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Sample records for radiation treated patients

  1. Lack of radiation optic neuropathy in 72 patients treated for pituitary adenoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, ACM; Dullaart, RPF; van der Vliet, AM; Szabo, BG; ter Weeme, CA; Pott, JWR

    The incidence of radiation optic neuropathy (RON) after external photon beam radiation therapy for nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFA) is not well-studied. Retrospective review of ophthalmological and imaging data in 72 patients with NFA treated between 1985 and 1998 with external beam radiation

  2. Genetic Modeling of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0680 TITLE: Genetic Modeling of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy PRINCIPAL... Genetic Modeling of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Barry S...achieve this goal has been the identification of genetic markers, primarily single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are associated with the

  3. Sepsis in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Literature review and consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirabile, Aurora; Numico, Gianmauro; Russi, Elvio G.; Bossi, Paolo; Crippa, Fulvio; Bacigalupo, Almalina; de Sanctis, Vitaliana; Musso, Stefania; Merlotti, Anna; Ghi, Maria Grazia; Merlano, Marco C.; Licitra, Lisa; Moretto, Francesco; Denaro, Nerina; Caspiani, Orietta; Buglione, Michela; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Cascio, Antonio; Bernier, Jacques; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Vermorken, Jan B.; Murphy, Barbara; Ranieri, Marco V.; Dellinger, R. Phillip

    2015-01-01

    The reporting of infection/sepsis in chemo/radiation-treated head and neck cancer patients is sparse and the problem is underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of

  4. Sepsis in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: literature review and consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirabile, A.; Numico, G.; Russi, E.G.; Bossi, P.; Crippa, F.; Bacigalupo, A.; De Sanctis, V.; Musso, S.; Merlotti, A.; Ghi, M.G.; Merlano, M.C.; Licitra, L.; Moretto, F.; Denaro, N.; Caspiani, O.; Buglione, M.; Pergolizzi, S.; Cascio, A.; Bernier, J.; Raber-Durlacher, J.; Vermorken, J.B.; Murphy, B.; Ranieri, M.V.; Dellinger, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    The reporting of infection/sepsis in chemo/radiation-treated head and neck cancer patients is sparse and the problem is underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of

  5. Survival Patterns in Elderly Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Linda W; Steenbakkers, Roel J H M; Bijl, Henk P; Vemer-van den Hoek, Johanna G M; Roodenburg, Jan L N; Oosting, Sjoukje F; Halmos, Gyorgy B; de Rooij, Sophia E; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2017-07-15

    We sought to assess the effect of age on overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and non-cancer-related death (NCRD) in elderly (aged ≥70 years) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with definitive radiation therapy. The results were compared with those of younger patients, and the most important prognostic factors for survival endpoints were determined. Treatments may be better justified based on identification of the main differences in survival between young and elderly patients. Data were analyzed from all consecutive HNSCC patients treated with definitive radiation therapy (66-70 Gy) in our department between April 2007 and December 2014. A total of 674 patients, including 168 elderly patients (24.9%), were included in the study. Multivariate association models were constructed to assess the effect of age on survival endpoints. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify potential prognostic factors for survival in elderly patients. A total of 674 consecutive patients, including 168 elderly patients, were analyzed. The 5-year OS and NCRD rates were significantly worse for elderly patients than for young patients: 45.5% versus 58.2% (P=.007) and 39.0% versus 20.7% (Pelderly patient group. Of the elderly patients, 80 (47%) died during follow-up; 45% of these deaths were ascribed to the index tumor. For elderly patients, radiation therapy combined with systemic forms of treatment was significantly associated with adverse NCRD rate (hazard ratio, 8.02; 95% confidence interval, 2.36-27.2; P=.001) after we performed a multivariate association analysis. Elderly HNSCC patients have worse survival outcomes than young HNSCC patients. Age is an independent prognostic factor for OS, mainly due to an increase in non-cancer-related mortality and comorbid diseases. The differences in CSS between young and elderly patients are negligible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

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    Gunther, Jillian R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ketonen, Leena [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Jeremy Y. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulino, Arnold C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M. [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Weinberg, Jeffrey [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Khatua, Soumen [Department of Pediatrics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Adesina, Adekunle [Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahajan, Anita, E-mail: amahajan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem.

  7. Low radiation dose to relatives after discharge of thyroid cancer patients treated with I-131

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    Remy, H.; Camps, E. [Pharmacy, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Ricard, M.; Lavielle, F.; Coulot, J. [Medical Physics, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Borget, I. [Health Economics, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Schhumberger, M. [Nuclear Medicine, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); University Paris-sud, Bicetre (France)

    2012-07-01

    Patients treated with I-131 for thyroid carcinoma are potential source of radiation exposure for other individuals. In order to provide more reliable information to patients and relatives, this study evaluated the radiation dose received by family members after discharge from the hospital. Three main observations can be drawn. First, rhTSH (recombinant human Thyrotropin) stimulation leads to lower irradiation when mean rate is considered (cumulated irradiation divided by time contact) 1.4 {mu}Sv per hour compared to 1.6 {mu}Sv with withdrawal. However, this had no impact on the radiation dose received by relatives, because of a longer time spent close to the patient when rhTSH is used. Secondly, the mean cumulated radiation dose delivered to the relatives during the 7 days following discharge was similar with either rhTSH (58 {mu}Sv) or withdrawal patients (49.6 {mu}Sv). Thirdly, in euthyroid patients after rhTSH, the whole body retention of I-131 after three days of hospitalization is significantly lower than in hypothyroid patients after withdrawal. The hospital stay can be shortened when rhTSH is used

  8. Dysphagia in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiation: assessment, sequelae, and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Barbara A; Gilbert, Jill

    2009-01-01

    Dysphagia is commonly seen in patients undergoing radiation-based therapy for locally advanced squamous carcinoma of the head and neck. Within 4 to 5 weeks of starting therapy, patients develop mucositis, radiation dermatitis, and edema of the soft tissues. Resulting pain, copious mucous production, xerostomia, and tissue swelling contribute to acute dysphagia. As the acute effects resolve, late effects including fibrosis, lymphedema, and damage to neural structures become manifest. Both acute and late effects result in adverse sequelae including aspiration, feeding tube dependence, and nutritional deficiencies. Early referral for evaluation by speech-language pathologists is critical to (1) ensure adequate assessment of swallow function, (2) determine whether further testing is needed to diagnose or treat the swallowing disorder, (3) generate a treatment plan that includes patient education and swallow therapy, (4) work with dieticians to ensure adequate and safe nutrition, and (5) identify patients with clinically significant aspiration.

  9. Safety and Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in Advanced Melanoma Patients Treated With Ipilimumab

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    Qin, Rosie [School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Olson, Adam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Singh, Bhavana [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Thomas, Samantha; Wolf, Steven [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Bhavsar, Nrupen A. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Hanks, Brent A. [Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Salama, April K.S., E-mail: april.salama@duke.edu [Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Ipilimumab and radiation therapy (RT) are standard treatments for advanced melanoma; preclinical models suggest the potential for synergy. However, limited clinical information exists regarding safety and optimal timing of the combination. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of consecutive patients with unresectable stage 3 or 4 melanoma treated with ipilimumab. Patients were categorized as having received RT or not. Differences were estimated between these 2 cohorts. Results: We identified 88 patients treated with ipilimumab. At baseline, the ipilimumab-plus-RT group (n=44) had more unfavorable characteristics. Despite this, overall survival, progression-free survival, and both immune-related and non–immune-related toxicity were not statistically different (P=.67). Patients who received ipilimumab before RT had an increased duration of irradiated tumor response compared with patients receiving ipilimumab after RT (74.7% vs 44.8% at 12 months; P=.01, log-rank test). In addition, patients receiving ablative RT had non–statistically significantly improved median overall survival (19.6 vs 10.2 months), as well as 6-month (95.1% vs 72.7%) and 12-month (79.7% vs 48.5%) survival rates, compared with those treated with conventionally fractionated RT. Conclusions: We found that both ablative and conventionally fractionated RT can be safely administered with ipilimumab without a clinically apparent increase in toxicity. Patients who received ipilimumab before RT had an increased duration of irradiated tumor response.

  10. Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

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    Azuddin, A. Yusof; Rahman, I. Abdul; Siah, N. J.; Mohamed, F.; Saadc, M.; Ismail, F.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60rectum, rectal mean dose and NTCPrectum with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

  11. Incidence, causative mechanisms, and anatomic localization of stroke in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy versus surgery alone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sattler, Margriet; Vroomen, Patrick; Sluiter, Wim J.; Schers, Henk J.; van den Berg, Gerrit; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; van den Bergh, Alphons C. M.; van Beek, Andre P.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical

  12. Treatment outcome of ductal carcinoma in situ patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy

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    Lim, Yu Jin; Kim, Kyu Bo; Choi, Eui Kyu; Han, Won Shik; Noh, Dong Young; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To evaluate the outcome of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) patients who underwent surgery followed by radiation therapy (RT). We retrospectively reviewed 106 DCIS patients who underwent surgery followed by postoperative RT between 1994 and 2006. Ninety-four patients underwent breast-conserving surgery, and mastectomy was performed in 12 patients due to extensive DCIS. Postoperative RT was delivered to whole breast with 50.4 Gy/28 fx. Tumor bed boost was offered to 7 patients (6.6%). Patients with hormonal receptor-positive tumors were treated with hormonal therapy. The median follow-up duration was 83.4 months (range, 33.4 to 191.5 months) and the median age was 47.8 years. Ten patients (9.4%) had resection margin <1 mm and high-grade and estrogen receptor-negative tumors were observed in 39 (36.8%) and 20 (18.9%) patients, respectively. The 7-year ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR)-free survival rate was 95.3%. Resection margin (<1 or ≥1 mm) was the significant prognostic factor for IBTR in univariate and multivariate analyses (p < 0.001 and p = 0.016, respectively). Postoperative RT for DCIS can achieve favorable treatment outcome. Resection margin was the important prognostic factor for IBTR in the DCIS patients who underwent postoperative RT.

  13. Treatment outcome of ductal carcinoma in situ patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yu Jin; Chie, Eui Kyu; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong Young; Ha, Sung W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcome of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) patients who underwent surgery followed by radiation therapy (RT). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 106 DCIS patients who underwent surgery followed by postoperative RT between 1994 and 2006. Ninety-four patients underwent breast-conserving surgery, and mastectomy was performed in 12 patients due to extensive DCIS. Postoperative RT was delivered to whole breast with 50.4 Gy/28 fx. Tumor bed boost was offered to 7 patients (6.6%). Patients with hormonal receptor-positive tumors were treated with hormonal therapy. Results The median follow-up duration was 83.4 months (range, 33.4 to 191.5 months) and the median age was 47.8 years. Ten patients (9.4%) had resection margin <1 mm and high-grade and estrogen receptor-negative tumors were observed in 39 (36.8%) and 20 (18.9%) patients, respectively. The 7-year ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR)-free survival rate was 95.3%. Resection margin (<1 or ≥1 mm) was the significant prognostic factor for IBTR in univariate and multivariate analyses (p < 0.001 and p = 0.016, respectively). Conclusion Postoperative RT for DCIS can achieve favorable treatment outcome. Resection margin was the important prognostic factor for IBTR in the DCIS patients who underwent postoperative RT. PMID:24724045

  14. Acupuncture in Treating Dry Mouth Caused By Radiation Therapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

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    RATIONALE: Acupuncture may help relieve dry mouth caused by radiation therapy. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying to see how well one set of acupuncture points work in comparison to a different set of acupuncture points or standard therapy in treating dry mouth caused by radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. |

  15. Sepsis in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Literature review and consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabile, Aurora; Numico, Gianmauro; Russi, Elvio G; Bossi, Paolo; Crippa, Fulvio; Bacigalupo, Almalina; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Musso, Stefania; Merlotti, Anna; Ghi, Maria Grazia; Merlano, Marco C; Licitra, Lisa; Moretto, Francesco; Denaro, Nerina; Caspiani, Orietta; Buglione, Michela; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Cascio, Antonio; Bernier, Jacques; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Vermorken, Jan B; Murphy, Barbara; Ranieri, Marco V; Dellinger, R Phillip

    2015-08-01

    The reporting of infection/sepsis in chemo/radiation-treated head and neck cancer patients is sparse and the problem is underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of infections and sepsis. The Delphi appropriateness method was used for this consensus. External expert reviewers then evaluated the conclusions carefully according to their area of expertise. The paper contains seven clusters of statements about the clinical definition and management of infections and sepsis in head and neck cancer patients, which had a consensus. Furthermore, it offers a review of recent literature in these topics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of radiation exposure in early-onset scoliosis patients treated with the vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Tyler A; Astur Neto, Nelson; Kelly, Derek M; Warner, William C; Sawyer, Jeffrey R

    2014-03-01

    The evaluation and treatment of patients with early-onset scoliosis requires multiple imaging studies and involves potential exposure to high cumulative lifetime doses of ionizing radiation. The Vertical Expandable Prosthetic Titanium Rib (VEPTR) used in the treatment of early-onset scoliosis requires numerous lengthening procedures and frequent radiographic follow-up. The purpose of this study was to quantify the ionizing radiation exposure in pediatric patients undergoing VEPTR treatment and to identify factors that place patients with early-onset scoliosis at greater risk of radiation exposure. Data were collected by retrospective review of the records of all patients with early-onset scoliosis who were treated with a VEPTR over a 4-year period (2007 to 2010). Diagnostic radiographs, computed tomography, intraoperative fluoroscopy, and nuclear medicine studies were identified and analyzed for ionizing radiation exposure. Total radiation exposure was determined and compared for risk factors such as etiology (eg, neuromuscular or congenital) and surgeon experience. In addition, radiographic studies directly related and unrelated to scoliosis treatment were compared. Twenty-four patients had 121 surgical procedures (mean 5.0/patients) and 962 imaging studies (mean 40/patients). The mean estimated cumulative radiation dose per patient during follow-up was 86.7 mSv (range, 42.6 to 174.9 mSv) with a mean dose per year of 34 mSv (range, 22.9 to 47.1 mSv). Patients with congenital scoliosis received greater mean amounts of radiation (35.2 mSv) than patients with neuromuscular scoliosis (31.9 mSv). Patients treated within the first 2 years of the study period had higher radiation exposure (42.4 mSv) compared with patients treated in the last 2 years (24.9 mSv) (PVEPTR treatment for early-onset scoliosis. There are differences in the amount and sources of radiation exposure between patients with early-onset scoliosis secondary to congenital and neuromuscular causes

  17. Estimating the excess lifetime risk of radiation induced secondary malignancy (SMN) in pediatric patients treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI): Conventional radiation therapy versus helical intensity modulated radiation therapy.

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    Holmes, Jordan A; Chera, Bhishamjit S; Brenner, David J; Shuryak, Igor; Wilson, Adam K; Lehman-Davis, Misty; Fried, David V; Somasundaram, Vivek; Lian, Jun; Cullip, Tim; Marks, Lawrence B

    To quantify the risk of radiation-induced second malignancies (SMN) in pediatric patients receiving craniospinal irradiation (CSI) either with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (Conv CSI) or tomotherapy helical intensity modulated radiation therapy (Tomo CSI). A novel predictive model that accounts for short- and long-term carcinogenesis was incorporated into our institutional treatment planning system to quantify the lifetime risk of SMN in incidentally irradiated organs. Five pediatric patients previously treated with CSI were studied. For each case, Conv CSI and Tomo CSI plans were computed. The excess absolute number of SMN was computed for each plan for each patient. For female patients, age was varied to assess its impact. Tomo CSI has a much higher risk than Conv CSI for breast cancer. Tomo has a slightly increased risk for the lung, and conventional has a slightly higher risk for the thyroid. Both techniques have intermediate risks to the pancreas and stomach, and lesser risks to the bladder and rectum. For the breast, the magnitude of the absolute risks varied with age: 14.2% versus 7.4% (Tomo vs Conv) age 5; 16.9% versus 7.6% age 10, and 18.6% versus 8.0% age 15. Tomo has a higher risk for inducing breast and lung second cancers, and when using Tomo-based intensity modulated radiation therapy, care should be taken to avoid incidental radiation to the breast. When planning CSI, one needs to balance these cancer risks against other normal tissue effects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Outcome of Patients Treated With a Single-Fraction Dose of Palliative Radiation for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

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    Thomas, Tarita O.; Agrawal, Priya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Guitart, Joan [Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rosen, Steven T. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rademaker, Alfred W. [Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Querfeld, Christiane [Department of Medicine/Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hayes, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Kuzel, Timothy M. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Mittal, Bharat B., E-mail: bmittal@nmh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a radiosensitive tumor. Presently, treatment with radiation is given in multiple fractions. The current literature lacks data that support single-fraction treatment for CTCL. This retrospective review assesses the clinical response in patients treated with a single fraction of radiation. Methods and Materials: This study reviewed the records of 58 patients with CTCL, primarily mycosis fungoides, treated with a single fraction of palliative radiation therapy (RT) between October 1991 and January 2011. Patient and tumor characteristics were reviewed. Response rates were compared using Fisher's exact test and multiple logistic regressions. Survival rates were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to assess the cost of a single vs a multifractionated treatment regimen. Results: Two hundred seventy individual lesions were treated, with the majority (97%) treated with ≥700 cGy; mean follow-up was 41.3 months (range, 3-180 months). Response rate by lesion was assessed, with a complete response (CR) in 255 (94.4%) lesions, a partial response in 10 (3.7%) lesions, a partial response converted to a CR after a second treatment in 4 (1.5%) lesions, and no response in 1 (0.4%) lesion. The CR in lower extremity lesions was lower than in other sites (P=.0016). Lesions treated with photons had lower CR than those treated with electrons (P=.017). Patients with lesions exhibiting large cell transformation and tumor morphology had lower CR (P=.04 and P=.035, respectively). Immunophenotype did not impact response rate (P=.23). Overall survival was significantly lower for patients with Sézary syndrome (P=.0003) and erythroderma (P<.0001). The cost of multifractionated radiation was >200% higher than that for single-fraction radiation. Conclusions: A single fraction of 700 cGy-800 cGy provides excellent palliation for CTCL lesions and is cost effective and convenient for the patient.

  19. Localized Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiation Therapy: A Long-Term Outcome in 86 Patients With 104 Treated Eyes

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    Harada, Ken, E-mail: keharada@ncc.go.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Murakami, Naoya; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro; Inaba, Koji; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Sumi, Minako [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Shigenobu [Department of Ophthalmic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tobinai, Kensei [Department of Hematologic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Uno, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Chiba University School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Itami, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history, behavior of progression, prognostic factors, and treatment-related adverse effects of primary ocular adnexal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma (POAML). Methods and Materials: Eighty-six patients with histologically proven stage I POAML treated with radiation therapy at National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo between 1990 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age was 56 years (range, 18-85 years). The median dose administered was 30 Gy (range, 30-46 Gy). Seventy-seven patients (90%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Results: The median follow-up duration was 9 years (range, 0.9-22 years). The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 97.6% and 93.5%, respectively, and no patients died of lymphoma. Patients with tumor sizes ≥4 cm showed a greater risk of contralateral relapse (P=.012). Six patients with contralateral relapse were seen and treated by radiation therapy alone, and all the lesions were controlled well, with follow-up times of 3 to 12 years. There was 1 case of local relapse after radiation therapy alone, and 3 cases of relapse occurred in a distant site. Cataracts developed in 36 of the 65 eyes treated without lens shielding and in 12 of the 39 patients with lens shielding (P=.037). Conclusions: The majority of patients with POAML showed behavior consistent with that of localized, indolent diseases. Thirty gray of local irradiation seems to be quite effective. The initial bilateral involvement and contralateral orbital relapses can be also controlled with radiation therapy alone. Lens shielding reduces the risk of cataract.

  20. Outcomes of patients with tonsillar carcinoma treated with post-tonsillectomy radiation therapy.

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    Yildirim, Gokcen; Morrison, William H; Rosenthal, David I; Sturgis, Erich M; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A; Schwartz, David L; Garden, Adam S

    2010-04-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the therapeutic outcomes of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil that underwent tonsillectomies followed by radiotherapy. A search of the database maintained within the Department of Radiation Oncology at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center identified 120 patients with carcinoma of the tonsil who were irradiated between 1979 and 2004 following total gross removal of their disease by tonsillectomy. Thirty-six patients had stage III disease and 64 patients had stage IV disease. Only 12 patients received systemic chemotherapy. With median follow-up of 51 months, the 5-year local-regional control rate, recurrence-free survival rate, and overall survival rates were 97%, 92%, and 86%, respectively. Patients who undergo tonsillectomies resulting in total gross removal of their primary disease followed by radiation have excellent outcomes. Our common practice is to deliver 66 Gy to the tonsillar bed. This practice has resulted in extremely high local control rates.

  1. Patterns of Radiation Therapy Practice for Patients Treated for Intact Cervical Cancer in 2005 to 2007: A Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Study

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    Eifel, Patricia J., E-mail: peifel@mdanderson.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ho, Alex; Khalid, Najma [American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Erickson, Beth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Owen, Jean [American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess practice patterns and compliance with clinical performance measures for radiation therapy (RT) for patients with intact carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: Trained research associates reviewed the records of 261 randomly selected patients who received RT for cervix carcinoma between 2005 and 2007 from 45 facilities randomly selected after stratification by practice type. National estimates of patient and treatment characteristics were calculated from survey data using SUDAAN statistical software. Results: From the survey data, we estimated that only 8% of US facilities treated on average more than 3 eligible patients per year. No small or medium nonacademic facilities in the survey treated more than 3 eligible patients per year. Approximately 65.5% of patients began treatment in a facility that treated 3 or fewer eligible patients per year. Although 87.5% of patients had brachytherapy as part of their treatment, the proportion treated with external beam RT only was about double that estimated from the 1996 to 1999 survey. The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy sharply increased, particularly in small nonacademic facilities. Overall, patients treated in nonacademic facilities were more likely to have incomplete or protracted treatment; 43% of patients treated in small nonacademic facilities did not have treatment completed within 10 weeks. Also, patients treated in facilities that treated 3 or fewer eligible patients per year were significantly less likely to receive concurrent chemotherapy than were patients treated in other facilities. Conclusion: Survey results indicate a disturbingly high rate of noncompliance with established criteria for high-quality care of patients with cervical cancer. Noncompliance rates are particularly high in nonacademic facilities, especially those that treat relatively few patients with intact cervical cancer.

  2. Patterns of radiation therapy practice for patients treated for intact cervical cancer in 2005 to 2007: a quality research in radiation oncology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifel, Patricia J; Ho, Alex; Khalid, Najma; Erickson, Beth; Owen, Jean

    2014-06-01

    To assess practice patterns and compliance with clinical performance measures for radiation therapy (RT) for patients with intact carcinoma of the cervix. Trained research associates reviewed the records of 261 randomly selected patients who received RT for cervix carcinoma between 2005 and 2007 from 45 facilities randomly selected after stratification by practice type. National estimates of patient and treatment characteristics were calculated from survey data using SUDAAN statistical software. From the survey data, we estimated that only 8% of US facilities treated on average more than 3 eligible patients per year. No small or medium nonacademic facilities in the survey treated more than 3 eligible patients per year. Approximately 65.5% of patients began treatment in a facility that treated 3 or fewer eligible patients per year. Although 87.5% of patients had brachytherapy as part of their treatment, the proportion treated with external beam RT only was about double that estimated from the 1996 to 1999 survey. The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy sharply increased, particularly in small nonacademic facilities. Overall, patients treated in nonacademic facilities were more likely to have incomplete or protracted treatment; 43% of patients treated in small nonacademic facilities did not have treatment completed within 10 weeks. Also, patients treated in facilities that treated 3 or fewer eligible patients per year were significantly less likely to receive concurrent chemotherapy than were patients treated in other facilities. Survey results indicate a disturbingly high rate of noncompliance with established criteria for high-quality care of patients with cervical cancer. Noncompliance rates are particularly high in nonacademic facilities, especially those that treat relatively few patients with intact cervical cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Localized Epidermal Cysts as a Radiation Recall Phenomenon in a Melanoma Patient Treated with Radiotherapy and the BRAF Inhibitor Vemurafenib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Houriet

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BRAF inhibitors are broadly used for metastatic melanoma with BRAF mutations. Their use results in various cutaneous side effects, such as the development of keratoacanthomas and squamous cell carcinomas. We report a patient with metastatic melanoma treated with vemurafenib who developed dozens of histologically confirmed epidermal cysts within 2 months after initiation of vemurafenib administration. The cystic lesions were observed only in the localized area where a large exophytic melanoma tumor mass had been previously irradiated. Localized epidermal cysts may constitute an unusual radiation recall reaction in patients treated with BRAF inhibitors.

  4. A clinical study of 14 patients with radiation colitis; A case of radiation colitis treated by abdominoperineal resection of the rectum and lumbar plasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futamura, Manabu; Tanaka, Sengai; Oshita, Hiroo; Nagao, Naritoshi (Gifu City Hospital (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    Clinical study of 14 patients with radiation colitis who were treated surgically at our clinic in the past 16-year period and a patient whose treatment was very difficult are reported. Primary lesions included 13 cervical carcinomas and one ovarian cancer. Ten cases received surgery combined with radiation and 4 did radiation. Radiation dose was 6055 rad on average. Latent time ranged from 6 months to 25 years with the average of 8 years and 9 months. No significant correlation between radiation dose and latent time was noted. Symptoms included obstruction and stenosis in 56% (8/14), hematoemesis in 46% (5/14), and fistula in 46% (5/14). All lesions presented as remarkably adhesion and stenosis, and resection with anastomosis was performed in 9 (64%), colostomy in 5 (46%), and urostomy in 2 (14%). Lumbar plasty was added in one case. A 65-year-old female patient who had undergone radiation therapy 13 years before had a rectal perforation and pelvic fistula. Abdominoperineal resection of the rectum and closure of the fistula by transferring the major gluteal muscle pedicle were performed. The patient is followed on ambulant basis for more than one year, and no evidence of recurrence has been observed. (author).

  5. Temporal Cerebral Microbleeds Are Associated With Radiation Necrosis and Cognitive Dysfunction in Patients Treated for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

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    Shen, Qingyu [Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Neurology, Zengcheng People' s Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Focai; Rong, Xiaoming [Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Yang, Wuyang [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Li, Yi; Cai, Zhaoxi; Xu, Pengfei; Xu, Yongteng [Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Yamei, E-mail: yameitang@hotmail.com [Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Gene Regulation and Target Therapy of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be complicated with radiation-induced brain necrosis (RN), resulting in deteriorated cognitive function. However, the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon remains unclear. This study attempts to elucidate the association between cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) and radiation necrosis and cognitive dysfunction in NPC patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This cross-sectional study included 106 NPC patients who were exposed to radiation therapy (78 patients with RN and 28 without RN). Sixty-six patients without discernable intracranial pathology were included as the control group. CMBs were confirmed using susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Cognitive function was accessed using Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Patients with a total score below 26 were defined as cognitively dysfunction. Results: Seventy-seven patients (98.7%) in the RN group and 12 patients (42.9%) in the non-RN group had at least 1 CMB. In contrast, only 14 patients (21.2%) in the control group had CMBs. In patients with a history of radiation therapy, CMBs most commonly presented in temporal lobes (76.4%) followed by cerebellum (23.7%). Patients with RN had more temporal CMBs than those in the non-RN group (37.7 ± 51.9 vs 3.8 ± 12.6, respectively; P<.001). The number of temporal lobe CMBs was predictive for larger volume of brain necrosis (P<.001) in multivariate linear regression analysis. Although cognitive impairment was diagnosed in 55.1% of RN patients, only 7.1% of non-RN patients sustained cognitive impairment (P<.001). After adjusting for age, sex, education, period after radiation therapy, CMBs in other lobes, and RN volume, the number of temporal CMBs remained an independent risk factor for cognitive dysfunction (odds ratio [OR]: 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.04; P=.003). Conclusions: CMBs is a common radiological manifestation in NPC patients with RN

  6. Predictors of Dysgeusia in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated With Chemotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapir, Eli [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Tao, Yebin [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Felix; Samuels, Stuart; El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Murdoch-Kinch, Carol A. [School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Objective(s): Dysgeusia is a significant factor reducing quality of life and worsening dysphagia in patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer. The factors affecting dysgeusia severity are uncertain. We investigated the effects on patient-reported dysgeusia of doses to the oral cavity, salivary output (required to dissolve food particles), and patient-reported xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) (N=73) receiving definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy concurrently with chemotherapy participated in a prospective, longitudinal study of quality of life (QOL), including assessment of patient-reported gustatory function by taste-related questions from the Head and Neck QOL instrument (HNQOL) and the University of Washington Head and Neck-related QOL instrument (UWQOL), before therapy and periodically after treatment. At these intervals, patients also completed a validated xerostomia-specific questionnaire (XQ) and underwent unstimulated and stimulated major salivary gland flow rate measurements. Results: At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment, dysgeusia improved over time: severe dysgeusia was reported by 50%, 40%, 22%, and 23% of patients, respectively. Significant associations were found between patient-reported severe dysgeusia and radiation dose to the oral cavity (P=.005) and tongue (P=.019); normal tissue complication probability for severe dysgeusia at 3 months showed mean oral cavity D{sub 50} doses 53 Gy and 57 Gy in the HNQOL and WUQOL questionnaires, respectively, with curve slope (m) of 0.41. Measured salivary output was not statistically significantly correlated with severe taste dysfunction, whereas patient-reported XQ summary scores and xerostomia while eating scores were correlated with severe dysgeusia in the UWQOL tool (P=.04). Conclusions: Taste impairment is significantly correlated with mean radiation dose to the oral cavity. Patient

  7. Using machine learning to predict radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Solberg, Timothy D.; Heskel, Marina; Ungar, Lyle; Simone, Charles B., II

    2016-08-01

    To develop a patient-specific ‘big data’ clinical decision tool to predict pneumonitis in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 61 features were recorded for 201 consecutive patients with stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT, in whom 8 (4.0%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Pneumonitis thresholds were found for each feature individually using decision stumps. The performance of three different algorithms (Decision Trees, Random Forests, RUSBoost) was evaluated. Learning curves were developed and the training error analyzed and compared to the testing error in order to evaluate the factors needed to obtain a cross-validated error smaller than 0.1. These included the addition of new features, increasing the complexity of the algorithm and enlarging the sample size and number of events. In the univariate analysis, the most important feature selected was the diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO adj%). On multivariate analysis, the three most important features selected were the dose to 15 cc of the heart, dose to 4 cc of the trachea or bronchus, and race. Higher accuracy could be achieved if the RUSBoost algorithm was used with regularization. To predict radiation pneumonitis within an error smaller than 10%, we estimate that a sample size of 800 patients is required. Clinically relevant thresholds that put patients at risk of developing radiation pneumonitis were determined in a cohort of 201 stage I NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. The consistency of these thresholds can provide radiation oncologists with an estimate of their reliability and may inform treatment planning and patient counseling. The accuracy of the classification is limited by the number of patients in the study and not by the features gathered or the complexity of the algorithm.

  8. Incidence, Causative Mechanisms, and Anatomic Localization of Stroke in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Treated With Postoperative Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery Alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattler, Margriet G.A., E-mail: g.a.sattler@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Vroomen, Patrick C. [Department of Neurology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Sluiter, Wim J. [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schers, Henk J. [Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (Netherlands); Berg, Gerrit van den [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R. [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Beek, André P. van [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical Center Groningen in The Netherlands was studied. Radiation therapy was administered in 236 patients. The TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) and the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification methods were used to determine causative mechanism and anatomic localization of stroke. Stroke incidences in patients treated with RT were compared with that observed after surgery alone. Risk factors for stroke incidence were studied by log–rank test, without and with stratification for other significant risk factors. In addition, the stroke incidence was compared with the incidence rate in the general Dutch population. Results: Thirteen RT patients were diagnosed with stroke, compared with 12 surgery-alone patients. The relative risk (RR) for stroke in patients treated with postoperative RT was not significantly different compared with surgery-alone patients (univariate RR 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-1.35, P=.23). Stroke risk factors were coronary or peripheral artery disease (univariate and multivariate RR 10.4, 95% CI 4.7-22.8, P<.001) and hypertension (univariate RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.8, P=.002). There was no difference in TOAST and Oxfordshire classification of stroke. In this pituitary adenoma cohort 25 strokes were observed, compared with 16.91 expected (standard incidence ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.00-1.96, P=.049). Conclusions: In pituitary adenoma patients, an increased incidence of stroke was observed compared with the general population. However, postoperative RT was not associated with an increased incidence of stroke or differences in causative mechanism or anatomic localization of stroke compared with surgery alone. The primary stroke risk

  9. Relationship Between Radiation-Induced Apoptosis of T Lymphocytes and Chronic Toxicity in Patients With Prostate Cancer Treated by Radiation Therapy: A Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foro, Palmira, E-mail: pforo@parcdesalutmar.cat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Algara, Manuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Lozano, Joan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Rodriguez, Nuria; Sanz, Xavier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Torres, Erica [Pathology Department, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Carles, Joan [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Oncology, Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Reig, Anna; Membrive, Ismael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Quera, Jaume [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Fernandez-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Oscar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Lacruz, Marti [Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Radiation Protection Department, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Bellosillo, Beatriz [Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Pathology Department, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation of radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes with late toxicity of prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: 214 patients were prospectively included in the study. Peripheral blood was drawn from patients before treatment and irradiated with 8 Gy. The percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes that underwent radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. Toxicity and mortality were correlated in 198 cases with pretreatment apoptosis and clinical and biological variables by use of a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: The mean percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte radiation-induced apoptosis was 28.58% (±14.23) and 50.76% (±18.9), respectively. Genitourinary (GU) toxicity was experienced by 39.9% of patients, while gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was experienced by 19.7%. The probability of development of GU toxicity was nearly doubled (hazard ratio [HR] 1.99, P=.014) in those patients in whom the percentage of in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T-lymphocytes was ≤28.58%. It was also almost double in patients who received doses ≥50 Gy in 65% of the bladder volume (V65 ≥50) (HR 1.92, P=.048). No correlation was found between GI toxicity and any of the variables studied. The probability of death during follow-up, after adjustment for different variables, was 2.7 times higher in patients with a percentage of CD8+ T lymphocyte apoptosis ≤50.76% (P=.022). Conclusions: In conclusion, our study shows, in the largest prospective cohort of prostate cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy, that in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T lymphocytes assessed before radiation therapy was associated with the probability of developing chronic GU toxicity. In addition, the radiation dose received in the urinary bladder (V65 ≥50) affected the occurrence of GU toxicity. Finally, we also demonstrate that radiation-induced apoptosis of

  10. Efficiency of applying low-intensity laser radiation in treating patients with granuloma annulare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetkov, M. A.; Volnukhin, Vladimir A.; Kozlov, Valentine I.

    2001-04-01

    This article considers the application of low-intensity laser therapy in treating patients with granuloma annulare. The treatment was carried out by using two different laser therapeutic techniques, namely, the local laser irradiation of pathological foci and the laser transcutaneous irradiation of blood. It was found that both techniques produced a unidirectional effect, brought about a pronounced improvement of the clinical picture of the disease, and normalized microcirculation and microvascular reactivity of the affected skin.

  11. ATM Polymorphisms Predict Severe Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Huihua [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan (China); Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Zhensheng [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ting [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Qiming; Liu, Hongliang [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Li-E [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Qingyi, E-mail: qwei@mdanderson.org [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mediates detection and repair of DNA damage. We investigated associations between ATM polymorphisms and severe radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: We genotyped 3 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ATM (rs1801516 [D1853N/5557G>A], rs189037 [-111G>A] and rs228590) in 362 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who received definitive (chemo)radiation therapy. The cumulative severe RP probabilities by genotypes were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. The associations between severe RP risk and genotypes were assessed by both logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard model with time to event considered. Results: Of 362 patients (72.4% of non-Hispanic whites), 56 (15.5%) experienced grade ≥3 RP. Patients carrying ATM rs189037 AG/GG or rs228590 TT/CT genotypes or rs189037G/rs228590T/rs1801516G (G-T-G) haplotype had a lower risk of severe RP (rs189037: GG/AG vs AA, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.83, P=.009; rs228590: TT/CT vs CC, HR=0.57, 95% CI, 0.33-0.97, P=.036; haplotype: G-T-G vs A-C-G, HR=0.52, 95% CI, 0.35-0.79, P=.002). Such positive findings remained in non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions: ATM polymorphisms may serve as biomarkers for susceptibility to severe RP in non-Hispanic whites. Large prospective studies are required to confirm our findings.

  12. Outcomes of oral cavity cancer patients treated with surgery followed by postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan-Davidson, Sean R; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Myers, Jeffrey N; Gunn, Gary B; Johnson, Faye M; Skinner, Heath; Beadle, Beth M; Gillenwater, Ann M; Phan, Jack; Frank, Steven J; William, William N; Wong, Andrew J; Lai, Stephen Y; Fuller, Clifton D; Morrison, William H; Rosenthal, David I; Garden, Adam S

    2017-09-01

    Although treatment paradigms have not changed significantly, radiotherapy, surgery, and imaging techniques have improved, leading us to investigate oncologic and survival outcomes for oral cavity squamous cell cancer (OCSCC) patients treated with surgery followed by postoperative IMRT. Records of patients with pathological diagnosis of OCSCC treated between 2000 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients' demographic, disease, and treatment criteria were extracted. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival curves. Two hundred eighty-nine patients were analyzed. Median follow-up was 35months. Two hundred sixty-eight had neck dissections (93%), of which 66% had nodal involvement, and 51% of those positive dissections had extracapsular extension. Forty patients received induction chemotherapy and 107 received concurrent chemotherapy. Median dose to high risk clinical target volume was 60Gy/30 fractions. The 5-year locoregional control and overall survival rates were 76% and 57%, respectively. Tumors with >1.5cm depth of invasion had significantly higher risk of local failure compared with ≤1.5cm (p1.5cm depth of invasion (p=0.003) were independent predictors of poorer survival. Disease outcomes were consistent with historical data and did not appear compromised by the use of IMRT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlation between radiation dose and histopathological findings in patients with gliblastoma treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageji, T; Mizobuchi, Y; Nagahiro, S; Nakagawa, Y; Kumada, H

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the correlation between the radiation dose and histopathological findings in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Histopathological studies were performed on specimens from 8 patients, 3 had undergone salvage surgery and 5 were autopsied. For histopathological cure of GBM at the primary site, the optimal minimal dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were 68Gy(w) and 44Gy(w), respectively. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Donepezil in Treating Young Patients With Primary Brain Tumors Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy to the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-31

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Radiation Toxicity

  15. Estimated radiation doses to different organs among patients treated for ankylosing spondylitis with a single course of X rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, C.A.; Smith, P.G.; Stratton, I.M.; Darby, S.C.; Doll, R.

    1988-03-01

    A follow-up study of over 14000 patients treated with a single course of X rays for ankylosing spondylitis demonstrated substantial excess risk of developing cancer. Previously the excess risk of leukaemia has been related to the estimated mean radiation dose to active bone marrow but detailed estimates were not made of the radiation doses to other organs. Data extracted from the original treatment records of a random sample of one in 15 patients have been used to make dose estimates, using Monte Carlo methods, for 30 specific organs or body regions and 12 bone marrow sites. Estimates of mean and median organ doses, standard deviations and ranges have been tabulated. Detailed distributions are presented for six organs (lung, bronchi, stomach, oesophagus, active bone marrow and total body). Comparison with the earlier bone marrow estimates and more recent theoretical estimates shows good agreement.

  16. Other primary malignancies in breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Min; Cormier, Janice N; Xing, Yan; Giordano, Sharon Hermes; Chai, Christy; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Vlastos, Georges; Kuerer, Henry M; Mirza, Nadeem Q; Buchholz, Thomas A; Hunt, Kelly K

    2013-05-01

    Our purpose was to examine the incidence and impact on survival of other primary malignancies (OPM) outside of the breast in breast cancer patients and to identify risk factors associated with OPM. Patients with stage 0-III breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy at our center from 1979 to 2007 were included. Risk factors were compared between patients with/without OPM. Logistic regression was used to identify factors that were associated with OPM. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated. Among 4,198 patients in this study, 276 (6.6 %) developed an OPM after breast cancer treatment. Patients with OPM were older and had a higher proportion of stage 0/I disease and contralateral breast cancer compared with those without OPM. In a multivariate analysis, older patients, those with contralateral breast cancer, and those who did not receive chemotherapy or hormone therapy were more likely to develop OPM after breast cancer. Patients without OPM had better overall survival. The SIR for all OPM sites combined after a first primary breast cancer was 2.91 (95 % confidence interval: 2.57-3.24). Significantly elevated risks were seen for numerous cancer sites, with SIRs ranging from 1.84 for lung cancer to 5.69 for ovarian cancer. Our study shows that breast cancer patients have an increased risk of developing OPM over the general population. The use of systemic therapy was not associated with increased risk of OPM. In addition to screening for a contralateral breast cancer and recurrences, breast cancer survivors should undergo screening for other malignancies.

  17. Electrophysiological Monitoring in Patients With Tumors of the Skull Base Treated by Carbon-12 Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carozzo, Simone [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Schardt, Dieter [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Narici, Livio [Department of Physics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Combs, Stephanie E.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Sannita, Walter G., E-mail: wgs@dism.unige.it [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report the results of short-term electrophysiologic monitoring of patients undergoing {sup 12}C therapy for the treatment of skull chordomas and chondrosarcomas unsuitable for radical surgery. Methods and Materials: Conventional electroencephalogram (EEG) and retinal and cortical electrophysiologic responses to contrast stimuli were recorded from 30 patients undergoing carbon ion radiation therapy, within a few hours before the first treatment and after completion of therapy. Methodologies and procedures were compliant with the guidelines of the International Federation for Clinical Neurophysiology and International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision. Results: At baseline, clinical signs were reported in 56.6% of subjects. Electrophysiologic test results were abnormal in 76.7% (EEG), 78.6% (cortical evoked potentials), and 92.8% (electroretinogram) of cases, without correlation with neurologic signs, tumor location, or therapy plan. Results on EEG, but not electroretinograms and cortical responses, were more often abnormal in patients with reported clinical signs. Abnormal EEG results and retinal/cortical responses improved after therapy in 40% (EEG), 62.5% (cortical potentials), and 70% (electroretinogram) of cases. Results on EEG worsened after therapy in one-third of patients whose recordings were normal at baseline. Conclusions: The percentages of subjects whose EEG results improved or worsened after therapy and the improvement of retinal/cortical responses in the majority of patients are indicative of a limited or negligible (and possibly transient) acute central nervous system toxicity of carbon ion therapy, with a significant beneficial effect on the visual pathways. Research on large samples would validate electrophysiologic procedures as a possible independent test for central nervous system toxicity and allow investigation of the correlation with clinical signs; repeated testing over time after therapy would demonstrate, and may

  18. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Francois, E-mail: francois.meyer@chuq.qc.ca [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Andre; Wang, Chang Shu [Radiation Therapy Department, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Geoffrey [Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Bairati, Isabelle [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22-2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41-11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical setting could help

  19. Radiation-treated ready-to-eat (RTE) chicken breast Adobo for immuno-compromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, Chitho P; De Guzman, Zenaida M; Tolentino, Levelyn Mitos M; Cobar, Maria Lucia C; Abrera, Gina B

    2014-11-15

    Usually in hospitals low-bacterial diets are served to immuno-compromised patients (ICPs). However, low-bacterial diets still pose a high risk of microbial infections and limit the food selection of the patients. Thus, pathogen-free dishes must be made available. This study presents the development of pathogen-free ready-to-eat (RTE) Filipino ethnic food chicken breast Adobo, sterilized by exposure to high-dose gamma rays (25 kGy) in combination with conventional treatments. Frozen vacuum-packed samples artificially inoculated with Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, were exposed to 25 kGy gamma radiation for complete sterilization. Microbial quality and sterility of the samples were analysed following 15, 30, and 60 days of storage at -4°C. The effects of high-dose gamma irradiation on the nutritional quality and sensory characteristics of RTE chicken breast Adobo were also evaluated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiation-induced secondary malignancies for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a pilot study of patients treated via IMRT or VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HF

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hsiao-Fei Lee,1,2 Jen-Hong Lan,1,2 Pei-Ju Chao,1,2 Hui-Min Ting,1,2 Hui-Chun Chen,2 Hsuan-Chih Hsu,2 Tsair-Fwu Lee1–4 1Medical Physics and Informatics Laboratory of Electronics Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China; 3Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Yuan’s General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China Background: Patients treated with radiotherapy are at risk of developing a second cancer during their lifetime, which can directly impact treatment decision-making and patient management. The aim of this study was to qualify and compare the secondary cancer risk (SCR after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC patients. Patients and methods: We analyzed the treatment plans of a cohort of 10 NPC patients originally treated with IMRT or VMAT. Dose distributions in these plans were used to calculate the organ equivalent dose (OED with Schneider’s full model. Analyses were applied to the brain stem, spinal cord, oral cavity, pharynx, parotid glands, lung, mandible, healthy tissue, and planning target volume. Results: We observed that the OED-based risks of SCR were slightly higher for the oral cavity and mandible when VMAT was used. No significant difference was found in terms of the doses to other organs, including the brain stem, parotids, pharynx, submandibular gland, lung, spinal cord, and healthy tissue. In the NPC cohort, the lungs were the organs that were most sensitive to radiation-induced cancer. Conclusion: VMAT afforded superior results in terms of organ-at-risk-sparing compared with IMRT. Most OED

  1. Dose-Response Relationship between Radiation Dose and Loco-regional Control in Patients with Stage II-III Esophageal Cancer Treated with Definitive Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Suh, Yang-Gun; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Sang Kil; Shin, Sung Kwan; Cho, Byung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol

    2017-07-01

    The correlation between radiation dose and loco-regional control (LRC) was evaluated in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Medical records of 236 stage II-III esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive CRT at Yonsei Cancer Center between 1994 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Among these, 120 received a radiation dose of 60 Gy) is associated with increased LRC, PFS, and OS in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive CRT.

  2. Risk of hypothyroidism among patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with radiation therapy: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chao-Yueh; Lin, Chun-Shu; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Huang, Wen-Yen; Su, Yu-Fu; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Tsai, I-Ju; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the incidence and risk of hypothyroidism among patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) after radiation therapy (RT). We identified 14,893 NPC patients and 16,105 other head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with RT without thyroidectomy from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan between 2000 and 2011. Each NPC patient was randomly frequency-matched with four individuals without NPC by age, sex, and index year. Competing-risk regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of hypothyroidism requiring thyroxin associated with NPC after RT. The risk of developing hypothyroidism was significantly higher in the NPC cohort than in the matched cohort (adjusted HR=14.35, 95% CI=11.85-17.37) and the HNC cohort (adjusted HR=2.06, 95% CI=1.69-2.52). Independent risk factors for hypothyroidism among NPC patients included younger age, female sex, higher urbanization level, autoimmune disease, and receipt of chemotherapy. The risk of hypothyroidism requiring thyroxin was significantly higher in NPC patients after RT than in the general Taiwanese population and HNC patients. Regular clinical and serum thyroid function tests are essential among NPC survivors after RT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical and Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation Pneumonitis in a Large Series of Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Ryan [University of South Florida School of Medicine, Tampa, Florida (United States); Han Gang [Department of Biostatistics, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Sarangkasiri, Siriporn; DeMarco, MaryLou; Turke, Carolyn; Stevens, Craig W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@Moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report clinical and dosimetric factors predictive of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) from a series of 240 patients. Methods and Materials: Of the 297 isocenters treating 263 patients, 240 patients (n=263 isocenters) had evaluable information regarding RP. Age, gender, current smoking status and pack-years, O{sub 2} use, Charlson Comorbidity Index, prior lung radiation therapy (yes/no), dose/fractionation, V{sub 5}, V{sub 13}, V{sub 20}, V{sub prescription}, mean lung dose, planning target volume (PTV), total lung volume, and PTV/lung volume ratio were recorded. Results: Twenty-nine patients (11.0%) developed symptomatic pneumonitis (26 grade 2, 3 grade 3). The mean V{sub 20} was 6.5% (range, 0.4%-20.2%), and the average mean lung dose was 5.03 Gy (0.547-12.2 Gy). In univariable analysis female gender (P=.0257) and Charlson Comorbidity index (P=.0366) were significantly predictive of RP. Among dosimetric parameters, V{sub 5} (P=.0186), V{sub 13} (P=.0438), and V{sub prescription} (where dose = 60 Gy) (P=.0128) were significant. There was only a trend toward significance for V{sub 20} (P=.0610). Planning target volume/normal lung volume ratio was highly significant (P=.0024). In multivariable analysis the clinical factors of female gender, pack-years smoking, and larger gross internal tumor volume and PTV were predictive (P=.0094, .0312, .0364, and .052, respectively), but no dosimetric factors were significant. Conclusions: Rate of symptomatic RP was 11%. Our mean lung dose was <600 cGy in most cases and V20 <10%. In univariable analysis, dosimetric factors were predictive, while tumor size (or tumor/lung volume ratio) played a role in multivariable and univariable and analysis, respectively.

  4. Skin dose for head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy(IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hsiao-Ju; Li, Chi-Wei; Tsai, Wei-Ta; Chang, Chih-Chia; Tsang, Yuk-Wah

    2017-11-01

    The reliability of thermoluminescent dosimeters (ultrathin TLD) and ISP Gafchromic EBT2 film to measure the surface dose in phantom and the skin dose in head-and-neck patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique(IMRT) is the research focus. Seven-field treatment plans with prescribed dose of 180 cGy were performed on Eclipse treatment planning system which utilized pencil beam calculation algorithm(PBC). In calibration tests, the variance coefficient of the ultrathin TLDs were within 3%. The points on the calibration curve of the Gafchromic film was within 1% variation. Five measurements were taken on phantom using ultrathin TLD and EBT2 film respectively. The measured mean surface doses between ultrathin TLD or EBT2 film were within 5% deviation. Skin doses of 6 patients were measured for initial 5 fractions and the mean dose per-fraction was calculated. If the extrapolated doses for 30 fractions were below 4000 cGy, the skin reaction grading observed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) was either grade 1 or grade 2. If surface dose exceeded 5000 cGy in 32 fractions, then grade 3 skin reactions were observed.

  5. Quality of life (QOL) in women treated for gynecologic malignancies with radiation therapy: a literature review of patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabeau-Beale, Kristina L; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2014-08-01

    To summarize the literature on quality of life for patients treated with definitive radiation for gynecologic cancers, with a specific focus on patient reported outcomes. A literature review was performed to summarize studies about patient-reported outcomes and quality of life in women with gynecologic malignancies who were treated with definitive radiation therapy. Summaries are by disease site, including endometrial, cervical and vulvar cancers. Over 20 different survey instruments have been used to describe patient-reported outcomes for women treated with radiation for gynecologic cancer. Regardless of disease site, all patients describe a degree of compromise in physical and social functioning, as well as sexual dysfunction. Specific symptoms which are most bothersome for patients vary by disease site, such as bowel concerns predominating for endometrial cancer patients, while body image is more concerning for cervical cancer patients. Several quality of life concerns exist for women treated with radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies. Significant overlap exists in the QOL issues affecting these patients. Whether to combine or separate surveys by diagnosis, treatment type, age, or time point should be explored further. Assessing patients' psychological, emotional, and physical concerns helps to understand long-term adjustment, enabling incorporation of these domains into future trials that will ultimately improve patient well-being. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation pneumonitis in non‑small‑cell lung cancer patients treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RP) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing helical tomotherapy (HT) and the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with it. Materials and Methods: We analyzed data from the treatment protocols of 62 NSCLC patients.

  7. Radiation pneumonitis in non.small.cell lung cancer patients treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RP) in non.small.cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing helical tomotherapy (HT) and the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with it. Materials and Methods: We analyzed data from the treatment protocols of 62 NSCLC patients.

  8. [Periodontal conditions in growth age patients treated for leukemia with chemotherapy and radiation therapy protocols].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignanelli, M; Masera, G

    1989-01-01

    Patients affected by acute leukemia under radiotherapy and chemotherapy, less them 12 years ols were investigated about periodontal health. Patients were in total remission. Clinical and radiological X-Ray exams investigated soft deposits, calculus, intensive gingivitis, periodontal lesions and CPITN index. The Authors concluded that indices of these patients are better than in normal subjects.

  9. Radiation exposure of relatives of patients treated with Ra-223 dichloride; Strahlenexposition von Angehoerigen bei Therapie mit Ra-223-Dichlorid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, C.; Szermerski, B.; Solle, A.; Geworski, L. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Stabsstelle Strahlenschutz und Abt. Medizinische Physik; Pinkert, J. [Bayer Vital GmbH, Leverkusen (Germany); Kranert, W.T. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Andreeff, M. [Universitaetsklinikum ' ' Carl Gustav Carus' ' TU Dresden (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2015-07-01

    Since November 2013, a radiopharmaceutical containing Ra-223 dichloride as active substance is approved in the European Union for patients with castration resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases and no known visceral metastases. Ra-223 (T{sub 1/2} = 11.43 d) decays via a chain of 4 alpha and 2 beta decays. This therapy is presently the only application of an alpha emitter in clinical routine therapy. To show that the exposure of relatives and caregivers of patients treated with Ra-223 dichloride in an outpatient setting does not exceed a value of 1 mSv, the multicenter study ''RAPSODY'' was conducted. As Ra-223 and most of its progeny emit alpha particles, the internal exposure had to be evaluated in particular. Within this study, measurements of the radiation emitted from the patient were performed using standard dose-rate meters. Wipe-tests were taken in the patients' homes to identify significant contaminations and evaluated by liquid scintillation counting. Samples of saliva and sweat were taken and measured using gamma spectrometry. Ra-223 disintegrates to the noble gas Rn-219 and was measured in the exhaled breath from the patients using conventional Radon Monitors. Furthermore, a computational fluid dynamics simulation (CFD) was performed to assess the radioactivity in the air, which could be inhaled by persons close to the patient. Conclusions: The potential exposure of relatives and caregivers by external irradiation and incorporation of radioactivity exhaled or excreted by the patient with saliva or sweat is well below 1 mSv. No objections are seen regarding outpatient treatment. This paper summarizes contents of a poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  10. SU-F-T-117: A Pilot Study of Organ Dose Reconstruction for Wilms Tumor Patients Treated with Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makkia, R; Pelletier, C; Jung, J [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Gopalakrishnan, M [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mille, M; Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Kalapurakal, J [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To reconstruct major organ doses for the Wilms tumor pediatric patients treated with radiation therapy using pediatric computational phantoms, treatment planning system (TPS), and Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation methods. Methods: A total of ten female and male pediatric patients (15–88 months old) were selected from the National Wilms Tumor Study cohort and ten pediatric computational phantoms corresponding to the patient’s height and weight were selected for the organ dose reconstruction. Treatment plans were reconstructed on the computational phantoms in a Pinnacle TPS (v9.10) referring to treatment records and exported into DICOM-RT files, which were then used to generate the input files for XVMC MC code. The mean doses to major organs and the dose received by 50% of the heart were calculated and compared between TPS and MC calculations. The same calculations were conducted by replacing the computational human phantoms with a series of diagnostic patient CT images selected by matching the height and weight of the patients to validate the anatomical accuracy of the computational phantoms. Results: Dose to organs located within the treatment fields from the computational phantoms and the diagnostic patient CT images agreed within 2% for all cases for both TPS and MC calculations. The maximum difference of organ doses was 55.9 % (thyroid), but the absolute dose difference in this case was 0.33 Gy which was 0.96% of the prescription dose. The doses to ovaries and testes from MC in out-of-field provided more discrepancy (the maximum difference of 13.2% and 50.8%, respectively). The maximum difference of the 50% heart volume dose between the phantoms and the patient CT images was 40.0%. Conclusion: This study showed the pediatric computational phantoms are applicable to organ doses reconstruction for the radiotherapy patients whose three-dimensional radiological images are not available.

  11. Assessment of Organ Motion in Postoperative Endometrial and Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Eleanor E.R., E-mail: Eleanor.harris@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Latifi, Kujtim; Rusthoven, Chad; Javedan, Ken; Forster, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may be useful to reduce toxicity in gynecologic cancer patients requiring postoperative pelvic irradiation. This study was undertaken to quantify vaginal wall organ motion during the course of postoperative pelvic irradiation using pelvic IMRT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two consecutive patients treated with postoperative pelvic IMRT on helical tomotherapy had fiducial markers placed at the vaginal apex prior to simulation then daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) scans for positioning. The daily positions of the fiducials were registered and measured in reference to the initial CT scan to quantify the degree of vaginal wall organ motion during the entire course of therapy. Results: The total motion of the fiducials center of mass (COM) was a median of 5.8 mm (range, 0.6-20.2 mm), and 95% of all COM positions fell within 15.7 mm of their original position. Directional margins of 3.1 mm along the right-left axis, 9.5 mm along the superoinferior axis, and of 12.1 mm along the anteroposterior axis encompassed the vaginal fiducials in 95% of treatments. Mean organ deformation for all patients was 3.9 mm, (range, 0-27.5 mm; standard deviation, 3.1 mm), with significant distortions of greater than 10 mm in 17% of secondary image sets. Conclusions: These data suggest a planning target volume margin of 16 mm will account for maximal organ motion in the majority of gynecologic patients undergoing postoperative pelvic IMRT, and it may be possible to incorporate directional motion into the planning target volume margin.

  12. Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jonathan; Dawson, Laura A; Jiang, Haiyan; Kim, John; Dinniwell, Rob; Brierley, James; Wong, Rebecca; Lockwood, Gina; Ringash, Jolie

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate quality of life (QoL), an important outcome owing to poor long-term survival, after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the liver. Patients (n=222) with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), liver metastases, or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and Child-Pugh A liver function received 24-60 Gy of 6-fraction image-guided SBRT. Prospective QoL assessment was completed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) and/or Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep, version 4) questionnaires at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Ten HCC patients with Child-Pugh B liver function were also treated. The QLQ-C30 was available for 205 patients, and 196 completed the FACT-Hep. No difference in baseline QoL (P = .17) or overall survival (P = .088) was seen between the HCC, liver metastases, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients. Appetite loss and fatigue measured by the QLQ-C30 clinically and statistically worsened by 1 month after treatment but recovered by 3 months. At 3 and 12 months after treatment, respectively, the FACT-Hep score had improved relative to baseline in 13%/19%, worsened in 36%/27%, and remained stable in 51%/54%. Using the QLQ-C30 Global Health score, QoL improved in 16%/23%, worsened in 34%/39%, and remained stable in 50%/38% at 3 and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 17.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.3-19.8 months). Higher baseline scores on both FACT-Hep and QLQ-C30 Global Health were associated with improved survival. Hazard ratios for death, per 10-unit decrease in QoL, were 0.90 (95% CI 0.83-0.98; P = .001) and 0.88 (95% CI 0.82-0.95; P = .001), respectively. Tumor size was inversely correlated with survival. Liver SBRT temporarily worsens appetite and fatigue, but not overall QoL. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is well tolerated and warrants comparison against other liver-directed therapies

  13. Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.klein@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jiang, Haiyan [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kim, John; Dinniwell, Rob; Brierley, James; Wong, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lockwood, Gina [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ringash, Jolie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate quality of life (QoL), an important outcome owing to poor long-term survival, after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the liver. Methods and Materials: Patients (n=222) with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), liver metastases, or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and Child-Pugh A liver function received 24-60 Gy of 6-fraction image-guided SBRT. Prospective QoL assessment was completed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) and/or Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep, version 4) questionnaires at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Ten HCC patients with Child-Pugh B liver function were also treated. Results: The QLQ-C30 was available for 205 patients, and 196 completed the FACT-Hep. No difference in baseline QoL (P=.17) or overall survival (P=.088) was seen between the HCC, liver metastases, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients. Appetite loss and fatigue measured by the QLQ-C30 clinically and statistically worsened by 1 month after treatment but recovered by 3 months. At 3 and 12 months after treatment, respectively, the FACT-Hep score had improved relative to baseline in 13%/19%, worsened in 36%/27%, and remained stable in 51%/54%. Using the QLQ-C30 Global Health score, QoL improved in 16%/23%, worsened in 34%/39%, and remained stable in 50%/38% at 3 and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 17.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.3-19.8 months). Higher baseline scores on both FACT-Hep and QLQ-C30 Global Health were associated with improved survival. Hazard ratios for death, per 10-unit decrease in QoL, were 0.90 (95% CI 0.83-0.98; P=.001) and 0.88 (95% CI 0.82-0.95; P=.001), respectively. Tumor size was inversely correlated with survival. Conclusions: Liver SBRT temporarily worsens appetite and fatigue, but not overall QoL. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is well tolerated and warrants

  14. Prevalence of hypothyroidism among patients with breast cancer treated with radiation to the supraclavicular field: a single-centre survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikawa, Yuichiro; Kosaka, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Kazuki; Hohokabe, Eri; Takebe, Sayaka; Narukami, Ryo; Hattori, Takayuki; Ueki, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Kengo; Imagumbai, Toshiyuki; Kato, Hironori; Kokubo, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the prevalence of hypothyroidism (HT) in patients with breast cancer who received radiation therapy to the supraclavicular (SC) field to evaluate the effect of radiation on thyroid. Methods Between April 2007 and May 2016, consecutive patients with invasive breast cancer who received SC radiation were recruited. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (fT4) were measured between April and August 2016. On the basis of the radiation-planning CT images, thyroid volume was calculated and dose–volume parameters were estimated. The endpoints were the prevalence of HT as determined by high levels of TSH and low levels of fT4 in serum, and the prevalence of subclinical HT, determined by high-serum TSH and normal fT4. Results Among the 68 consecutive patients, 26 were excluded from evaluation (10 patients died, 6 had a history of previous thyroid disease and 10 were lost to follow-up). One (2.4%) and six (14.3%) of these patients had HT and subclinical HT, respectively, with a mean TSH level of 8.27 µU/mL. By univariate analysis, a predictive factor of HT and subclinical HT was a thyroid volume thyroid volume thyroid volume appeared to be a predictive marker of HT in this cohort, further prospective evaluation is needed. PMID:28761733

  15. Radiation Therapy Risk Factors for Development of Lymphedema in Patients Treated With Regional Lymph Node Irradiation for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Ravi A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Miller, Cynthia L. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Skolny, Melissa N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Warren, Laura E.G. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Horick, Nora [Department of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jammallo, Lauren S.; Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); O' Toole, Jean [Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle C. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: We previously evaluated the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE) with the addition of regional lymph node irradiation (RLNR) and found an increased risk when RLNR is used. Here we analyze the association of technical radiation therapy (RT) factors in RLNR patients with the risk of LE development. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively screened 1476 women for LE who underwent surgery for breast cancer. Among 1507 breasts treated, 172 received RLNR and had complete technical data for analysis. RLNR was delivered as supraclavicular (SC) irradiation (69% [118 of 172 patients]) or SC plus posterior axillary boost (PAB) (31% [54 of 172]). Bilateral arm volume measurements were performed pre- and postoperatively. Patients' RT plans were analyzed for SC field lateral border (relative to the humeral head), total dose to SC, RT fraction size, beam energy, and type of tangent (normal vs wide). Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze associated risk factors for LE. Results: Median postoperative follow-up was 29.3 months (range: 4.9-74.1 months). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LE was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15%-32%) for SC and 20% (95% CI: 11%-37%) for SC plus PAB (SC+PAB). None of the analyzed variables was significantly associated with LE risk (extent of humeral head: P=.74 for <1/3 vs >2/3, P=.41 for 1/3 to 2/3 vs >2/3; P=.40 for fraction size of 1.8 Gy vs 2.0 Gy; P=.57 for beam energy 6 MV vs 10 MV; P=.74 for tangent type wide vs regular; P=.66 for SC vs SC+PAB). Only pretreatment body mass index (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15, P=.0007) and the use of axillary lymph node dissection (HR: 7.08, 95% CI: 0.98-51.40, P=.05) were associated with risk of subsequent LE development. Conclusions: Of the RT parameters tested, none was associated with an increased risk of LE development. This study underscores the need for future work investigating alternative RLNR risk factors for LE.

  16. Sexual Functioning Among Endometrial Cancer Patients Treated With Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Intra-Vaginal Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damast, Shari, E-mail: shari.damast@yale.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldfarb, Shari [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Eaton, Anne; Patil, Sujata [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mosenkis, Jeffrey [Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bennett, Antonia [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Atkinson, Thomas [Department of Psychiatry, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jewell, Elizabeth; Leitao, Mario; Barakat, Richard; Carter, Jeanne [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Basch, Ethan [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: We used the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD) and factors associated with diminished sexual functioning in early stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with simple hysterectomy and adjuvant brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 104 patients followed in a radiation oncology clinic completed questionnaires to quantify current levels of sexual functioning. The time interval between hysterectomy and questionnaire completion ranged from <6 months to >5 years. Multivariate regression was performed using the FSFI as a continuous variable (score range, 1.2-35.4). SD was defined as an FSFI score of <26, based on the published validation study. Results: SD was reported by 81% of respondents. The mean ({+-} standard deviation) domain scores in order of highest-to-lowest functioning were: satisfaction, 2.9 ({+-}2.0); orgasm, 2.5 ({+-}2.4); desire, 2.4 ({+-}1.3); arousal, 2.2 ({+-}2.0); dryness, 2.1 ({+-}2.1); and pain, 1.9 ({+-}2.3). Compared to the index population in which the FSFI cut-score was validated (healthy women ages 18-74), all scores were low. Compared to published scores of a postmenopausal population, scores were not statistically different. Multivariate analysis isolated factors associated with lower FSFI scores, including having laparotomy as opposed to minimally invasive surgery (effect size, -7.1 points; 95% CI, -11.2 to -3.1; P<.001), lack of vaginal lubricant use (effect size, -4.4 points; 95% CI, -8.7 to -0.2, P=.040), and short time interval (<6 months) from hysterectomy to questionnaire completion (effect size, -4.6 points; 95% CI, -9.3-0.2; P=.059). Conclusions: The rate of SD, as defined by an FSFI score <26, was prevalent. The postmenopausal status of EC patients alone is a known risk factor for SD. Additional factors associated with poor sexual functioning following treatment for EC included receipt of laparotomy and lack of vaginal lubricant use.

  17. Correlating planned radiation dose to the cochlea with primary site and tumor stage in patients with head and neck cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jeanette; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine tumor characteristics that predict higher planned radiation (RT) dose to the cochlea in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). From 2004 to 2012, 99 patients with HNC underwent definitive IMRT to a median dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions, with the right and left cochlea-vestibular apparatus contoured for IMRT optimization as avoidance structures. If disease involvement was adjacent to the cochlea, preference was given to tumor coverage by prescription dose. Descriptive statistics were calculated for dose-volume histogram planning data, and mean planning dose to the cochlea (from left or right cochlea, receiving the greater amount of RT dose) was correlated to primary site and tumor stage. Mean (standard deviation) cochlear volume was 1.0 (0.60) cm{sup 3} with maximum and mean planned doses of 31.9 (17.5) Gy and 22.1 (13.7) Gy, respectively. Mean planned dose (Gy) to cochlea by tumor site was as follows: oral cavity (18.6, 14.4), oropharynx (21.7, 9.1), nasopharynx (36.3, 10.4), hypopharynx (14.9, 7.1), larynx (2.1, 0.62), others including the parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus (33.6, 24.0), and unknown primary (25.6, 6.7). Average mean planned dose (Gy) to the cochlea in T0-T2 and T3-T4 disease was 22.0 and 29.2 Gy, respectively (p = 0.019). By site, a significant difference was noted for nasopharynx and others (31.6 and 50.7, p = 0.012) but not for oropharynx, oral cavity, and hypopharynx. Advanced T category predicted for higher mean cochlear dose, particularly for nasopharyngeal, parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus HNC sites.

  18. [Formula: see text]Working memory and attention in pediatric brain tumor patients treated with and without radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghubar, Kimberly P; Mahone, E Mark; Yeates, Keith Owen; Cecil, Kim M; Makola, Monwabisi; Ris, M Douglas

    2017-08-01

    Children are at risk for cognitive difficulties following the diagnosis and treatment of a brain tumor. Longitudinal studies have consistently demonstrated declines on measures of intellectual functioning, and recently it has been proposed that specific neurocognitive processes underlie these changes, including working memory, processing speed, and attention. However, a fine-grained examination of the affected neurocognitive processes is required to inform intervention efforts. Radiation therapy (RT) impacts white matter integrity, likely affecting those cognitive processes supported by distributed neural networks. This study examined working memory and attention in children during the early delayed stages of recovery following surgical resection and RT. The participants included 27 children diagnosed with pediatric brain tumor, treated with (n = 12) or without (n = 15) RT, who completed experimental and standardized measures of working memory and attention (n-back and digit span tasks). Children treated with radiation performed less well than those who did not receive radiation on the n-back measure, though performance at the 0-back level was considerably poorer than would be expected for both groups, perhaps suggesting difficulties with more basic processes such as vigilance. Along these lines, marginal differences were noted on digit span forward. The findings are discussed with respect to models of attention and working memory, and the interplay between the two.

  19. Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) Score Could Be a Predictive Factor for Radiation Pneumonitis in Lung Cancer Patients With Normal Pulmonary Function Treated by Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Ye, WenFeng; Li, QiWen; Wang, Bin; Luo, GuangYu; Chen, ZhaoLin; Guo, SuPing; Qiu, Bo; Liu, Hui

    2017-09-19

    To investigate the relationship between malnutrition and the severity of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with lung cancer with normal baseline pulmonary function and lungs' V20 SGA) scores; radiation esophagitis grade; V20 of lungs; and mean lung dose. These factors were correlated with RP using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Of 150 patients, 12 patients (8.0%) developed Grade 3 to 5 RP, 37 (24.6%) patients developed grade 3 to 5 esophageal toxicity. In univariate analysis, ALB level (P = .002), radiation esophagitis (P SGA score (P SGA (P SGA could be a predictor for RP in patients with lung cancer treated with definitive IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adjuvant radiation therapy is associated with better oncological outcome compared with salvage radiation therapy in patients with pN1 prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilki, Derya; Preisser, Felix; Tennstedt, Pierre; Tober, Patrick; Mandel, Philipp; Schlomm, Thorsten; Steuber, Thomas; Huland, Hartwig; Schwarz, Rudolf; Petersen, Cordula; Graefen, Markus; Ahyai, Sascha

    2017-05-01

    To analyse the comparative effectiveness of no treatment (NT) or salvage radiation therapy (sRT) at biochemical recurrence (BCR) vs adjuvant radiation therapy (aRT) in patients with lymph node (LN)-positive prostate cancer (PCa) after radical prostatectomy (RP). A total of 773 patients with LN-positive PCa at RP, with or without additional radiation therapy (RT), in the period 2005-2013, were retrospectively analysed. Cox regression analysis was used to assess factors influencing BCR and metastasis-free survival (MFS). Propensity score-matched analyses were performed. The median follow-up for the entire patient group was 33.8 months. Four-year BCR-free and MFS rates were 43.3% and 86.6%, respectively, for all patients. In multivariate analysis, NT/sRT (n = 505) was an independent risk factor for BCR and metastasis compared with aRT (n = 213). The superiority of aRT was confirmed after propensity score matching. The 4-year MFS in the matched cohort was 82.5% vs 91.8% for the NT/sRT and aRT groups, respectively (P = 0.02). Early sRT (pre-RT prostate-specific antigen [PSA] ≤0.5 ng/mL) compared with sRT at PSA >0.5 ng/mL was significantly associated with a lower risk of metastasis. Patients with LN-positive PCa who received aRT had a significantly better oncological outcome than patients with NT/sRT, independent of tumour characteristics. Patients with early sRT had higher rates of response and better MFS than patients with pre-RT PSA >0.5 ng/mL. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Sorafenib Increases Tumor Hypoxia in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy: Results of a Phase 1 Clinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milosevic, Michael F., E-mail: mike.milosevic@rmp.uhn.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Townsley, Carol A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Chaudary, Naz [Department of Advanced Molecular Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Clarke, Blaise [Department of Pathology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Pintilie, Melania [Department of Clinical Study Coordination and Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Fan, Stacy; Glicksman, Rachel [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Haider, Masoom [Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Kim, Sunmo [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); MacKay, Helen [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Yeung, Ivan [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Hill, Richard P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Advanced Molecular Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); and others

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have shown that angiogenesis inhibition can improve response to radiation therapy (RT). The purpose of this phase 1 study was to examine the angiogenesis inhibitor sorafenib in patients with cervical cancer receiving radical RT and concurrent cisplatin (RTCT). Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with stage IB to IIIB cervical cancer participated. Sorafenib was administered daily for 7 days before the start of standard RTCT in patients with early-stage, low-risk disease and also during RTCT in patients with high-risk disease. Biomarkers of tumor vascularity, perfusion, and hypoxia were measured at baseline and again after 7 days of sorafenib alone before the start of RTCT. The median follow-up time was 4.5 years. Results: Initial complete response was seen in 12 patients. One patient died without achieving disease control, and 4 experienced recurrent disease. One patient with an extensive, infiltrative tumor experienced pelvic fistulas during treatment. The 4-year actuarial survival was 85%. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity developed in 4 patients. Sorafenib alone produced a reduction in tumor perfusion/permeability and an increase in hypoxia, which resulted in early closure of the study. Conclusions: Sorafenib increased tumor hypoxia, raising concern that it might impair rather than improve disease control when added to RTCT.

  2. Predictive factors for Child-Pugh score elevation in hepatocellular carcinoma patients treated with conformal radiation therapy: dose-volume histogram analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Woo Yoon

    2013-01-01

    We designed the study to identify the clinical and dose-volumetric parameters associated with the risk of Child-Pugh score elevation in hepatocellular carcinoma patients treated with conformal radiation therapy. All 161 hepatocellular carcinoma patients in the study underwent 4D-computed tomography simulation, and a dose-volume histogram was generated after radiotherapy planning. Patients who had an elevated Child-Pugh (e-CP) score of 2 or more without progressive disease within 3 months were defined as e-CP positive. Twenty-six of 142 patients without progressive disease were e-CP positive. Pretreatment Child-Pugh class, further treatment within 30 days of radiotherapy, lymph node metastasis, mean liver dose, V(20 Gy), V(25 Gy), and V(30 Gy) were significantly correlated with e-CP positivity. The e-CP developed in 13 of 106 patients (12.3%) with V(30 Gy) of ≤28.1% and in 13 of 36 patients (36.1%) with V(30 Gy) >28.1% (P = 0.001). Our data demonstrate that mean liver dose, V(10 Gy), V(20 Gy), V(25 Gy), and V(30 Gy) are independent dose-volumetric predictors for e-CP positivity in hepatocellular carcinoma patients treated with conformal radiation therapy. V(30 Gy) should be limited to less than 28.1% to minimize the risk of e-CP.

  3. Near Complete Response in a Patient with Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Treated with Brentuximab Vedotin Concurrent with Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana, Wilbur; Buck, Dennis Andrew; Smith, Tristan

    2017-01-01

    Brentuximab vedotin, an antibody drug conjugate that delivers monomethyl auristatin E into CD-30 expressing cells is FDA approved for the treatment of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma after the failure of autologous stem cell transplantation or at least 2 prior multi-agent chemotherapy regiments. This approval was based on a study that showed an overall response rate of 75% and complete remission in 34%. We present a case of a 24-year-old male with classical nodular sclerosing Hodgkin lymphoma who achieved near complete remission following 5 cycles of brentuximab concurrent with ISRT (involved site radiation therapy) following progression of first-line ABVD (Adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) and subsequent second-line ICE (ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide) chemotherapy. This case not only reiterates the efficacy of brentuximab vedotin in the third-line setting but introduces the role of and need for further clinical trials of combined radiotherapy with brentuximab in Hodgkin lymphoma patients following failure of second-line options.

  4. Change in Diffusing Capacity After Radiation as an Objective Measure for Grading Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Treated for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain); Gomez, Daniel, E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Eapen, George [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liu Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Scoring of radiation pneumonitis (RP), a dose-limiting toxicity after thoracic radiochemotherapy, is subjective and thus inconsistent among studies. Here we investigated whether the extent of change in diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) after radiation therapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) could be used as an objective means of quantifying RP. Patients and Methods: We analyzed potential correlations between DLCO and RP in 140 patients who received definitive RT ({>=}60 Gy) with or without chemotherapy for primary NSCLC. All underwent DLCO analysis before and after RT. Post-RT DLCO values within 1 week of the RP diagnosis (Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3) were selected and compared with that individual's preradiation values. Percent reductions in DLCO and RP grade were compared by point biserial correlation in the entire patient group and in subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Results: Patients experiencing Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3 RP had median percentage changes in DLCO after RT of 10.7%, 13%, 22.1%, or 35.2%. Percent reduction in DLCO correlated with RP Grade {<=}1 vs. {>=}2 (p = 0.0004). This association held for the following subgroups: age {>=}65 years, advanced stage, smokers, use of chemotherapy, volume of normal lung receiving at least 20 Gy {>=}30%, and baseline DLCO or forced expiratory volume in 1 second {>=}60%. Conclusions: By correlating percent change in DLCO from pretreatment values at the time of diagnosis of RP with RP grade, we were able to identify categories of RP based on the change in DLCO. These criteria provide a basis for an objective scoring system for RP based on change in DLCO.

  5. Are the American Society for Radiation Oncology Guidelines Accurate Predictors of Recurrence in Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Balloon-Based Brachytherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira K. Christoudias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO consensus statement (CS provides guidelines for patient selection for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI following breast conserving surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate recurrence rates based on ASTRO CS groupings. A single institution review of 238 early stage breast cancer patients treated with balloon-based APBI via balloon based brachytherapy demonstrated a 4-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR rate of 5.1%. There were no significant differences in the 4-year actuarial IBTR rates between the “suitable,” “cautionary,” and “unsuitable” ASTRO categories (0%, 7.2%, and 4.3%, resp., P=0.28. ER negative tumors had higher rates of IBTR than ER positive tumors. The ASTRO groupings are poor predictors of patient outcomes. Further studies evaluating individual clinicopathologic features are needed to determine the safety of APBI in higher risk patients.

  6. Risk of Severe Toxicity According to Site of Recurrence in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Diane C.; Vargo, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ferris, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ohr, James [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Clump, David A.; Yau, Wai-Ying Wendy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bauman, Julie E. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Branstetter, Barton F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Heron, Dwight E., E-mail: herond2@umpc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To report a 10-year update of our institutional experience with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for reirradiation of locally recurrent head and neck cancer, focusing on predictors of toxicity. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 291 patients treated with SBRT for recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck cancer between April 2002 and March 2013. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of severe acute and late toxicity. Patients with <3 months of follow-up (n=43) or who died within 3 months of treatment (n=21) were excluded from late toxicity analysis. Results: Median time to death or last clinical follow-up was 9.8 months among the entire cohort and 53.1 months among surviving patients. Overall, 33 patients (11.3%) experienced grade ≥3 acute toxicity and 43 (18.9%) experienced grade ≥3 late toxicity. Compared with larynx/hypopharynx, treatment of nodal recurrence was associated with a lower risk of severe acute toxicity (P=.03), with no significant differences in severe acute toxicity among other sites. Patients treated for a recurrence in the larynx/hypopharynx experienced significantly more severe late toxicity compared with those with oropharyngeal, oral cavity, base of skull/paranasal sinus, salivary gland, or nodal site of recurrence (P<.05 for all). Sixteen patients (50%) with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal recurrence experienced severe late toxicity, compared with 6-20% for other sites. Conclusions: Salvage SBRT is a safe and effective option for most patients with previously irradiated head and neck cancer. However, patients treated to the larynx or hypopharynx experience significantly more late toxicity compared with others and should be carefully selected for treatment, with consideration given to patient performance status, pre-existing organ dysfunction, and goals of care. Treatment toxicity in these patients may be mitigated with more conformal plans to allow for increased

  7. Does radiation dose to the salivary glands and oral cavity predict patient-rated xerostomia and sticky saliva in head and neck cancer patients treated with curative radiotherapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doornaert, P; Slotman, BJ; Leemans, CR; Langendijk, JA

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To investigate the association between the mean salivary gland and oral cavity dose, with patient-rated moderate and severe xerostomia and sticky saliva. Patients and methods: One hundred and fifty-seven patients treated with bilateral irradiation for head and neck cancer

  8. Serial changes in lymphocyte subsets in patients with newly diagnosed high grade astrocytomas treated with standard radiation and temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campian, Jian L; Piotrowski, Anna F; Ye, Xiaobu; Hakim, Frances T; Rose, Jeremy; Yan, Xiao-Yi; Lu, Yao; Gress, Ronald; Grossman, Stuart A

    2017-11-01

    The immune system plays a significant role in cancer prevention and outcome. In high grade astrocytomas (HGA), severe lymphopenia is associated with shortened survival due to tumor progression. This study was performed to quantify serial changes in lymphocyte subsets in HGA following standard radiation (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ). Adults (KPS >60, HIV negative) with newly diagnosed HGA scheduled to receive concurrent RT and TMZ and adjuvant TMZ were eligible. Blood was collected before beginning concurrent RT/TMZ and at weeks 6, 10, 18, and 26, and 3 months after completing adjuvant TMZ. Lymphocyte subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. Twenty patients (70% glioblastoma, median age 53, 50% male, 80% Caucasian) who enrolled from January 2014 to August 2014 were followed until April 2016. Baseline dexamethasone dose was 0.5 mg/day and 15% had absolute lymphocyte counts (ALC) <1000 cells/mm3 before starting RT/TMZ. However, 75% developed lymphopenia with ALC <1000 cells/mm3 after completion of RT/TMZ. NK cells, B cells and all T lymphocytes subsets dropped significantly after concurrent RT/TMZ and remained depressed for the 48 weeks of observation. The CD4+/CD8+ ratio was not affected significantly during follow-up. Severe lymphopenia involving all subsets occurred early in treatment and remained present for nearly 1 year. To our knowledge, this is the first report of serial trends in lymphocyte subsets following standard RT and TMZ for HGA.

  9. Spot-Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma: Clinical Outcome of 26 Patients Treated at Paul Scherrer Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rombi, Barbara [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); ATreP (Provincial Agency for Proton Therapy), Trento (Italy); Ares, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.ares@psi.ch [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hug, Eugen B. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Schneider, Ralf; Goitein, Gudrun; Staab, Adrian; Albertini, Francesca; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Timmermann, Beate [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); WestGerman Proton Therapy Center Essen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical results of fractionated spot-scanning proton radiation therapy (PT) in 26 pediatric patients treated at Paul Scherrer Institute for chordoma (CH) or chondrosarcoma (CS) of the skull base or axial skeleton. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and June 2010, 19 CH and 7 CS patients with tumors originating from the skull base (17) and the axial skeleton (9) were treated with PT. Mean age at the time of PT was 13.2 years. The mean prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) for CH and 66 Gy (RBE) for CS, at a dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy (RBE) per fraction. Results: Mean follow-up was 46 months. Actuarial 5-year local control (LC) rates were 81% for CH and 80% for CS. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) was 89% for CH and 75% for CS. Two CH patients had local failures: one is alive with evidence of disease, while the other patient succumbed to local recurrence in the surgical pathway. One CS patient died of local progression of the disease. No high-grade late toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Spot-scanning PT for pediatric CH and CS patients resulted in excellent clinical outcomes with acceptable rates of late toxicity. Longer follow-up time and larger cohort are needed to fully assess tumor control and late effects of treatment.

  10. Impact of concurrent versus adjuvant chemotherapy on the severity and duration of lymphopenia in glioma patients treated with radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Alexander J; Campian, Jian L; Hui, Caressa; Rudra, Soumon; Rao, Yuan J; Thotala, Dinesh; Hallahan, Dennis; Huang, Jiayi

    2018-01-01

    Prolonged severe lymphopenia has been shown to persist beyond a year in glioma patients after radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent and adjuvant chemotherapy. This study examines the differential impact of concurrent versus adjuvant chemotherapy on lymphopenia after RT. WHO grade II-III glioma patients who received RT with concurrent and/or adjuvant chemotherapy from 2007 to 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. Concurrent chemotherapy was temozolomide (TMZ), and adjuvant chemotherapy was either TMZ or procarbazine/lomustine/vincristine (PCV). Absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) was analyzed at baseline, 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 months after the start of RT. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify the clinical variables in predicting acute or late lymphopenia. There were 151 patients with evaluable ALC: 91 received concurrent and adjuvant TMZ (CRT + ADJ), 32 received only concurrent TMZ (CRT), and 28 received only adjuvant TMZ or PCV (ADJ). There were 9 (10%) versus 6 (19%) versus 0 (0%) cases of grade 3 lymphopenia (ALC < 500/mm3) at 6 weeks and 4 (6%) versus 0 (0%) versus 3 (17%) cases at 12 months in CRT + ADJ, CRT and ADJ groups, respectively. On multivariable analyses, concurrent chemotherapy (odds ratio [OR] 72.3, p < 0.001), female sex (OR 10.8, p < 0.001), and older age (OR 1.06, p = 0.002) were the most significant predictors for any grade ≥ 1 lymphopenia (ALC < 1000/mm3) at 1.5 months. Older age (OR 1.08, p = 0.02) and duration of adjuvant chemotherapy (OR 1.19, p = 0.003) were significantly associated with grade ≥ 1 lymphopenia at 12 months. Thus, concurrent chemotherapy appears as the dominant contributor to the severity of acute lymphopenia after RT in WHO grade II-III glioma patients, and duration of adjuvant chemotherapy appears as the key factor to prolonged lymphopenia.

  11. Interval to Biochemical Failure Predicts Clinical Outcomes in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated by Combined-Modality Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shilkrut, Mark; McLaughlin, P. William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To validate the prognostic value of interval to biochemical failure (IBF) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (HiRPCa) treated with combined-modality radiation therapy (CMRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of HiRPCa (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score [GS] 8-10, or clinical T stage T3-T4) treated with either dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or CMRT. Interval to biochemical failure was classified as ≤18 or >18 months from the end of all therapy to the date of biochemical failure (BF). Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the prognostic value of IBF ≤18 months for distant metastasis (DM) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: Of 958 patients with a median follow-up of 63.2 months, 175 patients experienced BF. In those with BF, there were no differences in pretreatment clinical characteristics between the EBRT and CMRT groups, except for a higher proportion of patients with GS 8-10 in the CMRT group (70% vs 52%, P=.02). Median IBF after all therapy was 24.0 months (interquartile range 9.6-46.0) in the EBRT group and 18.9 months (interquartile range 9.2-34.5) in the CMRT group (P=.055). On univariate analysis, IBF ≤18 months was associated with increased risk of DM and PCSM in the entire cohort and the individual EBRT and CMRT groups. On multivariate analysis, only GS 9-10 and IBF ≤18 months, but not the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use, predicted DM (hazard ratio [HR] 3.7, P<.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-10.3 for GS 9-10; HR 3.9, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-6.5 for IBF ≤18 months) and PCSM (HR 14.8, P<.009, 95% CI 2.0-110 for GS 9-10; HR 4.4, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-8.1 for IBF ≤18 months). Conclusions: Short IBF was highly prognostic for higher DM and PCSM in patients with HiRPCa. The prognostic value of IBF for DM and PCSM was not affected by the radiation

  12. KeraStat Skin Therapy in Treating Radiation Dermatitis in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage 0-IIIA Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Skin Reactions Secondary to Radiation Therapy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  13. Predictors for long-term survival free from whole brain radiation therapy in patients treated with radiosurgery for limited brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eGorovets

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify predictors for prolonged survival free from salvage whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT in patients with brain metastases treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS as their initial radiotherapy approach. Material and Methods: Patients with brain metastases treated with SRS from 2001-2013 at our institution were identified. SRS without WBRT was typically offered to patients with 1-4 brain metastases, Karnofsky Performance Status ≥70, and life expectancy ≥3 mo. Three hundred and eight patients met inclusion criteria for analysis. Medical records were reviewed for patient, disease, and treatment information. Two comparison groups were identified: those with ≥1-yr WBRT-free survival (N=104, and those who died or required salvage WBRT within 3 mo of SRS (N=56. Differences between these groups were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses.Results: Median survival for all patients was 11 mo. Among patients with ≥1-yr WBRT-free survival, median survival was 33 mo [12-107 mo] with only 21% requiring salvage WBRT. Factors significantly associated with prolonged WBRT-free survival on univariate analysis (p<0.05 included younger age, asymptomatic presentation, RTOG RPA class I, fewer brain metastases, surgical resection, breast primary, new or controlled primary, absence of extracranial metastatic disease, and oligometastatic disease burden (≤5 metastatic lesions. After controlling for covariates, asymptomatic presentation, breast primary, single brain metastasis, absence of extracranial metastases, and oligometastatic disease burden remained independent predictors for favorable WBRT-free survival.Conclusions: A subset of patients with brain metastases can achieve long-term survival after upfront SRS without the need for salvage WBRT. Predictors identified in this study can help select patients that might benefit most from a treatment strategy of SRS alone.

  14. Multi-Institutional Experience of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Black vs White Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole Breast Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Carl [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Bai, Harrison [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Neboori, Hanmanth [Drexel Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Takita, Cristiane [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Motwani, Sabin [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Wright, Jean L.; Hobeika, Georges [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Jones, Tiffanie [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Goyal, Sharad [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Given the paucity of data on racial disparities in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the data from a multi-institutional cohort of DCIS patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast radiation therapy (RT) were analyzed to determine whether racial disparities or differences exist. Methods and Materials: A total of 533 white and 76 black DCIS patients from 3 university-based cancer centers were uniformly treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT. All patient data were collected and analyzed as a function of race. Results: The median follow-up was 5.2 years. No significant racial differences were seen in tumor size, age at diagnosis, estrogen receptor status, necrosis, or grade (all P>.05). Of the treatment parameters, the RT dose delivered, boost, positive margin rates, frequency of hormone receptor status assessment, and receipt of hormonal therapy for the 2 cohorts did not significantly differ (all P>.05). The local relapse-free survival was similar at 5 years (96.1% and 98.1%, P=.399) and 10 years (92.8% vs 95.8%, P=.360), with no significant overall survival difference at 10 years (94.0% vs 88.9%, P=.290) between the white and black patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, race was not an independent predictor of local relapse-free survival or overall survival when accounting for age, grade, and margin status. Conclusion: In our large cohort of DCIS patients uniformly treated at 3 institutions with breast conservation without any apparent differences in treatment delivery parameters, we demonstrated that the clinical and pathologic features and local survival outcomes did not differ as a function of race. Our results suggest that when black patients with DCIS are appropriately selected for breast conservation and receive adjuvant RT without racial disparities in the treatment parameters, differences in the outcomes as a function of race do not exist.

  15. Effect of treatment modality on the hypothalamic-pituitary function of patients treated with radiation therapy for pituitary adenomas: Hypothalamic dose and endocrine outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eElson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Both fractionated external beam radiotherapy and single fraction radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas are associated with the risk of hypothalamic-pituitary (HP axis dysfunction.Objective: To analyze the effect of treatment modality (Linac, TomoTherapy, or Gamma Knife on hypothalamic dose and correlate these with HP-Axis deficits after radiotherapy.Methods:Radiation plans of patients treated postoperatively for pituitary adenomas using Linac-based 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT (n=11, TomoTherapy-based Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT (n=10, or Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS(n=12 were retrospectively reviewed. Dose to the hypothalamus was analyzed and postradiotherapy hormone function including growth hormone (GH, thyroid (TSH, adrenal (ACTH, prolactin (PRL, and gonadotropins (FSH/LH were assessed. Results:Post-radiation, 13 of 27 (48% patients eligible for analysis developed at least one new hormone deficit, of which 8 of 11 (72% occurred in the Linac group, 4 of 8 (50% occurred in the TomoTherapy group, and 1 of 8 (12.5% occurred in the Gamma Knife group. Compared with fractionated techniques, Gamma Knife showed improved hypothalamic sparing for DMax Hypo, and V12Gy. For fractionated modalities, TomoTherapy showed improved dosimetric characteristics over Linac-based treatment with hypothalamic DMean (44.8 Gy vs. 26.8 Gy p=0.02, DMax (49.8 Gy vs. 39.1 Gy p=0.04, and V12Gy (100% vs. 76% p=0.004.Conclusion:Maximal dosimetric avoidance of the hypothalamus was achieved using Gamma Knife-based radiosurgery followed by TomoTherapy-based IMRT, and Linac-based 3D conformal radiation therapy, respectively.

  16. A dosimetric study of polyethylene glycol hydrogel in 200 prostate cancer patients treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy±intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Tobin J; Wilder, Richard B; Fernandez, Daniel C; Mellon, Eric A; Saini, Amarjit S; Hunt, Dylan C; Pow-Sang, Julio M; Spiess, Phillipe E; Sexton, Wade J; Poch, Michael A; Biagioli, Matthew C

    2014-04-01

    We sought to analyze the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel on rectal doses in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Between July 2009 and April 2013, we treated 200 clinically localized prostate cancer patients with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy±intensity modulated radiation therapy. Half of the patients received a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided transperineal injection of 10mL PEG hydrogel (DuraSeal™ Spinal Sealant System; Covidien, Mansfield, MA) in their anterior perirectal fat immediately prior to the first HDR brachytherapy treatment and 5mL PEG hydrogel prior to the second HDR brachytherapy treatment. Prostate, rectal, and bladder doses and prostate-rectal distances were calculated based upon treatment planning CT scans. There was a success rate of 100% (100/100) with PEG hydrogel implantation. PEG hydrogel significantly increased the prostate-rectal separation (mean±SD, 12±4mm with gel vs. 4±2mm without gel, phydrogel temporarily displaced the rectum away from the prostate by an average of 12mm and led to a significant reduction in rectal radiation doses, regardless of BMI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-term Survival and Toxicity in Patients Treated With High-Dose Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Josh; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Cox, Brett [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term survival and toxicity outcomes with the use of high-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 86.4 Gy for patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between August 1997 and December 2008, 1002 patients were treated to a dose of 86.4 Gy using a 5-7 field IMRT technique. Patients were stratified by prognostic risk group based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk classification criteria. A total of 587 patients (59%) were treated with neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen deprivation therapy. The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 5.5 years (range, 1-14 years). Results: For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, 7-year biochemical relapse-free survival outcomes were 98.8%, 85.6%, and 67.9%, respectively (P<.001), and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 99.4%, 94.1%, and 82.0% (P<.001), respectively. On multivariate analysis, T stage (P<.001), Gleason score (P<.001), and >50% of initial biopsy positive core (P=.001) were predictive for distant mestastases. No prostate cancer-related deaths were observed in the low-risk group. The 7-year prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) rates, using competing risk analysis for intermediate- and high-risk groups, were 3.3% and 8.1%, respectively (P=.008). On multivariate analysis, Gleason score (P=.004), percentage of biopsy core positivity (P=.003), and T-stage (P=.033) were predictive for PCSM. Actuarial 7-year grade 2 or higher late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were 4.4% and 21.1%, respectively. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity was experienced by 7 patients (0.7%) and 22 patients (2.2%), respectively. Of the 427 men with full potency at baseline, 317 men (74%) retained sexual function at time of last follow-up. Conclusions: This study represents the largest cohort of patients treated with high-dose radiation to 86.4 Gy, using IMRT for localized prostate cancer, with the longest follow-up to date

  18. DOC-2/DAB2 Interacting Protein Status in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Correlates With Outcome for Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Corbin; Tumati, Vasu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Kapur, Payal [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Yan, Jingsheng [Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Hong, David; Bhuiyan, Manzerul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Xie, Xian-Jin [Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Pistenmaa, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Yu, Lan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Hsieh, Jer-Tsong [Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Saha, Debabrata [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Kim, D. W. Nathan, E-mail: Nathan.Kim@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simmons Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: This pilot study investigates the role of DOC-2/DAB2 Interacting Protein (DAB2IP) and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) as prognostic biomarkers in high-risk prostate cancer patients receiving definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry was performed and scored by an expert genitourinary pathologist. Clinical endpoints evaluated were freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), castration resistance–free survival (CRFS), and distant metastasis–free survival (DMFS). Log-rank test and Cox regression were used to determine significance of biomarker levels with clinical outcome. Results: Fifty-four patients with high-risk prostate cancer (stage ≥T3a, or Gleason score ≥8, or prostate-specific antigen level ≥20 ng/mL) treated with radiation therapy from 2005 to 2012 at our institution were evaluated. Nearly all patients expressed EZH2 (98%), whereas 28% of patients revealed DAB2IP reduction and 72% retained DAB2IP. Median follow-up was 34.0 months for DAB2IP-reduced patients, 29.9 months for DAB2IP-retained patients, and 32.6 months in the EZH2 study. Reduction in DAB2IP portended worse outcome compared with DAB2IP-retained patients, including FFBF (4-year: 37% vs 89%, P=.04), CRFS (4-year: 50% vs 90%, P=.02), and DMFS (4-year: 36% vs 97%, P=.05). Stratified EZH2 expression trended toward significance for worse FFBF and CRFS (P=.07). Patients with reduced DAB2IP or highest-intensity EZH2 expression exhibited worse FFBF (4-year: 32% vs 95%, P=.02), CRFS (4-year: 28% vs 100%, P<.01), and DMFS (4-year: 39% vs 100%, P=.04) compared with the control group. Conclusion: Loss of DAB2IP is a potent biomarker that portends worse outcome despite definitive radiation therapy for patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 is expressed in most high-risk tumors and is a less potent discriminator of outcome in this study. The DAB2IP status in combination with degree of EZH2 expression may be useful for

  19. Ki-67 Is an Independent Predictor of Metastasis and Cause-Specific Mortality for Prostate Cancer Patients Treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhoven, Bret [University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Yan, Yan [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ritter, Mark, E-mail: ritter@humonc.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Khor, Li-Yan [Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hammond, Elizabeth [LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jones, Christopher [Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Amin, Mahul [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, Ontario (Canada); Zeitzer, Kenneth [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pollack, Alan [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: The association of Ki-67 staining index (Ki67-SI) with overall survival (OS), disease-specific mortality (DSM), distant metastasis (DM), and biochemical failure (BF) was examined in men with favorable- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer receiving radiation therapy (RT) alone or with short-term androgen deprivation (ADT) in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-08. Methods and Materials: 468 patients (23.6%) on RTOG 94-08 had sufficient tissue for Ki67-SI analysis. The median follow-up time was 7.9 years. Ki67-SI was determined by immunohistochemistry and quantified manually and by image analysis. Correlative analysis versus clinical outcome was performed using the third quartile (≥Q3) cutpoint. A proportional hazards multivariable analysis (MVA) dichotomized covariates in accordance with trial stratification and randomization criteria. Results: In MVAs adjusted for all treatment covariates, high Ki67-SI (≥Q3) was correlated with increased DSM (hazard ratio [HR] 2.48, P=.03), DM (HR 3.5, P=.002), and BF (HR 3.55, P<.0001). MVA revealed similar Ki67-associated hazard ratios in each separate treatment arm for DSM, DM, and BF; these reached significance only for DM in the RT-alone arm and for BF in both arms. Ki67-SI was not a significant predictor of intraprostatic recurrence assessed by repeated biopsy 2 years after treatment. Patients with a high or low Ki67-SI seemed to experience a similar relative benefit from the addition of ADT to radiation. Conclusions: High Ki67-SI independently predicts for increased DSM, DM, and protocol BF in primarily intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with RT with or without ADT on RTOG 94-08 but does not predict for local recurrence or for increased relative benefit from ADT. This and prior studies lend support for the use of Ki67-SI as a stratification factor in future trials.

  20. Outcomes in a Multi-institutional Cohort of Patients Treated With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Advanced or Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paly, Jonathan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Biggs, Peter J.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Roeder, Falk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Martínez-Monge, Rafael [Radiation Oncology Division, University of Navarre, Pamplona (Spain); Whitson, Jared [Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Calvo, Felipe A. [Departamento de Oncología, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Fastner, Gerd; Sedlmayer, Felix [Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Salzburg (Austria); Wong, William W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Ellis, Rodney J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seidman Cancer Center University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Haddock, Michael G.; Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A., E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study aimed to analyze outcomes in a multi-institutional cohort of patients with advanced or recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 2010, 98 patients received IORT for advanced or locally recurrent RCC at 9 institutions. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 3.5 years. Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Chained imputation accounted for missing data, and multivariate Cox hazards regression tested significance. Results: IORT was delivered during nephrectomy for advanced disease (28%) or during resection of locally recurrent RCC in the renal fossa (72%). Sixty-nine percent of the patients were male, and the median age was 58 years. At the time of primary resection, the T stages were as follows: 17% T1, 12% T2, 55% T3, and 16% T4. Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a visibly complete resection of tumor. Preoperative or postoperative external beam radiation therapy was administered to 27% and 35% of patients, respectively. The 5-year OS was 37% for advanced disease and 55% for locally recurrent disease. The respective 5-year DSS was 41% and 60%. The respective 5-year DFS was 39% and 52%. Initial nodal involvement (hazard ratio [HR] 2.9-3.6, P<.01), presence of sarcomatoid features (HR 3.7-6.9, P<.05), and higher IORT dose (HR 1.3, P<.001) were statistically significantly associated with decreased survival. Adjuvant systemic therapy was associated with decreased DSS (HR 2.4, P=.03). For locally recurrent tumors, positive margin status (HR 2.6, P=.01) was associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: We report the largest known cohort of patients with RCC managed by IORT and have identified several factors associated with survival. The outcomes for patients receiving IORT in the setting of local recurrence compare favorably to

  1. SU-F-T-432: Magnetic Field Dose Effects for Various Radiation Beam Geometries for Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim-Reinders, S [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Physics (Canada); Keller, B; McCann, C; Sahgal, A; Lee, J; Kim, A [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated partial breast irradiation (HPBI) is being used at our clinic to treat inoperable breast cancer patients who have advanced disease. We are investigating how these patients could benefit from being treated in an MRI-linac, where real-time daily MRI tumor imaging and plan adaptation would be possible. As a first step, this study evaluates the dosimetric impact of the magnetic field for different radiation beam geometries on relevant OARs. Methods: Five patients previously treated using HPBI were selected. Six treatment plans were generated for each patient, evaluating three beam geometries (VMAT, IMRT, 3DCRT) with and without B{sub 0}=1.5 T. The Monaco TPS was used with the Elekta MRI-Linac beam model, where the magnetic field is orthogonal to the radiation beam. All plans were re-scaled to the same isocoverage with a prescription of 40Gy/5 to the PTV. Plans were evaluated for the effect of the magnetic field and beam modality on skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}, lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} and mean heart dose. Results: Averaged over all patients, skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}for 3DCRT was higher than VMAT and IMRT (by +22% and +21%, with B{sub 0}-ON). The magnetic field caused larger increases in skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}for 3DCRT (+8%) than VMAT (+3%) and IMRT (+4%) compared with B{sub 0}-OFF. With B{sub 0}-ON, 3DCRT had a markedly lower mean heart dose than VMAT (by 538cGy) and IMRT (by 562cGy); for lung V{sub 2} {sub 0}, 3DCRT had a marginally lower dose than VMAT (by −2.2%) and IMRT (also −2.2%). The magnetic field had minimal effect on the mean heart dose and lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} for all geometries. Conclusion: The decreased skin dose in VMAT and IMRT can potentially mitigate the effects of skin reactions for HPBI in an MRI-linac. This study illustrated that more beam angles may result in lower skin toxicity and better tumor conformality, with the trade-off of elevated heart and lung doses. We are receiving funding support from Elekta.

  2. Importance of Local Control in Early-Stage Prostate Cancer: Outcomes of Patients With Positive Post-Radiation Therapy Biopsy Results Treated in RTOG 9408

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: dkrauss@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Hu, Chen [NRG Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gore, Elizabeth M. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Chafe, Susan Maria Jacinta [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Leibenhaut, Mark H. [Sutter General Hospital, Sacramento, California (United States); Narayan, Samir [Michigan Cancer Research Consortium CCOP (United States); Torres-Roca, Javier [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Zeitzer, Kenneth L. [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Bronx, New York, New York (United States); Donavanik, Viroon [Christiana Care Health Services Inc CCOP, Newark, Delaware (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); McGowan, David G. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Jones, Christopher U. [Sutter General Hospital, Sacramento, California (United States); Shipley, William U. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the association between positive post-radiation therapy (RT) biopsy results and subsequent clinical outcomes in males with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group study 94-08 analyzed 1979 males with prostate cancer, stage T1b-T2b and prostate-specific antigen concentrations of ≤20 ng/dL, to investigate whether 4 months of total androgen suppression (TAS) added to RT improved survival compared to RT alone. Patients randomized to receive TAS received flutamide with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist. According to protocol, patients without evidence of clinical recurrence or initiation of additional endocrine therapy underwent repeat prostate biopsy 2 years after RT completion. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of positive post-RT biopsy results on clinical outcomes. Results: A total of 831 patients underwent post-RT biopsy, 398 were treated with RT alone and 433 with RT plus TAS. Patients with positive post-RT biopsy results had higher rates of biochemical failure (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-2.1) and distant metastasis (HR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.3-4.4) and inferior disease-specific survival (HR = 3.8; 95% CI = 1.9-7.5). Positive biopsy results remained predictive of such outcomes after correction for potential confounders such as Gleason score, tumor stage, and TAS administration. Prior TAS therapy did not prevent elevated risk of adverse outcome in the setting of post-RT positive biopsy results. Patients with Gleason score ≥7 with a positive biopsy result additionally had inferior overall survival compared to those with a negative biopsy result (HR = 1.56; 95% CI = 1.04-2.35). Conclusions: Positive post-RT biopsy is associated with increased rates of distant metastases and inferior disease-specific survival in patients treated with definitive RT and was associated with inferior overall

  3. A critical analysis of the interpretation of biochemical failure in surgically treated patients using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiation and Oncology criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretzer, Matthew B; Trock, Bruce J; Han, Misop; Walsh, Patrick C

    2002-10-01

    The use of prostate specific antigen (PSA) to indicate biochemical failure has become an accepted procedure to measure the effectiveness of therapy. Because long-term randomized studies comparing radiation modalities to radical prostatectomy are not available, use of biochemical recurrence as a surrogate measure of efficacy is increasing. Unfortunately, the definition of failure is not uniform among therapies. We evaluate how the American Society for Therapeutic Radiation and Oncology (ASTRO) criteria affect the interpretation of failure when applied to radical prostatectomy. We retrospectively reviewed data from 2,691 men who underwent anatomical radical prostatectomy for localized disease between 1985 and 2000. All patients had regular followup visits ranging from 6 months to 15 years (mean 6). No patients were treated with radiation or hormonal therapy preoperatively or postoperatively until clinical recurrence. Biochemical failure was defined as any measurable PSA 0.2 ng./ml. or greater. We evaluated how elements of the ASTRO criteria affected the failure rate when applied to this series. We looked at 1) backdating the failure date to the midpoint between nadir and first PSA greater than 0.2 ng./ml., 2) early censoring if only 1 or 2 increasing values were available and 3) defining failure after 3 consecutive PSA increases and backdating failure time (midpoint of nadir and first PSA increase). Using actuarial analysis of the data defining failure as the first PSA 0.2 ng./ml. or greater, biochemical freedom from failure at 5, 10 and 15 years was 85%, 77% and 68%, respectively. In contrast, when backdating was used in this series, almost all failures occurred early with rare late failures (freedom from failure 82%, 80% and 80% at 5, 10 and 15 years, respectively). The difference in failure became even more pronounced when ASTRO criteria were applied requiring 3 consecutive increases, and backdating failure to the midpoint between nadir and first PSA (freedom from

  4. Prognostic Importance of Gleason 7 Disease Among Patients Treated With External Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Detailed Biopsy Core Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Zumsteg, Zach; Ghadjar, Pirus; Pangasa, Misha; Pei, Xin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Fine, Samson W. [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of primary Gleason (pG) grade among a large cohort of Gleason 7 prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From May 1989 to January 2011, 1190 Gleason 7 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT at a single institution. Of these patients, 613 had a Gleason 7 with a minimum of a sextant biopsy with nonfragmented cores and full biopsy core details available, including number of cores of cancer involved, percentage individual core involvement, location of disease, bilaterality, and presence of perineural invasion. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 1-16 years). The prognostic implication for the following outcomes was analyzed: biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: The 8-year bRFS rate for pG3 versus pG4 was 77.6% versus 61.3% (P<.0001), DMFS was 96.8% versus 84.3% (P<.0001), and PCSM was 3.7% versus 8.1% (P=.002). On multivariate analysis, pG4 predicted for significantly worse outcome in all parameters. Location of disease (apex, base, mid-gland), perineural involvement, maximum individual core involvement, and the number of Gleason 3+3, 3+4, or 4+3 cores did not predict for distant metastases. Conclusions: Primary Gleason grade 4 independently predicts for worse bRFS, DMFS, and PCSM among Gleason 7 patients. Using complete core information can allow clinicians to utilize pG grade as a prognostic factor, despite not having the full pathologic details from a prostatectomy specimen. Future staging and risk grouping should investigate the incorporation of primary Gleason grade when complete biopsy core information is used.

  5. The efficacy of chlorhexidine gel in reduction of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species in patients treated with radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, J.B.; McBride, B.C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Merilees, H.; Spinelli, J. (Cancer Control Agency of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada))

    1991-02-01

    Xerostomia may develop in patients with cancer who receive radiotherapy that includes the salivary glands in the field. These patients are at high risk of rampant dental caries. Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species have been associated with dental caries. Quantitative counts of these organisms demonstrated high caries risk due to streptococci in 66% and due to lactobacilli in 100% of patients studied. Use of chlorhexidine rinse was shown to reduce S. mutans counts 1.1 logs and lactobacilli 1.1 logs. The use of chlorhexidine gel resulted in a reduction of S. mutans 1.2 logs and lactobacilli 2.2 logs. In the subjects using the rinse, caries risk due to streptococci was reduced to low levels in 44% and due to lactobacilli in only one subject, with reduction to moderate risk in one third and no change in risk in the remaining patients. The use of chlorhexidine gel was found to reduce the caries risk associated with streptococci to low levels in all patients, and the risk associated with lactobacilli to low and moderate risk in two thirds of patients.

  6. SU-F-R-53: CT-Based Radiomics Analysis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, E; Coroller, T; Narayan, V; Agrawal, V; Hou, Y; Romano, J; Franco, I; Mak, R; Aerts, H [Brigham Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is the standard of care for medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and has demonstrated excellent local control and survival. However, some patients still develop distant metastases and local recurrence, and therefore, there is a clinical need to identify patients at high-risk of disease recurrence. The aim of the current study is to use a radiomics approach to identify imaging biomarkers, based on tumor phenotype, for clinical outcomes in SBRT patients. Methods: Radiomic features were extracted from free breathing computed tomography (CT) images of 113 Stage I-II NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. Their association to and prognostic performance for distant metastasis (DM), locoregional recurrence (LRR) and survival was assessed and compared with conventional features (tumor volume and diameter) and clinical parameters (e.g. performance status, overall stage). The prognostic performance was evaluated using the concordance index (CI). Multivariate model performance was evaluated using cross validation. All p-values were corrected for multiple testing using the false discovery rate. Results: Radiomic features were associated with DM (one feature), LRR (one feature) and survival (four features). Conventional features were only associated with survival and one clinical parameter was associated with LRR and survival. One radiomic feature was significantly prognostic for DM (CI=0.670, p<0.1 from random), while none of the conventional and clinical parameters were significant for DM. The multivariate radiomic model had a higher median CI (0.671) for DM than the conventional (0.618) and clinical models (0.617). Conclusion: Radiomic features have potential to be imaging biomarkers for clinical outcomes that conventional imaging metrics and clinical parameters cannot predict in SBRT patients, such as distant metastasis. Development of a radiomics biomarker that can identify patients at high-risk of

  7. Long-Term Outcome and Quality of Life of Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma Treated With or Without Pelvic Radiotherapy in the Post Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Carcinoma 1 (PORTEC-1) Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nout, Remi A.; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V.; Lybeert, Marnix L. M.; Warlam-Rodenhuis, Carla C.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Lutgens, Ludy C. H. W.; Pras, Betty; van Putten, Wim L. J.; Creutzberg, Carien L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the long-term outcome and health-related quality of life (HRQL) of patients with endometrial carcinoma (EC) treated with or without pelvic radiotherapy in the Post Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Carcinoma 1 (PORTEC-1) trial. Patients and Methods Between 1990 and

  8. Salivary Cytokine Levels and Oral Mucositis in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, Paolo, E-mail: Paolo.bossi@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Bergamini, Cristiana [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Miceli, Rosalba [Clinical Epidemiology and Trial Organization Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Cova, Agata [Unity of Immunotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Orlandi, Ester [Radiotherapy 2 Unity, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Resteghini, Carlo; Locati, Laura; Alfieri, Salvatore; Imbimbo, Martina; Granata, Roberta [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Mariani, Luigi [Clinical Epidemiology and Trial Organization Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Iacovelli, Nicola Alessandro [Radiotherapy 2 Unity, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Huber, Veronica [Unity of Immunotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Cavallo, Anna [Department of Physics and Radiation Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Licitra, Lisa [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Rivoltini, Licia [Unity of Immunotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: We assessed the presence of salivary cytokines, their modulation during chemoradiation therapy (CTRT), and their association with oral mucositis severity in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: The present prospective observational study enrolled 55 patients with locally advanced HNC requiring CTRT. We also studied 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with other cancers. The salivary levels of 13 cytokines were analyzed. We constructed a cytokine predictive score of oral mucositis severity. Results: The baseline salivary cytokine levels were not associated with the severity of treatment-induced oral mucositis. The cytokine levels overall increased during treatment, especially in patients with worse mucositis. In particular, on univariable analysis, an increase of interleukin (IL)-1β (area under the curve [AUC] 0.733; P=.009), IL-6 (AUC 0.746; P=.005), and tumor necrosis factor-α (AUC 0.710; P=.005) at the third week of treatment was significantly associated with the development of severe oral mucositis. On multivariable analysis, the predictive score based on the IL-1β and IL-6 changes from baseline to week 3 was an early strong predictor of higher grade oral mucositis. Conclusions: The treatment of HNC patients with concurrent CTRT induces a significant increase in the salivary levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, all positively associated with the severity of mucosal toxicity. A greater increase of IL-1β and IL-6 3 weeks after treatment initiation is predictive of worse oral mucositis, representing a potential tool for the early identification of patients at risk.

  9. Functional dosimetric metrics for predicting radiation-induced lung injury in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dongqing

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI is an important dose-limiting toxicity during thoracic radiotherapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT perfusion-weighted functional dose-volume histogram (FDVH for predicting RILI in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Methods Fifty-seven locally advanced NSCLC patients receiving chemoradiotherapy were enrolled prospectively. Patients had treatment scans and dose calculations to provide a standard dose-volume histogram (DVH. Fusion of SPECT and computed tomography scans provided perfusion-weighted FDVH and associated functional dosimetric parameters (relative volumes of functional lung receiving more than a threshold dose of 5 – 60 Gy at increments of 5 Gy [FV5 – FV60]. The predictive abilities of FDVH and DVH were calculated and compared based on the area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC. Results The accumulative incidence of ≥ 2 grade RILI was 19.3% with a median follow-up of 12 months. Univariate analysis showed that the functional (FV5 – FV60 and standard (V5 – V40 parameters were associated with RILI (all value of p  Conclusions Functional metrics are identified as reliable predictors for RILI, however, this observation still needs to be further verified using a larger sample size.

  10. Studies on changes in bulks of body per dose and in the positioning of duodenum by respiration when treating pancreatic cancer patients with radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyeong Jun; Chun, Geum Seong; Park, Yeong Gyu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    In the case of treating pancreatic cancer, the importance is put on the spread of dose. Changes take place in duodenum in accordance with respiration. Thus, in this paper, I am going to trace the positioning of duodenum and the changes in bulks of body per dose by scanning the patients' Kilo voltage Cone-Beam CT using the hospital equipped CT-on rail System. Seeing three patients, I have acquired KVCBCT by using CT-on rail System and spotted the change in positioning at duodenum after comparing with the preliminary image of treatment plan by using SYNGO Software. Then, I followed the change in the bulk of duodenum and analyzed the changes in bulks of body on the same dose by transmitting the acquired KVCBCT into Pinnacle, a treatment plan system. The changes in the positioning shall be as set forth like this: 1.2 cm, 1.0 cm in Left-Right Direction, 0 cm, 0.8 cm in Craniocaudal Direction, 0.1 cm, and 1.0 cm in Anterior-Posterior Direction. Patient number one showed that his bulks in body had increased by maximum 460%, minimum 120%, the bulks in patient number two had increased by maximum 490%, minimum 160%, and the bulks of patient number three had increased by maximum 150%. But Minimum volume decreased 30%. Patient number one showed only a little bit of change at first when compared with the preliminary treatment plan. However, the dose increased the bulks in the patient's body: V{sub 10} 118%, V{sub 20} 117%, V{sub 30} 400%, and V{sub 40} 480% In treating patients with radiation therapy using 3D-CRT, the dose amount penetrated into duodenum needs to be minimized by planning appropriate treatment beforehand. In order to establish an appropriate treatment plan it is required to comprehend the changes at positioning of the duodenum by respiration and predict the changes in the bulks of duodenum by setting precise Planning Target Volume.

  11. The Effect of Biologically Effective Dose and Radiation Treatment Schedule on Overall Survival in Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, John M. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Ross, Rudi [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Harder, Eileen M.; Mancini, Brandon R. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E.; Shafman, Timothy D.; Dosoretz, Arie P. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Evans, Suzanne B.; Husain, Zain A.; Yu, James B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Decker, Roy H., E-mail: roy.decker@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of biologically effective dose (BED{sub 10}) and radiation treatment schedule on overall survival (OS) in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using data from 65 treatment centers in the United States, we retrospectively reviewed the records of T1-2 N0 NSCLC patients undergoing SBRT alone from 2006 to 2014. Biologically relevant covariates, including dose per fraction, number of fractions, and time between fractions, were used to quantify BED{sub 10} and radiation treatment schedule. The linear-quadratic equation was used to calculate BED{sub 10} and to generate a dichotomous dose variable of <105 Gy versus ≥105 Gy BED{sub 10}. The primary outcome was OS. We used the Kaplan-Meier method, the log–rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression with propensity score matching to determine whether prescription BED{sub 10} was associated with OS. Results: We identified 747 patients who met inclusion criteria. The median BED{sub 10} was 132 Gy, and 59 (7.7%) had consecutive-day fractions. Median follow-up was 41 months, and 452 patients (60.5%) had died by the conclusion of the study. The 581 patients receiving ≥105 Gy BED{sub 10} had a median survival of 28 months, whereas the 166 patients receiving <105 Gy BED{sub 10} had a median survival of 22 months (log–rank, P=.01). Radiation treatment schedule was not a significant predictor of OS on univariable analysis. After adjusting for T stage, sex, tumor histology, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, BED{sub 10} ≥105 Gy versus <105 Gy remained significantly associated with improved OS (hazard ratio 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.62-0.98, P=.03). Propensity score matching on imbalanced variables within high- and low-dose cohorts confirmed a survival benefit with higher prescription dose. Conclusions: We found that dose escalation to 105 Gy BED

  12. Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation on Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Modern Systemic Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D., E-mail: tendulr@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rehman, Sana; Shukla, Monica E.; Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Moore, Halle; Budd, G. Thomas [Department of Solid Tumor Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Dietz, Jill; Crowe, Joseph P. [Department of General Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Macklis, Roger [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) remains controversial for patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes (LN+). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all 369 breast cancer patients with 1-3 LN+ who underwent mastectomy without neoadjuvant systemic therapy between 2000 and 2007 at Cleveland Clinic. Results: We identified 271 patients with 1-3 LN+ who did not receive PMRT and 98 who did receive PMRT. The median follow-up time was 5.2 years, and the median number of LN dissected was 11. Of those not treated with PMRT, 79% received adjuvant chemotherapy (of whom 70% received a taxane), 79% received hormonal therapy, and 5% had no systemic therapy. Of the Her2/neu amplified tumors, 42% received trastuzumab. The 5-year rate of locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 8.9% without PMRT vs 0% with PMRT (P=.004). For patients who did not receive PMRT, univariate analysis showed 6 risk factors significantly (P<.05) correlated with LRR: estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor negative (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6), lymphovascular invasion (HR 2.4), 2-3 LN+ (HR 2.6), nodal ratio >25% (HR 2.7), extracapsular extension (ECE) (HR 3.7), and Bloom-Richardson grade III (HR 3.1). The 5-year LRR rate was 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1%-6.8%] for patients with 0-1 risk factor vs 14.6% [95% CI, 8.4%-20.9%] for patients with {>=}2 risk factors (P=.0006), respectively. On multivariate analysis, ECE (HR 4.3, P=.0006) and grade III (HR 3.6, P=.004) remained significant risk factors for LRR. The 5-year LRR was 4.1% in patients with neither grade III nor ECE, 8.1% with either grade III or ECE, and 50.4% in patients with both grade III and ECE (P<.0001); the corresponding 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates were 91.8%, 85.4%, and 59.1% (P=.0004), respectively. Conclusions: PMRT offers excellent control for patients with 1-3 LN+, with no locoregional failures to date. Patients with 1-3 LN+ who have grade III disease and/or ECE should be strongly considered

  13. Correlation of Radiation Pneumonitis History Before Nivolumab with Onset of Interstitial Lung Disease and Progression-free Survival of Patients with Pre-treated Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiya, Akihiro; Tamiya, Motohiro; Nakahama, Kenji; Taniguchi, Yoshihiko; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Isa, Shun-Ichi; Inoue, Takako; Okishio, Kyoichi; Nishino, Kazumi; Kumagai, Toru; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Hirashima, Tomonori; Imamura, Fumio; Atagi, Shinji

    2017-09-01

    Nivolumab has a promising efficacy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as second-line or later treatment, and after radiotherapy as abscopal effect. However, the effects of radiation pneumonitis history before nivolumab have not been clarified. Therefore, we retrospectively analyzed the correlation of a history of radiation pneumonitis before nivolumab with onset of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and progression-free survival (PFS) after nivolumab treatment in patients with previously treated NSCLC. A total of 201 patients treated with nivolumab were retrospectively reviewed. We collected clinical data of patients at the time of starting nivolumab and we evaluated ILD incidence and PFS in relation to patient characteristics, including radiation pneumonitis history. The median age was 68 years; 135 patients were men, 157 had a smoking history, and 153 had performance status of 0 or 1. Thirty-four patients experienced radiation pneumonitis before nivolumab, and 50 patients received radiotherapy to the chest (31 patients received curative radiotherapy). The overall median PFS was 2.8 months and the overall ILD rate was 12.4%. Higher ILD incidence was observed in the group with a history of radiation pneumonitis (26.5%) compared to the group without radiation pneumonitis (9.6%). The median PFS was 3.6 and 2.3 months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, a history of radiation pneumonitis was also significantly correlated with good PFS (p=0.023). Although increasing the risk of ILD, a history of radiation pneumonitis before nivolumab also contributes to the prolongation of PFS after nivolumab. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. Health-Related Quality of Life in Elderly Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Treated With Short-Course Radiation Therapy Plus Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gminniti@ospedalesantandrea.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Scaringi, Claudia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Baldoni, Alessandra [Department of Medical Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Lanzetta, Gaetano [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); De Sanctis, Vitaliana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Esposito, Vincenzo [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University Sapienza, Rome (Italy)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To describe the quality of life (QOL) in elderly patients with glioblastoma (GBM) treated with an abbreviated course of radiation therapy (RT; 40 Gy in 15 fractions) plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: Health-related QOL (HRQOL) was assessed by European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30, version 3) and EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire Brain Cancer Module (QLQ-BN20). Changes from baseline in the score of 9 preselected domains (global QLQ, social functioning, cognitive functioning, emotional functioning, physical functioning, motor dysfunction, communication deficit, fatigue, insomnia) were determined 4 weeks after RT and thereafter every 8 weeks during the treatment until disease progression. The proportion of patients with improved HRQOL scores, defined as a change of 10 points or more, and duration of changes were recorded. Results: Sixty-five patients completed the questionnaires at baseline. The treatment was consistently associated with improvement or stability in most of the preselected HRQOL domains. Global health improved over time; mean score differed by 9.6 points between baseline and 6-month follow-up (P=.03). For social functioning and cognitive functioning, mean scores improved over time, with a maximum difference of 10.4 points and 9.5 points between baseline and 6-month follow-up (P=.01 and P=.02), respectively. By contrast, fatigue worsened over time, with a difference in mean score of 5.6 points between baseline and 4-month follow-up (P=.02). Conclusions: A short course of RT in combination with TMZ in elderly patients with GBM was associated with survival benefit without a negative effect on HRQOL until the time of disease progression.

  15. Cognitive function, mood, and sleep quality in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal cancer: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yan-Lin; Li, Ling; Qin, Ling; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Qu, Song; Liang, Xia; Wei, Zhou-Ji

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the cognitive function, depression, anxiety, and sleep quality in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) before and after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Eligible patients with newly diagnosed NPC treated with primary IMRT were recruited. A series of neuropsychological tests were performed within 1 week before and after IMRT. Cognitive function was measured with the Das-Naglieri cognitive assessment system. The Self-rating Anxiety Scale and Self-rating Depression Scale were used to assess mood states. Sleep quality was evaluated by means of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. A total of 51 patients were enrolled. The overall prevalence of depression, anxiety, and poor sleep quality showed a significant increase after RT, compared with their pre-RT levels (39.2% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.000; 19.6% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.039; 64.7% vs. 37.3%, p = 0.003, respectively). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that pre-RT depression and younger age and pre-RT anxiety and younger age were significant predictors of post-RT depression and anxiety, respectively (p sleep quality before treatment was also associated with poor sleep after RT (p = 0.032). However, the cognitive function evaluated by the cognitive assessment system from pre-RT was similar to the post-RT results. Exposure to ionizing radiation for the treatment of NPC decreased mood and sleep quality following IMRT, especially for patients with depression, anxiety, younger age, or poor sleep before treatment. No acute cognitive deficits were found resulting from IMRT, but the long-term effects of RT might still warrant concern. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Prognostic Value of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Beam Radiation Therapy for Locally Recurrent Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Multicentric Long-Term Outcome Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Felipe A. [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Sole, Claudio V., E-mail: cvsole@uc.cl [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Instituto de Radiomedicina, Santiago (Chile); Cambeiro, Mauricio [Service of Radiation Oncology, Clínica Universitaria, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Montero, Angel; Polo, Alfredo [Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Universidad de Alcala, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, Carmen [School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Instituto de Radiomedicina, Santiago (Chile); Service of Radiation Oncology, Clínica Universitaria, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Universidad de Alcala, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Cuervo, Miguel [Service of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); San Julian, Mikel [Service of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Clínica Universitaria, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); and others

    2014-01-01

    Background: A joint analysis of data from centers involved in the Spanish Cooperative Initiative for Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy was performed to investigate long-term outcomes of locally recurrent soft tissue sarcoma (LR-STS) patients treated with a multidisciplinary approach. Methods and Materials: Patients with a histologic diagnosis of LR-STS (extremity, 43%; trunk wall, 24%; retroperitoneum, 33%) and no distant metastases who underwent radical surgery and intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT; median dose, 12.5 Gy) were considered eligible for participation in this study. In addition, 62% received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT; median dose, 50 Gy). Results: From 1986 to 2012, a total of 103 patients from 3 Spanish expert IOERT institutions were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 57 months (range, 2-311 months), 5-year local control (LC) was 60%. The 5-year IORT in-field control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival were 73%, 43%, and 52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, no EBRT to treat the LR-STS (P=.02) and microscopically involved margin resection status (P=.04) retained significance in relation to LC. With regard to IORT in-field control, only not delivering EBRT to the LR-STS retained significance in the multivariate analysis (P=.03). Conclusion: This joint analysis revealed that surgical margin and EBRT affect LC but that, given the high risk of distant metastases, DFS remains modest. Intensified local treatment needs to be further tested in the context of more efficient concurrent, neoadjuvant, and adjuvant systemic therapy.

  17. Thyroid V30 Predicts Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism in Patients Treated With Sequential Chemo-Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cella, Laura [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Conson, Manuel; Caterino, Michele; De Rosa, Nicola [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Liuzzi, Raffaele [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Picardi, Marco; Grimaldi, Francesco [Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Solla, Raffaele [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Farella, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Pacelli, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.pacelli@cnr.it [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Hypothyroidism (HT) is a frequent late side effect of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) therapy. The purpose of this study is to determine dose-volume constraints that correlate with functional impairment of the thyroid gland in HL patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 consecutive patients undergoing antiblastic chemotherapy and involved field radiation treatment (median dose, 32 Gy; range, 30-36 Gy) for HL were retrospectively considered. Their median age was 28 years (range, 14-70 years). Blood levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodo-thyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), and thyroglobulin antibody (ATG) were recorded basally and at different times after the end of therapy. For the thyroid gland, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), dosimetric parameters, and the percentage of thyroid volume exceeding 10, 20, and 30 Gy (V10, V20, and V30) were calculated in all patients. To evaluate clinical and dosimetric factors possibly associated with HT, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: Eight of 61 (13.1%) patients had HT before treatment and were excluded from further evaluation. At a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 6-99 months), 41.5% (22/53) of patients developed HT after treatment. Univariate analyses showed that all dosimetric factors were associated with HT (p < 0.05). On multivariate analysis, the thyroid V30 value was the single independent predictor associated with HT (p = 0.001). This parameter divided the patients into low- vs. high-risk groups: if V30 was {<=} 62.5%, the risk of developing HT was 11.5%, and if V30 was >62.5%, the risk was 70.8% (p < 0.0001). A Cox regression curve stratified by two levels of V30 value was created (odds ratio, 12.6). Conclusions: The thyroid V30 predicts the risk of developing HT after sequential chemo-radiotherapy and defines a useful constraint to consider for more accurate HL treatment

  18. Setup errors in patients with head-neck cancer (HNC), treated using the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) technique: how it influences the customised immobilisation systems, patient's pain and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contesini, Massimiliano; Guberti, Monica; Saccani, Roberta; Braglia, Luca; Iotti, Cinzia; Botti, Andrea; Abbati, Emilio; Iemmi, Marina

    2017-04-27

    In patients with head-neck cancer treated with IMRT, immobility of the upper part of the body during radiation is maintained by means of customised immobilisation devices. The main purpose of this study was to determine how the procedures for preparation of customised immobilisation systems and the patients characteristics influence the extent of setup errors. A longitudinal, prospective study involving 29 patients treated with IMRT. Data were collected before CT simulation and during all the treatment sessions (528 setup errors analysed overall); the correlation with possible risk factors for setup errors was explored using a linear mixed model. Setup errors were not influenced by the patient's anxiety and pain. Temporary removal of the thermoplastic mask before carrying out the CT simulation shows statistically borderline, clinically relevant, increase of setup errors (+24.7%, 95% CI: -0.5% - 55.8%). Moreover, a unit increase of radiation therapists who model the customised thermoplastic mask is associated to a -18% (-29.2% - -4.9%) reduction of the errors. The setup error is influenced by the patient's physical features; in particular, it increases both in patients in whom the treatment position is obtained with 'Shoulder down' (+27.9%, 2.2% - 59.7%) and in patients with 'Scoliosis/kyphosis' problems (+65.4%, 2.3% - 164.2%). Using a 'Small size standard plus customized neck support device' is associated to a -52.3% (-73.7% - -11.2%) reduction. The increase in number of radiation therapists encountered during the entire treatment cycle does not show associations. Increase in the body mass index is associated with a slight reduction in setup error by (-2.8%, -5% - -0.7%). The position of the patient obtained by forcing the shoulders downwards, clinically significant scoliosis or kyphosis and the reduction of the number of radiation therapists who model the thermoplastic mask are found to be statistically significant risk factors that can cause an increase in setup

  19. Quantitative Analysis of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Identifies Novel Prognostic Imaging Biomarkers in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Yi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Song, Jie; Pollom, Erqi; Alagappan, Muthuraman [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Shirato, Hiroki [Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Li, Ruijiang, E-mail: rli2@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To identify prognostic biomarkers in pancreatic cancer using high-throughput quantitative image analysis. Methods and Materials: In this institutional review board–approved study, we retrospectively analyzed images and outcomes for 139 locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The overall population was split into a training cohort (n=90) and a validation cohort (n=49) according to the time of treatment. We extracted quantitative imaging characteristics from pre-SBRT {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, including statistical, morphologic, and texture features. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was built to predict overall survival (OS) in the training cohort using 162 robust image features. To avoid over-fitting, we applied the elastic net to obtain a sparse set of image features, whose linear combination constitutes a prognostic imaging signature. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the association with OS, and concordance index (CI) was used to evaluate the survival prediction accuracy. Results: The prognostic imaging signature included 7 features characterizing different tumor phenotypes, including shape, intensity, and texture. On the validation cohort, univariate analysis showed that this prognostic signature was significantly associated with OS (P=.002, hazard ratio 2.74), which improved upon conventional imaging predictors including tumor volume, maximum standardized uptake value, and total legion glycolysis (P=.018-.028, hazard ratio 1.51-1.57). On multivariate analysis, the proposed signature was the only significant prognostic index (P=.037, hazard ratio 3.72) when adjusted for conventional imaging and clinical factors (P=.123-.870, hazard ratio 0.53-1.30). In terms of CI, the proposed signature scored 0.66 and was significantly better than competing prognostic indices (CI 0.48-0.64, Wilcoxon rank sum test P<1e-6

  20. Estimates of radiation doses in tissue and organs and risk of excess cancer in the single-course radiotherapy patients treated for ankylosing spondylitis in England and Wales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.

    1982-02-01

    The estimates of absorbed doses of x rays and excess risk of cancer in bone marrow and heavily irradiated sites are extremely crude and are based on very limited data and on a number of assumptions. Some of these assumptions may later prove to be incorrect, but it is probable that they are correct to within a factor of 2. The excess cancer risk estimates calculated compare well with the most reliable epidemiological surveys thus far studied. This is particularly important for cancers of heavily irradiated sites with long latent periods. The mean followup period for the patients was 16.2 y, and an increase in cancers of heavily irradiated sites may appear in these patients in the 1970s in tissues and organs with long latent periods for the induction of cancer. The accuracy of these estimates is severely limited by the inadequacy of information on doses absorbed by the tissues at risk in the irradiated patients. The information on absorbed dose is essential for an accurate assessment of dose-cancer incidence analysis. Furthermore, in this valuable series of irradiated patients, the information on radiation dosimetry on the radiotherapy charts is central to any reliable determination of somatic risks of radiation with regard to carcinogenesis in man. The work necessary to obtain these data is under way; only when they are available can more precise estimates of risk of cancer induction by radiation in man be obtained.

  1. High frequency of radiation pneumonitis in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent radiotherapy and gemcitabine after induction with gemcitabine and carboplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Gallardo-Rincón, Dolores; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Michel, Rosa M; Astorga-Ramos, Alma M; Martínez-Barrera, Luis; de la Garza, Jaime

    2009-07-01

    The combination of chemotherapy and thoracic radiation is the standard treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, most favorable chemotherapy regimen, timing of full-dose chemotherapy, and optimal combination of chemotherapy with radiation remain to be determined. Our primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine concurrent with radiotherapy after induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus carboplatin for locally advanced NSCLC. Patients with histologically proven NSCLC stage IIIA and -B received carboplatin (area under the curve of 2.5) and gemcitabine (800 mg/m) on days 1 and 8, every 21 days for two cycles, followed by conventional fractioned thoracic radiotherapy and concomitant weekly gemcitabine 200 mg/m, and finally, consolidation chemotherapy. Inclusion was discontinued because of high-grade 3 to 5 radiation-pneumonitis events (6 of 19 patients, 31.6%), including one treatment-related death associated with radiation pneumonitis. Median follow-up was 11.9 months. Most common grades 3/4 hematological side effects comprised anemia, neutropenia 3 of 19 patients, each (15.8%), and thrombocytopenia (4 of 19, 21.1%) during induction. Partial response was observed in 10 patients (52.6%) following induction chemotherapy. After concurrent chemo-radiotherapy, overall response was 68.4%. Four patients (21.1%) underwent surgical resection. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 12 +/- 1 month (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.8-14.1) and 21 +/- 3.5 months (95% CI, 14-27.9 months), respectively. Concurrent radiotherapy with gemcitabine after induction with gemcitabine and carboplatin showed a high-response rate; however, it is associated with excessive pulmonary toxicity. Adjustments in gemcitabine dosage during radiotherapy or changes in radiotherapy planning could reduce toxicity.

  2. Combined low initial DNA damage and high radiation-induced apoptosis confers clinical resistance to long-term toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with high-dose radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordón Elisa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Either higher levels of initial DNA damage or lower levels of radiation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been associated to increased risk for develop late radiation-induced toxicity. It has been recently published that these two predictive tests are inversely related. The aim of the present study was to investigate the combined role of both tests in relation to clinical radiation-induced toxicity in a set of breast cancer patients treated with high dose hyperfractionated radical radiotherapy. Methods Peripheral blood lymphocytes were taken from 26 consecutive patients with locally advanced breast carcinoma treated with high-dose hyperfractioned radical radiotherapy. Acute and late cutaneous and subcutaneous toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity scoring schema. The mean follow-up of survivors (n = 13 was 197.23 months. Radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was quantified as the initial number of DNA double-strand breaks induced per Gy and per DNA unit (200 Mbp. Radiation-induced apoptosis (RIA at 1, 2 and 8 Gy was measured by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide. Results Mean DSB/Gy/DNA unit obtained was 1.70 ± 0.83 (range 0.63-4.08; median, 1.46. Radiation-induced apoptosis increased with radiation dose (median 12.36, 17.79 and 24.83 for 1, 2, and 8 Gy respectively. We observed that those "expected resistant patients" (DSB values lower than 1.78 DSB/Gy per 200 Mbp and RIA values over 9.58, 14.40 or 24.83 for 1, 2 and 8 Gy respectively were at low risk of suffer severe subcutaneous late toxicity (HR 0.223, 95%CI 0.073-0.678, P = 0.008; HR 0.206, 95%CI 0.063-0.677, P = 0.009; HR 0.239, 95%CI 0.062-0.929, P = 0.039, for RIA at 1, 2 and 8 Gy respectively in multivariate analysis. Conclusions A radiation-resistant profile is proposed, where those patients who presented lower levels of initial DNA damage and higher levels of radiation induced apoptosis were at low

  3. Treatment Related Cardiac Toxicity in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, Lawrence B

    2005-01-01

    To determine the incidence, dose/time-dependence, and functional significance of regional cardiac perfusion abnormalities in patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT...

  4. Treatment Related Cardiac Toxicity in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, Lawrence B

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence dose/time-dependence and functional significance of regional cardiac perfusion abnormalities in patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT...

  5. Treatment Related Cardiac Toxicity in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    To determine the incidence, dose/time-dependence, and functional significance of regional cardiac perfusion abnormalities in patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT...

  6. Post-radiation mucocele in two patients treated for nasopharyngeal cancer; Mucocele apres radiotherapie chez deux patients traites pour cancer du nasopharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mnejja, M.; Hammami, B.; Achour, I.; Chakroun, A.; Charfeddine, I.; Ghorbel, A. [Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia); Frikha, M. [Service de carcinologie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia); Daoud, J. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-06-15

    A 30-year-old woman, with a history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which was treated by radiotherapy nine years previously, presented with occasional diplopia and recent headaches. A nasopharyngeal biopsy showed no recurrence. The imaging revealed a sphenoidal sinus mucocele. Endoscopic marsupialization of the mucocele allowed clinical improvement. A 56-year-old woman presented, five years after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, with a fronto-orbital mass. CT-scan revealed a fronto-ethmoidal mucocele. Nasopharyngeal biopsy showed tumour recurrence. Marsupialization of mucocele was performed. Recurrence of the carcinoma was treated by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Sphenoidal sinus mucocele developing after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma has rarely been reported. CT scan and MRI are useful tools in making the diagnosis. Biopsy is required to diagnose recurrence or associated radio-induced tumor. Endoscopic approach gives good results. (authors)

  7. Predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Jun; Li, Guang; Ma, Lianghua; Han, Chong; Zhang, Shuo; Yao, Lei [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)], e-mail: gl1963516@yahoo.cn; Diao, Rao [Dept. of Experimental Technology Center, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China); Zang, Shuang [Dept. of Nursing, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)

    2013-08-15

    Grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis (RP) is generally severe and life-threatening. Predictors of grade {>=}2 are usually used for grade {>=}3 RP prediction, but it is unclear whether these predictors are appropriate. In this study, predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP were investigated separately. The increased risk of severe RP in elderly patients compared with younger patients was also evaluated. Material and methods: A total of 176 consecutive patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were followed up prospectively after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. RP was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Mean lung dose (MLD), mean heart dose, ratio of planning target volume to total lung volume (PTV/Lung), and dose-volume histogram comprehensive value of both heart and lung were associated with both grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP in univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, age and MLD were predictors of both grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP; receipt of chemotherapy predicted grade {>=}3 RP only; and sex and PTV/Lung predicted grade {>=}2 RP only. Among patients who developed high-grade RP, MLD and PTV/Lung were significantly lower in patients aged {>=}70 years than in younger patients (p<0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions: The predictors were not completely consistent between grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP. Elderly patients had a higher risk of severe RP than younger patients did, possibly due to lower tolerance of radiation to the lung.

  8. Long-Term Outcome After Radiotherapy in Patients With Atypical and Malignant Meningiomas-Clinical Results in 85 Patients Treated in a Single Institution Leading to Optimized Guidelines for Early Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeberg, Sebastian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Hartmann, Christian [Department of Neuropathology, Institute for Pathology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Clinical Cooperation Unit Neuropathology, Heidelberg (Germany); Welzel, Thomas; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Deimling, Andreas von [Department of Neuropathology, Institute for Pathology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Clinical Cooperation Unit Neuropathology, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E., E-mail: Stephanie.combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Previously, we could show that the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of meningiomas significantly correlated with outcome in patients with atypical and anaplastic histology. In the present work, we analyzed our long-term experience in radiotherapy for atypical and malignant meningioma diagnosed according to the most recent WHO categorization system. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with atypical and 23 patients with malignant meningioma have been treated with radiotherapy. Sixty percent of all patients received radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection, 19% at disease progression and 8.3% as a primary treatment. Radiation was applied using different techniques including fractionated stereotactic RT (FSRT), intensity-modulated RT, and combination treatment with carbon ions. The median PTV was 156.0 mL. An average dose of 57.6 Gy (range, 30-68.4 Gy) in 1.8-3 Gy fractions was applied. All patients were followed regularly including clinical-neurological follow-up as well as computed tomographies or magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Overall survival was impacted significantly by histological grade, with 81% and 53% at 5 years for atypical or anaplastic meningiomas, respectively. This difference was significant at p = 0.022. Eighteen patients died of tumor progression during follow-up. Progression-free survival was 95% and 50% for atypical, and 63% and 13% for anaplastic histology at 2 and 5 years. This difference was significant at p = 0.017. Despite histology, we could not observe any prognostic factors including age, resection status, or Karnofsky performance score. However, preexisting clinical symptoms observed in 63 patients improved in 29.3% of these patients. Conclusion: RT resulted in improvement of preexisting clinical symptoms; outcome is comparable to other series reported in the literature. RT should be offered after surgical resection after initial diagnosis to increase progression-free survival as well as overall

  9. Comparison of doses received by the hippocampus in patients treated with single isocenter– vs multiple isocenter–based stereotactic radiation therapy to the brain for multiple brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algan, Ozer, E-mail: oalgan@ouhsc.edu; Giem, Jared; Young, Julie; Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Hossain, Sabbir

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiation therapy using a single isocenter (SI)–based or multiple isocenter (MI)–based treatment planning in patients with less than 4 brain metastases. In total, 10 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating 2-3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study, and 2 sets of stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans (SI vs MI) were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences, and doses received by the hippocampus and the brain were calculated and compared between the 2 treatment techniques. A total of 23 lesions in 10 patients were evaluated. The median tumor volume, the right hippocampus volume, and the left hippocampus volume were 3.15, 3.24, and 2.63 mL, respectively. In comparing the 2 treatment plans, there was no difference in the planning target volume (PTV) coverage except in the tail for the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve. The only statistically significant dosimetric parameter was the V{sub 100}. All of the other measured dosimetric parameters including the V{sub 95}, V{sub 99}, and D{sub 100} were not significantly different between the 2 treatment planning techniques. None of the dosimetric parameters evaluated for the hippocampus revealed any statistically significant difference between the MI and SI plans. The total brain doses were slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose region, although this difference was not statistically different. The use of SI-based treatment plan resulted in a 35% reduction in beam-on time. The use of SI treatments for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain when compared with MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment.

  10. Head and neck soft tissue sarcomas treated with radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas K. Vitzthum

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck soft tissue sarcomas (HNSTSs are rare and heterogeneous cancers in which radiation therapy (RT has an important role in local tumor control (LC. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes and patterns of treatment failure in patients with HNSTS treated with RT. A retrospective review was performed of adult patients with HNSTS treated with RT from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2012. LC, locoregional control (LRC, disease-free survival (DFS, overall survival (OS, and predictors thereof were assessed. Forty-eight patients with HNSTS were evaluated. Five-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of LC, LRC, DFS, and OS were 87, 73, 63, and 83%, respectively. Angiosarcomas were found to be associated with worse LC, LRC, DFS, and OS. Patients over the age of 60 had lower rates of DFS. HNSTSs comprise a diverse group of tumors that can be managed with various treatment regimens involving RT. Angiosarcomas have higher recurrence and mortality rates.

  11. Evolution of radiation defect and radiation hardening in heat treated SA508 Gr3 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Kwon, Junhyun [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daeduck-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Chansun, E-mail: c.shin@mju.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Myongji University, 116 Myongji-ro, Cheoin-gu, Youngin-shi, Gyeonggi-do 449-728 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    The formation of radiation defects and corresponding radiation hardening in heat-treated SA508 Gr3 steel after Fe ion irradiation were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy and a nano-indentation technique. As the residual dislocation density is increased in the matrix, the formation of radiation defects is considerably weakened. Comparison between the characteristics of the radiation defect and an evaluation of radiation hardening indicates that a large dislocation loop contributes little to the radiation hardening in the heat-treated SA508 Gr3 steel.

  12. Evolution of radiation defect and radiation hardening in heat treated SA508 Gr3 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Kwon, Junhyun; Shin, Chansun

    2014-01-01

    The formation of radiation defects and corresponding radiation hardening in heat-treated SA508 Gr3 steel after Fe ion irradiation were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy and a nano-indentation technique. As the residual dislocation density is increased in the matrix, the formation of radiation defects is considerably weakened. Comparison between the characteristics of the radiation defect and an evaluation of radiation hardening indicates that a large dislocation loop contributes little to the radiation hardening in the heat-treated SA508 Gr3 steel.

  13. Serum Proteome Signature of Radiation Response: Upregulation of Inflammation-Related Factors and Downregulation of Apolipoproteins and Coagulation Factors in Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy—A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlak, Piotr, E-mail: widlak@io.gliwice.pl [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice (Poland); Jelonek, Karol; Wojakowska, Anna; Pietrowska, Monika [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice (Poland); Polanska, Joanna [Institute of Automatics Control, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice (Poland); Marczak, Łukasz [Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Miszczyk, Leszek; Składowski, Krzysztof [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice (Poland)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation affects the proteome of irradiated cells and tissue, yet data concerning changes induced during radiation therapy (RT) in human blood are fragmentary and inconclusive. We aimed to identify features of serum proteome and associated processes involved in response to partial body irradiation during cancer treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and 20 patients with prostate cancer received definitive intensity modulated RT. Blood samples were collected before RT, just after RT, and 1 month after the end of RT. Complete serum proteome was analyzed in individual samples, using a shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach which allowed identification of approximately 450 proteins. Approximately 100 unique proteins were quantified in all samples after exclusion of immunoglobulins, and statistical significance of differences among consecutive samples was assessed. Processes associated with quantified proteins and their functional interactions were predicted using gene ontology tools. Results: RT-induced changes were marked in the HNSCC patient group: 22 upregulated and 33 downregulated proteins were detected in post-RT sera. Most of the changes reversed during follow-up, yet levels of some proteins remained affected 1 month after the end of RT. RT-upregulated proteins were associated with acute phase, inflammatory response, and complement activation. RT-downregulated proteins were associated with transport and metabolism of lipids (plasma apolipoproteins) and blood coagulation. RT-induced changes were much weaker in prostate cancer patients, which corresponded to differences in acute radiation toxicity observed in both groups. Nevertheless, general patterns of RT-induced sera proteome changes were similar in both of the groups of cancer patients. Conclusions: In this pilot study, we proposed to identify a molecular signature of radiation response, based on specific

  14. Improved survival outcomes with the incidental use of beta-blockers among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H M; Liao, Z X; Komaki, R; Welsh, J W; O'Reilly, M S; Chang, J Y; Zhuang, Y; Levy, L B; Lu, C; Gomez, D R

    2013-05-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that norepinephrine can directly stimulate tumor cell migration and that this effect is mediated by the beta-adrenergic receptor. We retrospectively reviewed 722 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive radiotherapy (RT). A Cox proportional hazard model was utilized to determine the association between beta-blocker intake and locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). In univariate analysis, patients taking beta-blockers (n = 155) had improved DMFS (P beta-blockers (n = 567). In multivariate analysis, beta-blocker intake was associated with a significantly better DMFS [hazard ratio (HR), 0.67; P = 0.01], DFS (HR, 0.74; P = 0.02), and OS (HR, 0.78; P = 0.02) with adjustment for age, Karnofsky performance score, stage, histology type, concurrent chemotherapy, radiation dose, gross tumor volume, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the use of aspirin. There was no association of beta-blocker use with LRPFS (HR = 0.91, P = 0.63). Beta-blocker use is associated with improved DMFS, DFS, and OS in this large cohort of NSCLC patients. Future prospective trials can validate these retrospective findings and determine whether the length and timing of beta-blocker use influence survival outcomes.

  15. Analysis of incidental radiation dose to uninvolved mediastinal/supraclavicular lymph nodes in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer treated without elective nodal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Irfan; DeMarco, Marylou; Stevens, Craig W; Fulp, William J; Dilling, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Classic teaching states that treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) requires large treatment fields covering the entire mediastinum. However, a trend in modern thoracic radiotherapy is toward more conformal fields, employing positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine the gross tumor volume (GTV). This analysis evaluates the dosimetric results when using selective nodal irradiation (SNI) to treat a patient with L-SCLC, quantitatively comparing the results to standard Intergroup treatment fields. Sixteen consecutive patients with L-SCLC and central mediastinal disease who also underwent pretherapy PET/CT scans were studied in this analysis. For each patient, we created SNI treatment volumes, based on the PET/CT-based criteria for malignancy. We also created 2 ENI plans, the first without heterogeneity corrections, as per the Intergroup 0096 study (ENI(off)) and the second with heterogeneity corrections while maintaining constant the number of MUs delivered between these latter 2 plans (ENI(on)). Nodal stations were contoured using published guidelines, then placed into 4 "bins" (treated nodes, 1 echelon away, >1 echelon away within the mediastinum, contralateral hilar/supraclavicular). These were aggregated across the patients in the study. Dose to these nodal bins and to tumor/normal structures were compared among these plans using pairwise t-tests. The ENI(on) plans demonstrated a statistically significant degradation in dose coverage compared with the ENI(off) plans. ENI and SNI both created a dose gradient to the lymph nodes across the mediastinum. Overall, the gradient was larger for the SNI plans, although the maximum dose to the "1 echelon away" nodes was not statistically different. Coverage of the GTV and planning target volume (PTV) were improved with SNI, while simultaneously reducing esophageal and spinal cord dose though at the expense of modestly reduced dose to anatomically distant lymph nodes

  16. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Xerostomia and trismus (Part 2). Literature review and consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Bossi, Paolo; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Berruti, Alfredo; Trippa, Fabio; Nicolai, Pietro; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is a well-known radical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Nevertheless acute side effects (such as moist desquamation, skin erythema, loss of taste, mucositis etc.) and in particular late toxicities (osteoradionecrosis, xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.) are often debilitating and underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for this consensus and external experts evaluated the conclusions. The paper contains 20 clusters of statements about the clinical definition and management of stomatological issues that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecrosis (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia (10 clusters of statements). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Predictors of mucositis in oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancer in patients treated with volumetric modulated radiation treatment: A dose-volume analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Fersino, Sergio; Fiorentino, Alba; Giaj Levra, Niccolò; Di Paola, Gioacchino; Ruggieri, Ruggero; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess predictors of mucositis in oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancer after definitive or adjuvant volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) +/- chemotherapy. Fifty patients were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed for the following parameters as potential predictors of mucositis ≥ G2: total oral mucosa and oral mucosa minus target high-low radiation dose regions (planning target volumes [PTVs]), mean dose (Dmean ), maximum dose (Dmax ), chemotherapy, weight loss, and dysphagia. Mucositis ≥ G2 was found to be statistically related to chemotherapy, weight loss, dysphagia ≥ G2, total oral mucosa Dmean ≥50 Gy and Dmax ≥65 Gy, V45 Gy >40%, V50 Gy >30%, and V55 Gy >20% of the oral mucosa minus target PTVs. A ratio between total oral mucosa and oral mucosa minus target PTVs >2.5 is related to G3 mucositis (p = .03). New parameters were found as predictors of moderate-severe mucositis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E815-E819, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The prognostic value of expression of HIF1α, EGFR and VEGF-A, in localized prostate cancer for intermediate- and high-risk patients treated with radiation therapy with or without androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Damien C

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Androgens stimulate the production of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1α and ultimately vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A. Additionally, epithelial growth factor (EGF mediates HIF1α production. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX expression is associated with tumor cell hypoxia in a variety of malignancies. This study assesses the prognostic relation between HIF1α, VEGF-A, EGF Receptor and CAIX expression by immunochemistry in diagnostic samples of patients with intermediate- and high-risk localized prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy, with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Materials and methods Between 1994 and 2004, 103 prostate cancer patients (mean age, 68.7 ± 6.2, with prostate cancer (mean PSA, 13.3 ± 3.7, were treated with radiation therapy (RT, median dose, 74 Gy. Fifty seven (55.3% patients received ADT (median duration, 6 months; range, 0 – 24. Median follow-up was 97.6 months (range, 5.9 – 206.8. Results Higher EGFR expression was significantly (p = 0.04 correlated with higher Gleason scores. On univariate analysis, HIF1α nuclear expression was a significant (p = 0.02 prognostic factor for biological progression-free survival (bPFS. A trend towards significance (p = 0.05 was observed with EGFR expression and bPFS. On multivariate analysis, low HIF1α nuclear (p = 0.01 and high EGFR (p = 0.04 expression remained significant adverse prognostic factors. Conclusions Our study suggests that high nuclear expression of HIF1α and low EGFR expression in diagnostic biopsies of prostate cancer patients treated with RT ± ADT is associated with a good prognosis.

  19. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Standard Uptake Value as a Metabolic Predictor of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation: Impact on Acute and Late Hematological Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elicin, Olgun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Callaway, Sharon [Velocity Medical Solutions, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Prior, John O. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bourhis, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ozsahin, Mahmut, E-mail: mahmut.ozsahin@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Herrera, Fernanda G., E-mail: fernanda.herrera@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between bone marrow (BM) response to radiation and radiation dose by using {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET standard uptake values (SUV) and to correlate these findings with hematological toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer (CC) patients treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen women with a diagnosis of CC were treated with standard doses of CRT. All patients underwent pre- and post-therapy [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT). Hemograms were obtained before and during treatment and 3 months after treatment and at last follow-up. Pelvic bone was autosegmented as total bone marrow (BM{sub TOT}). Active bone marrow (BM{sub ACT}) was contoured based on SUV greater than the mean SUV of BM{sub TOT}. The volumes (V) of each region receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy (V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40}, respectively) were calculated. Metabolic volume histograms and voxel SUV map response graphs were created. Relative changes in SUV before and after therapy were calculated by separating SUV voxels into radiation therapy dose ranges of 5 Gy. The relationships among SUV decrease, radiation dose, and HT were investigated using multiple regression models. Results: Mean relative pre-post-therapy SUV reductions in BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} were 27% and 38%, respectively. BM{sub ACT} volume was significantly reduced after treatment (from 651.5 to 231.6 cm{sup 3}, respectively; P<.0001). BM{sub ACT} V{sub 30} was significantly correlated with a reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV (R{sup 2}, 0.14; P<.001). The reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV significantly correlated with reduction in white blood cells (WBCs) at 3 months post-treatment (R{sup 2}, 0.27; P=.04) and at last follow-up (R{sup 2}, 0.25; P=.04). Different dosimetric parameters of BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} correlated with long-term hematological outcome. Conclusions: The volumes of BM

  20. Heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, E L; Abrahamsen, B; Vestergaard, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates.......The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates....

  1. Hematologic Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postprostatectomy Whole-Pelvis Irradiation With Different Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Techniques Is Not Negligible and Is Prolonged: Preliminary Results of a Longitudinal, Observational Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzarini, Cesare, E-mail: cozzarini.cesare@hsr.it [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Chiorda, Barbara Noris [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Sini, Carla; Fiorino, Claudio [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco [Department of Urology, Vita-Salute University, Milan (Italy); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To address the thus-far poorly investigated severity and duration of hematologic toxicity from whole-pelvis radiation therapy (WPRT) in a cohort of chemo-naïve patients treated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy including WPRT with different intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, doses, and fractionations. Methods and Materials: This analysis pertains to 125 patients (70 from a pilot study and 55 from an observational protocol) for whom 1 baseline and at least 3 subsequent blood samples (median 6), obtained at irradiation midpoint and end, and thereafter at 3, 6, and 12 months, were available. Patients were treated with adjuvant (n=73) or salvage intent; static-field IMRT (n=19); volumetric modulated arc therapy (n=60) or helical Tomotherapy (n=46); and conventional (n=39) or moderately hypofractionated (median 2.35 Gy per fraction, n=86) regimens. The median 2-Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) to the prostatic bed was 70.4 Gy with a lymph-nodal planning target volume of 50.2 Gy. Clinical and dosimetric data were collected. Results: Both leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were significant (median nadir count 65% and 67% of baseline, respectively), with leukopenia also persisting (1-year median count 75% of baseline). Lymphopenia was the major contributor to the severity and 1-year persistence of leukopenia; all patients developed acute grade ≥1 lymphopenia (61% and 26% grade 2 and ≥3, respectively), whereas 1-year grade ≥2 lymphopenia was still present in 16%. In addition to an independent predictive role of corresponding baseline values, multivariable analyses highlighted that higher EQD2 doses to lymph nodal planning target volume increased risk of acute neutropenia and hypofractionation for acute thrombocytopenia. Of note, patients of older age were at higher risk for acute grade 2 lymphopenia, and interestingly, increased risk of grade >2 lymphopenia for those who smoked at least one year. No role for different IMRT techniques

  2. SU-E-T-466: Dosimetric Assessment of the Salivary Glands in Head and Neck Tumour Patients Treated with Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, Xavier C [University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Costa, Ferreira B [University of Aveiro, Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Khouri, L; Lopes, M [IPOCFG, EPE, Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P [University of Texas Health Science Center, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate the correlation between different dosimetric indices and the clinical outcome, which was recorded at different time points after the treatment, regarding the structure of salivary glands in head and neck cancer radiotherapy. Methods: 218 salivary glands from patients with head and neck tumours treated at IPOCFG from 2007 to 2013 were included in this study. The follow up of those patients consisted on weekly medical visits during the treatment that take about seven weeks. After that the patients had consults every three months. Treatment complications were graded using the RTOG/EORTC guidelines. The response of the salivary glands (both parotids, oral cavity and both submandibular glands) was analyzed for six time periods: 7th week, 3rd, 7th, 12th, 18th and 24th months after the start of the radiotherapy. The total dose distributions, converted to a fractionation scheme of 2Gy fractional doses, were used to calculate the DVHs and dose-response plots of salivary glands. Results: The small differences obtained between the mean DVHs showed that patients should be grouped into: with complications (G1+G2) and without complications (G0). The mean dose/2Gy was 22.2±13.2 Gy (G0) and 33.2±8.0 Gy (G1+G2) for the 7th week, 31.9±9.6 Gy (G0) and 34.6±6.8 Gy (G1+G2) for the 12th month and, 32.9±9.3 Gy (G0) and 37.2±8.5 Gy (G1+G2) for the 24th month. The dose-response plots for the 7th week and 24th month were similar to the dose-response curves published in the literature. Conclusion: In some cases, there were not major differences between the mean DVHs of the groups with and without complications in the salivary glands, when comparing them at different time periods. More radiobiological analysis should thus be made to estimate the clinical impact of those differences.

  3. The effect of region of interest strategies on apparent diffusion coefficient assessment in patients treated with palliative radiation therapy to brain metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Johannesen, Helle H; Geertsen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is widely used in radiation therapy (RT) response studies, no standard of delineating the region of interest (ROI) exists. In this retrospective study, we evaluate the effect of four ROI strategies on the apparent diffusion...

  4. Analysis of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with severe acute radiation pneumonitis in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Bo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the association between the clinical, dosimetric factors and severe acute radiation pneumonitis (SARP in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LANSCLC treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Methods We analyzed 94 LANSCLC patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT between May 2005 and September 2006. SARP was defined as greater than or equal 3 side effects and graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3.0. The clinical and dosimetric factors were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between clinical, dosimetric factors and SARP. Results Median follow-up was 10.5 months (range 6.5-24. Of 94 patients, 11 (11.7% developed SARP. Univariate analyses showed that the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP, mean lung dose (MLD, relative volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose of 5-60 Gy at increments of 5 Gy (V5-V60, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and Forced Expiratory Volume in the first second (FEV1 were associated with SARP (p p = 0.001 and V10 (p = 0.015 were the most significant factors associated with SARP. The incidences of SARP in the group with NTCP > 4.2% and NTCP ≤4.2% were 43.5% and 1.4%, respectively (p 50% were 5.7% and 29.2%, respectively (p Conclusions NTCP value and V10 are the useful indicators for predicting SARP in NSCLC patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT.

  5. Do Surgeons Treat Their Patients Like They Would Treat Themselves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.J.; Teunis, T.; Guitton, T.G.; Ring, D.; Biert, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial unexplained geographical and surgeon-to-surgeon variation in rates of surgery. One would expect surgeons to treat patients and themselves similarly based on best evidence and accounting for patient preferences. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Are surgeons more likely to

  6. Do Surgeons Treat Their Patients Like They Would Treat Themselves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Stein J.; Teunis, Teun; Guitton, Thierry G.; Ring, David; Spoor, Andy B.; Chauhan, Aakash; Shafritz, Adam B.; Wasterlain, Amy; Terrono, Andrew L.; Neviaser, Andrew S.; Schmidt, Andrew; Nelson, Andy; Miller, Anna N.; Kristan, Anze; Apard, Thomas; Berner, Arne; Ilyas, Asif; Jubel, Axel; Jost, Bernhard; Babis, George; Watkins, Barry; Kreis, Barbara; Nolan, Betsy M.; Crist, Brett D.; Cross, Brian J.; Wills, Brian P. D.; Barreto, Camilo Jose Romero; Ekholm, Carl; Swigart, Carrie; Spath, Catherine; Zalavras, Charalampos; Cassidy, Charles; Garnavos, Christos; Moreno-Serrano, Constanza L.; Rodner, Craig; Klostermann, Cyrus; Osei, Daniel A.; Rikli, Daniel A.; Haverkamp, Daniel; Polatsch, Daniel; Drosdowech, Darren; Edelstein, David M.; Eygendaal, Denise; McKee, Desirae M.; van Deurzen, Derek; Verbeek, Diederik O. F.; Patel, Minoo; Brilej, Drago; Walbeehm, Erik T.; Pemovska, Emilija Stojkovska; Hofmeister, Eric; Twiss, Eric L. L.; Hammerberg, Eric Mark; Schumer, Evan D.; Kaplan, F. Thomas D.; Suarez, Fabio; Fernandes, Carlos H.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Walter, Frank L.; Seibert, Franz Josef; Frihagen, Frede; Kraan, Gerald; Gadbled, Guillaume; Huemer, Georg M.; Kohut, Georges; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Garrigues, Grant; Bayne, Grant J.; DeSilva, Gregory; Bamberger, H. Brent; Grunwald, H. W.; Goost, Hans; Broekhuyse, Henry; Durchholz, Holger; Routman, Howard D.; Kodde, F.; McGraw, Iain; Harris, Ian; Lin, Ines C.; Choueka, Jack; Kazanjian, Jack Elias; Gillespie, James A.; Biert, Jan; Greenberg, Jeffrey A.; Abrams, Jeffrey; Wint, Jeffrey; Giuffre, Jennifer L.; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Overbeck, Joachim P.; Doornberg, Job N.; Scheer, Johan H.; Itamura, John; Erickson, John M.; McAuliffe, John; Capo, John T.; Taras, John; Braman, Jonathan; Rubio, Jorge; Filho, Jose Eduardo Grandi Ribeiro; Abboud, Joseph; Conflitti, Joseph M.; Abzug, Joshua M.; Roiz, Juan Miguel Rodriguez; Adams, Julie; Bishop, Julius; Kabir, Karoush; Zyto, Karol; Lee, Kendrick; Eng, Kevin; Rumball, Kevin M.; Erol, Konul; Dickson, Kyle; Jeray, Kyle; Bainbridge, Chris; Poelhekke, Lodewijk; van Minnen, Paul; Mica, Ladislav; Borris, Lars C.; Adolfsson, Lars E.; Weiss, Lawrence; Schulte, Leah M.; Lane, Lewis B.; Paz, Lior; Taitsman, Lisa; Guenter, Lob; Catalano, Louis; Campinhos, Luiz Aaugusto B.; Austin, Luke S.; Lygdas, Panagiotis; Waseem, Mohammad; Palmer, M. Jason; Krijnen, Matthijs R.; Abdel-Ghany, Mahmoud I.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Rizzo, Marco; Oidtmann, Marijke; Pirpiris, Marinis; Loebenberg, Mark I.; Boyer, Martin; Richardson, Martin; Mormino, Matt; Menon, Matthew; Calcagni, Maurizio; Beaumont-Courteau, Maxime; Soong, Maximillian; Wood, Megan M.; Meylaerts, Sven A.; Darowish, Michael; Nancollas, Michael; Prayson, Michael; Quinn, Michael; Grafe, Michael W.; Kessler, Michael W.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Ruiz-Suarez, Michell; Pirela-Cruz, Miguel A.; Mckee, Mike; Merchant, Milind; Tyllianakis, Minos; Shafi, Mohamed; Felipe, Naquira Escobar Luis; Parnes, Nata; Chen, Neal C.; Wilson, Neil; Elias, Nelson; Akabudike, Ngozi M.; Horangic, Nicholas J.; Shortt, Nicholas L.; Schep, Niels; Rossiter, Nigel; Kanakaris, Nikolaos K.; van Eerten, Percy V.; Paladini, Paolo; Melvanki, Parag; Althausen, Peter; Giannoudis, Peter; Hahn, Peter; Evans, Peter J.; Jebson, Peter; Kloen, Peter; Krause, Peter; Brink, Peter R. G.; Schandelmaier, Peter; Peters, Anil; Dantuluri, Phani; Blazar, Philip; Muhl, Philipp; Andreas, Platz; Choudhari, Pradeep; Inna, Prashanth; Gaston, R. Glenn; Haverlag, Robert; Ramli, Radzeli Mohd; Costanzo, Ralph M.; de Bedout, Ramon; Ranade, Ashish; Hauck, Randy; Smith, Raymond Malcolm; Babst, Reto H.; Jenkinson, Richard; Hutchison, Richard L.; GIlbert, Richard S.; Page, Richard S.; Wallensten, Richard; Papandrea, Rick; Zura, Robert D.; Slater, Robert R.; Gray, Robert R. L.; Wagenmakers, Robert; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Hackney, Roger G.; van Riet, Roger; Calfee, Ryan P.; Mehta, Samir; Bouaicha, Samy; Spruijt, Sander; Kakar, Sanjeev; Kaplan, Saul; Duncan, Scott F.; Kaar, Scott G.; Mitchell, Scott; Rowinski, Sergio; van Helden, Svenhjalmar; Jacoby, Sidney M.; Kennedy, Stephen A.; Westly, Stephen K.; Beldner, Steven; Morgan, Steven J.; Sulkers, George; Schepers, Tim; Baxamusa, Taizoon; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Wyrick, Theresa; Begue, Thierry; DeCoster, Thomas; Dienstknecht, Thomas; Varecka, Thomas F.; Higgins, Thomas; Fischer, Thomas J.; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Wright, Thomas; Chesser, Tim; Omara, Timothy; Siff, Todd; Havlifc, Tomo; Neuhaus, Valentin; Sabesan, Vani J.; Nikolaou, Vasileios S.; Verhofstad, Michael; Giordano, Vincenzo; Iyer, Vishwanath M.; Vochteloo, Anne; Batson, W. Arnnold; Hammert, Warren C.; Belangero, William Dias; Satora, Wojciech; Weil, Yoram; Balogh, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial unexplained geographical and surgeon-to-surgeon variation in rates of surgery. One would expect surgeons to treat patients and themselves similarly based on best evidence and accounting for patient preferences. (1) Are surgeons more likely to recommend surgery when choosing for

  7. Genome Wide Association Study to Identify SNPs and CNPs Associated with Development of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    hemorrhagic cystitis . Whereas risk factors for acute urinary morbidity have been well-documented, acute urinary morbidity does not predict strongly...multi-SNP model including SNPs in ART1, ID3, EPDR1, PAH, and XRCC6, was found to be predictive of radiation cystitis among a group of men (n = 197...studies to date have been conducted using relatively small sample sizes, and many look at single measures of urinary toxicity (ex. cystitis ) or

  8. Randomized study of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy versus nasogastric tubes for enteral feeding in head and neck cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corry, J; Poon, W; McPhee, N; Milner, A D; Cruickshank, D; Porceddu, S V; Rischin, D; Peters, L J

    2008-10-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes have largely replaced nasogastric tubes (NGT) for nutritional support of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing curative (chemo)radiotherapy without any good scientific basis. A randomized trial was conducted to compare PEG tubes and NGT in terms of nutritional outcomes, complications, patient satisfaction and cost. The study was closed early because of poor accrual, predominantly due to patients' reluctance to be randomized. There were 33 patients eligible for analysis. Nutritional support with both tubes was good. There were no significant differences in overall complication rates, chest infection rates or in patients' assessment of their overall quality of life. The cost of a PEG tube was 10 times that of an NGT. The duration of use of PEG tubes was significantly longer, a median 139 days compared with a median 66 days for NGT. We found no evidence to support the routine use of PEG tubes over NGT in this patient group.

  9. Transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1) is a serum biomarker of radiation induced fibrosis in patients treated with intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation: preliminary results of a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothe, Dustin L; Coplowitz, Shana; Greenwood, Eleni; Barney, Christian L; Christos, Paul J; Parashar, Bhupesh; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K S Clifford; Wernicke, A Gabriella

    2013-12-01

    To examine a relationship between serum transforming growth factor β -1 (TGF-β1) values and radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF). We conducted a prospective analysis of the development of RIF in 39 women with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0-I breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and accelerated partial breast irradiation via intracavitary brachytherapy (IBAPBI). An enzyme-linked immunoassay (Quantikine, R&D, Minneapolis, MN) was used to measure serum TGF-β1 before surgery, before IBAPBI, and during IBAPBI. Blood samples for TGF-β1 were also collected from 15 healthy, nontreated women (controls). The previously validated tissue compliance meter (TCM) was used to objectively assess RIF. The median time to follow-up for 39 patients was 44 months (range, 5-59 months). RIF was graded by the TCM scale as 0, 1, 2, and 3 in 5 of 20 patients (25%), 6 of 20 patients (30%), 5 of 20 patients (25%), and 4 of 20 patients (20%), respectively. The mean serum TGF-β1 values were significantly higher in patients before surgery than in disease-free controls, as follows: all cancer patients (30,201 ± 5889 pg/mL, P=.02); patients with any type of RIF (32,273 ± 5016 pg/mL, Parea under the curve (AUC)ROC of 0.867 (95% confidence interval 0.700-1.000). The TGF-β1 threshold cutoff was determined to be 31,000 pg/mL, with associated sensitivity and specificity of 77.8% and 90.0%, respectively. TGF-β1 levels correlate with the development of moderate to severe RIF. The pre-IBAPBI mean TGF-β1 levels can serve as an early biomarker for the development of moderate to severe RIF after IBAPBI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Local control and survival in patients with soft tissue sarcomas treated with limb sparing surgery in combination with interstitial brachytherapy and external radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhic, A.; Hovgaard, D.; Mork, Petersen M.

    2008-01-01

    %. Nineteen (49%) patients suffered from some degree of decreased force or function of the affected extremity, 16 (41%) suffered from oedema, 12 (31%) had persistent pain, 8 (21%) suffered from wound complications, and in 4 (10%) of these patients plastic surgery were required. CONCLUSION: Limb sparing......PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate local control, survival and complication rate after treatment of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) with limb-sparing surgery combined with pulsed-dose rate (PDR) interstitial brachytherapy (BRT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). PATIENTS AND METHODS......: A retrospective review of 39 adult patients (female/male=25/14, mean age 51(range 21-78) years) with STS who underwent primary limb-sparing surgery combined with PDR BRT (20Gy) and additional post-operative EBRT (50Gy) during the years 1995-2004. RESULTS: Five patients developed local recurrence after a mean...

  11. The Role of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy with Photons, Protons and Heavy Ions for Treating Extracranial Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Michael Laine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the ability to deliver large doses of ionizing radiation to a tumor has been limited by radiation induced toxicity to normal surrounding tissues. This was the initial impetus for the development of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy, where large volumes of healthy tissue received radiation and were allowed the time to repair the radiation damage. However, advances in radiation delivery techniques and image guidance have allowed for more ablative doses of radiation to be delivered in a very accurate, conformal and safe manner with shortened fractionation schemes. Hypofractionated regimens with photons have already transformed how certain tumor types are treated with radiation therapy. Additionally, hypofractionation is able to deliver a complete course of ablative radiation therapy over a shorter period of time compared to conventional fractionation regimens making treatment more convenient to the patient and potentially more cost-effective. Recently there has been an increased interest in proton therapy because of the potential further improvement in dose distributions achievable due to their unique physical characteristics. Furthermore, with heavier ions the dose conformality is increased and in addition there is potentially a higher biological effectiveness compared to protons and photons. Due to the properties mentioned above, charged particle therapy has already become an attractive modality to further investigate the role of hypofractionation in the treatment of various tumors. This review will discuss the rationale and evolution of hypofractionated radiation therapy, the reported clinical success with initially photon and then charged particle modalities, and further potential implementation into treatment regimens going forward.

  12. Oral Mucosa Dose Parameters Predicting Grade ≥3 Acute Toxicity in Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Treated With Concurrent Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy: An Independent Validation Study Comparing Oral Cavity versus Mucosal Surface Contouring Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaixin; Yang, Ling; Hu, Qiang-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Zhong; Chen, Ming; Chen, Yuanyuan

    2017-10-01

    To determine whether volumes based on the contours of the mucosal surface instead of the oral cavity can be used to predict grade ≥3 acute oral mucosa toxicity in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LANPC) treated with concurrent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and chemotherapy. A standardized method for the oral cavity (oral cavity contours, OCC) and a novel method for the mucosal surface (mucosal surface contours, MSC) were developed for the oral mucosa and prospectively applied to the radiation treatment plans of 92 patients treated with concurrent IMRT and chemotherapy for LANPC. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data were extracted and then toxicity was analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were carried out for both contouring methods. Grade ≥3 acute oral mucosa toxicity occurred to 20.7% (19/92) of patients in the study. A highly significant dose-volume relationship between oral mucosa irradiation and acute oral mucosa toxicity was supported by using both oral cavity and mucosal surface contouring techniques. In logistic regression, body weight loss was an independent factor related to grade ≥3 acute toxicity for OCC and MSC (P=.017 and 0.005, respectively), and the independent factor of dosimetric parameters for OCC and MSC were V30Gy (P=.003) and V50Gy (P=.003) respectively. In the receiver operating characteristics curve, the areas under V30Gy of the OCC curves was 0.753 (P=.001), while the areas under V50Gy of MSC curves was 0.714 (P=.004); the cut-off value was 73.155% (sensitivity, 0.842; specificity, 0.671) and 14.32% (sensitivity, 0.842; specificity, 0.575), respectively. DVH analysis of mucosal surface volumes accurately predicts grade ≥3 acute oral mucosa toxicity in patients with LANPC receiving concurrent IMRT and chemotherapy, but in clinical practice the MSC method appears no better than the OCC one. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Oral Mucosa Dose Parameters Predicting Grade ≥3 Acute Toxicity in Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Treated With Concurrent Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy: An Independent Validation Study Comparing Oral Cavity versus Mucosal Surface Contouring Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaixin Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine whether volumes based on the contours of the mucosal surface instead of the oral cavity can be used to predict grade ≥3 acute oral mucosa toxicity in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LANPC treated with concurrent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and chemotherapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A standardized method for the oral cavity (oral cavity contours, OCC and a novel method for the mucosal surface (mucosal surface contours, MSC were developed for the oral mucosa and prospectively applied to the radiation treatment plans of 92 patients treated with concurrent IMRT and chemotherapy for LANPC. Dose–volume histogram (DVH data were extracted and then toxicity was analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were carried out for both contouring methods. RESULTS: Grade ≥3 acute oral mucosa toxicity occurred to 20.7% (19/92 of patients in the study. A highly significant dose–volume relationship between oral mucosa irradiation and acute oral mucosa toxicity was supported by using both oral cavity and mucosal surface contouring techniques. In logistic regression, body weight loss was an independent factor related to grade ≥3 acute toxicity for OCC and MSC (P = .017 and 0.005, respectively, and the independent factor of dosimetric parameters for OCC and MSC were V30Gy (P = .003 and V50Gy (P = .003 respectively. In the receiver operating characteristics curve, the areas under V30Gy of the OCC curves was 0.753 (P = .001, while the areas under V50Gy of MSC curves was 0.714 (P = .004; the cut-off value was 73.155% (sensitivity, 0.842; specificity, 0.671 and 14.32% (sensitivity, 0.842; specificity, 0.575, respectively. CONCLUSION: DVH analysis of mucosal surface volumes accurately predicts grade ≥3 acute oral mucosa toxicity in patients with LANPC receiving concurrent IMRT and chemotherapy, but in clinical practice the MSC method appears no better than

  14. The cognitive profile of children treated with radiation for acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    radiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. S-J Whitaker, E Schutte. Department of Psychology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. S-J Whitaker, BA ..... Hypofrontality in unmedicated schizophrenia patients studied with PET during performance of a serial verbal learning task. Schizophr Res 2000;43(1):33-46.

  15. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Dental pathologies and osteoradionecrosis (Part 1) literature review and consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Sottocornola, Lara; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Paganelli, Corrado; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Bossi, Paolo; Berruti, Alfredo; Pavanato, Giovanni; Nicolai, Piero; Maroldi, Roberto; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is the typical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Acute side effects (such as oral mucositis, dermatitis, salivary changes, taste alterations, etc.), and late toxicities in particular (such as osteo-radionecrosis,

  16. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Xerostomia and trismus (Part 2). Literature review and consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Bossi, Paolo; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Berruti, Alfredo; Trippa, Fabio; Nicolai, Pietro; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is a well-known radical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Nevertheless acute side effects (such as moist desquamation, skin erythema, loss of taste, mucositis etc.) and in particular late toxicities (osteoradionecrosis,

  17. Defining the "Hostile Pelvis" for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: The Impact of Anatomic Variations in Pelvic Dimensions on Dose Delivered to Target Volumes and Organs at Risk in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Whole Pelvic Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yirmibeşoğlu Erkal, Eda; Karabey, Sinan; Karabey, Ayşegül; Hayran, Mutlu; Erkal, Haldun Şükrü

    2015-07-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of variations in pelvic dimensions on the dose delivered to the target volumes and the organs at risk (OARs) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) to be treated with whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) in an attempt to define the hostile pelvis in terms of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In 45 men with high-risk PCa to be treated with WPRT, the target volumes and the OARs were delineated, the dose constraints for the OARs were defined, and treatment plans were generated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0924 protocol. Six dimensions to reflect the depth, width, and height of the bony pelvis were measured, and 2 indexes were calculated from the planning computed tomographic scans. The minimum dose (Dmin), maximum dose (Dmax), and mean dose (Dmean) for the target volumes and OARs and the partial volumes of each of these structures receiving a specified dose (VD) were calculated from the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The data from the DVHs were correlated with the pelvic dimensions and indexes. According to an overall hostility score (OHS) calculation, 25 patients were grouped as having a hospitable pelvis and 20 as having a hostile pelvis. Regarding the OHS grouping, the DVHs for the bladder, bowel bag, left femoral head, and right femoral head differed in favor of the hospitable pelvis group, and the DVHs for the rectum differed for a range of lower doses in favor of the hospitable pelvis group. Pelvimetry might be used as a guide to define the challenging anatomy or the hostile pelvis in terms of treatment planning for IMRT in patients with high-risk PCa to be treated with WPRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Basics of Radiation Biology When Treating Hyperproliferative Benign Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Rödel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For decades, low- and moderate-dose radiation therapy (RT has been shown to exert a beneficial therapeutic effect in a multitude of non-malignant conditions including painful degenerative muscoloskeletal and hyperproliferative disorders. Dupuytren and Ledderhose diseases are benign fibroproliferative diseases of the hand/foot with fibrotic nodules and fascial cords, which determine debilitating contractures and deformities of fingers/toes, while keloids are exuberant scar formations following burn damage, surgery, and trauma. Although RT has become an established and effective option in the management of these diseases, experimental studies to illustrate cellular composites and factors involved remain to be elucidated. More recent findings, however, indicate the involvement of radiation-sensitive targets like mitotic fibroblasts/myofibroblasts as well as inflammatory cells. Radiation-related molecular mechanisms affecting these target cells include the production of free radicals to hamper proliferative activity and interference with growth factors and cytokines. Moreover, an impairment of activated immune cells involved in both myofibroblast proliferative and inflammatory processes may further contribute to the clinical effects. We here aim at briefly describing mechanisms contributing to a modulation of proliferative and inflammatory processes and to summarize current concepts of treating hyperproliferative diseases by low and moderate doses of ionizing radiation.

  19. L-lysine in Treating Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy With or Without Chemotherapy For Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Mucositis; Oral Complications of Chemotherapy; Oral Complications of Radiation Therapy; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage

  20. Transforming Growth Factor β-1 (TGF-β1) Is a Serum Biomarker of Radiation Induced Fibrosis in Patients Treated With Intracavitary Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: Preliminary Results of a Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothe, Dustin L. [Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Coplowitz, Shana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Greenwood, Eleni [Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Barney, Christian L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Christos, Paul J. [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Parashar, Bhupesh; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K. S. Clifford [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Wernicke, A. Gabriella, E-mail: gaw9008@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To examine a relationship between serum transforming growth factor β -1 (TGF-β1) values and radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF). Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective analysis of the development of RIF in 39 women with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0-I breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and accelerated partial breast irradiation via intracavitary brachytherapy (IBAPBI). An enzyme-linked immunoassay (Quantikine, R and D, Minneapolis, MN) was used to measure serum TGF-β1 before surgery, before IBAPBI, and during IBAPBI. Blood samples for TGF-β1 were also collected from 15 healthy, nontreated women (controls). The previously validated tissue compliance meter (TCM) was used to objectively assess RIF. Results: The median time to follow-up for 39 patients was 44 months (range, 5-59 months). RIF was graded by the TCM scale as 0, 1, 2, and 3 in 5 of 20 patients (25%), 6 of 20 patients (30%), 5 of 20 patients (25%), and 4 of 20 patients (20%), respectively. The mean serum TGF-β1 values were significantly higher in patients before surgery than in disease-free controls, as follows: all cancer patients (30,201 ± 5889 pg/mL, P=.02); patients with any type of RIF (32,273 ± 5016 pg/mL, P<.0001); and women with moderate to severe RIF (34,462 ± 4713 pg/mL, P<0.0001). Patients with moderate to severe RIF had significantly elevated TGF-β1 levels when compared with those with none to mild RIF before surgery (P=.0014) during IBAPBI (P≤0001), and the elevation persisted at 6 months (P≤.001), 12 months (P≤.001), 18 months (P≤.001), and 24 months (P=.12). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of TGF-β1 values predicting moderate to severe RIF was generated with an area under the curve (AUC){sub ROC} of 0.867 (95% confidence interval 0.700-1.000). The TGF-β1 threshold cutoff was determined to be 31,000 pg/mL, with associated sensitivity and specificity of 77.8% and 90.0%, respectively. Conclusions: TGF-β1 levels correlate with

  1. Histopathology of uveal melanomas treated with charged particle radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, J.B.; Char, D.H.

    1987-06-01

    The authors have treated 255 uveal melanomas with helium ion radiation. Twenty-three eyes have been enucleated because of complications and five eyes have been obtained at autopsy. We have evaluated 27 of these eyes. Neovascular glaucoma (10 eyes), painful keratitis (6 eyes), continued tumor growth (4 eyes), and vitreous hemorrhage (2 eyes) were the major complications of treatment that led to enucleation. The degree of tumor necrosis correlated with the size, pigmentation, and anterior extent of the tumor. It did not correlate with the interval from irradiation or with the amount of tumor shrinkage. Mitotic figures were extremely rare in treated tumors, suggesting that the tumor cells have lost their ability to cycle.

  2. Prevention and control of sequels in the mouth of patients treated with radiation therapy for head and neck tumors; Prevencao e controle das sequelas bucais em pacientes irradiados por tumores de cabeca e pescoco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Maria de Fatima Aparecida; Novikoff, Silviene; Tresso, Adriana; Segreto, Roberto Araujo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Setor de Odontologia; Cervantes, Onivaldo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina. Setor de Radioterapia

    2005-04-01

    Surgery and radiation therapy are de main treatments for head and neck cancer. The side effects of the interaction of ionizing radiation on the tissues include dermatitis, mucositis, xerostomia, candidiasis, dysgeusia, dysphagia, caries, trismus, osteoradionecrosis. Objective: To assess dental condition of the patients using a protocol which allows avoiding or reducing the effects of radiation in the tissues of the oral cavity. Materials And Methods: Dental follow-up was performed before, during and up to 180 days after radiation therapy in 12 patients submitted to surgery and radiation therapy or radiation therapy alone. Results: The proportion of effects such as dermatitis, mucositis, dysgeusia, and dysphagia increased from the second week of the treatment until the end of the administrations. There was a clear decrease at the end of the treatment which was close to baseline values after 180 days. The reduction of xerostomia was slower and less effective. No case of caries, trismus, and osteoradionecrosis were observed during the assessment period. Conclusion: Regular dental follow-up associated with preventive measures such as prophylactic management of dental and oral diseases, adequate hygiene, mouth-washing with bicarbonate water and chamomile tea, and topic fluorine application contributed to improve the recovery conditions of patients with cancer of head and neck submitted to radiation therapy. (author)

  3. Benign post-radiation rectal stricture treated with endoscopic balloon dilation and intralesional triamcinolone injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikas, Michael; Touzopoulos, Panagiotis; Mitrakas, Alexandros; Zezos, Petros; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Efremidou, Eleni; Liratzopoulos, Nikolaos; Polychronidis, Alexandros; Kouklakis, George

    2012-09-01

    Post-radiation stricture is a rare complication after pelvis irradiation, but must be in the mind of the clinician evaluating a lower gastrointestinal obstruction. Endoscopy has gained an important role in chronic radiation proctitis with several therapeutic options for management of intestinal strictures. The treatment of rectal strictures has been limited to surgery with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, a less invasive therapeutic approach for benign rectal strictures, endoscopic balloon dilation with or without intralesional steroid injection, has become a common treatment modality. We present a case of benign post-radiation rectal stricture treated successfully with balloon dilation and adjuvant intralesional triamcinolone injection. A 70-year-old woman presented to the emergency room complaining for 2 weeks of diarrhea and meteorism, 11 years after radiation of the pelvis due to adenocarcinoma of the uterus. Colonoscopy revealed a stricture at the rectum and multiple endoscopic biopsies were obtained from the stricture. The stricture was treated with endoscopic balloon dilation and intralesional triamcinolone injection. The procedure appears to have a high success rate and a very low complication rate. Histologic examination of the biopsies revealed non-specific inflammatory changes of the rectal mucosa and no specific changes of the mucosa due to radiation. All biopsies were negative for malignancy. The patient is stricture-free 12 months post-treatment.

  4. Benign Post-Radiation Rectal Stricture Treated with Endoscopic Balloon Dilation and Intralesional Triamcinolone Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Karanikas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-radiation stricture is a rare complication after pelvis irradiation, but must be in the mind of the clinician evaluating a lower gastrointestinal obstruction. Endoscopy has gained an important role in chronic radiation proctitis with several therapeutic options for management of intestinal strictures. The treatment of rectal strictures has been limited to surgery with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, a less invasive therapeutic approach for benign rectal strictures, endoscopic balloon dilation with or without intralesional steroid injection, has become a common treatment modality. We present a case of benign post-radiation rectal stricture treated successfully with balloon dilation and adjuvant intralesional triamcinolone injection. A 70-year-old woman presented to the emergency room complaining for 2 weeks of diarrhea and meteorism, 11 years after radiation of the pelvis due to adenocarcinoma of the uterus. Colonoscopy revealed a stricture at the rectum and multiple endoscopic biopsies were obtained from the stricture. The stricture was treated with endoscopic balloon dilation and intralesional triamcinolone injection. The procedure appears to have a high success rate and a very low complication rate. Histologic examination of the biopsies revealed non-specific inflammatory changes of the rectal mucosa and no specific changes of the mucosa due to radiation. All biopsies were negative for malignancy. The patient is stricture-free 12 months post-treatment.

  5. Hypoacusia in a Patient Treated by Isotretinoin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rosende

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Isotretinoin is the most effective treatment for severe acne, but there are several adverse effects associated with its use, some of them very exceptional (<1/10000. We report one case of hypoacusia and tinnitus in a 15-year-old boy treated with isotretinoin during 6 weeks, who quickly improved after isotretinoin withdrawal. Also, we comment other publications about hearing alterations in patients treated with isotretinoin and other retinoids.

  6. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  7. New technologies in radiation therapy: ensuring patient safety, radiation safety and regulatory issues in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amols, Howard I

    2008-11-01

    New technologies such as intensity modulated and image guided radiation therapy, computer controlled linear accelerators, record and verify systems, electronic charts, and digital imaging have revolutionized radiation therapy over the past 10-15 y. Quality assurance (QA) as historically practiced and as recommended in reports such as American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Groups 40 and 53 needs to be updated to address the increasing complexity and computerization of radiotherapy equipment, and the increased quantity of data defining a treatment plan and treatment delivery. While new technology has reduced the probability of many types of medical events, seeing new types of errors caused by improper use of new technology, communication failures between computers, corrupted or erroneous computer data files, and "software bugs" are now being seen. The increased use of computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography imaging has become routine for many types of radiotherapy treatment planning, and QA for imaging modalities is beyond the expertise of most radiotherapy physicists. Errors in radiotherapy rarely result solely from hardware failures. More commonly they are a combination of computer and human errors. The increased use of radiosurgery, hypofractionation, more complex intensity modulated treatment plans, image guided radiation therapy, and increasing financial pressures to treat more patients in less time will continue to fuel this reliance on high technology and complex computer software. Clinical practitioners and regulatory agencies are beginning to realize that QA for new technologies is a major challenge and poses dangers different in nature than what are historically familiar.

  8. Improving patient safety in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendee, William R; Herman, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in the 1990s, and emphasized in 2000 with the release of an Institute of Medicine report, healthcare providers and institutions have dedicated time and resources to reducing errors that impact the safety and well-being of patients. But in January 2010 the first of a series of articles appeared in the New York Times that described errors in radiation oncology that grievously impacted patients. In response, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American Society of Radiation Oncology sponsored a working meeting entitled "Safety in Radiation Therapy: A Call to Action." The meeting attracted 400 attendees, including medical physicists, radiation oncologists, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, hospital administrators, regulators, and representatives of equipment manufacturers. The meeting was cohosted by 14 organizations in the United States and Canada. The meeting yielded 20 recommendations that provide a pathway to reducing errors and improving patient safety in radiation therapy facilities everywhere.

  9. Skin cancer in patients with chronic radiation dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.M.; Hanke, C.W.; Zollinger, T.W.; Montebello, J.F.; Hornback, N.B.; Norins, A.L.

    1989-04-01

    The cases of 76 patients with chronic radiation dermatitis resulting from low-dose ionizing radiation for benign disease were reviewed retrospectively for risk factors leading to the development of neoplasia. The patients were studied with respect to original hair color, eye color, sun reactive skin type, benign disease treated, area treated, age at treatment, and age at development of first skin cancer. Analysis of data showed 37% of patients had sun-reactive skin type I, 27% had type II, and 36% had type III. Types IV through VI were not represented. There appeared to be an overrepresentation of types I and II. Increased melanin pigmentation may therefore be either directly or indirectly protective against the development of skin cancers in patients who have received low-dose superficial ionizing radiation for benign disease. The sun-reactive skin type of patients with chronic radiation dermatitis may be used as a predictor of skin cancer risk when the total dose of ionizing radiation is not known.

  10. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissouni Soundouss

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Case presentation A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. Conclusion We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders.

  11. Progressive tumefactive fibroinflammatory lesion of the infratemporal fossa treated by radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian O’Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumefactive fibroinflammatory lesion (TFIL is a rare benign tumor in the head and neck region. We present a case of a 40-year-old female with a benign but progressive lesion of the infratemporal fossa, which was diagnosed as TFIL. Patient responded briefly to a course of steroid treatment but eventually showed progression and was unresponsive to further steroids. She was then treated with external beam radiation to a dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. After radiation a slow, gradual decrease in tumor size was noted over the course of years and she is free of disease after more than 11 years of follow-up. The major longterm side effect this patient developed was an expected unilateral radiation-induced retinopathy, due to the close proximity of the lesion to the orbit. The dilemma of treatment of benign disease with radiation with potential long-term complications is discussed and a review of the literature on TFIL is presented.

  12. Life Expectancy in Patients Treated for Osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Osmond, Clive; Cooper, Cyrus

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a chronic disease, carrying an elevated risk of fractures, morbidity, and death. Long-term treatment may be required, but the long-term risks with osteoporosis drugs remain incompletely understood. The competing risk of death may be a barrier to treating the oldest, yet this may...... not be rational if the risk of death is reduced by treatment. It is difficult to devise goal-directed long-term strategies for managing osteoporosis without firm information about residual life expectancy in treated patients. We conducted an observational study in Danish national registries tracking prescriptions...... for osteoporosis drugs, comorbid conditions, and deaths. We included 58,637 patients and 225,084 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Information on deaths until the end of 2013 was retrieved, providing a follow-up period of 10 to 17 years. In men younger than 80 years and women younger than 60 years...

  13. Measurement of radiation exposure in attendants of thyroid cancer patients treated with {sup 131}I; Medicion de la exposicion a la radiacion en familiares de pacientes tratados con {sup 131}I por patologia tiroidea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez G, Y. T.

    2012-07-01

    Patients treated with {sup 131}I for differentiated thyroid cancer present radiological risk to relatives, occupational exposed workers and general public. Recently, the IAEA issued document K-9010241, 2010, which recommends that patient discharge from hospital must be based on the particular status of each patient, unlike the current criteria applied in Mexico based on the exposure rate at a 1 m distance. In this work thermoluminescent dosimeters were used during a 15 day period to measure the effective dose received by 40 family caregivers of patients treated with {sup 131}I, after their release from hospital 'Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia', Mexico. Relatives were classified in two groups, ambulatory (outpatients) and hospitalized (inpatients), according to the release mode of the patient. Measurements were performed for 20 family caregivers in each group. The effective dose received by all family members of outpatient and inpatient groups was found to be smaller that 5 mSv. In addition, 70 and 90% of inpatient and outpatient groups, respectively, received doses lower than 1 mSv. These data provide information which allow to give recommendations of possible modifications to current regulations in Mexico regarding discharge from hospital of patients treated with radiopharmaceuticals. (Author)

  14. Acupuncture treatment of patients with radiation-induced xerostomia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, M.; Dawidson, I.; Johnson, G.; Angmar-Maansson, B. [Karolinska Inst., Huddinge (Sweden). Dept. of Cardiology; Fernberg, J.-O. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of General Oncology

    1996-05-01

    Xerostomia is a common and usually irreversible side effect in patients receiving radiation therapy (>50 Gy) for head and neck cancer. Of 38 patients with radiation-induced xerostomia, 20 in the experimental group were treated with classical acupuncture and 18 patients in the control group received superficial acupuncture as placebo. Within both groups the patients showed significantly increased salivary flow rates after the acupuncture treatment. In the experimental group 68% and in the control group 50% of the patients had increased salivary flow rates at the end of the observation period. Among those patients who had had all their salivary glands irradiated, 50% in both groups showed increased salivary flow rates (>20%) by the end of the observation period of 1 year. The study indicates that among the patients who had increased salivary flow rates already after the first 12 acupuncture sessions, the majority had high probability of continual improvement after the completion of acupuncture treatment. (Author).

  15. Definitive treatment of anal canal carcinoma with radiotherapy: Adverse impact of a pre-radiation resection. A retrospective study of 57 patients treated with curative intent;Radiotherapie a visee curative du carcinome du canal anal: impact defavorable d'une resection prealable. Etude retrospective de 57 patients traites en intention curative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coquard, R. [Centre de Radiotherapie Bayard, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Cenni, J.C. [Clinique du Tonkin, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Artru, P.; Lledo, G. [Hopital prive Jean-Mermoz, 69 - Lyon (France); Chalabreysse, P. [Centre de pathologie CY-PATH (Fondation Marcel-Merieux), 69 - Lyon (France); Queneau, P.E. [Hopital prive de l' Est Lyonnais, 69 -Saint-Priest (France); Taieb, S. [Centre hospitalier mutualiste des Portes-du-Sud, 69 - Feyzin (France); Alessio, A. [Clinique Trenel, 69 -Sainte-Colombe (France)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose To describe retrospectively the overall survival, the cancer specific survival and the tumor control in an homogeneous series of patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal treated with definitive radiotherapy; to assess the impact of brachytherapy, chemotherapy and pre-radiotherapy resection on the risk of recurrence. Patients and methods From 1997 to 2007, 57 patients (pts) presenting with an epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal (T1: 14, T2: 33, T3-4: 10, N0: 31, N1: 19, N2: 3, N3: 4, M0: 57) were treated with definitive radiotherapy by the same radiation oncologist. The treatment included an external beam irradiation (E.B.R.T.) given to the posterior pelvis (45 Gy/25 fractions) and, six weeks later, a boost delivered with interstitial brachytherapy (37/57) or external beam irradiation (20/57). Twelve pts had undergone a surgical resection of the tumour before radiotherapy. A belly board was used for E.B.R.T. in 13 pts. A concurrent platinum based chemotherapy was done in 42 pts. The mean follow-up was 57 months. Results The overall survival rate at 5 years was 89% with a cause specific survival of 96%. Five patients recurred (5-year rate: 12%: four had local relapse (5-year rate: 8%), four had groin recurrence, and distant metastases were seen in two. In univariate analysis, the risk of relapse was higher in patients who had undergone a pre-radiation excision (p = 0.018), in those who did not receive chemotherapy (p = 0.076) and in those who were irradiated on a belly board (p = 0.049). In multivariate analysis, a pre-radiotherapy resection (p = 0.084) had an inverse impact on the tumour control reaching the level of statistical significance and the use of a belly board was of marginal influence (p = 0.13). Conclusion Radiotherapy and chemo radiation with cisplatin-based chemotherapy cure a vast majority of patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal. Therapeutic factors that may interfere with the definition of the target volume and

  16. The cognitive profile of children treated with radiation for acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Cranial radiation is part of a treatment protocol for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in South Africa. Radiation is known to disrupt the myelination and integrity of white matter tracts in the brain. Associated cognitive impairment has been well documented in other countries, but not to the same ...

  17. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Eftekhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right–sided cancer. Methods: To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. Results: A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46. In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03 and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049 walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%, while in five of the controls (13.9%,(Odds ratio=1.3. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusion: The risk of radiation induced myocardial

  18. Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Medulloblastoma and Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors: Outcomes for Very Young Children Treated With Upfront Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Rachel B., E-mail: rbjimenez@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sethi, Roshan [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Depauw, Nicolas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pulsifer, Margaret B. [Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); McBride, Sean M. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ebb, David [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fullerton, Barbara C.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; MacDonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the early outcomes for very young children with medulloblastoma or supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (SPNET) treated with upfront chemotherapy followed by 3-dimensional proton radiation therapy (3D-CPT). Methods and Materials: All patients aged <60 months with medulloblastoma or SPNET treated with chemotherapy before 3D-CPT from 2002 to 2010 at our institution were included. All patients underwent maximal surgical resection, chemotherapy, and adjuvant 3D-CPT with either craniospinal irradiation followed by involved-field radiation therapy or involved-field radiation therapy alone. Results: Fifteen patients (median age at diagnosis, 35 months) were treated with high-dose chemotherapy and 3D-CPT. Twelve of 15 patients had medulloblastoma; 3 of 15 patients had SPNET. Median time from surgery to initiation of radiation was 219 days. Median craniospinal irradiation dose was 21.6 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness); median boost dose was 54.0 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness). At a median of 39 months from completion of radiation, 1 of 15 was deceased after a local failure, 1 of 15 had died from a non-disease-related cause, and the remaining 13 of 15 patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence. Ototoxicity and endocrinopathies were the most common long-term toxicities, with 2 of 15 children requiring hearing aids and 3 of 15 requiring exogenous hormones. Conclusions: Proton radiation after chemotherapy resulted in good disease outcomes for a small cohort of very young patients with medulloblastoma and SPNET. Longer follow-up and larger numbers of patients are needed to assess long-term outcomes and late toxicity.

  19. Prognostic impact of external beam radiation therapy in patients treated with and without extended surgery and intraoperative electrons for locally recurrent rectal cancer: 16-year experience in a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Felipe A; Sole, Claudio V; Alvarez de Sierra, Pedro; Gómez-Espí, Marina; Blanco, Jose; Lozano, Miguel A; Del Valle, Emilio; Rodriguez, Marcos; Muñoz-Calero, Alberto; Turégano, Fernando; Herranz, Rafael; Gonzalez-Bayon, Luis; García-Sabrido, Jose Luis

    2013-08-01

    To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Long-Term Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9903: A Randomized Phase 3 Trial to Assess the Effect of Erythropoietin on Local-Regional Control in Anemic Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenouda, George, E-mail: George.shenouda@muhc.mcgill.ca [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Zhang, Qiang [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center (United States); Ang, K. Kian [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Machtay, Mitchell [University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Parliament, Matthew B. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Hershock, Diane [University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Suntharalingam, Mohan [University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lin, Alexander [University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Rotman, Marvin [Brooklyn Minority-based Community Clinical Oncology Program, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Nabid, Abdenour [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke (Québec), Québec (Canada); Hong, Susan [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Shehata, Sarwat [Northeastern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre, Sudbury, Ontario (Canada); Cmelak, Anthony J. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Sultanem, Khalil [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Le, Quynh-Thu [Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: This paper reports long-term results of RTOG 9903, to determine whether the addition of erythropoietin (EPO) would improve the outcomes of radiation therapy (RT) in mildly to moderately anemic patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCCa). Methods and Materials: The trial included HNSCCa patients treated with definitive RT. Patients with stage III or IV disease received concomitant chemoradiation therapy or accelerated fractionation. Pretreatment hemoglobin levels were required to be between 9.0 and 13.5 g/dL (12.5 g/dL for females). EPO, 40,000 U, was administered weekly starting 7 to 10 days before RT was initiated in the RT + EPO arm. Results: A total of 141 of 148 enrolled patients were evaluable. The baseline median hemoglobin level was 12.1 g/dL. In the RT + EPO arm, the mean hemoglobin level at 4 weeks increased by 1.66 g/dL, whereas it decreased by 0.24 g/dL in the RT arm. With a median follow-up of 7.95 years (range: 1.66-10.08 years) for surviving patients and 3.33 years for all patients (range: 0.03-10.08 years), the 5-year estimate of local-regional failure was 46.2% versus 39.4% (P=.42), local-regional progression-free survival was 31.5% versus 37.6% (P=.20), and overall survival was 36.9% versus 38.2% (P=.54) for the RT + EPO and RT arms, respectively. Late toxicity was not different between the 2 arms. Conclusions: This long-term analysis confirmed that despite the ability of EPO to raise hemoglobin levels in anemic patients with HNSCCa, it did not improve outcomes when added to RT. The possibility of a detrimental effect of EPO could not be ruled out.

  1. Brachial Plexopathy in Apical Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation: Dosimetric Analysis and Clinical Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eblan, Michael J.; Corradetti, Michael N.; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Xanthopoulos, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mitra, Nandita [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Christodouleas, John P.; Grover, Surbhi; Fernandes, Annemarie T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Langer, Corey J.; Evans, Tracey L.; Stevenson, James [Department of Medical Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Apisarnthanarax, Smith, E-mail: apisarns@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Data are limited on the clinical significance of brachial plexopathy in patients with apical non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy. We report the rates of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) and tumor-related brachial plexopathy (TRBP) and associated dosimetric parameters in apical NSCLC patients. Methods and Materials: Charts of NSCLC patients with primary upper lobe or superiorly located nodal disease who received {>=}50 Gy of definitive conventionally fractionated radiation or chemoradiation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of brachial plexopathy and categorized as RIBP, TRBP, or trauma-related. Dosimetric data were gathered on ipsilateral brachial plexuses (IBP) contoured according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group atlas guidelines. Results: Eighty patients were identified with a median follow-up and survival time of 17.2 and 17.7 months, respectively. The median prescribed dose was 66.6 Gy (range, 50.4-84.0), and 71% of patients received concurrent chemotherapy. RIBP occurred in 5 patients with an estimated 3-year rate of 12% when accounting for competing risk of death. Seven patients developed TRBP (estimated 3-year rate of 13%), comprising 24% of patients who developed locoregional failures. Grade 3 brachial plexopathy was more common in patients who experienced TRBP than RIBP (57% vs 20%). No patient who received {<=}78 Gy to the IBP developed RIBP. On multivariable competing risk analysis, IBP V76 receiving {>=}1 cc, and primary tumor failure had the highest hazard ratios for developing RIBP and TRBP, respectively. Conclusions: RIBP is a relatively uncommon complication in patients with apical NSCLC tumors receiving definitive doses of radiation, while patients who develop primary tumor failures are at high risk for developing morbid TRBP. These findings suggest that the importance of primary tumor control with adequate doses of radiation outweigh the risk of RIBP in this population of

  2. Somatic Mutations of tradescantia 4430 treated with radiation and mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Jeon; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Yup [Dept.of Science and Biotechnology, Jeonju University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-11-15

    Tradescantia 4430 clone is an interspecific hybrid made by artificially crossing T. hirsutiflora with T. subacaulis. It has hereditary heteromorphy in its flower color, blue dominant and pink recessive. The hybrid clone is exttremely sensitive to ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens. Groups of inflorescence cuttings were irradiated with 0.3, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Gy. After irradiation, the cuttings were maintained at 24 degrees C under a controlled light:dark (14 : 10) cycle. Five days after irradiation, mutations started to increase rapidly and reached a maximum rate during 8⁓10 days after irradiation. Mutation frequencies increased with radiation dose and with mercury concentration. In conclusion irradiation as well as mercury caused a dose- or concentration-response relationship in the somatic mutation frequencies of Tradescantia 4430. Tradescantia 4430 proved to be a good material for studying the combined effect of radiation and mercury.

  3. Survival times for canine intranasal sarcomas treated with radiation therapy: 86 cases (1996-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sones, Evan; Smith, Annette; Schleis, Stephanie; Brawner, William; Almond, Gregory; Taylor, Kathryn; Haney, Siobhan; Wypij, Jackie; Keyerleber, Michele; Arthur, Jennifer; Hamilton, Terrance; Lawrence, Jessica; Gieger, Tracy; Sellon, Rance; Wright, Zack

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomas comprise approximately one-third of canine intranasal tumors, however few veterinary studies have described survival times of dogs with histologic subtypes of sarcomas separately from other intranasal tumors. One objective of this study was to describe median survival times for dogs treated with radiation therapy for intranasal sarcomas. A second objective was to compare survival times for dogs treated with three radiation therapy protocols: daily-fractionated radiation therapy; Monday, Wednesday, and Friday fractionated radiation therapy; and palliative radiation therapy. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for dogs that had been treated with radiation therapy for confirmed intranasal sarcoma. A total of 86 dogs met inclusion criteria. Overall median survival time for included dogs was 444 days. Median survival time for dogs with chondrosarcoma (n = 42) was 463 days, fibrosarcoma (n = 12) 379 days, osteosarcoma (n = 6) 624 days, and undifferentiated sarcoma (n = 22) 344 days. Dogs treated with daily-fractionated radiation therapy protocols; Monday, Wednesday and Friday fractionated radiation therapy protocols; and palliative radiation therapy protocols had median survival times of 641, 347, and 305 days, respectively. A significant difference in survival time was found for dogs receiving curative intent radiation therapy vs. palliative radiation therapy (P = 0.032). A significant difference in survival time was also found for dogs receiving daily-fractionated radiation therapy vs. Monday, Wednesday and Friday fractionated radiation therapy (P = 0.0134). Findings from this study support the use of curative intent radiation therapy for dogs with intranasal sarcoma. Future prospective, randomized trials are needed for confirmation of treatment benefits. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  4. Ultrasound elastography in patients with rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, S R; Vagn-Hansen, C; Sørensen, T

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current literature has described several predictive markers in rectal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation, but so far none of them have been validated for clinical use. The purpose of the present study was to compare quantitative elastography based on ultrasound measurements...... in the course of chemoradiation with tumor response based on T stage classification and the Mandard tumor regression grading (TRG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively examined 31 patients with rectal cancer planned for high dose radiochemotherapy. The tumor and the mesorectal fat elasticity were measured...... using the Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse to generate information on the mechanical properties of the tissue. The objective quantitative elastography shear wave velocity was compared to the T stage classification and TRG. RESULTS: The baseline mean tumor elasticity was 3.13m/s. Two and six weeks after...

  5. Proton radiation therapy for pediatric medulloblastoma and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors: outcomes for very young children treated with upfront chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Rachel B; Sethi, Roshan; Depauw, Nicolas; Pulsifer, Margaret B; Adams, Judith; McBride, Sean M; Ebb, David; Fullerton, Barbara C; Tarbell, Nancy J; Yock, Torunn I; Macdonald, Shannon M

    2013-09-01

    To report the early outcomes for very young children with medulloblastoma or supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (SPNET) treated with upfront chemotherapy followed by 3-dimensional proton radiation therapy (3D-CPT). All patients aged chemotherapy before 3D-CPT from 2002 to 2010 at our institution were included. All patients underwent maximal surgical resection, chemotherapy, and adjuvant 3D-CPT with either craniospinal irradiation followed by involved-field radiation therapy or involved-field radiation therapy alone. Fifteen patients (median age at diagnosis, 35 months) were treated with high-dose chemotherapy and 3D-CPT. Twelve of 15 patients had medulloblastoma; 3 of 15 patients had SPNET. Median time from surgery to initiation of radiation was 219 days. Median craniospinal irradiation dose was 21.6 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness); median boost dose was 54.0 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness). At a median of 39 months from completion of radiation, 1 of 15 was deceased after a local failure, 1 of 15 had died from a non-disease-related cause, and the remaining 13 of 15 patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence. Ototoxicity and endocrinopathies were the most common long-term toxicities, with 2 of 15 children requiring hearing aids and 3 of 15 requiring exogenous hormones. Proton radiation after chemotherapy resulted in good disease outcomes for a small cohort of very young patients with medulloblastoma and SPNET. Longer follow-up and larger numbers of patients are needed to assess long-term outcomes and late toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation port cutaneous metastases: Reports of two patients whose recurrent visceral cancers presented as skin lesions at the site of previous radiation and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Spencer Hoyt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is associated with a variety of complications, including the development of primary skin cancers in the radiated region. However, it is rare for patients with visceral cancers who are treated with radiation therapy to subsequently develop cutaneous metastasis within the radiation port. We describe two patients with internal malignancies who developed cutaneous metastases within their radiation ports following radiotherapy. In addition, we used PubMed to perform an extensive literature review and identify additional reports of cutaneous metastasis within a radiation port. We excluded patients who developed melanoma or primary skin cancers in the radiation port. We also excluded patients with non-solid organ malignancies. Herein, we summarize the characteristics of 23 additional patients who experienced radiation port cutaneous metastases and explore possible mechanisms for the occurrence of radiation port cutaneous metastases.

  7. The cognitive profile of children treated with radiation for acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Demyelination induced by the radiation used in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) diminishes the white matter in the brain.1 At least one neuropsychological consequence of demyelination is a reduction in processing speed.2 A brain region identified as being particularly sensitive to disruptions.

  8. Inter-scan and inter-observer tumour volume delineation variability on cone beam computed tomography in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying; Lee, Stephanie; Agrawal, Vishesh; Romano, John; Baldini, Elizabeth H; Chen, Aileen B; Kozono, David E; Killoran, Joseph H; Wagar, Matthew; Hacker, Fred L; Aerts, Hugo Jwl; Lewis, John H; Mak, Raymond H

    2017-02-01

    Quantification of volume changes on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) during lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and for adaptive treatment planning. This study quantifies inter-scan and inter-observer variability in tumour volume delineation on CBCT. Three clinicians independently contoured the primary gross tumour volume (GTV) manually on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (post) for 19 NSCLC patients. Relative volume differences (RVD) were calculated between the pre- and post-CBCTs for a given treatment and between any two of three observers for a given CBCT. Coefficient of variation (CV) was used to quantitatively measure and compare the extent of variability. Inter-observer variability had a significantly higher CV of 0.15 ± 0.13 compared to inter-scan CV of 0.03 ± 0.04 with P volume delineation on CBCT with greatest variability for small tumours (volume change during SBRT treatment for tumours with diameter greater than 2 cm, with larger thresholds needed for smaller tumours. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  9. Quality of life study in prostate cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy: comparing late bowel and bladder quality of life symptoms to that of the normal population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, A L; Watkins Bruner, D; Peter, R; Hanks, G E

    2001-01-01

    The goals of this study were twofold. First, differences were quantified for symptoms that impact bowel and bladder quality of life (QOL) in prostate cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) alone to the prostate vs. whole pelvis with prostate boost. Second, bowel and bladder QOL measures for these patients were compared to those of the normal population of men with a similar age distribution. Two health status surveys evaluating bowel and bladder functioning, along with the AUA Symptom Problem Index and the BPH Impact Index, were mailed to 195 prostate cancer patients treated with 3DCRT between 12/92 and 11/95 at Fox Chase Cancer Center by a single clinician (GH). No patient received hormonal management as part of his treatment. Ninety-five patients had pretreatment PSA levels or =10 ng/ml, T2B/T3 tumors, Gleason scores 7-10, or perineural invasion. These patients were treated to the whole pelvis followed by a boost to the prostate and are referred to as Group II. Frequencies were tabulated, and differences in percentages for the two groups were evaluated using the two-tailed Fisher's Exact Test. Overall percentages were compared to those for equivalent measures reported by Litwin (1999) based on a normal population of men with a mean age of 73 years (range 47-86). Comparisons to the normal population were also evaluated using two-tailed Fisher's Exact p values. The mailing yielded a high response rate of 71% (n = 139, 66 in Group I and 73 in Group II). The mean age was 67 (range 49-82), and the median ICRU dose levels for Groups I and II were 73 and 76 Gy, respectively. Responses relating to bladder symptoms were similar for Groups I and II, except for the degree of bother associated with trouble in urination over the last month. Percentages for no bother at all were 66% and 56% for Groups I and II, respectively. Observed differences in bowel functioning related to rectal urgency over the past year (22% vs. 40% for Groups I

  10. Intraoperative radiation therapy for breast cancer patients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutta SW

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sunil W Dutta,1 Shayna L Showalter,2 Timothy N Showalter,1 Bruce Libby,1 Daniel M Trifiletti1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI provides an attractive alternative to whole breast irradiation (WBI through normal tissue radiation exposure and reduced treatment duration. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT is a form of APBI with the shortest time interval, as it delivers the entirety of a planned radiation course at the time of breast surgery. However, faster is not always better, and IORT has been met with healthy skepticism. Patients treated with IORT have an increased compliance and overall satisfaction when compared to patients treated with WBI. However, early randomized trial results demonstrated an increased rate of recurrence after IORT, slowing its widespread adoption. Despite these controversies, IORT utilization is increasing nationally and several novel developments are aimed at continuing to minimize the risk of recurrence and treatment-related toxicity while maximizing the patient experience. Keywords: IORT, lumpectomy, breast conservation, electron, photon, evidence

  11. Monitoring multiple myeloma patients treated with daratumumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCudden, Christopher; Axel, Amy E; Slaets, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    and IFE can confound the use of these tests for response assessment in clinical trials and disease monitoring. METHODS: To discriminate between endogenous myeloma protein and daratumumab, a daratumumab-specific immunofixation electrophoresis reflex assay (DIRA) was developed using a mouse anti......-daratumumab antibody. To evaluate whether anti-daratumumab bound to and shifted the migration pattern of daratumumab, it was spiked into daratumumab-containing serum and resolved by IFE/SPE. The presence (DIRA positive) or absence (DIRA negative) of residual M-protein in daratumumab-treated patient samples...... was evaluated using predetermined assessment criteria. DIRA was evaluated for specificity, limit of sensitivity, and reproducibility. RESULTS: In all of the tested samples, DIRA distinguished between daratumumab and residual M-protein in commercial serum samples spiked with daratumumab and in daratumumab...

  12. Adding Chemotherapy to Radiation Improves Survival for Some Patients with Rare Brain Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-term results from two clinical trials confirm that certain patients with anaplastic oligodendrogliomas live substantially longer if they are treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy rather than radiatiation alone.

  13. MR imaging predictors of local control of glottic squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiation alone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ljumanovic, Redina; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van Wattingen, Menno; Schenk, Barry; Knol, Dirk L.; Leemans, C. Rene; Castelijns, Jonas A.

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the prognostic significance of magnetic resonance ( MR) imaging - determined tumor parameters, especially the presence of cartilage invasion, regarding local control of glottic squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiation therapy ( RT) alone. Materials and

  14. Primary MALT Lymphoma of the Breast Treated with Definitive Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hissourou III

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a case of a 59-year-old woman, with a family history of breast cancer, who presented with extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (MALT of the left breast. She received definitive radiation therapy and remains without evidence of disease. Here, we present a case and review the current literature to determine the optimal treatment of this rare presentation of MALT.

  15. Genetic Variants of NPAT-ATM and AURKA are Associated With an Early Adverse Reaction in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Patients With Cervical Cancer Treated With Pelvic Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Atsuko; Suga, Tomo; Shoji, Yoshimi [RadGenomics Project, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Hitoshi [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yoshinaga, Shinji [Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ohara, Kiyoshi [Tsukuba University Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan); Ariga, Hisanori [Tohoku University Hospital, Miyagi (Japan); Nomura, Kuninori [Toyama University Hospital, Toyama (Japan); Shibamoto, Yuta [Nagoya City University Hospital, Aichi (Japan); Ishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Moritake, Takashi; Michikawa, Yuichi; Iwakawa, Mayumi [RadGenomics Project, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Imai, Takashi, E-mail: imait@nirs.go.jp [RadGenomics Project, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: This study sought to associate polymorphisms in genes related to cell cycle regulation or genome maintenance with radiotherapy (RT)-induced an early adverse reaction (EAR) in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: This study enrolled 243 cervical cancer patients who were treated with pelvic RT. An early gastrointestinal reaction was graded using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2. Clinical factors of the enrolled patients were analyzed, and 208 patients were grouped for genetic analysis according to their EAR (Grade {<=}1, n = 150; Grade {>=}2, n = 58). Genomic DNA was genotyped, and association with the risk of EAR for 44 functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 19 candidate genes was assessed by single-locus, haplotype, and multilocus analyses. Results: Our analysis revealed two haplotypes to be associated with an increased risk of EAR. The first, comprising rs625120C, rs189037T, rs228589A, and rs183460G, is located between the 5' ends of NPAT and ATM (OR = 1.86; 95% CI, 1.21-2.87), whereas the second is located in the AURKA gene and comprises rs2273535A and rs1047972G (OR = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.10-2.78). A third haplotype, rs2273535T and rs1047972A in AURKA, was associated with a reduced EAR risk (OR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.20-0.89). The risk of EAR was significantly higher among patients with both risk diplotypes than in those possessing the other diplotypes (OR = 3.24; 95% CI, 1.52-6.92). Conclusions: Individual radiosensitivity of intestine may be determined by haplotypes in the NPAT-ATM and AURKA genes. These variants should be explored in larger association studies in cervical cancer patients.

  16. Synchronous malignant vagal paraganglioma with contralateral carotid body paraganglioma treated by radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devlina Chakarvarty

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Paragangliomas are rare tumors and very few cases of malignant vagal paraganglioma with synchronous carotid body paraganglioma have been reported. We report a case of a 20-year old male who presented with slow growing bilateral neck masses of eight years duration. He had symptoms of dysphagia to solids, occasional mouth breathing and hoarseness of voice. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC performed where he lived showed a sinus histiocytosis and he was administered anti-tubercular treatment for six months without any improvement in his symptoms. His physical examination revealed pulsatile, soft to firm, non-tender swellings over the anterolateral neck confined to the upper-mid jugulo-diagastric region on both sides. Direct laryngoscopy examination revealed a bulge on the posterior pharyngeal wall and another over the right lateral pharyngeal wall. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, 99mTc-labeled octreotide scan and angiography diagnosed the swellings as carotid body paraganglioma, stage III on the right side with left-sided vagal malignant paraganglioma. Surgery was ruled out as a high morbidity with additional risk to life was expected due to the highly vascular nature of the tumor. The patient was treated with radiation therapy by image guided radiation to a dose of 5040cGy in 28 fractions. At a follow-up at 16 months, the tumors have regressed bilaterally and the patient can take solids with ease.

  17. Diagnostic radiation exposure in pediatric trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Marissa A; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Nabaweesi, Rosemary; Locke, Paul; Ziegfeld, Susan; Brown, Robert

    2011-02-01

    The amount of imaging studies performed for disease diagnosis has been rapidly increasing. We examined the amount of radiation exposure that pediatric trauma patients receive because they are an at-risk population. Our hypothesis was that pediatric trauma patients are exposed to high levels of radiation during a single hospital visit. Retrospective review of children who presented to Johns Hopkins Pediatric Trauma Center from July 1, 2004, to June 30, 2005. Radiographic studies were recorded for each patient and doses were calculated to give a total effective dose of radiation. All radiographic studies that each child received during evaluation, including any associated hospital admission, were included. A total of 945 children were evaluated during the study year. A total of 719 children were included in the analysis. Mean age was 7.8 (±4.6) years. Four thousand six hundred three radiographic studies were performed; 1,457 were computed tomography (CT) studies (31.7%). Average radiation dose was 12.8 (±12) mSv. We found that while CT accounted for only 31.7% of the radiologic studies performed, it accounted for 91% of the total radiation dose. Mean dose for admitted children was 17.9 (±13.8) mSv. Mean dose for discharged children was 8.4 (±7.8) mSv (pcumulative radiation exposure can be high. In young children with relatively long life spans, the benefit of each imaging study and the cumulative radiation dose should be weighed against the long-term risks of increased exposure.

  18. Radiation synovectomy: treatment option for haemophilia patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ablation of the synovium with radiopharmaceuticals, referred to as radiation synovectomy, (RS), has emerged as a simple affordable and safe procedure that is highly effective in preventing chronic disabling end stage arthritis in haemophilia patients. Objective: To provide a review of the principles and role of ...

  19. Patient position verification with oblique radiation beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsema, Nanna M.; van den Bergh, Alfons C. M.; Burlage, Fred R.; Bijl, Henk P.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Meertens, Harm

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In this study we investigated whether the position of head and neck cancer patients during radiotherapy could be determined from portal images of oblique radiation beams. Currently applied additional anterior posterior (AP) and lateral verification beams could then be abandoned. Method: The

  20. Predictors of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Receiving Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Smith, Grace L.; Milgrom, Sarah; Osborne, Eleanor M.; Reddy, Jay P.; Akhtari, Mani; Reed, Valerie; Arzu, Isidora; Allen, Pamela K.; Wogan, Christine F.; Fanale, Michele A.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Turturro, Francesco; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Fowler, Nathan; Westin, Jason; Nastoupil, Loretta; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Rodriguez, Alma; Ahmed, Sairah; Nieto, Yago; Dabaja, Bouthaina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Few studies to date have evaluated factors associated with the development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), especially in patients treated with contemporary radiation techniques. These patients represent a unique group owing to the often large radiation target volumes within the mediastinum and to the potential to receive several lines of chemotherapy that add to pulmonary toxicity for relapsed or refractory disease. Our objective was to determine the incidence and clinical and dosimetric risk factors associated with RP in lymphoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a single institution. Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical charts and radiation records of 150 consecutive patients who received mediastinal IMRT for HL and NHL from 2009 through 2013. Clinical and dosimetric predictors associated with RP per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute toxicity criteria were identified in univariate analysis using the Pearson χ2 test and logistic multivariate regression. Results Mediastinal radiation was administered as consolidation therapy in 110 patients with newly diagnosed HL or NHL and in 40 patients with relapsed or refractory disease. The overall incidence of RP (RTOG grade 1–3) was 14% in the entire cohort. Risk of RP was increased for patients who received radiation for relapsed or refractory disease (25%) versus those who received consolidation (10%, P=0.019). Several dosimetric parameters predicted RP, including mean lung dose (MLD) >13.5 Gy, V20 >30%, V15 >35%, V10 >40% and V5>55%. The likelihood ratio (LR) χ2 value was highest for V5lymphoma, all dosimetric parameters predicted RP, although small doses to large volumes of lung had the greatest influence. Patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma who received salvage chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were at higher risk for symptomatic RP. PMID:25863764

  1. Does Statin or ASA Affect Survival When Prostate Cancer Is Treated with External Beam Radiation Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Caon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prior studies evaluating the effect of statins or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA on the survival of men receiving prostate cancer were treatment have reported conflicting results, and have not adjusted for comorbidity. Our aim is to investigate the influence of statins and ASA on prostate cancer survival, when comorbidity is adjusted for, in men treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT for prostate cancer. Methods. A cohort of 3851 patients with prostate cancer treated with curative EBRT ± androgen deprivation therapy (ADT between 2000 and 2007. Stage, treatment, medication use, and Charlson comorbidity index (CCI scores were analyzed. Results. Median followup was 8.4 years. Mean age was 70.3 years. Neoadjuvant ADT was used in 67%. Statins were used in 23%, ASA in 24%, and both in 11%. Comorbidity scores were 0 in 65%, 1 in 25%, and ≥2 in 10% of patients. Statin and ASA use were associated with increased age and comorbidity. Although statin and ASA use were significantly associated with improved prostate cancer specific survival (PCSS on univariate analysis, neither were on multivariate analysis. Conclusion. Neither statin nor ASA use impacted PCSS on multivariate competing risks analysis. Survival was impacted by increased comorbidity as well as statin and ASA use.

  2. Short and long term radiation induced cardiovascular disease in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Nielsen, Hanne Melgaard

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced cardiovascular disease is well described as a late effect in cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Advancements in surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have led to an increasing number of cancer survivors with resultant long-term side effects related to their cancer...

  3. Sideroblastic anemia as a preleukemic event in patients treated for Hodgkin's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitahara, M.; Cosgriff, T.M.; Eyre, H.J.

    1980-05-01

    Sideroblastic anemia after treatment for Hodgkin's disease was seen in two patients 3 years after completion of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. This was followed in both by the development of myelomonoblastic leukemia. No evidence of recurrent Hodgkin's disease was present in either patient. Our observation suggests that development of sideroblastic anemia in patients previously treated for Hodgkin's disease is probably secondary to the treatment and is a preleukemic event.

  4. Incidence of cancer in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients treated 25 years previously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simony, Ane; Hansen, Emil Jesper; Christensen, Steen Bach; Carreon, Leah Y; Andersen, Mikkel Osterheden

    2016-10-01

    To report the incidence of cancer in a cohort of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients treated 25 years previously. 215 consecutive AIS patients treated between 1983 and 1990 were identified and requested to return for clinical and radiographic examination. The incidence of cancer was determined through chart review and follow-up interviews. Using the original radiographic log file that included patient position, mAs, kV and the total number of X-rays taken, a radiation physicist calculated the total radiation dose during treatment and follow-up adjusted for BMI and sex. From the original cohort of 215 consecutive AIS patients, radiation information was available in 211 of the patients, and medical charts were available in 209 AIS patients. 170 (83 %) of the 205 AIS patients participated in the follow-up study with questionnaires. The calculated mean total radiation exposure was 0.8-1.4 mSV per examination and 2.4-5.6 mSv/year. An average of 16 radiographs were taken during the treatment period. Nine AIS patients developed cancer, mostly breast (3) and endometrial (4). The AIS patients had a relative risk of 4.8 (CI 2.3-5.8, p cancer compared to the normal Danish population. The overall cancer rate in this AIS cohort was 4.3 % which is five times higher than compared to the age-matched Danish population, and endometrial and breast cancer was most frequent. The radiation dose applied to the patients in this study, is comparable to modern equipment. This is to our knowledge the first study to report increased rates of endometrial cancers in a cohort of AIS patients, and future attention is needed to reduce the radiation dose distributed to the AIS patients both pre-operatively and during surgery.

  5. Predictors of overall satisfaction of cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker-Schiebe M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Martina Becker-Schiebe,1,2 Uwe Pinkert,1 Tahera Ahmad,1 Christof Schäfer,3 Wolfgang Hoffmann,1 Heiko Franz4 1Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Städtisches Klinikum Braunschweig gGmbH, Braunschweig, 2Radiation Oncology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, 3Radiation Oncology Straubing, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, 4Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Städtisches Klinikum Braunschweig gGmbH, Braunschweig, Germany Background: Reporting the experiences and satisfaction of patients, as well as their quality of care scores is an emerging recommendation in health care systems. Many aspects of patients’ experience determine their overall satisfaction. The aim of this evaluation was to define the main factors contributing to the satisfaction of patients undergoing radiotherapy in an outpatient setting. Patients and methods: A total of 1,710 patients with a histologically proven cancer, who were treated in our department between 2012 and 2014, were recruited for this prospective evaluation. At the end of therapy, each patient was asked to grade the skills and the care provided by radiation therapists, physicians, and physician’s assistants, as well as the overall satisfaction during therapy. Statistical analysis was performed to determine which parameters had the greatest influence on overall satisfaction. Results: Overall satisfaction with the provided care was high with a mean satisfaction score of 1.4. Significant correlations were found between overall satisfaction and each of the following survey items: courtesy, protection of privacy, professional skills and care provided by the radiation therapists and physicians, accuracy of provided information, and cleanliness. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that courteous behavior and the protection of privacy were the strongest predictors for overall satisfaction (P<0.001, followed by care and skills of physicians and radiation therapists. Patients suffering from head

  6. Are Patients Traveling for Intraoperative Radiation Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey E. Larson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. One benefit of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT is that it usually requires a single treatment, thus potentially eliminating distance as a barrier to receipt of whole breast irradiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distance traveled by IORT patients at our institution. Methods. Our institutional prospective registry was used to identify IORT patients from 10/2011 to 2/2017. Patient’s home zip code was compared to institution zip code to determine travel distance. Characteristics of local (100 miles patients were compared. Results. 150 were patients included with a median travel distance of 27 miles and mean travel distance of 121 miles. Most were local (68.7%, with the second largest group living faraway (20.0%. Subset analysis of local patients demonstrated 20.4% traveled 1000 miles. The local, regional, and faraway patients did not differ with respect to age, race, tumor characteristics, or whole breast irradiation. Conclusions. Breast cancer patients are traveling for IORT, with 63% traveling >20 miles for care. IORT is an excellent strategy to promote breast conservation in selected patients, particularly those who live remote from a radiation facility.

  7. Development of a Standardized Method for Contouring the Lumbosacral Plexus: A Preliminary Dosimetric Analysis of this Organ at Risk Among 15 Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lower Gastrointestinal Cancers and the Incidence of Radiation-Induced Lumbosacral Plexopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Sun K., E-mail: sun.yi@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Mak, Walter [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Yang, Claus C.; Liu Tianxiao [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Cui Jing; Chen, Allen M.; Purdy, James A.; Monjazeb, Arta M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Do, Ly [Cancer Care Institute, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To generate a reproducible step-wise guideline for the delineation of the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) on axial computed tomography (CT) planning images and to provide a preliminary dosimetric analysis on 15 representative patients with rectal or anal cancers treated with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: A standardized method for contouring the LSP on axial CT images was devised. The LSP was referenced to identifiable anatomic structures from the L4-5 interspace to the level of the sciatic nerve. It was then contoured retrospectively on 15 patients treated with IMRT for rectal or anal cancer. No dose limitations were placed on this organ at risk during initial treatment planning. Dosimetric parameters were evaluated. The incidence of radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILSP) was calculated. Results: Total prescribed dose to 95% of the planned target volume ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy (median 54 Gy). The mean ({+-}standard deviation [SD]) LSP volume for the 15 patients was 100 {+-} 22 cm{sup 3} (range, 71-138 cm{sup 3}). The mean maximal dose to the LSP was 52.6 {+-} 3.9 Gy (range, 44.5-58.6 Gy). The mean irradiated volumes of the LSP were V40Gy = 58% {+-} 19%, V50Gy = 22% {+-} 23%, and V55Gy = 0.5% {+-} 0.9%. One patient (7%) was found to have developed RILSP at 13 months after treatment. Conclusions: The true incidence of RILSP in the literature is likely underreported and is not a toxicity commonly assessed by radiation oncologists. In our analysis the LSP commonly received doses approaching the prescribed target dose, and 1 patient developed RILSP. Identification of the LSP during IMRT planning may reduce RILSP. We have provided a reproducible method for delineation of the LSP on CT images and a preliminary dosimetric analysis for potential future dose constraints.

  8. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  9. Survey of Michigan dentists and radiation oncologists on oral care of patients undergoing head and neck radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Yoshita; Bahlhorn, Hannah; Zafar, Saniya; Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel; Eisbruch, Avraham; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol Anne

    2012-07-01

    Oral complications of radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) are associated with a significant decline in oral health-related quality of life (OHQOL). The dentist, working with the radiation oncologist and the rest of the health care team, plays an important role in the prevention and management of these complications, but patients do not always receive care consistent with current guidelines. This study investigated barriers to recommended care. There is variability in knowledge and practice among dentists and radiation oncologists regarding the dental management of patients treated with head and neck radiotherapy (HNRT), and inadequate communication and collaboration between members of the patient's health care team contribute to inconsistencies in application of clinical care guidelines. There is on interest and need for continuing dental (CDE) and medical education (CME) on this topic. A questionnaire was developed to assess dentists' knowledge and practice of dental management of HNC patients and their interest in CDE on this topic. All members of the Michigan Dental Association (MDA) with email addresses were asked to complete the survey online, and a random sample of MDA members without email addresses was invited to complete a paper version of the same survey. All Michigan members of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) were invited to complete an online version of the survey modified for radiation oncologists. The response rate for dentists was 47.9% and radiation oncologists was 22.3%. Of the dentists who responded, 81% reported that a major barrier to providing dental treatment before radiotherapy was a lack of time between initial dental consultation and the start of radiation; inadequate communication between health care providers was blamed most frequently for this. Ten percent of the dentists and 25% of the radiation oncologists reported that they did not treat HNC patients because they lacked adequate training, and 55% of

  10. Addressing Quality of Life Issues in Long Term Survivors of Head & Neck Cancer treated with Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishan Basu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The rapid advancement of curative treatment modalities has resulted in improvement of cure rates of head neck cancer leaving us with a larger number of long term survivors from the disease. Unfortunately, long term complications of therapy continue to hurt patients even after cure, compromising their quality of life. This is particularly true for the patients treated with primary radiation/chemo-radiation therapy, where so called organ preservation does not necessarily translate into preservation of organ function. Long term sequelae of treatment, particularly xerostomia and swallowing difficulties compromise the survivors’ quality of life. More studies, particularly suited to our clinical scenario, are warranted to address the quality of life issues in these patients, so that better evidence-based guidelines may be developed for their benefit.

  11. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in an eye of retinoblastoma treated by radiation and cryocoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Kawai, Masataka; Nii, Seiji [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Katsura, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Akihiro

    1999-08-01

    A 4-month-old female infant was diagnosed as bilateral retinoblastoma. The left eye was treated by enucleation and the right by radiation. The right eye received repeated thermochemotherapy, cryocoagulation and photocoagulation for recurrence. Total retinal detachment was detected after surgery for complicated cataract at the age of 2 years 9 months. Vitreous surgery led to the detection of posterior vitreous detachment and retinal breaks in the coagulated scar areas with vitreoretinal adhesion around the calcified tumor. During the following one year, the retina has been attached with no reoccurrence of the tumor. This case illustrates that rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is a possibility in retinoblastoma treated by radiation or retinal coagulations. (author)

  12. Dental management of patients irradiated for oral cancer. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regezi, J.A.; Courtney, R.M.; Kerr, D.A.

    1976-08-01

    Management of patients irradiated for oral cancer should include consideration of their oral health prior to, and after, radiation therapy. Data from 130 patients, followed for a period of 1 to 10 years, are presented and evaluated. The philosophy of retention and maintenance of as many teeth as possible is supported by this data. Extraction of teeth with severe periodontal disease after irradiation also proves to be a relatively safe operation. Osteoradionecrosis tends to be limited in extent and is generally well tolerated by the patient when treated conservatively. A treatment regimen is presented that significantly reduces the morbidity from therapeutic irradiation of the jaws. A comprehensive dental evaluation and follow-up plan coupled with patient cooperation are instrumental to the success of this program.

  13. Nintedanib Compared With Placebo in Treating Against Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Are Undergoing Chemoradiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-08

    Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  14. Thyroid abnormalities in patients previously treated with irradiation for acne vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, D.B.; Grammes, C.F.; Starkey, R.H.; Monsaert, R.P.; Sunderlin, F.S.

    1984-01-01

    Of 1,203 patients who received radiation treatment for acne vulgaris between 1940 and 1968, 302 patients were recalled and examined, 121 at Geisinger Medical Center and the remainder by their local physicians. Radiation records were reviewed on all patients. Lead-rubber and cones had been used as shielding. Mean age at the time of exposure was 21 years and mean total exposure was 692 R. Palpable nodular thyroid disease was found in eight patients (2.6%). Of these, thyroid carcinoma was detected in two patients (0.66%). Although the number of patients examined was small, the incidence of carcinomas was unexpectedly high. We conclude that follow-up examination is worthwhile for patients previously treated by irradiation for acne vulgaris.

  15. High mortality among heart failure patients treated with antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veien, Karsten T; Videbæk, Lars; Schou, Morten

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to assess whether pharmacologically treated depression was associated with increased mortality risk in systolic heart failure (SHF) patients. METHODS: Patients (n=3346) with SHF (left ventricular ejection fraction......BACKGROUND: This study was designed to assess whether pharmacologically treated depression was associated with increased mortality risk in systolic heart failure (SHF) patients. METHODS: Patients (n=3346) with SHF (left ventricular ejection fraction...

  16. Treating the elderly diabetic patient: special considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezerle L

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Louise Kezerle, Leah Shalev, Leonid Barski Department of Internal Medicine F, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel Abstract: The prevalence of diabetes is rising in the >65 year-old group. The challenge of defining the goals of therapy arises from the heterogeneity of the aging process and the sparse clinical data in this patient population. In light of these challenges, the clinician should be aware of the pitfalls of caring for the older diabetic patient and prioritize an individualized treatment plan to ensure an optimal glycemic control, without placing the patient at unnecessary risk. We present a review of the current guidelines and literature that deal specifically with the treatment of the older diabetic patient in order to establish the principles of treatment in this age group and help the clinician make decisions regarding the care of these patients. Keywords: diabetes treatment, elderly, review

  17. High mortality among heart failure patients treated with antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veien, Karsten Tang; Videbæk, Lars; Schou, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to assess whether pharmacologically treated depression was associated with increased mortality risk in systolic heart failure (SHF) patients.......This study was designed to assess whether pharmacologically treated depression was associated with increased mortality risk in systolic heart failure (SHF) patients....

  18. Association Between Treatment at a High-Volume Facility and Improved Survival for Radiation-Treated Men With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mahal, Brandon A. [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Muralidhar, Vinayak [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nezolosky, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Den, Robert B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Martin, Neil E.; Orio, Peter F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nguyen, Paul L., E-mail: pnguyen@LROC.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Although the association between higher hospital volume and improved outcomes has been well-documented in surgery, there is little data about whether this effect exists for radiation-treated patients. We investigated whether treatment at a radiation facility that treats a high volume of prostate cancer patients is associated with improved survival for men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We used the National Cancer Database (NCDB) to identity patients diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2004 to 2006. The radiation case volume (RCV) of each hospital was based on its number of radiation-treated prostate cancer patients. We used propensity-score based analysis to compare the overall survival (OS) of high-risk prostate cancer patients in high versus low RCV hospitals. Primary endpoint is overall survival. Covariates adjusted for were tumor characteristics, sociodemographic factors, radiation type, and use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Results: A total of 19,565 radiation-treated high-risk patients were identified. Median follow-up was 81.0 months (range: 1-108 months). When RCV was coded as a continuous variable, each increment of 100 radiation-managed patients was associated with improved OS (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95-0.98; P<.0001) after adjusting for known confounders. For illustrative purposes, when RCV was dichotomized at the 80th percentile (43 patients/year), high RCV was associated with improved OS (7-year overall survival 76% vs 74%, log-rank test P=.0005; AHR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.86-0.96, P=.0005). This association remained significant when RCV was dichotomized at 75th (37 patients/year), 90th (60 patients/year), and 95th (84 patients/year) percentiles but not the 50th (19 patients/year). Conclusions: Our results suggest that treatment at centers with higher prostate cancer radiation case volume is associated with improved OS for radiation-treated men with high-risk prostate

  19. Changes in the Submandibular Gland in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer After Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uchiyama, Y.; Kreiborg, Sven; Murakami, Shumei

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the impairment of the submandibular gland, in terms of changes in volume by computed tomography (CT) and CT value, which was the mean pixel value at a region of interest, in a group of patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT......). Patients and Methods: Eleven patients treated with RT, where the effective radiation dose to the submandibular gland was known, were included in the study. CT scanning was performed both before and after RT. The average follow-up period after RT was 555 days (range=107-1231 days). Results: The mean volume...

  20. Foreign patients in ER: receiving, understanding, treating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Dal Molin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last years the presence of foreign patients inside Emergency Departments is increased, this means many problems, like misunderstanding, communication difficulties and more problematic situations when, our work or our expectations meet the values sideboards and life style of our patients. This article purpose is to describe this phenomenon inside Biella Emergency Departments, because if you know a situation you can solve it better.

  1. God of the hinge: treating LGBTQIA patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Annie

    2017-11-01

    This paper looks at systems of gender within the context of analysis. It explores the unique challenges of individuation faced by transsexual, transgender, gender queer, gender non-conforming, cross-dressing and intersex patients. To receive patients generously we need to learn how a binary culture produces profound and chronic trauma. These patients wrestle with being who they are whilst simultaneously receiving negative projections and feeling invisible. While often presenting with the struggles of gender conforming individuals, understanding the specifically gendered aspect of their identity is imperative. An analyst's unconscious bias may lead to iatrogenic shaming. The author argues that rigorous, humble inquiry into the analyst's transphobia can be transformative for patient, analyst, and the work itself. Analysis may, then, provide gender-variant patients with their first remembered and numinous experience of authentic connection to self. Conjuring the image of a hinge, securely placed in the neutral region of a third space, creates a transpositive analytic temenos. Invoking the spirit of the Trickster in the construction of this matrix supports the full inclusion of gender-variant patients. Nuanced attunement scaffolds mirroring and the possibility of play. Being mindful that gender is sturdy and delicate as well as mercurial and defined enriches the analyst's listening. © 2017, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  2. The Modern Role of Radiation Therapy in Treating Advanced-Stage Retinoblastoma: Long-Term Outcomes and Racial Differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orman, Amber [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Koru-Sengul, Tulay [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Miao, Feng [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Markoe, Arnold [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Panoff, Joseph E., E-mail: jpanoff@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To evaluate the effects of various patient characteristics and radiation therapy treatment variables on outcomes in advanced-stage retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of 41 eyes of 30 patients treated with external beam radiation therapy between June 1, 1992, and March 31, 2012, with a median follow-up time of 133 months (11 years). Outcome measures included overall survival, progression-free survival, local control, eye preservation rate, and toxicity. Results: Over 90% of the eyes were stage V. Definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was delivered in 43.9% of eyes, adjuvant EBRT in 22% of eyes, and second-line/salvage EBRT in 34.1% of eyes. A relative lens sparing (RLS) technique was used in 68.3% of eyes and modified lens sparing (MLS) in 24.4% of eyes. Three eyes were treated with other techniques. Doses ≥45 Gy were used in 68.3% of eyes. Chemotherapy was a component of treatment in 53.7% of eyes. The 10-year overall survival was 87.7%, progression-free survival was 80.5%, and local control was 87.8%. White patients had significantly better overall survival than did African-American patients in univariate analysis (hazard ratio 0.09; 95% confidence interval 0.01-0.84; P=.035). Toxicity was seen in 68.3% of eyes, including 24.3% with isolated acute dermatitis. Conclusions: External beam radiation therapy continues to be an effective treatment modality for advanced retinoblastoma, achieving excellent long-term local control and survival with low rates of treatment-related toxicity and secondary malignancy.

  3. Regional brain glucose metabolism and neurocognitive function in adult survivors of childhood cancer treated with cranial radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Kevin R; Minoshima, Satoshi; Edelmann, Michelle; Morris, Brannon; Sabin, Noah D; Brinkman, Tara M; Armstrong, Gregory T; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Shulkin, Barry

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine associations between regional brain metabolism, as measured by (18)F-FDG PET, and neurocognitive outcomes in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with cranial radiation. Thirty-eight adult survivors of ALL were randomly selected from a large cohort treated with cranial radiation therapy (19 with 18 Gy and 19 with 24 Gy of exposure). At a mean age of 26.4 (range, 22.3-37.4) years, and 23.5 (range, 20.4-32.8) years since diagnosis, patients underwent comprehensive neurocognitive evaluations and brain (18)F-FDG PET imaging during a resting condition. (18)F-FDG PET images were analyzed stereotactically, and pixel values were normalized to global activity. Predefined region-of-interest and voxel-based correlation analyses were performed. Compared with national norms, survivors demonstrated lower vocabulary (P working memory (P < 0.001), oral naming speed (P < 0.001), and cognitive flexibility (P < 0.001). Metabolic activity was higher in basal gangliar structures for those treated with 24 Gy of cranial radiation therapy (P = 0.04). Metabolic activity was positively correlated with oral naming speed in both lateral frontal lobes (ρ = 0.48 and 0.47 for right and left frontal regions, respectively, P < 0.01) and negatively correlated with cognitive flexibility in the sections of the basal ganglia (P < 0.01 for both caudate and putamen). Neurocognitive impairment in long-term survivors of ALL treated with cranial radiation appears to be associated with increased metabolic activity in frontal cerebral cortical and subcortical regions in the basal ganglia, suggesting decreased efficiency of the frontostriatal brain circuit. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  4. Ultrasound Evaluation of Thyroid Gland Pathologies After Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy to Treat Malignancy During Childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lollert, André, E-mail: andre.lollert@unimedizin-mainz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); Gies, Christina; Laudemann, Katharina [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); Faber, Jörg [Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); Jacob-Heutmann, Dorothee [Department of Radio-oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); König, Jochem [Institute for Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); Düber, Christoph; Staatz, Gundula [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate correlations between treatment of malignancy by radiation therapy during childhood and the occurrence of thyroid gland pathologies detected by ultrasonography in follow-up examinations. Methods and Materials: Reductions of thyroid gland volume below 2 standard deviations of the weight-specific mean value, occurrence of ultrasonographically detectable thyroid gland pathologies, and hypothyroidism were retrospectively assessed in 103 children and adolescents 7 months to 20 years of age (median: 7 years of age) at baseline (1997-2013) treated with chemoradiation therapy (with the thyroid gland dose assessable) or with chemotherapy alone and followed by ultrasonography and laboratory examinations through 2014 (median follow-up time: 48 months). Results: A relevant reduction of thyroid gland volume was significantly correlated with thyroid gland dose in univariate (P<.001) and multivariate analyses for doses above 2 Gy. Odds ratios were 3.1 (95% confidence interval: 1.02-9.2; P=.046) for medium doses (2-25 Gy) and 14.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.4-160; P=.027) for high doses (>25 Gy). Thyroid gland dose was significantly higher in patients with thyroid gland pathologies during follow-up (P=.03). Univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between hypothyroidism and thyroid gland dose (P<.001). Conclusions: Ultrasonographically detectable changes, that is, volume reductions, pathologies, and hypothyroidism, after malignancy treatment during childhood are associated with thyroid gland dose. Both ultrasonography and laboratory follow-up examinations should be performed regularly after tumor therapy during childhood, especially if the treatment included radiation therapy.

  5. Thyroid abnormalities in patients previously treated with irradiation for acne vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, D.B.; Grammes, C.F.; Starkey, R.H.; Monsaert, R.P.; Sunderlin, F.S.

    1984-01-01

    Of 1203 patients who received radiation treatment for acne vulgaris between 1940 and 1968, 302 were recalled and examined, 121 at Geisinger Medical Center and the remainder by their local physicians. Radiation records were reviewed on all patients. Lead-rubber and cones had been used as shielding. Mean age at the time of exposure was 21 years and mean total exposure was 692 R. Palpable nodular thyroid disease was found in eight patients (2.6%). Of these, thyroid carcinoma was detected in two patients (0.66%). Although the number of patients examined was small, the incidence of carcinomas was unexpectedly high. The authors conclude that follow-up examination is worthwhile for patients previously treated by irradiation for acne vulgaris.

  6. Treating Brain Tumor with Microbeam Radiation Generated by a Compact Carbon-Nanotube-Based Irradiator: Initial Radiation Efficacy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Lei; Frank, Jonathan E; Inscoe, Christina R; Burk, Laurel M; Hadsell, Mike; Lee, Yueh Z; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2015-09-01

    Microbeam radiation treatment (MRT) using synchrotron radiation has shown great promise in the treatment of brain tumors, with a demonstrated ability to eradicate the tumor while sparing normal tissue in small animal models. With the goal of expediting the advancement of MRT research beyond the limited number of synchrotron facilities in the world, we recently developed a compact laboratory-scale microbeam irradiator using carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission-based X-ray source array technology. The focus of this study is to evaluate the effects of the microbeam radiation generated by this compact irradiator in terms of tumor control and normal tissue damage in a mouse brain tumor model. Mice with U87MG human glioblastoma were treated with sham irradiation, low-dose MRT, high-dose MRT or 10 Gy broad-beam radiation treatment (BRT). The microbeams were 280 μm wide and spaced at 900 μm center-to-center with peak dose at either 48 Gy (low-dose MRT) or 72 Gy (high-dose MRT). Survival studies showed that the mice treated with both MRT protocols had a significantly extended life span compared to the untreated control group (31.4 and 48.5% of life extension for low- and high-dose MRT, respectively) and had similar survival to the BRT group. Immunostaining on MRT mice demonstrated much higher DNA damage and apoptosis level in tumor tissue compared to the normal brain tissue. Apoptosis in normal tissue was significantly lower in the low-dose MRT group compared to that in the BRT group at 48 h postirradiation. Interestingly, there was a significantly higher level of cell proliferation in the MRT-treated normal tissue compared to that in the BRT-treated mice, indicating rapid normal tissue repairing process after MRT. Microbeam radiation exposure on normal brain tissue causes little apoptosis and no macrophage infiltration at 30 days after exposure. This study is the first biological assessment on MRT effects using the compact CNT-based irradiator. It provides an alternative

  7. Vulnerability of white matter to insult during childhood: evidence from patients treated for medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxon-Emre, Iska; Bouffet, Eric; Taylor, Michael D; Laperriere, Normand; Sharpe, Michael B; Laughlin, Suzanne; Bartels, Ute; Scantlebury, Nadia; Law, Nicole; Malkin, David; Skocic, Jovanka; Richard, Logan; Mabbott, Donald J

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Craniospinal irradiation damages the white matter in children treated for medulloblastoma, but the treatment-intensity effects are unclear. In a cross-sectional retrospective study, the effects of treatment with the least intensive radiation protocol versus protocols that delivered more radiation to the brain, in addition to the effects of continuous radiation dose, on white matter architecture were evaluated. METHODS Diffusion tensor imaging was used to assess fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity. First, regional white matter analyses and tract-based spatial statistics were conducted in 34 medulloblastoma patients and 38 healthy controls. Patients were stratified according to those treated with 1) the least intensive radiation protocol, specifically reduced-dose craniospinal irradiation plus a boost to the tumor bed only (n = 17), or 2) any other dose and boost combination that delivered more radiation to the brain, which was also termed the "all-other-treatments" group (n = 17), and comprised patients treated with standard-dose craniospinal irradiation plus a posterior fossa boost, standard-dose craniospinal irradiation plus a tumor bed boost, or reduced-dose craniospinal irradiation plus a posterior fossa boost. Second, voxel-wise dose-distribution analyses were conducted on a separate cohort of medulloblastoma patients (n = 15). RESULTS The all-other-treatments group, but not the reduced-dose craniospinal irradiation plus tumor bed group, had lower fractional anisotropy and higher radial diffusivity than controls in all brain regions (all p 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Together, the results show that white matter damage has a clear association with increasing radiation dose, and that treatment with reduced-dose craniospinal irradiation plus tumor bed boost appears to preserve white matter in some brain regions.

  8. Predictors of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Receiving Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnix, Chelsea C., E-mail: ccpinnix@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Grace L.; Milgrom, Sarah; Osborne, Eleanor M.; Reddy, Jay P.; Akhtari, Mani; Reed, Valerie; Arzu, Isidora; Allen, Pamela K.; Wogan, Christine F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fanale, Michele A.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Turturro, Francesco; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Fowler, Nathan; Westin, Jason; Nastoupil, Loretta; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Rodriguez, M. Alma [Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); and others

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Few studies to date have evaluated factors associated with the development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), especially in patients treated with contemporary radiation techniques. These patients represent a unique group owing to the often large radiation target volumes within the mediastinum and to the potential to receive several lines of chemotherapy that add to pulmonary toxicity for relapsed or refractory disease. Our objective was to determine the incidence and clinical and dosimetric risk factors associated with RP in lymphoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed clinical charts and radiation records of 150 consecutive patients who received mediastinal IMRT for HL and NHL from 2009 through 2013. Clinical and dosimetric predictors associated with RP according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute toxicity criteria were identified in univariate analysis using the Pearson χ{sup 2} test and logistic multivariate regression. Results: Mediastinal radiation was administered as consolidation therapy in 110 patients with newly diagnosed HL or NHL and in 40 patients with relapsed or refractory disease. The overall incidence of RP (RTOG grades 1-3) was 14% in the entire cohort. Risk of RP was increased for patients who received radiation for relapsed or refractory disease (25%) versus those who received consolidation therapy (10%, P=.019). Several dosimetric parameters predicted RP, including mean lung dose of >13.5 Gy, V{sub 20} of >30%, V{sub 15} of >35%, V{sub 10} of >40%, and V{sub 5} of >55%. The likelihood ratio χ{sup 2} value was highest for V{sub 5} >55% (χ{sup 2} = 19.37). Conclusions: In using IMRT to treat mediastinal lymphoma, all dosimetric parameters predicted RP, although small doses to large volumes of lung had the greatest influence. Patients with relapsed

  9. Long-Term Relief of Cerebral Radiation Necrosis Treated with Low-Dose Bevacizumab - a Report of 2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiongge; Zhao, Juan; Xu, Jing; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Shui, Yongjie; Shen, Li; Wei, Qichun

    2017-01-01

    Radiation necrosis is 1 of the most significant complications of brain tumor irradiation. The standard treatment for patients with radiation necrosis consists of corticosteroids to reduce the amount of cerebral edema and, if required, cyst drainage. 2 patients with symptomatic radiation necrosis initially unresponsive to steroid treatment were treated with repeated low-dose bevacizumab at 5 mg/kg body weight. Rapid and lasting symptom relief, as well as neuroradiological improvement was seen in both cases. A dramatic rapid magnetic resonance imaging response with decrease in contrast enhancement was found shortly after administering the first dose of bevacizumab. The improvement of perifocal edema was relatively slower than of the reduction of enhancement. Only a slight reduction in size of the involved area could be expected after the first dose of bevacizumab. Further shrinkage was seen after the second and third doses. The individuals reported have been doing well for more than 45 and 22 months, respectively, after the initiation of bevacizumab treatment. Our data add to the literature supporting of the use of bevacizumab as an effective therapeutic agent for radiation necrosis, particularly in cases unresponsive to steroid treatment. © 2017 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  10. Pseudoproteinuria in tolmetin-treated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, G E; Wortham, G F

    1975-04-01

    In a clinical study of the new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug tolmetin, the urines of 5 patients reacted positively when tested for protein by the standard sulfosalicylic acid method. Pseudoproteinuria, due to the precipitation by acid of the major metabolite of tolmetin, was suspected. The urines were subsequently tested for protein by the following alternate methods: solubility of acid precipitate test, heat coagulation test, Upjohn modification of the sulfosalicylic acid test, biuret test, Albustix, and electrophoresis. All were negative for protein. These results confirmed that the reactions with the sulfosalicylic acid test did not indicate true proteinuria but pseudoproteinuria. It is suggested that patients who receive tolmetin be tested for proteinuria by methods other than those involving acid precipitation.

  11. Follow-up study of late effects in /sup 224/Ra treated ankylosing spondylitis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, R.R.; Goessner, W.

    1983-01-01

    Fifteen hundred thirty-one patients treated with /sup 224/Ra from 14 hospitals in the F.R.G. and 267 control patients with ankylosing spondylitis not treated with any form of ionizing radiation are being followed. Since 1970 three cases of malignant tumour in the skeleton have been found among /sup 224/Ra-treated patients with skeletal doses below 90 rad compared with 0.4-0.6 expected. Two of these three cases were tumours of the bone marrow. An effect of /sup 224/Ra on the haematopoietic system cannot be excluded. Also, seven cases of cataract were found among 274 /sup 224/Ra patients. The mean time since /sup 224/Ra treatment was 26 yr. The mean age at diagnosis was 66 yr. The cataract incidence was not unusual for people of this age.

  12. Radiation-induced cranial neuropathy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, X.; Tang, Y.; Lu, K.; Peng, Y. [Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Neurology; Chen, M. [Sun Yat-sen Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the long-term characteristics of radiation-induced cranial nerve injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. We studied cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in 328 NPC patients who received radiotherapy between 1994 and 2006. Follow-up was 93.6% complete as of December 2009. A total of 72 patients with CNP were recruited for analysis (56 men and 16 women). Patients with evidence of residual or recurrent tumor accompanied by CNP were excluded. The characteristics of CNP and the relationship with the radiation fields as well as re-radiotherapy were evaluated. After a mean follow-up of 11.2 years, 72 patients were found to have developed CNP. The latency of palsy ranged from 0.6-16.0 years. For the 67 patients with first course radiation, the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves were the most vulnerable combination, occurring in 57 patients (85.1%). Patients with facial-cervical field radiation had a significantly longer latency comparing with that of patients with facial-cervical split fields (p = 0.021). In the first 5 years, 49.3% of patients developed CNP, while 40.3% presented CNP in the second 5-year period. In patients with first course radiation, 61 patients had more than one CNP. With regard to the 5 patients with re-radiation, most of them had multiple upper cranial nerve injuries. Radiation therapy of NPC patients may lead to cranial neuropathy. Patients with facial-cervical radiation fields had a longer latency for the manifestation of CNP compared with those patients who were treated with split fields. In patients with re-radiotherapy, the frequency of upper cranial nerve injury increased greatly.

  13. Treatment and outcome in cancer cervix patients treated between 1979 and 1994: A single institutional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamkishore Shrivastava

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 6234 patients with carcinoma of the cervix treated with radical intent between 1979 and 1994. All the work-up, staging investigations, treatment details, radiation protocols, outcomes, and toxicities were noted, compiled, and analyzed. Results: With a mean age of 46 years (range: 18-90 years; median: 45 years, 669 (11% patients were in stage Ib, 284 (5% were in stage IIa, 1891 (30% were in stage IIb, 69 (1% were in stage IIIa, and 3321 (53% were in stage IIIb. With a median follow-up of 68 months (57-79 months for the entire group, there was no significant difference in the outcome of 953 patients with international federation of gynecology and obstetrics (FIGO Ib-IIa treated after radical surgery, pre-operative radiation therapy (pre-op RT + Sx or after radical radiation; their disease-free survival (DFS was 60-62% at 8 years. In our series of 1891 patients with stage IIb and 3321 with stage IIIb, a respective DFS of 56% and 40% was achieved at 8 years. Conclusion: Over the last two decades, with the acquisition of newer facilities and inception of Joint Clinics, there has been a significant refinement in the treatment protocols and outcome. Improving radiation strategies to improve therapeutic ratio is the key to success.

  14. Radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Mondrup, K.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology R)

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and latency period of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients by a neurological follow-up examination at least 60 months (range 67-130 months) after the primary treatment. All patients were treated primarily with simple mastectomy, axillary nodal sampling and radiotherapy (RT). Postoperatively, pre- and postmenopausal patients were randomly allocated chemotherapy for antiestrogen treatment. All patients were recurrence-free at time of examination. Clinically, 35% (25-47%) of the patients had RBP; 19% (11-29%) had definite RBP, i.e. were physically disabled, and 16% (9-26%) had probable RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-35%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%) of cases assessment of a definite level was not possible. RBP was more common after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (42%) than after radiotherapy alone (26%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The incidence of definite RBP was significantly higher in the younger age group (p = 0.02). This could be due to more extensive axillary surgery but also to the fact that chemotherapy was given to most premenopausal patients. In most patients with RBP the symptoms began during or immediately after radiotherapy, and were thus without significant latency. Chemotherapy might enhance the radiation-induced effect on nerve tissue, thus diminishing the latency period. Lymphedema was present in 22% (14-32%), especially in the older patients, and not associated with the development of RBP. In conclusion, the damaging effect of RT on peripheral nerve tissue was documented. Since no successful treatment is available, restricted use of RT to the brachial plexus is warranted, especially when administered concomitantly with cytotoxic therapy. (orig.).

  15. Performance Improvement of Total Ionization Dose Radiation Sensor Devices Using Fluorine-Treated MOHOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ching Hsieh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluorine-treated titanium nitride–silicon oxide–hafnium oxide–silicon oxide–silicon devices (hereafter F-MOHOS are candidates for total ionization dose (TID radiation sensor applications. The main subject of the study reportedherein is the performance improvement in terms of TID radiation-induced charge generation effect and charge-retention reliability characterization for F-MOHOS devices. In the case of F-MOHOS TID radiation sensors, the gamma radiation induces a significant decrease of threshold voltage VT and the radiation-induced charge density is nearly six times larger than that of standard metal–oxide–nitride–oxide–silicon MONOS devices. The decrease of VT for F-MOHOS after gamma irradiation has a strong correlation to the TID up to 5 Mrad gamma irradiation as well. The improvement of charge retention loss for F-MOHOS devices is nearly 15% better than that of metal–oxide–hafnium oxide–oxide–silicon MOHOS devices. The F-MOHOS device described in this study demonstrates better feasibility for non-volatile TID radiation sensing in the future.

  16. Maintenance hemodialysis patients have high cumulative radiation exposure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, Sinead M

    2010-10-01

    Hemodialysis is associated with an increased risk of neoplasms which may result, at least in part, from exposure to ionizing radiation associated with frequent radiographic procedures. In order to estimate the average radiation exposure of those on hemodialysis, we conducted a retrospective study of 100 patients in a university-based dialysis unit followed for a median of 3.4 years. The number and type of radiological procedures were obtained from a central radiology database, and the cumulative effective radiation dose was calculated using standardized, procedure-specific radiation levels. The median annual radiation dose was 6.9 millisieverts (mSv) per patient-year. However, 14 patients had an annual cumulative effective radiation dose over 20 mSv, the upper averaged annual limit for occupational exposure. The median total cumulative effective radiation dose per patient over the study period was 21.7 mSv, in which 13 patients had a total cumulative effective radiation dose over 75 mSv, a value reported to be associated with a 7% increased risk of cancer-related mortality. Two-thirds of the total cumulative effective radiation dose was due to CT scanning. The average radiation exposure was significantly associated with the cause of end-stage renal disease, history of ischemic heart disease, transplant waitlist status, number of in-patient hospital days over follow-up, and death during the study period. These results highlight the substantial exposure to ionizing radiation in hemodialysis patients.

  17. Five-year quality of life of endometrial cancer patients treated in the randomised Post Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Cancer (PORTEC-2) trial and comparison with norm data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nout, Remi A; Putter, Hein; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M; Jobsen, Jan J; Lutgens, Ludy C H W; van der Steen-Banasik, Elzbieta M; Mens, Jan Willem M; Slot, Annerie; Stenfert Kroese, Marika C; Nijman, Hans W; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; Creutzberg, Carien L

    2012-07-01

    The PORTEC-2 trial showed efficacy and reduced side-effects of vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) compared with external beam pelvic radiotherapy (EBRT) for patients with high-intermediate risk endometrial cancer. The current analysis was done to evaluate long-term health related quality of life (HRQL), and compare HRQL of patients to an age-matched norm population. Patients were randomly allocated to EBRT (n=214) or VBT (n=213). HRQL was assessed using EORTC QLQ-C30 and subscales from PR25 and OV28 (bladder, bowel, sexual symptoms); and compared to norm data. Median follow-up was 65 months; 348 (81%) patients were evaluable for HRQL (EBRT n=166, VBT n=182). At baseline, patient functioning was at lowest level, increasing during and after radiotherapy to reach a plateau after 12 months, within range of scores of the norm population. VBT patients reported better social functioning (p=0.005) and lower symptom scores for diarrhoea, faecal leakage, need to stay close to a toilet and limitation in daily activities due to bowel symptoms (p⩽0.001), compared to EBRT. There were no differences in sexual functioning or symptoms between the treatment groups; however, sexual functioning was lower and sexual symptoms more frequent in both treatment groups compared to the norm population. Patients who received EBRT reported clinically relevant higher levels of bowel symptoms and related limitations in daily activities with lower social functioning, 5 years after treatment. VBT provides a better HRQL, which remained similar to that of an age-matched norm population, except for sexual symptoms which were more frequent in both treatment groups. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Metallic taste in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijpma, I.; Renken, R. J.; ter Horst, G. J.; Reyners, A. K. L.

    Background: Metallic taste is a taste alteration frequently reported by cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Attention to this side effect of chemotherapy is limited. This review addresses the definition, assessment methods, prevalence, duration, etiology, and management strategies of metallic

  19. Relationships between Regional Radiation Doses and Cognitive Decline in Children Treated with Cranio-Spinal Irradiation for Posterior Fossa Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Doger de Speville

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric posterior fossa tumor (PFT survivors who have been treated with cranial radiation therapy often suffer from cognitive impairments that might relate to IQ decline. Radiotherapy (RT distinctly affects brain regions involved in different cognitive functions. However, the relative contribution of regional irradiation to the different cognitive impairments still remains unclear. We investigated the relationships between the changes in different cognitive scores and radiation dose distribution in 30 children treated for a PFT. Our exploratory analysis was based on a principal component analysis (PCA and an ordinary least square regression approach. The use of a PCA was an innovative way to cluster correlated irradiated regions due to similar radiation therapy protocols across patients. Our results suggest an association between working memory decline and a high dose (equivalent uniform dose, EUD delivered to the orbitofrontal regions, whereas the decline of processing speed seemed more related to EUD in the temporal lobes and posterior fossa. To identify regional effects of RT on cognitive functions may help to propose a rehabilitation program adapted to the risk of cognitive impairment.

  20. Carcinoma of penis. Review of cases treated by surgery and radiation therapy 1960-1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieg, R.M.; Luk, K.H.

    1981-08-01

    Cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis treated by surgery and radiation therapy at Moffitt Hospital, University of California, and Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center are reviewed. Only cases followed for more than three years or with autopsy findings are presented. For the primary lesion, over-all surgical control rate locally was 15/17 or 88 per cent. Over-all control rate with radiation therapy alone was 9/12 (75 per cent), and with surgical salvage 11/12 (92 per cent). Radiation therapy appears to be the treatment of choice for early stage lesions, reserving surgery for salvage. Prophylactic ilioinguinal lymph node dissection for N0 lesions is not warranted. The role of chemotherapy needs further investigation.

  1. Five-year quality of life of endometrial cancer patients treated in the randomised Post Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Cancer (PORTEC-2) trial and comparison with norm data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nout, Remi A.; Putter, Hein; Jurgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Lutgens, Ludy C. H. W.; van der Steen-Banasik, Elzbieta M.; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Slot, Annerie; Kroese, Marika C. Stenfert; Nijman, Hans W.; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V.; Creutzberg, Carien L.

    Background: The PORTEC-2 trial showed efficacy and reduced side-effects of vaginal brachy-therapy (VBT) compared with external beam pelvic radiotherapy (EBRT) for patients with high-intermediate risk endometrial cancer. The current analysis was done to evaluate long-term health related quality of

  2. What is the value of emission tomography studies in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated by Ir-192 brachytherapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koot, R. W.; Habraken, J. B. A.; Paans, A. M. J.; Bosch, D. A.; Pruim, J.; Hulshof, M.C.C.M.

    Background. We studied the use of (201)Thallium SPECT and L-[1-C-11]-tyrosine PET in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated with Ir-192 brachytherapy after surgery and external beam radiation therapy. We hypothesised that the patients most likely to benefit from further surgery

  3. Multiple Gastrointestinal Polyps in Patients Treated with BRAF Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaravadi, Ravi K; Hamilton, Kathryn E; Ma, Xiaohong; Piao, Shengfu; Portillo, Armando Del; Nathanson, Katherine L; Carlino, Matteo S; Long, Georgina V; Puzanov, Igor; Xu, Xiaowei; Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Tsai, Kenneth Y; Flaherty, Keith T; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Goodman, Grant R; McArthur, Grant A; Rustgi, Anil K; Metz, David C; Schuchter, Lynn M; Chapman, Paul B; Sepulveda, Antonia R

    2015-12-01

    BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) extend survival in BRAF-mutant melanoma but can promote the growth of Ras-mutant neoplasms. This study determined if gastrointestinal polyps found in BRAFi-treated patients harbored Ras mutations. Colonic and gastric polyps were identified and resected from BRAFi-treated melanoma patients. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed on polyps. The ability of BRAFi to promote polyp formation was functionally characterized in Apc Min(+/-) mice. MAPK and β-catenin pathway activity was assessed by immunohistochemistry in mouse and human polyps. Fourteen patients treated with BRAFi underwent endoscopy to assess for polyps. Seven out of 7 patients >40 years of age and treated for >2 years were found to have colonic tubular adenomas with 4 out of the 7 patients having 5 or more polyps. One patient presented with bleeding from hyperplastic gastric polyps that recurred 6 months after BRAFi rechallenge. NGS performed on polyps found no mutations in MAPK pathway genes, but found APC mutations in all tubular adenomas. A significant increase in the number of polyps was observed in BRAFi-treated compared with control-treated Apc Min(+/-) mice (20.8 ± 9.2 vs 12.8 ± 0.1; P = 0.016). No polyps were observed in BRAFi-treated wild-type mice. BRAFi may increase the risk of developing hyperplastic gastric polyps and colonic adenomatous polyps. Due to the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and the possibility of malignant transformation, further studies are needed to determine whether or not endoscopic surveillance should be recommended for patients treated with BRAFi. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Oral care of the cancer patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzhausen, T. (Medical Univ. of Southern Africa, Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Community Dentistry)

    1982-07-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently being used for the patient with oral cancer. The survival rate is increasing, due to more effective treatment technique. The question of whether any teeth should be extracted, the mode of therapy and the side effects of radiation like Xerostomia, caries, stomatitis, trismus and osteo-radionecrosis and also post radiation care are discussed.

  5. Characterization of the CPAP-treated patient population in Catalonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turino, Cecilia; Bertran, Sandra; Gavaldá, Ricard; Teixidó, Ivan; Woehrle, Holger; Rué, Montserrat; Solsona, Francesc; Escarrabill, Joan; Colls, Cristina; García-Altés, Anna; de Batlle, Jordi; Sánchez de-la-Torre, Manuel; Barbé, Ferran

    2017-01-01

    There are different phenotypes of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), many of which have not been characterised. Identification of these different phenotypes is important in defining prognosis and guiding the therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to characterise the entire population of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-treated patients in Catalonia and identify specific patient profiles using cluster analysis. A total of 72,217 CPAP-treated patients who contacted the Catalan Health System (CatSalut) during the years 2012 and 2013 were included. Six clusters were identified, classified as "Neoplastic patients" (Cluster 1, 10.4%), "Metabolic syndrome patients" (Cluster 2, 27.7%), "Asthmatic patients" (Cluster 3, 5.8%), "Musculoskeletal and joint disorder patients" (Cluster 4, 10.3%), "Patients with few comorbidities" (Cluster 5, 35.6%) and "Oldest and cardiac disease patients" (Cluster 6, 10.2%). Healthcare facility use and mortality were highest in patients from Cluster 1 and 6. Conversely, patients in Clusters 2 and 4 had low morbidity, mortality and healthcare resource use. Our findings highlight the heterogeneity of CPAP-treated patients, and suggest that OSA is associated with a different prognosis in the clusters identified. These results suggest the need for a comprehensive and individualised approach to CPAP treatment of OSA.

  6. Cognitive function in patients with chronic pain treated with opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, G P; de Mattos Pimenta, C A; Braga, P E

    2012-01-01

    The paucity of studies regarding cognitive function in patients with chronic pain, and growing evidence regarding the cognitive effects of pain and opioids on cognitive function prompted us to assess cognition via neuropsychological measurement in patients with chronic non-cancer pain treated...... with opioids....

  7. Health status in patients treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Angélique A; Denollet, Johan; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a promising treatment in chronic heart failure (CHF). However, a subgroup of patients still report impaired health status, cardiac symptoms, and feelings of disability following CRT. The aims of this study were to examine (1) whether CHF patients treated...

  8. Atrial fibrillation in fracture patients treated with oral bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B; Eiken, P; Brixen, K

    2009-01-01

    increased even in patients who stopped therapy after the first packet and (ii) risks were not increased by high adherence. Bisphosphonate-exposed patients were at increased risk of hospital-treated AF [adjusted HR: 1.13 (1.01-1.26)], but the risk amongst bisphosphonate users was inversely proportional...

  9. Metabolic control of type 2 diabetic patients commonly treated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fasting insulin and glucose concentrations were used to assess insulin resistance and sensitivity (%S) using Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) method. Results: Of the 179 patients studied, 87% of male and 92% of female patients were treated with sulphonylurea drugs whereas 13% and 9% of male and female ...

  10. Treating depression in HIV-positive patients affects adherence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-02

    Sep 2, 2012 ... ART adherence in a group of HIV-positive patients with depression at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital. Treating depression in HIV-positive patients affects adherence. M Y H Moosa, F Y Jeenah. Division of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.

  11. The morbidity and mortality of surgically treated urological patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the morbidity and mortality of surgically treated urological patients at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (MTRH) and compare them with those of other tertiary centres. Design: A fi ve year hospital based, retrospective study reviewing files of patients who underwent surgery for urological problems in ...

  12. Communication skills training for radiation therapists: preparing patients for radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkett, Georgia; O'Connor, Moira; Aranda, Sanchia; Jefford, Michael; Merchant, Susan; York, Debra; Miller, Lisa; Schofield, Penelope

    2016-12-01

    Patients sometimes present for radiation therapy with high levels of anxiety. Communication skills training may assist radiation therapists to conduct more effective consultations with patients prior to treatment planning and treatment commencement. The overall aim of our research is to examine the effectiveness of a preparatory programme 'RT Prepare' delivered by radiation therapists to reduce patient psychological distress. The purpose of this manuscript was to describe the communication skills workshops developed for radiation therapists and evaluate participants' feedback. Radiation therapists were invited to participate in two communication skills workshops run on the same day: (1) Consultation skills in radiation therapy and (2) Eliciting and responding to patients' emotional cues. Evaluation forms were completed. Radiation therapists' consultations with patients were then audio-recorded and evaluated prior to providing a follow-up workshop with participants. Nine full day workshops were held. Sixty radiation therapists participated. Positive feedback was received for both workshops with 88% or more participants agreeing or strongly agreeing with all the statements about the different components of the two workshops. Radiation therapists highlighted participating in role play with an actor, discussing issues; receiving feedback; acquiring new skills and knowledge; watching others role play and practicing with checklist were their favourite aspects of the initial workshop. The follow-up workshops provided radiation therapists with feedback on how they identified and addressed patients' psychological concerns; time spent with patients during consultations and the importance of finding private space for consultations. Communication skills training consisting of preparing patients for radiation therapy and eliciting and responding to emotional cues with follow-up workshops has the potential to improve radiation therapists' interactions with patients undergoing

  13. Lymph Node Failure Pattern and Treatment Results of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated with Definitive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Heui Kwan [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo Geon [Jesushospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    We evaluated the failure pattern of the celiac axis, gastric lymph node, and treatment outcome in the upper and mid-esophageal region of cancer patients treated by definitive radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, retrospectively. Materials and Methods: The study constituted the evaluation 108 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer receiving radiotherapy or a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy at Chonbuk National University Hospital from January 1986 to December 2006. In total, 82 patients treated by planned radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, were analysed retrospectively. The study population consisted of 78 men and 2 women (mean age of 63.2 years). In addition, 51 patients received radiotherapy alone, whereas 31 patients received a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The primary cancer sites were located in the upper portion (17 patients), and mid portion (65 patients), respectively. Further, the patients were in various clinical stages including T1N0-1M0 (7 patients), T2N0-1M0 (18 patients), T3N0-1M0 (44 patients) and T4N0-1M0 (13 patients). The mean follow up period was 15 months. Results: The various treatment outcomes included complete response (48 patients), partial response (31 patients) and no response (3 patients). The failure patterns of the lymph node were comprised of the regional lymph node (23 patients) and the distance lymph node which included celiac axis and gastric lymph node (13 patients). However, metastasis was not observed in the regional and distant lymph node in 10 patients, whereas 36 patients were not evaluated. Furthermore, of the 13 patients who developed celiac axis and gastric lymph node metastases, 3 were in stage T1N0-1M0 and 10 were in stage T2-4N0-1M0. A complete response appeared in 12 patients, whereas a partial response appeared in 1 patient. The mean survival time of the

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for late radiation-induced tissue toxicity: prospectively patient-reported outcome measures in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teguh, David N.; Bol Raap, René; Struikmans, Henk; Verhoef, Cees; Koppert, Linetta B.; Koole, Arne; Huang, Yadi; van Hulst, Rob A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines patient reported outcome measures of women undergoing hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) after breast-conserving therapy. Included were 57 women treated with HBOT for late radiation-induced tissue toxicity (LRITT) referred in the period January 2014-December 2015. HBOT consisted

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for late radiation-induced tissue toxicity: Prospectively patient-reported outcome measures in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.N. Teguh (David); R. Bol Raap (René); H. Struikmans (Henk); C. Verhoef (Kees); L.B. Koppert (Lisa); A. Koole (Arne); Y. Huang (Yadi); R.A. van Hulst (R.)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Introduction:__ This study examines patient reported outcome measures of women undergoing hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) after breast-conserving therapy. __Method:__ Included were 57 women treated with HBOT for late radiation-induced tissue toxicity (LRITT) referred in the

  16. Hypereosinophilia in patients with multiple sclerosis treated with natalizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M; Lalive, P H; Chofflon, M; Simon, H-U; Chizzolini, C; Ribi, C

    2011-10-18

    To report asymptomatic hypereosinophilia as a potential side effect in patients treated with natalizumab, an α-4 integrin blocking agent. A case series of 3 patients treated with natalizumab for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis including functional and phenotypic characterization of their peripheral blood lymphocytes and eosinophils is presented. Marked peripheral blood eosinophilia with more than 2,000 cells/mm(3) emerged in all 3 patients after the fourth natalizumab infusion and was asymptomatic. Hypereosinophilia was associated with enhanced Th2 activity, ceased with drug discontinuation, and in 2 of 3 patients recurred with drug resumption. Despite persistently high eosinophil counts, there were no signs of end-organ damage. Hypereosinophilia may occur during treatment with natalizumab. It seems to reflect enhanced Th2 activity and recedes with systemic corticosteroids. If the patient is asymptomatic, natalizumab may be continued, provided that other causes of eosinophilia are excluded and the patient is carefully monitored.

  17. Screening for thyroid cancer in survivors of childhood and young adult cancer treated with neck radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonorezos, Emily S; Barnea, Dana; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Chou, Joanne F; Sklar, Charles A; Elkin, Elena B; Wong, Richard J; Li, Duan; Tuttle, R Michael; Korenstein, Deborah; Wolden, Suzanne L; Oeffinger, Kevin C

    2017-06-01

    The optimal method of screening for thyroid cancer in survivors of childhood and young adult cancer exposed to neck radiation remains controversial. Outcome data for a physical exam-based screening approach are lacking. We conducted a retrospective review of adult survivors of childhood and young adult cancer with a history of neck radiation followed in the Adult Long-Term Follow-Up Clinic at Memorial Sloan Kettering between November 2005 and August 2014. Eligible patients underwent a physical exam of the thyroid and were followed for at least 1 year afterwards. Ineligible patients were those with prior diagnosis of benign or malignant thyroid nodules. During a median follow-up of 3.1 years (range 0-9.4 years), 106 ultrasounds and 2277 physical exams were performed among 585 patients. Forty survivors had an abnormal thyroid physical exam median of 21 years from radiotherapy; 50% of those with an abnormal exam were survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma, 60% had radiation at ages 10-19, and 53% were female. Ultimately, 24 underwent fine needle aspiration (FNA). Surgery revealed papillary carcinoma in seven survivors; six are currently free of disease and one with active disease is undergoing watchful waiting. Among those with one or more annual visits, representing 1732 person-years of follow-up, no cases of thyroid cancer were diagnosed within a year of normal physical exam. These findings support the application of annual physical exam without routine ultrasound for thyroid cancer screening among survivors with a history of neck radiation. Survivors with a history of neck radiation may not require routine thyroid ultrasound for thyroid cancer screening. Among adult survivors of childhood and young adult cancer with a history of radiation therapy to the neck, annual physical exam is an acceptable thyroid cancer screening strategy.

  18. A systematic review of implant outcomes in treated periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Vanessa; Mardas, Nikos; Farias, Bruna; Petrie, Aviva; Needleman, Ian; Spratt, David; Donos, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effect of treated periodontitis on implant outcomes in partially edentulous individuals compared with periodontally healthy patients. Longitudinal studies reporting on implant survival, success, incidence of peri-implantitis, bone loss and periodontal status, and on partially dentate patients with a history of treated periodontitis were included. The search yielded 14,917 citations. Twenty-seven publications met the inclusion criteria for qualitative data synthesis. Implant success and survival were higher in periodontally healthy patients, whilst bone loss and incidence of peri-implantitis was increased in patients with history of treated periodontitis. There was a higher tendency for implant loss and biological complications in patients previously presenting with severe forms of periodontitis. The strength of the evidence was limited by the heterogeneity of the included studies in terms of study design, population, therapy, unit of analysis, inconsistent definition of baselines and outcomes, as well as by the inadequate reporting of statistical analysis and accounting for confounding factors; thus, meta-analysis could not be performed. Implants placed in patients treated for periodontal disease are associated with higher incidence of biological complications and lower success and survival rates than those placed in periodontally healthy patients. Severe forms of periodontal disease are associated with higher rates of implant loss. However, it is critical to develop well-designed, long-term prospective studies to provide further substantive evidence on the association of these outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Survival and prognostic factors in patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Thomas; Oettingen, Gorm von; Lassen-Ramshad, Yasmin A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background. Stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) of brain metastases is used with good effect around the world, but no consensus exists regarding which prognostic factors that are related to favourable or unfavourable prognosis after the treatment. A better definition of these factors...... will ensure a more precise application of the treatment. Material and methods. A consecutive cohort of the 198 patients treated for brain metastases with SRT without concurrent whole-brain radiation therapy at our department from 2001 to 2012 was retrospectively analysed. Results. Median survival was seven...... to clinical cerebral progression. Conclusion. We identified four prognostic factors related to survival after SRT for brain metastases. The grouping of patients by these factors is useful to determine the level of treatment. We discourage the delivery of SRT to patients with 3-4 unfavourable prognostic...

  20. Radiation-induced xerostomia in a patient with nasopharyngeal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: This study reports a case of radiation-induced xerstomia in a patient with nasopharyngeal cancer, to emphasize the need for prompt oral care to prevent untoward effects of xerostomia and to improve patients' quality of life. CASE REPORT: A 60 year old man diagnosed of radiation-induced xerostomia, after 6 ...

  1. Physician and nurse knowledge about patient radiation exposure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-23

    Nov 23, 2015 ... The cumulative effects of radiation exposure over multiple diagnostic imaging methods affect the risk of cancer development in pediatric patients.[11,12]. Both the physicians and nurses underestimated the radiation dose of brain CT in this study. Adult and pediatric patients present to the ED because of ...

  2. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging among patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Desmond, Alan N

    2012-03-01

    There are concerns about levels of radiation exposure among patients who undergo diagnostic imaging for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compared with other gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We quantified imaging studies and estimated the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation received by patients with organic and functional GI disorders. We also identified factors and diagnoses associated with high CEDs.

  3. Radiation exposure in gastroenterology: improving patient and staff protection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ho, Immanuel K H

    2014-08-01

    Medical imaging involving the use of ionizing radiation has brought enormous benefits to society and patients. In the past several decades, exposure to medical radiation has increased markedly, driven primarily by the use of computed tomography. Ionizing radiation has been linked to carcinogenesis. Whether low-dose medical radiation exposure will result in the development of malignancy is uncertain. This paper reviews the current evidence for such risk, and aims to inform the gastroenterologist of dosages of radiation associated with commonly ordered procedures and diagnostic tests in clinical practice. The use of medical radiation must always be justified and must enable patients to be exposed at the lowest reasonable dose. Recommendations provided herein for minimizing radiation exposure are based on currently available evidence and Working Party expert consensus.

  4. Intrahepatic Flow Redistribution in Patients Treated with Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spreafico, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.spreafico@istitutotumori.mi.it; Morosi, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.morosi@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Radiology (Italy); Maccauro, Marco, E-mail: marco.maccauro@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Italy); Romito, Raffaele, E-mail: raffaele.romito@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Liver Surgery and Transplant (Italy); Lanocita, Rodolfo, E-mail: rodolfo.lanocita@istitutotumori.mi.it; Civelli, Enrico M., E-mail: enrico.civelli@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Radiology (Italy); Sposito, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.sposito@istitutotumori.mi.it; Bhoori, Sherrie, E-mail: sherrie.bhoori@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Liver Surgery and Transplant (Italy); Chiesa, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.chiesa@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Italy); Frigerio, Laura F., E-mail: laura.frigerio@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Radiology (Italy); Lorenzoni, Alice, E-mail: alice.lorenzoni@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Italy); Cascella, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.cascella@istitutotumori.mi.it; Marchianò, Alfonso, E-mail: alfonso.marchiano@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Radiology (Italy); Mazzaferro, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.mazzaferro@istitutotumori.mi.it [Fondazione Istituto Tumori, Department of Liver Surgery and Transplant (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    IntroductionIn planning Yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y)-radioembolizations, strategy problems arise in tumours with multiple arterial supplies. We aim to demonstrate that tumours can be treated via one main feeding artery achieving flow redistribution by embolizing accessory vessels.MethodsOne hundred {sup 90}Y-radioembolizations were performed on 90 patients using glass microspheres. In 19 lesions/17 patients, accessory branches were found feeding a minor tumour portion and embolized. In all 17 patients, the assessment of the complete perfusion was obtained by angiography and single photon emission computerized tomography–computerized tomography (SPECT–CT). Dosimetry, toxicity, and tumor response rate of the patients treated after flow redistribution were compared with the 83 standard-treated patients. Seventeen lesions in 15 patients with flow redistribution were chosen as target lesions and evaluated according to mRECIST criteria.ResultsIn all patients, the complete tumor perfusion was assessed immediately before radioembolization by angiography in all patients and after the {sup 90}Y-infusion by SPECT–CT in 15 of 17 patients. In the 15 assessable patients, the response rate in their 17 lesions was 3 CR, 8 PR, and 6 SD. Dosimetric and toxicity data, as well tumour response rate, were comparable with the 83 patients with regular vasculature.ConclusionsAll embolization procedures were performed successfully with no complications, and the flow redistribution was obtained in all cases. Results in term of toxicity, median dose administered, and radiological response were comparable with standard radioembolizations. Our findings confirmed the intratumoral flow redistribution after embolizing the accessory arteries, which makes it possible to treat the tumour through its single main feeding artery.

  5. Trismus, xerostomia and nutrition status in nasopharyngeal carcinoma survivors treated with radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-J; Chen, S-C; Wang, C-P; Fang, Y-Y; Lee, Y-H; Lou, P-J; Ko, J-Y; Chiang, C-C; Lai, Y-H

    2016-05-01

    The aims of the study were to: (1) examine levels of trismus, xerostomia and nutritional status; (2) compare levels of trismus, xerostomia and nutritional status in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) receiving different types of radiation modalities; and (3) identify factors related to NPC survivors' risk status for malnutrition and existing malnutrition. A cross-sectional study with consecutive sampling was conducted. NPC survivors were recruited from otolaryngology/oncology outpatient clinics in a medical centre in Northern Taiwan. Study measures included (1) Mandibular Function Impairment Questionnaire, (2) Xerostomia Questionnaire, (3) Mini Nutrition Assessment, (4) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale - Depression subscale, and (5) Symptom Severity Scale. A total of 110 subjects were recruited. Those receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy had less trismus and xerostomia than patients receiving two-dimensional radiation therapy. Patients with female gender, advanced stage, completion of treatments within 1 year, higher levels of depression, more severe trismus and higher symptom severity tended to have malnutrition or were at risk of malnutrition. Trismus and xerostomia are long-term problems in some NPC survivors and may contribute to malnutrition. To better manage a patient's trismus and xerostomia and to enhance nutritional status, clinicians should develop a patient-specific care programme based on careful assessment and targeted measures to improve oral function and insure adequate nutritional intake. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Implant-prosthetic rehabilitation after radiation treatment in head and neck cancer patients: a case-series report of outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotic Jasna

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Slovenia has a high burden of head and neck cancer. Patients are mostly treated with surgery followed by radiation therapy. Advanced surgical and prosthodontic techniques have expanded the rehabilitation options. The aim of the study was to review the outcome of implant-prosthetic treatment after radiation therapy.

  7. Incidence of dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients treated with primary radiotherapy and cetuximab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selzer, Edgar; Liederer Susanne; Lemaire, Christiane; Radonjic, Dejan; Poetter, Richard; Bachtiary, Barbara [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Kren, Gerhard; Knocke, Thomas [Hospital Hietzing, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Kornek, Gabriela [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Internal Medicine I

    2011-06-15

    To retrospectively assess the incidence of radiation dermatitis in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) who received primary radiotherapy in combination with cetuximab in a curative intent. A total of 112 consecutively treated patients who received cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy at the Departments of Radiotherapy at the Medical University in Vienna and the Hospital Hietzing (Vienna) were analyzed. Radiotherapy was administered either as conventional radiotherapy (70 Gy in 7 weeks) or using a concomitant boost protocol (72 Gy in 6 weeks). The incidence of dermatitis and mucositis within the radiation portals in 103 eligible patients was compared with a historical control group treated at the Medical University of Vienna as well as with published data. The incidence of grade 1/2, 3, and 4 dermatitis was 57%, 29%, and 1% in the radiotherapy plus cetuximab treated collective. The incidence of grade 1/2, 3, and 4 mucositis was 37%, 47%, and 4%, respectively. The incidence of grade 3 dermatitis during concurrent radiotherapy plus cetuximab was 29% in our patient collective. Only one case of grade 4 dermatitis was observed. These results do not statistically differ significantly from the incidence reported in the Bonner trial and indicate that cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy is well tolerated. (orig.)

  8. Patterns of Referral to Radiation Oncology among Patients with Bladder Cancer: a Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirt, J S; Siemens, D R; Zaza, K; Mackillop, W J; Booth, C M

    2017-03-01

    Radical radiotherapy is a reasonable alternative to cystectomy for some patients with invasive bladder cancer, and postoperative radiotherapy may be indicated in patients at high risk of local recurrence. Here we describe pre- and postoperative radiation oncology consultation among patients with bladder cancer in Ontario. Records of radiotherapy and surgery were linked to the Ontario Cancer Registry (OCR) to identify all patients who received treatment with curative intent for bladder cancer between 1994 and 2008. Billing records were linked to the OCR to determine which patients were seen by radiation oncology before radical therapy or after cystectomy. Factors associated with radiation oncology consultation were explored by logistic regression. In total, 5259 patients with bladder cancer underwent treatment with curative intent in Ontario between 1994 and 2008. Of these, 3879 had primary cystectomy and 1380 had primary radiotherapy. Thirty-two per cent (1698/5259) of all patients were seen by radiation oncology. Independent factors associated with radiation oncology consultation included advanced age (P oncology consultation. Ten per cent of patients treated by cystectomy (386/3879) were seen by radiation oncology in the postoperative setting; rates varied widely across regions (range 6-44%). These geographical variations were highly significant in the multivariate analysis (P oncology consultation (all P oncology consultation. One third of all patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer in routine practice were seen in consultation by radiation oncology. Few patients who undergo cystectomy have the benefit of either a preoperative or a postoperative opinion about the potential role of radiotherapy in their management. Closer collaboration between radiation oncologists and urologists is warranted. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Aplastic anemia as a cause of death in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopecky, Jindrich; Priester, Peter; Slovacek, Ladislav; Petera, Jiri; Macingova, Zuzana [Dept. of Clinical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Hospital and Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Kopecky, Otakar [Clinical Oncology, Regional Hospital Nachod (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Background: Standard treatment of glioblastoma multiforme consists of postoperative radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, followed by a 6-month chemotherapy. Serious hematologic complications are rarely reported. Case Report and Results: The authors present the case of a 61-year-old female patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with external-beam radiation therapy and concomitant temozolomide. After completion of treatment, the patient developed symptoms of serious aplastic anemia that eventually led to death due to prolonged neutro- and thrombocytopenia followed by infectious complications. Conclusion: Lethal complications following temozolomide are, per se, extremely rare, however, a total of four other cases of aplastic anemia have been reported in the literature so far. (orig.)

  10. Predictive factors of radiation-induced skin toxicity in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Chia-Hsuan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the factors affecting the incidence of radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant 3 D conformal radiotherapy by the analysis of dosimetry and topical treatments. Methods Between September 2002 and July 2009, 158 breast cancer patients were treated with adjuvant 3 D conformal radiotherapy after undergoing surgery. Before November 2006, 90 patients were subjected to therapeutic skin care group and topical corticosteroid therapy was used for acute radiation dermatitis. Thereafter, 68 patients received prophylactic topical therapy from the beginning of radiotherapy. The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinical and treatment factors. Furthermore, the possible mechanisms responsible for the effects of topical treatment on radiation-induced dermatitis were investigated in vivo. Results The incidence of radiation-induced moist desquamation was 23% across 158 patients. Higher volume receiving 107% of prescribed dose within PTV (PTV-V107%; >28.6% and volume receiving 110% of prescribed dose within treated volume (TV-V110%; > 5.13%, and no prophylactic topical therapy for irradiated skin, were associated with higher incidence of acute radiation dermatitis. The protective effect of prophylactic topical treatment was more pronounced in patients with TV-V110% > 5.13%. Furthermore, using irradiated mice, we demonstrated that topical steroid cream significantly attenuated irradiation-induced inflammation, causing a decrease in expression of inflammatory cytokines and TGF-beta 1. Conclusion TV-V110% > 5.13% may be an important predictor for radiation induced dermatitis. Prophylactic topical treatment for irradiated skin can significantly improve the tolerance of skin to adjuvant radiotherapy, especially for patients with higher TV-V110%.

  11. Empowering patients for radiation therapy safety: Results of the EMPATHY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibault, J-E; Pernet, A; Mollo, V; Gourdon, L; Martin, O; Giraud, P

    2016-12-01

    With the increase of treatment complexity, enhancing safety is a key concern in radiation oncology. Beyond the involvement of the healthcare professional, patient involvement and empowerment could play a major role in that setting. We explored how patients perceived and fulfilled that role during their radiation treatment. A voluntary and anonymous questionnaire was administered to all patients treated in our department between November 2013 and May 2014. The following data were collected: sociodemographic profile; information received and initiatives to search for additional information; behavior when an unusual treatment event was perceived; active involvement in the safety of the treatment; nature and perception of their own involvement. A statistical analysis was performed to assess behavioral predictors. A total of 155 patients answered the survey. Most of them were treated for prostate (n=58, 37.4%), lung (n=27, 17.4%), head and neck (n=26, 16.8%) and breast (n=25, 16.1%). Only eight patients (5%) had previously received radiation therapy. Ninety-five percent of the patients estimated they had received enough information about their treatment, but 48% would have wanted more. When patients noticed an unusual event during their treatment session, most of them (61%) reported it to the radiation therapist. Patient participation to radiation therapy safety should be encouraged to ensure a cooperative risk management. Healthcare professionals need to inform the patients on the basic technical processes involved in their treatment. Patient empowerment should be added to the verifications made by the radiation therapists and physicians but should not replace them. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. A patient with endobronchial BALT lymphoma successfully treated with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Sayed M S; Heitbrink, Martin A; Jiwa, Mehdi; Boersma, Wim G

    2007-10-01

    Low-grade bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) lymphoma is a rare tumour originating from the marginal zone of lymphoid tissue. It is a subgroup of B-cell extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with an indolent course. We report a case of this tumour with characteristic histologic feature. The patient had non-specific respiratory complaints. The tumour occluded the right bronchus intermedius. He received radiation therapy alone, resulting in complete remission of the tumour and disappearance of symptoms.

  13. Metallic taste in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJpma, I; Renken, R J; Ter Horst, G J; Reyners, A K L

    2015-02-01

    Metallic taste is a taste alteration frequently reported by cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Attention to this side effect of chemotherapy is limited. This review addresses the definition, assessment methods, prevalence, duration, etiology, and management strategies of metallic taste in chemotherapy treated cancer patients. Literature search for metallic taste and chemotherapy was performed in PubMed up to September 2014, resulting in 184 articles of which 13 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria: English publications addressing metallic taste in cancer patients treated with FDA-approved chemotherapy. An additional search in Google Scholar, in related articles of both search engines, and subsequent in the reference lists, resulted in 13 additional articles included in this review. Cancer patient forums were visited to explore management strategies. Prevalence of metallic taste ranged from 9.7% to 78% among patients with various cancers, chemotherapy treatments, and treatment phases. No studies have been performed to investigate the influence of metallic taste on dietary intake, body weight, and quality of life. Several management strategies can be recommended for cancer patients: using plastic utensils, eating cold or frozen foods, adding strong herbs, spices, sweetener or acid to foods, eating sweet and sour foods, using 'miracle fruit' supplements, and rinsing with chelating agents. Although metallic taste is a frequent side effect of chemotherapy and a much discussed topic on cancer patient forums, literature regarding metallic taste among chemotherapy treated cancer patients is scarce. More awareness for this side effect can improve the support for these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hair cortisol measurement in mitotane-treated adrenocortical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenschijn, L; Quinkler, M; van Rossum, E F C

    2014-04-01

    The only approved drug for the treatment of adrenocortical cancer (ACC) is mitotane. Mitotane is adrenolytic and therefore, hydrocortisone replacement therapy is necessary. Since mitotane increases cortisol binding globulin (CBG) and induces CYP3A4 activity, high doses of hydrocortisone are thought to be required. Evaluation of hydrocortisone therapy in mitotane-treated patients has been difficult since there is no good marker to evaluate hydrocortisone therapy. Measurement of cortisol in scalp hair is a novel method that offers the opportunity to measure long-term cortisol levels. Our aim was to evaluate whether hair cortisol measurements could be useful in evaluating recent hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients. Hair cortisol levels were measured in 15 mitotane-treated ACC patients on hydrocortisone substitution and 96 healthy individuals. Cortisol levels were measured in 3 cm hair segments, corresponding to a period of 3 months. Hair cortisol levels were higher in ACC patients compared to healthy individuals (pcortisol levels above the reference range. None of the patients had hair cortisol levels below normal. In contrast to hydrocortisone doses (β=0.03, p=0.93), hair cortisol levels were associated with BMI (β=0.53, p=0.042). There was no correlation between hair cortisol levels and hydrocortisone doses (β=0.41, p=0.13). Almost half of the ACC patients had high hair cortisol levels, suggesting long-term over-substitution of hydrocortisone in some of the patients, whereas none of the patients was under-substituted. Hair cortisol measurements might be useful in long-term monitoring hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. [The successfully treated patients - are they the satisfied ones?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkers, Michael; Gerth, Nico; Pfau, Giselher; Hachenberg, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    The current scientific opinion on the success of a therapy is that patients having undergone a successful therapy are satisfied. However, in reality, it is possible that patients with poor living conditions are satisfied (well-being paradox) whereas patients treated successfully are not (dissonance). The higher the psychological distress, the more rare is the assumption that successful therapy is an equivalent of satisfaction. Satisfaction depends more on fulfillment of patient expectations and involvement of the physicians. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Impact of an angiotensin analogue in treating thermal and combined radiation injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Sachin Suresh

    Background: In recent years there has been a growing concern regarding the use of nuclear weapons by terrorists. Such incidents in the past have shown that radiation exposure is often accompanied by other forms of trauma such as burns, wounds or infection; leading to increased mortality rates among the affected individuals. This increased risk with combined radiation injury has been attributed to the delayed wound healing observed in this injury. The Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) has emerged as a critical regulator of wound healing. Angiotensin II (A-II) and Angiotensin (1-7) [A(1-7)] have been shown to accelerate the rate of wound healing in different animal models of cutaneous injury. Nor-Leu3-Angiotensin (1-7) [Nor-Leu3-A (1-7)], an analogue of A(1-7), is more efficient than both A-II and A(1-7) in its ability to improve wound healing and is currently in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Aims: The three main goals of this study were to; 1) Develop a combined radiation and burn injury (CRBI) model and a radiation-induced cutaneous injury model to study the pathophysiological effects of these injuries on dermal wound healing; 2) To treat thermal and CRBI injuries using Nor-Leu 3-A (1-7) and decipher the mechanism of action of this peptide and 3) Develop an in-vitro model of CRBI using dermal cells in order to study the effect of CRBI on individual cell types involved in wound healing. Results: CRBI results in delayed and exacerbated apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation in injured skin as compared to thermal injury by itself. Radiation-induced cutaneous injury shows a radiation-dose dependent increase in inflammation as well as a chronic inflammatory response in the higher radiation exposure groups. Nor-Leu3-A (1-7) can mitigate thermal and CRBI injuries by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage while increasing the rate of proliferation of dermal stem cells and re-epithelialization of injured skin. The in

  17. Efficacy and safety of retreatment with nivolumab in metastatic melanoma patients previously treated with nivolumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Motoo; Otsuka, Atsushi; Kondo, Tomohiro; Nagai, Hiroki; Nonomura, Yumi; Kaku, Yo; Matsumoto, Shigemi; Muto, Manabu

    2017-11-01

    Nivolumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against programmed death-1 that has been shown to improve survival in patients with metastatic melanoma. However, the efficacy of nivolumab and other agents in melanoma remains limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of retreatment with nivolumab in metastatic melanoma patients who previously progressed on nivolumab. A retrospective review was performed on eight consecutive metastatic melanoma patients retreated with nivolumab who progressed on previous nivolumab. These patients received nivolumab 2 mg/kg every 3 weeks. Best responses to each treatment were assessed using RECIST 1.1. Of eight metastatic melanoma patients, three patients received chemotherapy before first nivolumab. The median first nivolumab treatment period was 4.1 months. During first nivolumab, 3 (37.5%) patients achieved a partial response and 3 (37.5%) patients achieved stable disease as their best response. First nivolumab was discontinued due to disease progression in seven patients and grade 3 colitis in 1 patient. Patients were subsequently treated with ipilimumab (n = 6), vemurafenib (n = 1), or no other medical treatment (n = 1). The median treatment period between first and second nivolumab was 3.0 months. Four patients received radiation therapy between first and second nivolumab. The median second nivolumab treatment period was 4.3 months. Among the eight patients who received second nivolumab, 2 (25%) patients achieved a partial response and 3 (37.5%) patients achieved stable disease as their best response. Second nivolumab was discontinued due to disease progression in seven patients. One patient continues to receive second nivolumab. Among the four patients treated with ipilimumab and radiotherapy between first and second nivolumab, the response rate was 50% and the disease control rate was 75%. This study showed that retreatment with nivolumab is an option for select metastatic melanoma

  18. The changing face of HIV/AIDS in treated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llibre, Josep M; Falco, Vicenç; Tural, Cristina; Negredo, Eugenia; Pineda, Juan A; Muñoz, Jose; Ortega, Enrique; Videla, Sebastia; Sirera, Guillem; Martinez, Esteban; Miralles, Celia; Iribarren, Josean; Galindo, Maria J; Domingo, Pere; d'Arminio-Monforte, Antonella; Miro, Jose M; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2009-07-01

    The spectrum of complications emerging in successfully treated HIV-infected patients has dramatically changed since the advent of HAART. Typical AIDS-defining illnesses have been substituted by new comorbid conditions that threaten even those patients who maintain virologic suppression. Proper management of cardiovascular risk, and early diagnosis of AIDS-related and, particularly, non-AIDS-related malignancies (including papilomavirus-related neoplasms) must be introduced into the routine of care. Hot areas of investigation include HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, hepatitis B and C coinfection, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and tuberculosis. Bone and kidney long-term toxicities and lipoatrophy remain as issues of paramount importance. The identification and early treatment of immune reconstitution disease is also of major interest, specially in those patients starting their antiretroviral treatment with severe CD4 cell depletion. The present review focuses on these twelve areas of increasing interest for physicians currently facing successfully treated HIV+ patients.

  19. Polyarthritis flare in patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with infliximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Filippucci

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last ten years, the treatment of seronegative spondyloarthropathies has changed dramatically with the introduction of the anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα agents. Nevertheless, there is a growing number of studies describing several adverse reactions in patients treated with biological agents. In the present report we describe the case of a 22-year-old male patient with ankylosing spondylitis who developed a “paradoxic” adverse reaction, while receiving infliximab.

  20. Severe hyponatraemia in an amiloride/hydrochlorothiazide-treated patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Assen, S.; Mudde, A.H.

    1999-01-01

    A 85-year-old woman treated with, among other drugs, a thiazide diuretic presented with a severe hyponatraemia. She met several of the criteria for SIADH and, besides drugs, no cause for SIADH was found. After stopping the thiazide diuretic and restricting fluid intake the patient recovered fully.

  1. metabolic control of type-2 diabetic patients commonly treated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-04-04

    Apr 4, 2003 ... Objective: To assess metabolic control in type 2 diabetic patients predominantly treated with sulphonylurea ... shown that the disorder has a hereditary background(1,2) and often .... of fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, triglycerides and LDL- ..... Weir, G.C. Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus: interplay.

  2. Haematological alteration in Leprosy patients treated with dapsone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the haemoglobin concentration (Hb); total white blood cell count (WBC), differential WBC count; platelet count and reticulocyte count in leprosy patients already treated with dapsone. Design: A case-control study. Setting: Specialist Hospital Ossiomo, which is a Leprosarium and Haematology ...

  3. A 3- Year Review of Patients with Chronic Empyema Treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Empyema thoracic is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This study was aimed at determining the causes, clinical presentation, outcomes of surgical intervention and variables associated with adverse outcomes in patients with chronic empyema treated surgically.

  4. Influence of pretreatment polarographically measured oxygenation levels in spontaneous canine tumors treated with radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bley, C.R.; Ohlerth, S.; Wergin, M.; Achermann, R.; Kaser-Hotz, B. [Section of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Vetsuisse Faculty, Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Roos, M. [Biostatistics, ISPM, Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-09-15

    Background and purpose: the level of hypoxia in primary tumors has been described to influence response to treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of pretreatment oxygen level measurements in spontaneous canine tumors on treatment outcome. Material and methods: data of pretreatment tumor oxygenation status and local tumor response after primary radiation therapy in a group of spontaneously occurring tumors in dogs (n = 52) was collected. Radiation therapy was given with curative (14-17 x 3-3.5 Gy) or palliative intent (3 x 8 Gy or 4-5 x 6 Gy). Progression-free interval and overall survival were correlated to polarographically measured tumor oxygenation status. Results: in the curatively irradiated group, tumors with median p0{sub 2} values {<=} 10 mmHg tended to have shorter median progression-free interval compared to better oxygenated tumors (246 vs. 739 days). The same trend could be shown for overall survival (330 vs. 745 days), indicating a cutoff value in this region. In the group treated with lower doses of radiation, the level of oxygen was no longer found to be of prognostic value; however, in this group hemoglobin had a significant impact on outcome. Conclusion: in curatively irradiated spontaneous canine tumors, tumor hypoxia was found to be a prognostic indicator, independent of tumor histologies and volume. (orig.)

  5. Laser Desorption Postionization Mass Spectrometry of Antibiotic-Treated Bacterial Biofilms using Tunable Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasper, Gerald L; Takahashi, Lynelle K; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Moore, Jerry F; Hanley, Luke

    2010-08-04

    Laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) with 8.0 ? 12.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation is used to single photon ionize antibiotics andextracellular neutrals that are laser desorbed both neat and from intact bacterial biofilms. Neat antibiotics are optimally detected using 10.5 eV LDPI-MS, but can be ionized using 8.0 eV radiation, in agreement with prior work using 7.87 eV LDPI-MS. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation also postionizes laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotics and extracellular material from within intact bacterial biofilms. Different extracellular material is observed by LDPI-MS in response to rifampicin or trimethoprim antibiotic treatment. Once again, 10.5 eV LDPI-MS displays the optimum trade-off between improved sensitivity and minimum fragmentation. Higher energy photons at 12.5 eV produce significant parent ion signal, but fragment intensity and other low mass ions are also enhanced. No matrix is added to enhance desorption, which is performed at peak power densities insufficient to directly produce ions, thus allowing observation of true VUV postionization mass spectra of antibiotic treated biofilms.

  6. Modern principles of radiation protection of medical radiance exposed patients

    OpenAIRE

    A. I. Sevalnyev; A. V. Kutsak; Kostenetskyy, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction It is very important to determine effective protection from radiation for patients and to establish necessity of X-Ray examination because radiation doses are not regulated. International commission of radiation protection (ICRP) pays great attention to this question. ICRP published recommendations according to patient’s protection on medical irradiation.(ICRP Publication 84,85,86,87, 93, 102) Aim of the study: To create the scientific basis for creation of the nation...

  7. Modern principles of radiation protection of medical radiance exposed patients

    OpenAIRE

    A. I. Sevalnyev; A. V. Kutsak; Kostenetskyy, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionIt is very important to determine effective protection from radiation for patients and to establish necessity of X-Ray examination because radiation doses are not regulated. International commission of radiation protection (ICRP) pays great attention to this question. ICRP published recommendations according to patient’s protection on medical irradiation.(ICRP Publication 84,85,86,87, 93, 102)Aim of the study:To create the scientific basis for creation of the national normative me...

  8. Physical Activity in Patients Treated With Peritoneal Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharshika Thangarasa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with chronic diseases are known to benefit from exercise. Despite a lack of compelling evidence, patients with end-stage kidney disease treated with peritoneal dialysis are often discouraged from participating in exercise programs that include resistance training due to concerns about the development of hernias and leaks. The actual effects of physical activity with or without structured exercise programs for these patients remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to more completely define the risks and benefits of physical activity in the end-stage kidney disease population treated with peritoneal dialysis. Methods/design: We will conduct a systematic review examining the effects of physical activity on end-stage kidney disease patients treated with peritoneal dialysis. For the purposes of this review, exercise will be considered a purposive subcategory of physical activity. The primary objective is to determine if physical activity in this patient population is associated with improvements in mental health, physical functioning, fatigue and quality of life and if there is an increase in adverse outcomes. With the help of a skilled librarian, we will search MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized trials and observational studies. We will include adult end-stage kidney disease patients treated with peritoneal dialysis that have participated in an exercise training program or had their level of physical activity assessed directly or by self-report. The study must include an assessment of the association between physical activity and one of our primary or secondary outcomes measures. We will report study quality using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for randomized controlled trials and the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale for observational studies. Quality across studies will be assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE

  9. Radiation recall gastritis secondary to erlotinib in a patient with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Casey; Hegde, Sanjay; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-12-01

    Radiation recall refers to chemotherapy-triggered inflammation in healthy areas previously exposed to irradiation. Chemotherapeutics known to be associated with radiation recall phenomenon include anthracyclines, taxanes and antimetabolites, such as gemcitabine and capecitabine. Case reports detailing radiation recall dermatitis and pneumonitis associated with erlotinib have been previously described in the literature, however, there are no reported cases describing radiation gastritis associated with erlotinib. We report a patient with pancreatic cancer who developed gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to radiation recall gastritis related to erlotinib exposure. A 57-year-old Hispanic male with pancreatic cancer initially received 7 cycles of FOLFIRINOX followed by capecitabine with radiation therapy for 28 fractions for a total of 5,040 cGy. Re-staging with computed tomography demonstrated stable disease. The patient was then treated with erlotinib and capecitabine for approximately two months before restaging demonstrated progressive disease. Shortly after discontinuing erlotinib and capecitabine, the patient reported maroon colored stools. Laboratory studies demonstrated a precipitous drop in hemoglobin and hematocrit from pre-treatment baseline, ultimately requiring transfusion with packed red blood cells. Subsequent esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated findings consistent with radiation gastritis, with oozing in the gastric body and antrum, which was treated therapeutically with argon plasma coagulation. The patient's gastrointestinal bleed was difficult to control. Over the course of a two-month period - the patient required multiple admissions, repeat therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopies and transfusions. Radiation recall from erlotinib is rare but can potentially arise in any site that has been previously irradiated. There may be an association between the pathogenesis of radiation recall and erlotinib's up-regulation of the angiogenic growth factor

  10. Nutritional status of patients treated with radiotherapy as determined by subjective global assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koom, Woong Sub; Keum, Ki Chang [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seung Do [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of this prospective multi-institutional study was to evaluate the nutritional status of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of head and neck, lung, or gastrointestinal cancer. A total of 1,000 patients were enrolled in this study at seven different hospitals in Seoul, Korea between October 2009 and May 2010. The nutritional status of patients after receiving 3 weeks of RT was evaluated using subjective global assessment (SGA). The nutritional status of each patient was rated as well nourished (A), moderately malnourished (B), or severely malnourished (C). The mean age of patients in this study was 59.4 {+-} 11.9 years, and the male to female ratio was 7:3. According to the SGA results, 60.8%, 34.5%, and 4.7% of patients were classified as A, B, or C, respectively. The following criteria were significantly associated with malnutrition (SGA B or C; p < 0.001): loss of subcutaneous fat or muscle wasting (odds ratio [OR], 11.473); increased metabolic demand/stress (OR, 8.688); ankle, sacral edema, or ascites (OR, 3.234); and weight loss 5% (OR, 2.299). SGA was applied successfully to assess the nutritional status of most patients. The prevalence of malnutrition in a radiation oncology department was 39.2%. The results of this study serve as a basis for implementation of nutrition intervention to patients being treated at radiation oncology departments.

  11. Nutritional status of patients treated with radiotherapy as determined by subjective global assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koom, Woong Sub; Ahn, Seung Do; Song, Si Yeol; Lee, Chang Geol; Moon, Sung Ho; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok; Oh, Young-Taek; Lee, Ho Sun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this prospective multi-institutional study was to evaluate the nutritional status of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of head and neck, lung, or gastrointestinal cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 1,000 patients were enrolled in this study at seven different hospitals in Seoul, Korea between October 2009 and May 2010. The nutritional status of patients after receiving 3 weeks of RT was evaluated using subjective global assessment (SGA). The nutritional status of each patient was rated as well nourished (A), moderately malnourished (B), or severely malnourished (C). Results The mean age of patients in this study was 59.4 ± 11.9 years, and the male to female ratio was 7:3. According to the SGA results, 60.8%, 34.5%, and 4.7% of patients were classified as A, B, or C, respectively. The following criteria were significantly associated with malnutrition (SGA B or C; p < 0.001): loss of subcutaneous fat or muscle wasting (odds ratio [OR], 11.473); increased metabolic demand/stress (OR, 8.688); ankle, sacral edema, or ascites (OR, 3.234); and weight loss ≥5% (OR, 2.299). Conclusion SGA was applied successfully to assess the nutritional status of most patients. The prevalence of malnutrition in a radiation oncology department was 39.2%. The results of this study serve as a basis for implementation of nutrition intervention to patients being treated at radiation oncology departments. PMID:23170292

  12. Radiation dose measurement of paediatric patients in Estonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kepler, K. [Training Centre of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tartu (Estonia); Lintrop, M. [Department of Radiology, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu (Estonia); Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Eek, V.; Filippova, I. [Estonian Radiation Protection Centre, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2003-06-01

    According to the Medical Exposure Directive (97/43/Euratom) the radiation doses to patients should be measured in every hospital and doses should be compared to the reference doses established by the competent authorities. Special attention should be paid to the paediatric x-ray examinations, because the paediatric patients are more radiosensitive than adult patients. The requirement of measurements of radiation dose to patients is not yet included in the Estonian radiation act, but the purpose to join the European Communities makes the quality control in radiology very actual in Estonia. The necessity exists to introduce suitable measurement methods in the Xray departments of Estonian hospitals for establishing feedback system for radiologists, radiographers and medical physicists in optimising the radiation burden of patients and image quality. (orig.)

  13. Addison disease in patients treated with glucocorticoid therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Acute adrenal crisis in patients with unrecognized chronic adrenocortical failure is difficult to diagnose and potentially fatal. We describe 2 patients with acute adrenal crisis whose diagnoses were hindered because of concomitant glucocorticoid treatment. Acute adrenal insufficiency is primarily a state of mineralocorticoid deficiency. Prednisolone and prednisone, the most frequently prescribed anti-inflammatory corticosteroid agents, have minimal mineralocorticoid activity. Several conditions that may be treated with pharmacological glucocorticoids are associated with an increased risk of Addison disease. An acute adrenal crisis, against which concurrent glucocorticoid therapy does not confer adequate protection, may develop in such patients.

  14. Evaluation of patients' engagement in radiation therapy safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, A; Mollo, V; Bibault, J-E; Giraud, P

    2016-12-01

    Treatment safety has become a priority in health policies after several incidents occurred around the world in radiation oncology departments. The aim of this study was to analyse the patients' contribution in that field and to understand which actions empower the patient in that regard. Several methods were used in a general hospital and in a comprehensive cancer centre to analyse the activities of the radiation therapists and the patients and the interactions between them: treatment session observations, semidirective interviews with radiation therapists and patients, self and alloconfrontation with radiation therapists and explanatory interviews with patients. Cooperation of the patients in treatment safety acts as an additional step that contributes to safer treatments. Radiation therapy sessions are a creative opportunity for the patient to observe, learn and analyse what is happening. Changes between treatment sessions are a source of anxiety for the patients. This study highlights the factors that favour the patients' participation. A trusting relationship and support from the health professionals can be leveraged in that manner. There is a common will shared between the patients and the health professionals towards better treatment safety. The cooperation is still not well-known and underused. This empowerment of the patient cannot be mandatory but should be promoted and developed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  15. Physician and nurse knowledge about patient radiation exposure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Imaging methods that use ionizing radiation in emergency departments (EDs) have increased with advances in radiological diagnostic methods. Physician and nurse awareness of the radiation dose in the ED and the associated cancer risks to which the patients are exposed were surveyed with a ...

  16. Radiation injury in a patient with unusually high sensitivity to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, S.; Saito, F.; Suda, T.; Fijibayashi, H.; Shibuya, H.; Horiuchi, J.; Suzuki, S.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation therapy is usually given with the assumption that interindividual variations in radiosensitivity are small, except for some patients with hereditary diseases associated with increased sensitivity. Recently, we observed radiation induced pericarditis in a breast carcinoma patient, in whom clinical signs, blood counts and chromosome analysis after in vitro irradiation of blood suggested a state of unusually high radiosensitivity. No evidence of constitutional chromosome abnormality was found in karyotypic analysis with the G-banding technique.

  17. Patterns of Relapse in High-Risk Neuroblastoma Patients Treated With and Without Total Body Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Richard [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Polishchuk, Alexei [School of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); DuBois, Steven [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Dana-Farber/Boston Children' s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hawkins, Randall [School of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Lee, Stephanie W. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bagatell, Rochelle [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Shusterman, Suzanne [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Dana-Farber/Boston Children' s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hill-Kayser, Christine [Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Al-Sayegh, Hasan [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Dana-Farber/Boston Children' s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Diller, Lisa [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Dana-Farber/Boston Children' s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Haas-Kogan, Daphne A. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Dana-Farber/Boston Children' s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Matthay, Katherine K. [School of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); London, Wendy B. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Dana-Farber/Boston Children' s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); and others

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy to initial sites of disease may influence relapse patterns in high-risk neuroblastoma. However, the effect of systemic irradiation by use of total body irradiation (TBI) on anatomic patterns of relapse has not previously been investigated. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed patients receiving definitive treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma with subsequent relapse in bony metastatic sites, with a date of relapse between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2012. Anatomic sites of disease, defined by metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) avidity, were compared at diagnosis and at first relapse. The Fisher exact test was performed to compare relapse in initially involved sites between patients treated with and without TBI. Results: Seventy-four patients with a median age at diagnosis of 3.5 years (range, 0.3-15.3 years) had relapse in 227 sites of MIBG-avid metastatic disease, with a median time to relapse of 1.8 years. Of the 227 sites of first relapse, 154 sites (68%) were involved at diagnosis. When we compared relapse patterns in patients treated with and without TBI, 12 of 23 patients (52%) treated with TBI had relapse in ≥1 previously MIBG-avid site of disease whereas 40 of 51 patients (78%) treated without TBI had relapse in ≥1 previously MIBG-avid site of disease (P=.03). Conclusions: Patients treated with systemic irradiation in the form of TBI were significantly less likely to have relapse in prior sites of disease. These findings support further investigation into the role of radiopharmaceutical therapies in curative multimodality therapy.

  18. Pre-Radiation dental considerations and management for head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufta, Kenneth; Forman, Michael; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Sollecito, Thomas P; Panchal, Neeraj

    2018-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) is accompanied by a high rate of morbidity, and complications can have a lifelong, profound impact on both patients and caregivers. Radiation-related injury to the hard and soft tissue of the head and neck can significantly decrease patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study is to provide patent-specific guidelines for managing the oral health and related side effects of HNC patients treated with radiation therapy. Based on reviewed articles retrieved on the PubMed database, guidelines for management of the oral health of this patient population were organized into three separate categories: cancer, patient, and dentition. The location, type, and staging of the cancer, along with the radiation used to treat the cancer significantly impact dental treatment. Several unique patient characteristics such as motivation, presence of support system, socioeconomic status, nutrition, and race have all been found to affect outcomes. Dental disease and available supportive dental management was found to significantly impact treatment and quality of life in this patient population. By comprehensively assessing unique cancer, patient, and dental-related factors, this review provides individualized evidence-based guidelines on the proper management of this complex and vulnerable patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Implant therapy on patients treated with oral bisphosphonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Petros Tripodakis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Bisphosphonates represent a group of drugs with a significant effect on bone structure preventing bone remodelling. They can be administered for the treatment of osteoporosis, Paget’s disease, osteogenesis imperfecta, osteopenia and bone metastases. The aim of this study was to discuss the necessary precautions for successful implant therapy on patients treated with per os bisphosphonates. Case reports: Two female patients, both in the seventh decade of life, requested implant therapy. Their medical history was significant for osteoporosis, managed with per os bisphosphonates (Risedronate and Alendronate, respectively, without other risk factors for osteonecrosis. The duration of bisphosphonate administration was 4 years and 2 months respectively. After consultation with the treating physician, the patients stopped the bisphosphonates 3 months before and 3 months after the placement of the implants. The patients received antibiotic coverage for the surgical interventions. The treatment plan was completed uneventfully with placement of fixed prostheses without complications during a 2-year follow-up period. Conclusion: The greatest dental treatment-related risk for patients on bisphosphonate therapy is bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis, which presents with exposure of avascular bone of the jaws and, according to the clinical stage, pain, inflammation, fractures and/or extensive osteolysis. Most of reported cases of bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis consist of patients on intravenous drug therapy who had undergone dentoalveolar surgery. Patients on per os bisphosphonates may undergo all types of dentoalveolar surgery, including implant placement, as long as the necessary precautions (bisphosphonate discontinuation, antibiotic coverage, meticulous oral hygiene are taken.

  20. Ventricular arrhythmias in patients treated with methadone for opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, Sam; Seewald, Randy M; Yang, Felix; Schweitzer, Paul; Rosman, Jonathan

    2010-06-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a significant rise in reported cases of methadone induced QT prolongation (QTP) and Torsades de Pointes (TdP) in patients treated for opioid dependence. Optimal management of these patients is challenging. We report a case series of 12 consecutive patients admitted to our institution with methadone-induced QTP and ventricular arrhythmias. All patients survived the presenting arrhythmia. Successful transition to buprenorphine was accomplished in three patients. QT interval normalized and none of these patients had recurrent arrhythmias. Methadone dose was reduced in five patients with improvement of QT interval and resolution of arrhythmia. Four patients, including two with ICDs, refused or did not tolerate a reduction in their methadone dose. Ventricular arrhythmias in patients on methadone are an uncommon but important problem. Buprenorphine, a partial micro-opiate-receptor agonist and a kappa-opiate-receptor antagonist does not cause QTP or TdP. Buprenorphine is a useful and effective alternative to methadone in a select group of patients, including those with documented ventricular arrhythmias on methadone. Pacemakers or defibrillators should be reserved for patients who have failed buprenorphine or a reduced methadone dose.

  1. Practical Management Guide for Clinicians Who Treat Patients with Amiodarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Andrew E; Olshansky, Brian; Naccarelli, Gerald V; Kennedy, John I; Murphy, Elizabeth J; Goldschlager, Nora

    2016-05-01

    Amiodarone, an iodinated benzofuran derivative with Class I, II, III, and IV antiarrhythmic properties, is the most commonly used antiarrhythmic drug used to treat supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. Appropriate use of this drug, with its severe and potentially life-threatening adverse effects, requires an essential understanding of its risk-benefit properties in order to ensure safety. The objective of this review is to afford clinicians who treat patients receiving amiodarone an appropriate management strategy for its safe use. The authors of this consensus management guide have thoroughly reviewed and evaluated the existing literature on amiodarone and apply this information, along with the collective experience of the authors, in its development. Provided are management guides on the intravenous and oral dosing of amiodarone, appropriate outpatient follow-up of patients taking the drug, its recognized adverse effects, and recommendations on when to consult specialists to help in patient management. All clinicians must be cognizant of the appropriate use, follow-up, and adverse reactions of amiodarone. The responsibility incurred by those treating such patients cannot be overemphasized. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Colorectal Histology Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Local Failure in Lung Metastases Treated With Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkley, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Trakul, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Jacobs, Lisa Rose; Eyben, Rie von; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shultz, David Benjamin, E-mail: DavidS4@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) is increasingly used to treat lung oligometastases. We set out to determine the safety and efficacy of this approach and to identify factors associated with outcomes. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective study of patients treated with SABR for metastatic lung tumors at our institution from 2003 to 2014. We assessed the association between various patient and treatment factors with local failure (LF), progression, subsequent treatment, systemic treatment, and overall survival (OS), using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: We identified 122 tumors in 77 patients meeting inclusion criteria for this study. Median follow-up was 22 months. The 12- and 24-month cumulative incidence rates of LF were 8.7% and 16.2%, respectively; the 24-month cumulative incidence rates of progression, subsequent treatment, and subsequent systemic treatment were 75.2%, 64.5%, and 35.1%, respectively. Twenty-four-month OS was 74.6%, and median OS was 36 months. Colorectal metastases had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of LF at 12 and 24 months (25.5% and 42.2%, respectively), than all other histologies (4.4% and 9.9%, respectively; P<.0004). The 24-month cumulative incidences of LF for colorectal metastases treated with a biologically effective dose at α/β = 10 (BED{sub 10}) of <100 Gy versus BED{sub 10} of ≥100 Gy were 62.5% and 16.7%, respectively (P=.08). Toxicity was minimal, with only a single grade 3 or higher event observed. Conclusions: SABR for metastatic lung tumors appears to be safe and effective with excellent local control, treatment-free intervals, and OS. An exception is metastases from colorectal cancer, which have a high LF rate consistent with a radioresistant phenotype, suggesting a potential role for dose escalation.

  3. RTOG 0211: A Phase 1/2 Study of Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Gefitinib for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarti, Arnab, E-mail: Arnab.chakravarti@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Arthur G. James Comprehensive Cancer Center and Richard L. Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Wang, Meihua [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Robins, H. Ian [University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Lautenschlaeger, Tim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Arthur G. James Comprehensive Cancer Center and Richard L. Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Brachman, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Schultz, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Choucair, Ali [Neuroscience Institute, Norton Healthcare System, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Dolled-Filhart, Marisa [HistoRx, Branford, Connecticut (United States); Christiansen, Jason [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California–San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Gustavson, Mark [HistoRx, Branford, Connecticut (United States); Molinaro, Annette [HistoRx, Branford, Connecticut (United States); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Mischel, Paul [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Radiation Oncology Department, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in combination with radiation for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) patients. Methods and Materials: Between March 21, 2002, and May 3, 2004, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0211 enrolled 31 and 147 GBM patients in the phase 1 and 2 arms, respectively. Treatment consisted of daily oral gefinitnib started at the time of conventional cranial radiation therapy (RT) and continued post RT for 18 months or until progression. Tissue microarrays from 68 cases were analyzed for EGFR expression. Results: The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of gefitinib was determined to be 500 mg in patients on non-enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant drugs (non-EIAEDs). All patients in the phase 2 component were treated at a gefitinib dose of 500 mg; patients receiving EIADSs could be escalated to 750 mg. The most common side effects of gefitinib in combination with radiation were dermatologic and gastrointestinal. Median survival was 11.5 months for patients treated per protocol. There was no overall survival benefit for patients treated with gefitinib + RT when compared with a historical cohort of patients treated with RT alone, matched by RTOG recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class distribution. Younger age was significantly associated with better outcome. Per protocol stratification, EGFR expression was not found to be of prognostic value for gefitinib + RT-treated patients. Conclusions: The addition of gefitinib to RT is well tolerated. Median survival of RTOG 0211 patients treated with RT with concurrent and adjuvant gefitinib was similar to that in a historical control cohort treated with radiation alone.

  4. [Circulating endothelial progenitor cell levels in treated hypertensive patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroun-Eid, C; Ortega-Hernández, A; Abad, M; García-Donaire, J A; Barbero, A; Reinares, L; Martell-Claros, N; Gómez-Garre, D

    2015-01-01

    Most optimally treated hypertensive patients still have an around 50% increased risk of any cardiovascular event, suggesting the possible existence of unidentified risk factors. In the last years there has been evidence of the essential role of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in the maintenance of endothelial integrity and function, increasing the interest in their involvement in cardiovascular disease. In this study, the circulating levels of EPCs and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are investigated in treated hypertensive patients with adequate control of blood pressure (BP). Blood samples were collected from treated hypertensive patients with controlled BP. Plasma levels of EPCs CD34+/KDR+ and CD34+/VE-cadherin+ were quantified by flow cytometry. Plasma concentration of VEGF was determined by ELISA. A group of healthy subjects without cardiovascular risk factors was included as controls. A total of 108 hypertensive patients were included (61±12 years, 47.2% men) of which 82.4% showed BP<140/90 mmHg, 91.7% and 81.5% controlled diabetes (HbA1c <7%) and cLDL (<130 or 100 mg/dL), respectively, and 85.2% were non-smokers. Around 45% of them were obese. Although patients had cardiovascular parameters within normal ranges, they showed significantly lower levels of CD34+/KDR+ and CD34+/VE-cadherin+ compared with healthy control group, although plasma VEGF concentration was higher in patients than in controls. Despite an optimal treatment, hypertensive patients show a decreased number of circulating EPCs that could be, at least in part, responsible for their residual cardiovascular risk, suggesting that these cells could be a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Work activity in patients treated with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huarte, Alicia; Martínez-López, Marta; Manrique-Huarte, Raquel; Erviti, Sandra; Calavia, Diego; Alonso, Cora; Manrique, Manuel

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact that the cochlear implant (CI) had in the working life of individuals implanted, using the first version of a questionnaire developed in the cochlear implant program at the University Clinic of Navarre. Its purpose was to demonstrate that the CI significantly affected the working lives of these patients. This was a retrospection study on a population of 60 patients (mean age, 48 years old) with bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss treated with CI and to whom a questionnaire on working life satisfaction was given. Of the patients completing the questionnaire, 94.23% were currently satisfied at work. Almost all of them (93.05%) were more motivated to go to work after the implantation. The majority (79.31%) considered themselves more competent after surgery and device activation. Social relations at work were considered to have improved after cochlear implantation by 67.23% of patients. The CI provided positive support in the professional sphere as well as in social abilities by improving communication skills of implanted patients. The development of tools to assess the degree of job satisfaction of patients treated with a CI is of great interest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  6. Risk of First and Recurrent Stroke in Childhood Cancer Survivors Treated With Cranial and Cervical Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Sabine, E-mail: muellers@neuropeds.ucsf.edu [Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Sear, Katherine [Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Hills, Nancy K. [Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chettout, Nassim [Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Afghani, Shervin [Undergraduate Program, University of California, Berkeley, California (United States); Gastelum, Erica [School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Haas-Kogan, Daphne [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Fullerton, Heather J. [Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess, in a retrospective cohort study, rates and predictors of first and recurrent stroke in patients treated with cranial irradiation (CRT) and/or cervical irradiation at ≤18 years of age. Methods and Materials: We performed chart abstraction (n=383) and phone interviews (n=104) to measure first and recurrent stroke in 383 patients who received CRT and/or cervical radiation at a single institution between 1980 and 2009. Stroke was defined as a physician diagnosis and symptoms consistent with stroke. Incidence of first stroke was number of first strokes per person-years of observation after radiation. We used survival analysis techniques to determine cumulative incidence of first and recurrent stroke. Results: Among 325 subjects with sufficient follow-up data, we identified 19 first strokes (13 ischemic, 4 hemorrhagic, 2 unknown subtype) occurring at a median age of 24 years (interquartile range 17-33 years) in patients treated with CRT. Imaging was reviewed when available (n=13), and the stroke was confirmed in 12. Overall rate of first stroke was 625 (95% confidence interval [CI] 378-977) per 100,000 person-years. The cumulative incidence of first stroke was 2% (95% CI 0.01%-5.3%) at 5 years and 4% (95% CI 2.0%-8.4%) at 10 years after irradiation. With each 100-cGy increase in the radiation dose, the stroke hazard increased by 5% (hazard ratio 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.09; P=.02). We identified 6 recurrent strokes; 5 had available imaging that confirmed the stroke. Median time to recurrence was 15 months (interquartile range 6 months-3.2 years) after first stroke. The cumulative incidence of recurrent stroke was 38% (95% CI 17%-69%) at 5 years and 59% (95% CI 27%-92%) at 10 years after first stroke. Conclusion: Cranial irradiation puts childhood cancer survivors at high risk of both first and recurrent stroke. Stroke prevention strategies for these survivors are needed.

  7. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Benign Meningioma: Long-Term Outcome in 318 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokas, Emmanouil, E-mail: emmanouil.fokas@kgu.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Henzel, Martin [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Surber, Gunar; Hamm, Klaus [Department for Stereotactic Neurosurgery and Radiosurgery, HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Erfurt (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the long-term outcome of stereotactic-based radiation therapy in a large cohort of patients with benign intracranial meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2010, 318 patients with histologically confirmed (44.7%; previous surgery) or imaging-defined (55.3%) benign meningiomas were treated with either fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (79.6%), hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (15.4%), or stereotactic radiosurgery (5.0%), depending on tumor size and location. Local control (LC), overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), prognostic factors, and toxicity were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 50 months (range, 12-167 months). Local control, OS, and CSS at 5 years were 92.9%, 88.7%, and 97.2%, and at 10 years they were 87.5%, 74.1%, and 97.2%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, tumor location (P=.029) and age >66 years (P=.031) were predictors of LC and OS, respectively. Worsening of pre-existing neurologic symptoms immediately after radiation therapy occurred in up to 2%. Clinically significant acute toxicity (grade 3°) occurred in 3%. Only grade 1-2 late toxicity was observed in 12%, whereas no new neurologic deficits or treatment-related mortality were encountered. Conclusions: Patients with benign meningiomas predominantly treated with standard fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy with narrow margins enjoy excellent LC and CSS, with minimal long-term morbidity.

  8. The Prognostic Value of Baseline Lymphocyte, Neutrophil, and Monocyte Counts in Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma Treated with Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareena Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To determine the prognostic significance of pretreatment levels of circulating lymphocyte (CLC, neutrophil (CNC, and monocyte (CMC counts in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma (CC treated with definitive radiation. Methods. A retrospective, dual-institution review of patients with Stage IB2-IVA CC from 2005 to 2015. Progression-free (PFS and Overall Survival (OS were determined for high and low CLC, CNC, and CMC groups. Multivariate analysis was used to confirm prognostic value of baseline leukocyte counts. Results. 181 patients were included. Median follow-up time was 26 (3–89 months. CNC had no effect on PFS or OS. PFS was similar between CMC groups; however, OS was significantly improved for patients with low CMC (62.5 versus 45.3 months, p=0.016. High CLC was associated with improved PFS (48.5 versus 27.8 months, p=0.048 and OS (58.4 versus 34.9 months, p=0.048. On multivariate analysis, high CNC was associated with increased relapse risk (HR 1.12, p=0.006 and low CLC was associated with increased mortality risk (HR 0.67, p=0.027. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that leukocyte values can provide prognostic information in CC. These hypothesis-generating findings warrant further prospective investigations.

  9. Dose-volume analysis of radiation-induced trismus in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebre-Medhin, Maria; Haghanegi, Mahnaz; Robért, Lotta; Kjellén, Elisabeth; Nilsson, Per

    2016-11-01

    Trismus is a treatment-related late side effect in patients treated for cancer in the head and neck region (HNC). The condition can have a considerable negative impact on nutrition, dental hygiene, ability to speak and quality of life. We have previously studied trismus within the frame of a randomized phase 3 study of HNC patients treated with mainly three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) and found a strong association to mean radiation dose to the mastication muscles, especially the ipsilateral masseter muscle (iMAS). In the present study we have investigated trismus prevalence and risk factors in a more recent cohort of patients, treated with todays' more updated radiation techniques. Maximal interincisal distance (MID) was measured on 139 consecutive patients. Trismus was defined as MID ≤35 mm. Patient-, disease- and treatment-specific data were retrospectively recorded. Differences between groups were analyzed and mean absorbed dose to mastication structures was evaluated. Dosimetric comparisons were made between this study and our previous results. The prevalence of trismus was 24% at a median of 16 months after completion of radiotherapy. In bivariate analysis treatment technique (3DCRT vs. intensity modulated radiotherapy or helical tomotherapy), tumor site (oropharynx vs. other sites) and mean radiation doses to the ipsilateral lateral pterygoid muscle, the paired masseter muscles and the iMAS were significantly associated with MID ≤35 mm. In multivariable analysis only mean radiation dose to the iMAS was significantly associated to MID ≤35 mm. Mean radiation dose to the ipsilateral masseter muscle is an important risk factor for trismus development. Dose reduction to this structure during radiotherapy should have a potential to diminish the prevalence of trismus in this patient group.

  10. Utilization of Patient-Reported Outcomes to Guide Symptom Management during Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Malika Danner; Ming-yang Hung; Yung, Thomas M.; Marilyn Ayoob; Siyuan Lei; Collins, Brian T.; Simeng Suy; Collins, Sean P.

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionUtilization of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) to guide symptom management during radiation therapy is increasing. This study focuses on the use of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) as a tool to assess urinary and bowel bother during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its utility in guiding medical management.MethodsBetween September 2015 and January 2017, 107 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated wi...

  11. Utilization of Patient-Reported Outcomes to Guide Symptom Management during Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Danner, Malika; Hung, Ming-yang; Yung, Thomas M.; Ayoob, Marilyn; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T.; Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Utilization of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) to guide symptom management during radiation therapy is increasing. This study focuses on the use of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) as a tool to assess urinary and bowel bother during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its utility in guiding medical management. Methods Between September 2015 and January 2017, 107 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated...

  12. Asymptomatic reactivation of JC virus in patients treated with natalizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiping; Bord, Evelyn; Tompkins, Troy; Miller, Janice; Tan, Chen S; Kinkel, R Philip; Stein, Marion C; Viscidi, Raphael P; Ngo, Long H; Koralnik, Igor J

    2009-09-10

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) occurs in a fraction of patients with multiple sclerosis who were treated with natalizumab. Most adults who are infected with the JC virus, the etiologic agent in PML, do not have symptoms. We sought to determine whether exposure to natalizumab causes subclinical reactivation and neurotropic transformation of JC virus. We followed 19 consecutive patients with multiple sclerosis who were treated with natalizumab over an 18-month period, performing quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction assays in blood and urine for JC virus reactivation; BK virus, a JC virus-related polyomavirus, was used as a control. We determined JC virus-specific T-cell responses by means of an enzyme-linked immunospot assay and antibody responses by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and analyzed JC virus regulatory-region sequences. After 12 months of natalizumab therapy, the prevalence of JC virus in the urine of the 19 patients increased from a baseline value of 19% to 63% (P=0.02). After 18 months of treatment, JC virus was detectable in 3 of 15 available plasma samples (20%) and in 9 of 15 available samples of peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (60%) (P=0.02). JC virus regulatory-region sequences in blood samples and in most of the urine samples were similar to those usually found in PML. Conversely, BK virus remained stable in urine and was undetectable in blood. The JC virus-specific cellular immune response dropped significantly between 6 and 12 months of treatment, and variations in the cellular immune response over time tended to be greater in patients in whom JC viremia developed. None of the patients had clinical or radiologic signs of PML. Subclinical reactivation of JC virus occurs frequently in natalizumab-treated patients with multiple sclerosis. Viral shedding is associated with a transient drop in the JC virus-specific cellular immune response. 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society

  13. Leishmania infantum leishmaniasis in corticosteroid – treated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pittalis, Silvia; Nicastri, Emanuele; Spinazzola, Francesco; Ghirga, Piero; De Marco, Michele; Paglia, Maria Grazia; Narciso, Pasquale

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The number of leishmaniasis cases associated with immunosuppression has increased regularly over the past 20 years. Immunosuppression related to HIV infection, immunosuppressive treatment, organ transplantation, and neoplastic diseases increases the risk for Leishmania-infected people to develop visceral illness. Case presentation Three cases of Leishmania infantum leishmaniasis in corticosteroid (CS)-treated patients are reported: an isolated lingual leishmaniasis in a fa...

  14. Ofuji's disease in an immunocompetent patient successfully treated with dapsone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopikrishnan Anjaneyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis or Ofuji's disease is a non-infectious eosinophilic infiltration of hair follicles, which usually presents with itchy papules and pustules in a circinate configuration. We report this case of an immunocompetent patient with erythematous papules and plaques without macropustules diagnosed as eosinophilic pustular folliculitis—a rarely reported entity outside Japan. He was successfully treated with oral dapsone.

  15. metabolic control of type-2 diabetic patients commonly treated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-04-01

    Apr 1, 2003 ... of type 2 diabetes do not sustain glycaemic control. Objective: To assess metabolic control in type 2 diabetic patients predominantly treated with .... 1 (3.2). 5 (5.1). Alcohol consumption: • Yes (%). 23 (37.1)**. 5(21.7). 18 (46.2)a. 17(14.5). 2 (6.5). 15(17.4). Treatment. • Diet & exercise. 8(12.9). 2(8.7). 6(15.4).

  16. Metals determination in wood treated by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br; Silva, Richard Maximiliano da Cunha [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: maxcunha@cena.usp.br; Medeiros, Jean Gabriel da Silva; Tomazello Filho, Mario [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz]. E-mail: jeangm@esalq.usp.br; mtomazel@esalq.usp.br; Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: Silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Zucchi, Orgheda Luiza Araujo Domingues [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas]. E-mail: olzucchi@fcfrp.usp.br; Barroso, Regina Cely [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: cely@uerj.br

    2005-07-01

    The paper describes the use of X-Ray fluorescence analysis for distribution and quantification of metals in the hardwood (Eucalyptus sp) and softwood (Pinus sp) treated with CCA (copper-chromium-arsenic). The sapwood/heartwood for hardwood sample and the growth-rings for softwood sample were analyzed. The samples were scanned in 320 mm steps in the vertical direction. For excitation of the elements a white beam synchrotron radiation of {approx} 320 x 180 mm was employed and for the X-ray detection a Si(Li) semiconductor detector. The elements K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn and As were determined. Fundamental parameters were used to quantify the elements concentrations. (author)

  17. An elective radiation dose of 46 Gy is feasible in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Tsung-Min; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Lin, Chien-Yu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Ng, Shu-Hang; Wang, Hung-Ming; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to compare the treatment outcome of different radiation doses of elective neck irradiation (ENI) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). In total, 504 patients with nondisseminated NPC who underwent magnetic resonance imaging before radical IMRT between 2000 and 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were classified into 2 groups based on the ENI dose: low ENI when the ENI dose was 46 Gy (n = 446) and high ENI when the ENI doses were 50 to 60 Gy (n = 58). All the patients in both the groups received a median dose of 72 Gy to the gross tumor and involved nodes. The fraction size was 2 Gy per fraction. Matching was performed between low ENI and high ENI in a 2:1 ratio, and the matching criteria were N-stage, T-stage, treatment modality, pathology classification, sex, and age. The median follow-up for all patients was 63.5 months. In all patients, the 5-year progression-free survival (PFS), local control (LC), regional control (RC), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), overall survival (OS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS) for low ENI and high ENI patients were 69.0% and 63.2% (P = 0.331), 89.0% and 83.9% (P = 0.235), 90.1% and 85.2% (P = 0.246), 86.8% and 76.6% (P = 0.056), 77.5% and 80.8% (P = 0.926), and 84.4% and 82.5% (P = 0.237), respectively. In the matched-pair analysis, the 5-year PFS, LC, RC, DMFS, OS, and CSS for matched low ENI and high ENI patients were 74.1% and 63.2% (P = 0.134), 92.0% and 83.9% (P = 0.152), 90.1% and 85.2% (P = 0.356), 86.2% and 76.6% (P = 0.125), 87.0% and 80.8% (P = 0.102), and 88.6% and 82.5% (P = 0.080), respectively. In the multivariable analysis for all patients, the ENI group was not a significant factor for PFS, LC, RC, DMFS, OS, and CSS. A low ENI dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions is feasible in NPC patients treated with IMRT, and this concept should be validated in

  18. Outcomes and Patterns of Failure for Grade 2 Meningioma Treated With Reduced-Margin Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Press, Robert H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Prabhu, Roshan S., E-mail: roshansprabhu@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Appin, Christina L.; Brat, Daniel J. [Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Shu, Hui-Kuo G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hadjipanayis, Constantinos; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Oyesiku, Nelson M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Curran, Walter J.; Crocker, Ian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate intracranial control and patterns of local recurrence (LR) for grade 2 meningiomas treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with limited total margin expansions of ≤1 cm. Methods and Materials: We reviewed records of patients with a neuropathological diagnosis of grade 2 meningioma who underwent IMRT at our institution between 2002 and 2012. Actuarial rates were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method from the end of RT. LR was defined as in-field if ≥90% of the recurrence was within the prescription isodose, out-of-field (marginal) if ≥90% was outside of the prescription isodose, and both if neither criterion was met. Results: Between 2002 and 2012, a total of 54 consecutive patients underwent IMRT for grade 2 meningioma. Eight of these patients had total initial margins >1 cm and were excluded, leaving 46 patients for analysis. The median imaging follow-up period was 26.2 months (range, 7-107 months). The median dose for fractionated IMRT was 59.4 Gy (range, 49.2-61.2 Gy). Median clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV), and total margin expansion were 0.5 cm, 0.3 cm, and 0.8 cm, respectively. LR occurred in 8 patients (17%), with 2-year and 3-year actuarial local control (LC) of 92% and 74%, respectively. Six of 8 patients (85%) had a known pattern of failure. Five patients (83%) had in-field LR; no patients had marginal LR; and 1 patient (17%) had both. Conclusions: The use of IMRT to treat grade 2 meningiomas with total initial margins (CTV + PTV) ≤1 cm did not appear to compromise outcomes or increase marginal failures compared with other modern retrospective series. Of the 46 patients who had margins ≤1 cm, none experienced marginal failure only. These results demonstrate efficacy and low risk of marginal failure after IMRT treatment of grade 2 meningiomas with reduced margins, warranting study within a prospective clinical trial.

  19. Differences in Radiation Activity Between Glass and Resin 90Y Microspheres in Treating Unresectable Hepatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Trent; Hill, Jacqueline; Fahrbach, Thomas; Collins, Zachary

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the difference in prescribed radiation activity between glass and resin yttrium-90 (Y) microspheres for radioembolization of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver metastases at a tertiary care teaching institution. The authors performed a retrospective analysis on 126 patients with primary HCC and hepatic metastatic disease from extrahepatic primary cancers who underwent radioembolization with glass or resin particles between 2008 and 2013 at their institution. Radiation activity estimates for prescribed treatments, as well as for the alternate embolization particles, were calculated using commonly employed formulae for both glass and resin particles for all treatments. A total of 217 treatments were performed on 126 patients, with 136 (62.7%) using glass particles and 81 (37.3%) using resin particles. Forty-six (36.5%) patients had metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), 51 (40.5%) had primary HCC, while 11 (8.7%) had neuroendocrine carcinoma, and 18 (14.3%) had metastases from other primary tumors. The average prescribed activity was 2.66 GBq for glass treatments and 1.06 GBq for resin treatments across all cancer types. When the alternative treatment activity was calculated, activities were projected to decrease by an average of 1.52 GBq per treatment if resin microspheres were used instead of glass microspheres (-52.5%), while activities were projected to increase by an average of 1.57 GBq per treatment if glass microspheres were used instead of resin microspheres (148.9%; p glass microspheres.

  20. Testicular function in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated with radioiodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacini, F.; Gasperi, M.; Fugazzola, L. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess whether {sup 131}I therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) can affect endocrine testicular function. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T) concentrations were measured in 103 patients periodically submitted for radioiodine therapy for residual or metastatic disease. Mean follow-up was 93.7{+-}54 mo (range 10-243 mo). Mean FSH values in {sup 131}I-treated patients tested after their last treatment were 15.3{+-}9.9 mU/ml, significantly higher than those of 19 untreated patients (6.5{+-}3.1 mU/ml). Considering the mean +3 s.d. FSH of untreated subjects as the upper limit of normal range, 36.8% of the patients had an abnormal increase in serum FSH. Longitudinal analysis performed in 21 patients showed that the behavior of FSH in response to {sup 131}I therapy was not universal. Six patients had no change or a slight increase in serum FSH after {sup 131}I administration; eleven patients had a transient increase above normal values 6-12 mo after {sup 131}I treatment, with return to normal levels in subsequent months. The administration of a second dose was followed by a similar increase in FSH levels. Finally, four patients, followed for a long period of time and treated with several {sup 131}I doses, showed a progressive increase in serum FSH, which eventually became permanent. Semen analysis, performed in a small subgroup of patients, showed a consistent reduction in the number of normokinetic sperm. No change was found in serum T levels between treated and untreated patients. The results indicate that {sup 131}I therapy for thyroid carcinoma is associated with transient impairment of testicular germinal cell function. The damage may become permanent for high-radiation activities delivered year after year and might pose a significant risk of infertility. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Dyspnoea management in acute coronary syndrome patients treated with ticagrelor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Guido; Storey, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of dyspnoea in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients has always been considered a challenging diagnostic and therapeutic clinical scenario. P2Y12 platelet receptor inhibitors (i.e., clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor) are currently the cornerstone of treatment of ACS patients. Thus, in the last few years, the potential association between ACS and dyspnoea has also become more challenging with the increasing use of ticagrelor in these patients due to its beneficial effects on ischaemic event prevention and mortality, since ticagrelor can induce dyspnoea as a side effect. The present article is intended to review the current literature regarding dyspnoea occurrence in ACS patients, especially those treated with ticagrelor, and to propose ticagrelor-associated dyspnoea management recommendations based on current knowledge. PMID:25267878

  2. Dyspnoea management in acute coronary syndrome patients treated with ticagrelor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Guido; Storey, Robert F

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of dyspnoea in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients has always been considered a challenging diagnostic and therapeutic clinical scenario. P2Y12 platelet receptor inhibitors (i.e., clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor) are currently the cornerstone of treatment of ACS patients. Thus, in the last few years, the potential association between ACS and dyspnoea has also become more challenging with the increasing use of ticagrelor in these patients due to its beneficial effects on ischaemic event prevention and mortality, since ticagrelor can induce dyspnoea as a side effect. The present article is intended to review the current literature regarding dyspnoea occurrence in ACS patients, especially those treated with ticagrelor, and to propose ticagrelor-associated dyspnoea management recommendations based on current knowledge. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  3. [Tranexamic acid gel in patients treated with oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripollés-de Ramón, Jorge; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bravo-Llatas, Carmen; Bascones-Martínez, Antonio

    2014-12-09

    Patients treated with oral anticoagulants have increased susceptibility to bleeding, and therefore any surgical medical procedure and especially oral surgery requires a therapeutic approach that minimizes bleeding effects in these patients. The working hypothesis was based on studies of local application of tranexamic acid after maxillofacial interventions as effective therapeutic alternative for the prevention and control of bleeding. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of the application of a gel solution tranexamic acid after tooth extraction in anticoagulated patients in terms of healing time and degree of healing. The results indicate that application of tranexamic acid gel is very effective for consistency and maintenance in the place of action and shows its efficacy as a procoagulant material. The application of a gel solution of tranexamic acid in oral anticoagulants patients ameliorates healing time and the bleeding time within the first 48-72 h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. A case of rectovagino-vesical fistula due to radiation therapy for uterine cancer treated with covered expandable metallic stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsukasa, Shunroh; Okabe, Satoshi; Tanami, Hideaki [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] (and others)

    2002-04-01

    A 65-year-old woman had received a panhysterectomy and radiation therapy for a uterine cancer in 1974 and underwent a drainage operation for a peritonitis due to rupture of the bladder associated with radiation cystitis in 1983. A rectovesical fistula was revealed and partial resection of the bladder and rectum was performed in 1996. In 1998, rectovesical fistula recurred and symptom of fecaluria and contact-type dermatitis at perineal region subsequently worsened. In February, 2000, colonoscopy and gastrograffin-enema revealed a giant recto-vagino-vesical fistula. Although we recommended ileostomy, the patient refused our offer. She gave informed consent to our proposal about the insertion of a covered expandable metallic stent (EMS) into the rectum to treat for fecaluria. After insertion of a covered EMS, fecaluria and contact-type dermatitis at perineal region subsequently improved. Three months later, fecaluria appeared again. Finally, seven months later, severe inflammation occurred at perineal and pubic region because of migration of the covered EMS into the bladder, then we removed the covered EMS and performed ileostomy. It is difficult to use the covered EMS treatment for benign rectovesical or rectovaginal fistula for a long term. (author)

  5. Low early ototoxicity rates for pediatric medulloblastoma patients treated with proton radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gidley Paul W

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hearing loss is common following chemoradiotherapy for children with medulloblastoma. Compared to photons, proton radiotherapy reduces radiation dose to the cochlea for these patients. Here we examine whether this dosimetric advantage leads to a clinical benefit in audiometric outcomes. Methods From 2006-2009, 23 children treated with proton radiotherapy for medulloblastoma were enrolled on a prospective observational study, through which they underwent pre- and 1 year post-radiotherapy pure-tone audiometric testing. Ears with moderate to severe hearing loss prior to therapy were censored, leaving 35 ears in 19 patients available for analysis. Results The predicted mean cochlear radiation dose was 30 60Co-Gy Equivalents (range 19-43, and the mean cumulative cisplatin dose was 303 mg/m2 (range 298-330. Hearing sensitivity significantly declined following radiotherapy across all frequencies analyzed (P Conclusions Rates of high-grade early post-radiation ototoxicity following proton radiotherapy for pediatric medulloblastoma are low. Preservation of hearing in the audible speech range, as observed here, may improve both quality of life and cognitive functioning for these patients.

  6. Monitoring guidance for patients with hypophosphatasia treated with asfotase alfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishnani, Priya S; Rush, Eric T; Arundel, Paul; Bishop, Nick; Dahir, Kathryn; Fraser, William; Harmatz, Paul; Linglart, Agnès; Munns, Craig F; Nunes, Mark E; Saal, Howard M; Seefried, Lothar; Ozono, Keiichi

    2017-09-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a rare, inherited, systemic, metabolic disorder caused by autosomal recessive mutations or a single dominant-negative mutation in the gene encoding tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP). The disease is associated with a broad range of signs, symptoms, and complications, including impaired skeletal mineralization, altered calcium and phosphate metabolism, recurrent fractures, pain, respiratory problems, impaired growth and mobility, premature tooth loss, developmental delay, and seizures. Asfotase alfa is a human, recombinant enzyme replacement therapy that is approved in many countries for the treatment of patients with HPP. To address the unmet need for guidance in the monitoring of patients receiving asfotase alfa, an international panel of physicians with experience in diagnosing and managing HPP convened in May 2016 to discuss treatment monitoring parameters. The panel discussions focused on recommendations for assessing and monitoring patients after the decision to treat with asfotase alfa had been made and did not include recommendations for whom to treat. Based on the consensus of panel members, this review provides guidance on the monitoring of patients with HPP during treatment with asfotase alfa, including recommendations for laboratory, efficacy, and safety assessments and the frequency with which these should be performed during the course of treatment. Recommended assessments are based on patient age and include regular monitoring of biochemistry, skeletal radiographs, respiratory function, growth, pain, mobility and motor function, and quality of life. Because of the systemic presentation of HPP, a coordinated, multidisciplinary, team-based, patient-focused approach is recommended in the management of patients receiving asfotase alfa. Monitoring of efficacy and safety outcomes must be tailored to the individual patient, depending on medical history, clinical manifestations, availability of resources in the clinical

  7. Long-Term Survivorship of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated with Radical Intent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Agranovich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the recent trends in definitive management of esophageal cancer, the records of 138 consecutive patients treated with radical intent in a single institution between 1995 and 2003 were reviewed and analyzed. The median follow-up period was 5.7 years (range 1.1 to 10.4 years. Seventy-seven patients were treated with radiation therapy (RT only and 61 with combined regimens (CRT, in which RT was combined with either radical surgery or chemotherapy, or both. The overall survival of the entire cohort was 32% over two years and 20% over five years. The survivorship in the RT group was 17% over two years and 5% over five years. In the CRT group, 51% and 35% survived over two and five years, respectively. From all the potential prognostic factors examined by univariate and multivariate analyses, only male sex and use of CRT were strongly associated with better survivorship. There was no significant difference in the outcomes among the different regimens of CRT. Survivorship was not affected by the location or histology of the tumour, clinical stage, dose of RT or use of endoluminal brachytherapy in addition to external beam RT. There was a greater tendency to use RT only more often in older patients, but patient age did not affect survivorship. The proportion of patients treated with CRT did not change significantly over the last versus the first four years of the observed period. Combined regimens are undoubtedly superior to RT as a single modality. The long-term survivorship of patients in a subgroup of our patients treated with combined modality protocols compared favourably with the previously reported results in the literature and specifically in prospective randomized trials. However, the optimal combined modality regimen is yet to be defined.

  8. Perfusion lymphoscintigraphy using sup 99m Tc-human serum albumin in patients with treated uterine cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Kawamura, Masashi; Nishiyama, Yasuyuki; Itoh, Hisao; Hamamoto, Ken; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Matsuura, Shumpei (Ehime Univ., Shigenobu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-07-01

    Perfusion lymphoscintigraphy was performed by subcutaneous injection of 7.4 MBq (0.2 mCi) {sup 99m}Tc-human serum albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-HSA) in 25 patients with uterine cancer treated by operation and/or irradiation. Radioactivity at the injection site was counted for 3 min at 10 min (a) and at 3 hr (b) after injection, and the clearance of {sup 99m}Tc-HSA was defined as (1-(b)/(a))x100(%) ((a) and (b) were corrected for decay of the isotope). The clearance in legs with lymphedema was significantly more delayed than those in legs without lymphedema in patients treated with both operation and irradiation (16.6{+-}7.7% vs 34.9{+-}9.3%; p<0.01) and in patients treated with radiation therapy alone (33.1{+-}7.4 vs 48.0{+-}5.6; p<0.01). The clearances in edematous legs in a case which had developed venous occulusion after operation were 44.2% and 41.7%, which were almost the same as those in the non-edematous patients treated with operation alone. Clearance in patients treated with both operation and irradiation were significantly more delayed than those in patients treated with a single modality of operation or irradiation (30.1{+-}11.4% vs 41.9{+-}8.9%, 42.0{+-}9.7%, respectively; p<0.01). Radiation doses at points B were well correlated with clearance of {sup 99m}Tc-HSA (p<0.05). These data suggest that perfusion lymphoscintigraphy using {sup 99m}Tc-HSA is useful for evaluating the patients with lymphedema and for differentiating it from the edema caused by the other mechanisms. It is also suggested that radiation dose is one of factors in the occurrence of lymphedema. (author).

  9. Different outcomes of never-treated and treated patients with schizophrenia: 14-year follow-up study in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Mao-Sheng; Weng, Xue; Chan, Cecilia Lai-Wan; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai; Tang, Cui-Ping; Lin, Fu-Rong; Mao, Wen-Jun; Hu, Shi-Hui; Huang, Yue-Qin; Xiang, Meng-Ze

    2015-12-01

    The long-term outcome of never-treated patients with schizophrenia is unclear. To compare the 14-year outcomes of never-treated and treated patients with schizophrenia and to establish predictors for never being treated. All participants with schizophrenia (n = 510) in Xinjin, Chengdu, China were identified in an epidemiological investigation of 123 572 people and followed up from 1994 to 2008. The results showed that there were 30.6%, 25.0% and 20.4% of patients who received no antipsychotic medication in 1994, 2004 and 2008 respectively. Compared with treated patients, those who were never treated in 2008 were significantly older, had significantly fewer family members, had higher rates of homelessness, death from other causes, being unmarried, living alone, being without a caregiver and poor family attitudes. Partial and complete remission in treated patients (57.3%) was significantly higher than that in the never-treated group (29.8%). Predictors of being in the never-treated group in 2008 encompassed baseline never-treated status, being without a caregiver and poor mental health status in 1994. Many patients with schizophrenia still do not receive antipsychotic medication in rural areas of China. The 14-year follow-up showed that outcomes for the untreated group were worse. Community-based mental healthcare, health insurance and family intervention are crucial for earlier diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation in the community. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  10. Early Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postoperative Proton Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuaron, John J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Chon, Brian; Tsai, Henry; Goenka, Anuj; DeBlois, David [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hug, Eugen [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Cahlon, Oren, E-mail: cahlono@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To report dosimetry and early toxicity data in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative proton radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From March 2013 to April 2014, 30 patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer and no history of prior radiation were treated with proton therapy at a single proton center. Patient characteristics and dosimetry were obtained through chart review. Patients were seen weekly while on treatment, at 1 month after radiation therapy completion, and at 3- to 6-month intervals thereafter. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Frequencies of toxicities were tabulated. Results: Median dose delivered was 50.4 Gy (relative biological equivalent [RBE]) in 5 weeks. Target volumes included the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes including the internal mammary lymph nodes (in 93%). No patients required a treatment break. Among patients with >3 months of follow-up (n=28), grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 20 patients (71.4%), with 8 (28.6%) experiencing moist desquamation. Grade 2 esophagitis occurred in 8 patients (28.6%). Grade 3 reconstructive complications occurred in 1 patient. The median planning target volume V95 was 96.43% (range, 79.39%-99.60%). The median mean heart dose was 0.88 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.01-3.20 Gy (RBE)] for all patients, and 1.00 Gy (RBE) among patients with left-sided tumors. The median V20 of the ipsilateral lung was 16.50% (range, 6.1%-30.3%). The median contralateral lung V5 was 0.34% (range, 0%-5.30%). The median maximal point dose to the esophagus was 45.65 Gy (RBE) [range, 0-65.4 Gy (RBE)]. The median contralateral breast mean dose was 0.29 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.03-3.50 Gy (RBE)]. Conclusions: Postoperative proton therapy is well tolerated, with acceptable rates of skin toxicity. Proton therapy favorably spares normal tissue without compromising target coverage. Further follow-up is necessary to assess for clinical outcomes and cardiopulmonary

  11. Management of Cerebral Radiation Necrosis: A Retrospective Study of 12 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chenlong; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Zhang, Wenchuan; Yang, Min; Zhong, Wenxiang; Liu, Pengfei

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral radiation necrosis (RN) is a severe complication of radiotherapy for cerebral pathologies. This study discusses the radiographic and pathological features of 12 patients with RN and investigates the management strategy. Eleven patients with brain tumors, and one with cerebral cavernous angioma, treated by surgical resection or Gamma Knife alone before radiotherapy developed RN during follow-up. Surgical resection for the cerebral RN was performed in nine patients, and the other three patients received medical treatment. The clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), surgical findings, and pathological sections are reviewed. The diagnosis of RN was confirmed by histological study in all the patients; those with surgical and medical treatment recovered. As a major complication of radiotherapy, from the clinical and neuroradiological points of view, RN may simulate tumor recurrence. Due to the increasing number of patients with RN who will need to be treated in future years, the definite diagnosis and appropriate treatment of RN remain critical.

  12. Update on scar management: guidelines for treating Asian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sukwha; Choi, Tae Hyun; Liu, Wei; Ogawa, Rei; Suh, Jeong Seok; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2013-12-01

    Following injury, Asian skin has a tendency towards hyper-pigmentation and scar formation, and therefore the prevention of scarring is particularly important in Asian patients. Since publication of an International Clinical Recommendation on Scar Management in 2002, there have been numerous publications in the field of scar management. Advances in understanding scar formation have also led to the introduction of new treatments as well as a better understanding of established therapeutic options. A literature search for abstracts, clinical trials and meta-analyses evaluating scar prevention and treatment was performed using PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Based on this data a panel of experts formulated treatment recommendations for Asian patients. Following surgery, scar prevention should be initiated in all Asian patients due to the high risk of poor scars. There is strong evidence for the efficacy of silicone based products, and due to their ease of use, they can be considered first-line therapy. Silicone gel (versus silicone gel sheets) products have demonstrated efficacy. For patients who fail to respond to first-line therapy, intralesional steroid injections, radiation therapy, and intralesional 5-flourouracil injections have achieved widespread acceptance. Laser treatments have been increasingly used, although the evidence remains largely anecdotal without a clear consensus on optimal wavelength, or amount of energy. Surgical approaches have increased in sophistication with recognition of the impact that tension has on scar formation. Updated scar management recommendations will benefit practitioners making decisions regarding optimal, evidence-based treatment strategies for their patients.

  13. Case Study of Cancer Patients Treated with Herbal Acupuncture Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa-Seung Yoo

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was aimed to validate the Herbal Acupuncture Therapies(HAT for cancer patients. Patients and methods : This retrospective study was performed on 8 patients who were diagnosed as cancer in Korea and treated with HAT in the oriental hospital of Daejeon University, from January 2003 to January 2004. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 8 patients for improvement of symptoms, toxic effects of liver and kidney, myelosupression and changes of Quality of Life(QOL. Results : Analysis of change of chief complaints showed that 75% patients replied moderate relief and 25% replied complete relief in Likert scale. Analysis of Liver Function Test(LFT, Renal Function Test(RFT level showed that HAT does not have toxic effects on liver and kidney. Analysis of Complete Blood Count(CBC level showed that HAT does not have myelosuppression effects on bone marrow. Analysis of QOL showed that 100% patients replied improvement in Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status(ECOG status. Conclusion : Our findings suggest that HAT offer potential benefits for cancer patients.

  14. Effectiveness of semi-permeable dressings to treat radiation-induced skin reactions. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Castro, M; Martín-Gil, B; Peña-García, I; López-Vallecillo, M; García-Puig, M E

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to assess the available evidence concerning the effectiveness of semi-permeable dressings, on the full range of skin reactions, related to radiation therapy in cancer patients, from local erythema to moist desquamation, including subjective symptoms such as pain, discomfort, itchiness, burning and the effect on daily life activities. The bibliographic search was carried out looking for Randomised Clinical Trials (RCTs) indexed in PubMed, Cinhal, Cochrane plus and Biblioteca Nacional de Salud, published in the English and Spanish language, between 2010 and 2015. Data extraction and evaluation of study quality was undertaken by peer reviewers using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP). Of 181 studies, nine full texts were assessed. Finally, six RCT were included in the final synthesis: three analysed the application of Mepilex® Lite in breast cancer and head & neck cancer; one evaluated the application of Mepitel® Film in breast cancer; and two assessed the use of silver nylon dressings in breast cancer and in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer. The results show that semi-permeable dressings are beneficial in the management of skin toxicity related to radiation therapy. However, rigorous trials showing stronger evidence are needed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic pain treated with opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajo, Raquel; Segura, Ana; Inda, María-Del-Mar; Margarit, César; Ballester, Pura; Martínez, Emi; Ferrández, Guillermina; Sánchez-Barbie, Ángel; Peiró, Ana M

    2017-07-21

    Chronic pain is associated with comorbidities that have an impact on the quality of life of patients and, among others, affect their sexual functioning. One of the most relevant side effects of opioid analgesics is erectile dysfunction (ED), due in part to the inhibition of the gonadal-pituitary-hypothalamic axis and the decline in testosterone levels. To evaluate ED and effectiveness of treatment in men with chronic pain treated with long-term opioids. Prospective observational study lasting 3 years, where the intensity of pain (visual analogue scale, 0-10cm), erectile function (IIEF-EF, range 1-30 points), quality of life (EQ-VAS, 0-100mm), quality of sexual life (MSLQ-QOL, 0-100 points), anxiety/depression (HAD, 0-21 points) and testosterone levels, was assessed in patients who reported sexual dysfunction (ED or libido modification). A 6-month follow-up was applied to each patient after administering the usual treatment in the Andrology Unit. The study was approved by the Clinical Research Ethics Committee and data were statistically analyzed with the GraphPad Prism 5 software. ED was observed in 27.6% of patients (n=105, 57±12.2 years, mean dose of morphine equivalent=107.1±107.9mg/day, 84.3% adjuvant analgesics). After 6 months, 42% of patients showed a significant improvement after being treated with iPDE5 (48.5%) and/or testosterone gel (81.8%), with a resolution rate of 31% (p=0.000). A positive correlation was observed between the improvement of IIEF and quality of sexual life (55.5±25.7 points, p=0.000), as well as anxiety (7.4±4.3 points, p=0.048). No significant changes were observed in the levels of testosterone, in the levels of pain nor in the quality of life, which remained moderate. Erectile function and quality of sexual life, as well as anxiety, improved in patients treated chronically with opioids after administering andrological treatment. The management of patients with pain should include a review of their sexual health history given the

  16. Ethical issues in treating gay and lesbian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Jack

    2002-09-01

    Since the 1973 decision to remove homosexuality from the list of mental disorders, most mental health practitioners have shifted their clinical focus from "the cure" of homosexuality to treating the concerns of gay and lesbian patients. Some clinicians, however, reject the mental health mainstream's view and continue to conceptualize homosexuality as a mental disorder. Their clinical theories have been incorporated into wider societal debates regarding the status of gay and lesbian people. The sexual conversion or reparative therapies they practice, however, may include routine ethical violations in the realm of improper pressure, confidentiality, informed consent, and fiduciary responsibility to the patient's best interest. On the other hand, a normal/identity approach to treatment, particularly in its most reductionistic forms, may involve ethical lapses in the areas of informed consent and fiduciary responsibility to the patient's best interests as well.

  17. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Salman bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P.O. Box 422, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I. [Sudan Univesity of Science and Technology, College of Medical Radiologic Sciences, P.O. Box 1908, Khartoum (Sudan); Alzimami, K. [King Saud University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P.O. Box 10219, 11433 Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Osman, H. [Taif University, College of Applied Medical Science, Radiology Department, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Omer, H. [University of Dammam, Faculty of Medicine, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Sassi, S. A., E-mail: Abdelmoneim_a@yahoo.com [Prince Sultan Medical City, Department of Medical Physics, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-15

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  18. [Evaluation of patients with polytrauma treated in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwan, Krzysztof

    2009-10-01

    Polytrauma care is a very important diagnostic and therapeutic problem. The clinical profile of patients with multiorgan injuries admitted to the emergency department (ED) is different, similarly to severity of injuries. An evaluation of patients with polytrauma treated in ED and proposition of diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm in initial management in patients with multiply injuries. The analysis of medical data was performed in 72 polytraumized patients. Their age, sex, time of admission to ED, influence of alcohol and drugs, vital parameters, etiological factors, severity of injuries and the therapy after initial management in ED were studied. The majority of patients were admitted to ED in the morning. There were 25 females and 47 males. Their mean age was 41 years. Patients between 21-40 years of age represented half of all victims. There were 10 patients under influence of alcohol or drugs. Vital signs like Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and respiratory rate (RR) evaluated at the initial examination and counted as a values of Revised Trauma Score (RTS) in most cases were 7.841. The traffic accidents were the most frequent ethiologic factors. Head injuries, chest injuries and fractures were the most frequently. After initial treatment in ED, 22 patients were discharged home and 23 were hospitalized, because they had been needed surgical treatment, and 8 because of threat of life. 6 patients died in ED. Multiorgan injuries were diagnosed mainly in young men after traffic accidents in the morning. Head injuries, chest injuries and fractures were the most frequent. Author propose the diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for initial management in ED in patients with multiply injuries.

  19. Comparison of Healthcare Utilization Among Patients Treated With Alcoholism Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Tami L.; Montejano, Leslie B.; Kranzler, Henry R.; Chalk, Mady; Gastfriend, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine in a large claims database the healthcare utilization and costs associated with treatment of alcohol dependence with medications vs no medication and across 4 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved medications. Study Design Claims database analysis. Methods Eligible adults with alcohol dependence claims (n = 27,135) were identified in a commercial database (MarketScan; Thomson Reuters Inc, Chicago, Illinois). Following propensity score–based matching and inverse probability weighting on demographic, clinical, and healthcare utilization variables, patients who had used an FDA-approved medication for alcohol dependence (n = 2977) were compared with patients who had not (n = 2977). Patients treated with oral naltrexone hydrochloride (n = 2064), oral disulfiram (n = 2076), oral acamprosate calcium (n = 5068), or extended-release injectable naltrexone (naltrexone XR) (n = 295) were also compared for 6-month utilization rates of alcoholism medication, inpatient detoxification days, alcoholism-related inpatient days, and outpatient services, as well as inpatient charges. Results Patients who received alcoholism medications had fewer inpatient detoxification days (706 vs 1163 days per 1000 patients, P alcoholism-related inpatient days (650 vs 1086 days, P alcoholism-related emergency department visits (127 vs 171, P = .005). Among 4 medications, the use of naltrexone XR was associated with fewer inpatient detoxification days (224 days per 1000 patients) than the use of oral naltrexone (552 days, P = .001), disulfiram (403 days, P = .049), or acamprosate (525 days, P alcoholism-related inpatient days than the groups receiving disulfiram or acamprosate. More patients in the naltrexone XR group had an outpatient substance abuse visit compared with patients in the oral alcoholism medication groups. Conclusion Patients who received an alcoholism medication had lower healthcare utilization than patients who did not. Naltrexone XR showed an

  20. Predictive factors of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in primary and metastatic lung tumors treated with stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Pyo; Lee, Jeong Shim; Cho, Yeona; Chung, Seung Yeun; Lee, Jason Joon Bock; Lee, Chang Geol; Cho, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Although stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is widely used therapeutic technique, predictive factors of radiation pneumonitis (RP) after SABR remain undefined. We aimed to investigate the predictive factors affecting RP in patients with primary or metastatic lung tumors who received SABR. From 2012 to 2015, we reviewed 59 patients with 72 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated with SABR, and performed analyses of clinical and dosimetric variables related to symptomatic RP. SABR was delivered as 45–60 Gy in 3–4 fractions, which were over 100 Gy in BED when the α/β value was assumed to be 10. Tumor volume and other various dose volume factors were analyzed using median value as a cutoff value. RP was graded per the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.03. At the median follow-up period of 11 months, symptomatic RP was observed in 13 lesions (12 patients, 18.1%), including grade 2 RP in 11 lesions and grade 3 in 2 lesions. Patients with planning target volume (PTV) of ≤14.35 mL had significantly lower rates of symptomatic RP when compared to others (8.6% vs. 27%; p = 0.048). Rates of symptomatic RP in patients with internal gross tumor volume (iGTV) >4.21 mL were higher than with ≤4.21 mL (29.7% vs. 6.1%; p = 0.017). The incidence of symptomatic RP following treatment with SABR was acceptable with grade 2 RP being observed in most patients. iGTV over 4.21 mL and PTV of over 14.35 mL were significant predictive factors related to symptomatic RP.

  1. Infectious complications in paediatric patients treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Lozano, Maria José; Barquín-Conde, Marta Lucía; Fuentes-Moreno, Lucía; León-Vela, Roberto Manuel; Madrid-Vázquez, Lucas; Sánchez-Galindo, Amelia; López-Herce Cid, Jesús

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence, treatment and evolution of infections in children treated with ECMO. A retrospective study based on a prospective database was performed. Children under the age of 18 years treated with ECMO from September 2006 to November 2015 were included. The patients' clinical characteristics were collected, together with ECMO technique, cultures and treatment of infection. One hundred patients with a median age of 11 months were analysed. Heart disease was diagnosed in 94 patients. An infection was suspected and antibiotic treatment was initiated in 51 patients, although only 22 of them were microbiologically confirmed. The most common infection was sepsis (49%), followed by pneumonia (35.3%) and urinary tract infection (9.8%). There were no differences in haematological parameters and acute phase reactants between children with infection and those without. Children who died had a higher incidence of infection during ECMO (60.4%) than the survivors (40.3%), but the difference did not reach statistical significance (P=.07). The duration of admission in the PICU was 57 days in patients with infection vs 37 days in patients without infection but the difference was not statistically significant (P=.067). Infection in children with ECMO is common. There are no specific infection parameters and less than half of the clinical infections are confirmed microbiologically. There was no statistically significant correlation between infection and mortality or duration of PICU stay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  2. Treating diabetes mellitus in older and oldest old patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbatecola, A M; Paolisso, G; Sinclair, A J

    2015-01-01

    There is a rapidly growing number of persons reaching extreme age limits. Indeed, the fastest growth is found in those over the age of 80 years or octogenarians. Along with this continuous rise, there is a significant increase in type 2 diabetes in this population. Unfortunately, individuals living past 80 years of age are often accompanied by numerous comorbidities and geriatric conditions, all which render anti-diabetic treatment options challenging. Indeed the principles of managing type 2 diabetes are similar to younger patients. Special considerations in this delicate group are essential due to the increased prevalence of comorbidities and relative inability to tolerate adverse effects of medication and severe hypoglycemia. It is important to recall that octogenarians have shown to have a greater prevalence for cognitive impairment, physical disability, ren al and hepatic dysfunction, and syndromes, such as frailty compared to younger elders. The frailty syndrome is considered one of the most important limitations when treating octogenarians with type 2 diabetes in polypharmacy. Due to the lack of evidence for specific targets of glucose and glycated hemoglobin (A1C) levels in the elderly, available treatment guidelines are based on data extrapolation from younger adults and expert opinion citing reliable evidence. Overall, the most important conclusion emerging from these groups is to accomplish a moderate glycemic control (A1C levels between 7 -8%) in complex elderly patients. However, the risk of hypoglycemia from some treatments may present the greatest significant barrier to optimal glycemic control for the very old. The present review discusses the highlights from the latest guidelines for treating older persons and underlines the need for specific considerations when treating the very old in order to maintain a balance between treating comorbidities and maintaining quality of life.

  3. Differential gene expression before and after ionizing radiation of subcutaneous fibroblasts identifies breast cancer patients resistant to radiation-induced fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsner, Jan; Rødningen, Olaug K.; Overgaard, Jens

    2007-01-01

    and changes in radiation-induced gene expression in fibroblasts. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Gene expression was analysed by quantitative real-time PCR before and after a fractionated scheme with 3x3.5Gy/3 days in fibroblasts derived from 26 patients with breast cancer treated with post-mastectomy radiotherapy......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Differentially gene expression between patients with either very low or very high risk of radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) in patient-derived fibroblasts after irradiation has previously been reported. In the present study, we are investigating the robustness of radiation......-induced changes in gene expression in fibroblasts, whether differential expression is more pronounced when looking at the fold induction levels, taking into account the differences in background expression levels between patients, and whether there is a linear correlation between individual risk of RIF...

  4. Outcome analysis of colistin-treated burn center patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Rachel E; Hill, David M; Hickerson, William L

    2017-09-01

    Intravenous colistimethate sodium (CMS) use in burn center patients is increasing due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria. However, optimal dosing strategies and factors that may contribute to treatment failure are limited. The purpose of this study was to determine factors that may contribute to treatment failure in colistin-treated burn center patients. This retrospective, observational study included burn center patients that received ≥48h of intravenous CMS between June 1, 2009 and June 30, 2014. Data was collected utilizing the institution's electronic medical record system. Statistical analysis included demographic, univariable, and multivariable analysis to determine factors that may predict clinical failure of burn center patients requiring intravenous CMS. Eighty-one patients were included in this study, with 55 patients (68%) achieving clinical success. A total daily dose (TDD) of >5mg/kg ideal body weight (IBW) was associated with significantly less clinical failure (odds ratio=0.21; 95% CI, 0.05, 0.91). Additionally, clinical failure was significantly higher in patients with wounds as the primary source of infection, creatinine clearances of 91-120mL/min, and those receiving renal replacement therapy. No difference was observed in nephrotoxicity when comparing TDD >5mg/kg IBW and TDD ≤5mg/kg IBW. Clinical success was significantly higher with larger intravenous CMS doses in burn center patients. Higher CMS doses were not found to be associated with increased nephrotoxicity within this patient group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Unique proteomic signature for radiation sensitive patients; a comparative study between normo-sensitive and radiation sensitive breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiöld, Sara [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wernner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Azimzadeh, Omid [Institute of Radiation Biology, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München (Germany); Merl-Pham, Juliane [Research Unit Protein Science, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg (Germany); Naslund, Ingemar; Wersall, Peter; Lidbrink, Elisabet [Division of Radiotherapy, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Tapio, Soile [Institute of Radiation Biology, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum München (Germany); Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wernner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Haghdoost, Siamak, E-mail: Siamak.Haghdoost@su.se [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wernner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The unique protein expression profiles were found that separate radiosensitive from normal sensitive breast cancer patients. • The oxidative stress response, coagulation properties and acute phase response suggested to be the hallmarks of radiation sensitivity. - Abstract: Radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. Understanding the mechanisms behind normal tissue sensitivity is essential in order to minimize adverse side effects and yet to prevent local cancer reoccurrence. The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers of radiation sensitivity to enable personalized cancer treatment. To investigate the mechanisms behind radiation sensitivity a pilot study was made where eight radiation-sensitive and nine normo-sensitive patients were selected from a cohort of 2914 breast cancer patients, based on acute tissue reactions after radiation therapy. Whole blood was sampled and irradiated in vitro with 0, 1, or 150 mGy followed by 3 h incubation at 37 °C. The leukocytes of the two groups were isolated, pooled and protein expression profiles were investigated using isotope-coded protein labeling method (ICPL). First, leukocytes from the in vitro irradiated whole blood from normo-sensitive and extremely sensitive patients were compared to the non-irradiated controls. To validate this first study a second ICPL analysis comparing only the non-irradiated samples was conducted. Both approaches showed unique proteomic signatures separating the two groups at the basal level and after doses of 1 and 150 mGy. Pathway analyses of both proteomic approaches suggest that oxidative stress response, coagulation properties and acute phase response are hallmarks of radiation sensitivity supporting our previous study on oxidative stress response. This investigation provides unique characteristics of radiation sensitivity essential for individualized radiation therapy.

  6. Incidence, natural history, and patterns of locoregional recurrence in gastric cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Valerie K; Krishnan, Sunil; Mansfield, Paul F; Bhosale, Priya R; Kim, Michelle; Das, Prajnan; Janjan, Nora A; Delclos, Marc E; Lowy, Andrew M; Feig, Barry W; Pisters, Peter W T; Ajani, Jaffer A; Crane, Christopher H

    2008-07-01

    To retrospectively determine the incidence and patterns (in-field, marginal, or out-of-field) of locoregional gastric cancer recurrence in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy and to determine the outcome in these patients. Between 1994 and 2004, 149 patients with gastric carcinoma were treated according to institutional protocols with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Ultimately, 105 patients had an R0 resection. Of these 105 patients, 65 received preoperative chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and 40 received preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Most (96%) of these patients received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy during radiotherapy, and the median radiation dose was 45 Gy. We retrospectively identified and classified the patterns of locoregional recurrence. The 3-year actuarial incidence of locoregional recurrence was 13%, with locoregional disease recurring as any part of the failure pattern in 14 patients. Most (64%) of the evaluable locoregional recurrences were in-field. Of the 4 patients with a marginal recurrence, 2 had had inadequate coverage of the regional nodal volumes on their oblique fields. The pathologic complete response rate was 23%. A pathologic complete response was the only statistically significant predictor of locoregional control. Patients with gastric cancer who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy had low rates of locoregional recurrence. This strategy merits prospective multi-institutional and randomized evaluation.

  7. Transforming the patient experience in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, J Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Healthcare providers are paying more attention to behavioral neuroscience research that confirms what patients intuitively know: physical environments deeply influence one's sense of well being. Recognizing the importance of comforting environments, healthcare providers have been working with architects to design new facilities around the patient's experience. This doesn't mean that functional and technical considerations are unimportant; it's just that the patient's experience comes first. The patient is the most important user of a healthcare facility, and yet is the only user not sitting at the table during design meetings. For this reason, some healthcare providers work with their architects to develop the conceptual design from the patient's standpoint before seeking detailed staff input. Many indignities experienced by patients may be unwittingly imposed by caring and dedicated professional staff. Medical clutter, waste containers, water coolers, coffee makers, personal displays and decorations add up to create a distressing level of visual chaos. Departments are required to eliminate clutter and maintain a calm, pleasing environment. Employees appreciate a well-designed physical environment, too. Facilities that reduce stress for patients have the same impact on staff, alleviating tension as they care for patients. Putting the patient's experience first need not add capital construction cost to a project. Rearranging spaces for the sake of the patient adds no more to floor area. Added windows, skylights and interior finishes can add cost, but the incremental cost of these amenities is small in proportion to the total project cost. Facilities project powerful visual dues about an institution's values. Providers who carefully plan for a positive patient experience traditionally enjoy strong reputations and exceptional customer loyalty. These providers know that good design is not simply wrapping a pretty facade around a building or decorating the lobby. Good

  8. Treating malignant glioma in Chinese patients: update on temozolomide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang L

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Liang Chang,1 Jun Su,1 Xiuzhi Jia,2,3 Huan Ren2,3 1Department of Neurosurgery, The Tumor Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 2Department of Immunology, Harbin Medical University, 3Key Lab Infection and Immunity, Heilongjiang Province, Harbin, People's Republic of China Abstract: Malignant glioma, ie, anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma, is the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor in the People's Republic of China, and is particularly aggressive. The median survival of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma is only 12–14 months despite advanced therapeutic strategies. Treatment of malignant glioma consists mainly of surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy. Temozolomide (TMZ, a second-generation oral alkylating agent, is playing an increasingly important role in the treatment of malignant glioma in Chinese patients. Since the publication of a study by Stupp et al in 2005, which used a protocol of conventional fractionated irradiation with concomitant TMZ followed by standard TMZ for six cycles, many clinical studies in the People's Republic of China have demonstrated that such a treatment strategy has significantly improved efficacy with limited side effects for newly diagnosed glioblastoma after surgery as compared with strategies that do not contain TMZ. However, as a relatively new agent, the history and development of TMZ for malignant glioma is not well documented in Chinese patients. Multicenter, randomized controlled trials including appropriately sized patient populations investigating multiple aspects of TMZ therapy and related combination therapies are warranted in patients with malignant glioma. This review provides an update on the efficacy, mechanism of action, adverse reactions, and clinical role of TMZ in the treatment of malignant glioma in Chinese patients. Keywords: malignant glioma, chemotherapy, temozolomide, efficacy, side effect, People's Republic of China

  9. Mortality in elderly dementia patients treated with risperidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Martin; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso; Jeste, Dilip

    2006-12-01

    Agitation, aggression, and psychosis are among the most troublesome behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) and impair the lives of dementia patients and their caregivers. Atypical antipsychotics have been widely prescribed to improve these BPSD. However, in a number of trials with atypical antipsychotics, a consistent increase in overall mortality has been observed. The US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning for all atypical antipsychotics as a result of a meta-analysis of 17 placebo-controlled clinical trials using various atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of BSPD. To evaluate this mortality risk specifically for risperidone, 6 phase-2/3 double-blind trials comparing risperidone with placebo were analyzed. Data were obtained from Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated to compare the relative mortality risk between patients treated with risperidone and those treated with placebo. In this meta-analysis, 1721 patients were included. In the pooled sample, the mortality was 4.0% with risperidone versus 3.1% with placebo (relative risk, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-2.06) during treatment or within 30 days after treatment discontinuation. The most common adverse events associated with death were pneumonia, cardiac failure or arrest, or cerebrovascular disorder. No relationship was found between risperidone dose and mortality. In conclusion, this meta-analysis found a nonsignificant increase in mortality during treatment with risperidone in dementia patients. Larger studies would be needed to rule out a small increase in mortality in these patients. Careful assessments of potential benefits and risks should be made before prescribing risperidone for the treatment of BPSD.

  10. Thyroglobulin value in patients surgically treated for differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikač Gostimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thyroglobulin is composed glycoprotein, and it is synthesized by follicular cells of the thyroid gland. Treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinomas involves total thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine ablation of a potential remaining tissue. The measurement of thyroglobulin in the postoperative follow-up can serve as an indicator of tumor growth or recurrence of the disease. Objective. The aim of this paper is to examine the value of thyroglobulin in patients surgically treated for differentiated thyroid cancer who had metastases in the lymph nodes of the neck, as well as in operated on patients without any evident metastasis. Methods. Thyroglobulin values in the serum of 58 patients were analyzed. Two groups were formed. The thyroglobulin value was established with the use of IRMA-hTg (125I system. Normal levels of thyroglobulin were from 2 ng/ml to 65 ng/ml. For all of 58 patients, thyroglobulin was determined three times. The first, so-called pre-ablation thyroglobulin was determined immediately before the application of 131I ablation dose. The second and the third measurements were conducted six to eight months and one year, respectively, after the application of the ablation dose respectively. Results. The first group consisted of 14 patients with histologically proven metastases in the lymph nodes of the neck, while the second group consisted of 44 patients without any evident metastases. The average thyroglobulin value of pre-ablation in the patients from the first group was 43.45 ng/ml, while in the second was 7.57 ng/ml. Levene’s test (with p = 0.00, i.e p < 0.05, demonstrated a statistically significant difference. Furthermore, in both groups, there was statistically significant difference between pre-ablation and post-ablation thyroglobulin values (Student’s t-test with p < 0.05. Conclusion It can be concluded that the average value of thyroglobulin was significantly higher in patients with lymph node metastases

  11. Radiation treatment for the right naris in a pediatric anesthesia patient using an adaptive oral airway technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sponseller, Patricia, E-mail: sponselp@uw.edu; Pelly, Nicole; Trister, Andrew; Ford, Eric; Ermoian, Ralph

    2015-10-01

    Radiation therapy for pediatric patients often includes the use of intravenous anesthesia with supplemental oxygen delivered via the nasal cannula. Here, we describe the use of an adaptive anesthesia technique for electron irradiation of the right naris in a preschool-aged patient treated under anesthesia. The need for an intranasal bolus plug precluded the use of standard oxygen supplementation. This novel technique required the multidisciplinary expertise of anesthesiologists, radiation therapists, medical dosimetrists, medical physicists, and radiation oncologists to ensure a safe and reproducible treatment course.

  12. Severe infections in patients with autoimmune diseases treated with cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallasca, Javier A; Costa, Cecilia A; Maliandi, Maria Del Rosario; Contini, Liliana E; Fernandez de Carrera, Elena; Musuruana, Jorge L

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with connective tissue diseases. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs, such as cyclophosphamide (CYC), increases the risk of infections. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence rates of severe infections in patients who received treatment with CYC. The records of 60 patients with systemic autoimmune diseases who received treatment with CYC were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated the rate of severe infections that occurred during CYC therapy and the 3 subsequent months. Systemic lupus erythematosus was the most common disease, and diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis the most frequent indication. Severe infection occurred in 9 patients (15%). Community acquired pneumonia was the most frequent infection with 3 cases (33%) followed by Herpes Zoster with 2 reports (22%). The cumulative dose of corticosteroid was the only significant risk factor for infection 32.8±16.7 vs. 20.1±15.3 P=.007. The use of lower doses of corticosteroids and an aggressive management of infectious complications, allows for an acceptable safety profile in patients treated with CYC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient QA systems for rotational radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredh, Anna; Scherman, J.B.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per Martin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of commercial patient quality assurance (QA) systems to detect linear accelerator-related errors.......The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of commercial patient quality assurance (QA) systems to detect linear accelerator-related errors....

  14. Intubation of Profoundly Agitated Patients Treated with Prehospital Ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olives, Travis D; Nystrom, Paul C; Cole, Jon B; Dodd, Kenneth W; Ho, Jeffrey D

    2016-12-01

    Profound agitation in the prehospital setting confers substantial risk to patients and providers. Optimal chemical sedation in this setting remains unclear. The goal of this study was to describe intubation rates among profoundly agitated patients treated with prehospital ketamine and to characterize clinically significant outcomes of a prehospital ketamine protocol. This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients who received prehospital ketamine, per a predefined protocol, for control of profound agitation and who subsequently were transported to an urban Level 1 trauma center from May 1, 2010 through August 31, 2013. Identified records were reviewed for basic ambulance run information, subject characteristics, ketamine dosing, and rate of intubation. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) ambulance run data were matched to hospital-based electronic medical records. Clinically significant outcomes are characterized, including unadjusted and adjusted rates of intubation. Overall, ketamine was administered 227 times in the prehospital setting with 135 cases meeting study criteria of use of ketamine for treatment of agitation. Endotracheal intubation was undertaken for 63% (85/135) of patients, including attempted prehospital intubation in four cases. Male gender and late night arrival were associated with intubation in univariate analyses (χ2=12.02; P=.001 and χ2=5.34; P=.021, respectively). Neither ketamine dose, co-administration of additional sedating medications, nor evidence of ethanol (ETOH) or sympathomimetic ingestion was associated with intubation. The association between intubation and both male gender and late night emergency department (ED) arrival persisted in multivariate analysis. Neither higher dose (>5mg/kg) ketamine nor co-administration of midazolam or haloperidol was associated with intubation in logistic regression modeling of the 120 subjects with weights recorded. Two deaths were observed. Post-hoc analysis of intubation rates suggested a

  15. A case of progeria syndrome treated as VIP patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Mahant, Mahant PD, C.M. Reddy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is rare autosomal recessive genetic disease with an incidence of about one in eight million. He was 16 years old boy lying on the couch. He was short stature thin with minimal subcutaneous tissue, skin was thin and fragile with loss of hair over scalp, eyebrows and eyelashes, and his face was dismorphic with prominent eyes, beaked nose, small jaw and large cranium with visible veins over it. His voice was thin and high pitched. Overall, this gives them an extremely aged nearly 70 -80 years old man look. The patient was a known case of progeria syndrome and he was treated as a VIP patient by all faculty members and staff, though he belongs low socioeconomic status, no political issue with them. But still he was a VIP.

  16. Fluctuating anaemia in treated HIV patients: could be a PICA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajana, Faiza; Pasquet, Armelle; Auffret, Marine; Gautier, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    HIV infected patients are frequently exposed to anaemia, due to antiretroviral agents and/or prophylactic treatment of opportunistic infections. Anemia due to PICA, unusually evoked in our western countries, could be a more frequent situation than imagined. We report two cases of fluctuating anemia with no HIV or iatrogenic origin, observed in two HIV infected women, 47 years old and 33 years old respectively, coming from Africa and treated with antiretroviral agents. The anemia was explained by a culturally sanctioned practice of kaolin ingestion, in the broader context of PICA and resolved after the withdrawal of kaolin ingestion. PICA, and in particular kaolin ingestion, must be investigated when HIV infected patients came from Africa and presented significative unexplained anemia. © 2013 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  17. Clinical evaluation on cardiac enlargement in patients with esophageal cancer treated by radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasamoto, Ryuta [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-09-01

    Recent literature on chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer report the comparable survival results as surgery, and suggest the importance of management for the late adverse effect of chemoradiotherapy. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence and risk factors of cardiomegaly after chemoradiotherapy using low dose continuous infusion of 5FU/CDDP+5FU for esophageal cancer. Fifty-one patients with stage I-IVA esophageal cancer who were treated by radiotherapy with more than 50 Gy with or without chemotherapy and followed up for more than 6 months were analyzed. Sixteen patients were treated by radiation alone and 35 patients were treated by chemoradiotherapy. A change of CTR (cardio-thoracic ratio) was defined as the difference between CTR in the pre-treatment X-ray film and CTR in the post-treatment X-ray film with maximum cardiac silhouette. A change of CTR by more than 10% was defined as ''significant cardiomegaly''. In this study cardiac area-dose'', which is the sum of the products of cardiac area within every radiation field and its target dose, was calculated in each patient as a radiation parameter. Significant cardiomegaly was noted in 1 patient (6%) in the radiation alone group, in 8 patients (23%) in the chemoradiotherapy group and in 9 patients (18%) in the total population. In cases with more than 0.4 m{sup 2}{center_dot}Gy in cardiac area-dose, CTR elevation was significantly higher than in cases with less than 0.4m{sup 2}{center_dot}Gy. More than moderate pleural effusion was noted in 5 patients (10%). Chronic pericardial effusion and subsequent cardiac tamponade was considered to be one of the contributing factors for pleural effusion, because increases of pleural effusion coincided with CTR elevations in 3 cases. In addition, the fact that no case had right-sided unilateral pleural effusion suggested the direct effect of radiation to the pleura. Significant cardiomegaly was seen in 18% of 51 patients with

  18. Late Consequential Surgical Bed Soft Tissue Necrosis in Advanced Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated With Transoral Robotic Surgery and Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, J. Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lin, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.lin@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Gamerman, Victoria; Mitra, Nandita [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grover, Surbhi; McMenamin, Erin M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Weinstein, Gregory S.; O' Malley, Bert W. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Cohen, Roger B. [Department of Hematology Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Orisamolu, Abimbola; Ahn, Peter H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Quon, Harry, E-mail: hquon2@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: A subset of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP-SCC) managed with transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) developed soft tissue necrosis (STN) in the surgical bed months after completion of PORT. We investigated the frequency and risk factors. Materials and Methods: This retrospective analysis included 170 consecutive OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT between 2006 and 2012, with >6 months' of follow-up. STN was defined as ulceration of the surgical bed >6 weeks after completion of PORT, requiring opioids, biopsy, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Results: A total of 47 of 170 patients (28%) had a diagnosis of STN. Tonsillar patients were more susceptible than base-of-tongue (BOT) patients, 39% (41 of 104) versus 9% (6 of 66), respectively. For patients with STN, median tumor size was 3.0 cm (range 1.0-5.6 cm), and depth of resection was 2.2 cm (range 1.0-5.1 cm). Median radiation dose and dose of fraction to the surgical bed were 6600 cGy and 220 cGy, respectively. Thirty-one patients (66%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Median time to STN was 2.5 months after PORT. All patients had resolution of STN after a median of 3.7 months. Multivariate analysis identified tonsillar primary (odds ratio [OR] 4.73, P=.01), depth of resection (OR 3.12, P=.001), total radiation dose to the resection bed (OR 1.51 per Gy, P<.01), and grade 3 acute mucositis (OR 3.47, P=.02) as risk factors for STN. Beginning May 2011, after implementing aggressive avoidance of delivering >2 Gy/day to the resection bed mucosa, only 8% (2 of 26 patients) experienced STN (all grade 2). Conclusions: A subset of OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT are at risk for developing late consequential surgical bed STN. Risk factors include tonsillar location, depth of resection, radiation dose to the surgical bed, and severe mucositis. STN risk is significantly decreased with carefully avoiding a radiation dosage of >2 Gy/day to

  19. Late consequential surgical bed soft tissue necrosis in advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas treated with transoral robotic surgery and postoperative radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukens, J Nicholas; Lin, Alexander; Gamerman, Victoria; Mitra, Nandita; Grover, Surbhi; McMenamin, Erin M; Weinstein, Gregory S; O'Malley, Bert W; Cohen, Roger B; Orisamolu, Abimbola; Ahn, Peter H; Quon, Harry

    2014-08-01

    A subset of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP-SCC) managed with transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) developed soft tissue necrosis (STN) in the surgical bed months after completion of PORT. We investigated the frequency and risk factors. This retrospective analysis included 170 consecutive OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT between 2006 and 2012, with >6 months' of follow-up. STN was defined as ulceration of the surgical bed >6 weeks after completion of PORT, requiring opioids, biopsy, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. A total of 47 of 170 patients (28%) had a diagnosis of STN. Tonsillar patients were more susceptible than base-of-tongue (BOT) patients, 39% (41 of 104) versus 9% (6 of 66), respectively. For patients with STN, median tumor size was 3.0 cm (range 1.0-5.6 cm), and depth of resection was 2.2 cm (range 1.0-5.1 cm). Median radiation dose and dose of fraction to the surgical bed were 6600 cGy and 220 cGy, respectively. Thirty-one patients (66%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Median time to STN was 2.5 months after PORT. All patients had resolution of STN after a median of 3.7 months. Multivariate analysis identified tonsillar primary (odds ratio [OR] 4.73, P=.01), depth of resection (OR 3.12, P=.001), total radiation dose to the resection bed (OR 1.51 per Gy, P2 Gy/day to the resection bed mucosa, only 8% (2 of 26 patients) experienced STN (all grade 2). A subset of OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT are at risk for developing late consequential surgical bed STN. Risk factors include tonsillar location, depth of resection, radiation dose to the surgical bed, and severe mucositis. STN risk is significantly decreased with carefully avoiding a radiation dosage of >2 Gy/day to the surgical bed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Lobulated Enhancement Evaluation in the Follow-Up of Liver Metastases Treated by Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarraya, Hajer, E-mail: h-jarraya@o-lambret.fr [Department of Radiology, Oscar Lambret Oncologic Center, Lille (France); Borde, Paul [Department of Radiology, Oscar Lambret Oncologic Center, Lille (France); Mirabel, Xavier [Department of Radiotherapy, Oscar Lambret Oncologic Center, Lille (France); Ernst, Olivier [Department of Body Imaging, Claude Huriez University Hospital, Lille (France); Boulanger, Thomas [Department of Radiology, Oscar Lambret Oncologic Center, Lille (France); Lartigau, Eric [Department of Radiotherapy, Oscar Lambret Oncologic Center, Lille (France); Ceugnart, Luc [Department of Radiology, Oscar Lambret Oncologic Center, Lille (France); Kramar, Andrew [Statistical Unit, Oscar Lambret Oncologic Center, Lille (France); Taieb, Sophie [Department of Radiology, Oscar Lambret Oncologic Center, Lille (France)

    2015-06-01

    Objective: The Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) can have limitations when used to evaluate local treatments for cancer, especially for liver malignancies treated by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The aim of this study was to validate the relationship between the occurrence of lobulated enhancement (LE) and local relapse and to evaluate the utility of this relationship for predicting local progression. Patients and Methods: Imaging data of 59 lesions in 46 patients, including 281 computed tomographic (CT) scans, were retrospectively and blindly reviewed by 3 radiologists. One radiologist measured the lesion size, for each CT and overall, to classify responses using RECIST threshold criteria. The second studied LE occurrence. A third radiologist was later included and studied LE occurrence to evaluate the interobserver consistency for LE evaluation. Results: The mean duration of follow-up was 13.6 months. LE was observed in 16 of 18 progressive lesions, occurring before size-based progression in 50% of cases, and the median delay of LE detection was 3.2 months. The sensitivity of LE to predict progression was 89%, and its specificity was 100%. The positive predictive value was 100%, the negative predictive value was 95.3%, and the overall accuracy was 97%. The probability of local progression-free survival at 12 months was significantly higher for lesions without LE compared with all lesions: 0.80 (CI 95%: 0.65-0.89) versus 0.69 (CI 95%: 0.54-0.80), respectively. The overall concordance rate between the 2 readers of LE was 97.9%. Conclusion: Response assessment of liver metastases treated by SBRT can be improved by including LE. This study demonstrates the diagnostic and predictive utility of LE for assessing local progression at a size still eligible for local salvage treatment.

  1. Audiological profile of patients treated for childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Patricia Helena Pecora; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria Schmidt; Schultz, Christiane; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo; Lopes, Luiz Fernando

    To characterize the hearing loss after cancer treatment, according to the type of treatment, with identification of predictive factors. Two hundred patients who had cancer in childhood were prospectively evaluated. The mean age at diagnosis was 6 years, and at the audiometric assessment, 21 years. The treatment of the participants included chemotherapy without using platinum derivatives or head and neck radiotherapy in 51 patients; chemotherapy using cisplatin without radiotherapy in 64 patients; head and neck radiotherapy without cisplatin in 75 patients; and a combined treatment of head and neck radiotherapy and chemotherapy with cisplatin in ten patients. Patients underwent audiological assessment, including pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and immittancemetry. The treatment involving chemotherapy with cisplatin caused 41.9% and 47.3% hearing loss in the right and left ear, respectively, with a 11.7-fold higher risk of hearing loss in the right ear and 17.6-fold higher in the left ear versus patients not treated with cisplatin (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). Children whose cancer diagnosis occurred after the age of 6 have shown an increased risk of hearing loss vs. children whose diagnosis occurred under 6 years of age (p=0.02). The auditory feature found after the cancer treatment was a symmetrical bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Chemotherapy with cisplatin proved to be a risk factor, while head and neck radiotherapy was not critical for the occurrence of hearing loss. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiation dose estimation of patients undergoing lumbar spine radiography

    OpenAIRE

    Prince Kwabena Gyekye; Adu Simon; Emi-Reynolds Geoffrey; Yeboah Johnson; Inkoom Stephen; Cynthia Kaikor Engmann; Wotorchi-Gordon Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Radiation dose to organs of 100 adult patients undergoing lumbar spine (LS) radiography at a University Hospital have been assessed. Free in air kerma measurement using an ionization chamber was used for the patient dosimetry. Organ and effective dose to the patients were estimated using PCXMC (version 1.5) software. The organs that recorded significant dose due to LS radiography were lungs, stomach, liver, adrenals, kidney, pancreas, spleen, galbladder, and the heart. It was observed that th...

  3. Is Androgen Deprivation Therapy Necessary in All Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated in the Dose Escalation Era?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castle, Katherine O., E-mail: kocastle@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hoffman, Karen E.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adding androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer is unclear; therefore, we assessed the impact of adding ADT to dose-escalated RT on freedom from failure (FFF). Methods: Three groups of men treated with intensity modulated RT or 3-dimensional conformal RT (75.6-78 Gy) from 1993-2008 for prostate cancer were categorized as (1) 326 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone, (2) 218 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ≤6 months of ADT, and (3) 274 low-risk patients treated with definitive RT. Median follow-up was 58 months. Recursive partitioning analysis based on FFF using Gleason score (GS), T stage, and pretreatment PSA concentration was applied to the intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 5-year FFF. Results: Based on recursive partitioning analysis, intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were divided into 3 prognostic groups: (1) 188 favorable patients: GS 6, ≤T2b or GS 3+4, ≤T1c; (2) 71 marginal patients: GS 3+4, T2a-b; and (3) 68 unfavorable patients: GS 4+3 or T2c disease. Hazard ratios (HR) for recurrence in each group were 1.0, 2.1, and 4.6, respectively. When intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were compared to intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ADT, the greatest benefit from ADT was seen for the unfavorable intermediate-risk patients (FFF, 74% vs 94%, respectively; P=.005). Favorable intermediate-risk patients had no significant benefit from the addition of ADT to RT (FFF, 94% vs 95%, respectively; P=.85), and FFF for favorable intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone approached that of low-risk patients treated with RT alone (98%). Conclusions: Patients with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer did not benefit from the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT, and their FFF was nearly as good as patients with low-risk disease

  4. Survival Benefit for Pediatric Patients With Recurrent Ependymoma Treated With Reirradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouffet, Eric, E-mail: eric.bouffet@sickkids.ca [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hospital for Sick Children, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hawkins, Cynthia E. [Department of Pathology, Hospital for Sick Children, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ballourah, Walid [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hospital for Sick Children, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Taylor, Michael D. [Division of Neurosurgery, Hospital for Sick Children, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bartels, Ute K. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hospital for Sick Children, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Schoenhoff, Nicholas [Department of Psychology, Hospital for Sick Children, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Tsangaris, Elena; Huang, Annie [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hospital for Sick Children, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kulkarni, Abhaya [Division of Neurosurgery, Hospital for Sick Children, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mabbot, Donald J. [Department of Psychology, Hospital for Sick Children, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Tabori, Uri [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hospital for Sick Children, and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: The outcome of recurrent ependymoma in children is dismal. Reirradiation has been proposed as an effective modality for ependymoma at relapse. However, the toxicity and outcome benefits of this approach have not been well established. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective population-based study of all patients with recurrent ependymoma treated between 1986 and 2010 in our institution. Demographic, treatment, and outcome data were analyzed for the entire cohort. Results: Of 113 patients with intracranial ependymoma, 47 patients relapsed. At the time of relapse, 29 patients were treated with surgical resection and/or chemotherapy, and 18 patients received full-dose ({>=}54 Gy focal and/or craniospinal) reirradiation with or without surgery at recurrence. Reirradiation was tolerated well with no severe acute complications noticed. Three-year overall survival was 7% {+-} 6% and 81% {+-} 12% for nonreirradiated and reirradiated patients, respectively (p < 0.0001). Time to second progression after reirradiation was significantly longer than time to first progression. This surprising phenomenon was associated with improved progression-free survival for tumors with evidence of DNA damage (n = 15; p = 0.002). At a mean follow-up of 3.73 years, only 2/18 patients had endocrine dysfunction, and 1 patient required special education support. However, a decline in intellectual function from pre- to postreirradiation assessment was observed. Conclusions: Reirradiation is an effective treatment that may change the natural history of recurrent ependymoma in children. However, this change may be associated with increased neurocognitive toxicity. Additional follow-up is needed to determine the risk of late recurrence, secondary radiation-induced tumors, and long-term functional outcome of these patients.

  5. Application of cryoprecipitate in patients treated by portaazygous devascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Zhaoxu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the effect of cryoprecipitate-based blood component therapy on reducing perioperative risk in patients treated with portaazygous devascularization and to assess its influence on risk of post-operative complications. MethodsSixty-eight patients with portal hypertension who were scheduled for portaazygous devascularization were randomly assigned to receive either the standard surgery (control group, n=34 or surgery combined with perioperative transfusion of 10U cryoprecipitate (treatment group, n=34. Data recorded for inter-group comparative analysis (t-test included postoperative blood loss, prothrombin time, and recovery time, as well as incidences of re-hemorrhage in the gastrointestinal tract and of portal vein thrombosis. ResultsCompared with the control group, the cryoprecipitate-transfused patients showed significantly lower amount of blood loss after surgery and significantly lower incidence of postoperative bleeding and of re-hemorrhage in the gastrointestinal tract. The cryoprecipitate-transfused patients also experienced a shorter duration recovery period, with less days of in-hospital stay. There was no increase in the incidence of portal vein thrombosis after the use of cryoprecipitate. ConclusionApplication of cryoprecipitate during portaazygous devascularization surgery is safe and can improve coagulation function and reduce the risk of perioperative bleeding. Perioperative cryoprecipitate administration also benefits postoperative recovery and does not increase the incidence of portal vein thrombosis.

  6. PCSK9 Inhibitors: Treating the Right Patients in Daily Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Peta; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that inhibit proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) have emerged as a novel approach to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering. The potential role of PCSK9 inhibitors in clinical practice will be reviewed. Clinical trials have demonstrated that PCSK9 inhibitors produce robust LDL-C lowering when administered either as monotherapy or in combination with statins. This provides the opportunity to achieve effective lipid lowering in familial hypercholesterolemia, patients with either established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease or high risk primary prevention and an important opportunity to treat patients with statin intolerance. The findings from plaque imaging and patients with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease suggest that PCSK9 inhibition has favorable outcomes beyond improving lipid profiles, which has the opportunity to expand their use. PCSK9 inhibitors represent a new approach to achieving effective cardiovascular risk reduction in a broader number of patients. How these agents will be taken up in clinical practice remains to be determined.

  7. Bone densitometry in pediatric patients treated with pamidronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grissom, Leslie E.; Kecskemethy, Heidi H.; Harcke, H.Theodore [Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Nemours Children' s Clinic, Department of Medical Imaging, P.O. Box 269, Wilmington, DE (United States); Bachrach, Steven J. [Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Nemours Children' s Clinic, Division of General Pediatrics, P.O. Box 269, Wilmington, DE (United States); McKay, Charles [Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Nemours Children' s Clinic, Division of Nephrology, P.O. Box 269, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    2005-05-01

    To determine the effect of intravenous pamidronate on the bone mineral density of children with osteogenesis imperfecta and spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy. Charts of 38 children with osteogenesis imperfecta (n=20) and spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy (n=18) treated with pamidronate were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were selected for treatment because of prior fracture and/or abnormally low bone mineral density. All received intravenous pamidronate at two-month to eight-month intervals and were periodically examined using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. All patients had abnormally low bone mineral density prior to treatment. Lumbar spine bone mineral density and z-scores showed serial improvement in 31 of 32 patients. Spine bone mineral density increased 78{+-}38.1% in OI and 47.4{+-}39.0% in children with cerebral palsy. The area of greatest lateral distal femur bone mineral density improvement was in the metaphysis adjacent to the growth plate, with a 96{+-}87.8% improvement in the osteogenesis imperfecta group and 65.7{+-}55.2% improvement in the cerebral palsy group. Increases in bone mineral density exceeded that expected for age-specific growth. This was demonstrated by improvement in both spine and femur z-scores for both groups. No children with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy experienced fractures after the first week of treatment, whereas patients with osteogenesis imperfecta continued to have fractures but at a decreased rate. (orig.)

  8. The effect of smoking and major vein resection on post-therapy lymphedema in soft tissue sarcomas treated with neoadjuvant radiation and limb-salvage surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Meena; King, David M; Whitfield, Robert; Hackbarth, Donald A; Neilson, John C; Charlson, John A; Wang, Dian

    2015-04-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy with radiation +/- chemotherapy is an accepted management for soft tissue sarcomas (STS). The incidence of post-therapy lymphedema is around 30%. The purpose of this study was to identify variables that predict for post-therapy lymphedema. From 2000 to 2010, 132 patients with STS were treated with neoadjuvant radiation +/- chemotherapy followed by resection. Patient variables and treatment outcomes were reviewed. Presence of lymphedema was determined by the treating physician. The Fisher exact test was used for univariate analysis and logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Median follow-up was 3.1 years. Of the lower extremity STS, major veins were sacrificed in 34% of patients. Lymphedema occurred in 22.4% of patients. Smoking negatively predicted for lymphedema on univariate analysis (P=0.007), and sacrifice of a major vein was associated with an increased risk of lymphedema (P=0.02). On multivariate analysis, smoking (P=0.02, odds ratio 0.31) negatively predicted for and sacrifice of a major vein (P=0.03, odds ratio 2.7) positively predicted for lymphedema. There may be an association between smoking and decrease post-therapy lymphedema. Also, patients who undergo resection of a major vein seem to be more prone to post-therapy lymphedema.

  9. Radiation-induced abnormal cortical thickness in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiabao; Lv, Xiaofei; Niu, Meiqi; Liu, Lizhi; Chen, Jun; Xie, Fei; Zhong, Miao; Qiu, Shijun; Li, Li; Huang, Ruiwang

    2017-01-01

    Conventional MRI studies showed that radiation-induced brain necrosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in years after radiotherapy (RT) could involve brain gray matter (GM) and impair brain function. However, it is still unclear the radiation-induced brain morphological changes in NPC patients with normal-appearing GM in the early period after RT. In this study, we acquired high-resolution brain structural MRI data from three groups of patients, 22 before radiotherapy (pre-RT) NPC patients with newly diagnosed but not yet medically treated, 22 NPC patients in the early-delayed stage after radiotherapy (post-RT-ED), and 20 NPC patients in the late-delayed stage after radiotherapy (post-RT-LD), and then analyzed the radiation-induced cortical thickness alteration in NPC patients after RT. Using a vertex-wise surface-based morphometry (SBM) approach, we detected significantly decreased cortical thickness in the precentral gyrus (PreCG) in the post-RT-ED group compared to the pre-RT group. And the post-RT-LD group showed significantly increased cortical thickness in widespread brain regions, including the bilateral inferior parietal, left isthmus of the cingulate, left bank of the superior temporal sulcus and left lateral occipital regions, compared to the pre-RT group, and in the bilateral PreCG compared to the post-RT-ED group. Similar analysis with ROI-wise SBM method also found the consistent results. These results indicated that radiation-induced brain injury mainly occurred in the post-RT-LD group and the cortical thickness alterations after RT were dynamic in different periods. Our findings may reflect the pathogenesis of radiation-induced brain injury in NPC patients with normal-appearing GM and an early intervention is necessary for protecting GM during RT.

  10. Osteoradionecrosis and Radiation Dose to the Mandible in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Chiaojung Jillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstede, Theresa M. [Department of Dental Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S., E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lindberg, Mary E. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the association between radiation doses delivered to the mandible and the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 402 oropharyngeal cancer patients with stage T1 or T2 disease treated with definitive radiation between January 2000 and October 2008 for the occurrence of ORN. Demographic and treatment variables were compared between patients with ORN and those without. To examine the dosimetric relationship further, a nested case-control comparison was performed. One to 2 ORN-free patients were selected to match each ORN patient by age, sex, radiation type, treatment year, and cancer subsite. Detailed radiation treatment plans for the ORN cases and matched controls were reviewed. Mann-Whitney test and conditional logistic regression were used to compare relative volumes of the mandible exposed to doses ranging from 10 Gy-60 Gy in 10-Gy increments. Results: In 30 patients (7.5%), ORN developed during a median follow-up time of 31 months, including 6 patients with grade 4 ORN that required major surgery. The median time to develop ORN was 8 months (range, 0-71 months). Detailed radiation treatment plans were available for 25 of the 30 ORN patients and 40 matched ORN-free patients. In the matched case-control analysis, there was a statistically significant difference between the volumes of mandible in the 2 groups receiving doses between 50 Gy (V50) and 60 Gy (V60). The most notable difference was seen at V50, with a P value of .02 in the multivariate model after adjustment for the matching variables and dental status (dentate or with extraction). Conclusions: V50 and V60 saw the most significant differences between the ORN group and the comparison group. Minimizing the percent mandibular volume exposed to 50 Gy may reduce ORN risk.

  11. Osteoradionecrosis and radiation dose to the mandible in patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chiaojung Jillian; Hofstede, Theresa M; Sturgis, Erich M; Garden, Adam S; Lindberg, Mary E; Wei, Qingyi; Tucker, Susan L; Dong, Lei

    2013-02-01

    To determine the association between radiation doses delivered to the mandible and the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). We reviewed the records of 402 oropharyngeal cancer patients with stage T1 or T2 disease treated with definitive radiation between January 2000 and October 2008 for the occurrence of ORN. Demographic and treatment variables were compared between patients with ORN and those without. To examine the dosimetric relationship further, a nested case-control comparison was performed. One to 2 ORN-free patients were selected to match each ORN patient by age, sex, radiation type, treatment year, and cancer subsite. Detailed radiation treatment plans for the ORN cases and matched controls were reviewed. Mann-Whitney test and conditional logistic regression were used to compare relative volumes of the mandible exposed to doses ranging from 10 Gy-60 Gy in 10-Gy increments. In 30 patients (7.5%), ORN developed during a median follow-up time of 31 months, including 6 patients with grade 4 ORN that required major surgery. The median time to develop ORN was 8 months (range, 0-71 months). Detailed radiation treatment plans were available for 25 of the 30 ORN patients and 40 matched ORN-free patients. In the matched case-control analysis, there was a statistically significant difference between the volumes of mandible in the 2 groups receiving doses between 50 Gy (V50) and 60 Gy (V60). The most notable difference was seen at V50, with a P value of .02 in the multivariate model after adjustment for the matching variables and dental status (dentate or with extraction). V50 and V60 saw the most significant differences between the ORN group and the comparison group. Minimizing the percent mandibular volume exposed to 50 Gy may reduce ORN risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Malignancy rates in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with tocilizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Sebba, Anthony; Brockwell, Laura; Kelman, Ariella; Porter-Brown, Benjamin; Pulley, Jennifer; Napalkov, Pavel; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F

    2016-01-01

    To analyse malignancy rates in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with tocilizumab. Patients who received tocilizumab or placebo+methotrexate/disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in the double-blind phases of 5-phase three trials or who received at least 1 dose of tocilizumab in the long-term extension studies were analysed up to the 2 May 2012 cut-off date. Malignancies were monitored throughout the studies, analysed and adjudicated as malignant by medical review. Risk was compared with that in the general population using standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) based on data from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results SEER (US general population) and GLOBOCAN (non-US general population) databases. In total, 4009 patients in the tocilizumab all-exposure population were included. Mean treatment duration was 4.0 years (mean 5.1 (range 0.0-6.8); total observation time was 16 120.1 patient-years (PY). The adjudicated malignancy rate (95% CI) was 1.26/100 PY (1.09 to 1.44) and remained constant over time. The SIR (95% CI) for all malignancies combined, excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, was 1.36 (1.01 to 1.80) for US and 1.81 (1.44 to 2.23) for non-US populations, driven primarily by higher rates in lung and bronchus (US/non-US) malignancies and prostate cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (non-US), in contrast to those for the general populations; these higher rates are in line with those expected in patients with RA or in the geographic regions studied. Malignancy rates remained stable with long-term tocilizumab treatment, and malignancy types and rates were consistent with those expected in patients with RA.

  13. Updated Outcome and Analysis of Tumor Response in Mobile Spine and Sacral Chordoma Treated With Definitive High-Dose Photon/Proton Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman, E-mail: peyman.kabolizadeh@beaumont.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin; Liebsch, Norbert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hornicek, Francis J.; Schwab, Joseph H. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Choy, Edwin [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rosenthal, Daniel I. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej; DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Treatment of spine and sacral chordoma generally involves surgical resection, usually in conjunction with radiation therapy. In certain circumstances where resection may result in significant neurologic or organ dysfunction, patients can be treated definitively with radiation therapy alone. Herein, we report the outcome and the assessment of tumor response to definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 40 patients with unresected chordoma treated with photon/proton radiation therapy. Nineteen patients had complete sets of imaging scans. The soft tissue and bone compartments of the tumor were defined separately. Tumor response was evaluated by the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and volumetric analysis. Results: With a median follow-up time of 50.3 months, the rates of 5-year local control, overall survival, disease-specific survival, and distant failure were 85.4%, 81.9%, 89.4%, and 20.2%, respectively. Eighty-four computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed. Among the 19 patients, only 4 local failures occurred, and the median tumor dose was 77.4 GyRBE. Analysis at a median follow-up time of 18 months showed significant volumetric reduction of the total target volume (TTV) and the soft tissue target volume (STTV) within the first 24 months after treatment initiation, followed by further gradual reduction throughout the rest of the follow-up period. The median maximum percentage volumetric regressions of TTV and STTV were 43.2% and 70.4%, respectively. There was only a small reduction in bone target volume over time. In comparison with the modified RECIST, volumetric analysis was more reliable, more reproducible, and could help in measuring minimal changes in the tumor volume. Conclusion: These results continue to support the use of high-dose definitive radiation therapy for selected patients with unresected spine and sacral chordomas

  14. Development of a specialized service for patients undergoing Cutaneous Radiation Syndrome (3040)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portas, M.; Coppola, A.; De Lellis, M.C.; Giongrande, J.C.; Drago, H., E-mail: quemados_dtocirugia@buenosaires.gob.ar [Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Di Giorgio, M.; Dubner, D., E-mail: mdigiorg@cae.arn.gob.ar [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dovasio, F., E-mail: adrianacoppola2002@yahoo.com [Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mansilla, E. [C.U.C.A.I.B.A, Hospital San Martin, La Plata (Argentina)

    2013-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to stress the importance of the existence of a specialized sector within the Medical Centers for treating patients who have suffered the impact that means an apparently 'mild skin injury' and due to the lack of proper diagnosis, the progression of inflammatory waves, due to exacerbation periods, cannot be stopped. The cutaneous symptoms are caused by a combination of inflammatory process and alteration of cellular proliferation as a result of a specific pattern of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. The symptoms follow a time course pattern that mostly depend on the received doses, radiation quality, individual radiosensitivity, volume of skin exposed and patient's co morbidities: diabetes, smoking, obesity, etc., added to ischemia-reperfusion of the dermal vessels, and causing even more damage. For this reason, we have been working since 1997 in the frame of an agreement with the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina, for the diagnosis and treatment of localized radiation induced injuries. Patients were classified according to the toxicity criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer: grades 0 to 4. Since 2000, every patients assisted were treated with an equivalent therapeutic scheme, with a long term follow-up, showing favorable evolution in most cases. This work summarized the multidisciplinary professional group required, the therapeutic protocol and adjunctive treatments applied, and the tools used for diagnosis and follow-up. (author)

  15. Radiation oncology: An Irish hospitals approach to supporting patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Caragh [Cork University Hospital (Ireland)], E-mail: caragh.miller@tcd.ie

    2009-02-15

    Despite advances in medical technology, cancer is still one of the leading causes of death globally, leaving many patients to deal with the emotional and psychological aspects associated with cancer and its treatment [Department of Health and Children. A strategy for cancer control in Ireland. National Cancer Forum. Dublin; 2006]. The recognition and management of psychological conditions are an integral part of comprehensive cancer care. As a result, the Health Services Executive as part of the continuing expansion of Cork Radiation Oncology Department created the role of Information and Support Radiation Therapist. This post was specially created during June 2005 to facilitate the smooth entry into the treatment for patients and family members experiencing radiotherapy for the first time. Working alongside the oncology nurses and other health professionals the Information and Support Radiation Therapist aims to provide vital education/information and support to patients and their families. The provision of this new service for patients enables departments to adopt a holistic approach to treatment. This research identifies the cancer services and psychological support services in Ireland. Up-to-date audits of the new patient services established in the Cork Radiation Oncology Department and their psychological contribution towards cancer development and treatment are also discussed.

  16. Malignancies in patients treated with high doses of radium-224

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekolla, E.A. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS), Neuherberg (Germany); Walsh, L. [Radiobiological Inst., Univ. of Munich (Germany); Schottenhammer, G.; Spiess, H. [Children' s Hospital, Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Several thousand German patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis, tuberculosis and some other diseases, received multiple injections of the short-lived {alpha}-emitter {sup 224}Ra. The ''Spiess study'' was initiated in the early 1950s to follow the health of 899 persons (278 female, 621 male) who were treated mainly between 1945 and 1955. Most of the high dose patients and nearly all of those treated as children or juveniles (n=217) were included in the study. In June 2003, 152 persons were still alive. The most striking observed health effect, following {sup 224}Ra injections, was a temporal wave of 56 malignant bone tumours with a maximum at about 8 years after exposure which has already been described in several publications. In 2000, a new analysis was performed because an improved dosimetry resulted in modified bone surface doses. The estimated risk coefficient, averaged over all ages at exposure, was found to be in agreement with earlier analyses. However, a statistically significant increase of bone tumour risk with decreasing age at exposure was found. The earlier results, which indicated a reversed protraction factor, were confirmed. A significant excess of non-skeletal solid malignancies has also appeared during the most recent observation decade. In 2004, significant increases of cancer rates were observed for several sites: for breast cancer (31 cases observed vs. 9.1 cases expected), soft tissue malignancies (11 vs. 1.0), thyroid carcinomas (7 vs. 0.9), liver (8 vs. 2.3), kidney (13 vs. 4.6), pancreas (8 vs. 3.9), and bladder cancer (14 vs. 7.7). The 8-fold excess relative risk of mammary cancers in those women exposed as children or juveniles is particularly striking; moreover, 2 cases of breast cancer occurred in men. In 1993, a control group of tuberculosis patients not treated with {sup 224}Ra was established to rule out potential confounding factors - such as chest fluoroscopy - which might bias the breast cancer excess

  17. Impact of prognostic factors for postmastectomy radiation therapy of breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonov, K. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Velikaya, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    The study included 196 breast cancer patients with stages T1-3N0-3M0. The comprehensive therapy for breast cancer included surgical operation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Multivariate analysis showed that multifocality growth of tumor (p = 0.004), high grade III (p = 0.008), two metastatic lymph nodes (p = 0.02) were associated with an increased risk of regional node failure in the patients with one to three positive lymph nodes. The prognostic models describing the probability of local recurrences of breast cancer were developed for individualization of the radiation therapy tactics. Postmastectomy radiation therapy in the patients with high-risk breast cancer treated with modified radical mastectomy improves locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, does not increase late toxicity.

  18. Modern approach to treating mental patients in colonial chosun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bang Hyun

    2013-08-01

    them or who posed a threat to others, or else commissioned them to the government hospital. Thus, the final responsibility for mental patients was imposed on the modern Western medical team, because the district commissioners sent them to the police and the police sent them to the government mental hospital. Most educated people and government personnel in the colonial era thought modern Western psychiatry circles were responsible for mental patient management, and the Japanese empire enacted mental-healthrelated laws and made efforts to secure funds for the establishment of mental hospitals. As the literature at that time also show the position of the modern Western medical circle, their ambivalent attitude to mental patients must also be clarified to interpret the modern approach to treating mental patients in colonial Chosun. In this context, a research on historical figures in Japanese psychiatry, a study on the specific treatment methods used by the modern Western psychiatric team in the colonial era and their effects, and the extension of the subject period for such researches are suggested.

  19. A comparison of complication rates in early-stage breast cancer patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajkay, Nicolas; Collett, Abigail E; Bloomquist, Erica V; Gracely, Edward J; Frazier, Thomas G; Barrio, Andrea V

    2015-04-01

    The adoption of breast brachytherapy into clinical practice for early-stage breast cancer has increased over the last several years. Studies evaluating complication rates following treatment with brachytherapy have shown conflicting results. We compared local toxicity in patients treated with brachytherapy with those treated with whole-breast irradiation (WBI). We identified 417 early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation between 2004 and 2010, and compared 271 women treated with intracavitary brachytherapy with 146 women treated with WBI. Long-term complications were assessed using Kaplan-Meier curves with the log-rank test. Median follow-up was 4.6 years, and the 5-year incidence of infectious skin complications (9.7 vs. 11.0 %, p = 0.84), abscess (1.1 vs. 0 %, p = 0.15), telangiectasia (8.0 vs. 5.3 %, p = 0.35), and breast pain (14.2 vs. 9.4 %, p = 0.2) was similar between the brachytherapy and WBI cohorts. The brachytherapy cohort had a higher 5-year rate of seroma (46.5 vs. 18.5 %, p Brachytherapy patients trended towards more frequent biopsies as a result of fat necrosis to rule out a recurrence (11.2 vs. 6.7 %, p = 0.13). Patients treated with intracavitary brachytherapy had more local toxicity, particularly seroma and fat necrosis. Patients should be counseled on the possible increased rate of long-term complications associated with brachytherapy treatment.

  20. Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwint, Margriet [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Uyterlinde, Wilma [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heuvel, Michel van den [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Belderbos, Jose, E-mail: j.belderbos@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m Superscript-Two ). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D{sub mean} and D{sub max} of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade {>=}2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade {>=}3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade {>=}2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade {>=}3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade {>=}2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  1. Tissue biomarkers in melanoma patients treated with TIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Chantal Knol

    Full Text Available While treating stage III melanoma patients with autologous therapeutic TIL in an adjuvant setting, we previously reported a significant benefit of treatment on both progression-free survival and overall survival in patients with only one invaded lymph node (early stage III compared to patients with more than one invaded lymph nodes (advanced stage III. In this context, in order to understand the difference of activity of TIL therapy according to the progression of the illness at stage III, the first objective of the present study was to determine potential differences in the characteristics of TIL populations obtained from an early stage III and a more advanced stage III when tumor burden is more important. The second objective was to determine possible differences in tissue expression level of several molecules involved in interactions between tumor cells and T cells between early and advanced stage III considering that the tumor microenvironment of invaded lymph nodes could become more tolerant with the progression of the disease. A total of 47 samples of melanoma invaded LN from stage IIIb (AJCC 2007 melanoma patients treated with TIL plus IL-2 were included in this study. We confirmed that both PFS and OS were significantly associated to the presence of tumor-reactive T-cells among TIL injected to the patients and that these tumor reactive T cells were more frequently observed at the early stage III. Moreover, while analyzing the expression of 17 markers on 34/47 tumor specimens using immunohistochemistry, we identified that 3 tissue markers involved in interactions between melanoma cells and T cells have a significant difference of expression between early and advanced stage III: MHC class I, adhesion molecule ICAM-1 and the co-stimulation molecule LFA-3 had a significantly weaker expression in melanoma tissue specimens from advanced stage III. In addition, the expression of the alpha chain of the IL-2 receptor (CD25 and the nuclear

  2. Acupuncture for the prevention of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio do Prado Florence Braga

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in minimizing the severity of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 24 consecutive patients receiving > 5000 cGy radiotherapy (RT involving the major salivary glands bilaterally were assigned to either the preventive acupuncture group (PA, n = 12, treated with acupuncture before and during RT, or the control group (CT, n = 12, treated with RT and not receiving acupuncture. After RT completion, clinical response was assessed in all patients by syalometry, measuring the resting (RSFR and stimulated (SSFR salivary flow rates, and by the visual analogue scale (VAS regarding dry mouth-related symptoms. Statistical analyses were performed with repeated-measures using a mixed-effect modeling procedure and analysis of variance. An alpha level of 0.05 was accepted for statistical significance. Although all patients exhibited some degree of impairment in salivary gland functioning after RT, significant differences were found between the groups. Patients in the PA group showed improved salivary flow rates (RSFR, SSFR; p < 0.001 and decreased xerostomia-related symptoms (VAS, p < 0.05 compared with patients in the CT group. Although PA treatment did not prevent the oral sequelae of RT completely, it significantly minimized the severity of radiation-induced xerostomia. The results suggest that acupuncture focused in a preventive approach can be a useful therapy in the management of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing RT.

  3. Associations of ATM Polymorphisms With Survival in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Zhongli [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhang, Wencheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhou, Yuling; Yu, Dianke; Chen, Xiabin; Chang, Jiang; Qiao, Yan; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Ying; Wu, Chen [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Xiao, Zefen, E-mail: xiaozefen@sina.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Tan, Wen, E-mail: tanwen@cicams.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); and others

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are associated with survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy or surgery only. Methods and Materials: Four tagSNPs of ATM were genotyped in 412 individuals with clinical stage III or IV ESCC receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy, and in 388 individuals with stage I, II, or III ESCC treated with surgery only. Overall survival time of ESCC among different genotypes was estimated by Kaplan-Meier plot, and the significance was examined by log-rank test. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for death from ESCC among different genotypes were computed by a Cox proportional regression model. Results: We found 2 SNPs, rs664143 and rs664677, associated with survival time of ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy. Individuals with the rs664143A allele had poorer median survival time compared with the rs664143G allele (14.0 vs 20.0 months), with the HR for death being 1.45 (95% CI 1.12-1.89). Individuals with the rs664677C allele also had worse median survival time than those with the rs664677T allele (14.0 vs 23.5 months), with the HR of 1.57 (95% CI 1.18-2.08). Stratified analysis showed that these associations were present in both stage III and IV cancer and different radiation therapy techniques. Significant associations were also found between the SNPs and locosregional progression or progression-free survival. No association between these SNPs and survival time was detected in ESCC patients treated with surgery only. Conclusion: These results suggest that the ATM polymorphisms might serve as independent biomarkers for predicting prognosis in ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy.

  4. Voxel-based analysis unveils regional dose differences associated with radiation-induced morbidity in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Serena; Palma, Giuseppe; D'Avino, Vittoria; Gerardi, Marianna; Marvaso, Giulia; Ciardo, Delia; Pacelli, Roberto; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Alterio, Daniela; Cella, Laura

    2017-08-03

    The risk of radiation-induced toxicity in patients treated for head and neck (HN) cancer with radiation therapy (RT) is traditionally estimated by condensing the 3D dose distribution into a monodimensional cumulative dose-volume histogram which disregards information on dose localization. We hypothesized that a voxel-based approach would identify correlations between radiation-induced morbidity and local dose release, thus providing a new insight into spatial signature of radiation sensitivity in composite regions like the HN district. This methodology was applied to a cohort of HN cancer patients treated with RT at risk of radiation-induced acute dysphagia (RIAD). We implemented an inter-patient elastic image registration framework that proved robust enough to match even the most elusive HN structures and to provide accurate dose warping. A voxel-based statistical analysis was then performed to test regional dosimetric differences between patients with and without RIAD. We identified a significantly higher dose delivered to RIAD patients in two voxel clusters in correspondence of the cricopharyngeus muscle and cervical esophagus. Our study goes beyond the well-established organ-based philosophy exploring the relationship between radiation-induced morbidity and local dose differences in the HN region. This approach is generally applicable to different HN toxicity endpoints and is not specific to RIAD.

  5. Neuropathic pain in cancer patients treated with bortezomib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expósito Vizcaíno, S; Casanova-Mollà, J; Escoda, L; Galán, S; Miró, J

    The neuropathic pain is the most habitual problem in the neuropathy induced by chemotherapy (NIQ) and the one that more interferes in the quality of life of the patients. His precocious detection turns out to be fundamental to reduce or to eliminate the problems that from this one stem. The aims of this study were: 1) determine the incident and NIQ's characteristics and neuropathic pain in patients with mieloma multiple (MM) treated with bortezomib, and 2) to evaluate the impact of the neuropathic pain in the activities of the daily life (AVD). All the patients diagnosed of MM candidates for treatment with bortezomib attended in the Hospital Joan XXIII during 2013, took part. The participants were interviewed individually and were reporting on the presence, the characteristics and the impact of the pain, as well as of the adverse effects of the bortezomib. There took part 22 persons, of which NIQ presented the half, being the degree 2 the predominant one. The most habitual location of the neuropathic pain was hands and feet; it was appearing in a spontaneous and progressive way deteriorating in rest and during the night, with predominance of positive symptoms. The impact of the pain was reflected in all the AVD. The principal limitation was the disability to enjoy the life. The peripheral neuropathy occupied the first place in order of subjective importance for the patient followed by the fatigue and the constipation. A proper assessment and early detection of neuropathic pain is critical to minimizing its impact on the quality of life of patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of treatment outcome between breast-conservation surgery with radiation and total mastectomy without radiation in patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Il; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang Ok; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2011-08-01

    To test the difference in treatment outcome between breast-conservation surgery with radiation and total mastectomy without radiation, to evaluate the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Using the Severance Hospital Breast Cancer Registry, we divided the study population of T1, T2 and one to three axillary node-positive patients into two groups: breast-conservation surgery with radiation (BCS/RT) and total mastectomy without radiation (TM/no-RT). Data related to locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, and death were collected, and survival rates were calculated. The study population consisted of 125 patients treated with BCS/RT and 365 patients treated with TM/no-RT. With a median follow-up of 68.4 months, the 10-year locoregional recurrence-free survival rate with BCS/RT and TM/no-RT was 90.5% and 79.2%, respectively (p = 0.056). The 10-year distant recurrence-free survival rate was 78.8% for patients treated with BCS/RT vs. 68.0% for those treated with TM/no-RT (p = 0.012). The 10-years overall survival rate for patients treated with BCT/RT and TM/no-RT was 87.5% and 73.9%, respectively (p = 0.035). After multivariate analysis, patients treated with BCT/RT had better distant recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.527; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.297-0.934; p = 0.028), with improving locoregional recurrence-free survival (HR, 0.491; 95% CI, 0.231-1.041; p = 0.064) and overall survival trend (HR, 0.544; 95% CI, 0.277-1.067; p = 0.076). This study provides additional evidence that adjuvant radiation substantially reduces local recurrence, distant recurrence, and mortality for patients with one to three involved nodes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Controversial issues in treating the dental patient with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Robert E

    2010-08-01

    The author conducted a literature review to investigate concerns that parents of a child with an autism spectrum disorder may have when oral health care is provided to the child. The author conducted a search of PubMed using the terms "mercury," "fluoride," "nitrous oxide," "antibiotics," "gluten," "casein," "acetaminophen" and "dentistry" each with the term "autism." He identified controlled studies and literature reviews in both medical and alternative medical literature that were related to areas of importance to oral health care workers. The use of mercury, fluoride, nitrous oxide, antibiotic agents and acetaminophen all are sources of controversy between dentistry and the parents of children who have autism. The author found that patients who have autism frequently also have allergies, immune system problems, gastrointestinal disturbances and seizures. Dental health care workers must be aware of these comorbid conditions so they can provide optimal care to the children with autism spectrum disorders. The author found two distinct theories as to what causes autism: one that focuses on genetic causes, and one that focuses on the impact of the environment. He found that the interpretation of these theories might affect parents' concerns about various dental treatments. Dentists treating patients who have autism may need to provide more than standard patient care, as the use of time-tested dental treatment and prevention modalities may be questioned or refused by parents.

  8. Gorham-Stout syndrome of the pelvic girdle treated by radiation therapy. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyd, Reinhard; Tselis, Nikolaos; Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach am Main (Germany). Strahlenklinik; Rabeneck, Daniela [Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach am Main (Germany). Strahlenklinik; Universitaetsklinikum Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Onkologie; Doernenburg, Oliver [Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach am Main (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-02-15

    The Gorham-Stout syndrome (GSS) is a rare, benign idiopathic and progressive disorder causing massive osteolysis due to a vascular hyperproliferation replacing the bony structure. Clinical experience concerning the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) is limited to about 50 of an overall 200 cases reported worldwide. Case Report: A 24-year-old bedridden woman had histologically proven GSS with destruction of the anterior pelvic girdle and received RT for a total dose of 45.0 Gy applied in 5 weekly fractions of 1.8 Gy. In addition, the patient received intravenously 4 mg zoledronic acid once a month. One year after the combined treatment, complete pain relief occurred, and the patient was able to walk without the use of appliances. Imaging studies revealed no progression of the osteolysis but only minimal signs of remineralization. Conclusion: Combined treatment with RT and bisphosphonate administration can prevent the progression of osteolysis in GSS. Total doses of 40-45 Gy are recommended. (orig.)

  9. Bone mineral density in patients with treated Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braatvedt, G D; Joyce, M; Evans, M; Clearwater, J; Reid, I R

    1999-01-01

    Some studies have reported low bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with Addison's disease, whereas others have found BMD to be normal. It is possible that over-replacement of corticosteroids and adrenal androgen deficiency may contribute to a reduction in BMD in these patients. The aims of this study were to examine BMD using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in patients with treated Addison's disease at multiple skeletal sites and to investigate the relationships between these measurements and corticosteroid dose. Nineteen men, 3 premenopausal and 7 postmenopausal women with Addison's disease were studied and data from these patients were analyzed separately and as a group. The mean SEM age and duration of Addison's disease of the men were 44 +/- 3.8 years and 15 +/- 2.2 years, in the premenopausal women 40 +/- 2 years and 5 +/- 2.4 years, and in the postmenopausal women 68 +/- 4 years and 20 +/- 5 years, respectively. Eight men were unexpectedly hypogonadal (serum testosterone <13 nmol/l). BMD was expressed as a percent of values in normal controls (n = 418) adjusted for age, sex, ethnic origin, menopausal status and body weight. In the whole group (n = 29), mean BMD of the patients with Addison's disease was not different from normal at any site [mean (+/- SEM) lumbar spine 99.5% +/- 2.9%; femoral neck 99.3% +/- 2.5%; Ward's triangle 96.2% +/- 3.5%; trochanter 99.2% +/- 2.9%; radius 99.8% +/- 2.1%; total body 98.5% +/- 1.4%]. However, there was a wide range of bone densities, with some patients having a low BMD at multiple sites. Bone density was negatively correlated with current and cumulative corticosteroid dose per kilogram body weight and duration of Addison's disease. In conclusion, BMD in patients with Addison's disease is little different from normal, but may be lower in patients with disease of long duration and a high cumulative corticosteroid dose. Unexpected hypogonadism in men with Addison's disease is common.

  10. Psychology and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy

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    Yang, Jong Chul; Chung, Woong Ki [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    The object of this study is to investigate sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, psychology, self-esteem and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy and to provide useful information for therapeutic approach to cancer patients on radiation therapy. The subjects were 36 patients who had been treated with radiation therapy and 20 normal people. Sociodemographic information and clinical characteristics of cancer patients on radiation therapy were investigated, and symptom checklist-90-revised, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale for self esteem, World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Instrument for quality of life were administered to subjects. And Spearman's correlation analysis was used among these. The tendency of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility in cancer group were significantly higher than normal group. Self esteem and quality of life in cancer group were significantly lower than normal group. No significant difference was found in comparison of psychology, self esteem and quality of life according to sociodemographic variables. Among clinical characteristics, in the presence of metastasis in cancer patients, the scores of anxiety, phobia and paranoid ideation were higher. In patients with pain, the score of somatization was higher. And in case of weight loss, the score of somatization was higher. The higher score of depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower self-esteem. And higher score of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower quality of life. Understanding and management of psychological symptoms, such as somatization, depression, anxiety, and hostility, and pain control are necessary to improve quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy.

  11. Does radiation dose matter in thyroid cancer?: Patterns of local-regional failure in recurrent and metastatic well-differentiated thyroid cancers treated with dose-painted intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugard, Erin; Chen, Josephine; Quivey, Jeanne M; Glastonbury, Christine M; Khanafshar, Elham; Garsa, Adam A; George, Jonathan R; Yom, Sue S

    2016-08-01

    Due to complex multimodal treatments and a lengthy natural history of disease, the impact of radiation therapy for well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC) is challenging to evaluate. We analysed the effect of dose escalation, as enabled by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), on preventing local-regional failure (LRF) of microscopic and macroscopic WDTC. We performed a retrospective review of WDTC patients treated with IMRT from 1998-2011. Diagnostic imaging demonstrating first LRF was registered to the simulation CT containing the treated radiation isodose volumes. Areas of disease progression were contoured and the relationships of LRFs with isodose volumes were recorded. Thirty patients had a median follow-up of 56 months (range = 1-139). Seventeen (57%) had gross residual, five (17%) had microscopic residual and eight (27%) had clear margins at the time of IMRT. Nine patients (30%) developed LRF, at a median time of 44 months (range = 0-116). Of these, six (67%) had been radiated to gross disease and one (11%) had microscopic residual. In the seven analysable cases, only one (14%) LRF occurred within the 70 Gy isodose volume. Marginal LRFs were: four (57%) outside 70 Gy, one (14%) outside 60 Gy and one (14%) outside 50 Gy. All but one recurrence (86%) occurred in the perioesophageal region. Local-regional failure was seen most in patients who had gross disease at the time of IMRT, almost always occurred outside of the 70 Gy volume and was frequently in the area of oesophageal sparing. Meticulous surgical dissection, especially in the perioesophageal region, should be prioritised to prevent long-term LRF. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  12. The Use of Radiation Therapy in the Management of Selected Patients with Atypical Lipomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Atypical lipomas are uncommon, slow-growing benign tumors. While surgery has been the primary treatment modality, we have managed some patients with radiation (RT as a component of the treatment and have reported their outcomes in this study. Methods. A retrospective review of all cases of extremity and trunk atypical lipomas in The Sarcoma Database at the study institution was conducted. Results. Thirteen patients were identified. All patients underwent surgical resection at initial presentation and received pre- or postoperative radiation for subtotal resection (n=2, local recurrence (n=8, or progressive disease (n=3. The median total radiation dose was 50 Gy. Median followup was 65.1 months. All patients treated with RT remained free of disease at the last followup. No grade 3 or higher late toxicity from radiation was observed. No cases of tumor dedifferentiation occurred. Conclusion. For recurrent or residual atypical lipomas, a combination of reexcision and RT can provide long-term local control with acceptable morbidity. For recurrent tumors, pre-op RT of 50 Gy appears to be an effective and well-tolerated management approach.

  13. SU-E-T-208: Incidence Cancer Risk From the Radiation Treatment for Acoustic Neuroma Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D [Kyung Hee University International Med. Serv., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, W [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, D [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to compare the incidence risk of a secondary cancer from therapeutic doses in patients receiving intensitymodulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their incidnece excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) were estimated using the corresponding therapeutic doses measured at various organs by radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. Results: When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, normal liver, colon, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were measured. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A LAR were estimated that more than 0.03% of AN patients would get radiation-induced cancer. Conclusion: The tyroid was highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN. We found that LAR can be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  14. Comparison of weight changes in patients treated with different antidepressants: clinical experiences in Taiwanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jian-An; Tsang, Hin-Yeung

    2006-01-01

    Psychiatric patients are more likely to gain weight when prescribed antipsychotics or antidepressants. Studies on these issues in Taiwan are scarce. This study compared weight changes in patients treated with NaSSA (Noradrenergic and Specific Serotonergic Antidepressant) and SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors), and investigated possible associated factors. An observational, non-randomized study was conducted on all patients diagnosed with depression attending the out-patient's clinic at a general hospital. Patients treated with NaSSA or SSRIs were monitored for 24 weeks. Forty-Seven patients (27 patients on NaSSA and 20 on SSRIs) completed the study. Patients taking NaSSA gained an average of 1.87 kg (SD: 4.14, median: 1.0, range: -3.5 to 11.0) at the end of the study, compared to 1.83 kg (SD: 3.78; median: 1.5, range: -7.0 to 8.0) for the SSRIs group. No statistically significant difference existed between the two groups. However, patients who had never previously been treated with either SSRIs or NaSSA exhibited significantly greater weight gain (4.84 kg, SD: 3.20, median: 4.75, range: 0 to 11.0) than those who had previously been treated (-0.78 kg, SD: 2.36, median: -0.5, range: -7.0 to 3.5). Low initial body mass index and concomitant medications also seemed to be linked to weight gain. Significant weight gain occurred in those patients who had not been previously treated with NaSSA or SSRIs. Patients should be informed of this possibility before initiating treatment, especially those with low body mass index and those prescribed co-medications. Furthermore, the treatment program should include weight monitoring, nutritional assessment and counseling.

  15. Cumulative radiation exposure in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mark A; Noga, Michelle; Rutledge, Jennifer

    2015-02-01

    Certain pediatric patients undergoing surgery for the most severe forms of congenital heart disease are exposed to high doses of ionizing radiation. The amount of cumulative radiation exposure from all modalities has not yet been evaluated. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the cumulative radiation exposure in a contemporary cohort of patients with congenital heart disease undergoing single-ventricle palliation. This is a single-center, retrospective study of pediatric patients undergoing Fontan completion between May 2005 and May 2010. Radiation exposure from all procedures including cardiac catheterizations, computed tomography (CT) scans, plain film radiography, and nuclear medicine scans was evaluated. Radiation dose was calculated as the dose area product (μGy m(2)) and was measured in all cardiac catheterizations, CT scans, and other imaging modalities. Seventy patients who underwent Fontan completion at a mean age of 3.6 ± 1.5 years (range 1.4-8 years) were included in the study. Mean number of chest X-rays was 32 ± 8 (range 10-285) with a mean cumulative total exposure of 1,320 μGy m(2) (range 480-12,960) per patient. Mean number of cardiac catheterizations was 2.45 ± 1.3 (range 1-8), and mean fluoroscopy and cine angiography exposures per case were 1,103 ± 245 and 1,412 ± 273 μGy m(2) giving a mean cumulative exposure of 9,054 μGy m(2) (range 2,515-201,200) per patient for all catheterizations. Mean number of CT scans performed was 0.44 ± 0.4 (0-11), and the mean exposure was 352 μGy m(2), giving a mean cumulative total of 154 μGy m(2) (range 0-3,872) per person. A total of five lung perfusion scans were carried out. Radiation exposure in patients with congenital heart disease undergoing single-ventricle palliation is quite variable. Most of the exposure to ionizing radiation occurs during cardiac catheterization. Strategies to utilize other imaging modalities such as MRI would decrease exposure in this particular group of patients who

  16. Severe hypercalcemia and hypernatremia in a patient treated with canagliflozin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Arshpreet; Winters, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Drugs that inhibit the sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) are an exciting novel, insulin-independent treatment for diabetes that block glucose reabsorption from the proximal tubules of the kidney, leading to increased glucose excretion and lower blood glucose levels. Inhibition of SGLT2 activity also reduces sodium reabsorption, which together with glycosuria produces a mild diuretic effect with the potential for dehydration and hyperkalemia. We report on a 60-year-old man with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes treated with insulin, glimepiride, metformin and canagliflozin, who was admitted with altered mental status after a syncopal episode. He had a 1-week history of ingestion of Tums for heartburn followed by poor appetite and lethargy. Laboratory work-up showed acute kidney injury, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), and parathyroid hormone-independent severe hypercalcemia of 17.4 mg/dl. DKA resolved with insulin treatment, and saline hydration led to improvement in hypercalcemia and renal function over 48 h, but was accompanied by a rapid increase in the serum sodium concentration from 129 to 162 mmol/l despite changing fluids to 0.45% saline. Urine studies were consistent with osmotic diuresis. Hypernatremia was slowly corrected with hypotonic fluids, with improvement in his mental status over the next 2 days. This is the first report of hypercalcemia associated with the use of a SLGT2 inhibitor. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, canagliflozin may predispose to hypercalcemia in patients ingesting excessive calcium because of dehydration from osmotic diuresis, with reduced calcium excretion and possible increased intestinal calcium absorption. Saline therapy and osmotic diuresis may lead to hypernatremia from electrolyte-free water loss. Canagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, may cause hypercalcemia in susceptible patients.Although the exact mechanisms are unknown, dehydration from osmotic diuresis and increased intestinal calcium absorption play a role

  17. Radiation-Induced Changes in Serum Lipidome of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Jelonek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer radiotherapy (RT induces response of the whole patient’s body that could be detected at the blood level. We aimed to identify changes induced in serum lipidome during RT and characterize their association with doses and volumes of irradiated tissue. Sixty-six patients treated with conformal RT because of head and neck cancer were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were collected before, during and about one month after the end of RT. Lipid extracts were analyzed using MALDI-oa-ToF mass spectrometry in positive ionization mode. The major changes were observed when pre-treatment and within-treatment samples were compared. Levels of several identified phosphatidylcholines, including (PC34, (PC36 and (PC38 variants, and lysophosphatidylcholines, including (LPC16 and (LPC18 variants, were first significantly decreased and then increased in post-treatment samples. Intensities of changes were correlated with doses of radiation received by patients. Of note, such correlations were more frequent when low-to-medium doses of radiation delivered during conformal RT to large volumes of normal tissues were analyzed. Additionally, some radiation-induced changes in serum lipidome were associated with toxicity of the treatment. Obtained results indicated the involvement of choline-related signaling and potential biological importance of exposure to clinically low/medium doses of radiation in patient’s body response to radiation.

  18. Dental Student, Resident, and Faculty Attitudes Toward Treating Medicaid Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Feng, Xiaoying

    2017-11-01

    Failure to receive proper oral health care including both prevention and maintenance is influenced by myriad and complex social, economic, and dental factors, including access to care. Reducing oral health disparities requires changes in the preparation of future dentists as well as measuring and influencing the attitudes and knowledge of practicing dentists. The aim of this study was to determine the likelihood that future dentists (students and residents) and faculty members at one U.S. dental school would treat Medicaid participants. Attitudes were measured using the Deamonte Driver scenario survey, which assesses factors affecting dentists' participation in Medicaid. In October 2012, all 113 full-time faculty members were invited to participate, and 60 completed the survey, for a response rate of 53.1%. In January and February 2013, all 18 residents in the dental clinics and university hospital were invited to participate, and 16 completed the survey, for a response rate of 88.9%. From 2013 to 2015, all 267 students in three classes were invited to participate: first-year students in the Classes of 2017 and 2018 and fourth-year students in the Class of 2015. A total of 255 students completed the survey, for an overall student response rate of 95.5%. The results showed that the students were more likely to participate in caring for Medicaid patients than the faculty and residents. The white and male students had stronger negative stereotypes about Medicaid patients than the females and underrepresented minority students, while residents had stronger negative stereotypes about Medicaid patients than the students and faculty. Overall, the cultural competency skills, beliefs, and attitudes of these faculty members and residents were less developed than those of their students, signaling a need for broad educational and faculty development programs to fully prepare the future dental workforce to care for these patients.

  19. Efficacy of ingenol mebutate gel for actinic keratosis in patients treated by thiazide diuretics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campione E

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Elena Campione,1 Monia Di Prete,1 Laura Diluvio,1 Luca Bianchi,1 Augusto Orlandi2 1Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Pathology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy Abstract: Actinic keratosis (AK is considered as superficial squamous cell carcinoma. Chronic sun exposure plays a central role in its pathogenesis. In particular, ultraviolet B radiation causes direct damage to the DNA, producing pyrimidine dimers that suppress the protective role of p53. Other risk factors include advanced age, male sex, and fair skin type. Even some drugs used for treating blood hypertension, such as thiazide diuretics, can increase the risk of developing AK. Their photosensitizing action seems to be connected with reactive oxygen species production. We report our experience on ten patients affected by multiple AK, in therapy with thiazide diuretics, treated by ingenol mebutate gel. AK was clinically and dermoscopically evaluated at baseline and after 30 days from the beginning of the treatment. Moreover, patients were screened for vitamin D3 values and reported a general hypovitaminosis status. To our knowledge, we report for the first time the efficacy of ingenol mebutate gel in this group of patients, particularly at risk of developing AK. Keywords: anticancer agents, antitumor activity, cancer cells, skin precancerous lesion

  20. A radiative transfer model to treat infrared molecular excitation in cometary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debout, V.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Zakharov, V.

    2016-02-01

    The exospheres of small Solar System bodies are now observed with high spatial resolution from space missions. Interpreting infrared spectra of cometary gases obtained with the VIRTIS experiment onboard the Rosetta cometary mission requires detailed modeling of infrared fluorescence emission in optically thick conditions. Efficient computing methods are required since numerous ro-vibrational lines excited by the Sun need to be considered. We propose a new model working in a 3-D environment to compute numerically the local incoming radiation. It uses a new algorithm using pre-defined directions of ray propagation and ray grids to reduce the CPU cost in time with respect to Monte Carlo methods and to treat correctly the sunlight direction. The model is applied to the ν3 bands of CO2 and H2O at 4.3 μ m and 2.7 μ m respectively, and to the CO ∨ (1 → 0) band at 4.7 μ m. The results are compared to the ones obtained by a 1-D algorithm which uses the Escape Probability (EP) method, and by a 3-D ;Coupled Escape Probability; (CEP) model, for different levels of optical thickness. Our results suggest that the total band flux may vary strongly with azimuth for optically thick cases whereas the azimuth average total band flux computed is close to the one obtained with EP. Our model globally predicts less intensity reduction from opacity than the CEP model of Gersch and A'Hearn (Gersch, A.M., A'Hearn, M.F. [2014]. Astrophys. J. 787, 36-56). An application of the model to the observation of CO2, CO and H2O bands in 67/P atmosphere with VIRTIS is presented to predict the evolution of band optical thickness along the mission.

  1. Determinants of Patient Satisfaction During Receipt of Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Famiglietti, Robin M., E-mail: rfamigli@mdanderson.org; Neal, Emily C.; Edwards, Timothy J.; Allen, Pamela K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlations and relative contributions of components of a radiation oncology-specific patient satisfaction survey to their overall satisfaction scores. Methods and Materials: From September 2006 through August 2012, we prospectively collected data from 8069 patients receiving radiation treatments with a 26-question survey. Each question was rated on a 10-point Likert scale. We analyzed the correlation between scores for each question and the overall satisfaction question. We also dichotomized the scores to reflect satisfaction versus dissatisfaction and used logistic regression to assess the relationship between items in 4 domains (the patient–provider relationship, access and environmental issues, wait times, and educational information) and overall satisfaction. Results: Scores on all questions correlated with overall patient satisfaction scores (P<.0001). Satisfaction with patient–provider relationships had the greatest influence on overall satisfaction (R{sup 2}=0.4219), followed by wait times (R{sup 2}=0.4000), access/environment (R{sup 2}=0.3837), and patient education (R{sup 2}=0.3700). The specific variables with the greatest effect on patient satisfaction were the care provided by radiation therapists (odds ratio 1.91) and pain management (odds ratio 1.29). Conclusions: We found that patients' judgment of provider relationships in an outpatient radiation oncology setting were the greatest contributors to their overall satisfaction ratings. Other measures typically associated with patient satisfaction (phone access, scheduling, and ease of the check-in process) correlated less strongly with overall satisfaction. These findings may be useful for other practices preparing to assess patient ratings of quality of care.

  2. Late bone and soft tissue sequelae of childhood radiotherapy. Relevance of treatment age and radiation dose in 146 children treated between 1970 and 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, W. [Technical Univ. of Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Medical University / AKH Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kallfels, S. [Technical Univ. of Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Chemnitz (Germany); Herrmann, T. [Technical Univ. of Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The present retrospective study was initiated to characterize the effect of oncological treatments in children and adolescents on bone and soft tissues, and to assess their dependence on radiation dose and age at exposure. Patients and methods: The study included 146 patients treated between 1970 and 1997. All patients received external beam radiotherapy to the trunk or extremities, but no cranial irradiation. Median age at treatment was 8.8 years. Patients were screened at 18 years (median time interval since treatment 9.2 years, range 0.9-17.7 years) for pathological changes in the skeletal system and soft tissues (scoliosis, kyphosis, bony hypoplasia, soft tissue defects, asymmetries), which were classified as minor/moderate (grade 1) or substantial (grade 2). Results: Pathological findings were recorded in 75/146 patients (51 %). These were scored as minor in 44 (59 %) and substantial in 31 patients (41 %). Most pathological changes occurred in children treated under the age of 6 years. At 6 years and older, only doses > 35 Gy caused an effect, and no substantial changes were seen for treatment ages exceeding 12 years. Significant effects of radiation dose and age at exposure were observed for kyphoscoliosis (with vertebral body dose gradients < 35 Gy), hypoplasia and soft tissue defects and asymmetrical growth. Conclusion: Tolerance doses of 20 Gy need to be respected for growing bone, particularly in children treated under the age of 6 years. The late treatment sequelae analysed in the present study are largely avoided with the use of current therapeutic protocols. However, the systematic evaluation, documentation and continuous analysis of adverse events in paediatric oncology remains essential, as does the evaluation of novel radio(chemo)therapeutic approaches. (orig.)

  3. Bladder volume variations of cervical cancer patient in radiation therapy using ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jong Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The bladder volume change was measured using ultrasonography for helping decrease the side effects and other organ variations in the location of radiation therapy for cervical cancer patients. An experiment was performed targeting patients who were treated with radiation therapy at PNUH within the period from September to December 2015. To maintain the bladder volume, each patient was instructed to drink 500 cc water before and after CT simulation, 60 minutes before the dry run. Also, the bladder volume was measured in each patient CT scan, and a 3D conformal therapy plan was designed. The bladder volumes measured before and after the CT simulation, dry run, and radiation treatment planning were compared and analyzed. The average volume and average error of the bladder that were obtained from the measurement based on the CT scan images had the lowest standard deviation in the CT simulation. This means that the values that were obtained before and after the CT simulation were statistically relevant and correlative. Moreover, the bladder volume measured via ultrasonography was larger size, the average volume in the CT scan. But the values that were obtained Dry run and after the CT simulation were not statistically relevant. Drinking a certain amount of water helps a patient maintain his/her bladder volume for a dry run. Even then, it is difficult to maintain the bladder volume for the dry run. Also, whether or not the patients followed the directions for the dry run correctly is important.

  4. Phase 1 Study of Erlotinib Plus Radiation Therapy in Patients With Advanced Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, C. Hope; Deep, Nicholas L.; Nabell, Lisle; Carroll, William R.; Desmond, Renee; Clemons, Lisa; Spencer, Sharon; Magnuson, J. Scott [Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Rosenthal, Eben L., E-mail: oto@uab.edu [Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity profile of erlotinib therapy combined with postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy in patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, prospective, phase 1 open-label study of erlotinib with radiation therapy to treat 15 patients with advanced cutaneous head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Toxicity data were summarized, and survival was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The majority of patients were male (87%) and presented with T4 disease (93%). The most common toxicity attributed to erlotinib was a grade 2-3 dermatologic reaction occurring in 100% of the patients, followed by mucositis (87%). Diarrhea occurred in 20% of the patients. The 2-year recurrence rate was 26.7%, and mean time to cancer recurrence was 10.5 months. Two-year overall survival was 65%, and disease-free survival was 60%. Conclusions: Erlotinib and radiation therapy had an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. The disease-free survival in this cohort was comparable to that in historical controls.

  5. An analysis of the incidence and related factors for radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients who receive radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Heui Kwan [Prebyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    We analyzed the incidence and related factors of radiation dermatitis; at first, to recognize whether a decrease in radiation dermatitis is possible or not in breast cancer patients who received radiation therapy. Of 338 patients, 284 with invasive breast cancer who received breast conservation surgery with radiotherapy at Chonbuk National University Hospital from January 2007 to June 2009 were evaluated. Patients who also underwent bolus, previous contralateral breast irradiation and irradiation on both breasts were excluded. For patients who appeared to have greater than moderate radiation dermatitis, the incidence and relating factors for radiation dermatitis were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 207 and 77 patients appeared to have RTOG grade 0/1 or above RTOG grade 2 radiation dermatitis, respectively. The factors found to be statistically significant for the 77 patients who appeared to have greater than moderate radiation dermatitis include the presence of lymphocele due to the stasis of lymph and lymph edema which affect the healing disturbance of radiation dermatitis (p=0.003, p=0.001). Moreover, an allergic reaction to plaster due to the immune cells of skin and the activation of cytokine and concomitant hormonal therapy were also statistically significant factors (p=0.001, p=0.025). Most of the breast cancer patients who received radiation therapy appeared to have a greater than mild case of radiation dermatitis. Lymphocele, lymphedema, an allergy to plaster and concomitant hormonal therapy which affect radiation dermatitis were found to be significant factors. Consequently, we should eliminate lymphocele prior to radiation treatment for patients who appear to have an allergic reaction to plaster. We should also instruct patients of methods to maintain skin moisture if they appear to have a greater than moderate case of radiation dermatitis.

  6. Long-Term Results of 2-Dimensional Radiation Therapy in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Yang, Dae Sik; Yoon, Won Sup; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To analyze the treatment outcomes, complications, prognostic factors after a long-term follow-up of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone or concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Between December 1981 and December 2006, 190 eligible patients with non-metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated at our department with a curative intent. Of these patients, 103 were treated with RT alone and 87 patients received CCRT. The median age was 49 years (range, 8-78 years). The distributions of clinical stage according to the AJCC 6th edition included I: 7 (3.6%), IIA: 8 (4.2%), IIB: 33 (17.4%), III: 82 (43.2%), IVA: 31 (16.3%), IVB: 29 (15.3%). The accumulated radiation doses to the primary tumor ranged from 66.6-87.0 Gy (median, 72 Gy). Treatment outcomes and prognostic factors were retrospectively analyzed. Acute and late toxicities were assessed using the RTOG criteria. A total of 96.8% (184/190) of patients completed the planned treatment. With a mean follow-up of 73 months (range, 2-278 months; median, 52 months), 93 (48.9%) patients had relapses that were local 44 (23.2%), nodal 13 (6.8%), or distant 49 (25.8%). The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 55.6% and 44.5%, 54.8% and 51.3%, in addition to 65.3% and 57.4%, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that CCRT, age, gender, and stage were significant prognostic factors for OS. The CCRT and gender were independent prognostic factors for both DFS and DSS. There was no grade 4 or 5 acute toxicity, but grade 3 mucositis and hematologic toxicity were present in 42 patients (22.1%) and 18 patients (9.5%), respectively. During follow-up, grade 3 hearing loss in 9 patients and trismus in 6 patients were reported. The results of our study were in accordance with findings of previous studies and we confirmed that CCRT, low stage, female gender, and young age were related to improvement in OS

  7. Radiation therapy in elderly patients; Radiotherapie et sujet age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durdux, C.; Boisserie, T. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Gisselbrecht, M. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service de Geriatrie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-10-15

    Cancer is a disease that predominantly occurs in older patients who represent a quarter of the population in western countries. Numerous types of cancer are observed in elderly people. Radiotherapy is one of the most powerful treatment against cancer. Most of published studies have demonstrated feasibility of radiotherapy in curative or palliative intent whatever cancer types are considered. Complete geriatric assessment and a multidisciplinary approach are the key points. The purpose of this review is to highlight sights of radiation oncology specifically related to aging. Particular emphasis is placed on logistic and technical aspects of radiation, as dose, irradiated volume and fractionation. (authors)

  8. Multifocal atherosclerosis in patient after acute first degree radiation sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metlyaeva N.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: assessment the heavy psychosomatic and all-somatic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular pathology of patient, transferred an acute I degree radiation sickness, from the general evenly gamma-beta radiation. Conclusions. The subdepressive and disturbing-depressive syndrome of patient, transferred an acute radiation sickness (ARS of I degree, from the general evenly gamma-beta radiation, was independent risk factor of development of multifocal atherosclerosis; Features of development of all-somatic and psychosomatic pathology of patient are based on a combination of genetic prerequisites, environment influences (the stress caused by accident on the ChNPP and social factors, influencing on him during a course of life, especially during early socialization. Thus at development of psychosomatic frustration the combination of feature of the mental reaction connected with the personal characteristic and special relationship between mental (stress and physiological (somatic by aspects of reaction which led to metabolism violation, to aging, decrease in adaptation opportunities of an organism and development age — dependent pathology took place.

  9. The changes in quality ingredients of Qi chrysanthemum flowers treated with elevated UV-B radiation at different growth stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaoqin; Chu, Jianzhou; He, Xueli; Ma, Chunhui; Han, Chao; Shen, Haiyu

    2015-05-01

    The paper mainly reported the changes in quality ingredients of Qi chrysanthemum flowers treated with elevated UV-B radiation at different growth stages. The experiment included two levels of UV-B radiation (ambient UV-B, a 10% increase in ambient UV-B). Elevated UV-B radiation was carried out for 10-days during seedling, vigorous growth, bud and flower stages of Qi chrysanthemum, respectively. Elevated UV-B treatments applied during four development stages did not significantly affect flower yield, the rate of superoxide radical production and malondialdehyde concentration in flowers, while increased free amino acid concentration. The amino acid concentration induced by elevated UV-B radiation applied during bud stage was higher than that during the other stages. Elevated UV-B radiation applied during vigorous growth (except for flavone), bud and flower stages of chrysanthemum significantly increased hydrogen peroxide concentration, phenylalanine ammonia lyase enzyme activity, vitamin C, chlorogenic acid and flavone concentrations in flowers. These results suggested that active and nutritional ingredients in flowers of chrysanthemum could be increased by elevated UV-B radiation applied during the later growth stages of chrysanthemum. The paper supplied a simple and environmental-friendly method to improve quality of medicinal plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 000 members who specialize in treating cancer with radiation therapies. ASTRO is dedicated to improving patient care through ... rtanswers.org © ASTRO 2016 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Gynecologic cancers include malignancies of ...

  11. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  12. Radiation Dose to the Esophagus From Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy, 1943-1996: An International Population-Based Study of 414 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamart, Stephanie, E-mail: stephanie.lamart@nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Simon, Steven L. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita E.; Howell, Rebecca M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Curtis, Rochelle E. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Aleman, Berthe M.P. [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Travis, Lois [Rubin Center for Cancer Survivorship and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Kwon, Deukwoo [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Morton, Lindsay M. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To provide dosimetric data for an epidemiologic study on the risk of second primary esophageal cancer among breast cancer survivors, by reconstructing the radiation dose incidentally delivered to the esophagus of 414 women treated with radiation therapy for breast cancer during 1943-1996 in North America and Europe. Methods and Materials: We abstracted the radiation therapy treatment parameters from each patient’s radiation therapy record. Treatment fields included direct chest wall (37% of patients), medial and lateral tangentials (45%), supraclavicular (SCV, 64%), internal mammary (IM, 44%), SCV and IM together (16%), axillary (52%), and breast/chest wall boosts (7%). The beam types used were {sup 60}Co (45% of fields), orthovoltage (33%), megavoltage photons (11%), and electrons (10%). The population median prescribed dose to the target volume ranged from 21 Gy to 40 Gy. We reconstructed the doses over the length of the esophagus using abstracted patient data, water phantom measurements, and a computational model of the human body. Results: Fields that treated the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were used for 85% of the patients and delivered the highest doses within 3 regions of the esophagus: cervical (population median 38 Gy), upper thoracic (32 Gy), and middle thoracic (25 Gy). Other fields (direct chest wall, tangential, and axillary) contributed substantially lower doses (approximately 2 Gy). The cervical to middle thoracic esophagus received the highest dose because of its close proximity to the SCV and IM fields and less overlying tissue in that part of the chest. The location of the SCV field border relative to the midline was one of the most important determinants of the dose to the esophagus. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients in this study received relatively high incidental radiation therapy doses to the esophagus when the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were treated, whereas direct chest wall, tangentials, and axillary fields contributed lower

  13. Severe radiation therapy-related soft tissue toxicity in a patient with porphyria cutanea tarda: a case report and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, G. Brandon; Anderson, Karl E.; Patel, Abhilasha J.; Gallegos, Juan; Hallberg, Csilla K.; Sood, Gagan; Hatch, Sandra S.; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Background Some porphyrias are associated with cutaneous phototoxicity due to photoactivation of porphyrins, but whether ionizing radiation can have an additive effect is not clear. We report a case of severe radiation therapy-related toxicity in a patient with porphyria cutanea tarda and review the literature. Methods A 50 year-old man with porphyria cutanea was treated for lower lip squamous cell carcinoma with definitive radiation therapy. During radiation therapy acute toxicity was of an expected onset and severity. Six months after treatment completion, he developed skin hypopigmentation, soft tissue fibrosis, and areas of painful denuded skin and crusting within the previous treatment field. Results Reports of 7 porphyria patients receiving radiation therapy to at least 9 separate sites were reviewed, with only one previous report suggestive of increased radiation therapy-related toxicity. Conclusions Based on this report and one other, caution is warranted when considering radiation therapy in patients with active porphyria. PMID:19536857

  14. Prevenção e controle das seqüelas bucais em pacientes irradiados por tumores de cabeça e pescoço Prevention and control of sequels in the mouth of patients treated with radiation therapy for head and neck tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Aparecida Cardoso

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A cirurgia e a radioterapia são os principais métodos de tratamento das neoplasias de cabeça e pescoço. Dentre os efeitos colaterais resultantes da interação da radiação ionizante sobre os tecidos, temos dermatite, mucosite, xerostomia, candidíase, alteração do paladar, disfagia, cárie, trismo e osteorradionecrose. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a condição odontológica dos pacientes, através de protocolo que permita impedir ou minimizar os efeitos da radiação sobre os tecidos da cavidade bucal. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Realizou-se acompanhamento odontológico, antes, durante e até 180 dias após a radioterapia, em 12 pacientes submetidos a cirurgia e radioterapia, ou radioterapia exclusiva. RESULTADOS: Efeitos como dermatite, mucosite, alteração do paladar e disfagia cresceram em proporção a partir da segunda semana de tratamento até o final das aplicações, decrescendo visivelmente quando do término, chegando próximos aos valores basais após 180 dias. Quanto à xerostomia, a redução ocorreu mais lentamente e com menor efetividade. Cárie, trismo e osteorradionecrose não foram observados durante o período de avaliação. CONCLUSÃO: O acompanhamento odontológico sistemático, junto com medidas preventivas como adequação bucal prévia, orientações sobre higienização, utilização de bochechos de água bicarbonatada, chá de camomila, aplicação tópica de flúor, contribuíram para promover melhores condições de restabelecimento em pacientes com neoplasia da região de cabeça e pescoço submetidos à radioterapia.Surgery and radiation therapy are de main treatments for head and neck cancer. The side effects of the interaction of ionizing radiation on the tissues include dermatitis, mucositis, xerostomia, candidiasis, dysgeusia, dysphagia, caries, trismus, osteoradionecrosis. OBJECTIVE: To assess dental condition of the patients using a protocol which allows avoiding or reducing the effects of radiation in the tissues of

  15. Intensive Care Unit Outcomes Among Patients With Cancer After Palliative Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruser, Jacqueline M; Rakhra, Sunpreet S; Sacotte, Ryan M; Wehbe, Firas H; Rademaker, Alfred W; Wunderink, Richard G; Kruser, Tim J

    2017-11-15

    To inform goals of care discussions at the time of palliative radiation therapy (RT) consultation, we sought to characterize intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes for patients treated with palliative RT compared to all other patients with metastatic cancer admitted to the ICU. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with metastatic cancer admitted to an ICU in a tertiary medical center from January 2010 to September 2015. We compared in-hospital mortality between patients who received palliative RT in the 12 months before admission and all other patients with metastatic cancer. We used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between receipt of palliative RT and in-hospital mortality, adjusting for patient characteristics and acute illness severity. Among 1424 patients with metastatic cancer, 11.3% (n=161) received palliative RT before ICU admission. In-hospital mortality was 36.7% for palliative RT patients, compared with 16.6% for other patients with metastatic cancer (Ppalliative RT was associated with increased in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 2.08, 95% confidence interval 1.34-3.21, P=.001), after adjusting for patient characteristics and severity of critical illness. Only 34 patients (21.1%) treated with palliative RT received additional cancer-directed treatment after ICU admission. For patients with metastatic cancer, prior treatment with palliative RT is associated with increased in-hospital mortality after ICU admission. Nearly half of patients previously treated with palliative RT either died during hospitalization or were discharged with hospice care, and few received further cancer-directed therapy. Palliative RT referral may represent an opportunity to discuss end-of-life treatment preferences with patients and families. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) controlled outcome of side effects caused by ionizing radiation, treated with 780 nm-diode laser -- preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, M; Bonel, H; Sroka, R; Schaffer, P M; Busch, M; Sittek, H; Reiser, M; Dühmke, E

    2000-12-01

    Ionizing radiation therapy by way of various beams such as electron, photon and neutron is an established method in tumor treatment. The side effects caused by this treatment such as ulcer, painful mastitis and delay of wound healing are well known, too. Biomodulation by low level laser therapy (LLLT) has become popular as a therapeutic modality for the