancer were purchased online by 12% of Internet users. Conclusion: A significant number of cancer patients seen in radiation oncology departments at academic and community medical centers

  4. Treatment and outcome in cancer cervix patients treated between 1979 and 1994: A single institutional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamkishore Shrivastava

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 6234 patients with carcinoma of the cervix treated with radical intent between 1979 and 1994. All the work-up, staging investigations, treatment details, radiation protocols, outcomes, and toxicities were noted, compiled, and analyzed. Results: With a mean age of 46 years (range: 18-90 years; median: 45 years, 669 (11% patients were in stage Ib, 284 (5% were in stage IIa, 1891 (30% were in stage IIb, 69 (1% were in stage IIIa, and 3321 (53% were in stage IIIb. With a median follow-up of 68 months (57-79 months for the entire group, there was no significant difference in the outcome of 953 patients with international federation of gynecology and obstetrics (FIGO Ib-IIa treated after radical surgery, pre-operative radiation therapy (pre-op RT + Sx or after radical radiation; their disease-free survival (DFS was 60-62% at 8 years. In our series of 1891 patients with stage IIb and 3321 with stage IIIb, a respective DFS of 56% and 40% was achieved at 8 years. Conclusion: Over the last two decades, with the acquisition of newer facilities and inception of Joint Clinics, there has been a significant refinement in the treatment protocols and outcome. Improving radiation strategies to improve therapeutic ratio is the key to success.

  5. Radiation port cutaneous metastases: Reports of two patients whose recurrent visceral cancers presented as skin lesions at the site of previous radiation and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Spencer Hoyt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is associated with a variety of complications, including the development of primary skin cancers in the radiated region. However, it is rare for patients with visceral cancers who are treated with radiation therapy to subsequently develop cutaneous metastasis within the radiation port. We describe two patients with internal malignancies who developed cutaneous metastases within their radiation ports following radiotherapy. In addition, we used PubMed to perform an extensive literature review and identify additional reports of cutaneous metastasis within a radiation port. We excluded patients who developed melanoma or primary skin cancers in the radiation port. We also excluded patients with non-solid organ malignancies. Herein, we summarize the characteristics of 23 additional patients who experienced radiation port cutaneous metastases and explore possible mechanisms for the occurrence of radiation port cutaneous metastases.

  6. Craniofacial morphology in Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Julsoki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: In addition to well-established physical characteristics, Turner syndrome patients have distinct craniofacial morphology. Since short stature is the most typical characteristic, Turner syndrome patients are commonly treated with growth hormone in order to increase final height. At the same time, growth hormone treatment was found to influence craniofacial growth and morphology in various groups of treated patients. Whereas craniofacial characteristics of Turner syndrome patients are well documented, comparatively little is known of craniofacial morphology of those who are treated with growth hormone. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate craniofacial morphology in Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone in comparison to healthy females. Materials and methods: The cephalometric evaluation was conducted on twenty lateral cephalograms of Turner syndrome patients (13.53 ± 4.04 years treated with growth hormone for at least one year (4.94 ± 1.92 years in average. As a control group, forty lateral cephalograms of healthy female controls, who matched Turner syndrome patients by chronological (11.80 ± 2.37 years and skeletal age, were used. Eleven angular, seven linear measurements and six dimensional ratios were measured to describe craniofacial morphology. Results: The results obtained for angular measurements, in cephalometric analyses for Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone, revealed bimaxillary retrognathism. The linear measurements indicated longer mandibular ramus, anterior cranial base and both anterior and posterior facial heights. However, posterior cranial base and maxilla were in proportion to the anterior cranial base, when comparing dimensional ratios. Anterior cranial base, maxilla and mandibular ramus were larger in proportion to mandibular body; as well as posterior facial height was when compared to anterior facial height. Turner syndrome patients treated with growth

  7. Analytical signals from cancer patients following radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielopolski, L.; Meek, A.G.; Reinstein, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Cancer patients are treated with high energy (8 to 30 MeV) gamma radiation. This treatment modality provides better depth dose distribution than more conventional low-energy gamma treatments, in particular for deeply located tumors. A by-product of the high-energy treatment is gamma-induced activity in the treatment volume following photonuclear reactions. These reactions are endogenic and require that the gamma radiation energy be above threshold value in order for the reaction to take place. For most elements, the threshold value is above 8 MeV; however, for low Z elements, this threshold may reach 18 MeV as is the case for oxygen. The cross sections for the (γ, n) reactions are few millibarns for low Z elements and increases up to few hundreds of millibarns for the heavy elements. The radionuclides resulting from photonuclear reaction are typically positron emitter or decay by electron capture. Thus, it is possible to monitor either the annihilation radiation (511 KeV) or the characteristic gamma radiation. The present work demonstrates that the activity induced in cancer patients following a single treatment (300 rad) enables the monitoring of nitrogen and phosphorus in the irradiated volume. The results from measurements in phantom, cadavers, and cancer patients from different regions in the body are presented. The hypothesis to be tested is whether there are local changes in these two elements during the course of radiation treatment which might correlate with the efficacy of the treatment

  8. Proposed Lymph Node Staging System Using the International Consensus Guidelines for Lymph Node Levels Is Predictive for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients From Endemic Areas Treated With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wen-Fei; Sun, Ying; Mao, Yan-Ping; Chen, Lei; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Mo [Department of Radiation Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Li-Zhi [Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Ai-Hua [Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Li, Li [Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Ma, Jun, E-mail: majun2@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To propose a lymph node (N) staging system for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) based on the International Consensus Guidelines for lymph node (LN) levels and MRI-determined nodal variables. Methods and Materials: The MRI scans and medical records of 749 NPC patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The prognostic significance of nodal level, laterality, maximal axial diameter, extracapsular spread, necrosis, and Union for International Cancer Control/American Joint Committee on Cancer (UICC/AJCC) size criteria were analyzed. Results: Nodal level and laterality were the only independent prognostic factors for distant failure and disease failure in multivariate analysis. Compared with unilateral levels Ib, II, III, and/or Va involvement (hazard ratio [HR] 1), retropharyngeal lymph node involvement alone had a similar prognostic value (HR 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.43-1.17; P=.17), whereas bilateral levels Ib, II, III, and/or Va involvement (HR 1.65; 95% CI 1.06-2.58; P=.03) and levels IV, Vb, and/or supraclavicular fossa involvement (HR 3.47; 95% CI 1.92-6.29; P<.01) both significantly increased the HR for distant failure. Thus we propose that the N category criteria could be revised as follows: N0, no regional LN metastasis; N1, retropharyngeal lymph node involvement, and/or unilateral levels Ib, II, III, and/or Va involvement; N2, bilateral levels Ib, II, III, and/or Va involvement; N3, levels IV, Vb, and/or supraclavicular fossa involvement. Compared with the 7th edition of the UICC/AJCC criteria, the proposed N staging system provides a more satisfactory distinction between the HRs for regional failure, distant failure, and disease failure in each N category. Conclusions: The proposed N staging system defined by the International Consensus Guidelines and laterality is predictive and practical. However, because of no measurements of the maximal nodal diameter on MRI slices

  9. Chromosome inversions in lymphocytes of prostate cancer patients treated with X-rays and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignalosa, Diana; Lee, Ryonfa; Hartel, Carola; Sommer, Sylvester; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Debus, Jürgen; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the cytogenetic damage of the intrachange type in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients treated for prostate cancer with different radiation qualities. Material and methods: Prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a clinical trial based at the Heidelberg University Hospital and at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in 2006. Patients were treated either with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) alone or with a carbon-ion boost followed by IMRT. Blood samples were collected at the end of the therapy and the mBAND technique was used to investigate the cytogenetic damage of the inter and intrachange types. Moreover, the mBAND analysis was performed on healthy donor cells irradiated in vitro with X-rays or C-ions. Results: Our results show no statistically significant differences in the yield and the spectrum of chromosome aberrations among patients treated only with IMRT and patients receiving the combined treatment when similar target volumes and doses to the target are compared. Conclusion: The study suggests that the risks of normal tissue late effects and second malignancies in prostate cancer patients are comparable when heavy ions or IMRT radiotherapy are applied

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of fatigue and depression in the patient treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, Donna B.; Piper, Barbara F.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this course is to clarify the diagnosis of when the diagnosis of major depressive disorder is appropriate for the cancer patient treated with radiotherapy. Specific anxiety syndromes and confounding differential diagnoses will be considered. We will consider the relationship between depression and anxiety and the symptom of radiation-induced fatigue. The review will also include the psychopharmacology of common antidepressants and antianxiety agents

  11. Lymph Node Failure Pattern and Treatment Results of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated with Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Heui Kwan; Kim, Soo Geon

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the failure pattern of the celiac axis, gastric lymph node, and treatment outcome in the upper and mid-esophageal region of cancer patients treated by definitive radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, retrospectively. Materials and Methods: The study constituted the evaluation 108 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer receiving radiotherapy or a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy at Chonbuk National University Hospital from January 1986 to December 2006. In total, 82 patients treated by planned radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, were analysed retrospectively. The study population consisted of 78 men and 2 women (mean age of 63.2 years). In addition, 51 patients received radiotherapy alone, whereas 31 patients received a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The primary cancer sites were located in the upper portion (17 patients), and mid portion (65 patients), respectively. Further, the patients were in various clinical stages including T1N0-1M0 (7 patients), T2N0-1M0 (18 patients), T3N0-1M0 (44 patients) and T4N0-1M0 (13 patients). The mean follow up period was 15 months. Results: The various treatment outcomes included complete response (48 patients), partial response (31 patients) and no response (3 patients). The failure patterns of the lymph node were comprised of the regional lymph node (23 patients) and the distance lymph node which included celiac axis and gastric lymph node (13 patients). However, metastasis was not observed in the regional and distant lymph node in 10 patients, whereas 36 patients were not evaluated. Furthermore, of the 13 patients who developed celiac axis and gastric lymph node metastases, 3 were in stage T1N0-1M0 and 10 were in stage T2-4N0-1M0. A complete response appeared in 12 patients, whereas a partial response appeared in 1 patient. The mean survival time of the

  12. Metallic taste in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJpma, I; Renken, R J; Ter Horst, G J; Reyners, A K L

    2015-02-01

    Metallic taste is a taste alteration frequently reported by cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Attention to this side effect of chemotherapy is limited. This review addresses the definition, assessment methods, prevalence, duration, etiology, and management strategies of metallic taste in chemotherapy treated cancer patients. Literature search for metallic taste and chemotherapy was performed in PubMed up to September 2014, resulting in 184 articles of which 13 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria: English publications addressing metallic taste in cancer patients treated with FDA-approved chemotherapy. An additional search in Google Scholar, in related articles of both search engines, and subsequent in the reference lists, resulted in 13 additional articles included in this review. Cancer patient forums were visited to explore management strategies. Prevalence of metallic taste ranged from 9.7% to 78% among patients with various cancers, chemotherapy treatments, and treatment phases. No studies have been performed to investigate the influence of metallic taste on dietary intake, body weight, and quality of life. Several management strategies can be recommended for cancer patients: using plastic utensils, eating cold or frozen foods, adding strong herbs, spices, sweetener or acid to foods, eating sweet and sour foods, using 'miracle fruit' supplements, and rinsing with chelating agents. Although metallic taste is a frequent side effect of chemotherapy and a much discussed topic on cancer patient forums, literature regarding metallic taste among chemotherapy treated cancer patients is scarce. More awareness for this side effect can improve the support for these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hair cortisol measurement in mitotane-treated adrenocortical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenschijn, L; Quinkler, M; van Rossum, E F C

    2014-04-01

    The only approved drug for the treatment of adrenocortical cancer (ACC) is mitotane. Mitotane is adrenolytic and therefore, hydrocortisone replacement therapy is necessary. Since mitotane increases cortisol binding globulin (CBG) and induces CYP3A4 activity, high doses of hydrocortisone are thought to be required. Evaluation of hydrocortisone therapy in mitotane-treated patients has been difficult since there is no good marker to evaluate hydrocortisone therapy. Measurement of cortisol in scalp hair is a novel method that offers the opportunity to measure long-term cortisol levels. Our aim was to evaluate whether hair cortisol measurements could be useful in evaluating recent hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients. Hair cortisol levels were measured in 15 mitotane-treated ACC patients on hydrocortisone substitution and 96 healthy individuals. Cortisol levels were measured in 3 cm hair segments, corresponding to a period of 3 months. Hair cortisol levels were higher in ACC patients compared to healthy individuals (pcortisol levels above the reference range. None of the patients had hair cortisol levels below normal. In contrast to hydrocortisone doses (β=0.03, p=0.93), hair cortisol levels were associated with BMI (β=0.53, p=0.042). There was no correlation between hair cortisol levels and hydrocortisone doses (β=0.41, p=0.13). Almost half of the ACC patients had high hair cortisol levels, suggesting long-term over-substitution of hydrocortisone in some of the patients, whereas none of the patients was under-substituted. Hair cortisol measurements might be useful in long-term monitoring hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Addressing Quality of Life Issues in Long Term Survivors of Head & Neck Cancer treated with Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishan Basu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The rapid advancement of curative treatment modalities has resulted in improvement of cure rates of head neck cancer leaving us with a larger number of long term survivors from the disease. Unfortunately, long term complications of therapy continue to hurt patients even after cure, compromising their quality of life. This is particularly true for the patients treated with primary radiation/chemo-radiation therapy, where so called organ preservation does not necessarily translate into preservation of organ function. Long term sequelae of treatment, particularly xerostomia and swallowing difficulties compromise the survivors’ quality of life. More studies, particularly suited to our clinical scenario, are warranted to address the quality of life issues in these patients, so that better evidence-based guidelines may be developed for their benefit.

  15. [Outcome of eating disorder patients treated in tertiary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suokas, Jaana; Gissler, Mika; Haukka, Jari; Linna, Milla; Raevuori, Anu; Suvisaari, Jaana

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the outcome of eating disorder patients treated in a specialized treatment setting. Register-based follow-up study of adults (n = 2 450, 95% women, age range 18-62 years). For each patient four background-matched controls were selected. The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality was 6.51 in anorexia, 2.97 in bulimia and 1.77 in BED. Autoimmune diseases were more common in patients than in controls. Bulimia and BED were associated with increased type 2 diabetes risk. Pregnancy and childbirth rates were lower among patients than among controls. Eating disorders are associated with multiple health problems and increased mortality risk.

  16. Radiation induced chromosomal instability in lymphocytes of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, H.; Sagara, M.; Ban, S.; Noda, S.; Iwakawa, M.; Harada, Y.; Imai, T.; Cologne, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay has been extensively used to evaluate the radiation sensitivity of human individuals. Using the CBMN assay, Scott et al (1998, 1999) demonstrated that a fraction of radiosensitive individuals in breast cancer case population was larger than in normal individual population. However, Vral et al were very skeptical about the Scott et al's findings (2002). Under the approval from the ethical committee of NIRS, peripheral blood was obtained from 46 normal healthy females, 131 breast cancer patients, 32 cervical cancer patients and 7 female head and neck cancer patients. Radiosensitivity of T-lymphocytes was assessed by using a CBMN assay. The frequencies of MN per binucleated cell in healthy donors were 0.031(±0.010) and 0.151(±0.066) for cells treated before and after X-ray-irradiation (2Gy), respectively. Spontaneous MN frequencies in cancer patients were significantly higher than healthy donors (p < 0.001). Radiation sensitivities of breast- and head and neck-cancer patients were significantly higher than normal individuals (p < 0.001). Cervical cancer patients were more resistant to irradiation than healthy donors, though the number of cases for statistical analysis was small. (p < 0.001). We are considering that the HPV infection affected the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cases. Because it is widely believed that one key mechanism which leads to spontaneous micronucleus formation involves an imbalance of chromosomal segregation and a chromosomal instability in patients' lymphocytes might be greater than that in normal individuals' lymphocytes. Recently, Kuschel et al (2002) demonstrated that ratios in two SNPs on XRCC3 were significantly different between cancer patients and healthy females. Then, we can suppose that the radiation-related genes with low penetrance may be involved in tumorigenesis of mammary- and head and neck-cells, and also, in patients' radiation susceptibility

  17. Morphology and steroidogenesis of cultured granulosa cells obtained from ovaries of women treated with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrzypczak, J.

    1997-01-01

    The object of the study was the morphology and steroidogenesis of cultured granulosa cells obtained from 6 women aged 28-39 years who, because of Ib cervix carcinoma, were treated with ionizing radiation and later underwent surgery. It was observed that the granulosa cells were viable, had strong proliferative ability, and formed a monolayer on day 2 of culture. Contrary to our expectations, these cells produced larger amounts of steroids in culture than the control cells harvested from normal ovaries in late follicular phase. It was also found that the cells treated with ionizing radiation responded to exogenous gonadotropins with higher production of progesterone and estradiol than the controls. It is concluded that the increase in metabolic activity by granulosa cells from ovaries which had been indirectly affected by ionizing radiation is manifested by the stimulating influence of radiation on steroidogenesis. (author)

  18. Treat the whole patient and be aware of drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Harald

    2015-03-01

    The case of an elderly male with bilateral shoulder pain is presented. The pain had been successfully treated years earlier with surgery, but a repeat rotator cuff procedure when the pain recurred was not effective. The patient's physician asked about impact of systemic analgesics on the elderly patient and interactions with his blood pressure medications. Cardiovascular and renal risks of NSAOIDs are discussed as are potential toxicities of tramadol and too rapid withdrawal from it. Drug interactions of medications used are described.

  19. Polyarthritis flare in patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with infliximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Filippucci

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last ten years, the treatment of seronegative spondyloarthropathies has changed dramatically with the introduction of the anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα agents. Nevertheless, there is a growing number of studies describing several adverse reactions in patients treated with biological agents. In the present report we describe the case of a 22-year-old male patient with ankylosing spondylitis who developed a “paradoxic” adverse reaction, while receiving infliximab.

  20. Diagnostic radiation exposure in pediatric trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Marissa A; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Nabaweesi, Rosemary; Locke, Paul; Ziegfeld, Susan; Brown, Robert

    2011-02-01

    The amount of imaging studies performed for disease diagnosis has been rapidly increasing. We examined the amount of radiation exposure that pediatric trauma patients receive because they are an at-risk population. Our hypothesis was that pediatric trauma patients are exposed to high levels of radiation during a single hospital visit. Retrospective review of children who presented to Johns Hopkins Pediatric Trauma Center from July 1, 2004, to June 30, 2005. Radiographic studies were recorded for each patient and doses were calculated to give a total effective dose of radiation. All radiographic studies that each child received during evaluation, including any associated hospital admission, were included. A total of 945 children were evaluated during the study year. A total of 719 children were included in the analysis. Mean age was 7.8 (±4.6) years. Four thousand six hundred three radiographic studies were performed; 1,457 were computed tomography (CT) studies (31.7%). Average radiation dose was 12.8 (±12) mSv. We found that while CT accounted for only 31.7% of the radiologic studies performed, it accounted for 91% of the total radiation dose. Mean dose for admitted children was 17.9 (±13.8) mSv. Mean dose for discharged children was 8.4 (±7.8) mSv (pcumulative radiation exposure can be high. In young children with relatively long life spans, the benefit of each imaging study and the cumulative radiation dose should be weighed against the long-term risks of increased exposure.

  1. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature

  2. Follow-up of conservatively treated sleep apnoea patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health of School Children: Treatment of /ntestinal. Helminths and Schistosomiasis (WHO/GDS/IPI/GTD 92.1). Geneva: WHO, 1992. Accepted 17 June 1994. Follow-up of conservatively treated sleep apnoea patients. P. R. Bartel, J. Verster, P. J. Becker. Polysomnograms have been recorded at our laboratory since 1985 for ...

  3. Vertebral fractures in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with corticosteroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lems, W. F.; Jahangier, Z. N.; Jacobs, J. W.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    To examine the relationship between roentgenological deformities of the vertebral column and clinical manifestations of vertebral fractures in patients with RA, treated with glucocorticosteroids (Cs). In all outpatients of Utrecht University Hospital with RA, who were currently using Cs (n = 52),

  4. Profile of Hospitalized Elderly Patients Treated for Falling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ling Hsiao

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: This study utilized actual nationwide data to provide a profile of elderly patients treated for falling in Taiwan. Based on the results of this study, fall prevention should especially target the female elderly, and should be given more emphasis during the winter season, in terms of clinical and policy applications.

  5. Severe hyponatraemia in an amiloride/hydrochlorothiazide-treated patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Assen, S.; Mudde, A.H.

    1999-01-01

    A 85-year-old woman treated with, among other drugs, a thiazide diuretic presented with a severe hyponatraemia. She met several of the criteria for SIADH and, besides drugs, no cause for SIADH was found. After stopping the thiazide diuretic and restricting fluid intake the patient recovered fully.

  6. Short and long term radiation induced cardiovascular disease in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Nielsen, Hanne Melgaard

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced cardiovascular disease is well described as a late effect in cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Advancements in surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have led to an increasing number of cancer survivors with resultant long-term side effects related to their cancer...

  7. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in an eye of retinoblastoma treated by radiation and cryocoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Kawai, Masataka; Nii, Seiji; Katsura, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Akihiro

    1999-01-01

    A 4-month-old female infant was diagnosed as bilateral retinoblastoma. The left eye was treated by enucleation and the right by radiation. The right eye received repeated thermochemotherapy, cryocoagulation and photocoagulation for recurrence. Total retinal detachment was detected after surgery for complicated cataract at the age of 2 years 9 months. Vitreous surgery led to the detection of posterior vitreous detachment and retinal breaks in the coagulated scar areas with vitreoretinal adhesion around the calcified tumor. During the following one year, the retina has been attached with no reoccurrence of the tumor. This case illustrates that rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is a possibility in retinoblastoma treated by radiation or retinal coagulations. (author)

  8. Position modification and actual radiation dose in parotids for head and neck cancers treated with TomoTherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Huayong; Zhang Yongqian; Wang Yadi; Xu Weidong; Gao Junmao; Zhang Fuli; Yao Bo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the impact of parotid's position and volume changing on radiation dose for head and neck cancer treated with TomoTherapy. Methods: Totally 12 patients with head and neck cancer were treated with TomoTherapy. Before the treatment, the dose distribution was recalculated with MVCT images, which would obtain the parameters of position, volume and actual radiation dose for parotids. Results: The volume of parotids in Plan2 was significantly lower than in Plan1, and the percentage reduction was 29.06% and 31.78% for left and right parotid, respectively (Z = 6.77, 3.06, P < 0.05). Distance between the COM(center of mass) of parotids and the midline of body was significantly smaller in Plan2 than in Plan1, and the percentage reduction was 6.72% and 6.19% (t = 5.14, 5.80, P < 0.05) at left and right side, respectively. Average dose and V_2_6 for both parotids were higher than those in Plan1, increasing by an average of 37.74%, 25.08% (Z = -6.03, -5.31, P < 0.05) for left parotid and 30.45%, 19.33% (Z = -5.43, -3.26, P < 0.05) for right parotid, respectively. Conclusions: The actual radiation dose to parotids was significantly increased during the radiation therapy for patients with head and neck cancer. There was a linear correlation between the decrease of distance between the COM of parotids and the midline of body and the percentage increase of parotids' radiation dose. No correlation between the reduction of parotids' volume and dose to parotids. In order to reduce the parotids' radiation dose, modification of treatment plan at the appropriate time is essential. (authors)

  9. Optimization of combustion process for radiation-treated solid fuels in dust state