WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiation protection regulation

  1. Regulations in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    On the occasion of the twenty fifth anniversary of the Dutch Society for Radiation Protection, a symposium was held about Regulations in Radiation Protection. The program consisted of six contributions of which four are included in this publication. The posters presented are published in NVS-nieuws, 1985, vol. 11(5). (G.J.P.)

  2. Regulations for radiation protection in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    These Regulations specify that responsibility for applying radiation protection regulations in industrial radiography rests with the owner of the establishment who will designate a radiation protection officer to this effect. They provide for the organisation of radiation protection, including the measures to be observed, exposure limits, etc. The competent authority for these questions is the State Institute of Radiation Hygiene [fr

  3. Radiation Protection Ordinance 1989. Supplement with Radiation Protection Register Ordinance, general administration regulation pursuant to Sect. 45 Radiation Protection Ordinance, general administration regulation pursuant to Sect. 62 sub-sect. radiation passport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veith, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    The addendum contains regulations issued supplementary to the Radiation Protection Ordinance: The Radiation Protection Register as of April 3, 1990 including the law on the setting up of a Federal Office on Radiation Protection; the general administration regulation pursuant to Sect. 45 Radiation Protection Ordinance as of February 21, 1990; the general administration regulation pursuant to Sect. 62 sub-sect. 2 Radiation Protection Ordinance as of May 3, 1990 (AVV Radiation passport). The volume contains, apart from the legal texts, the appropriate decision by the Bundesrat, the official explanation from the Bundestag Publications as well as a comprehensive introduction into the new legal matter. (orig.) [de

  4. Radiation protection technology. Specific course for authorized radiation protection representatives according the qualification guidelines technology for the radiation protection regulations (StrlSchV) and X-ray regulation (RoeV). 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The specific course for authorized radiation protection representatives according the qualification guidelines technology for the radiation protection regulations (StrlSchV) and X-ray regulation (RoeV). Covers the following issues: radiation protection - generally; licenses and notifications; scientific fundamentals; dosimetry, surveillance, control, documentation; technical radiation protection; radiation protection calculations.

  5. Ionizing radiation protection regulation in Canada: the role of the Federal Provincial Territorial Radiation Protection Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, Christopher H.

    2008-01-01

    Canada has one of the broadest and most mature nuclear industries in the world, and is a world leader in uranium mining, and in the production of medical radioisotopes. The Canadian nuclear industry also includes: uranium milling, refining, and fuel fabrication facilities; nuclear generating stations; research reactors and related facilities; waste management facilities; and the use of radioactive materials in medicine and industry. Regulation of this broad and dynamic industry is a complex and challenging task. Canada has a cooperative system for the regulation of ionizing radiation protection covering federal, provincial, territorial, and military jurisdictions. A Federal/Provincial/Territorial Radiation Protection Committee (FPTRPC) exists to aid in cooperation between the various agencies. Their mandate encompasses regulation and guidance on all aspects of radiation protection: federal and provincial; NORM and anthropogenic; ionizing and non-ionizing. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is the federal nuclear regulator whose mandate includes radiation protection regulation of most occupational and public exposures. The CNSC does not regulate medical (patient) exposures, some aspects of NORM, or military applications. Provincial authorities are the primary regulators with respect to doses to patients and occupational doses arising from X-rays. Health Canada plays a role in X-ray device certification, development of national guidance (e.g. on radon) and direct regulation of certain federal facilities. NORM is regulated provincially, with varying regulatory mechanisms across the provinces and territories. Radiation protection regulation for National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces is performed by the Director General Nuclear Safety. This paper gives an overview of the structure of the regulation of ionizing radiation protection in Canada, and shares lessons learned, particularly with respect to the usefulness of the FPTRPC in helping coordinate and

  6. Federal radiation protection regulations: An industry viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harward, E.D.

    1987-01-01

    Regulations and standards to protect the public and workers from ionizing radiation have been in transition for a number of years, although most of the basic limits in use have remained essentially unchanged over the past 25 years or so. Legislation, political changes, new scientific data, advances in scientific concepts, and finally, public perception and resulting pressures have all been factors in the modifications that have been implemented or considered for radiation protection regulations in recent years. During this period, radiation exposures to both the public and the work force have been reduced through program management and improved technology. Based on activities of the AIF Subcommittee on Radiation Protection, this paper reviews pertinent NRC and EPA regulations, standards and guidance as well as NCRP recommendations and provide some analyses of these in terms of their potential effect on nuclear industry operations. Comments include suggestions where minor changes in Federal agency approaches to radiation regulation might be made for the public benefit

  7. Regulations for ionizing radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    General regulations and principles of radiation protection and safety are presented. In addition, the regulations for licensing and occupational and medical exposure as well as for safe transport of radioactive materials and wastes are given

  8. Updating radiation protection regulations in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.; El-Naggar, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this treatise is to present -the rational steps taken in the process of updating the Radiation Protection Regulations in Egypt. The contents of the review will include a historical synopsis, and the current state of art regarding competent authorities. Furthermore, the various committees formed with responsibilities for specific issues are indicated, including the role of the Ministry of Health (MOH), and that of the Atomic Energy Authority (AEA). Finally, the efforts made towards updating the radiation Protection Regulations in Egypt are highlighted. (author)

  9. Regulation on radiation protection health care of workers exposed to ionizing radiation. - Regulation on radiation protection health care - of the 25 Mar 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The present regulation will be in force on 1 July 1986 and supersedes a regulation from 29 September 1970. It regulates the medical surveillance with regard to radiation protection for all kinds of workers with an increased risk of being exposed to ionizing radiation such as e.g. reactor operators and miners. Examinations have to be performed according to directions of the SAAS including further measures if necessary regarding clinical occupational and radiation protection medicine. The task of the firms, the managers, the medical officers, and the SAAS are distinctly marked

  10. The development of radiation protection regulations in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusoff Ismail

    1995-01-01

    The paper begins by mentioning the established policy of the Government of Malaysia vis-a-vis protection against ionizing radiations as embodied in the Radioactive Substances Act 1968 and, later, the atomic Energy Licensing Act 1984. Then it turns to on the major events that influences the past, the present and the future development of the radiation protection regulations in Malaysia. it concludes with a vision where future Malaysia is seen drifting towards a consensus effort in radiation protection rendering self regulation the order of the day. (author)

  11. New legislative regulations for ensuring radiation protection using ionizing radiation sources in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, K.

    2018-01-01

    European Commission Directive No. 2013/59 / EURATOM laying down basic safety requirements for the provision of radiation protection regulates the provision of radiation protection for workers with radiation sources and residents in all areas of use of ionizing radiation sources. This Directive also addresses radiation protection in the use of ionizing radiation sources in medicine. The European Commission Directive regulates the requirements for radiation protection but also extends to its scope and provisions on the use of medical radiation sources (so-called m edical exposure ) in the scope of further legislation in the field of health care, which has to be amended and modified or possibly issued new. It was necessary in the preparation of the new act on radiation protection to amend simultaneously Act no. 576/2004 on the provision of health care and services related to provision of health care and Act no. 578/2004 on Health care Providers, Health care Professionals and Organizations in Health Care and to prepare a series of implementing regulations not only to the Law on Radiation Protection but also to the Laws governing the Provision of Health Care. The paper presents changes to existing legislation on radiation protection in medical radiation and new requirements for the construction and operation of health workplaces with radiation sources, the protection of the health of patients, the requirements for instrumentation used for medical radiation and radiological instrumentation tests. (authors)

  12. Radiation protection. Scientific fundamentals, legal regulations, practical applications. Compendium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchert, Guido; Gay, Juergen; Kirchner, Gerald; Michel, Rolf; Niggemann, Guenter; Schumann, Joerg; Wust, Peter; Jaehnert, Susanne; Strilek, Ralf; Martini, Ekkehard

    2011-06-01

    The compendium on radiation protection, scientific fundamentals, legal regulations and practical applications includes contributions to the following issues: (1) Effects and risk of ionizing radiation: fundamentals on effects and risk of ionizing radiation, news in radiation biology, advantages and disadvantages of screening investigations; (2) trends and legal regulations concerning radiation protection: development of European and national radiation protection laws, new regulations concerning X-rays, culture and ethics of radiation protection; (3) dosimetry and radiation measuring techniques: personal scanning using GHz radiation, new ''dose characteristics'' in practice, measuring techniques for the nuclear danger prevention and emergency hazard control; (4) radiation exposure in medicine: radiation exposure of modern medical techniques, heavy ion radiotherapy, deterministic and stochastic risks of the high-conformal photon radiotherapy, STEMO project - mobile CT for apoplectic stroke patients; (5) radiation exposure in technology: legal control of high-level radioactive sources, technical and public safety using enclosed radioactive sources for materials testing, radiation exposure in aviation, radon in Bavaria, NPP Fukushima-Daiichi - a status report; (6) radiation exposure in nuclear engineering: The Chernobyl accident - historical experiences or sustaining problem? European standards for radioactive waste disposal, radioactive material disposal in Germany risk assessment of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation (7) Case studies.

  13. Radiation protection and the laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Takuo

    1980-01-01

    In hospitals and clinics, when cobalt remote irradiation apparatuses, betatrons and linear accelerators are installed, the provisions of medical and radiation injury prevention laws and other related laws and regulations must be observed. The following matters are described: the laws and regulations concerning the prevention of radiation injuries, the definitions of the therapeutical equipments, the radiation protection standards for such facilities, radiation exposure dose and permissible dose, the procedures concerning the application before usage, the responsibilities of hospitals and clinics for radiation measurement and management, and shielding and shield calculations. (J.P.N.)

  14. The USA prepares to change its radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is preparing to revise its basic regulation on protection of people from ionizing radiation. The current regulation, ''Standards for protection against radiation'' -commonly referred to as ''Part 20'' - was originally published for comment in 1955. The regulation was based on early recommendations from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In 1977, the ICRP made major changes in its recommendations, known as ICRP-26. In 1990, the NRC Commissioners approved a new Part 20 reflecting ICRP-26, but improvements are to be specified and considered before a new regulation is published. (author)

  15. The general principles of radiation protection and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurengo, A.; Cesarini, J.P.; Lecomte, J.F.; Barbier, G.; Crescini, D.; Biau, A.; Blain, A.; Bailloeuil, C.; Gonin, M.; Bergot, D.

    2003-01-01

    Seven articles constitute this chapter about the radiation protection and the regulation. Radiological risk, reduction of public exposure to ultraviolet radiations, regulation for the radon, evolution of the French legislation against the dangers of ionizing radiations, the medical follow up after the professional life, the information system to reproduce the dosimetric data of workers, proposition of a scale to classify the radiations incidents in function of their seriousness. (N.C.)

  16. Pakistan nuclear safety and radiation protection regulation 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In this act regulations of nuclear safety and radiation protection in Pakistan has been explained. A legal and licensing procedure to handle protection of nuclear materials, processing storage of radioactive products has been described under this regulation. In these regulations full explanation of accidental exposure, delegation of powers and record keeping/waste disposal of radioactive has been given. (A.B.)

  17. Radiation protection - Revision of French radiation protection regulations (1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayoux, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    This article analyses the recent amendments to the 1966 and 1975 Decrees on general radiation protection principles and radiation protection of workers in large nuclear installations respectively and also describes national radiation protection law. In particular, the amendments incorporate the revised EURATOM basic radiation protection standards and the new international units (sievert and becquerel replace rem and curie) in the Decrees. (NEA) [fr

  18. Radiation protection for nurses. Regulations and guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    Rules and regulations of federal agencies and state radiation protection programs provide the bases for hospital policy regarding radiation safety for nurses. Nursing administrators should work with the radiation safety officer at their institutions to ensure that radiation exposures to staff nurses will be as low as reasonably achievable and that special consideration will be given to pregnant nurses. Nurses' fears about their exposure to radiation can be greatly reduced through education

  19. Regulation on protection against ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This regulation has as the objective to establish the criteria tending toward protecting the health of the population of the radiologic risks that can be derive from the employment of the ionizing radiations and similar activities. It establishes the requirements to comply with the radiactive installations, equipment transmitters of ionizing radiations, personal that works in them, operate the equipment and carry out any another similar activity such as: production, importation, exportation, transportation, transference of radioactive material or equipment generators of radiations ionizing. (S. Grainger) [es

  20. A general description of the Swedish radiation protection regulations of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staalnacke, C.-G.

    2001-01-01

    The regulation of ionizing radiation in Sweden is based on both the Radiation Protection Act and Ordinance from 1998. The Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI) acts as the regulatory authority for radiation safety and issues detailed regulations in specific areas. The report summarizes how the SSI controls radiation sources, including orphan sources for which a process for analyzing their occurrence has started in Sweden. A number of proposed procedures for the control and follow-up of sealed radioactive sources is provided. (author)

  1. Desirable changes in the legal radiation protection regulations in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holeczke, F.

    1988-01-01

    The complexity of the Austrian Radiation Protection Law ranging from nuclear reactors up to odontoradiographs hampers its amendment so that merely an amendment of the Radiation Protection Ordinance seems to be feasible. Suggestions for amendments should orient themselves along experience made in practice. In particular amendments of the regulations on the period for safekeeping the records in radiodiagnostics, on the final examination of persons exposed to radiation in the case of termination of employment as well as of Sec. 34, 41 Subsec. 2 and Sec. 62, Subsec. 1 would be desirable. The latter concern technical regulations, the monitored area and the equipment for the soft-ray technique. (DG) [de

  2. Legal and technical regulations in radiation protection and their effects on radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betz, B.

    1975-01-01

    During the last few years, new regulations and guidelines in the field of radiation protection have been issued which affect radiotherapy, too. On September 1st, 1973 the X-ray Ordinance became effective; a few weeks later, new guidelines for radiation protections when using radioactive substances in the field of medicine were published. Of particular topical interest is the appendix of these new guidelines, in which the principles of technical competence in radiation protection when handling radioactive substances in the field of medicine are laid down uniformly for the FRG. Amongst these more recent regulations, there is also the direction by the Minister of the Interior to put the operation of accelerators in the field of medicine according to section 19 of the Atomic Energy Act under the supervision of the state and to employ newly issued administrative guidelines. After a short survey on the radiation protection laws in force, a selection of important stipulations within the new legal regulations and guidelines is discussed with a view to their effects on radiotherapy. (orig./LN) [de

  3. New requirements embodied in expert knowledge regulations for industrial radiation protection officers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, H.G.

    2001-01-01

    Expert knowledge standards and certification requirements of health physics responsible persons or radiation safety officers in industry or in health care are laid down in Germany in administrative regulations. Now the new Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrlSchV) contains a specific section exclusively devoted to all aspects of expert knowledge in industrial radiation protection, which inter alia demonstrates the special significance of education and further training of radiation protection specialists. It is expected that the forthcoming new X-ray Ordinance (RoeV) will contain a similar amendment. The article explains the implications of the new Radiation Protection Ordinance for the education and further training of industrial radiation protection officers, but does not address specific aspects of nuclear engineering. (orig./CB) [de

  4. The Radiation Protection Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, L.

    1989-01-01

    The new Radiation Protection Act (1988:220) entered into force in Sweden on July 1st, 1988. This book presents the Act as well as certain regulations connected to it. As previously, the main responsibility for public radiation protection will rest with one central radiation protection authority. According to the 1988 Act, the general obligations with regard to radiation protection will place a greater responsibility than in the past on persons carrying out activities involving radiation. Under the act, it is possible to adjust the licensing and supervisory procedures to the level of danger of the radiation source and the need for adequate competence, etc. The Act recognises standardised approval procedures combined with technical regulations for areas where the risks are well known. The Act contains several rules providing for more effective supervision. The supervising authority may in particular decide on the necessary regulations and prohibitions for each individual case. The possibilities of using penal provisions have been extended and a rule on the mandatory execution of orders has been introduced. The Ordinance on Radiation Protection (1988:293) designates the National Institute of Radiation Protection (SSI) as the central authority referred to in the Radiation Protection Act. The book also gives a historic review of radiation protection laws in Sweden, lists regulations issued by SSI and presents explanations of radiation effects and international norms in the area. (author)

  5. The national radiation protection infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastauskas, A.

    1999-01-01

    The state system of radiation protection is still being created after Lithuania regained its independancy and in connection with recommendations laid in the ICRP-60 publication and requirements of legislation of European Community. A new regulation institutions was established and a number of laws and regulations related to radiation protection was prepared. The Radiation Protection Centre of Ministry of Health is the regulatory authority responsible for radiation protection of public and of workers using sources of ionizing radiation in Lithuania. A new Radiation Protection Law, Nuclear Energy Law, Radioactive Waste Management Law and different regulations was approved. Preparation of legislation, creation of state system of radiation protection and its upgrading allow to presume that the necessary level of radiation protection is to be achieved. (au)

  6. Regulations under the Radiation Protection and Control Act, 1982, No. 221 of 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    These Regulations made under the Radiation Protection and Control Act of 1982, amend several numerical quotations contained in the Radiation Safety (Transport) Regulations, No. 27, 1984, also made under the above mentioned Act. (NEA) [fr

  7. Radiation protection: Principles, recommendations and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitan, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation protection is a highly international dicipline with a high degree of international harmonization. Especially within the Nordic countries there is general agreement upon principles and standards, despite the actual practice may differ slightly. The basic recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) are accepted by the regulatory bodies and should be followed by all users of radiation. The users are in principle responsible for the radiation protection standard and activities themselves. Because most companies or hospitals lack sufficient expertise by themselves, they must rely upon recommendations from others. Primarily they should contact the national radiation protection agency. However, due to the international harmonization of radiation protection, information from other national or international agencies may be used with confidence. All users of radiation in the Nordic countries are obliged to act according to recognition and assessment of both risks and benefits, and they are responsible for updating their knowledge

  8. 26183 - Royal Decree 2519/1982 of 12 August approving the Regulations on Protection Against Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This Royal Decree approves the Regulations on Protection against Ionizing Radiation. The purpose of the Regulations is to implement the radiation protection principles laid down in the framework Act on Nuclear Energy of 29th April 1964, as amended. They supersede all existing national rules in the same field and contain administrative and technical provisions governing nuclear and radioactive installations and activities, including the use of radiation-emitting equipment. They were made in compliance with the most recent international regulations on radiation protection and safety, in particular the Recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); the Regulations also take into account the recent Euratom Directives. (NEA) [fr

  9. Radiation protection in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, H.

    1990-01-01

    Switzerland's present radiation protection regulations are based on only two paragraphs of the atomic law but have been very successful in practice. A new radiation protection law, separated from nuclear legislation and valid for all application of ionizing radiation and radioctive materials, was proposed and drafted by the Federal Commission on Radiation Protection and has now been accepted by parliament with only minor modifications. The draft of the revised regulations which also will cover all applications, should be ready for consultations next year. Both the law (which contains principles but no figures such as limits) and the regulations incorporate the latest state of ICRP recommendations and are formulated in such a way as to allow application of or quick adaptation to the new basic ICRP recommendation expected for 1991. The legislation is flexible, with a relatively low regulation density and leaves sufficient room for professional judgement on a case by case basis both for authorities and for the specialists responsible for radiation protection in practice. (orig./HSCH)

  10. From regulations towards radiation protection culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehler, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    Compliance with the technical standards and specifications is a necessary but not sufficient condition for quality in radiation protection. Reaching this quality objective is not a matter of forcing improvements by a regulatory policy of reducing dose limits, but of promoting a real radiation protection culture. The spread of such a radiological protection culture encourages the deliberate adoption in everyday practice of behaviour likely to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation as loser as reasonably achievable. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that the need to diffuse a radiological protection culture is inspired by the philosophy behind the system recommended by ICPR Publication 60 on the management of residual radiological risk and, in particular by the behavioural and incentive approach implied by the optimization principle. Special attention will be given to the fundamentals likely to contribute in a definition of radiation protection culture. (author)

  11. [Radiation protection. Implications for clinical practice on the new regulations governing roentgen ray irradiation and radioprotection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, U; Berlich, J

    2006-08-01

    In 2001 or 2002, the legislator made substantial alterations to the "Röntgenverordnung" [regulations governing use of roentgen ray radiation] and "Strahlenschutzverordnung" [regulations governing radiation protection]. This was done to bring German law in line with EU Directives 96/29/Euratom (basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiation) and 97/43/Euratom (health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionizing radiation in relation to medical exposure). Proper use of radiation in medicine requires that those involved in its application are aware of the biological effect of radiation. When staff and others are protected good organization and appropriate technology at the workplace can achieve a great deal. In the new directives, the radiation protection for the patient is quantified and the responsibility of the physician is clearly pointed out. The most important aim is uniform quality throughout Europe in radiological diagnosis and radiation protection.

  12. Radiation protection: Scientific fundamentals, legal regulations, practical applications. Compendium. 8. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchert, G.; Czarwinski, R.; Martini, E.; Ruehle, H.; Wust, P.

    2003-01-01

    In 2003, radiation effects and radiation risks were again a central issue, with new biokinetic and dosimetric models. Preliminary experience with new legal regulations on radiation protection was a central issue. Dosimetry and radiation protection metrology were gone into, as was radiation exposure in medicine, engineering, and the environment. New diagnostic methods in medicine were presented, and radiation exposures resulting from some of these techniques were analyzed. Industrial applications of ionising radiation and technical radiography were presented. Nuclear engineering was covered as well, e.g. how to maintain the current know-how after the agreed nuclear phase-out, the transport of spent fuel elements, and the safety of nuclear power stations in eastern Europe. As in the years before, detection limits in radiation measurement, calculations of radiation exposure, incidents in nuclear facilities, and radiation exposure assessment after safety-relevant incidents were among the issues discussed. (orig.)

  13. The executive regulations of the decree-law no. 31 of the year 2002 concerning radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Laws No.31 of the year 2002 of the State of Qatar is composed of five parts. Part 1 includes articles dealing with definition of terms (Chapter 1) and application and scope of the regulations (Chapter 2). Part 2 deals with licensing (Chapter 1) and inspections aspects (Chapter 2) of the regulations. Article 1 defines legal terms and radiation protection concepts in the context of this regulation. Article 2 describes practices that are covered by these regulations which include: 1. production of radiation sources; extraction and treatment of radioactive raw materials; and use of radiation or radioactive materials for medical, industrial, agricultural, training or scientific research purposes or others, including any activities relating to such use and involve or may involve radiation exposure; 2. practices involving natural sources of radiation which lead to greater dose than that prescribed for workers or the public, and which cannot be ignored from the perspective of radiation protection; 3. any other practice to be determined by the Council and which involves risks from: occupational exposure, medical exposure, public exposure, potential exposure, chronic exposure, or emergency exposure; and intervention in case of an emergency radiation or chronic exposure. Article 3 defines practices that are exempted from the requirements set out in these Regulations. Article 4, 5 and 6 deal with the principles of protection, dose limits and ideal protection and safety. Part 3 consists of 3 chapters: Chapter 1 describes Occupational Exposure Protection and Radiation Work Places, Chapter 2 describes Medical Exposure Protection and Chapter 3 describes Public Exposure. Part 4, consists of 3 chapters: Chapter 1 describes General Requirements For Safety Management and Performance, Chapter 2 describes Radiation Sources Safety and Accidents, and Chapter 3 describes Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials. Part 5 consists of 2 chapters: Chapter 1 describes

  14. Further European initiatives and regulations concerning radiation protection: drinking water guideline, maximum permissible contamination in food products and feeding stuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundigl, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The radiation protection community has observed intensively the development of basic safety standards concerning protection against hazards of ionizing radiation. The new core part of the European radiation protection legislation is complemented by several specialized regulations relevant for radiation protection. Besides the existing regulations in the field of emergency protection the European Commission initiated a drinking water guideline that will be published in the near future. Furthermore the European commission approved a revised regulation concerning the maximum permissible contamination limits for food products and feeding stuff in case of a future nuclear accident. Together with the new radiation protection basic standards a new complete, coherent and modernized European regulation package will be accomplished.

  15. Converting the GSR part3 into a national regulations for the protection and safety of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatim, Abdulrahman

    2016-04-01

    The achievement and maintenance of a high level of Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources depends on a sound legal and governmental infrastructure, including a regulatory body with well-defined responsibilities and functions. The project aimed at converting the IAEA GRS Part 3 into National regulations in Sudan for the protection against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation and safety of radiation sources. The regulations developed covered general requirements for radiation protection, verification of safety, planned exposure situations, emergency exposure situations and existing exposure situation. The Government of Sudan is expected to empower the Sudanese Nuclear Radiological Regulatory Authority (SNRAA) and other relevant authorities to undertake the conversion of IAEA GSR Part 3 into national regulations to be used to regulate all facilities and activities in Sudan. (au)

  16. Radiation protection at workplaces with increased natural radiation exposure in Greece: recording, monitoring and protection measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potiriadis, C.; Koukoliou, V.

    2002-01-01

    Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) is the regulatory, advisory and competent authority on radiation protection matters. It is the authority responsible for the introduction of Radiation Protection regulations and monitoring of their implementation. In 1997, within the frame of its responsibilities the Board of the GAEC appointed a task group of experts to revise and bring the present Radiation Protection Regulations into line with the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) 96/29/Euratom Directive and the 97/43/Euratom Directive (on health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure). Concerning the Title 7. of the new European BSS Directive, which refers to the Radiation Protection at work places with increased levels of natural radiation exposure, the Radiation Protection Regulations provides that the authority responsible for recording, monitoring and introducing protection measures at these places is the GAEC. Practices where effective doses to the workers due to increased natural radiation levels, may exceed 1mSv/y, have to be specified and authorised by the GAEC. The identification procedure is ongoing

  17. Radiation protection. Scientific fundamentals, legal regulations, practical applications. Compendium; Strahlenschutz. Wissenschaftliche Grundlagen, Rechtliche Regelungen, Praktische Anwendungen. Kompendium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchert, Guido; Gay, Juergen; Kirchner, Gerald; Michel, Rolf; Niggemann, Guenter; Schumann, Joerg; Wust, Peter; Jaehnert, Susanne; Strilek, Ralf; Martini, Ekkehard (eds.)

    2011-06-15

    The compendium on radiation protection, scientific fundamentals, legal regulations and practical applications includes contributions to the following issues: (1) Effects and risk of ionizing radiation: fundamentals on effects and risk of ionizing radiation, news in radiation biology, advantages and disadvantages of screening investigations; (2) trends and legal regulations concerning radiation protection: development of European and national radiation protection laws, new regulations concerning X-rays, culture and ethics of radiation protection; (3) dosimetry and radiation measuring techniques: personal scanning using GHz radiation, new ''dose characteristics'' in practice, measuring techniques for the nuclear danger prevention and emergency hazard control; (4) radiation exposure in medicine: radiation exposure of modern medical techniques, heavy ion radiotherapy, deterministic and stochastic risks of the high-conformal photon radiotherapy, STEMO project - mobile CT for apoplectic stroke patients; (5) radiation exposure in technology: legal control of high-level radioactive sources, technical and public safety using enclosed radioactive sources for materials testing, radiation exposure in aviation, radon in Bavaria, NPP Fukushima-Daiichi - a status report; (6) radiation exposure in nuclear engineering: The Chernobyl accident - historical experiences or sustaining problem? European standards for radioactive waste disposal, radioactive material disposal in Germany risk assessment of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation (7) Case studies.

  18. Measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations required for revised radiation protection regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Kojima, Noboru; Hayashi, Naomi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Radiation protection regulations based on the 1990 recommendations of ICRP have been revised and will take effect from Apr., 2001. The major changes concerning on the measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations are as follows. (1) Personal dose equivalent and ambient dose equivalent stated in ICRP Publication 74 are introduced as quantities to be measured with personal dosimeters and survey instruments, respectively. (2) For multiple dosimetry for workers, the compartment weighting factors used for a realistic assessment of effective dose are markedly changed. In advance of the introduction of the new radiation protection regulations, the impacts on workplace and personal monitoring for external radiations by these revisions were investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) A new ambient dose equivalent to neutrons is higher with a factor of 1.2 than the old one for moderated fission neutron spectra. Therefore, neutron dose equivalent monitors for workplace monitoring at MOX fuel for facilities should be recalibrated for measurement of the new ambient dose equivalent. (2) Annual effective doses of workers were estimated by applying new calibration factors to readings of personal dosimeters, worn by workers. Differences between effective doses and effective dose equivalents are small for workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX fuel. (author)

  19. Measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations required for revised radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Kojima, Noboru; Hayashi, Naomi

    2001-01-01

    Radiation protection regulations based on the 1990 recommendations of ICRP have been revised and will take effect from Apr., 2001. The major changes concerning on the measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations are as follows. (1) Personal dose equivalent and ambient dose equivalent stated in ICRP Publication 74 are introduced as quantities to be measured with personal dosimeters and survey instruments, respectively. (2) For multiple dosimetry for workers, the compartment weighting factors used for a realistic assessment of effective dose are markedly changed. In advance of the introduction of the new radiation protection regulations, the impacts on workplace and personal monitoring for external radiations by these revisions were investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) A new ambient dose equivalent to neutrons is higher with a factor of 1.2 than the old one for moderated fission neutron spectra. Therefore, neutron dose equivalent monitors for workplace monitoring at MOX fuel for facilities should be recalibrated for measurement of the new ambient dose equivalent. (2) Annual effective doses of workers were estimated by applying new calibration factors to readings of personal dosimeters, worn by workers. Differences between effective doses and effective dose equivalents are small for workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX fuel. (author)

  20. Statutory Instruments No 144 of 1994. European Communities (Protection of outside workers from ionising radiation) Regulations, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    These Regulations implement Council Directive 90/641 EURATOM of 4 December, 1990 on the operational protection of outside workers exposed to the risk of ionising radiation during their activities in controlled areas. The Regulations provide for the radiation protection of workers liable to receive an exposure of high radiation levels while working away from their employers' premises. The Regulations also apply to workers who come from, or who go to work in, another Member State of the European Community

  1. Ethical issues in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Lars

    2000-03-01

    Ethical theories are relevant to the current recommendations and standards for radiation protection. Radiation protection is not only a matter for science. It is also a problem of philosophy. In order for protection regulations to be respected, it must correspond to widely accepted ethical values among those who are affected by the regulations. The workshop covered the following issues: Problems in Present Protection Policy, ICRP Protection Policy - A Historical Perspective, Radiation Risk - What we know and what we believe, Present ICRP Recommendations, Ethical Values in the Context of ICRP Recommendations, Collective Responsibility for Invisible Harm, Environmental Protection - Ethical Issues, The Global Change of Values, and Procedural justice and Radiation Protection. Six workshop contributions and a workshop summary are presented in this report

  2. Ethical issues in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Lars (ed.)

    2000-03-15

    Ethical theories are relevant to the current recommendations and standards for radiation protection. Radiation protection is not only a matter for science. It is also a problem of philosophy. In order for protection regulations to be respected, it must correspond to widely accepted ethical values among those who are affected by the regulations. The workshop covered the following issues: Problems in Present Protection Policy, ICRP Protection Policy - A Historical Perspective, Radiation Risk - What we know and what we believe, Present ICRP Recommendations, Ethical Values in the Context of ICRP Recommendations, Collective Responsibility for Invisible Harm, Environmental Protection - Ethical Issues, The Global Change of Values, and Procedural justice and Radiation Protection. Six workshop contributions and a workshop summary are presented in this report.

  3. XXX. Days of Radiation Protection. Conference Proceedings of the 30-th Days of Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-11-15

    The publication has been set up as a proceedings of the conference dealing with health protection during work with ionizing radiation for different activities which involve the handling of ionizing radiation sources. The main conference topics are focused on current problems in radiation protection and radioecology. In this proceedings totally 107 papers are published. The Conference consists of following sections: Effects of ionizing radiation; Regulation of radiation protection; Dosimetry and Metrology of ionizing radiation; Radiation protection in nuclear Power plants; Medical exposure and radiation protection in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiation oncology; Natural radioactivity issues in radiation protection; Education, societal aspects and public involvement in radiation protection, trends and perspectives.

  4. XXX. Days of Radiation Protection. Conference Proceedings of the 30-th Days of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    The publication has been set up as a proceedings of the conference dealing with health protection during work with ionizing radiation for different activities which involve the handling of ionizing radiation sources. The main conference topics are focused on current problems in radiation protection and radioecology. In this proceedings totally 107 papers are published. The Conference consists of following sections: Effects of ionizing radiation; Regulation of radiation protection; Dosimetry and Metrology of ionizing radiation; Radiation protection in nuclear Power plants; Medical exposure and radiation protection in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiation oncology; Natural radioactivity issues in radiation protection; Education, societal aspects and public involvement in radiation protection, trends and perspectives

  5. Revised technical regulations on radiation protection and safety of 30 September 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    These revised technical regulations were made in implementation of Section 4 of Decree No 7/9038 of 30 November 1974 on radiation health and safety and lay down in detail the requirements to be met in Turkey for the use of all types of radiation sources. They set out protection plans and specify the protective equipment to be used as well as the controlled areas, i.e. areas in which radiation sources are used and which must be subject to special safety measures. Finally to obtain a license, users of radiation sources must fill in forms, the models of which are provided, giving their particulars and the specifications of the intended use and activity of the sources. (NEA) [fr

  6. Radiation protection in Qatar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Maadheed, Khalid; Al Khatibeh, Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The State of Qatar has become a member State of IAEA since 1974. Later the Department of Industrial Development (DID) beam the focal point and the competent authority regarding all aspects of the peaceful application of Nuclear Technology. In July, 2000 the Supreme Council was established and charged with all matters related to environmental protection. The Supreme Council joined the IAEA Projects on upgrading protection infrastructure in West Asia region. A preliminary research was initiated to discover where radiation sources are being used, and the legal framework, if any, to regulate their use. The research indicated that radiation sources were being used in the industrial practices (well logging, industrial radiography and nuclear gauges) and in medical practices (mainly diagnostic radiology). The research also indicated that there was virtually no legal framework to regulate them. In less than five years, the State of Qatar was able to issue the radiation protection law, three sets of regulations, namely: Radiation Protection Regulations, Radioactive Waste Management Regulations and the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials Regulations. In addition, several specific regulation work, dose limits and radiation protection officers were issued. A radiation Protection Department, comprising three sections was established. We are providing individual exposure monitoring for most of the radiation workers in the public sector and some in the private sector. We have set up a proper licensing and inspections procedures, where our inspectors are enforcing the law. More recently, we established an early warning network for nuclear of radiological emergencies, consisting of 6 transplantable stations, five mobile stations and two navigating stations. This year, the network was augmented with five fixed station and an advanced early warning centre, which provides early warning via multiple means (MMS, Fax, E-mail and audio alarms). Last year we signed a nuclear

  7. Regulations No. 187 of 31 May 1988 amending section 7 of the regulations on protective measures during work involving ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These regulations amend regulations No. 1157 of 14 Jun 1985 on protective measures during radiation work. Henceforth workers simultaneously exposed to radiation and cytostatic substances must be given special work instructions to secure their safety. (NEA) [fr

  8. [Radiation protection in orthopaedics: implications for clinical practice of the new regulations governing roentgen ray irradiation and radioprotection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, U; Berlich, J

    2006-05-01

    In 2001 or 2002, the legislator made substantial alterations to the "Röntgenverordnung" [regulations governing use of roentgen ray radiation] and "Strahlenschutzverordnung" [regulations governing radiation protection]. This was done to bring German law in line with EU Directives 96/29/Euratom (basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiation) and 97/43/Euratom (health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionizing radiation in relation to medical exposure). Proper use of radiation in medicine requires that those involved in its application are aware of the biological effects of radiation. When staff and others are protected good organization and appropriate technology at the workplace can achieve a great deal. In the new directives, the radiation protection for the patient is quantified and the responsibility of the physician is clearly pointed out. The most important aim is uniform quality throughout Europe in radiological diagnosis and radiation protection.

  9. Radiation protection law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, J.

    1981-01-01

    This article first reviews the general radiation protection law at international and national level, with particular reference to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) which, although not mandatory, are nevertheless taken into consideration by international organisations establishing basic radiation protection standards such as the UN, IAEA, NEA and Euratom, at Community level, and by national legislation. These standards are therefore remarkably harmonized. Radiation protection rule applied in France for the different activities and uses of radioactive substances are then described, and finally, a description is given of the regulations governing artificial radioisotopes and radioactive effluents. (NEA) [fr

  10. Guideline for radiation protection in veterinary medicine. Guideline relating to the Ordinance for Protection Against Damage Through Ionising Radiation (Radiation Protection Ordinance - StrlSchV) and the Ordinance for Protection Against X-Ray Radiation (X-Ray Ordinance - RoeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalczak, H.

    2005-05-01

    The Guideline on ''Radiation Protection in Veterinary Medicine'' primarily addresses the supreme Land authorities that are responsible for radiation protection. Its purpose is to harmonise the radiation protection procedures employed by the Laender, thus establishing a nationwide uniform system for monitoring the handling of radioactive substances and ionising radiation applications in veterinary medicine on the basis of the legal regulations in force. In addition the guideline is intended to serve veterinary staff as a source of practical information which explains the radiation protection requirements stipulated by the legal regulations and technical rules. This concerns in particular the rules for the acquisition of the necessary radiation protection skills or the necessary knowledge of radiation protection by the veterinary surgeon performing the application or the staff cooperation in the application

  11. Radiation protection in Bolivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Cuadros, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation protection in Bolivia has gone through a number of stages. Initially, in the 1970s, the focus was mainly on the analysis of environmental sources resulting from the nuclear tests carried out by France in the Pacific Ocean. Subsequently, the focus switched somewhat to radiation protection in connection with the mining of uranium and in the area of public health. During the third stage, radiation protection in other areas became important as the use of radiation sources was introduced. Finally, during the present -- fourth -- stage, radiation protection regulations are being introduced and mechanisms for the control of radiation sources are being established. (author)

  12. The principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of radiation protection is to avoid or to reduce the risks linked to ionizing radiation. In order to reduce these risks, the radiation protection uses three great principles: justification, optimization and limitation of radiation doses. to apply these principles, the radiation protection has regulatory and technical means adapted to three different categories of people: public, patients and workers. The nuclear safety authority elaborates the regulation, and carries out monitoring of the reliable application of radiation protection system. (N.C.)

  13. Rules and regulations of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The finality of this legislative text is to guarantee the radiation protection of the exposed personnel, of the people in general and the environment against the ionizing radiations risks. Its scope includes all the natural and juridical persons that work with ionizing radiation sources into the peruvian territory

  14. Royal Order of 22 April 1974 on Establishment of Fees in Implementation of Regulations on Protection at Work, Protection against Hazardous Equipment and Ionizing Radiations and amending the General Regulations on Protection at Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This Order was made in implementation of the Act of 3 December 1969 empowering the King to establish fees in application of regulations on protection at work, dangerous equipment and ionizing radiations. In particular, it sets fees for the licensing procedure for establishment classified according to the General Regulations for the Protection of the Population and Workers against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations of 28 February 1963. (NEA) [fr

  15. Regulation and inspection support radiation protection in nuclear and other installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.K.; Potter, C.; Harbison, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Over the past fifty years, radiation protection legislation in the UK has developed from a narrow industry-specific base to a comprehensive package of regulations and supporting Approved Code of Practice, with additional provisions for nuclear installations. Development of this legislation mirrors progress in international understanding about the risks from exposure to ionising radiation. The current Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 largely implement the Euratom 1980 Basic Safety Standards Directive and place particular emphasis on the need to keep exposure as low as reasonably practicable. The regulations have been underpinned by the development of the concept of the Tolerability of Risk and the application of the ALARP/ALARA principle, particularly at nuclear installations. Analysis of dose data on HSE's Central Index of Dose Information has shown the general success of this approach in the UK; the data have also allowed targeting of inspection effort. Currently, the Health and Safety Commission and Executive are developing plans for implementing the revised EU Basic Safety Standards Directive. (author)

  16. Health regulations about radiation oncology in Spain: The legislative dilemma between radiation protection and treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esco, R.; Biete, A.; Pardo, J.; Carceller, J.A.; Veira, C.; Palacios, A.; Vazquez, M.G.

    2001-01-01

    The Royal Decree 1566/1998 of July 17th establishes the criteria on quality in radiation therapy and is a cornerstone in Spanish regulation of this medical field. The Royal Decree gives some rules that, from a medical point of view, are considered as a good practice. Radiation protection of patients is necessary to achieve a high quality radiation oncology treatments. That is the reason why Royal decree 1566/1998 is titled 'quality criteria in radiation therapy'. A quality control program must be tailored to every single radiation oncology department and, for this reason, its standardization is difficult. Nevertheless, some medical procedures are defined by the royal decree and such procedures are the minimum criteria that all the departments must follow in the development of its own quality control program. The authors make some reflections about health regulations about radiation oncology in Spain, pointing out that a legislative dilemma between radiation protection and treatment of cancer due to application of the legislative rules may occur. The social and medical cost of rigid bureaucratic procedures is pointed out. A large amount of equipment controls and measurements takes time that could be used in treating patients. This is more important in an environment of limited technical and human resources. (author)

  17. Level of compliance with the radiation protection regulation-A survey among Norwegian hospitals and X-ray institutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friberg, E. G.; Widmark, A.; Solberg, M.; Woehni, T.

    2011-01-01

    To identify the level of compliance with the new radiation protection regulation among Norwegian health care enterprises (HCEs). Totally, 41 HCEs were authorised to use advanced X-ray equipment for medical purposes during 2005-07. Follow-up inspections with 14 HCEs were carried out during 2007-09. Main topics for the inspections were those requirements identified as most challenging to implement in the authorisation process. Totally, 192 non-conformities with the regulation were revealed during the authorisation process. The inspections revealed that 93 % of the inspected HCEs had non-conformities with the regulation. Most common non-conformities dealt with skills in radiation protection, establishment of local diagnostic reference levels, access to medical physicists and performance of quality control of X-ray equipment. Inspections are an effective tool for implementation of regulation the requirements at the HCEs, thus improving radiation protection awareness. (authors)

  18. Actual global problems of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.

    1995-01-01

    Personal views on some actual problems in radiation protection are given in this paper. Among these problems are: evolution methodology used in radiation protection regulations; radiation protection, nuclear energy and safety, and new approaches to the process of the hazardous substances management. An interesting fact relating to the X-ray, radiation protection and Nikola Tesla are given also. (author)

  19. Occupational radiation protection legislation in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.; Schlesinger, T.; Lemesch, C.

    1980-01-01

    A committee of experts appointed by the Minister of Labour and Social Affairs has proposed a comprehensive draft regulation, concerning the legal aspects of occupational radiation protection in Israel. The first section of the proposed regulation sets forth guidelines for control in facilities where workers handle radioactive materials or radiation equipment. This includes the duties of the managers of such places to ensure adequate radiation protection and also the maximum recommended doses (whole body and individual organs) for radiation workers. The second section deals with the monitoring regulations for radiation workers who may be exposed to doses in excess of 500 mRem/y. The third section outlines the nature of the mechanical supervision required, i.e. routine and special examinations. Finally the committee also proposed six miscellaneous recommendations for radiation protection. (UK)

  20. Radiation Control Regulation 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This Regulation (No. 434-1993) was made in pursuance of the Radiation Control Act 1990 and replaces the Active Substances Regulations 1959 repealed by the Act. It entered into force on 1 September 1993. The Regulation specifies that the technical radiation protection definitions have the same meaning as in the 1990 recommendations. The Regulation provides for the licensing of persons to use radioactive substances and radiation apparatus. It prescribes activities which may only be carried out by an accredited radiation expert and regulates the use of radiation apparatus and radioactive substances as well as the disposal and transport of radiation apparatus and radioactive substances. (NEA)

  1. Mines Safety Control (Radiation Protection) Regulations (Northern Territory) No. 30 of 25 September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    These Regulations, pursuant to the Mines Safety Control Act, are intended to prevent or limit the radiation risk to persons involved in the mining or milling of radioactive ores. The duties and responsibilities imposed by the Regulations on owners, managers and employees of the mines are identical with those set forth in the 1980 Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in the Mining and Milling of Radioactive Ores which establishes radiation standards and exposure limits, requires health surveillance of employees and provides for the management of radioactive wastes. (NEA) [fr

  2. Consequences of the new Slovenian legislation on radiation protection and nuclear safety for radiation protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozelj, M.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents brief description of the old Slovenian regulations and an overview of the new, harmonised regulations in the field of radiation protection training. The most important novelties were pointed out with possible consequences for the implementation of radiation protection training. Some suggestions on how to overcome transitional problems and how to improve training were also given. (author)

  3. Some aspects in the compliance with the Japanese radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hideaki; Mizushita, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the major subjects in the recent amendments to the Japanese radiation protection regulations. These are related to the scope of the application of regulations: exclusion, exemption and clearance. The Radiological Hazards Prevention Law has modified the legal definition of 'radioactive materials'. The Reactors Control Law has been amended to establish clearance levels for releasing radioactive materials from regulatory control. The Japanese government has a plan to develop guidelines for exclusion and exemption of certain types of naturally-occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Some aspects in the compliance with the regulations are addressed. (author)

  4. Health protection of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norwood, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    This textbook is addressed to all those concerned with the protection of radiation workers. It provides full coverage of the implications of radiation in exposed workers, and, after a chapter outlining, in simple terms, the basic facts about radiation, deals with measurement of ionising radiation; radiation dosimetry; effectiveness of absorbed dose; general biological effects of ionising radiation; somatic effects of radiation; the acute radiation syndrome; other somatic effects; hereditary effects; radiation protection standards and regulations; radiation protection; medical supervision of radiation workers; general methods of diagnosis and treatment; metabolism and health problems of some radioisotopes; plutonium and other transuranium elements; radiation accidents; emergency plans and medical care; atomic power plants; medico-legal problems

  5. Manual of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambini, D.J.; Granier, R.; Boisserie, G.

    1992-01-01

    This manual explains the principles and practice of radiation protection for those whose work in research, in the field of medicine or in the industry requires the use of radiation sources. It provides the information radiation users need to protect themselves and others and to understand and comply with international recommendations, regulations and legislation regarding the use of radionuclides and radiation machines. It is designed to teach a wide audience of doctors, biologists, research scientists, technicians, engineers, students and others

  6. The general principles of radiation protection and regulation; Les principes generaux de la radioprotection et la reglementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurengo, A [Societe Francaise de Radioprotection, 34 - Montpellier (France); Cesarini, J P [Societe Francaise de Radioprotection, Section Rayonnements non ionisants, 75 - Paris (France); Lecomte, J F; Barbier, G; Crescini, D; Biau, A [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, 92 (France); Blain, A [FRAMATOME, Dir. Combustible Nucleaire, Dept. Radioprotection Securite, 69 - Lyon (France); Bailloeuil, C; Gonin, M [Electricite de France, EDF-SCAST, 75 - Paris (France); Bergot, D [Ministere des Affaires Sociales, du Travail et de la Solidarite, Dir. des Relations du Travail, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-07-01

    Seven articles constitute this chapter about the radiation protection and the regulation. Radiological risk, reduction of public exposure to ultraviolet radiations, regulation for the radon, evolution of the French legislation against the dangers of ionizing radiations, the medical follow up after the professional life, the information system to reproduce the dosimetric data of workers, proposition of a scale to classify the radiations incidents in function of their seriousness. (N.C.)

  7. Regulation of the State Office of Nuclear Safety No. 307/2002 of 13 June April 2002 on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Regulation is a basic Czech document governing any activity associated with ionizing radiations. It comprises the following sections: (1) Introductory and general provisions (Classification of ionizing radiation sources; Categorization of workplaces performing radiation activities; Exposure optimization and limits) (2) Radiation activities (Conditions of a safe operation of workplaces performing radiation activities; Ionizing radiation source handling; Radioactive waste handling; Introduction of radionuclides into the environment; Other radiation activities; Details of conditions of medical examination; Monitoring, measuring, evaluating, verifying and recording radiation protection-related quantities, parameters and facts; Ionizing radiation source accountancy and recording of other radiation protection-related facts) (3) Working activities associated with enhanced exposure from natural sources; (4) Interventions to avert or reduce exposure (Interventions to reduce exposure to natural ionizing radiation sources; Interventions during radiation emergency situations; Interventions during persisting exposure). The document consists of 45 pages of text and 134 pages of annexes with tables and forms. This Regulation supersedes Regulation No. 184/1997. (P.A.)

  8. Radiation protection textbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambini, D.J.; Granier, R.

    2007-01-01

    This textbook of radiation protection presents the scientific bases, legal and statutory measures and technical means of implementation of the radioprotection in the medical and industrial sectors, research and nuclear installations. It collects the practical information (organization, analysis of post, prevention, evaluation and risks management, the controls, the training and the information) usually scattered and the theoretical knowledge allowing every person using ionizing radiation: To analyze jobs in controlled areas, to watch the respect for the current regulations, to participate in the training and in the information of the staffs exposed to intervene in accidental situation. This third edition is widely updated and enriched by the most recent scientific and legal data concerning, notably, the human exposure, the dosimetry, the optimization of the radiation protection and the epidemiological inquiries. The contents is as follows: physics of ionizing radiation, ionizing radiation: origin and interaction with matter, dosimetry and protection against ionizing radiation, detection and measurement of ionizing radiation, radiobiology, legal measures relative to radiation protection, human exposure of natural origin, human exposure of artificial origin, medical, dental and veterinarian radiology, radiotherapy, utilization of unsealed sources in medicine and research, electronuclear industry, non nuclear industrial and aeronautical activities exposing to ionizing radiation, accidental exposures. (N.C.)

  9. Radiation protection and the safe use of X-ray equipment: Laws, regulations and responsibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Petrus Herbst

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Lately, South Africa’s regulatory framework for electromagnetic medical devices has come under considerable pressure. In this article the legislative framework and regulatory infrastructure are scrutinized, by looking at how the legislature has given form to protective measures against ionizing radiation. Although the Hazardous Substances Act provides for effective protection against radiation, poor administration led to insufficient staffing levels, uncertainty about Regulations and licensing conditions and therefore undermines a sound radiation protection infrastructure. The legal basis of enforcing licensing conditions through a website without proper consultation with interested and affected parties is questionable and ineffective in controlling radiation levels. Effective and legal radiation control is possible by activating the National Advisory Committee on Electronic Products provided for in Regulation R326 published in 1979, but never implemented. The possible impact of annual quality assurance tests currently enforced through licensing conditions on the radiation dose of the population is not cost effective as new training and accreditation structures had to be created. The fact that generally more than 80% of overexposures are caused by human error is a clear indication that training of the daily users of X-ray equipment should be emphasized and not the training and accreditation of the technicians responsible for a single quality assurance test per year. Constructive engagement with the professional bodies involved in the medical use of X-rays through a National Advisory Committee on Electronic Products may be a cost effective solution for lowering radiation dose to the population.

  10. Radiological protection, from regulation to culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehler, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    In order to encourage a high degree of radiation protection of workers and members of public, the relevant authorities and operators in the nuclear industry should urge those responsible for radiation protection to do more than is required bu the pure and simple application of the regulations related to dose limitation compliance with the technical standards and specifications a necessary but not sufficient condition for quality in radiation protection. Reaching this quality objective is not a matter of forcing improvements bu a regulatory policy of reducing dose limits, but of promoting a real radiation protection culture based on an approach of optimizing the radiation protection formalized at the lightest level of the company structure, as well as on the professionalism individual responsibility, motivation and the freely consented to and understood participation of those involved in implementing this policy. The spread of a radiation protection culture encourages the deliberate adoption in everyday practice of behaviour likely to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, as law as reasonably achievable, and to give life to the 'spirit' of the regulations in the best conditions. This article intends to show that the need to diffuse a radiation protection culture, particularly based on the principle of optimization, is inspired both by the philosophy behind the system recommended by the behavioural and incentive approach implied by the optimization principle. Special attention will be given to the fundamentals likely to contribute in a definition of radiation protection culture. (author)

  11. Radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volodin, V; Hanson, G P

    1993-12-31

    The goal of this Chapter is to give a general outline of the essential principles and procedures for radiation protection in a nuclear medicine department where radionuclides are used for diagnosis and therapy. More detailed recommendations regarding radiation protection in nuclear medicine are given in the publications of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP, publications 25, 57, 60) and in ILO/IAEA/WHO Manual on Radiation Protection in Hospitals and General Practice (Volume 2: Unsealed Sources, WHO, Geneva, 1975), on which this Chapter is based. This chapter is not intended to replace the above-mentioned international recommendations on radiation protection, as well as existing national regulations on this subject, but intended only to provide guidance for implementing these recommendations in clinical practice

  12. Radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volodin, V.; Hanson, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this Chapter is to give a general outline of the essential principles and procedures for radiation protection in a nuclear medicine department where radionuclides are used for diagnosis and therapy. More detailed recommendations regarding radiation protection in nuclear medicine are given in the publications of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP, publications 25, 57, 60) and in ILO/IAEA/WHO Manual on Radiation Protection in Hospitals and General Practice (Volume 2: Unsealed Sources, WHO, Geneva, 1975), on which this Chapter is based. This chapter is not intended to replace the above-mentioned international recommendations on radiation protection, as well as existing national regulations on this subject, but intended only to provide guidance for implementing these recommendations in clinical practice

  13. Radiation protection training for users of ionizing radiation in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellet, S.; Giczi, F.; Elek, R.; Temesi, A.; Csizmadia, H.; Sera, E.

    2012-01-01

    According to the current and previous regulation related to the safety use of ionizing radiation, the personnel involved must obtain special qualification in radiation protection. In Hungary the radiation protection training are performed by appropriately certified training centers on basic, advanced and comprehensive levels. Certification of the training centers is given by the competent radiological health/radiation protection authority. The office of the Chief Medical Officer is the certifying authority for advanced and comprehensive levels training, as well as competent Regional Radiological Health Authority is responsible for basic level courses. The content and length of courses are specified in the regulation for all three levels of industrial, laboratory and medical users, in general. Some of the universities, technical and medical oriented are certified for advanced training for students as gradual course. Recently in Hungary there are 47 certified training centers for advanced and comprehensive courses, where the trainers should have a five years job experience in radiation protection and successful completion of comprehensive level course in radiation protection. (authors)

  14. Agencies revise standards for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article deals with a guideline, compiled by the IAEA, for radiation protection. The guidelines aim at the control of individual risk through specified limits, optimisation of protection and the justification of all practices involving exposure to radiation. The guideline is a revision of the 1967 publication of the IAEA, Basic safety standards for radiation protection. According to the document the main resposibility for radiation protection lies with the employer. The workers should be responsible for observing protection procedures and regulations for their own as well as others' safety

  15. What is good radiation protection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, B.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation protection is based on the ICRP-System with its pillars justification, limitation and optimization. From this radiation protection should be the same irrespective of the application of radiation. But radiation protection in the nuclear industry is much different from the use of radiation sources or X-ray units. This is by far not due to the different technologies. It originates from the different interpretation of the system. For one person good radiation protection would mean to have no radiation exposures, to avoid radiation at all as best option and to use it only if there are no alternatives. For another person the best radiation protection would be the one which does not produce much efforts and costs. So what is reasonable? In reality the first interpretation prevails, at least in Germany. A change is needed. If we continue to exercise radiation protection as we do it today the beneficial application of radiation will be restricted unduly and might become impossible at all. A stronger orientation towards the naturally occurring radiation would help instead to regulate natural radiation in the same way as it is done for artificial radiation. The system of ICRP has to be changed fundamentally.

  16. Radiation protection in medical imaging and radiation oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Stoeva, Magdalena S

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Protection in Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology focuses on the professional, operational, and regulatory aspects of radiation protection. Advances in radiation medicine have resulted in new modalities and procedures, some of which have significant potential to cause serious harm. Examples include radiologic procedures that require very long fluoroscopy times, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, and intravascular brachytherapy. This book summarizes evidence supporting changes in consensus recommendations, regulations, and health physics practices associated with these recent advances in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology. It supports intelligent and practical methods for protection of personnel, the public, and patients. The book is based on current recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and is complemented by detailed practical sections and professional discussions by the world’s leading medical and health physics professionals. It also ...

  17. Assumptions used in determining the radiation exposure according to the amended Radiation Protection Ordinance, and required adjustments in the General Administrative Regulation relating to paragraph 45 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, E.

    2000-01-01

    Within the framework of the amendment of the Radiation Protection Ordinance, the need arises to also amend the General Administrative Regulation on calculation of the radiation exposure due to radioactivity release with gaseous or liquid effluents, for the purpose of verification of compliance with the dose limits given in section 45 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. The General Administrative regulation has to be harmonized with European legislation, EURATOM Directive 96/29. The required consultations for decision making have been a task of the working group for 'Anpassung der radiooekologischen Berechnungsgrundlage', of the Radioecology Committee of the SSK. The paper discusses the resulting draft document for amendment presented to and accepted by the SSK Committee. The document is awaiting discussion for final decision among members of the SSK, and between the SSK and representatives of Land governments as well as various bodies representing interests. (orig./CB) [de

  18. Biological Research for Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Jung, Il Lae; Choi, Yong Ho; Kim, Jin Sik; Moon, Myung Sook; Byun, Hee Sun; Phyo, Ki Heon; Kim, Sung Keun

    2005-04-01

    The work scope of 'Biological Research for the Radiation Protection' had contained the research about ornithine decarboxylase and its controlling proteins, thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin, S-adenosymethionine decarboxylase, and glutamate decarboxylase 67KD effect on the cell death triggered ionizing radiation and H 2 O 2 (toxic agents). In this study, to elucidate the role of these proteins in the ionizing radiation (or H 2 O 2 )-induced apoptotic cell death, we utilized sensesed (or antisensed) cells, which overexpress (or down-regulate) RNAs associated with these proteins biosynthesis, and investigated the effects of these genes on the cytotoxicity caused by ionizing radiation and H 2 O 2 (or paraquat). We also investigated whether genisteine(or thiamine) may enhance the cytotoxic efficacy of tumor cells caused by ionizing radiation (may enhance the preventing effect radiation or paraquat-induced damage) because such compounds are able to potentiate the cell-killing or cell protecting effects. Based on the above result, we suggest that the express regulation of theses genes have potentially importance for sensitizing the efficiency of radiation therapy of cancer or for protecting the radiation-induced damage of normal cells

  19. Radiation protection programme for LEU miniature source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beinpuo, Ernest Sanyare Warmann

    2015-02-01

    A radiation protection program has been developed to promote radiation dose reduction. It emphasize radiological protection fundamentals geared at reducing radiation from the application of the research reactor at the reactor center of the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. The objectives of the radiation safety program are both to ensure that nuclear scientists and technicians are exposed to a minimum of ionizing radiation and to protect employees and facility users and surrounding community from any potentially harmful effects of nuclear research reactor at GAEC. The primary purpose of the radiation control program is to assure radiological safety of all personnel and the public to guarantee that ionizing radiation arising out of the operations of the Research Reactor at the Reactor Center does not adversely affect personnel, the general public or the environment. This program sets forth polices, regulations, and procedures approved by the Centers Radiation Control Committee. The regulations and procedures outlined in this program are intended to protect all individuals with a minimum of interference in their activities and are consistent with regulations of the Radiation Protection Board (RPB) applicable to ionizing radioactive producing devices. (au)

  20. Sweden's radiation protection regulations for spent fuel and nuclear waste: Requirements and compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norden, M.; Jensen, M.; Larsson, C.M.; Avila, R.; Bergman, S.S.; Wiebert, A.; Wiklund, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Swedish regulations on radiation protection in connection with spent fuel and nuclear waste disposal concern protection of human health and the environment. The reasoning behind the regulations is in observance with the Rio declaration, in the sense that they take into consideration sustainable development also in continued presence of multiple sources of radioactive effluents. Optimisation and best available technique are used as methods for risk reduction. For human health, a risk concept is used, whereas for environmental protection, focus is set on protection of biological resources and diversity. Compliance with the health and environmental goals is discussed using generic definition of the environment. The hypothetical outflow from a repository takes place in the different compartments and the resulting spread in doses are discussed and compared to the requirements of the individual dose standard, and other environmental effects are assessed. (author)

  1. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

    2007-08-09

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

  2. Nuclear safety and radiation protection in France in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this voluminous report describe the different ASN (Nuclear Safety Authority) actions: nuclear activities (ionising radiation and health and environmental risks), principles and stakeholders in nuclear safety regulation, radiation protection and protection of the environment, regulation, regulation of nuclear activities and exposure to ionizing radiation, radiological emergencies, public information and transparency, international relations. It also gives an overview of nuclear safety and radiation protection activities in the different French regions. The second part addresses activities regulated by the ASN: medical uses of ionizing radiation, non-medical uses of ionizing radiation, transport of radioactive materials, nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle installations, nuclear research facilities and various nuclear installations, safe decommissioning of basic nuclear installations, radioactive waste and contaminated sites and soils

  3. Radiation regulations - a UK/European perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimpton, P.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Basic standards for radiation protection in the European Union are laid down in Directives made under the EURATOM Treaty that must be implemented by Member States in national legislation. These Directives are presently based on the 1990 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and include Basic Safety Standards (1996) for the protection of workers and the public, and the Medical Exposure Directive (1997) for the protection of patients. UK legislation has recently been revised to meet these new standards, principally through the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999 and the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations (IR(ME)R) 2000. A framework of formal and informal guidance supports these regulations. IR(ME)R 2000 clarifies and strengthens the roles and responsibilities of Employers, Practitioners, Operators and Referrers in relation to the justification and optimisation of protection for individual medical exposures. In particular, there is now a formal requirement for the adoption of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) by employers as a practical tool for promoting patient protection during diagnostic exposures. The recent revision of regulations concerned with medical exposures in the UK is seen as an evolutionary rather than revolutionary process to strengthen the safe and effective use of radiation in medicine. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  4. Education in Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodig, D.; Kasal, B.; Tezak, S.; Poropat, M.; Kubelka, D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: This paper discussed the problem of the education in radiation protection. All aspects of education are included started with primary school and lasted with very specialised courses for the experts. In the last few years the lack of interest for education in radiation protection was recognised by many agencies included also IAEA and EU commission. In this paper the reasons for this situation will be presented and the way how to promote this subject again. It is not possible to prevent effects of radiation on environment and population if qualified and well educated experts do not exist. The situation in the field of education in radiation protection in Croatia will be presented, according to the new regulations in this field. (author)

  5. Radiation protection zoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Radiation being not visible, the zoning of an area containing radioactive sources is important in terms of safety. Concerning radiation protection, 2 work zones are defined by regulations: the monitored zone and the controlled zone. The ministerial order of 15 may 2006 settles the frontier between the 2 zones in terms of radiation dose rates, the rules for access and the safety standards in both zones. Radioprotection rules and the name of the person responsible for radiation protection must be displayed. The frontier between the 2 zones must be materialized and marked with adequate equipment (specific danger signs and tapes). Both zones are submitted to selective entrance, the access for the controlled zone is limited because of the radiation risk and of the necessity of confining radioactive contamination while the limitation of the access to the monitored zone is due to radiation risk only. (A.C.)

  6. A knowledge and awareness level survey of radiation protection among the radiation workers in Henan Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiao-jun; Tian, Chong-bin; Zhang, Qin-fu; Liu, Cheng; Ding, Li

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To reveal the knowledge and awareness level of radiation protection among radiation workers in Henan province and to explore the methods to improve it. Methods: A questionnaire survey was carried out among 208 radiation workers. Results: The correct rate of the answer to radiation protection knowledge from radiation workers in Henan province is 53.78%. Most of them (88.9%) realized that it is important to protect patients and their companions. They adhere to the principles of justification of medial exposure and optimization of radiation protection and follow the management system of radiation protection. However, a few workers didn't follow the principles strictly. Sometime, during the radio diagnosis and radiotherapy services, the patients and their companions were not well protected from the radiation, and some patients were given unnecessary X-ray examine. Even worse, some workers did not attach importance to the regulations of radiation protection and disobey them frequently. Again, some hospital leaders disregard the regulation of radiation protection and didn't follow the regulation of health surveillance and radiation protection monitoring properly. And those behaviors and attitude, in fact, influence some workers' attitude to radiation protection. Conclusion: The level of radiation protection knowledge and awareness among the radiation workers in Henan province needs to be improved. It is necessary to strengthen radiation protection knowledge by strengthening training, and to improve safety awareness among the radiation staff, and, more important, the hospital leaders as well. (author)

  7. The new look for radiation regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loy, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act (1998) provides the CEO of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency with responsibilities related to researching and advising on radiation protection and nuclear safety, and powers to regulate the Commonwealth's use of radiation and nuclear facilities. This regulation is new to Commonwealth departments and agencies. To support the CEO in meeting these responsibilities and exercising the regulatory powers, the Act also establishes a new advisory council and two advisory committees. Other novel aspects of the Act include a public consultation process for applications for licence related to nuclear facilities, and a regime of quarterly reporting by the CEO to Parliament, in addition to the usual requirements for annual reports

  8. 100 years of ionizing radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltrukiewicz, Z.; Musialowicz, T.

    1999-01-01

    The development of radiation protection from the end of 19. century and evolution of opinion about injurious effect of ionizing radiation were presented. Observations of undesirable effects of ionizing radiation exposition, progress of radiobiology and dosimetry directed efforts toward radiation protection. These activities covered, at the beginning, limited number of persons and were subsequently extended to whole population. The current means, goals and regulations of radiological control have been discussed

  9. Health protection of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norwood, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    Essential information on the health protection of radiation workers which has accumulated since the advent of nuclear fission thirty years ago is presented in simple terms. Basic facts on ionizing radiation, its measurement, and dosimetry are presented. Acute and chronic somatic and genetic effects are discussed with emphasis on prevention. Radiation protection standards and regulations are outlined, and methods for maintaining these standards are described. Diagnosis and treatment of radiation injury from external radiation and/or internally deposited radionuclides is considered generally as well as specifically for each radioisotope. The medical supervision of radiation workers, radiation accidents, atomic power plants, and medicolegal problems is also covered. (853 references) (U.S.)

  10. Evaluation of radiation protection educational level of professional exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, O.; Krstev, S.; Jovanovic, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Serbia and Montenegro legislation concerning with radiation protection was upgrading after publication ICRP- 60 and B.S.S., No.115. Present Law on the Protection against Ionizing Radiation is in force from 1996. Among quite new issues in radiation protection regulations there was article relate to obligatory refresher training. Due to adverse political and economic situation through many years radiation protection regulations were not fulfill completely. The aim of this investigation was to get real view to education level of professional exposed workers. In Serbia and Montenegro the most of ionizing radiation sources are in medical use and the most exposed workers are radiographers and radiologists. The test was passed by 200 radiographers and 50 radiologists. Main groups of questions were: Radiation protection and safety; difference between safety and security; legislation: law and regulations; incidents, accidents and operational failures: recording, learning. Usually, knowledge from school pales. New quantities (as ambient and personal dose equivalent) are mostly unknown. It is easier to understand the real difference between safety and security than to understand linguistic differences. Discussing regulations workers are more interesting in syndicate regulations than radiation protection ones. Operational failures and incidents are hidden. Better to say: nobody dare to speak about them. The results imposed conclusion that regulatory body has to pay more attention to upraise safety culture and radiation protection education level of professional exposed workers. (authors)

  11. Radiation Protection Infrastructure In Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriambololona, R.; Ratovonjanahary, J.F.; Zafimanjato, J.L.R.; Randriantseheno, H.F.; Ramanandraibe, M.J.; Randriantsizafy, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation sources are widely used in medicine, industry, research and education in Madagascar. Safety and security of these sources are the main statutory functions of the Regulatory Authority as defined by the regulations in Radiation Protection in Madagascar. These functions are carried out through the system of notification, authorization and inspection, inventory of radiation source and emergency preparedness. The law no 97-041 on radiation protection and radioactive waste management in Madagascar was promulgated on 2nd January 1998. It governs all activities related to the peaceful use of nuclear energy in Madagascar in order to protect the public, the environment and for the safety of radiation sources. This law complies with the International Basic Safety Standards for protection against ionising Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS, IAEA Safety Series no 115). Following the promulgation of the law, four decrees have been enacted by the Malagasy Government. With an effective implementation of these decrees, the ANPSR will be the Highest Administrative Authority in the Field of Radiation Protection and Waste Management in Madagascar. This Regulatory Authority is supported by an Executive Secretariat, assisted by the OTR for Radiation Protection and the OCGDR for Managing Radioactive Waste.The paper includes an overview of the regulatory infrastructure and the organizations of radiation protection in Madagascar

  12. Organization of radiation protection in German nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Using the operating handbooks of the nuclear power stations in West Germany, an examination was carried out of how far the existing organisational structure for radiation protection fulfils the requirements for protection and whether a standardisation of the organisation would provide improvements for the protection of the personnel and for the practicability of the radiation protection organisation. In particular, the parts 'Personnel operating organisation', 'Radiation protection order' and 'Maintenance order' of the operating handbook were evaluated and an audit was made of the radiation protection organisation. In general, the result of the assessment is that the organisation of radiation protection does not contradict the orders, guidelines and regulations in any of the nuclear power stations examined. Corresponding to the possibilities of regulating details of the radiation protection organisation within the undertaking, the target of 'protection of the personnel against radioactive irradiation' is achieved by the various organisation structures which are largely equal to the given example. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Software for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graffunder, H.

    2002-01-01

    The software products presented are universally usable programs for radiation protection. The systems were designed in order to establish a comprehensive database specific to radiation protection and, on this basis, model in programs subjects of radiation protection. Development initially focused on the creation of the database. Each software product was to access the same nuclide-specific data; input errors and differences in spelling were to be excluded from the outset. This makes the products more compatible with each other and able to exchange data among each other. The software products are modular in design. Functions recurring in radiation protection are always treated the same way in different programs, and also represented the same way on the program surface. The recognition effect makes it easy for users to familiarize with the products quickly. All software products are written in German and are tailored to the administrative needs and codes and regulations in Germany and in Switzerland. (orig.) [de

  14. The competent person in radiation protection: practical radiation protection for industry and research - unsealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruchet, H.

    2009-01-01

    The mission of the competent person in radiation protection has been broadly developed these last years to take an essential function in firm:study of working place, delimitation of regulated areas, monitoring of exposure, relations with authorities. The competent person in radiation protection must follow a training, defined by decree and shared in two parts: a theoretical part used as compulsory subjects and a practical part specific to the different sectors of activity (research, industry, medical centers, nuclear facilities) as well as the radiation use type. This volume corresponds to the practical module devoted to the industrial and research facilities concerned by the possession of management of sealed or unsealed sources. In accordance with the regulations stipulating that this module must allow to apply the theoretical knowledge to concrete situations in work. It includes eight chapters as following: radiation protection in industrial and research facilities, use of sources and associated risks, fitting out professional premises, evaluation of exposure, control of radiation protection; use of detection equipment and radioactive contamination and exposure measurement equipment, associated to methods and calculation tools; radioactive waste management; accidental or damaged situations management; methodology of working place analysis completed by the application to practical cases found in laboratories. (N.C.)

  15. Questions concerning radiation protection in the field of radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, W.; Quednau, F.; Wels, Ch.

    1987-01-01

    Based on legal regulations, guidelines, and standards valid in the German Democratic Republic 105 questions concerning radiation protection are answered covering subjects indicated by the following key words and headings: radiometric gages, radiation protection measures, working within protected areas, legal provisions, responsible staff member, radiation protection officer, operating personnel, radiation protection instructions, safe keeping of radiation sources, leak testing, unusual occurrence, transport of radioactive materials, and ceasing of operation

  16. The German Radiation Protection Ordinance of 2000: a survey and comparison with the former regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, H.

    2000-01-01

    The radiation protection standards defined by the European Union in May 1996, as well as the EU directive for the protection of patients, effective since June 1997, have to be incorporated into the law and administrative regulations of the Federal Republic of Germany by the 13th of May 2000. The German BMU, the ministry responsible for nuclear safety and radiation protection, presented the draft law for departmental consultation about the amendment of the StlSchV in December 1999. This draft law is the basis of the expert discussions of the meeting. One major change for instance is that for the first time, a broad classification system has been applied, which facilitates orientation. (orig./CB) [de

  17. Implementation of organizational measures in radiation protection in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freerk Boersma, H.

    2004-01-01

    The Regulation Administrative and Organizational Measures in Radiation Protection is an important part of new legislation concerning radiation protection in the Netherlands. In this contribution we pay attention to the implementation of two obligations resulting from this regulation, being the creation of a radiation protection organization, and the realization of a system of internal permits. These obligations apply to holders of comprehensive licenses. Relevant aspects of the regulation will be explained in some detail. The first draft of a guideline, initiated by the Dutch Radiation Protection Society and meant to facilitate putting up a system for internal permits, is discussed. We also describe the radiation protection organization and the system of internal permits at Groningen University, and focus on the major successes and flaws of both. (Author) 7 refs

  18. Management information system applied to radiation protection services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Souza, Leonardo Soares de; Figueiredo, Geraldo Magela; Figueiredo, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    An effective management information system based on technology, information and people is necessary to improve the safety on all processes and operations subjected to radiation risks. The complex and multisource information flux from all radiation protection activities on nuclear organizations requires a robust tool/system to highlight the strengths and weaknesses and identify behaviors and trends on the activities requiring radiation protection programs. Those organized and processed data are useful to reach a successful management and to support the human decision-making on nuclear organization. This paper presents recent improvements on a management information system based on the radiation protection directives and regulations from Brazilian regulatory body. This radiation protection control system is applied to any radiation protection services and research institutes subjected to Brazilian nuclear regulation and is a powerful tool for continuous management, not only indicating how the health and safety activities are going, but why they are not going as well as planned showing up the critical points. (author)

  19. Management information system applied to radiation protection services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Souza, Leonardo Soares de; Figueiredo, Geraldo Magela; Figueiredo, Arthur, E-mail: pabloag@cdtn.br, E-mail: lss@cdtn.br, E-mail: gmf@cdtn.br, E-mail: arthurqof@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    An effective management information system based on technology, information and people is necessary to improve the safety on all processes and operations subjected to radiation risks. The complex and multisource information flux from all radiation protection activities on nuclear organizations requires a robust tool/system to highlight the strengths and weaknesses and identify behaviors and trends on the activities requiring radiation protection programs. Those organized and processed data are useful to reach a successful management and to support the human decision-making on nuclear organization. This paper presents recent improvements on a management information system based on the radiation protection directives and regulations from Brazilian regulatory body. This radiation protection control system is applied to any radiation protection services and research institutes subjected to Brazilian nuclear regulation and is a powerful tool for continuous management, not only indicating how the health and safety activities are going, but why they are not going as well as planned showing up the critical points. (author)

  20. Radiation protection course for physicians. 3. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieve, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    The regulations of the Radiation Protection Ordinance and the X-ray Ordinance concerning the expert training of radiological safety officers and health physicists working in hospitals and general practice require expert knowledge in radiation protection of these persons. Expert knowledge includes knowledge of radiation protection itself but also experience in the medical application of ionizing radiation and radioactive materials and experience required for judging the state of health of persons occupationally exposed to radiation. The discussions between lectures and participants of the radiation protection courses made it necessary to update the textbooks with regard to the latest state of knowledge in radiobiology, radiation hygiene, radiation protection, and legislation. (orig./HP) [de

  1. The case against protecting the environment from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.T.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the (rarely heard) argument in favour of retention of the present system of radiation protection of the environment. There has been a recent trend in the radioecological and radiation protection community towards greater regulation of the effects of ionising radiations on biota. In particular, the often quoted International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) hypothesis that: If humans are protected from the effects of ionising radiation, then flora and fauna are also adequately protected has been criticised as being too anthropocentric and not adequate for protection of the environment. In this paper I will challenge this view, arguing firstly that this statement is almost always quoted out of its proper context, and secondly that the ICRP hypothesis does adequately protect the environment from the effects of ionising radiations. In view of the relatively insignificant effect of regulated releases of ionising radiation on the environment, the economic cost of further regulation will not result in a significant environmental benefit. Whilst empirical research to test the ICRP hypothesis should continue, until there is clear evidence against it, this simple and cost-effective approach should be retained. This would benefit the environment by directing scarce resources to more urgent environmental problems. (author)

  2. Radiation protection safety in Uganda -- Experience and prospects of the National Radiation Protection Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Uganda National Radiation Protection Service (NRPS) is a technical body under the Atomic Energy Control Board, established by Law - the Atomic Energy Decree of 1972, Decree No. 12, to oversee and enforce safety of radiation sources, practices and workers; and to protect the patients, members of the public and the environment from the dangers of ionizing radiation and radioactive wastes. The Ionizing Radiation Regulations (Standards) - Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 21 of 1996 -- back up the Law. The Law requires all users, importers and operators of radiation sources and radioactive materials to notify the NRPS for registration and licensing. The NRPS is responsible for licensing and for the regulatory enforcement of compliance to the requirements for the safety of radiation sources and practices. There are about 200 diagnostic X-ray units, two radiotherapy centres, one nuclear medicine unit, several neutron probes, about three level gauges and two non-destructive testing sources and a number of small sealed sources in teaching and research institutions. About 50% of these sources have been entered in our inventory using the RAIS software provided by the IAEA. There are about 500 radiation workers and 250 underground miners. The NRPS covers about 50% of the radiation workers. It is planned that by June 2001, all occupational workers will be monitored, bringing coverage to 100%. The Government of Uganda is making the necessary legal, administrative and technical arrangements aimed at establishing the National Radiation Protection Commission as an autonomous regulatory authority. The Atomic Energy Decree of 1972 and Regulations of 1996 are being revised to provide for the National Radiation Protection Commission and to make it comply with the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards Safety Series No. 115. (author)

  3. Regional radiation protection initiatives by Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey, J.

    1993-01-01

    Australia both through the auspices of the IAEA and from Government Aid Grants has contributed to the improvement of radiation protection throughout the Asia/Pacific region. The assistance has been in the form of training and improvement to radiation protection infrastructures. The presentation describes the objectives, scope and diversity of the radiation protection infrastructure program and the benefits to the large number of persons included in the program. An outline of the current IAEA program is also discussed together with an explanation of how the program will assist national regulators in the education of radiation workers, in hazardous operations such as industrial radiography

  4. The Radiation Protection in Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillen, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    A brief account of the activities on radiation safety carried out by the General Directorate of Nuclear Energy of Guatemala in the period 1991-1992 is presented. The activities are reported under organization, activities on occupational radiation protection in medicine, industry and research, personnel monitoring, radiation metrology, regulations and international cooperation are described

  5. Knowledge plus Attitude in Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velez, G. R.; Sanchez, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Basic Safety Standards recommendations, the scope of the radiation protection was broadening. On behalf of the incorporation of radiation protection of the patient in medical exposures, the different groups of professionals involved: physicians, medical physicists, radiation protection officers, regulators, etc., have to work together. The objective of radiation protection, that is, to reduces doses from practices, to prevent potential exposures, to detect its occurrence as well as to evaluate and spread such abnormal situations, will be obtained only if it were possible to joint two basic conditions: knowledge and attitude. It should be well known the differences between the backgrounds needed to be for example, a medical physicist or an R.P.O., However, their attitude to solve an eventual problem involving radiation protection should be the same; as well as the behavior of the specialized physician and regulators, in order to add towards common goals. In this work, we show as an example the curricula contents about radiation protection of the cancer of medical physics in the Universidad Nacional de San Martin (UNSAM), and the corresponding module on medical exposures from the Post-Graduate course on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, held since the 80s in Buenos Aires by the National Commission of Atomic Energy, ARN, IAEA, and the Universidad de Buenos Aires. On the other hand, we describe different attitudes which leads or could start major radiological accidents, regardless the level of knowledge in radiation protection. We conclude that the larger numbers of accidents are due to problems in the attitude than in the level of knowledge of the person involved. Consequently; we suggest emphasizing the discussion on how to generate positive attitudes in every professional involucrated, independently of its cognitive profile or level. (Author) 2 refs

  6. New general radiation protection training course

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Some members of CERN personnel, users included, may have to work in supervised or controlled radiation areas, or may be concerned with activities involving the use of radioactive sources. According to CERN Safety rules all persons whose work may encounter ionising radiation risk must be adequately trained. This training must ensure that workers are informed about the potential health risks which could result from radiation exposure, about the basic principles of radiation protection and of the relevant radiation protection regulations as well as about safe working methods and techniques in radiation zones. Therefore the Organization organises mandatory general and work-specific radiation protection (RP) courses addressed to its personnel. These courses are also open to contractors’ personnel, in addition to the RP training they must receive from their employers. Based on the results of a pilot project, an improved general radiation protection course has been prepared. This...

  7. New general radiation protection training course

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Some members of CERN personnel, including users, may have to work in supervised or controlled radiation areas, or may be involved in activities involving the use of radioactive sources. According to CERN Safety Rules all persons whose work may be associated with ionising radiation risk must be adequately trained. This training must ensure that workers are informed about the potential health risks which could result from radiation exposure, the basic principles of radiation protection and the relevant radiation protection regulations as well as safe working methods and techniques in radiation zones. Therefore the Organization organises mandatory general and work-specific radiation protection (RP) courses for its personnel. These courses are also open to contractors’ personnel, in addition to the RP training they must receive from their employers. Based on the results of a pilot project, an improved general radiation protection course has been prepared. This new ½ day cours...

  8. New radiation protection legislation in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jender, M.; Persson, Lars

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the new Act is to protect humans, animals and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing as well as non-ionizing radiation. As previously, the main responsibility for public radiation protection will rest with a single central radiation protection authority. According to the Act, the general obligations with regard to radiation protection will assign greater responsibility than in the past to persons carrying out activities involving radiation. Persons engaged in such activities will be responsible for the safe processing and storage of radioactive waste. The Act also contains rules governing decommissioning of technical equipment capable of generating radiation. The Act contains several rules providing for more effective supervision. The supervisory authority may, in particular, decide on the necessary regulations and prohibitions for each individual case. The scope for using penal provisions has been extended and a rule on the mandatory execution of orders regarding radiation protection measures has been introduced. (authors)

  9. Conflicting paradigms in radiation protection: 20 Questions with answers from the regulator, the health physicist, the scientist, and the lawyers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, D.J.; Stansbury, P.S.; Porter, S.W. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    George Orwell's open-quotes doublethinkclose quotes should be generalized to open-quotes polythinkclose quotes to describe the multiplicity of views that radiation protection professionals must simultaneously accommodate. The paradigms, that is, organizing principles and beliefs, that (1) regulators, (2) operational health physicists, (3) scientists, (4) lawyers for the defendant, and (5) lawyers for the plaintiff use in their approaches to radiation protection are presented. What we believe as scientists often conflicts with what we do for purposes of radiation protection. What we need to do merely to protect humankind and the environment from harmful effects of radiation is far less than what we must do to satisfy the regulator, whose paradigm has checklists, score-keeping, and penalties. In the hands of lawyers, our work must overcome different challenges. Even if the paradigms of the operational health physicist, the scientist, and the regulator match, the odds against the lawyers paradigms also matching are astronomical. The differing paradigms are illustrated by example questions and answers. It is important for educators, trainers, and health physicists to recognize and separate the score-keeping, practice, science, and legal issues in health physics

  10. Sense and purpose of radiation protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malasek, A.

    1992-04-01

    Training in radiation protection is of great significance in connection with the activities of the executive, the federal army and emergency organizations in emergency operations for the protection of the population in the case of large-scale radioactive contamination due to diverse causes. The presently valid legal situation of radiation protection training is presented in connection with the expected modification in the amendment to the SSVO. The special situation of radiation protection training for the executive, the federal army and emergency organizations is described and discussed in connection with the new aspects outlined in the draft of the new radiation protection regulation. In conclusion, problems arising in the conveyance of basic knowledge in radiation protection are illustrated by means of a concrete example. (author)

  11. 6. national congress of radiation protection S.F.R.P. 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This congress tackles the following subjects: individual dosimetry for external irradiation, update of arrangements in the public health code relative to the radiation protection, implementation of zoning decree, regulation, radiation protection in professional area, radiation protection in ITER, non ionizing radiation, radiation protection in accident situation, biological radiation effects, radiation protection for patients, dosimetry, environmental exposure, radiation protection and radioactive waste management. (N.C.)

  12. Radiation Protection Officer certification scheme. Malaysian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pungut, Noraishah; Razali, Noraini; Mod Ali, Noriah

    2011-01-01

    In Malaysia, the need for maintaining competency in radiation protection is emerging, focusing on the qualification of Radiation Protection Officers (RPO). Regulation 23 of Malaysian Radiation Protection (Basic Safety Standards) Regulations 1988, requires the applicant to employ an RPO, with the necessary knowledge, skill and training, enabling effective protection of individuals and minimizing danger to life, property and the environment for all activities sought to be licensed. An RPO must demonstrate the knowledge required, by attending RPO courses organised by an accredited agency and pass the RPO certification examination. Maintaining a high level of competency is crucial for future development of safe applications of ionising radiation. The major goal of training is to provide essential knowledge and skills and to foster correct attitudes on radiation protection and safe use of radiation sources. Assessment of the competency is through theoretical and practical examination. A standard criterion on the performance of the individuals evaluated has been established and only those who meet this criterion can be accepted as certified RPO. The National Committee for the Certification of Radiation Protection Officer (NCCRPO), comprising experts in various fields, is responsible to review and update requirements on competency of a certified RPO. With increasing number of candidates (i.e. 701 in 2008) and the international requirement for radioactive source security, it is incumbent upon the NCCRPO to improve the syllabus of the certification scheme. The introduction of a Radiation Protection Advisor (RPA) to provide service and advice to the radiation industry in Malaysia is also seriously considered. (author)

  13. Current Trends in Radiation Protection Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The third generation of the ICRP recommendations was adopted in April 2007. The recommendations rely on situations (planned, emergency and existing), individual (occupational, public and patient) and radiation protection system (justification, optimization and dose limits). In the present work attention is paid to discuss the new recommendations and role of IAEA in updating its Basic Safety Standards for protection against ionizing radiation and safety of radiation sources and its impact for the national regulations

  14. Sec. 46 of the radiation protection ordinance - waiting for implementing regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maushart, R.

    1977-01-01

    There is much uncertainty among the users of radioactive substances in research and medicine about the practical consequences stemming from Sec. 46 of the new Radiation Protection Ordinance with respect to releases of radionuclides with the air and water. On the one hand, the 30 mrem concept has drastically curbed permissible release concentrations. In addition, balancing for each specific nuclide has become compulsory. Both conditions would demand a revision and extension of present measuring techniques. However, the responsible supervisory authorities are unable to issue any rules or regulations as long as there are no uniform standards. The consequence is a complete lack of knowledge, both on the part of users and the supplying industries, about the future expenditure necessary for liquid and gaseous effluent control and the technical performance criteria to be met by radiation measuring equipment. It is to be hoped that these implementing regulations, which are so urgently needed, will soon be published so as to allow users to engage in meaningful and binding planning again, both technically and financially. (orig.) [de

  15. XXXVI. Days of Radiation Protection. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-11-01

    The publication has been set up as a proceedings of the conference dealing with health protection during work with ionizing radiation for different activities which involve the handling of ionizing radiation sources. The main conference topics are focused on current problems in radiation protection and radioecology. In this proceedings totally 93 abstracts are published. The Conference consists of following sections: (I) General aspects and new trends of radiation protection); (II) Radiation protection in medicine; (III): Dosimetry and metrology of external and internal radiation exposure; (IV) Regulation of radiation exposure to natural sources and control of radon exposure; (V) Radiation protection in nuclear power plants, their decommissioning and waste management; (VI) Application of radiation protection standards in the emergency management; (VII) Biological effects of ionizing radiation and risk estimation; (VIII) Education and training in radiation protection in the light of new recommendations of EU, ICRP and IAEA.

  16. Providing Radiation Protection Experts in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partington, C.; Owen, D.

    2004-01-01

    The EEC Directive on Qualified Experts in Radiation Protection has been implemented in the United Kingdom by the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999 (IRR99). These Regulations require Radiation Employers to appoint suitable Radiation Protection Advisers (RPA) who must be consulted in certain circumstances when starting work with, or using ionising radiations. Radiation Protection Advisers have to have a current certificate of competence and, to gain one of these, must have demonstrated their competence in one of two ways either by achieving a National Vocational Qualification in Radiation Protection Practice or by being Certificated by an Assessing Body. Assessing Bodies have to be recognised by the Health and Safety Executive, who undertake a rigorous assessment process to determine whether the proposed Assessing Body is fit to undertake RPA Assessments. By July 2003, only two such Assessing Bodies had been approved in the UK. These two Assessing Bodies are ? RPA 2000 a company established by the four leading Radiation Protection Professional Societies in the UK for assessing anyone in the UK as Radiation Protection Advisers, And ? BNFL established by BNFL to assess the competence of BNFL's own Radiation Protection Advisers. This paper will describe the standards against which Radiation Protection Advisers are assessed, the manner in which each of these two Assessing Bodies carry out the assessment process and their experience to date. The way in which Radiation Employers carry out the appointment process will also be described. Potential future developments of the Assessment Process and standards will also be discussed. (Author)

  17. Regulation for radiation protection in applications of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonawane, Avinash U.

    2016-01-01

    Applications of ionising radiation in multifarious field are increasing in the country for the societal benefits. The national regulatory body ensures safety and security of radiation sources by enforcing provisions in the national law and other relevant rules issued under the principle law. In addition, the enforcement of detailed requirements contained in practice specific safety codes and standard and issuance of safety directives brings effectiveness in ensuring safe handling and secure management of radiation sources. The regulatory requirements for control over radiation sources throughout their life-cycle have evolved over the years from experience gained. Nevertheless, some of the regulatory activities which require special attention have been identified such as the development of regulation to deal with advance emerging radiation technology in applications of radiation in medicine and industry; sustaining continuity in ensuring human resource development programme; inspections of category 3 and 4 disused sources and their safe disposal; measures for controlling transboundary movement of radiation sources. The regulatory measures have been contemplated and are being enforced to deal with the above issues in an effective manner. The complete involvement of the management of radiation facilities, radiation workers and their commitment in establishing and maintaining safety and security culture is essential to handle the radiation sources safely and efficiently at all times

  18. Radiation protection in nuclear energy. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The conference was convened to provide a forum for the exchange of international views on the principles of radiation protection for regulators and practitioners, to highlight issues of current importance, to examine the problems encountered in applying the principles of radiation protection, and, where possible, to identify generic solutions. The highlights of the conference were the sessions on the interface between nuclear safety and radiation protection, the evolution of radiation protection principles, exemption rules and accident experiences. The special session on the practical implications of the linear dose-response relationships also provoked particular interest. Although the session on optimization and decision aiding did not reveal any new developments, it did indicate an increasing emphasis on the optimization of radiation protection. A clear trend towards attaining lower collective doses per unit practice over a given time period, despite the increase in nuclear power plant capacity, is also apparent, although very few data on job-related worker doses have been published to date in the open literature. From the regulators' viewpoint, a very strong desire was expressed for a move towards regulatory strategies that exempt practices and sources causing insignificant individual and collective doses. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Regulation on Radiation Safety of Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    This regulation includes all the requirements administrative, radiation protection, that licensees must meet in order to obtain authorization from the competent authority to apply and use radiation sources, equipment emiting ionizing radiation in different practices authorized

  20. Operational radiation protection and radiation protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.

    1989-01-01

    The radiation protection system in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) is reviewed. The competent authority (the SAAS) and its systems of licensing and supervision are described. Discussion covers the role of the Radiation Protection Officer, the types of radiation monitoring, medical surveillance programs and the classification of workers and work areas. Unusual occurrences in the GDR, 1963-1976, are presented and the occupational radiation protection problems at some specific types of workplaces are discussed. The GDR's system of training in radiation protection and nuclear safety is described. 5 figs., 18 tabs

  1. IX Congress of Spanish radiation protection Society (Bilbao, May-2002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The present book contains the papers presented to the IX Congress of Spanish Radiation Protection Society. The main sessions were : 1.- Scientific area of Radiation Protection and Regulation, Social aspects, Radioactive waste management and Dismantling. 2.- Radiation protection in Medical applications. 3.- Physics of radiations and their measurements

  2. Radiation protection in nuclear energy. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The conference was convened to provide a forum for the exchange of international views on the principles of radiation protection for regulators and practitioners, to highlight issues of current importance, to examine the problems encountered in applying the principles of radiation protection, and, where possible, to identify generic solutions. A special session entitled ''The dose-response relationship: implications for nuclear energy'', and a panel on ''Radiation protection education and training'' were included in the conference programme. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. The Australian radiation protection and Nuclear Safety Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macnab, D.; Burn, P.; Rubendra, R.

    1998-01-01

    The author talks about the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), the new regulatory authority which will combine the existing resources of the Australian Radiation Laboratory and the Nuclear Safety Bureau. Most uses of radiation in Australia are regulated by State or Territory authorities, but there is presently no regulatory authority for Commonwealth uses of radiation. To provide for regulation of the radiation practices of the Commonwealth, the Australian Government has decided to establish the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) and a Bill has passed through the House of Representatives and will go to the Spring sitting of the Senate. The new agency will subsume the resources and functions of the Nuclear Safety Bureau and the Australian Radiation Laboratory, with additional functions including the regulation of radiation protection and nuclear safety of Commonwealth practices. Another function of ARPANSA will be the promotion of uniform regulatory requirements for radiation protection across Australia. This will be done by developing, in consultation with the States and Territories, radiation health policies and practices for adoption by the Commonwealth, States and Territories. ARPANSA will also provide research and services for radiation health, and in support of the regulatory and uniformity functions. The establishment of ARPANSA will ensure that the proposed replacement research reactor, the future low level radioactive waste repository and other Commonwealth nuclear facilities and radiation practices are subject to a regulatory regime which reflects the accumulated experience of the States and Territories and best international practice, and meets public expectations

  4. Practical guidelines for radiation protection in uranium prospecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    The handling and processing of materials with a uranium content of 200 ppm (2 470 Bq/kg of uranium-238) is covered by the Act (1984:3) on nuclear activities. In addition, all types of management of radioactive substances is dealt with by the Radiation Protection Act (1988:220). Uranium exploration which involves the handling of mineral samples containing uranium are both nuclear activities and activities with radiation. Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SSM, has decided to allow exceptions from the nuclear law for uranium exploration. However, if the radioactivity of the contents of the samples exceed the exemption levels specified in Section 2 Radiation Protection Regulation (1988:293) as a general rule, the licensed under the Radiation Protection Act. Exception-level for uranium-238 in radioactive equilibrium with its decay products 1 kBq/kg, equivalent to 0.008 percent uranium. Applications for permits for uranium prospecting should be sent to the Authority before exploration begins. The Authority may also grant an exemption from licensing under the Radiation Protection Act if that can be done without the purpose of infringe the law. Although the exemption from licensing is given, the Radiation Protection Act applies, i.e. the general obligations and responsibilities to arrange for the safe management of radioactive waste. In addition the law shall apply, mutatis mutandis, for the protection of workers, the public and the environment in general. The CEO of the prospecting company is ultimately responsible that activity is carried out in accordance with current legislation. If uranium mining would be considered, an authorization under the Nuclear Act is needed. In that case a permit under the Radiation Protection Act is not needed. However, radiation protection conditions to be supported by the Radiation Protection Act. For entry and exit of radioactive substances SSI FS 2006:1 When transporting uranium ores and borehole cores the Rescue Board regulations SRVFS

  5. 5th December 1990 - Royal Order amending the provisions of the General Regulations for protection at work, concerning the protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This Royal Order amending the 1946 General Regulations for the protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiation implements on a national level the European Community Directives No. 80/836 Euratom of 15 July 1980 laying down basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the hazards of ionizing radiations and No. 84/466 Euratom of 3 September 1984 laying down basic measures for the radiation protection of persons undergoing medical examination or treatment [fr

  6. Healing Arts Radiation Protection Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The Healing Arts Radiation Protection Act is concerned with regulating the registration, installation, operation, inspection and safety of X-ray machines. The Act provides for the establishment of the Healing Arts Radiation Protection Commission which is responsible for reporting on all the above matters to the Ontario Minister of Health. In addition the board is responsible for the continuing development of an X-ray safety code and for the submission of an annual report of their activities to the minister

  7. From the history of radiation protection in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poretti, G.

    1991-01-01

    The first part of this contribution describes the development of medical radiation protection in Switzerland, grouped into X-ray diagnostics, radiation therapy, and nuclear medicine. The second part gives a detailed chronology of Swiss radiation protection for nuclear engineering and industry, laws and regulations, authorities and government institutions, and unions and societies. (orig.) [de

  8. Radiation protection - the employer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfinch, E.

    1983-01-01

    A brief report is given of a paper presented at the symposium on 'Radiation and the Worker - where do we go from here' in London 1983. The paper concerned the employers' viewpoint on the draft of the proposed Ionising Radiations Regulations in the Health and Safety Commission Consultative Document. It was concluded that there was already a very good standard of radiological protection in the UK and that any improvements could therefore only be fringe improvements, although the cost to the employer of introducing and implementing the new proposed Regulations was bound to be high. (U.K.)

  9. Laser radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelic, D.; Muric, B.; Vasiljevic, D.

    2011-01-01

    We have presented the effects of laser radiation on human organism, with special emphasize on eye as the most sensitive organ. It was pointed-out that there are many parameters that should be taken into account when determining the level of protection from laser light. In that respect it is important to be aware of international standards that regulate this area. In addition, we have described a new material which efficiently protects human eye, by formation of microlens and carbonization. [sr

  10. Emerging radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, a number of radiation protection issues have emerged into the public forum. The perceived high risks associated with radiation exposure, and disproportionate media attention to such issues, have contributed to heightened concerns by the public and the individual occupationally exposed worker. This paper examines the new and controversial radiation risk estimates of the National Research Council's BEIR V committee, which are based on the most current atomic-bomb survivor data and a revised dosimetry model. These risk estimates are somewhat higher than past values, and may eventually impact the legal framework in the United States through the regulations of the EPA, NRC, DOE, OSHA, and other agencies that set radiation exposure standards. Additionally, present regulations and standards are often based upon differing levels of acceptable risk, which have led to conflicting exposure and effluent release criteria. Further, due to inherent boundaries in legal authority, many potentially significant sources of radiation exposure to the public remain unregulated Radiation exposure scenarios such as medical x-ray, radon, and other technology enhanced sources have no legal limits. These issues and others are examined and analyzed with respect to regulatory policy

  11. Radiation protection in the pharmaceutical-chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesser, R.

    1992-01-01

    Some aspects of the use of ionizing radiation in research in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries will be discussed, the emphasis being placed on the handling of open radioactive materials in research laboratories. The compliance with official regulations and the preparation of company internal radiation protection regulations are described. 1 tab., 9 refs

  12. Basic knowledge from legal provisions of radiation protection for staff members in radiological facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulheim, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Based on ICRP recommendations the GDR legislation of radiation protection is performed by the National Board of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection of the GDR. The legal regulations of radiation protection in biomedical radiography and radiotherapy are specified. The main content of the atomic energy law and of the regulation on guarantee of nuclear safety and radiation protection is outlined. Basic principles such as radiation workers, operating personnel of nuclear facilities and the categories of their working conditions, areas of radiation protection and unusual events are defined. Responsibility, tasks of responsive staff members, measures of control by state and plant, guarantee of radiation protection, limitation of radiation doses and last not least regulations of sentences and fines, resp., are specified

  13. Radiation and man. From radiology to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    Man first became aware of the invisible radiation surrounding him in 1895, when Wilhelm Roentgen showed that a photographic plate could be affected by an invisible radiation capable of passing through matter. He called this radiation 'X-rays' from X, the unknown. Doctors immediately saw the usefulness of this type of radiation and began to use it in medical research. This was the birth of radiology. 'Mankind has been exposed to radiation since his first appearance on Earth. We first became aware of this at the end of the 19. century'. However, it was not long before some of the doctors and radiologists treating their patients with X-rays began to fall ill. It began to be understood that exposure to high doses of radiation was dangerous and protective measures were necessary. From the 1920's onwards, international commissions were established to specify regulations for the use of radiation and for the radiological protection of personnel. (authors)

  14. Radiation Protection Procedures to Individuals According to Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The new recommendations of the International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) had been adopted in March 2007. Historically, the first main ICRP recommendations were adopted in 1976. Hence, IAEA issued its publication (safety series no 9) entitled Basic safety standards for radiation protection, EU issued its legislative directive. Furthermore, U K issued its 1985 Ionizing Radiation Regulations . These recommendations were based upon system of dose limitation (justification, optimization and annual dose limits and Four types of exposures (occupational, medical, public and planned special exposure) The second main ICRP recommendations were adopted in 1990. Hence, IAEA together with other international organizations issued its publication (safety series no 115) entitled International Basic Safety Standards for protection against ionizing radiation and safety of radiation sources in 1996. Furthermore, EU issued its new legislative directive and UK issued its updated Ionizing radiation regulations in 1999. These recommendations based upon two systems of protection, these are system of protection in practice and system of protection in intervention. The new ICRP or 2007 recommendations is based upon situations 1- Planned situations, 2- Emergency situations, and 3- Existing situations. The 2007 recommendations rely also on Individuals 1- Occupational, 2- Public and 3- Patient and Furthermore, elements of Radiation Protection system are 1- Justification, 2- Optimization and 3- Dose limits. Updated numerical values for radiation weighting factors for proton is 2 instead of 5 and for neutron , its continuous function instead of discrete values . New numerical values for tissue weighting factors include value of 8% for Gonads instead of 20%. The recommended nominal probability is around 5 per cSv. IAEA as well other international organization are updating its Basic Safety Standards . National regulations shall also be updated accordingly

  15. Accredited training on radiation protection for the Austrian police

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timal, G.

    2009-01-01

    In Austria, radiological emergencies are handled following the Intervention Regulation, in force since 2007. This regulation also defines duration and content for the training of radiation protection personnel, taking advantage of the standard OeNORM S 5207 published in 2005. Radiation protection personnel of the Austrian police are trained at the Federal Security Academy in Traiskirchen near Vienna. The Federal Security Academy is a training centre certified by the Austrian Standards Institute. The poster describes the modular organisation of the training and its duration and content as well as the further trainings available to the radiation protection personnel of the Police. (orig.)

  16. Radiation protection as part of occupational health and safety in the regulation of uranium mines in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    The author establishes that radiation exposure is one of the health hazards of uranium mining and therefore has to be controlled. The jurisdictional framework for this is outlined and the role and functions of the Atomic Energy Control Board are detailed. The author then sets down seven objectives for radiation protection followed by an outline of the Canadian regulatory philosophy including an examination of two possible approaches to regulation of uranium mining and milling, and a sketch of pending new regulations. After setting down what he considers the main concerns of the AECB in mine regulation, the author details the Board's licensing process, compliance activities and relationship with workers. The conclusion includes a call for a more rational approach in considering and therefore dealing with radiation as a workplace hazard

  17. Radiation protection training programmes Spanish approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arboli, M. Marco; Suarez, M. Rodriguez; Cabrera, S. Falcon

    2002-01-01

    Radiation Protection Programmes are being considered the best way to promote safety culture and to spread and propagate European basic safety standards. It is widely accepted that training is an important tool to upgrade competence for radiation exposed workers. The Spanish Radiation Protection Education and Training Programmes provide a solid and integrated educational model, which takes into account the variety of applied fields, the different levels of responsibilities, the technological and methodological advances, as well as the international tendencies. The needs for a specialised training on Radiation Protection (RP) for exposed workers appears into the Spanish regulation in 1964. National initial training programmes are well established since 1972. Individual certifications, based on personal licences are required for exposed workers. The Spanish regulation also includes continuous and on the job RP training. The educational programmes are being continuously updating and improving. CIEMAT plays an important role in RP Spanish training, improving and modifying the previous RP courses and developing new programmes in order to complete the RP training levels. To achieve Radiation Protection objectives, new technological media for educational methods and material are taking into account. Nevertheless, Spanish RP education and training model has to be improved in some aspects. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the situation and the future needs to be considered in order to complete the RP training processes

  18. An overview of radiation protection at national level in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitriou, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Greek radiation protection Regulations were revised extensively and harmonized with the relevant Euratom Directives in 1991, covering almost all applications of ionizing radiation. According to the low in force, Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) is the regulatory and competent authority on radiation protection matters. Among others is responsible: for evaluating the environmental radiation, for introducing emergency plans to responsible Ministries to cope with radiation accidents or increased radioactivity levels, for issuing safety regulation concerning the operation employing ionizing radiation, performing inceptions to all installations or laboratories where radioisotopes or radiation producing machines are employed including all medical applications and issuing the certificate of compliance with the radiation protection regulations. GAEC is the governmental licensing authority for import, export, possession, use, transport and disposal of radioactive materials including fissile materials, and is also responsible for providing training and education to scientists and technical personnel on radiation protection and operates a two years postgraduate course in Medical radiation Physics in collaboration with three Greek Universities, leading to an M Sc degree.The achievements, initiatives and perceptivities of GAEC in the fields of its responsibility are discussed. Statistical data concerning the application of ionising radiation in Greece during the last five years are also presented (author)

  19. A guide to practical radiation protection in medicine. X-Ray Ordinance. Radiation Protection Ordinance. Practice-oriented hints, comments, text compilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiebich, M.; Nischelsky, J.E.; Pfeiff, H.; Westermann, K.

    2003-01-01

    This loose-leaf collection has been compiled for users who have to implement the X-ray Ordinance and the Radiation Protection Ordinance at their place of work. It presents all acts, ordinances, safety guides, regulations and recommendations of relevance in connection with the above two ordinances, as well as practical instructions and the full text of technical codes. Radiation protection officers and other persons in charge of radiation protection will find the references, information and advice needed to solve problems encountered. (orig.) [de

  20. Radiation protection/shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation protection/shielding design of a nuclear facility requires a coordinated effort of many engineering disciplines to meet the requirements imposed by regulations. In the following discussion, the system approach to Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) radiation protection will be described, and the program developed to implement this approach will be defined. In addition, the principal shielding design problems of LMFBR nuclear reactor systems will be discussed in realtion to LWR nuclear reactor system shielding designs. The methodology used to analyze these problems in the U.S. LMFBR program, the resultant design solutions, and the experimental verification of these designs and/or methods will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  1. The revised German radiation protection ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palm, M.

    2002-01-01

    Since August 2001, German radiation protection law is governed by a new Radiation Protection Ordinance, implementing two new Euratom Directives and taking into account new scientific developments, which provides a comprehensive basis for the protection of man and the environment. The Ordinance has been completely restructured; however, it is still a very complex piece of legislation comprising 118 provisions and 14 annexes, some of them highly technical. Reduced dose limits for occupationally exposed persons and members of the public, a detailed provision on clearance of radioactive substances, a new part aiming at the protection of man and the environment against ionising radiation emanating from natural sources, and regulations dealing with the protection of consumers in connection with the addition of radioactive substances to consumer goods are some of the centre pieces of the new legislation which shall contribute significantly to the further prevention or at least minimisation of the adverse effects of radiation exposure. (orig.) [de

  2. Radiation protection training: twenty year experience in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellet, Sandor; Kanyar, Bela; Zagyvay, Peter; Solymosi, Jozsef; Bujtas, Tibor; Feher, Istvan; Giczi, Ferenc; Deme, Sandor; Uray, Istvan

    2008-01-01

    In Hungary, radiation protection training for radiation workers has been introduced in very early, just following the publication of the ICRP recommendation No. 26. Before that, in some of the institutions, radiation protection training was recommended for technicians and medical doctors working in nuclear medicine, X-ray diagnostic radiology and radiation therapy, as well as in some of industrial applications, but not on regular way. Since 1988, radiation protection training regulated by the Ministry of Health and required for all of the workers in radiation workplaces licensed by the authority the State Public Health and Medical Officers Service (SPHAMOS). Decree No. 16/2000. (VI. 8.) EuM of the Minister of Health on the enforcement of Clauses of the Nuclear Law 116/1996 regulates the radiation protection training of Radiation Workers (RW). Annex 4 of Decree sees radiation protection training and in-service training: Persons performing conducted work in the field of the use of the nuclear energy and any other work within legal relationship shall be educated in training and in-service training at an interval of 5 years. Three levels of the training introduced; basic, extended and comprehensive, based on radiation risk related to the given job. Several institutions are involved in performing radiation protection training, such universities, scientific institutions, Regional Radiological Health Centers (RRHC) of SPHAMOS, private enterprises etc. All training course material is subject to accreditation. Most of the faculties of the universities involved in training of natural sciences and engineering provide subjects on the fundamentals of dosimetry, radiobiology and radiation protection within the courses of physics, biophysics, chemistry, biology, ecology etc. These courses take 5-10 contact hours per week on average. The members of the Hungarian Committee of EUTERP Platform summarize their broad experience collected in the past 20 year. (author)

  3. Expert knowledge in radiation protection. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spang, A.

    1990-01-01

    This revised version of the first edition, which was published in 1983, incorporates the full scale of developments and changes made since then, as e.g.: the new Radiation Protection Ordinance, which introduces the concept and definition of effective dose, ED, and limits the maximum permissible occupational exposure to 400 mSv. Changes have become effective for instance in the transport regulations, in the regulations for radioactive waste delivery and collection, in the field of health physics, and with regard to activities under outside contract; b) the EURATOM basic standards and the new SI units: Becquerel and Sievert have replaced Curie and Rem; c) a number of ICRP recommendations, events and scientific results, which frequently make radiation protection more plausible, or sometimes even necessary; d) the new DIN standards and BMU regulations, which also are a valuable source of reference for the radiation protection officer. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Radiation Protection and Safety infrastructure in Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ylli, F.; Dollani, K.; Paci, R.

    2005-01-01

    On 1995 Albania Parliament approved the Radiation Protection Act, which established the Radiation Protection Commission as Regulatory Body and Radiation Protection Office as an executive office. The licensing of private and public companies is a duty of RPC and the inspections, enforcement, import - export control, safety and security of radioactive materials, are tasks of RPO. Regulations on licence and inspection, safe handling of radioactive sources, radioactive waste management and transport of radioactive materials have been approved. The Codes of practice in diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine have been prepared. Institute of Nuclear Physics carry out monitoring of personal dosimetry, response to the radiological emergencies, calibration of dosimetric equipment's, management of radioactive waste, etc. Based in the IAEA documents, a new Radiation Protection Act is under preparation

  5. Deviating measurements in radiation protection. Legal assessment of deviations in radiation protection measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegl, A.

    1996-01-01

    This study investigates how, from a legal point of view, deviations in radiation protection measurements should be treated in comparisons between measured results and limits stipulated by nuclear legislation or goods transport regulations. A case-by-case distinction is proposed which is based on the legal concequences of the respective measurement. Commentaries on nuclear law contain no references to the legal assessment of deviating measurements in radiation protection. The examples quoted in legal commentaries on civil and criminal proceedings of the way in which errors made in measurements for speed control and determinations of the alcohol content in the blood are to be taken into account, and a commentary on ozone legislation, are examined for analogies with radiation protection measurements. Leading cases in the nuclear field are evaluated in the light of the requirements applying in case of deviations in measurements. The final section summarizes the most important findings and conclusions. (orig.) [de

  6. Proceedings of the Radiation protection supervisors' day of November 7, 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlet, Jean; Piferrer, Jean-Paul; Morin, Catherine; Lefaure, Christian; Tourneux, Christophe; CONAN, Nadine; MARC, Benoit; Etard, Cecile; Rehel, J.L.; Aubert, B.; Ranouil, Julien

    2013-11-01

    Organised by the Association for radioprotection Techniques and Sciences (ATSR) and sponsored by the Commission of external radiation protection supervisors, this radiation protection supervisors' day was the occasion to take stock of the regulation, of the recurrent problems and advances in radiation protection. The conference brought together 9 presentations dealing with: 1 - Works of the Commission of external radiation protection supervisors (J.P. Piferrer); 2 - National and European regulation updates (T. Lahaye); 3 - Problems relating to control equipments (J. Langlet); 4 - Problems relating to the professional insurance for external radiation protection supervisors: national consultation by the ATSR (key points for the development of a national multidisciplinary consultative meeting by the ATSR, C. Morin); 5 - Situation of radiation protection supervisor networks (C. Lefaure, C. Tourneux); 6 - RPE-RPA-RSSO functions at CERN: creation and experience feedback (Experience feedback of the implementation of the RPE/RPO(A) European regulation at CERN, N. Conan); 7 - Industry: PCR n + Σ TQRP = SRP* (B. Marc); 8 - Interventional radiology: lessons to be learnt from recent overexposure incidents? (Medicine: protection supervisor and interventional radiology, C. Etard, J.L. Rehel, B. Aubert); 9 - GEDOC: research group on eye lens dosimetry (Eye lens exposure to ionizing radiations, J. Ranouil). This document brings together the presentations (slides) presented during the conference

  7. Recent international regulations: low dose-low rate radiation protection and the demise of reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkalides, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    The radiation protection measures suggested by the International Committee for Radiation Protection (ICRP), national regulating bodies and experts, have been becoming ever more strict despite the decrease of any information supporting the existence of the Linear no Threshold model (LNT) and of any adverse effects of Low Dose Low Rate (LDLR) irradiation. This tendency arises from the disproportionate response of human society to hazards that are currently in fashion and is unreasonable. The 1 mSv/year dose limit for the public suggested by the ICRP corresponds to a 1/18,181 detriment-adjusted cancer risk and is much lower than other hazards that are faced by modern societies such as e.g. driving and smoking which carry corresponding rate risks of 1/2,100 and 1/2,000. Even worldwide deadly work accidents rate is higher at 1/ 8,065. Such excessive safety measures against minimal risks from man made radiation sources divert resources from very real and much greater hazards. In addition they undermine research and development of radiation technology and tend to subjugate science and the quest for understanding nature to phobic practices.

  8. Proceedings of the Eleventh Radiation Physics and Protection Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The proceeding contains of 404 pages, the available maertial of 35 contributions: and covering of conference topics: Plenary, Invited, Keynote Talks. Nuclear Power Plant Accident. Cosmogenic Radionuclides. Waste Storage and Disposal Solutions. Radiation Medical Physics. Radiation Detection and Measurements. Radioactive in Building Materials. Radiation Protection Regulations and public Protection. Environmental Radioactivity.

  9. The development of the international and national radiation protection law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischof, W.

    1978-01-01

    The author reports in detail about the development of the international radiation protection law, gives a general survey of domestic legislation in the FRG and abroad and presents the individual problems of the radiation protection laws in a comparative way, such as radiation protection principles/dose limit values, licensing and monitoring regulations disposal of radioactive wastes, application of ionising rays and radioactive substances to men as well as protection from non-ionising radiation. (UN) [de

  10. Comparison of Radiation Protection Training in European Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozelj, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Practice and implementation of radiation protection in European countries and in majority of other countries all over the world relies on common principles and recommendations established by international organisations. These principles and recommendations were incorporated in national legislation ensuring similar and compatible standards of protection for occupationally exposed workers and members of the public. One of the basic requirements derived from international recommendations is also formal request for training of occupationally exposed workers. The final goals of the training are defined only indirectly through standards of safety and protection. Therefore national regulation regarding radiation protection training in particular country is a result of general approach to education and training, historical circumstances, influence and importance of nuclear technology and other factors influencing health protection and national well-being in general. The result is variety of national regulations ranging from very stringent and detailed to rather general and flexible. Nevertheless, results of implemented training do not differ sufficiently to significantly affect achieved standards of radiation protection. According to available information European countries implement radiation protection training in dissimilar ways. Institutions and organisations involved, as well as form and duration of training varies from country to country. Therefore, it is not possible to determine common rules just by reviewing radiation protection training in different countries. It is the intention of this contribution to analyse and discuss available information regarding radiation protection training and point out the necessity of international co-operation in this field, especially in the sense of the future trends. (author)

  11. Low-level radioactive waste disposal: radiation protection laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapuis, A.M.; Guetat, P.; Garbay, H.

    1991-01-01

    The politics of radioactive waste management is a part of waste management and activity levels are one of the components of potential waste pollutions in order to assume man and environment safety. French regulations about personnel and public' radiation protection defines clearly the conditions of radioactive waste processing, storage, transport and disposal. But below some activity levels definite by radiation protection laws, any administrative procedures or processes can be applied for lack of legal regulations. So regulations context is not actually ready to allow a rational low-level radioactive waste management. 15 refs.; 4 tabs.; 3 figs

  12. Computer Based Radiation Protection- A New Cd-Rom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geringer, T.; Bammer, M.; Ablber, M.

    2004-01-01

    Within the next few years, there'll be a lot of new challenges required from radiation protection. According to EU regulation[1] and the new austrian radiation protection law [2] regular additional training are requested. Patients protection in diagnostic and therapeutic usage of ionising radiation gains also more and more importance.[3] Not really surprisingly, the general population is definitely highly aware of the risks coming with the usage of radionuclides and x-rays in medicine. Furthermore, the nuclear power plant in Temelin, near the austrian border initiated a lively discussion about risks, necessity and use of ionising radiation in medicine and industry. It turned out to be a really hard job handling these topics in public. A brilliant didactics based on independent information and viewpoints was required. ARC Seibersdorf Research GmbH, represented by the department of medical technical applications and the radiation protection academy, developed an interactive CD-ROM covering several applications: Basics on radiation protection for medical and technical personnel ; preparation for a radiation protection training. Repetition of the main topics for graduates of a radiation protection training. Basics on radiation protection and emergency management for medical staff as well as for the general public. (Author)

  13. Radiation protection at reactors RA and RB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.

    2003-02-01

    Radiation protection activities at the RA and RB reactors are imposed by the existing legal regulations and international recommendations in this field. This annual report contains five parts which cover the following topics: Radiation safety, dosimetry control and technical radiation protection at reactors RA and RB; Handling of radioactive waste, actions and decontamination; Control of the environment (surroundings of RA and RB reactors) and meteorological measurements; Control of internal contamination and internal exposure; Health control od personnel exposed to radiation. Personnel as well as financial data are part of this report

  14. Protection of persons occupationally exposed to radiation and of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieve, F.E.

    1976-01-01

    The experiences of the last ten years have shown that the measures of the First Radiation Protection Ordinance generally proved to be sufficient for the protection of the employed or of the patients. They had to be amended in so far as the exposure to radiation for those occupationally exposed can be reduced. This results in changes to the regulations so that certain groups of persons can also be effectively controlled. The recognition that medical supervision for radiation protection reasons is reasonable only if exposure has occurred should be additionally utilized in the regulations if the Euratom standards make this possible. The protection of patients attains some new rules which can be derived from handling and from therapeutical use. In this case too experience resulted in a more reasonable application of ionizing radiation and radioactive materials than was expected when the First Radiation Protection Ordinance was issued. (orig.) [de

  15. Radiation protection and occupational health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassels, B.M.; Carter, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines trends in occupational and public health standard setting including those which apply to radiation protection practices. It is the authors' contention that while regulators, unions and employees demand higher standards of radiation protection and industry attempts to comply with tight controls of radiation exposure in the workplace, these standards are out of step with standards applied to health away from the workplace, recreational activity and other areas of industrial hygiene. The ultimate goal of an improvement in the health of the nation's workforce may no longer be visible because it has been submerged beneath the predominating concern for one aspect of health in the workplace. 35 refs., 5 tabs

  16. Foundations for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Full text; In 1996, the IAEA published the latest edition of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (Basic Safety Standards or BSS) comprising basic requirements to be filled in all activities involving radiation exposure. The standards define internationally harmonized requirements and provide practical guidance for public authorities and services, employers and workers, specialized radiation protection bodies, enterprises and health and safety communities. In the same year, the IAEA, through the technical cooperation programme, launched the Model Project on Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure, a global initiative designed to help Member States establish the infrastructure needed to adhere to the BSS. To address the complexity of this task, the radiation protection team identified key elements, known as Thematic Safety Areas. These are: 1. Legislative Framework and Regulatory Infrastructure, Draft and put into effect radiation protection laws and regulations and establish and empower a national regulatory authority. 2. Occupational Exposure Control Protect the health and safety of each individual who faces the risk of radiation exposure in the workplace through individual and workplace monitoring programmes, including dose assessment, record keeping of doses and quality management. 3. Medical Exposure Control: Develop procedures and activities to control the exposure of patients undergoing diagnosis and/or treatment via diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine or radiotherapy through staff training, provision of basic quality control equipment, and the establishment of quality assurance programmes. 4. Public and Environmental Exposure Control: Develop means to protect both the public and the environment including: a) programmes to register, inventory and provide safe storage of unused radioactive sources and material; b) procedures to control and safely

  17. Radiation protection requirements for dental X-ray diagnostic facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taschner, P.; Koenig, W.; Andreas, M.; Trinius, W.

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of radiation protection regulations the planning of dental X-ray facilities is discussed considering organizational, technical and structural measures suitable for fulfilling protection requirements. Finally, instructions are given aimed at reducing radiation doses to personnel and patients. (author)

  18. Radiation protection requirements for dental X-ray diagnostic facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taschner, P; Koenig, W [Staatliches Amt fuer Atomsicherheit und Strahlenschutz, Berlin (German Democratic Republic); Andreas, M [Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Fachrichtung Stomatologie; Trinius, W [Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Radiologische Klinik

    1976-03-01

    On the basis of radiation protection regulations the planning of dental X-ray facilities is discussed considering organizational, technical and structural measures suitable for fulfilling protection requirements. Finally, instructions are given aimed at reducing radiation doses to personnel and patients.

  19. Radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive material. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides guidance on meeting the requirements for the establishment of radiation protection programmes (RPPs) for the transport of radioactive material, to optimize radiation protection in order to meet the requirements for radiation protection that underlie the Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. This Guide covers general aspects of meeting the requirements for radiation protection, but does not cover criticality safety or other possible hazardous properties of radioactive material. The annexes of this Guide include examples of RPPs, relevant excerpts from the Transport Regulations, examples of total dose per transport index handled, a checklist for road transport, specific segregation distances and emergency instructions for vehicle operators

  20. Regulations concerning radiation protection and survey; Donnees de la surveillance et regles qui en resultent en matiere de protection contre les rayonnements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhamel,; Lavie,; Fitoussi, [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The many and always increasing applications of Atomic Energy for peaceful uses set many safety and security problems relatively to the workers, populations, and locating of the sites in general. A comparative study of the radiation hazards to which the people working in the 'Commissariat a l'energie atomique' installations were exposed during 1957 and the results obtained concerning individual and collective safety and security were extremely satisfactory owing to a continuous control and supervision. 2. However a few contamination and irradiation incidents - exposed subsequently as well as the way they were dealt with - show the necessity of a circumstantial regulation inside of an atomic center to establish the responsibility of the service in charge of the control of the radiation and the responsibility of the services using radioactive products with regard to contamination by radioactive materials. 3. Abstract of the different practical safety and security regulations concerning holding, manipulation, transport and stocking of radioactive materials. Pursuant to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiologic Protection, the radioelements are classified according to the danger that can occur from them in comparison with the Pu with regard to: - radioactive noxiousness; specific activity per unit of mass; contamination hazards. 4. The service in charge of radiation protection plays the important part of a technical adviser for the construction of specialized laboratories and sees to the keeping of protection regulations. 5. Data essential to radiation protection are given to the people using radioactive materials; particularly: - a table of the radioisotopes and the hazards occurring from them; - radiation hazards regarding {gamma} ray emitted by irradiated Pu; - radiation hazards regarding {gamma} ray emitted by irradiated Th. 6. As the hazards occasioned by irradiated uranium have already been studied, the case of a low and total irradiation

  1. Regional and national radiation protection activities in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation protection activities in Egypt go back to 1957 where the Egyptian Atomic Energy Commission (EAEC) Law was issued. Radiation protection and civil defense department was one of EAEC eighth departments. Ionizing radiation law was issued in 1960 and its executive regulation in 1962. The main aim of the present work is to through some light on the current radiation protection activities in Egypt. This includes not only the role of governmental organizations but also to the non governmental organizations. Currently a new Nuclear Safety law is understudy. Regional activities such as holding the second all African IRPA regional radiation protection congress which was held in April 2007 and national training and workshops are held regularly through EAEA, AAEA and MERRCAC. (author)

  2. Focus radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebermann, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The publication of the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz on radiation protection covers the following issues: (i) exposure from natural sources: health hazard due to radon, radiation protection in residential homes, radon in Germany, natural raw materials in industrial processes; (ii) clearance of radioactive wastes: clearance in the frame of nuclear power plant dismantling, the situation in Germany and Europe; (iii) emergency management: principles of radiation protection, fictive sequence of accident events; (iiii) other actual radiation protection topics: more limits - more protection? radiation protection in medicine, occupational radiation protection.

  3. Radiation protection in medicine. Actual regulations and the new EU BSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loose, R.; Wucherer, M.

    2013-01-01

    Medical radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, optimisation and dose limitation. Depending on the application, medical staff and patients are affected. The implementation of new basic safety standards (BSS) of the European Commission (EC) brings changes, which must be implemented into national law. They have varying effects depending on the type of application (radiology, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy) for all three principles of radiation protection. (orig.)

  4. Rule concerning sanitary protection against ionizing radiations: novelties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bercedo, A.; Carmena, P.; Prieto, J. A.; Rubio, G.; Sollet, E.; Sustacha, D.

    2002-01-01

    Last July the a new legal Rule concerning Sanitary Protection against Ionising Radiation was published, as a transposition of the EU Directive about the Basic Norms related to the sanitary protection of workers and population against the risks resultant of the ionising radiation. The origin of this legislation goes back to the revision of the protection doctrine by the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) en the year 1990. El scope of the revised Rule is the regulation of the protection of population and workers against ionising radiation, the establishment of the national protection system with its exposition and dose limits and the correspondent penalty regime. It also modifies the maximum radiation dose limits and reinforces the application of the optimisation principle in the use of ionising radiation. In this article, the novelties introduced by the new Rule are commented in detail, ordered by the Titles I to IX in which the Rule is divided. (Author)

  5. Protection against Ionizing Radiation, No. 1420

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of national legislative and regulatory provisions on radiation protection in force on 15 November 1978. In addition to the in extenso texts on the subject, only the relevant provisions in laws and regulations with a more general scope have been reproduced. This comprehensive compilation expands and updates a previous collection by the Official Gazette of the French Republic which covered only decrees and orders on the protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiation. (NEA) [fr

  6. Radiation Regulation Bodies in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavunda, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    Tthere are two types Regulatory Bodies in South Africa: department of Health - Radiation Control (DoH) and National Nuclear Regulator (NNR). The function DoH include of Promotion and maintenance of health within the framework of National health plan, Protection against injury or disease caused by technological devises, Protection against injury or disease caused by radiation, Promote safe and legal use of such products. The National Nuclear Regulator authorizes Nuclear Installation License, Nuclear Vessel License, Certificate of Registration and Certificate of Exemption. Some of the Electronic Products include licensing electro-medical products, Import or manufactured License conditions, Radiation workers, Report forms, Use and Radio-nuclides. Nuclear Authorization is the process of granting, by the National Nuclear Regulator, a written approval to applicants or / and operating organizations to perform nuclear related activities as detailed in the scope of the authorization. International Trade Administration Commission of South Africa (ITAC) issue license for import and export of all products including electronic X-Ray products and Radio-nuclides

  7. Regulatory System of Radiation Protection in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, F. T.; Huang, C. C.

    2004-01-01

    After the radioactive contaminated buildings incident occurred in Taiwan in 1993, the competent authority for radiation protection the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) started to review the structured problem of radiation protection regulatory system. Through several years' investigation and study, the AEC has improved two important tools in radiation protection regulatory system, i.e., control regulations and actual practice, and made them more rigorous and efficient. This paper will make a brief introduction of the efforts that Taiwan has made in this respect. Taiwan's radiation protection control was based on the Atomic Energy Law promulgated in 1968, but the control idea and authorization scope were not sufficient to appropriately respond to the highly developed economy and democracy in Taiwan. After several years' legislative process, the Ionizing Radiation Protection Law (IRP Law) was promulgated and entered into force on February 1, 2003. This IRP Law specifically emphasizes categorized risk management of radiation sources, establishment of personnel licenses and training system, enhancement of public safety control, and implementation of quality assurance program for medical exposure. The Legislative Yuan (Congress) fully authorized the competent authority to establish various technological control regulations according to control necessity without prior review by the Legislative Yuan in advance. As to the penalties of the violations of the IRP Law, the AEC adopts high-rated administrative fines and applies the Criminal Law to those who seriously contaminate the environment. In actual practice, the AEC has constructed a Radiation Protection Control Information System compatible with the IRP Law that fully combines the functions of computers and Internet. The information of facility operators who own radiation sources, radiation protection specialists, and operating personnel are entered into this system, starting from the submission of application of the

  8. Management information system on radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Souza, Leonardo Soares de; Figueiredo, Geraldo Magela, E-mail: pabloag@cdtn.b, E-mail: lss@cdtn.b, E-mail: gmf@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Considering the flux complexity and the multi source information of all radiation protection activities on nuclear organizations, an effective management information system based on technology, information and people is necessary to improve the safety on all processes and operations subjected to radiation risks. An effective management information system is an essential tool to highlight the strengths and weaknesses and identify behaviors and trends on the activities requiring radiation protection programs. Such kind of distinct knowledge is useful to reach an effective management and support the human decision-making on nuclear organization. This paper presents a management information system based on Brazilian directives and regulations on radiation protection. Due to its generic characteristics, this radiation protection control system can be implemented on any nuclear organization by reediting the non restricted parameters which could differ considering all facilities and laboratories expected on-site with diverse technologies applications. This system can be considered as a powerful tool applied on the continuous management of radiation protection activities on nuclear organizations and research institutes as well as for long term planning, not only indicating how the safety activities are going, but why they are not going as well as planned where that is the case. (author)

  9. Management information system on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Souza, Leonardo Soares de; Figueiredo, Geraldo Magela

    2011-01-01

    Considering the flux complexity and the multi source information of all radiation protection activities on nuclear organizations, an effective management information system based on technology, information and people is necessary to improve the safety on all processes and operations subjected to radiation risks. An effective management information system is an essential tool to highlight the strengths and weaknesses and identify behaviors and trends on the activities requiring radiation protection programs. Such kind of distinct knowledge is useful to reach an effective management and support the human decision-making on nuclear organization. This paper presents a management information system based on Brazilian directives and regulations on radiation protection. Due to its generic characteristics, this radiation protection control system can be implemented on any nuclear organization by reediting the non restricted parameters which could differ considering all facilities and laboratories expected on-site with diverse technologies applications. This system can be considered as a powerful tool applied on the continuous management of radiation protection activities on nuclear organizations and research institutes as well as for long term planning, not only indicating how the safety activities are going, but why they are not going as well as planned where that is the case. (author)

  10. Atoms, radiation, and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes basic atomic and nuclear structure, the physical processes that result in the emission of ionizing radiations, and external and internal radiation protection criteria, standards, and practices from the standpoint of their underlying physical and biological basis. The sources and properties of ionizing radiation-charged particles, photons, and neutrons-and their interactions with matter are discussed in detail. The underlying physical principles of radiation detection and systems for radiation dosimetry are presented. Topics considered include atomic physics and radiation; atomic structure and radiation; the nucleus and nuclear radiation; interaction of heavy charged particles with matter; interaction of beta particles with matter; phenomena associated with charged-particle tracks; interaction of photons with matter; neutrons, fission and criticality; methods of radiation detection; radiation dosimetry; chemical and biological effects of radiation; radiation protection criteria and standards; external radiation protection; and internal dosimetry and radiation protection

  11. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and radiological terms, quantities, and units. Basic principles of radiation protection (ICRP, IAEA, EURATOM, FRG). Biological effects of ionizing radiation. Objectives of practical radiation protection. (HP) [de

  12. Radiation protection in medical and biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente Puch, A.E. de la

    2013-01-01

    The human exposure to ionizing radiation in the context of medical and biomedical research raises specific ethical challenges whose resolution approaches should be based on scientific, legal and procedural matters. Joint Resolution MINSAP CITMA-Regulation 'Basic Standards of Radiation Safety' of 30 November 2001 (hereafter NBS) provides for the first time in Cuba legislation specifically designed to protect patients and healthy people who participate in research programs medical and biomedical and exposed to radiation. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the need to develop specific requirements for radiation protection in medical and biomedical research, as well as to identify all the institutions involved in this in order to establish the necessary cooperation to ensure the protection of persons participating in the investigation

  13. Radiation protection day - Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-06-01

    This document brings together the abstracts of all presentations given at the Radiation protection day organised in May 2000 by the French association for radiation protection techniques and sciences (ATSR) on the topic of the new European and French radiation protection regulations and their conditions of application in hospitals. Content: 1 - Presentation of the Office of Protection against Ionizing Radiations (O.P.R.I.), status of texts and evolution, practical implementation of operational dosimetry (Alain Valero, O.P.R.I.); 2 - Presentation of the Radiation Protection Service of the Army (S.P.R.A.) and its role in French army's hospitals (Jean-Baptiste Fleutot, S.P.R.A.); 3 - 96/29 European directive and water quality - transposition in French law (Daniel Robeau, I.P.S.N. Fontenay-Aux-Roses); 4 - Presentation of an automatized active dosimetry system (Michel Deron, G.E.M. System); 5 - Euratom 97/43 Directive from June 30, 1997 - assessment of the existing framework for patients protection in medical environment (Pierre Muglioni, APAVE Nord Ouest); 6 - Specificities of the ionising radiations risk in medical environment - presentation of a ionising radiations risk assessment grid (Marie-Christine Soula, Labour regional direction Ile de France); 7 - Low dose effects (B. Le Guen, E.D.F. G.D.F.); 8 - Operational dosimetry in the medical domain - the Saphydose dosemeter (Frederico Felix - Saphymo); 9 - Positrons and radiation protection (Luc Cinotti - C.E.R.M.E.P.); 10 - Workplace studies in medical environment - areas and personnel classification (Jean-Claude Houy, Sandrine Laugle, Eugene Marquis Cancer Centre Rennes); 11 - Experience feedback after 4 years of active dosimetry in a nuclear medicine service (Albert Lisbona, Centre Rene Gauducheau Nantes/Saint-Herblain); 12 - Operational dosimetry as it is performed today in CNRS laboratories (Helene Dossier - C.N.R.S. Orsay); 13 - Radiation protection in submarine naval forces (Pierre Laroche, Army's health service

  14. Basis for radiation protection of the nuclear worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara, F.A.

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of the standards for protection of persons who work in areas that have a potential for radiation exposure. A review is given of the units of radiation exposure and dose equivalent and of the value of the maximum permissible dose limits for occupational exposure. Federal Regulations and Regulatory Guides for radiation protection are discussed. Average occupational equivalent doses experienced in several operations typical of the United States Nuclear Industry are presented and shown to be significantly lower than the maximum permissible. The concept of maintaining radiation doses to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable is discussed and the practice of imposing engineering and administrative controls to provide effective radiation protection for the nuclear worker is described

  15. Radiation protection and safety infrastructures in Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paci, Rustem; Ylli, Fatos

    2008-01-01

    The paper intends to present the evolution and actual situation of radiation protection and safety infrastructure in Albania, focusing in its establishing and functioning in accordance with BBS and other important documents of specialized international organizations. There are described the legal framework of radiation safety, the regulatory authority, the services as well the practice of their functioning. The issue of the establishing and functioning of the radiation safety infrastructure in Albania was considered as a prerequisite for a good practices development in the peaceful uses of radiation sources . The existence of the adequate legislation and the regulatory authority, functioning based in the Basic Safety Standards (BSS), are the necessary condition providing the fulfilment of the most important issues in the mentioned field. The first document on radiation protection in Albania stated that 'for the safe use of radiation sources it is mandatory that the legal person should have a valid permission issued by Radiation Protection Commission'. A special organ was established in the Ministry of Health to supervise providing of the radiation protection measures. This organization of radiation protection showed many lacks as result of the low efficiency . The personnel monitoring, import, transport, waste management and training of workers were in charge of Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP). In 1992 an IAEA RAPAT mission visited Albania and proposed some recommendations for radiation protection improvements. The mission concluded that 'the legislation of the radiation protection should be developed'. In 1995 Albania was involved in the IAEA Model Project 'Upgrading of Radiation Protection Infrastructure'. This project, which is still in course, intended to establish the modern radiation safety infrastructures in the countries with low efficiency ones and to update and upgrade all aspects related with radiation safety: legislation and regulations, regulatory

  16. The Swedish Radiation Protection Institute's regulations concerning the final management of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste - with background and comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    This report presents and comments on the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute's Regulations concerning the Protection of Human Health and the Environment in connection with the Final Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel or Nuclear Waste, SSI FS 1998: 1

  17. Law of the Republic of Belarus about radiation protection of the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Law of Republic of Belarus about radiation protection of the population determines bases of legal regulation in the field of guarantee of radiation protection of the population and is directed on creation of conditions for protection of life and health of the people from harmful influence of ionising radiation. The law contains the following mail articles: Legal regulation in the field of guarantee of radiation protection; Principles of guarantee of radiation protection; Measures for guarantee of radiation protection; Functions of the state in the field of guarantee of radiation protection; System of the executive authority bodies in the field of guarantee of radiation protection; The state programs in the field of guarantee of radiation protection; State standardisation in the field of guarantee of radiation protection; Licensing of activity in sphere of handling with ionising radiation sources; Industrial control for guarantee of radiation protection; Estimation of a condition of radiation protection; Duties of the user for guarantee of radiation protection at handling with ionising radiation sources; Guarantee of radiation protection at influence of radon and gamma - radiation of natural radioisotopes; Guarantee of radiation protection at production of foodstuff and usage of drinking water; Guarantee of radiation protection of the citizens (patients) at a medical irradiation; Control and account of individual irradiation dozes; Protection of the population and workers (personnel) from radiation accident; Duties of the user of ionising radiation sources for guarantee of radiation protection at radiation accident; Standardisation of irradiation of the citizens attracted for liquidation of consequences of radiation accidents; Right of the citizens of Republic of Belarus, foreign citizens and persons without citizenship for radiation protection; Right of the citizens and public associations on receiving of information; The public control for guarantee of radiation

  18. Disposal regulations and techniques applicable to devices using ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    L'office de Protection contre les rayonnement ionisants, being a government body under the supervision of Ministry of Health and Labour, among other different missions controls the compliance of radiation protection laws with the aim to guarantee the safe operation of equipment using ionising radiation sources. These regulations concerning competence of personnel, especially in the field of medicine or application of ionising radiation on humans, are restricted only to medical doctors (or dentists in their domain) by technical constraints dealing with design of equipment and its exploitation. At the same time regulations define conditions of permanent control in order to verify compliance of radiation protection laws

  19. Strategies of NSC in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentijo, J. C.; Gil, E.; Rodriguez, M.; Ramos, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Spanish radiation protection model is consistent with the recommendations established in the ICRP-60, and it is strongly implemented in all practices and related activities of the country. the practical implementation of that model is assuring a high level of protection of workers, public and environment. The Nuclear Safety Council (CSN), as Spanish regulator, is currently involved in the implementation of a new Strategic Plan, which contains, among others, strategic and operational objectives to improve the national system of radiation protection, so they will drive the activities of the CSN in this field during the coming years. A summary of those objectives and the related action plan are described. (Author)

  20. Workstations studies and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahaye, T.; Donadille, L.; Rehel, J.L.; Paquet, F.; Beneli, C.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Vrigneaud, J.M.; Gauron, C.; Petrequin, A.; Frison, D.; Jeannin, B.; Charles, D.; Carballeda, G.; Crouail, P.; Valot, C.

    2006-01-01

    This day on the workstations studies for the workers follow-up, was organised by the research and health section. Devoted to the company doctors, for the competent persons in radiation protection, for the engineers of safety, it presented examples of methodologies and applications in the medical, industrial domain and the research, so contributing to a better understanding and an application of regulatory measures. The analysis of the workstation has to allow a reduction of the exposures and the risks and lead to the optimization of the medical follow-up. The agenda of this day included the different subjects as follow: evolution of the regulation in matter of demarcation of the regulated zones where the measures of workers protection are strengthened; presentation of the I.R.S.N. guide of help to the realization of a workstation study; implementation of a workstation study: case of radiology; the workstation studies in the research area; Is it necessary to impose the operational dosimetry in the services of radiodiagnostic? The experience feedback of a competent person in radiation protection (P.C.R.) in a hospital environment; radiation protection: elaboration of a good practices guide in medical field; the activities file in nuclear power plant: an evaluation tool of risks for the prevention. Methodological presentation and examples; insulated workstation study; the experience feedback of a provider; Contribution of the ergonomics to the determiners characterization in the ionizing radiation exposure situations;The workstations studies for the internal contamination in the fuel cycle facilities and the consideration of the results in the medical follow-up; R.E.L.I.R. necessity of workstation studies; the consideration of the human factor. (N.C.)

  1. Radiation protection education and training in Switzerland: What can be improved?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahn, Swen-Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of the amendment of the Swiss radiation protection regulations (StSV) the radiation protection education and training system is checked whether there is a need for improvement measures or the regulations have to be revised. Experiences, the comparison with other education and training systems and international developments were compiled and evaluated The responsible expert group with participants from authorities and instructors decided that no fundamental changes are necessary. In the contribution two items are discussed: The mandatory external consulting of licensees by acknowledged radiation protection experts - as required by the EU BSS (basic safety standards) with the definition of a radiation protection expert (RPE) - bears more disadvantages than advantages. On the other hand the improvement potential with respect to clearness and courtesy of requirements for radiation protection education and training in Switzerland were considered in the frame of WU-BSS revision.

  2. What is good radiation protection?; Was ist guter Strahlenschutz?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, B. [Lorenz Consulting, Essen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Radiation protection is based on the ICRP-System with its pillars justification, limitation and optimization. From this radiation protection should be the same irrespective of the application of radiation. But radiation protection in the nuclear industry is much different from the use of radiation sources or X-ray units. This is by far not due to the different technologies. It originates from the different interpretation of the system. For one person good radiation protection would mean to have no radiation exposures, to avoid radiation at all as best option and to use it only if there are no alternatives. For another person the best radiation protection would be the one which does not produce much efforts and costs. So what is reasonable? In reality the first interpretation prevails, at least in Germany. A change is needed. If we continue to exercise radiation protection as we do it today the beneficial application of radiation will be restricted unduly and might become impossible at all. A stronger orientation towards the naturally occurring radiation would help instead to regulate natural radiation in the same way as it is done for artificial radiation. The system of ICRP has to be changed fundamentally.

  3. Fundamentals of pracical radiation protection. 4. upd. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, H.G.

    2007-01-01

    Humans have no means of sensing high-energy radiation from radioactive materials and other radiation sources. Health effects may occur after a delay of several days to several years, until it is too late to take protective measures. This book does not focus on the medical aspect but on the prevention of radiation damage by appropriate preventive and technical measures. It is based on scientific investigations of radiation effects and long years of experience with radiation sources. For a better understanding, fundamental concepts of radiation physics and biology are explained, followed by chapters on radiation metering, protective measures and legal regulations. Only radiation sources with a radiation energy below about 100 MeV are considered. (orig.)

  4. Radiation Protection in Paediatric Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade and a half, special issues have arisen regarding the protection of children undergoing radiological examinations. These issues have come to the consciousness of a gradually widening group of concerned professionals and the public, largely because of the natural instinct to protect children from unnecessary harm. Some tissues in children are more sensitive to radiation and children have a long life expectancy, during which significant pathology can emerge. The instinct to protect children has received further impetus from the level of professional and public concern articulated in the wake of media responses to certain publications in the professional literature. Many institutions have highlighted the need to pay particular attention to the special problems of protecting paediatric patients. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has noted it and the IAEA's General Safety Requirements publication, Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards (BSS), requires it. This need has been endorsed implicitly in the advisory material on paediatric computed tomography scanning issued by bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration and the National Cancer Institute in the United States of America, as well as by many initiatives taken by other national and regional radiological societies and professional bodies. A major part of patient exposure, in general, and paediatric exposure, in particular, now arises from practices that barely existed two decades ago. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that this innovation has been driven both by the imaging industry and by an ever increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practice lag (inevitably) behind industrial and clinical innovations. This Safety Report is designed to consolidate and provide timely advice on

  5. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Aman; Sharma, Shivam; Parasher, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Radiation dose measurement, field of radiobiology, is considered to be critical factor for optimizing radiation protection to the health care practitioners, patients and the public. This lead to equipment that has dose - area product meters permanently installed. In many countries and even institution, the range of equipment is vast and with the opportunity for radiation protection and dose recording varies considerably. Practitioners must move with the changed demands of radiation protection but in many cases without assistance of modern advancements in technology Keeping the three basic safety measures Time, Dose and Shielding we can say 'Optimum dose is safe dose' instead of 'No dose is safe dose'. The purpose enclosed within the title 'Radiation Protection'. The use of radiation is expanding widely everyday around the world and crossing boundaries of medical imaging, diagnostic and. The way to get the ''As low as reasonably achievable' is only achievable by using methodology of radiation protection and to bring the concern of general public and practitioners over the hazards of un-necessary radiation dose. Three basic principles of radiation protection are time, distance and shielding. By minimizing the exposure time increasing the distance and including the shielding we can reduce the optimum range of dose. The ability of shielding material to attenuate radiation is generally given as half value layer. This is the thickness of the material which will reduce the amount of radiation by 50%. Lab coat and gloves must be worn when handling radioactive material or when working in a labeled radiation work area. Safety glasses or other appropriate splash shields should be used when handling radioactive material. 1. Reached to low dose level to occupational workers, public as per prescribed dose limit. 2. By mean of ALARA principle we achieved the protection from radiation besides us using the radiation for our benefit

  6. Nuclear energy and radiation protection law: no. 14 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The full text of Jordan's Nuclear Energy and Radiation Protection Law, no. 14 1987. The law's 39 articles govern all aspects organizing the utilization of nuclear energy and radiation protection activities in the country; including terms and conditions for licensing activities and personnel, and the import, export, and disposal of radioactive sources. The law establishes for the purpose of implementing its regulations, a consultative technical committee and a radiation protection board, both in the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources

  7. Radiation protection for humans and environment. 50 years competence in the professional association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, Benno; Wilhelm, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The conference proceedings of the IRPA (International radiation protection association) annual meeting 2016 contain the contribution of invited referents, other contributions and poster contributions concerning radiation protection in nuclear facilities, radiation protection of the public and environment, radioactive waste management, uranium mining, environmental monitoring, natural radioactivity, and radiation protection laws and regulations.

  8. Further European initiatives and regulations concerning radiation protection: drinking water guideline, maximum permissible contamination in food products and feeding stuff; Weitere europaeische Initiativen und Regelungen im Strahlenschutz. Trinkwasserrichtlinie, maximal zulaessige Kontaminationswerte in Nahrungs- und Futtermitteln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundigl, Stefan [Europaeische Kommission, Generaldirektion Energie, Luxemburg (Luxembourg). Abt. D3 - Strahlenschutz, EUFO 4150

    2013-07-01

    The radiation protection community has observed intensively the development of basic safety standards concerning protection against hazards of ionizing radiation. The new core part of the European radiation protection legislation is complemented by several specialized regulations relevant for radiation protection. Besides the existing regulations in the field of emergency protection the European Commission initiated a drinking water guideline that will be published in the near future. Furthermore the European commission approved a revised regulation concerning the maximum permissible contamination limits for food products and feeding stuff in case of a future nuclear accident. Together with the new radiation protection basic standards a new complete, coherent and modernized European regulation package will be accomplished.

  9. Concepts of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This seventh chapter presents the concepts and principles of safety and radiation protection, emergency situations; NORM and TENORM; radiation protection care; radiation protection plan; activities of the radiation protection service; practical rules of radiation protection and the radiation symbol

  10. A policy study in strengthening the national infrastructure for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Il [Korean Association for Radiation Protection, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jai Ki; Chang, Jaik Won; Lee, Choon Sik [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Whang, Joo Ho; Kim, Ki Ho [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    Public attitude declined further toward against the nuclear technology and eventually caused undue societal costs. Since the general public are aware of, or even afraid of, effects of radiation, it is hard to expect successful nuclear program without making them ease about radiation. In order to make the public feel easy and think that they get adequate protection, the infrastructure for radiation protection should be strengthened to the level corresponding to the utilization of nuclear/radiation technologies in the country. Public confidence in the role of the regulatory body is utmost important. The objectives of this study are to figure out a good model of regulatory body for radiation protection in Korea and to promulgate a draft legislations including provisions on the competent authority, the national policy and programs for upgraded infrastructure for radiation protection. As an appropriate form for the regulatory body in Korea, 'board of nuclear and radiation regulation', an independent and specialized organization under the direction of the prime minister, was proposed. It is expected that disadvantages dominate if the organization for radiation protection is separated from one for nuclear regulation. The proposed draft radiation protection acts consist of 8 chapters and 55 articles and some supplementary provisions. Copious footnotes provide explanations of the articles including the basis, considerations. justification.

  11. Radiation protection data sheet. Radiation protection data sheets for the use of radionuclides in unsealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    These radiation protection data sheet are devoted to responsible persons and employees of various laboratories or medical, pharmaceutical, university and industrial departments where radionuclides are handled as well as all the persons who attend to satisfy in this field. They contain the essential radiation protection data for the use of unsealed sources: physical characteristics, risk assessment, administrative procedures, recommendations, regulations and bibliography. This new series includes the following radionuclides: californium 252, curium 244, gallium 67, indium 113m, plutonium 238, plutonium 239, polonium 210, potassium 42, radium 226, thorium 232, uranium 238 and zinc 65. (O.M.)

  12. The philosophy, past and present of radiation protection in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaercher, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation protection in radiotherapy can be effected not only by legal provisions, regulations and a sophisticated supervisory apparatus but also by a high level of radiation protection awareness among medical doctors and staff who are responsible for patient radiation protection, too. This awareness will have to be promoted by imparting knowledge and experience to and by those involved with therapeutical measures. However, any exaggeration when doing so will result in causing doctors to become irritated with legal supervision and will cause radiation protection practice to deteriorate. Positive implementation of radiation protection does not only involve the handling of lead and baryte but also the joy in doing something meaningful. (orig./HSCH) [de

  13. Limiting value definition in radiation protection physics, legislation and toxicology. Fundamentals, contrasts, perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeddinck, Ulrich; Koenig, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The volume is the documentation of an ENTRIA workshop discussion on limiting value definition in radiation protection including the following contributions: Introduction in radiation protection -fundamentals concepts of limiting values, heterogeneity; evaluation standards for dose in radiation protection in the context of final repository search; definition of limiting values in toxicology; public participation to limiting value definition - a perspective for the radiation protection regulation; actual developments in radiation protection.

  14. National committee on radiation protection, 1928-1960: from professional guidelines to government regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    The National Committee on Radiation Protection is a private, self-perpetuating body of radiation experts founded in 1928 which, except during World War II, has established the basic guidelines for radiation safety in the United States. This dissertation examines three themes in its history from 1928 to 1960. On an intellectual level, how do scientists make judgments when called upon to perform a legal function, instead of conduct research? On an institutional level, how does a scientific committee develop when it serves a medical, industrial, and legal constituency larger than the research community of the scientist themselves? On a political level, how has the development of atomic energy influenced both the intellectual content of the radiation safety standards and the institutional form of the NCRP? Institutional and political concerns were found to play a significant role in the NCRP's intellectual work from 1928 to 1960. The time span can be divided into three periods, revealing a growing politicization of radiation safety: professional self-regulation (1928-1941), government advisory committee (1946-1954), and public controversy and increasing legislation (1954-1960). In 1959, political controversy led to the establishment of the Federal Radiation Council, a government agency which was to replace the NCRP

  15. Radiation protection standards for the occupational workers and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkin, S.C.; Dickson, R.L.; Halford, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    Federal Regulations concerning radiation protection standards have been undergoing significant changes within the last decade. In addition to these changes, a proliferation in the number of Federal radiation standards has also occurred. A tabulation of these regulations aids in the understanding of which current standards apply to the nuclear industry with respect to environmental contamination and exposure to workers, and the public. Furthermore, most of the current regulations, proposed revisions, and proposed new rulings fall into several major categories. A tabulation of these categories illustrates common public, occupational, and environmental needs for which the DOE, NRC, and EPA have developed their specific radiation standards. Finally, risk based systems for radiation protection have been proposed by the DOE, NRC, and EPA, although these agencies are not entirely consistent in the application of this methodology. 2 tables

  16. Decree-law no 348/89 on protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    This Decree-Law sets up a National Commission for Protection against Radiation (Comissao Nacional de Proteccao contra Radiacoes - CNPCR) within the General Directorate for Health in the Health Ministry. The Commission has advisory functions covering protection against ionizing radiation resulting from all nuclear activities. It will make recommendations on harmonizing national radiation protection regulations with those of other European Community Member States and in accordance with Community Directives in this field. The Decree-Law repeals Decree-Law No 44 060 of 25 November 1961 and Decree-Law No 45 132 of 13 June 1963 on radiation protection [fr

  17. European Legalisation on Protection Against Cosmic Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courades, M.

    1999-01-01

    Specific provisions on protection of aircrew against cosmic radiation have been laid down for the first time at EU level as part of the Basic Safety Standards for the Health Protection of the General Public and Workers against the Dangers of Ionizing Radiation (Council Directive 96/29/Euratom of 13 May 1996). These provisions, focusing mainly on health and radiological surveillance, are minimal requirements; therefore the Directive leaves significant discretion to the Member States as regards actions to be taken; Member States have to transpose these provisions into national law before 13 May 2000. Further harmonisation of Community regulations on civil aviation safety will be needed in the field of protection against cosmic radiation. This is to obtain a high level of radiation protection for the aircrew and to maintain fair competition under the common transport policy. Additionally, particular requirement are foreseen for detection and monitoring devices as well as for working instructions (Operations Manual). (author)

  18. Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, James E

    2007-01-01

    Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection offers professionals and advanced students a comprehensive coverage of the major concepts that underlie the origins and transport of ionizing radiation in matter. Understanding atomic structure and the physical mechanisms of radiation interactions is the foundation on which much of the current practice of radiological health protection is based. The work covers the detection and measurement of radiation and the statistical interpretation of the data. The procedures that are used to protect man and the environment from the potential harmful effects of

  19. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A NRPB leaflet in the 'At-a-Glance' series explains in a simple but scientifically accurate way what radiation is, the biological effects and the relative sensitivity of different parts of the human body. The leaflet then discusses radiation protection principles, radiation protection in the UK and finally the effectiveness of this radiation protection as judged by a breakdown of the total dose received by an average person in the UK, a heavy consumer of Cumbrian seafood, an average nuclear industry worker and an average person in Cornwall. (UK)

  20. Code of practice of radiation protection in fixed nuclear gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltayeb, M. A. M.

    2012-09-01

    The present work aims at developing and updating a code of practice of radiation protection in fixed nuclear gauges that comply with current international recommendations. The work also intended to evaluate the current radiation protection situation in two selected companies using nuclear gauges in Sudan. A draft of the code is proposed which includes the basic principle of protection such as source construction and gauges radiation monitoring, storage maintenance and leak testing as well as specific issues related to nuclear gauges. The practical part of this study included investigation of radiation protection in the comparisons using nuclear gauges for level detection, to evaluate the level of radiation protection and the compliance to the regulatory authority regulations. The result revealed that the two companies do not have an effective radiation protection program and that can lead to exposure of workers to unnecessary doses. Some recommendations were stated, if implemented they could improve the status of radiation protection in those companies. (Author)

  1. Training in radiation protection and the safe use of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The need for education and training in the various disciplines of radiation protection has long been recognized by the IAEA, the International Labour Organization (ILO), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the World Health Organization and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). This need has been partially met through the many training courses undertaken by these organizations, either individually or in collaboration. The IAEA has assisted developing Member States in the training of specialists in radiation protection and safety through its organized educational and specialized training courses, workshops, seminars, fellowships and scientific visits. Training is an important means of promoting safety culture and enhancing the level of competence of personnel involved in radiation protection activities, and has acquired a place in the IAEA's programme accordingly. For example, the IAEA Post-graduate Educational Course in Radiation Protection and the Safe Use of Radiation Sources is regularly offered in countries around the world, and has been provided in Arabic, English, French, Spanish and Russian. The training provided by the IAEA is primarily aimed at regulators, professionals working in radiation protection and those responsible for the development of training programmes in their own countries. The importance of adequate and appropriate training for all those working with ionizing radiation has been highlighted by the results of the IAEA's investigations of radiological accidents. A significant contributory factor in a number of the accidents has been a lack of adequate training, which gave rise to errors with serious consequences. This report provides assistance in organizing training and complying with the requirements on training of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS). The previous version of this report. Technical Reports

  2. Code of practice for radiation protection in veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, J.; Fenton, D.; McGarry, A.; McAllister, H.; Skelly, C

    2002-11-01

    This Code of Practice updates the Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in Veterinary Radiology prepared by the Nuclear Energy Board in June 1989. The Code is designed to give guidance to veterinary surgeons to ensure that they, their employees and members of the public are adequately protected from the hazards of ionising radiation arising from the use of X-ray equipment and radioactive substances in the practice of veterinary medicine. It reflects the regulations as specified in the Radiological Protection Act, 1991, (Ionising Radiation) Order, 2000 (S.I. No. 125 of 2000)

  3. Regulatory requirements for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, E.A.; Cunningham, R.E.; Hard, J.E.; Mattson, R.J.; Smith, R.D.; Peterson, H.T. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Regulatory requirements for radiation protection have evolved and matured over several decades. Due to the wide adoption of recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP), there exists international agreement on the principles to be followed for radiation protection. This foundation will be increasingly important due to the growing need for international agreements and standards for radiation protection and radioactive materials management. During the infancy of the commercial nuclear industry, primary reliance was placed on the protection of the individual, both in the work force and as a member of the public. With the growth of nuclear power in the 1960's and 1970's, environmental impact assessments and expert reviews of bio-effects data have focused attention on statistical risks to large population groups and the use of the collective dose commitment concept to estimate potential effects. The potential release of long-lived radionuclides from the nuclear fuel cycle requires further consideration of radionuclide accumulation in the biosphere and calls for controls conceived and implemented at the international level. The initial development efforts for addressing these concerns already have been instituted by the ICRP and the IAEA. However, formal international agreements and a unified set of international standards may be required to implement the recommendations of these groups. Further international efforts in the field of radiation protection are also called for in developing waste management practices and radioactive effluent control technology, in site selection for fuel reprocessing plants and waste dispersal facilities, and for ensuring safe transport of high-level wastes in various forms. Since the regulation of very low dose rates and doses will be involved, it will be useful to reexamine dose-effect relationships and societal goals for health protection. Improved criteria and methodologies for ''as low as readily

  4. Mandatory certification of personal protection equipment against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, Tulio A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper analyze the regulations establishing mandatory certification of personal protection equipment, including those aim to protect against ionizing radiation due to the external irradiation and to the radioactive contamination. (author)

  5. An outlook to radiation protection development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martincic, R.; Strohal, P.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation protection and safety have developed over many decades as the effects of ionizing radiation have been better and better understood. Some events in the last decade had essential impact on radiation protection policy/philosophy and related safety standards. Among them are available data of some long term radio-epidemiological studies of populations exposed to radiation. Investigations of the survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki illustrated that exposure to radiation has also a potential for the delayed induction of malignancies. They also showed that irradiation of pregnant women may result with certain mental damage in foetus. Several big radiation accidents which appeared in the last decade also had an impact on developments in radiation protection philosophy and practices. A well known Chernobyl accident showed that limited knowledge was available at the time of the accident on transfer of radionuclides in a specific environment, radioecological effects and pathways of highly radioactive atmospheric precipitation generated during the accident on various components of the environment. New scientific data indicated also that in some parts of human environment there are measurable effects of chronic exposure resulting from natural radiation. UNSCEAR is periodically publishing the most valuable set of data as compilation, and disseminates information on the health effects of radiation and on levels of radiation exposure due to different sources. These data are also the best guidelines for the necessary improvements and updating of radiation protection practices and philosophies. The latest ICRP-60 publication and recently issued International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources are reflecting many of the above mentioned findings. On the other hand the use of radiation sources is increasing day by day, and many new facilities applying radiation in radiotherapy

  6. Royal Order of 5 December 1975 amending the Royal Order of 11 May 1971 embodying the general Military Regulations for Protection Against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This Royal Order amends the Royal Order on general Military Regulations for Protection against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations to bring it into line with the Royal Order of 23 December 1970, amending the general Regulations for Protection of the Population and Workers against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations of 28 February 1963, subject to certain adaptations specific to military activities. (NEA) [fr

  7. Radiation Protection Services Division: progress report for 1992-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massand, O.P.; Murthy, B.K.S.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Radiation Protection Services Division during 1993, for implementation of radiation safety in all institutions in India using radiation sources in medical, industrial and research applications. It gives information about personnel monitoring using photographic film and TLD badges, neutron monitoring badges, advisory and licensing services, regulation, transport of radioactive materials and periodic protection survey. About 33 publications by the staff of the Division are also listed. (author). 4 tabs

  8. Radiation protection. Basic concepts of ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Tsutomu; Hirata, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    The title subject is easily explained. Main international organizations for radiation protection are United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The UNSCEAR objectively summarizes and publishes scientific findings; ICRP, an NGO, takes part in recommending the radiological protection from the expertized aspect; and IAEA, a UN autonomy, aims at peaceful usage of atomic power. These organizations support the legal regulation and standard of nations. The purpose of the ICRP recommendation (Pub. 103, 2007) is to contribute to the appropriate protection of radiation hazardous effects, which are assumed to be linearly proportional (the model of linear no-threshold, LNT) that radiation risk exists even at the lowest dose. When a change in the single cell results in hazardous alteration, the causative effects are called stochastic effects, which include the mutation leading to cancer formation and genetic effect in offspring (not observed in man). ICRP says the validity of LNT for the stochastic effects essentially from the protective aspect, although epidemiological data support it at >100 mSv exposure. The deterministic effects are caused by loss of cell itself or of its function, where the threshold is defined to be the dose causing >1% of disorder or death. Radiation protective system against exposure is on the situation (programmed, emergent and natural), category (occupational, public and medical) and 3 principles of justification, optimization and application of dose limit. (T.T.)

  9. The responsible radiation protection supervisor: Who actually is he? Legal entities under public law and their legal responsibilities pursuant to radiation protection laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkmann, M.

    1998-01-01

    All radiation protection relevant activities subject to licencing or notifying include observation of legally allocated responsibilities. Responsible radiation protection supervisor is the licence owner in person. If the holder is a legal entity, that entity is responsible as such. The executives of the entity exercise the functions of a responsible radiation protection officer, or may delegate them to an authorized deputy. In this case, the yardstick of a possible liability may be changed. The liability of the responsible persons is determined by the general legal regulations. (orig.) [de

  10. Some human-related problems in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasuo

    1980-01-01

    Radiation protection includes both human and source-related problems. The human problems have not only medical but also social aspects, such as labor management. Special attention should be paid to the fact that the subject of radiation protection is not a human being as living thing but as member of society. ICRP recommended that conditions of work can be divided into two classed, working condition A and B, according to annual exposure. This application is of great value to radiation protection practice. Nevertheless the legal regulations do not adopt it yet. The present condition of the medical surveillance of radiation workers is not appropriate from the scientific standpoint. This is the difficult problem which is caused by the delay of the legal application of ICRP recommendation. Compensation for occupational radiation hazards should be overlooked. This problem have been investigated by an authorized committee, but a number of unsolved problems still remain. (author)

  11. Enhancing radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    When a new radiotherapy center in Gezira, Sudan, delivers its first therapeutic dose to a cancer patient, two things happen: A young man begins to regain his health and looks forward to being better able to support his family and contribute to his community; and a developing nation realizes an important step toward deriving the social and economic benefits of nuclear science. The strategic application of nuclear technology in particular fields- human health, industry, food and agriculture, energy, water resources and environmental protection - has enormous potential to help shape the future of developing countries. But past radiological incidents, several of which involved high levels of exposure or death (Bolivia, Brazil, Cost Rica, Georgia, Ghana, Morocco, Panama and Thailand), underscore the inherent and very serious risks. For this reason, the IAEA's Departments of Technical Cooperation and Nuclear Safety and Security partner closely, particularly in the area of radiation protection. They strive to consider every minute detail in the equation that brings together radiation sources, modern technologies, people and the environment. Launched in 1996, the Model Project on Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure (the Model Project) aimed to help Member States: achieve capacities that underpin the safe and secure application of nuclear technologies; establish a legislative framework and regulatory infrastructure; develop exposure control mechanisms to protect workers, medical patients, the public and the environment; and achieve preparedness and planned response to radiological emergencies. In fact, the hospital scenario above typically marks several years of intense collaboration amongst scientists, legislators, regulators, politicians and administrators from both Member States and the IAEA, orchestrated and aided by regional managers and technical experts from the IAEA. As radiation protection team members can attest, every application of nuclear technology

  12. Radiation. Protection. Health. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, Michael; Maringer, Franz Josef; Steurer, Andreas; Schwaiger, Martina; Timal, Guenter

    2015-01-01

    The topics of the meeting are the diagnostic and therapeutic application of ionizing radiations, the application of radiation in research, industry and engineering and radiation protection. The volume includes the following chapters: Radiation protection and society, radiation protection infrastructure, population and environment, metrology and measuring techniques, 1. Workshop on population and environment, NORM and radon, 2. Update: dose - extent of damage - limiting value definition, radiation protection for personnel (except medicine), radiation protection in medicine.

  13. Radiation protection principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail Bahari

    2007-01-01

    The presentation outlines the aspects of radiation protection principles. It discussed the following subjects; radiation hazards and risk, the objectives of radiation protection, three principles of the system - justification of practice, optimization of protection and safety, dose limit

  14. Radiation protection training and education in Europe.An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlbruch, Jan-Willem

    2013-01-01

    In order to realize radiation protection reliably mandatory protection goals have to be defined. These goals were formulated using the fundamentals of radiation protection and are described by the terms ''justification'', ''dose limitation'' and ''dose reduction and dose minimization''. While there is consensus within Europe with respect to the protection goals the implementation of one of the main components, the radiation protection education and training is regulated in very different ways in European countries. At the same time the necessity of comparable certificates is growing, which will be enhanced by the amendment of the EU BSS (basic safety standards). The authors recommend to study the different approaches to learn from each other.

  15. National congress of radiation protection - Book of presentations (slides)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    This document brings together all the available presentations (slides) of the 9. French national congress of radiation protection. The congress comprised 9 tutorial sessions and 13 ordinary sessions. The tutorial sessions covered the following topics: T1 - Fukushima accident's consequences on terrestrial environment; T2 - The efficient dose: use and limitations in the industrial and medical domains; T3 - Revision of the NFC 15-160 standard relative to radiological facilities; T4 - Medical implants and low frequency electromagnetic fields; T5 - Report from the working group on radiological zoning; T6 - Incidents in medical environment; T7 - ADR: European agreement about the international road transport of dangerous goods; T8 - Cigeo project: industrial geologic disposal facility; T9 - Dose control in medical imaging: what progress since 2010? The ordinary sessions gathered fifty-nine presentations dealing with the following subjects: 1 - effects of ionising radiations on man and ecosystems; 2 - radiation protection regulation and standards; 3 - radiation protection in incident, accident and post-accident situation; 4 - radiation protection of populations and ecosystems; 5 - Radiation protection and society; 6/11 - Radiation protection of patients; 7/8 - Eye lens irradiation and dosimetry; 9 - Non-ionising radiations; 10/12 - Radiation protection in professional environments; 13 - advances in dosimetry and metrology

  16. Radiation Protection Ordinance. Preventive Radiation Protection Act. 3. rev. and enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, R.; Zerlett, G.

    1990-01-01

    This 3rd edition presents the official explanations of the legislative intent behind the Radiation Protection Ordinance of 1976 and the 2nd amending ordinance, and the commentaries which as usual refer to the legal aspects and the related medical, scientific, and technical aspects. As a consequence of the reactor accident at Chernobyl, the existing radiation protection law has been extended by the Act for Preventive Measures for Pretection of the Population Against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiation (Preventive Radiation Protection Act), establishing preventive legal provisions and measures, so that this new edition has likewise been extended by commentaries on the Protective Radiation Protection Act and an introduction to the new area of law. The material also includes the Act for Establishment of a Federal Office for Radiation Protection, of October 9, 1989, which amended the Atomic Energy Act and the Preventive Radiation Protection Act. The correction of the Radiation Protection Ordinance of October 16, 1989 (BGBl. I p. 1926) has been incorporated into the text of the amended version of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. Court decisions and literature referred to cover material published up to the first months of 1989. (orig.) [de

  17. Australia's proactive approach to radiation protection of the environment: how integrated is it with radiation protection of humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, G A; Grzechnik, M; Tinker, R; Larsson, C M

    2018-01-01

    Australia's regulatory framework has evolved over the past decade from the assumption that protection of humans implies protection of the environment to the situation now where radiological impacts on non-human species (wildlife) are considered in their own right. In an Australian context, there was a recognised need for specific national guidance on protection of non-human species, for which the uranium mining industry provides the major backdrop. National guidance supported by publications of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (Radiation Protection Series) provides clear and consistent advice to operators and regulators on protection of non-human species, including advice on specific assessment methods and models, and how these might be applied in an Australian context. These approaches and the supporting assessment tools provide a mechanism for industry to assess and demonstrate compliance with the environmental protection objectives of relevant legislation, and to meet stakeholder expectations that radiological protection of the environment is taken into consideration in accordance with international best practice. Experiences from the past 5-10 years, and examples of where the approach to radiation protection of the environment has been well integrated or presented some challenges will be discussed. Future challenges in addressing protection of the environment in existing exposure situations will also be discussed.

  18. Strengthening the radiation protection culture: a priority of EDF radiation protection policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcier, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In order to improve the management of radiation protection at EDF nuclear power plants, the Human Factors Group of the Research and Development Division of EDF has performed some studies on the appropriation process of the radiation protection requirements. These studies have notably shown that an efficient application of the radiation protection requirements lies on a comprehension by all workers of the meaning of these requirements. Furthermore, they should not be applied under the constraint or because of the fear of a sanction, but the workers need to perceive and understand the benefits in terms of protection associated with the radiation protection requirements. The strengthening of the radiation protection culture is therefore a key element of the radiation protection policy developed by EDF. This culture lies on an awareness of the health risks potentially associated with low levels of ionising radiations, as well as on the knowledge of tools, techniques and good practices developed to control the level of exposures and improve the radiation protection. Various type of actions have been undertaken to reinforce among the relevant players (exposed and non-exposed workers, contractors, all levels of management,... ) an awareness of radiation protection in order to integrate it in their day to day work: elaboration of a 'radiation protection system of reference' explaining how the radiation protection regulatory requirements are applied at EDF, publication of a 'radiation protection handbook' available for all workers (including contractors), training sessions, creation of networks of specialists from the various nuclear power plants on specific radiation protection issues, organisation of feed-back experience forum, etc. Beyond these specific actions, i t is also important to ensure a support and an assistance on the field by dedicated specialists. In this perspective, the health physicists have to play a key role in order to

  19. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998. Guide to the Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety licensing framework. 1. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide information to Commonwealth entities who may require a license under the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (ARPANS) Act 1998 to enable them to posses, have control of, use, operate or dispose of radiation sources. The guide describes to which agencies and what activities require licensing. It also addresses general administrative and legal matters such as appeal procedures, ongoing licensing requirements, monitoring and compliance. Applicants are advised to consult the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998 and accompanying Regulations when submitting applications

  20. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998. Guide to the Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety licensing framework; 1. ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide information to Commonwealth entities who may require a license under the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (ARPANS) Act 1998 to enable them to posses, have control of, use, operate or dispose of radiation sources. The guide describes to which agencies and what activities require licensing. It also addresses general administrative and legal matters such as appeal procedures, ongoing licensing requirements, monitoring and compliance. Applicants are advised to consult the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998 and accompanying Regulations when submitting applications

  1. Pakistan nuclear safety and radiation protection ordinance-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    An act to provide the regulations of nuclear safety and radiation protection in Pakistan has been explained. A legal and licensing procedure to handle production of nuclear materials, processing, storage of radioactive products and wastes has been described under this regulation. (A.B.)

  2. An evaluation of radiation protection in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berteig, L.; Flatby, J.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of radiation protection in Norway is presented. Statens Institutt for Straalehygiene is the organization which performs the radiation protection functions on a national basis, and the laws upon which its activities are based are cited. The relevant parts of the ILO Convention nr.115 are also cited. The tasks of the institute are divided in the following programmes:- (i)radiation protection regulations and inspection, (ii) training and information (iii) emergency planning and provisions (iv) development of methods and, (v) administration. These programmes are defined and briefly described. The organisational structure and tasks are described. Analysis in tabular form of the status of the tasks leads to the conclusion that, while the institute's laboratories and equipment are satisfactory shortage of personnel restricts the adequate performance of its tasks. (JIW)

  3. Radiation Protection Elephants in the Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    As our system of radiological protection evolves, several significant issues loom within radiation protection discussions and publications. These issues influence the nature of epidemiological and radiobiological research and the establishment of radiation protection recommendations, standards, and regulations. These issues are like the proverbial e lephants in the room . They are large, and it is unwise to ignore them. This paper discusses the impact of three young elephants as they make their presence increasingly obvious: increased cancer susceptibility from early-life exposure to radiation, terrorism and fear of radiation, and patient safety. Increased cancer susceptibility from early-life exposure to radiation is emerging as a discussion topic related to the safety of computed tomography (CT) and other medical modalities. Shortly after publication of CT dose data, manufacturers were helping to reduce doses to children by increasing flexibility for adjustment of technique factors. Also, radiation epidemiological data are being used in the development of guidance on exposure to chemical carcinogens during early life. Re-emergence of public fear of radiation has been fueled by threats of radiological dispersion devises and confusing messages about personal decontamination, emergency room acceptance or rejection of contaminated victims, and environmental clean-up. Finally, several professional publications have characterized risk of medical radiation exposure in terms of patient deaths even though epidemiological data do not support such conclusions. All three of these elephants require excellent science and sophisticated data analysis to coax them from the room. Anecdotal communications that confuse the public should be avoided. These are not the only elephants in the room, but these three are making their presence increasingly obvious. This paper discusses the need for radiation protection professionals to rely on good science in the evolution of the system of

  4. Legislative and statutory framework of radiation protection of patients in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milu, Constantin

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the legislative and statutory framework of radiation protection of patients in Romania, starting with the basic Law 111/1996 on the Safe Deployment of Nuclear Activities, and its amendments in 1998 and 2006 and the general nuclear safety regulation, which is in agreement with the international regulation. Regarding the medical exposure, jointly the Nuclear Regulatory Authority and the Ministry of Public Health issued in 2002 a separate regulation, which was published in the Official Gazette Part I No. 446 bis in 25 June 2002 and represents the transposition of the European Directive 97/43/EURATOM of 30 June 1997 on health protection on individuals against the dangers of ionizing radiation in relation to medical exposure, and repealing Directive 84/466/EURATOM. Following this document, several specific regulations on radiation protection of the patients were approved by the Ministry of Public Health. Some practical problems already arise, particularly due to the lack of medical physics departments in hospitals. (author)

  5. Germany (Federal Republic). Ministry of the Interior. Order on protection against damage due to ionising radiation. Radiation Protectin Order. StrlSchV 20 Oct. 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-02-01

    The order is arranged in parts, entitled: introductory provisions; control provisions (handling radioactive matter, the carriage of radioactive matter, the import and export of radioactive matter, the construction and operation of installation for generating ionising radiation, employees and other persons working under supervision, design approval); safety regulations (general regulations, protection of the population and the environment against the hazards of ionising radiation, occupational exposure to radiation, radiation protection areas, physical protection and control, medical supervision, instruments for measuring radiation, other safety regulations); fines; and final provisions. (U.K.)

  6. Radiation protection in the field of environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yamin

    2003-01-01

    The relationship of radiation protection with environmental protection, the sources that may give rise to the environmental radiation contamination, and the system of radiation protection and the fundamental principles and requirements for radiation environmental management are introduced. Some special radiation protection problems faced with in the radiation environmental management are discussed. (author)

  7. Considerations on radiation protection of aircraft crew in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federico, C.A.; Goncalez, O.L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discuss the guidelines existing in the ICRP documents related to radiation protection applied to the aircraft crew and it is presented a brief report on the evolution of these studies in this field, and also the regulations already adopted by the integrating of the European Union, Canada and USA. Also, are presented some peculiarities of Brazilian air space and the legislation applied to work with ionizing radiation, discussing the general aspects of radiation protection applied to the aircraft crew in Brazil

  8. The Duty of the ANARAP-MAD for the Development of Radiation Protection in Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratovonjanahary, F.

    2010-01-01

    Association NAtionale de Radio Protection-MADagascar (ANARAP-MAD), to develop the radiation protection in Madagascar; to promote the radiation protection in Madagascar; to set up links with international institutions dealing with the same objectives (I.A.E.A., W.H.O., etc...); to care for the enforcement of the regulation in radiation protection; to propose improvements and amendments; to find solutions to problems relevant to the enforcement of the regulation; to inform and to train in the field of radiation protection; to contribute in the development of the science, all activities carried out by the association are based on the existing legislation in the country. Despite the insufficiency of financial support, the ANARAP-MAD had always made an effort to carry out activities for the development of radiation protection infrastructure in Madagascar. The main problem is also that the regulatory Authority is not yet operational. However, the ANARAP-MAD, with the support of the Madagascar-INSTN, has the challenge to effectively promoting radiation protection in Madagascar

  9. Introduction to radiation protection practical knowledge for handling radioactive sources

    CERN Document Server

    Grupen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    The book presents an accessible account of the sources of ionising radiation and the methods of radiation protection. The basics of nuclear physics which are directly related to radiation protection are briefly discussed. The book describes the units of radiation protection, the measurement techniques, biological effects of radiation, environmental radiation, and many applications of radiation. For each chapter there is a problem section with full solutions. A detailed glossary and many useful information in appendixes complete the book. The author has addressed the issue of internationality to make sure that the text and, in particular, the complicated regulations can be easily interpreted not only in Europe and the United States but also in other countries. The subject of radiation protection requires a certain amount of mathematics. For those who have forgotten the basic rules of calculus a short refresher course in the form of a mathematical appendix is added.

  10. Training in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, F.

    1998-01-01

    Persons who are exposed to ionizing radiation at their workplace have to be trained in radiation protection. According to the Radiation Protection Ordinance the person with responsibility in radiation protection has to guarantee that the training is performed twice a year. Our training material was created especially for the persons defined in the Radiation Protection Ordinance and the X-ray Ordinance. It enables persons who teach (generally the radiation protection officer) to perform the training without tedious study and preparation of the documents. Our material is not just another textbook for radiation protection but rather a folder with colour transparencies and explanatory texts which make a difference in volume and price in comparison to other existing materials. (orig.) [de

  11. The Swedish Radiation Protection Institute's regulations concerning the final management of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste - with background and comments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-11-01

    This report presents and comments on the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute's Regulations concerning the Protection of Human Health and the Environment in connection with the Final Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel or Nuclear Waste, SSI FS 1998: 1.

  12. Radiation protection seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Seminar, was organized by the Argentina Association of Biology and Nuclear Medicine, and Bacon Laboratory, the 20 june 2012, in the Buenos Aires city of Argentina. In this event were presented some papers on the following topics: methods of decontamination, radiation protection of patients; concepts of radiation protection and dosimetry.

  13. Domestic hygienic legislation concerning population radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marej, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    Problems and principles of domestic sanitary legislation, concerning population radiation protection, are considered. The legislation envisages preventive measures, directed to contamination preventation of the main environmental objects, it regulates their content in the objects, their human intake and ionizing radiation doses, which might affect population. Existing domestic hygienic guides and safety standards for personnel and population are enumerated and characterized

  14. [The new law on radiation protection as a consequence of the EU safety standard of 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, G

    2017-07-01

    The transformation of a European guideline (2013/59/Euratom) from 2013 into national law requires adaptation of the national statutory regulations. This year, all areas of protection from ionizing radiation will be subject to the new radiation protection law (StrlSchG). Through this, the German X‑ray and Radiation Protection Acts will be combined to form a higher level of authority. The main parts of the StrlSchG will receive a new classification and will be organized according to the exposure scenario: radiation protection in planned exposure scenarios, radiation protection in emergency exposure scenarios, radiation protection in existing exposure scenarios, and the regulation of overall exposure scenarios. The most important or modified regulated points for radiology are concerned with early recognition, where the application of X‑ray or nuclear radiation is permitted in principle under certain conditions; the consultation of medical physics experts in all diagnostic investigative procedures involving radiation and applications for radiological intervention that are linked to high doses in the person under investigation; teleradiology, another special case of the application of X‑rays in humans that requires approval, now with the "required" technical qualification in radiation protection, formerly with the "full" technical qualification, in addition to research, the simplified approval procedure being substituted with a notification procedure.Furthermore, in contrast to previous regulations, those tasked with radiation protection can contact the regulators directly in the case of conflict, which indicates considerable reinforcement of their authority.The only dose limit that will be considerably reduced is the organ-specific equivalent dose of the eye lens, where the highest value will be reduced from 150 to 20 mSv per year in those who are exposed to radiation professionally.

  15. Radiation Protection, Safety and Security Issues in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boadu, Mary; Emi-Reynolds, Geoffrey; Amoako, Joseph Kwabena; Akrobortu, Emmanuel; Hasford, Francis

    2016-11-01

    Although the use of radioisotopes in Ghana began in 1952, the Radiation Protection Board of Ghana was established in 1993 and served as the national competent authority for authorization and inspection of practices and activities involving radiation sources until 2015. The law has been superseded by an Act of Parliament, Act 895 of 2015, mandating the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Ghana to take charge of the regulation of radiation sources and their applications. The Radiation Protection Institute in Ghana provided technical support to the regulatory authority. Regulatory and service activities that were undertaken by the Institute include issuance of permits for handling of a radiation sources, authorization and inspection of radiation sources, radiation safety assessment, safety assessment of cellular signal towers, and calibration of radiation-emitting equipment. Practices and activities involving application of radiation are brought under regulatory control in the country through supervision by the national competent authority.

  16. Radiation safety and protection on the nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.; Bogorad, V.I.; Vasil'chenko, V.N.; Klyuchnikov, A.A.; Litvinskaya, T.V.; Slepchenko, A.Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The main issues of the radiation safety and protection provision on the nuclear power plants are considered in this monograph. The description of the basic sources of the radiation danger on NPPs, the principles, the methods and the means of the safety and radiation monitoring provision are shown. The special attention is paid to the issues of the ionizing radiation regulation

  17. Current state and trend of radiation regulation system in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonehara, Hidenori

    2004-01-01

    Japanese regulation system for safety against radiation essentially started from 'Atomic Energy Basic Law' enacted in 1955 and 'Law Concerning Prevention of Radiation Hazards due to Radioisotopes, etc' enacted in 1957, has been regarded as a central rule for radiation protection and safety. Related laws and regulations have been enacted together with their revision. Radiation Council, established in the Science and Technology Agency in 1962 and now belonging to the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, has deliberated basically on International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) statements for legal revision and has set up working groups for current problems. Activities of the groups have concerned ICRP Publication 60 (1990) and later related publications for incorporating the principle into laws as to concepts of dose limits, effective dose, and then of exemption and exclusion. International status of the Japanese regulation, problems and tasks in the regulation are also commented. (N.I.)

  18. Procedures for the systematic appraisal of operational radiation protection programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to give guidance to management and regulators of organisations using ionizing radiations on a technique for systematically appraising their operational radiation protection programme in order that its adequacy and effectiveness can be objectively determined. The appraisal technique is based on analytical trees and can be used to examine either a whole programme, to determine its completion and adequacy or to examine one component of a programme in considerable detail. This document will not develop technical recommendations on particular radiation protection programmes. These will be found in the appropriate Safety Series document on operational radiation protection. 8 refs, figs

  19. The radiation protection units of the Austrian fire brigades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspek, W.; Schoenhacker, S.

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1960s, Austrian fire brigades have been involved in radiation protection. With the preparations for the NPP Zwentendorf and the building of the research reactor in Seibersdorf, the first radiation protection units of the fire brigade were founded. 45 years later: The NPP Zwentendorf never saw its start-up, the use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity is prohibited by a constitutional law, and the research reactor is being decommissioned. What's left are the radiation protection units of the fire brigades. The contribution gives an overview of similarities and differences of the radiation protection units in the nine federal states of Austria, with a special focus on equipment, training and organisation. Nation-wide guidelines and regulations for the tactics of first responders at radiological emergencies are presented and a couple of incidents will be analysed. (orig.)

  20. Radiation protection in the intervenmtional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Benjamin V.; Lissek, Friedrich; Waldeck, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Interventional radiology and neuroradiology covers a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic methods. A minimal invasive percutaneous access under imaging guidance is common for all these methods. The legal regulations for quality assurance are reviewed, technical possibilities for dose reduction and the importance of modern radiation protection procedures are discussed.

  1. Radiation protection, 1975. Annual EPA review of radiation protection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The EPA, under its Federal Guidance authorities, is responsible for advising the President on all matters pertaining to radiation and, through this mechanism, to provide guidance to other Federal agencies on radiation protection matters. Highlights are presented of significant radiation protection activities of all Federal agencies which were completed in 1975, or in which noteworthy progress was made during that period, and those events affecting members of the public. State or local activities are also presented where the effects of those events may be more far-reaching. At the Federal level significant strides have been made in reducing unnecessary radiation exposure through the efforts of the responsible agencies. These efforts have resulted in the promulgation of certain standards, criteria and guides. Improved control technologies in many areas make it feasible to reduce emissions at a reasonable cost to levels below current standards and guides. This report provides information on the significant activities leading to the establishment of the necessary controls for protection of public health and the environment. Radiation protection activities have been undertaken in other areas such as medical, occupational and consumer product radiation. In the context of radiation protection, ancillary activities are included in this report in order to present a comprehensive overview of the events that took place in 1975 that could have an effect on public health, either directly or indirectly. Reports of routine or continuing radiation protection operations may be found in publications of the sponsoring Federal agencies, as can more detailed information about activities reported in this document. A list of some of these reports is included

  2. The importance of research for the regulatory framework of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt-Hannig, A.

    1998-01-01

    On behalf of the Federal ministry for Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), the Federal Office for Radiation Protection in Germany (BfS) is carrying out a research program in the field of radiation protection. More that 60 research and study contracts in 11 different radiation protection areas are funded every year, and these are carried out mainly by universities and research centers. The results of these projects are used in developing radiation protection regulations, guidelines and procedures to fulfill the special radiation protection tasks of the BMU, the execution of which is required by law. Planning, scientific and administrative management, provision of assistance as well as expert evaluation of the results from these projects lies within the area of responsibility of the BfS. A report issued annually provides information on preliminary and final results of radiation protection research projects in Germany (author) Germany (author)

  3. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations

  4. Radiation protection. A guide for scientists and physicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, J.

    1972-01-01

    This manual was written for individuals who wish to become qualified in radiation protection as an adjunct to working with sources of ionizing radiation or using radionuclides in the field of medicine. It provides the radiation user with information needed to protect himself and others and to understand and comply with governmental and institutional regulations regarding the use of radionuclides and radiation machines. It is designed for a wide spectrum of users, including physicians, research scientists, engineers, and technicians. It should be useful also to radiation safety officers, members of radiation safety committees, and others who are responsible for the proper use of radiation sources, although they may not be working with the sources directly. The presentation in this manual is designed to obviate the need for reviews of atomic and radiation physics, and the mathematics has been limited to elementary arithmetical and algebraic operations

  5. Protection of the patient from ionizing radiation in medical exposure in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, T.; Ben Shlomo, A.; Berlovitz, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The ICRP issued in 1991 its recent recommendations related to the protection of the worker, the public and the patient from ionizing radiation. In 1996 the IAEA together with the WHO, the ILO and other major international bodies published the Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the BSS). The BSS are based on the core principles of Justification, Optimization and Dose Limitation. Many countries adopted the radiation protection philosophy and the administrative framework presented in the BSS as the basis for their legal radiation protection system. Following the publication of the BSS, the EC published in 1997 its Medical Exposure Directive 97/43 /Euratom. Article 14 of the ME Directive requires that EC member states bring into force the laws and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this directive before 13 May 2000. Most EC member states have complied with this requirement and issued the relevant laws and /or regulations. The Ionizing Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations that came into force in the UK on 13 May 2000 are a good example

  6. Radiation protection optimization without and with guide values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, B.; Wuertemberger, M.

    2013-01-01

    Optimization of radiation protection is one of the well-known three pillars of the ICRP System of Radiation Protection and is part of the regulations in nearly all countries. Since ICRP Publication 103 in this context dose constraints are part of many discussions and often lead to confusion. A study of NEA 2011 about the use of dose constraints investigated the situation in Europe and revealed that values for doses are used but seldom in the sense of the ICRP. The draft of the new Euratom-BSS requires also dose constraints for occupational protection as well as for the protection of the public. Do we really need these Dose Constraints? Is it really important to invest resources into the definition of and compliance with figures? Is it not more important to bring the spirit of ALARA into practice? We believe, radiation protection can be done completely without dose constraints and nevertheless successfully. This is demonstrated by the development of occupational exposure worldwide. Especially, radiation protection optimization shall not be restricted to the establishment of dose constraints; it is much more. However, constraints in the sense of guide values can be useful e.g. as benchmark for 'good' radiation protection, but always taken into account the individual circumstances. The authors demonstrate by explaining their operational practice how to use dose constraints reasonable without creating new limits. (orig.)

  7. Radiation protection in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elamin, O.I.; Hajmusa, E.A.; Shaddad, I.A.

    2001-01-01

    The regulatory framework as established by the Sudan Atomic Energy Commission (SAEC) Act, promulgated in 1996, is described in the report. Three levels of responsibility in meeting radiation protection requirements are established: the Board, the Radiation Protection Technical Committee as the competent authority in the field of radiation protection, and the SAEC Department of Radiation Protection and Environmental Monitoring as the implementing technical body. The report also refers to environmental activities, patient doses in diagnostic radiology, the management of disused sources, emergency preparedness and orphan sources, and the national training activities in the radiation protection field. (author)

  8. The physics of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Schuricht, V.; Steuer, J.

    1996-01-01

    The book is aimed at both practising specialists and scientists wishing to learn about the fundamental science of radiation protection. The first part of the book, 'Physical Fundamentals of Radiation Protection', presents a concise description of radiation sources and radiation fields, interaction of radiation with matter, radiation effects and radiation damage, basic concept of radiation protection, radiation exposure of man, radiation protection measuring techniques and physical fundamentals for limiting radiation exposure. The second part, 'Calculational Exercises for Radiation Protection' is intended to supplement the first part by carrying out relevant calculations, amending and adding special aspects and to give guidance in solving practical problems. The book is written for scientists as well as for students and staff working in nuclear facilities, hospitals and institutions responsible for radiation and environmental protection. (UK)

  9. Focus radiation protection; Schwerpunkt Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebermann, Lutz (comp.)

    2016-07-01

    The publication of the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz on radiation protection covers the following issues: (i) exposure from natural sources: health hazard due to radon, radiation protection in residential homes, radon in Germany, natural raw materials in industrial processes; (ii) clearance of radioactive wastes: clearance in the frame of nuclear power plant dismantling, the situation in Germany and Europe; (iii) emergency management: principles of radiation protection, fictive sequence of accident events; (iiii) other actual radiation protection topics: more limits - more protection? radiation protection in medicine, occupational radiation protection.

  10. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-01-01

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material

  11. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-06-01

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

  12. Radiation protection medicine - a special field of health care and industrial safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, D.

    1988-01-01

    The definition of the term radiation protection medicine is followed by a brief account of the pathophysiology of radiation effects. Developments in the special field of general and occupational health are also described together with relevant GDR regulations. Information is provided on what is done at present at various levels in the GDR, in the context of peaceful use of nuclear energy, to provide adequate services in radiation protection medicine for all radiation workers and the population, with reference to the scope of activities of the Institute of Medicine attached to the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection, the network of works medical officers in charge of radiation protection and the system for clinical treatment of acute radiation damage. (author)

  13. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ures Pantazi, M.

    1994-01-01

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection

  14. Proceedings of the workshop/symposium on radiation protection: past and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TerMarsch, D.J.; Myers, D.K.

    1989-06-01

    A major goal of this workshop/symposium was to bring together a group of experts from Canada and other countries to identify changing needs in radiation protection and potential goals for future research. The 33 papers presented cover the areas of regulation, research needs, and radiation protection during operation, accident conditions and medical procedures

  15. Safety Regulations for Ionizing Radiations. Vietnam Standard (TCVN 4397-87)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The regulations were prepared for purpose of providing basic requirements of ionizing radiation protection and giving guide for design criteria of radiation installations in Vietnam. The allowable maximum levels for personnel categories are established. Regulated are methods for handling sealed and unsealed sources of radiation, transfer and transport of radioactive materials. Defined requirements and operating conditions that must be met. Determined are procedures and actions of decontamination. (N.H.A)

  16. Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos, M.

    2002-01-01

    Major achievements of SCK-CEN's Radiation Protection Department in 2001 are described. The main areas for R and D of the department are enviromnental remediation, emergency planning, radiation protection research, low-level radioactvity measurements, safeguards and physics measurements, decision strategy research and policy support and social sciences in nuclear research. Main achievements for 2001 in these areas are reported

  17. Radiation protection medical care of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walt, H.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation protection medical care for radiation workers is part of the extensive programme protecting people against dangers emanating from the peaceful application of ionizing radiation. Thus it is a special field of occupational health care and emergency medicine in case of radiation accidents. It has proved helpful in preventing radiation damage as well as in early detection, treatment, after-care, and expert assessment. The medical checks include pre-employment and follow-up examinations, continued long-range medical care as well as specific monitoring of individuals and defined groups of workers. Three levels of action are involved: works medical officers specialized in radiation protection, the Institute of Medicine at the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection, and a network of clinical departments specialized in handling cases of acute radiation damage. An account is given of categories, types, and methods of examinations for radiation workers and operators. (author)

  18. Radiation protection forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, W.

    2010-01-01

    The National Director of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority and Radiation Protection of Uruguay in the first forum for radiation protection set out the following themes: activity of regulatory body, radiation safety, physical security, safeguards, legal framework, committed substantive program, use of radiation, risks and benefits, major sources of radiation, the national regulatory framework, national inventory of sources, inspections, licensing, import and export of sources control , radioactive transport, materials safety, agreements, information and teaching, radiological emergencies and prompt response.

  19. Radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1980-01-01

    The present paper deals with: Objectives and basic concepts of radiation protection, basic radiobiological considerations, the ICRP system of dose limitation and with operational radiation protection (limits, reference levels, occupational exposure). (RW)

  20. Accreditation of laboratories in the field of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galjanic, S.; Franic, Z.

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives a review of requirements and procedures for the accreditation of test and calibration laboratories in the field of radiation protection, paying particular attention to Croatia. General requirements to be met by a testing or calibration laboratory to be accredited are described in the standard HRN EN ISO/IEC 17025, General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories. The quality of a radiation protection programme can only be as good as the quality of the measurements made to support it. Measurement quality can be assured by participation in measurement assurance programmes that evaluate the appropriateness of procedures, facilities, and equipment and include periodic checks to assure adequate performance. These also include internal consistency checks, proficiency tests, intercomparisons and site visits by technical experts to review operations. In Croatia, laboratories are yet to be accredited in the field of radiation protection. However, harmonisation of technical legislation with the EU legal system will require some changes in laws and regulations in the field of radiation protection, including the ones dealing with the notification of testing laboratories and connected procedures. Regarding the notification procedures for testing laboratories in Croatia, in the regulated area, the existing accreditation infrastructure, i.e. Croatian Accreditation Agency is ready for its implementation, as it has already established and further developed a consistent accreditation system, compatible with international requirements and procedures.(author)

  1. 21 century perspective in radiation protection of humans and human population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, G.

    2003-01-01

    In 21 century ionizing radiation is applied in all field of human activities. In parallel, the radiobiology and radiation medicine are developing as separate branches for the purposes of the radiation protection: for risk estimation and regulation of the human irradiation. Main features of radiation protection at the beginning of the century are: 1.Well developed conservative theoretical background, based on the linear non-threshold concept 'dose-effect' towards the carcinogenesis and genetic effects; 2. Developed international and national structures, including organizations as ICRP, UNSCEAR, ICRU, IAEA, WHO, FAO, BEIR, OECD/NEA, ILO, NCRP, NRPB etc. 3. Detailed regulative legislation for all cases of human irradiation, combines with effective control structures. Ionizing radiation is the most strictly regulated factor affecting humans among the all adverse impacts of the living environment. The expectations for the radiation protection in 21 century are: 1. A radical reassessment of the concept for low doses and the linear non-threshold concept since data for existing of a threshold on the human population level. 2. Taking into consideration of the the adaptation to the irradiation, comparable with the natural radiation background. 3. Taking into consideration of the radiation hormesis, which are now ignored by the risk theory. 4. Clarification of the questions of the genetic effects, which are not yet determined for the human population. 5. Radical solutions of the radioactive waste problem, which will be crucial for the future of the nuclear energy production. 6. Gradual overcoming of the fear from ionizing radiation, which is an important social factor

  2. Development and application of the basic principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    The basic philosophy of radiation protection, i.e. to prevent non-stochastic effects and to reduce stochastic effects to an acceptable level, is realized in the internationally accepted three-stage system of dose reduction, viz. justification, ALARA and dose limits. Historical development of this three-stage system is described and the three components are worked out further. The application and applicability of the system is considered for radiation sources and accidents. Attention is also given to regulations, national policy and practice of radiation protection. (G.J.P.)

  3. Challenges in Regulating Radiation Sources and Radioactive Waste in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngwakwe, C.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying challenges that hamper the efficiency and efficacy of Regulatory Infrastructure (People and Processes) as regards ensuring safety & security of radiation sources and radioactive waste is a major step towards planning for improvement. In a world constantly motivated by technological advancements, there has been considerable increase in the use of new technologies incorporating radioactive sources in both medical and industrial applications due to its perceived benefits, hence changing the dynamics of regulation. This paper brings to the fore, contemporary challenges experienced by regulators in the course of regulating radiation sources and radioactive waste in Nigeria. These challenges encountered in the business of regulating radiation sources and radioactive waste in Nigeria amongst others include; knowledge gap in the use of novel technologies for industrial applications (e.g. radiotracers in oil & gas and wastewater management), inadequate collaboration with operators to ensure transparency in their operations, inadequate cooperation from other government agencies using ionizing radiation sources, lack of synergy between relevant government agencies, difficulty in establishing standard radioactive waste management facility for orphan & disused sources, and inadequate control of NORMS encountered in industrial activities (e.g. well logging, mining). Nigerian Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NNRA), the body saddled with the responsibility of regulating the use of ionizing radiation sources in Nigeria is empowered by the Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection Act to ensure the protection of life, property, and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, hence are not immune to the aforementioned challenges. (author)

  4. Workshop Euratom Directive 97/43. New trends in radiation protection in clinical practice, in research and in regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzei, F.

    1999-01-01

    The Euratom Directive 97/43 on health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionizing radiation in relation to medical exposure is presented. In particular the following topics are focused, with a multidisciplinary approach, on: diagnostic reference levels in radiodiagnostics and nuclear medicine; radiation protection in paediatrics, in interventional radiology and in computer tomography; radiation protection radiotherapy, radiation protection in medical research; radiation protection in prenatal and neonatal exposure; radiation protection in medical-legal exposures [it

  5. The philosophy of German radiation protection legislation and supervision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, H.

    1976-01-01

    It is the objective of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance to protect life, health and property from the harmful effects of ionizing radiations and to ensure compensation for damage caused by ionizing radiations. This scope is already fixed in section 1 of the Atomic Law of the FRG and in accord with the comparable regulation or decrees of other countries all over the world. To reach this objective, by the Radiation Protection Ordinance: 1) the handling of radioactive material is subjected to an extensive control by the state or his organisations (part of this control are the licensing prcedures for handling, carriage, import and exprot, and transactions of radioactive materials as well as the direct supervision by the concerned authorities), 2) dose limits and limits of activity and concentrations are defined, 3) safety provisions are fixed which are legally binding the holder of a license and other persons appointed by him, responsible for radiation protection, 4) statutory offences are listed so that any person who wilfully or negligently contravenes the prescriptions shall be punished. (orig./RW) [de

  6. On the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of Organised Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Kovacevic, M.; Pantelic, G.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation protection, both as a multidisciplinary scientific discipline and as an attitude, has largely contributed to the protection of man and the environment against the potential harm of ionizing radiation, allowing its beneficial and safe use. Over the past decades, almost a century, professionals active in the domain of radiation protection have immensely contributed to the development of legislation and regulations, to monitoring and control, to prediction of consequences and to the assessment of risks. This paper summarizes evolution and achievements of the radiation protection professionals in the region known as former Yugoslavia the occasion of the fifty years of organized professional activities in the area of radiation protection. The paper covers activities related to the early days of the radiation protection association brings the information about relevant activities as organization of symposia and other meetings, participation in international organizations and publishing activities of the society.(author)

  7. S.I. No 189 of 1988, European Communities (Medical Ionizing Radiation) Regulations, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    The Regulations provide that all those engaged in the use of ionizing radiation for medical (including dental) purposes must be competent in radiation protection and have appropriate training. They also specify that the exposure of a patient to ionizing radiation must be medically justified and the dose delivered must be as low as is reasonably achievable. The Regulations implement the provisions of the Directive of the Council of the European Communities No 84/466 Euratom of 3 September 1984 laying down basic measures for the radiation protection of persons undergoing medical examination or treatment [fr

  8. Judicial facts on licensing and supervisory procedures concerning radiation protection law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenhaum, O.

    1976-01-01

    Some statistical studies on the present licensing and supervision procedures are discussed, viz. on 1) owner of a licence accord. to sect. 3 and 4 of the 1st Radiation Protection Ordinance; 2) special licences according to section 1 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance for the release of radioactive materials in air and water (required in a very few cases only); 3) violations of the regulations were not of a severe nature (mostly from industry). The author condludes that the present regulations proved to be satisfactory. Minor corrections relating to licence-free handling, restriction of the requirements for a licence as well as to prohibition of illegal use of the radiation warning sign are desired. (HP) [de

  9. Conference on the public health aspects of protection against ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-07-01

    The Conference on Public Health Aspects of Protection against Ionizing Radiation was convened by the World Health Organization at Duesseldorf, Germany, from 25 June - 4 July 1962. It was designed to examine the part which public health authorities should play in controlling the hazards of ionizing radiation, and it was attended by 63 participants from 36 countries and from a number of international organizations. The aims of the Conference were: a) to specify the role of public health services in respect of radiation protection; b) to review, on the basis of existing material and information to be made available at the Conference, the present situation of radiation protection services in different countries and to discuss desirable trends in the organization and administration of these services within the public health services; and c) to consider requirements as regards qualifications and training of public health personnel in charge of radiation protection services. The programme of the Conference centred around seven major topics: 1) ionizing radiation as a public health problem; 2) principles of public health in radiation protection; 3) review of existing laws, regulations, codes of practice and examples of radiation protection services; 4) the role of public health radiation protection services; 5) the role of public health services in planning for and dealing with emergencies (incidents and accidents); 6) qualifications and training of public health personnel in charge of radiation protection services; 7) health education of the public in the field of radiation protection.

  10. Conference on the public health aspects of protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    The Conference on Public Health Aspects of Protection against Ionizing Radiation was convened by the World Health Organization at Duesseldorf, Germany, from 25 June - 4 July 1962. It was designed to examine the part which public health authorities should play in controlling the hazards of ionizing radiation, and it was attended by 63 participants from 36 countries and from a number of international organizations. The aims of the Conference were: a) to specify the role of public health services in respect of radiation protection; b) to review, on the basis of existing material and information to be made available at the Conference, the present situation of radiation protection services in different countries and to discuss desirable trends in the organization and administration of these services within the public health services; and c) to consider requirements as regards qualifications and training of public health personnel in charge of radiation protection services. The programme of the Conference centred around seven major topics: 1) ionizing radiation as a public health problem; 2) principles of public health in radiation protection; 3) review of existing laws, regulations, codes of practice and examples of radiation protection services; 4) the role of public health radiation protection services; 5) the role of public health services in planning for and dealing with emergencies (incidents and accidents); 6) qualifications and training of public health personnel in charge of radiation protection services; 7) health education of the public in the field of radiation protection

  11. Policy and technical matters for the application of ICRP 1977 recommendations to Japanese radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tatsuji

    1987-01-01

    Tens years has passed since 1977 when the ICRP recommendations were made, and the work of revising the Japanese radiation regulations in response to the recommendations is almost completed. The work has been conducted mainly by an elemental group established under the Radiation Council. The elemental group submitted the first interim report to the Council in 1980, which presented recommendations on the objectives of radiation protection, dose equivalent limits for the general public, facilities inspection and products testing, medical surveillance, etc. After making deliberations in response to studies by the ICRP working group, the elemental group compiled the second interim report in July 1981. Further studies were conducted and the final report was submitted to the Council in March 1983. The final report covered the definitions of such terms as 'dose equivalent', dose equivalent limit for workers, exposure dose in the event of emergency, dose equivalent limit for the general public, various standards for protection, classification of workers by working conditions, classification of work sites monitoring of exposure dose, and implementation of medical surveillance. After making deliberations, the Council submitted a report in 1986 to government agencies concerned, whose contents are almost the same as those of the above final report except for some amendments. (Nogami, K.)

  12. Radiation regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braithwaite, J.; Grabosky, P.

    1985-01-01

    The five main areas of radiation regulation considered are radiation exposure in the mining of uranium and other minerals, exposure in the use of uranium in nuclear reactors, risks in the transport of radioactive materials and hazards associated with the disposal of used materials. In Australia these problems are regulated by mines departments, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and radiation control branches in state health departments. Each of these instutional areas of regulation is examined

  13. Radiation protection in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ashkar, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Full text: People are exposed to ionizing radiation in many different forms: cosmic rays that penetrate earth atmosphere or radiation from soil and mineral resources are natural forms of ionizing radiation. Other forms are produced artificially using radioactive materials for various beneficial applications in medicine, industry and other fields. The greatest concerns about ionizing radiation are tied to its potential health effects and a system of radiation protection has been developed to protect people from harmful radiation. The promotion of radiation protection is one of the International Atomic Energy Agency main activities. Radiation protection concerns the protection of workers, members of public, and patients undergoing diagnosis and therapy against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The report covers the responsibility of radiation protection officer in Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) in Inshas - Egypt, also presents the protection against ionizing radiation from external sources, including types of radiation, sources of radiation (natural - artificial), and measuring units of dose equivalent rate. Also covers the biological effects of ionizing radiation, personal monitoring and radiation survey instruments and safe transport of radioactive materials. The report describes the Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2), the survey instruments used, also presents the results obtained and gave a relations between different categories of data. (author)

  14. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1976-01-01

    The lecture is divided into five sections. The introduction deals with the physical and radiological terms, quantities and units. Then the basic principles of radiological protection are discussed. In the third section attention is paid to the biological effects of ionizing radiation. The fourth section deals with the objectives of practical radiological protection. Finally the emergency measures are discussed to be taken in radiation accidents. (HP) [de

  15. Radiation protection laws, competences and organizational structures in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peinsipp, N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper points out the priorities and peculiarities of German radiation protection laws. With the coming into force of the unification agreement, the Atomic Energy Act, the Radiation Protection Ordinance, and the X-Ray Ordinance became valid in the five new Federal States and Berlin, with slight deviations and amendments. Radiation protection law is Federal law adapted to EC law, with several variations, such as the minimization rule in section 28, para 1, Radiation Protection Ordinance, compared to the ALARA principle, or lower partial body dose limits. The paper discusses licensing and protective regulations; the terms' officer responsible for radiation protection' and 'officer in charge of radiation protection'; radiation pass; physical radiation monitoring, and medical follow-up checks as well as governmental control functions and competences; executive functions of the Federal Government; import and export; Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz; transportation of radioactive materials; radioactive waste management. The annex comprises several tables to illustrate the aforesaid. (HSCH) [de

  16. Radiation Protection Society of Serbia and Montenegro. Proceedings of 24. Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacevic, M.

    2007-09-01

    The Proceedings are a collection of papers presented at the 24. Symposium of the Radiation Protection Society of Serbia and Montenegro, held in Zlatibor, Serbia, 3-5 October 2007. The papers are organised into following sessions: Radioecology, Radiotoxicology, Radiation Protection in Medicine, Dosimetry, Radiobiology, Radioactive Waste, Measuring Instrumentation, Regulations and Standards, Education and Public Information, Nonionizing radiation, Other topics. The papers represent the scientific contributions of 156 authors. The Proceedings were printed in 120 hard copies

  17. Occupational radiation protection. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. In 1996, the Agency published Safety Fundamentals on Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 120) and International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing, Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115), both of which were jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the IAEA, the International Labour Organisation, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. These publications set out, respectively, the objectives and principles for radiation safety and the requirements to be met to apply the principles and to achieve the objectives. The establishment of safety requirements and guidance on occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation safety provided by the IAEA to its Member States. The objective of the IAEA's occupational protection programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach to the optimization of occupational radiation protection, through the development and application of guidelines for restricting radiation exposures and applying current radiation protection techniques in the workplace. Guidance on meeting the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, one giving general guidance on the development of occupational radiation protection programmes and two giving more detailed guidance on the monitoring and assessment of workers' exposure due to external radiation sources and from intakes of radionuclides, respectively. These Safety

  18. Occupational radiation protection. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. In 1996, the Agency published Safety Fundamentals on Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 120) and International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing, Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115), both of which were jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the IAEA, the International Labour Organisation, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. These publications set out, respectively, the objectives and principles for radiation safety and the requirements to be met to apply the principles and to achieve the objectives. The establishment of safety requirements and guidance on occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation safety provided by the IAEA to its Member States. The objective of the IAEA's occupational protection programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach to the optimization of occupational radiation protection, through the development and application of guidelines for restricting radiation exposures and applying current radiation protection techniques in the workplace. Guidance on meeting the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, one giving general guidance on the development of occupational radiation protection programmes and two giving more detailed guidance on the monitoring and assessment of workers' exposure due to external radiation sources and from intakes of radionuclides, respectively. These Safety

  19. Occupational radiation protection. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. In 1996, the Agency published Safety Fundamentals on Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 120) and International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing, Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115), both of which were jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the IAEA, the International Labour Organisation, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. These publications set out, respectively, the objectives and principles for radiation safety and the requirements to be met to apply the principles and to achieve the objectives. The establishment of safety requirements and guidance on occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation safety provided by the IAEA to its Member States. The objective of the IAEA's occupational protection programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach to the optimization of occupational radiation protection, through the development and application of guidelines for restricting radiation exposures and applying current radiation protection techniques in the workplace. Guidance on meeting the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, one giving general guidance on the development of occupational radiation protection programmes and two giving more detailed guidance on the monitoring and assessment of workers' exposure due to external radiation sources and from intakes of radionuclides, respectively. These Safety

  20. Occupational radiation protection. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. In 1996, the Agency published Safety Fundamentals on Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 120) and International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing, Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115), both of which were jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the IAEA, the International Labour Organisation, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. These publications set out, respectively, the objectives and principles for radiation safety and the requirements to be met to apply the principles and to achieve the objectives. The establishment of safety requirements and guidance on occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation safety provided by the IAEA to its Member States. The objective of the IAEA's occupational protection programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach to the optimization of occupational radiation protection, through the development and application of guidelines for restricting radiation exposures and applying current radiation protection techniques in the workplace. Guidance on meeting the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, one giving general guidance on the development of occupational radiation protection programmes and two giving more detailed guidance on the monitoring and assessment of workers' exposure due to external radiation sources and from intakes of radionuclides, respectively. These Safety

  1. Comments to the German society's for radiation protection (Gesellschaft fur Strahlenschutz) proposed principles for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, L.

    2002-01-01

    The German Society for Radiation Protection (in German Gesellschaft fur Strahlenschutz) is a separate society for radiation protection in Germany in addition to the leading society named Association of German and Swiss Radiation Protection Specialists (in German Fachverband fur Strahlenschutz). The Society is an international professional society. There are several hundreds members of the German Society for Radiation Protection. The German Society for Radiation Protection is not a member of IRPA (the International Radiation Protection Society). The IRPA member is the Association of German and Swiss Radiation Protection Specialists. According to information given on the web site of the Society for Radiation Protection (www.gfstrahlenschutz.de) the Society was founded in 1990 because in the opinion of the founding members the older professional societies and associations have not adequately considered and implemented the present knowledge of radiation risks and radiation protection. In accordance with its statutes the society pursues besides other aims the best possible protection of humans and the environment from the detrimental action of ionising and non-ionising radiation. The dealing with ionising and non-ionising radiation can according to the Society only be justified on the basis of biological and medical state of the art knowledge

  2. Radiation protection in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado M, H.

    2008-12-01

    The justification of the practices is the fundamental principle on which rests the peaceful use of ionizing radiations. They actually contain as aspirations to improve the quality of people's lives, contributing to sustainable development through environmental protection, so that the sources security and the individuals protection will be conditions which are not and should can not be operated. For medical applications is a highly illustrative example of this, since both for the diagnosis and therapy, the goal is to achieve what is sought for the white tissue, secured the least possible damage to the neighboring tissues so that in turn reduce the negative effects for the patient. As a basis for achieving the above, it is essential to have qualified personnel in all areas incidents, for example users, workers, officials and staff members. There are a variety of specialists in the field of medical applications as, nuclear chemistry, nuclear engineering, radiation protection, medical physics, radiation physics and others. Among the human resource in the country must make up the majority are medical radiologists, highlighting gaps in the number of radiotherapy and nuclear medicine but specially in the medical physics, who is in some way from a special viewpoint of the formal school, new to the country. This is true for the number of facilities which are in the country. The radiation protection responsibilities in medical applications focus primarily on two figures: the radiology safety manager, who is primarily dedicated to the protection of occupationally exposed personnel and the public, and the medical physicist whose functions are geared towards the radiological protection of the patient. The principal legislation in the medical applications area has been enacted and is monitored by the Health Secretary and National Commission on Nuclear Safety and Safeguards, entities that have reached agreements to avoid overlap and over-regulation. Medical applications in the

  3. Occupational radiation protection: Protecting workers against exposure to ionizing radiation. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, mining and milling; medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The term 'occupational exposure' refers to the radiation exposure incurred by a worker, which is attributable to the worker's occupation and committed during a period of work. According to the latest (2000) Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), an estimated 11 million workers are monitored for exposure to ionizing radiation. They incur radiation doses attributable to their occupation, which range from a small fraction of the global average background exposure to natural radiation up to several times that value. It should be noted that the UNSCEAR 2000 Report describes a downward trend in the exposure of several groups of workers, but it also indicates that occupational exposure is affecting an increasingly large group of people worldwide. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS), which are co-sponsored by, inter alia, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO), establish a system of radiation protection which includes radiation dose limits for occupational exposure. Guidance supporting the requirements of the BSS for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, jointly sponsored by the IAEA and the ILO. These Guides describe, for example, the implications for employers in discharging their main responsibilities (such as setting up appropriate radiation protection programmes) and similarly for workers (such as properly using the radiation monitoring devices provided to them). The IAEA i organized its first International Conference on Occupational Radiation Protection. The

  4. Radiation protection programme at Krsko nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breznik, B.

    1996-01-01

    Krsko NPP, a Westinghouse two-loop PWR of 632 M We power, is in commercial operation since 1982. Reduction of radioactive releases to the environment and the reduction of doses to workers is the basic goal in the plant radiological protection. The radiation protection programme is established to ensure that the radiation exposures to workers and members of the public are minimized according to the As Low As Reasonably Achievable approach and controlled in accordance with international safety standards and Slovenian regulations. The basis for the operational and technical measures has been provided according to the industrial good practice. The effluent control is based on the Standard Radioactive Effluent Technical Specifications, and environmental surveillance is established according to the programme defined by the regulations. The dose constraints and performance indicators are used to assure the effectiveness of the radiation protection programme and provide a convenient follow-up tool. The monitoring programme results of each year show that there is no measurable dose to the public due to radioactive releases. The commitment to the dose burden of any member of a critical group is assessed to be below the dose constraint. Individual and collective doses of the workers are within a range typical for the PWRs of a similar type. (author)

  5. 6. Regional Congress on Radiation Protection and Safety; 3. Iberian and Latin American Congress on Radiological Protection Societies; Regional IRPA Congress. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-11-01

    The 6th Regional Congress on Radiation Protection and Safety was organized by the Peruvian Radiation Protection Society and the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy, held in Lima, Peru, between 9 and 13 of november of 2003. In this event, were presented 227 papers that were articulated in the following sessions: radiation natural exposure, biological effects of ionizing radiation, instruments and dosimetry, radiological emergency and accidents, occupational radiation protection, radiological protection in medical exposure, radiological environmental protection, legal aspects, standards and regulations, training, education and communication, radioactive waste management, radioactive material transport, nuclear safety and biological effects of non-ionizing radiation. (APC)

  6. Principles of Radiation Protection Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli

    2004-01-01

    The contents of this chapter are follows - Radiation Protection Concepts: justification, dose limitation, optimisation, potential exposures, situation requiring intervention; Special Considerations. Protection from Radiation Hazards, Remove the Hazard, Prevent the Hazard, Guard the Worker, Implementation of Radiation Protection and Safety Measures, Distance, Shielding, Time, Monitoring Programme, Safety System. Radiation Protection in Radiological Service: Specific Requirement in Diagnostic Radiological Service

  7. S.I. No 125 of 2000 Radiological Protection Act 1991 (ionising radiation) Order 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This statutory instrument provides for the implementation of Council Directive 96/29/Euratom of 13 May 1996 laying down basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionising radiation. It also incorporates the provisions of Council Directive 90/641/Euratom of 4 December 1990 on the operational protection of outside workers exposed to the risk of ionising radiation during their activities in controlled areas. It replaces the provisions of the European Communities (Ionising Radiation) Regulations, 1991 (S.I. No. 43 of 1991), the Radiological Protection Act, 1991 (General Control of Radioactive Substances, Nuclear Devices and Irradiating Apparatus) Order, 1993 (S.I. No. 151 of 1993) and the European Communities (Protection of Outside Workers from Ionising Radiation) Regulations, 1994 (S.I. No. 144 of 1994). The main changes introduced in this Order are: the inclusion of work activities involving exposure to natural sources of radiation, stricter application of existing radiation protection principles through the introduction of lower dose limits, the use of dose constraints in keeping doses as low as reasonably achievable (i.e. optimisation process) and extended application of justification principles, the introduction of radiation protection principles for intervention in cases of radiological emergencies or lasting exposures. (author)

  8. Foundations of radiation physics and radiation protection. 5. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, Hanno

    2017-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Types of radiation and radiation fields, the atomic structure, radioactive decays, decay law, natural and artificial radioactivity, interactions of ionizing photon radiation, attenuation of neutral-particle beams, interactions of neutron radiation, interactions of charged particles, ionization and energy transfer, radiation doses, radiation protection phantoms, foundations of the radiation biology of cells, effects and risks of ionizing radiation, radiation expositions of men with ionizing radiation, radiation protection law, practical radiation protection against ionizing radiations, radiation eposures in medical radiology. (HSI)

  9. Criteria for radiological protection against exposure to natural radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of humans to natural sources of radiation has been a continuous and inevitable feature of life on earth. This exposure exceeds all due to artificial sources combined for most people. Many exposures to natural radiation sources are modified by human action. In particular, natural radionuclides are released into the environment in mineral processing and in activities such as the production of phosphate fertilizers and the use of fossil fuels. An increase of exposures to this natural radiation is caused. The relevance of exposure to natural radiation is confirmed by the fact that, for most people, the exposures to natural background radiation have been much more significant than exposures to artificial sources, with exceptions. Among these exceptions have been noted: medical exposures, accidents with release of radionuclides and some specific workplaces. In all cases, however, the natural background radiation has formed the basis on which all the others exposures are added and is a common level serving as compared to other exposures. Regulations and instructions have begun to establish in some countries to regulate natural radiation, countries like Spain, have already incorporated into its regulations on health protection against ionizing radiation the subject of natural radiation. (author) [es

  10. Europe's contribution to implementation of a radiation protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    What is commonly referred to as a radiation protection system is a range of scientific considerations, principles and rules, the aim of which is to contribute to an appropriate level of protection of individuals and the environment against the harmful effects of exposure to ionising radiation, without excessively limiting desirable human activities which can be associated with such exposure (see ICRP Publication 103). This system is essentially based on an international consensus. The European level only concerns the Member States of the Union but it is crucial that it constitute the final, legally binding step prior to the definition of national regulations. The European radiation protection system (the EURATOM Treaty and its derived legislation) is presented below, not from the legal perspective but from a contextual viewpoint. Research activities are not discussed here. (author)

  11. Radiation protection type testing and licensing of diagnostic X-ray equipment in the GDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taschner, P.; Poulheim, K.F.; Feldheim, W.

    1987-01-01

    The results of more than 10 years experience in type testing and type licensing of diagnostic X-ray equipment with respect to meeting radiation protection requirements as well as the implications for the conduct of these procedures resulting from the introduction of new radiation protection legislation in 1983 and 1984, are described. At present an updated version of the 'Regulation of 16 December 1977 concerning radiation protection type testing and licensing of sealed radiation sources and equipment emitting ionizing radiation' is being prepared. (author)

  12. Radiation Protection Training in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankauskiene, D.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation Protection Training is an important component of Radiation Protection and serves for human radiation safety. According to the Lithuanian Law on Radiation Protection the legal persons and enterprises without the status of legal persons to conduct practices with sources or which workers work under exposure must organize at their own expenses a compulsory training and assessment of knowledge of the workers engaging in activities with the sources and radiation protection officers. Such training has been started in 1999. In Lithuania there are few institutions executing Radiation Protection training. Under requirements of legal act On Frequency and Procedure of Compulsory Training and Assessment Knowledge of the Workers Engage in Activities with the Sources of Ionising Radiation and Radiation Protection Officers these institutions have to prepare and coordinate training programs with the Radiation Protection Center. There are adopted different educating programs for Radiation Protection Training to the Workers and Radiation Protection Officers depending on character of work and danger of sources. The duration of Training is from 30 to 270 hours. The Training shall be renewed every five years passing 30 hors course. To ensure the adequate quality of training a great deal of attention is paid to qualifying the lectures. For this purpose, it was established an Evaluation commission to estimate the adequacy of lecturer's knowledge to requirements of Training programs. After passing exams the lectures get the qualification confirming certificates. The main task of our days is to establish and arrange the National Training Centre on Radiation Protection Training that would satisfy requirements and recommendations of legal documents of IAEA and EU for such kind of institutions of institutions. (Author)

  13. Practical radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouwer, G.; Van den Eijnde, J.H.G.M.

    1997-01-01

    This textbook aims at providing sufficient knowledge and insight to carry out correctly radiation protection activities and operations. The subjects are appropriate for the training of radiation protection experts for the levels 5A (encapsulated sources, X rays) and 5B (open sources, laboratory activities)

  14. Criteria for radiological protection against exposure to natural radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation includes natural radiation which has been part cosmic radiation. Radon in homes, irradiation, gamma, among others, they have also been part of ionizing radiation. The activities that have lead to natural radiation materials are: mining and processing of uranium, radio application and thorium, phosphate industry, mining and smelting of metals, oil and gas extraction, coal mining and power generation, rare earth industry and titanium, zirconium and ceramics, building materials, waste water purification. Therefore, different criteria for radiation protection have had to create against exposure to natural radiation. Distinct rules and regulations to control were created in that sense [es

  15. Environmental protection in the frame of radiation protection. Recommendation of the Commission on radiological protection including justification and explanation; Schutz der Umwelt im Strahlenschutz. Empfehlung der Strahlenschutzkommission mit Begruendung und Erlaeuterung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-01-15

    The environmental protection is part of the radiation protection but without defined regulations concerning the protection of non-human species and the ecological systems. In 2008 the SSK (Strahlenschutzkommission) was asked to elaborate measures for environmental radiation protection. Part of the recommendation was the application of sustainability concepts on radioactive materials.

  16. Perspectives for environmental radiation protection in EU radiation protection legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, A.

    2000-01-01

    The basis of EU radiation protection legislation is the EURATOM Trealy. It is discussed whether the Treaty offers a legal basis for the protection of the natural environment. The incorporation of provisions pertaining to the nuclear fuel cycle or to radioactive substances in general environmental legislation is explained, as well as the possible implications of international conventions subscribed by the European Union. The European Commission is in the process of developing an overall approach to risk analysis for the protection of health, consumer interests, and the environment. It is examined to what extent the consideration of the impact of radiation on the natural environment fits in the overall framework and whether the principles underlying classical radiation protection are applicable to biota. Specific attention is given to situations where high levels of environmental radioactivity would require intervention. (Author)

  17. New regulations in the German Radiation Protection Ordinance. What do the changes mean?; Neues in der Strahlenschutzverordnung. Was bringt die Aenderung?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickel, Angela [Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs-GmbH, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Fehringer, Franz [Berufsgenossenschaft Energie Textil Elektro, Koeln (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Feldmann, Ulrike [Wirtschaftsverband Kernbrennstoff-Kreislauf und Kerntechnik e.V., Berlin (Germany)] [and others

    2012-11-01

    Since November 1{sup st} 2011, several new regulations have become effective in the Radiation Protection Ordinance, that are described here first as a general overview and then in more detail. The first part of the contribution compiles the non-medical and the second one the medical applications. (orig.)

  18. Philosophy of radiological protection and radiation hazard protection law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Michiaki; Kawano, Takao

    2013-01-01

    The radiation protection and the human safety in radiation facilities are strictly controlled by law. There are rules on the radiation measurement, too. In the present review, philosophy of the radiological protection and the radiation hazard protection law is outlined with reference to ICRP recommendations. (J.P.N.)

  19. Radiation Protection Proclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A proclamation of the Government of Ethiopia, cited as the radiation protection proclamation number 79/1993 was prepared with the objective to establish a national radiation protection authority that formulates policies, controls and supervises activities involving all sources of radiation and lay down laws governing such activities in order to ensure public safety against associated hazards while allowing radiation related activities to be carried out for the benefit of the public . The Authority is guided by an inter-ministerial board and is accountable to the Ethiopian Science and Technology Commission

  20. National congress of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The congress of radiation protection tackled different areas of radiation protection. The impact of ionizing radiations on environment coming from radioactive activities. The biological radiation effects, the dosimetry, the different ways of doing relative to radiation protection,the risks analysis and the communications with populations, information about accidents and the lessons learned from them are included in this congress. (N.C.)

  1. Instructed officers Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This law contains instructions on the prevention of radiological and contains 4 articles Article I: describe the responsibilities of the institutions that operate within the scope of radiological protection in terms of the number of radiation protection officers and personal Supervisors who available in the practices radiation field. Article II: talking about the conditions of radiation protection officers that must be available in the main officers and working field in larg institutions and thecondition of specific requirements for large enterprises of work permits in the field of radiological work that issued by the Council. Article III: the functions and duties of officers in the prevention of radiological oversee the development of radiation protection programmes in the planning stages, construction and preparing the rules of local labour and what it lead of such tasks.Article IV: radiation protection officers powers: to modify and approve the programme of prevention and radiation safety at the company, stop any unsafe steps, amend the steps of the usage, operation of materials, devices and so on

  2. Radiation Protection, Safety and Security Issues in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boadu, M. B.; Emi-Reynolds, G.; Amoako, J. K.; Hasford, F.; Akrobortu, E.

    2015-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Board was established in 1993 by PNDC Law 308 as the National Competent Authority for the regulation of radiation sources and radioactive materials in Ghana. The mandate and responsibilities of RPB are prescribed in the legislative instrument, LI 1559 issued in 1993. The operational functions of the Board are carried out by the Radiation Protection Institute, which was established to provide technical support for the enforcement of the legislative instrument. The regulatory activities include among others: – Issuance permits for the import/export of any radiation producing device and radioactive materials into/out of the country. It therefore certifies the radioactivity levels in food and the environmental samples. – Authorization and Inspection of practices using radiation sources and radioactive materials in Ghana. – Undertakes safety assessment services and enforcement actions on practices using radiation sources and radioactive materials in line with regulations. – Provides guidance and technical support in fulfilling regulatory requirement to users of radiation producing devices and radioactive materials nationwide by monitoring of monthly radiation absorbed doses for personnel working at radiation facilities. – Provides support to the management of practices in respect of nuclear and radioactive waste programme. – Calibrates radiation emitting equipment and nuclear instrumentation to ensure the safety of patients, workers and the general public. – Establish guidelines for the mounting (non-ionizing) communication masts. – Environmental monitoring (non-ionizing) programmes for communication masts. With the establishment of the national competent authority, facilities using radioactive sources and radiation emitting devices have been brought under regulatory control. Effective regulatory control of radiation emitting devices are achieved through established legal framework, independent Regulatory Authority supported by

  3. The gender problem in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Lars [Nobel Inst. of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    Gender is a range of characteristics used to distinguish between males and females, particularly in the cases of men and women and the masculine and feminine attributes assigned to them. While the social sciences sometimes approach gender as a social construct, and some gender studies particularly do, research in the natural and medical sciences investigates whether biological differences in males and females influence the development of gender in humans. Radiation protection regulations also take into account the possibly different radiation risks of males and females. The following contribution investigates how far this is justified, and what are the consequences. (orig.)

  4. The gender problem in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Gender is a range of characteristics used to distinguish between males and females, particularly in the cases of men and women and the masculine and feminine attributes assigned to them. While the social sciences sometimes approach gender as a social construct, and some gender studies particularly do, research in the natural and medical sciences investigates whether biological differences in males and females influence the development of gender in humans. Radiation protection regulations also take into account the possibly different radiation risks of males and females. The following contribution investigates how far this is justified, and what are the consequences. (orig.)

  5. Radiation exposure and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, F.; Scherer, E.

    1985-01-01

    The present volume is devoted to the radiation hazards and the protective measures which can be taken. It describes the current state of knowledge on the changes which exposure to ionizing rays and other forms of physical energy can induce in organs and tissues, in the functional units and systems of the organism. Special attention is paid to general cellular radiation biology and radiation pathology and to general questions of the biological effects of densely ionizing particle radiation, in order to achieve a better all-round understanding of the effects of radiation on the living organism. Aside from the overviews dealing with the effects of radiation on the abdominal organs, urinary tract, lungs, cerebral and nervous tissue, bones, and skin, the discussion continues with the lymphatic system, the bone marrow as a bloodforming organ, and the various phases of reaction in the reproductive organs, including damage and subsequent regeneration. A special section deals with environmental radiation hazards, including exposure to natural radiation and the dangers of working with radioactive substances, and examines radiation catastrophes from the medical point of view. Not only reactor accidents are covered, but also nuclear explosions, with exhaustive discussion of possible damage and treatment. The state of knowledge on chemical protection against radiation is reviewed in detail. Finally, there is thorough treatment of the mechanism of the substances used for protection against radiation damage in man and of experience concerning this subject to date. In the final section of the book the problems of combined radiotherapy are discussed. The improvement in the efficacy of tumor radiotherapy by means of heavy particles is elucidated, and the significance of the efficacy of tumor therapy using electron-affinitive substances is explained. There is also discussion of the simultaneous use of radiation and pharmaceuticals in the treatment of tumors. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Phosphorus-32: practical radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballance, P.E.; Morgan, J.

    1987-01-01

    This monograph offers practical advice to Radiation Protection Advisors, Radiation Protection Supervisors and Research Supervisors, together with research workers, particularly those in the field of molecular biological research. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: physical properties, radiation and measurement methods, radiation units, phosphorus metabolism and health risks, protection standards and practical radiation protection, administrative arrangements, accidents, decontamination, emergency procedures, a basic written system for radiochemical work, with specialised recommendations for 32 P, and guidance notes of accident situations involving 32 P. (U.K.)

  7. Optimisation of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Optimisation of radiation protection is one of the key elements in the current radiation protection philosophy. The present system of dose limitation was issued in 1977 by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and includes, in addition to the requirements of justification of practices and limitation of individual doses, the requirement that all exposures be kept as low as is reasonably achievable, taking social and economic factors into account. This last principle is usually referred to as optimisation of radiation protection, or the ALARA principle. The NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) organised an ad hoc meeting, in liaison with the NEA committees on the safety of nuclear installations and radioactive waste management. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual papers presented at the meeting

  8. Applied radiation biology and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granier, R.; Gambini, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Written by two eminent expects in the field with many years of teaching experience between them, this book presents a concise coverage of the physical and biological basics of radiation biology and protection. The book begins with a description of the methods of particle detection and dosimetric evaluation. The effects of ionizing radiation on man are treated from the initial physico-chemical phase of interaction to their conceivable pathological consequences. Regulations, limits and safeguards on nuclear power plants, radioisotope installations and medical centers which make use of ionizing radiation are given and the risks of exposure to natural, industrial and scientific radiation sources evaluated. The final chapter takes a look at some of the more important nuclear accidents, including Windscale, Three Mile Island, and Chernobyl, and describes basic procedures to be carried out in the eventuality of a nuclear emergency. Twelve chapters have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  9. Radiation protection instrument 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Radiation Protection Instrument, 1993 (Legislative Instrument 1559) prescribes the powers and functions of the Radiation Protection Board established under the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission by the Atomic Energy Commission (Amendment) Law, 1993 (P.N.D.C. Law 308). Also included in the Legislative Instrument are schedules on control and use of ionising radiation and radiation sources as well as procedures for notification, licensing and inspection of ionising radiation facilities. (EAA)

  10. Regulation for oil wells logging using ionizing radiation sources. A draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidrowoh, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    A project to regulate logging activities using ionizing radiation sources in oil wells in Ecuador is proposed. Its development is based on basic concepts of energy, radiation protection and characteristics of oil exploitation in Ecuador

  11. Deficiencies in radiation protection record systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.B.; Lyon, M.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation protection records are a fundamental part of any program for protecting radiation workers. Records are essential to epidemiological studies of radiation workers and are becoming increasingly important as the number of radiation exposure litigation cases increases. Ready retrievability of comprehensive records is also essential to the adequate defense of a radiation protection program. Appraisals of numerous radiation protection programs have revealed that few record-keeping systems comply with American National Standards Institute, Standard Practice N13.6-1972. Record-keeping requirements and types of deficiencies in radiation protection records systems are presented in this paper, followed by general recommendations for implementing a comprehensive radiation protection records system

  12. Deficiencies in radiation protection record systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.B.; Lyon, M.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation protection records are a fundamental part of any program for protecting radiation workers. Records are essential to epidemiological studies of radiation workers and are becoming increasingly important as the number of radiation exposure litigation cases increases. Ready retrievability of comprehensive records is also essential to the adequate defense of a radiation protection program. Appraisals of numerous radiation protection programs have revealed that few record-keeping systems comply with American National Standards Institute, Standard Practice N13.6-1972. Record-keeping requirements and types of deficiencies in radiation protection records systems are presented in this paper, followed by general recommendations for implementing a comprehensive radiation protection records system. 8 refs

  13. Radiation protection in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOuld, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    A book on radiation protection in hospitals has been written to cater for readers with different backgrounds, training and needs by providing an elementary radiation physics text in Part I and an advanced, comprehensive Part II relating to specific medical applications of X-rays and of radioactivity. Part I includes information on basic radiation physics, radiation risk, radiation absorption and attenuation, radiation measurement, radiation shielding and classification of radiation workers. Part II includes information on radiation protection in external beam radiotherapy, interstitial source radiotherapy, intracavitary radiotherapy, radioactive iodine-131 radiotherapy, nuclear medicine diagnostics and diagnostic radiology. (U.K.)

  14. Radiation protection training in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    An increasing number of radiation protection experts and of professionally exposed workers is temporarily or permanently working in a country other than the one where they received their radiation protection education or training. They all face the problem and the difficulties of recognition of radiation protection training programs by other countries. For this reason the German-Swiss Radiation Protection Association (Fachverband fuer Strahlenschutz; FS) made a proposal to IRPA for an action on the mutual recognition of radiation protection education in Europe. In a first step contacts were made with two other European Associations of France and UK in order to establish a joint working group. (orig.) [de

  15. Some problems in the acceptability of implementing radiation protection programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neill, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The three fundamentals that radiation protection programs are based upon are; 1) establishing a quantitative correlation between radiation exposure and biological effects in people; 2) determining a level of acceptable risk of exposure; and 3) establishing systems to measure the radiation dose to insure compliance with the regulations or criteria. The paper discusses the interrelationship of these fundamentals, difficulties in obtaining a consensus of acceptable risk and gives some examples of problems in identifying the most critical population-at-risk and in measuring dose. Despite such problems, it is recommended that we proceed with the existing conservative structure of radiation protection programs based upon a linear no threshold model for low radiation doses to insure public acceptability of various potential radiation risks. Voluntary compliance as well as regulatory requirements should continue to be pursued to maintain minimal exposure to ionizing radiation. (author)

  16. New development in the certification of a component radiation protection officer in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail Bahari; Azwar, M.H.; Mohd Pauzi, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    The appointment of a Radiation protection Officer (RPO) by companies for activities related to the use of Atomic Energy, including Industrial Radiography is mandated under regulation 23 of the Radiation Protection (Basic Safety Standards) Regulations 1988. The regulations categorically requires the appointment of a competent person to help ensure radiation safety at work. Definition of competency has been spelt out in the regulations and this is translated to include having been trained and tested through examination by the AELB and be able to carry out the duties and responsibilities prescribed by the Act and Regulations. This paper discusses the development in the certification of RPO in the field of industrial radiography and what the new RPO certification scheme together with the Certification of RPO standard (LEMI/TEK/44) will do to increase competency as well as the market value of future RPOs. (Author)

  17. LLNL Radiation Protection Program (RPP) Rev 9.2, Implementation of 10 CFR 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shingleton, K. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) originally issued Part 10 CFR 835, Occupational Radiation Protection, on January 1, 1994. This regulation, hereafter referred to as “the Rule”, required DOE contractors to develop and maintain a DOE-approved Radiation Protection Program (RPP); DOE approved the initial Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) RPP (Rev 2) on 6/29/95. DOE issued a revision to the Rule on December 4, 1998 and approved LLNL’s revised RPP (Rev 7.1) on 11/18/99. DOE issued a second Rule revision on June 8, 2007 (effective July 9, 2007) and on June 13, 2008 approved LLNL’s RPP (Rev 9.0) which contained plans and measures for coming into compliance with the 2007 Rule changes. DOE issued a correction to the Rule on April 21, 2009.

  18. Radiation protection optimization. Advances in practical implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Within the Community, protection against the dangers of ionizing radiation is regulated in conformity with the provisions of two Council Directives. One is of general application for all activities involving a hazard arising from ionizing radiation and lays down the basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionizing radiation. The other is derived from the abovementioned one and lays down the basic measures for the radiation protection of persons undergoing medical examination or treatment. The Commission, in collaboration with the Spanish Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear and the Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, organized on 12, 13 and 14 September 1988 in Madrid, the third scientific seminar on the optimization principle (Alara) which is a key element of the two abovementioned Council Directives. The seminar allowed an analysis of the progress made since the previous seminars of 1979 and 1983, in the practical implementation of the optimization principle, in relation to the design and operation of nuclear and industrial installations, natural radioactivity, medical practices and countermeasures. The report contains the 20 original contributions presented and some general considerations on the results of the seminar

  19. Radiation protection - thirty years after

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper is discussed some questions in the field of Radiation Protection as like: historical prologue of radiations discovery and it's systematics; radiation and radiation protection; ALARA principle and 'de minimis' approach; radiation risks and dose limits and radiation and chemicals a risk comparison (author)

  20. Radiation protection - thirty years after

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninkovic, M M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1989-07-01

    In this paper is discussed some questions in the field of Radiation Protection as like: historical prologue of radiations discovery and it's systematics; radiation and radiation protection; ALARA principle and 'de minimis' approach; radiation risks and dose limits and radiation and chemicals a risk comparison (author)

  1. ISO radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.; West, N.

    1981-01-01

    After a brief description of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and its Technical Committee (TC) 85 ''Nuclear Energy'', the work of its Sub-Committee (SC) 2 ''Radiation Protection'' is described in some detail. Several international standards on subjects closely related to radiation protection have already been published, for example ISO-361 (Basic radiation protection symbol), ISO-1757 (Photographic dosimeters), ISO-1758 and 1759 (Direct and indirect-reading pocket exposure meters), ISO-2889 (Sampling of airborne radioactive materials), ISO-4037 (X and gamma reference radiations for calibration) and ISO-4071 (Testing of exposure meters and dosimeters). TC 85/SC 2 has currently eight active Working Groups (WG) dealing with 14 standards projects, mostly in advanced stages, in such fields as neutron and beta reference radiations, and X and gamma radiations of high and low dose-rates and high energies for calibration purposes, reference radiations for surface contamination apparatus, ejection systems for gamma radiography apparatus, industrial and laboratory irradiators, lead shielding units, protective clothing, thermoluminescence dosemeters, radioelement gauges, and surface contamination and decontamination. (author)

  2. Main principles of radiation protection and their applications in waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    The average exposure for an individual from such background in the United States is about 300 mrem per year with approximately 200 mrem of this coming from radon exposure alone. In addition to the natural sources of background radiation, a very small amount of the background radiation occurs due to the nuclear weapons test fallout. Manmade sources of radiation also include certain consumer products, industrial and research use of radioisotopes, medical X-rays, and radiopharmaceuticals. When all sources, natural and man-made, are taken into account, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has estimated that the average annual dose to individuals in the US population is 360 mrem (NCRP Report No. 93). In this report the fundamental principles of radiation protection are reviewed, as well as the relevant laws and regulations in the United States and discuss application of radiation protection in radioactive waste management

  3. Symposium on radiation protection in neighbouring countries in Central Europe - 1995. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glavic-Cidro, D [J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1996-01-01

    The 1995 Symposium on Radiation Protection in Neighbouring Countries in Central Europe was a continuation of a series of conferences held by radiation protection societies and/or associations in Central Europe to promote the knowledge in radiation protection and to exchange scientific information and experience between countries in this region. Radiation hazards present a small part of all hazards to which the mankind is exposed these days. However, radiation protection do have a leading role in creating a strategy to minimize and regulate practices where various hazards are involved. This time the symposium was organized by Radiation Protection Association of Slovenia and J. Stefan Institute in cooperation with Austrian Association for Radiation Protection, Croatian Radiation Protection Association, Czech Society for Radiation Protection, Health Physics Section of Hungary, Italian Radiation Protection Association and Slovak Society of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Hygiene. It was held in Portoroz, Slovenia. 112 papers were contributed as oral or poster presentations by 194 authors from 15 countries and two international organizations. Papers and posters covered a wide range of subjects, including: radiation protection at work place, natural radioactivity, nuclear instrumentation and dosimetry, emergency exposure situations, waste management, radiation protection principles and policies, radiation protection infrastructure, education, training and public relations and non-ionizing radiation. The well being of humans and other biota is tied in a very fundamental way to the environment, which make the environment a primary target for protection. That's why we believe that the activities of our Societies in future should be aimed at the protection of the environment in general, through a global and multi-disciplinary approach and the symposium demonstrated that there is a clear need for international communication and co-operation. The symposium was sponsored by

  4. Symposium on radiation protection in neighbouring countries in Central Europe - 1995. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glavic-Cidro, D.

    1996-01-01

    The 1995 Symposium on Radiation Protection in Neighbouring Countries in Central Europe was a continuation of a series of conferences held by radiation protection societies and/or associations in Central Europe to promote the knowledge in radiation protection and to exchange scientific information and experience between countries in this region. Radiation hazards present a small part of all hazards to which the mankind is exposed these days. However, radiation protection do have a leading role in creating a strategy to minimize and regulate practices where various hazards are involved. This time the symposium was organized by Radiation Protection Association of Slovenia and J. Stefan Institute in cooperation with Austrian Association for Radiation Protection, Croatian Radiation Protection Association, Czech Society for Radiation Protection, Health Physics Section of Hungary, Italian Radiation Protection Association and Slovak Society of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Hygiene. It was held in Portoroz, Slovenia. 112 papers were contributed as oral or poster presentations by 194 authors from 15 countries and two international organizations. Papers and posters covered a wide range of subjects, including: radiation protection at work place, natural radioactivity, nuclear instrumentation and dosimetry, emergency exposure situations, waste management, radiation protection principles and policies, radiation protection infrastructure, education, training and public relations and non-ionizing radiation. The well being of humans and other biota is tied in a very fundamental way to the environment, which make the environment a primary target for protection. That's why we believe that the activities of our Societies in future should be aimed at the protection of the environment in general, through a global and multi-disciplinary approach and the symposium demonstrated that there is a clear need for international communication and co-operation. The symposium was sponsored by

  5. 1988 annual work report of the Department for Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.

    1989-03-01

    The Department for Safety and Radiation Protection continues to be responsible for coordinating radiation protection, safety and protection at the KFA. It supports the other institutes and departments in performing the safety tasks allotted to them. The principal tasks of the Department are in administrative and technical assistance to these organization units and in safeguards. Administrative assistance involves, for example, regulation of the radiation protection organization in the institutes, including the appointment of radiation protection officers (Strahlenschutzbeauftragte). Furthermore, this includes the central handling of the registration system with the authorities and dealing with outside firms thus considerably relieving the institutes of their administrative tasks. Handling licensing procedures and the central accountancy of radioactive materials is also to be mentioned in this context. Technical assistance largely consists of developing, maintaining and repairing radiation measuring instruments and in the monitoring of personnel by evaluating personnel dosimeters and incorporation controls for radioactive sources. The safeguards tasks of the Department concern the very staff-intensive physical protection, as well as environmental protection and industrial safety. (orig.) [de

  6. European Radiation Protection Course - Basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massiot, Philippe; Ammerich, Marc; Viguier, Herve; Jimonet, Christine; Bruchet, Hugues; Vivier, Alain; Bodineau, Jean-Christophe; Etard, Cecile; Metivier, Henri; Moreau, Jean-Claude; Nourredine, Abdel-Mijd

    2014-01-01

    Radiation protection is a major challenge in the industrial applications of ionising radiation, both nuclear and non-nuclear, as well as in other areas such as the medical and research domains. The overall objective of this textbook is to participate to the development of European high-quality scheme and good practices for education and training in radiation protection (RP), coming from the new Council Directive 2013/59/Euratom laying down basic safety standards for protection against the dangers arising from exposure to ionising radiation. These ERPTS (European Radiation Protection Training Scheme) reflects the needs of the Radiation Protection Expert (RPE) and the Radiation Protection Officer (RPO), specifically with respect to the Directive 2013/59/Euratom in all sectors where ionising radiation are applied. To reflect the RPE training scheme, six chapters have been developed in this textbook: Radioactivity and nuclear physics; Interaction of ionising radiation with matter; Dosimetry; Biological effects of ionising radiation; Detection and measurement of ionising radiation; Uses of sources of ionising radiation. The result is a homogeneous textbook, dealing with the ERPTS learning outcomes suggested by ENETRAPII project (European Network on Education and Training in Radiological Protection II) from the 7. Framework Programme. A cyber-book is also part of the whole training material to develop the concept of 'learning more' (http://www.rpe-training.eu). The production of this first module 'basics' training material, in the combined form of a textbook plus a cyber-book as learning tools, will contribute to facilitate mutual recognition and enhanced mobility of these professionals across the European Union. (authors)

  7. 3084 ROYAL DECREE No 53/1992 of 24 January 1992 approving the Regulation on Health Protection against Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this new Regulation is to unite in a single instrument the existing rules on this subject contained in Decree 2519/1982 as amended by Decree 1753/1987, now repealed, as well as to introduce certain modifications which have proved desirable in the light of the practical application of those rules. The 1987 Decree reflected the basic safety standards of the Euratom Directives. Like that Decree, the new regulation lays down the measures for protection of the public and occupationally exposed persons against the dangers of ionizing radiation. The Regulation is supplemented by Appendices providing for definitions of radiological, biological and medical terms, annual dose limits for the public and for occupationally exposed persons, etc. (NEA)

  8. 6. national congress of radiation protection S.F.R.P. 2007; 6. congres national de radioprotection S.F.R.P. 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This congress tackles the following subjects: individual dosimetry for external irradiation, update of arrangements in the public health code relative to the radiation protection, implementation of zoning decree, regulation, radiation protection in professional area, radiation protection in ITER, non ionizing radiation, radiation protection in accident situation, biological radiation effects, radiation protection for patients, dosimetry, environmental exposure, radiation protection and radioactive waste management. (N.C.)

  9. Global view on radiation protection in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.

    2011-01-01

    When planning good management of ionising radiation in medicine, key factors such as ensuring that health professionals work together and convincing them that radiation protection (RP) represents a substantial part of the quality management system in their clinical practice are of utmost importance. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation has decided that one of the thematic priorities will be medical radiation exposure of patients. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has recently updated the report on RP in medicine and continues to work on focused documents centred on specific areas where advice is needed. The roles of the International Atomic Energy Agency, World Health Organization and the European Commission, in the area of RP in medicine, are described in the present document. The industry, the standardisation organisations as well as many scientific and professional societies are also dedicating significant effort to radiation safety aspects in medicine. Some of the efforts and priorities contemplated in RP in medicine over the coming years are suggested. The best outcome will be accomplished when all the actors, i.e. medical doctors, other health professionals, regulators, health authorities and the industry manage to work together. (authors)

  10. Epistemological basis of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouailhetas, Yannick; Acar, Maria E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Regarding natural phenomena understood or not, the absolute truth must be somewhere. In fact, there is no evidence that neither nature nor the phenomena that it includes were 'created' to be understood. Except for the fact that Man appeared through the same process, with his curiosity, capacity to perceive and manipulate, his greed for power and fears. In general, the attitude towards questions for which the absolute truth has not been reached varies from ignorance/indifference to the search of knowledge through scientific methodology, and may even be based on beliefs. The fact that the interaction between ionizing radiations and living beings results in biological effect is true. That the biological effect of high doses of radiation, absorbed outside the context of medicine, is hazardous for the irradiated individuals also seems to be true. That any dose is dangerous, or not, is debatable: the available information and knowledge are not consistent enough to end the question; and so, the absolute truth remains hidden. Radiological Protection is founded on the principle that any increase of dose results in an increase in the risk of cancer, and that this risk must be kept as low as possible. It is therefore based on this 'belief' that the international organisms of radiological protection emit recommendations aiming the protection of people and the environment. What is interesting about this question is that because of restrictions imposed by regulating agencies, populations, members of the public and the environment are properly protected against harmful effects of ionizing radiations, which makes the truth no longer interesting. Radiological Protection is a requirement associated to all activities involving nuclear energy. It satisfies several interests and opposes others. The greater the opposed interests and the perception that the absolute truth can represent dialectic advantage to one of the parts, the greater the perception of the importance of its

  11. Radiation protection in radionuclide investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction; radiation and radioactivity; alpha particles; beta particles; neutrons; electromagnetic radiation; units of radioactivity and radiation; biological effects of radiation; the philosophy of radiation protection (ALARA principle); practical aspects of radiation protection; work with unsealed radiation sources; radionuclide studies in experimental animals; radiation safety during clinical investigations; legislative control of radiation work; radioactive waste disposal; emergency procedures; conclusion. (U.K.)

  12. Radiation protection housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, A

    1975-04-10

    The radiation protection housing consists of a foot rim with castor swivel wheels, a tubular frame tapering off at the top, and a crown. In the upper part of the tubular frame a lead glass window is permanently installed. The sides are covered with radiation attenuating curtains of leaded rubber. The housing has the shape of a truncated pyramid which can be dismantled into its constituent parts. It is used for protection from radiation encountered in X-ray facilities in dental radiology.

  13. Physics for radiation protection

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, James E

    2013-01-01

    A much-needed working resource for health physicists and other radiation protection professionals, this volume presents clear, thorough, up-to-date explanations of the basic physics necessary to address real-world problems in radiation protection. Designed for readers with limited as well as basic science backgrounds, Physics for Radiation Protection emphasizes applied concepts and carefully illustrates all topics through examples as well as practice problems. Physics for Radiation Protection draws substantially on current resource data available for health physics use, providing decay schemes and emission energies for approximately 100 of the most common radionuclides encountered by practitioners. Excerpts of the Chart of the Nuclides, activation cross sections, fission yields, fission-product chains, photon attenuation coefficients, and nuclear masses are also provided.

  14. Radiation protection data sheets for the use of Tritium in unsealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This radiation protection data sheet is intended for supervisors and staff in the different medical, hospital, pharmaceutical, university and industrial laboratories and departments where Tritium is handled, and also for all those involved in risk prevention in this field. It provides essential data on radiation protection measures during the use of Tritium in unsealed sources: physical characteristics, risk assessment, administrative procedures, recommendations, regulations and bibliography

  15. Knowledge in Radiation Protection: a Survey of Professionals in Medical Imaging, Radiation Therapy and Nuclear Medicine Units in Yaounde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ongolo-Zogo, P.; Nguehouo, M.B.; Yomi, J.; Nko'o Amven, S.

    2013-01-01

    Medical use of ionizing radiation is now the most common radiation source of the population at the global level. The knowledge and practices of health professionals working with X-rays determine the level and quality of implementation of internationally and nationally recommended measures for radiation protection of patients and workers. The level of implementation and enforcement of international recommendations in African countries is an issue of concern due to weak laws and regulations and regulatory bodies. We report the results of a cross-sectional survey of health professionals working with ionizing radiation in Yaounde, the capital city of Cameroon. More than 50% of these professionals have a moderate level of knowledge of the norms and principles of radiation protection and more than 80% have never attended a continuing professional development workshop on radiation protection. (authors)

  16. Is radiation protection for the unborn child guaranteed by radiation protection for female workers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosske, C.; Karcher, K.

    2003-01-01

    ICRP Publication 88 recommends doses to embryo and fetus from intakes of radionuclides by the mother for various intake scenarios. Mainly by answering the question 'Is radiation protection for the unborn child guaranteed by radiation protection for female workers?' it has been assessed if the intake scenarios given in ICRP Publication 88 are adequate for radiation protection purposes. This is generally the case, but the consideration of an additional chronic intake scenario for early pregnancy would be helpful. It is demonstrated that following chronic intake by inhalation, for most radionuclides radiation protection for (female) workers is also adequate for protection of the unborn child, considered as a member of the public. However, there are a number of radionuclides for which possible intakes in routine operations should be more restricted (up to 1% of the annual limits on intake for workers in the case of nickel isotopes) to ensure radiation protection for the unborn child. (author)

  17. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations on x-ray diagnostics; issued on April 28, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    These regulations are applicable to practices with ionising radiation with respect to medical and dental diagnostics by means of external radiation sources like x-rays or radioactive substances. The regulations are also applicable to medical or dental use of such radiation sources for planning and guidance, for research and for legal and insurance related examinations

  18. General principles of radiation protection in hospital media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanteur, J.

    1993-01-01

    Principles of radiation protection given by ICRP in term of justification, optimization, limitation are applicable in hospital media. The medical act has to be justified and, in France, it is not possible to use ionizing radiations without a prescription from a doctor. The acceleration of technologies development make non radiological techniques more employed than radiologic ones, in an aim of efficiency more than an aim radiation protection. The second principle of optimization means to give medical care with the minimum of ionizing radiations for the patients as well the operators. For the principle of limitation which applied only for operators, we have the new recommends of ICRP, but it would be reasonable to give the most part of decision to the works doctor to decide if somebody has the aptitude to work at an exposed place. The last points concern the quality of equipment, the safety of installations, the organization of works which are under laws and regulations. 3 tabs

  19. Optimization and radiation protection culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, In Young; Shin, Hyeong Ki; Lee, Chan Mi

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture or radiation protection culture is based in common on the term, 'culture'. Culture is defined as the learned, shared set of symbols and patterns of basic assumptions, which is invented, discovered, or developed by a given group as it learns to cope with its problem of external adaptation and internal integration. Safety culture generally refers to the attitude and behaviors affecting safety performance. The concept of 'Safety Culture' was introduced after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. For the accident, nuclear society reached the conclusion that the cause was the wrong management attitude of the NPP, that is, deficient 'Safety Culture'. Recently, 'Radiation Protection Culture' was introduced as the core concept of nuclear safety culture. There have been many efforts to establish definition and develop assessment tool for radiation protection culture in international level such as ICRP and IRPA as well as NRC. In the same context with the safety culture, radiation protection culture is defined as 'the core values and behaviors resulting from a collective commitment by leaders and individual's to emphasize safety over competing goals to ensure protection of people and the environment.' It is worthwhile to recognize that regulatory enforcement in establishing healthy radiation protection culture of operators should be minimized because culture is not in the domain of regulatory enforcement. However, as 'ALARA', the most important concept in radiation protection, may be successfully achieved only in well established radiation protection culture, the least regulatory intervention would be needed in promoting and nurturing radiation protection culture in licensee. In addition, the concept of radiation protection culture should be addressed in plant operational policy to achieve the goals of ALARA. The pre-condition of the successful radiation protection culture is a healthy organizational

  20. Optimization and radiation protection culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, In Young; Shin, Hyeong Ki; Lee, Chan Mi [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Safety culture or radiation protection culture is based in common on the term, 'culture'. Culture is defined as the learned, shared set of symbols and patterns of basic assumptions, which is invented, discovered, or developed by a given group as it learns to cope with its problem of external adaptation and internal integration. Safety culture generally refers to the attitude and behaviors affecting safety performance. The concept of 'Safety Culture' was introduced after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. For the accident, nuclear society reached the conclusion that the cause was the wrong management attitude of the NPP, that is, deficient 'Safety Culture'. Recently, 'Radiation Protection Culture' was introduced as the core concept of nuclear safety culture. There have been many efforts to establish definition and develop assessment tool for radiation protection culture in international level such as ICRP and IRPA as well as NRC. In the same context with the safety culture, radiation protection culture is defined as 'the core values and behaviors resulting from a collective commitment by leaders and individual's to emphasize safety over competing goals to ensure protection of people and the environment.' It is worthwhile to recognize that regulatory enforcement in establishing healthy radiation protection culture of operators should be minimized because culture is not in the domain of regulatory enforcement. However, as 'ALARA', the most important concept in radiation protection, may be successfully achieved only in well established radiation protection culture, the least regulatory intervention would be needed in promoting and nurturing radiation protection culture in licensee. In addition, the concept of radiation protection culture should be addressed in plant operational policy to achieve the goals of ALARA. The pre-condition of the successful radiation protection culture is a healthy organizational

  1. Yugoslavia: Act of 21 November 1984 on radiation protection and the safe use of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This Act which entered into force on 1 December 1984 repeals the 1976 Act on Protection against Ionizing Radiation and regulates most of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and radiation protection in Yugoslavia. The Act lays down the licensing procedure for nuclear installations and covers safety-related questions in connection with standards, technical criteria etc. It also takes into account several areas regulated at international level, namely safeguards and physical protection of nuclear material. (NEA) [fr

  2. Manual on radiation protection in hospital and general practice. Volume 4. Radiation protection in dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koren, K; Wuehrmann, A H

    1977-01-01

    The nine chapters of this manual on radiation protection in dentistry discuss the following topics: the need for radiation protection; delegation of responsibility; radiographic equipment; radiographic film; radiographic techniques; film processing and handling; patient doses; general radiation protection and monitoring; and educational standards. (HLW)

  3. Radiation protection in today's world: towards sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The science and application of radiological protection have continually evolved since the beginning of the 20 century when the health effects of radiation first began to be discovered. Given these changes, notably over the past 10 to 15 years, and considering the recent evolution of social values and judgements, the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) felt that it would be worthwhile to identify possible emerging challenges as well as ongoing challenges that will require new approaches to reach sustainable decisions. This report concisely describes the CRPPH views of the most significant challenges to radiological protection policy, regulation and application that are likely to emerge or are already emerging. While not proposing solutions to these issues, the report characterizes key aspects and pressures, taking into account the evolution of science, society and experience, such that governments can better foresee these challenges and be prepared to address them appropriately. (author)

  4. MO-E-213-03: Newer Radiation Protection Requirements in Last Decade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clements, J. [Kaiser Permanente (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The focus of work of medical physicists in 1980’s was on quality control and quality assurance. Radiation safety was important but was dominated by occupational radiation protection. A series of over exposures of patients in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and observation of skin injuries among patients undergoing interventional procedures in 1990’s started creating the need for focus on patient protection. It gave medical physicists new directions to develop expertise in patient dosimetry and dose management. Publications creating awareness on cancer risks from CT in early part of the current century and over exposures in CT in 2008 brought radiation risks in public domain and created challenging situations for medical physicists. Increasing multiple exposures of individual patient and patient doses of few tens of mSv or exceeding 100 mSv are increasing the role of medical physicists. Expansion of usage of fluoroscopy in the hands of clinical professionals with hardly any training in radiation protection shall require further role for medical physicists. The increasing publications in journals, recent changes in Safety Standards, California law, all increase responsibilities of medical physicists in patient protection. Newer technological developments in dose efficiency and protective devices increase percentage of time devoted by medical physicists on radiation protection activities. Without radiation protection, the roles, responsibilities and day-to-day involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic radiology becomes questionable. In coming years either medical radiation protection may emerge as a specialty or medical physicists will have to keep major part of day-to-day work on radiation protection. Learning Objectives: To understand how radiation protection has been increasing its role in day-to-day activities of medical physicist To be aware about international safety Standards, national and State regulations that require higher attention to radiation

  5. RCA - a regional approach to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.; Easey, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for Asia and Oceania is the oldest of four International Atomic Energy Agency Member State regional programs. Organized in 1972, 17 countries are now members of RCA - Australia, Bangladesh, Peoples Republic of China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Viet Nam. A number of projects related to the application of a wide range of nuclear technologies are conducted through RCA. The program is established by national coordinators for each project area, in consultation with IAEA technical officers. Most of the funding comes directly from RCA regional donor countries, with about one third supplied through the IAEA Technical Cooperation program. In 1986, following the Chernobyl accident, national coordinators and the IAEA staff recognized the value of establishing an RCA project aimed at strengthening regional radiation protection programs. The potential importance of RCA involvement in radiation protection is underscored by the fact that its member states comprise more than half of the world's population. The regional approach to addressing radiation protection issues allows member states to take advantage of regional resources to solve common regional problems. RCA provides the opportunity for specialists who may have few professional colleagues in their country to develop valuable contacts with regional radiation protection experts. In a very real way, specialists can network with their neighbours, often establishing bilateral programs outside of the RCA auspices. The current five year RCA Project to strengthen radiation protection infrastructure, with the IAEA designation - RAS/9/006, will be completed at the end of 1997. The project was developed to address five mayor areas of activity: Off-site emergency response; individual monitoring, internal and external; characterization of the physical, anatomical, physiological

  6. Regulation and decision-making in environmental radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The EC-funded project FASSET (Framework for Assessment of Environmental impact), which completed in 2003, has developed an assessment framework for evaluating the environmental impact of ionising radiation on biota in natural ecosystems. The FASSET framework comprises: source characterisation and initial hazard analysis; ecosystem description and selection of reference organisms (ca 30, with defined geometry and life history); exposure analysis, including conversion of input data to external and internal radionuclide concentrations, and subsequent conversion to dose rates; effects analysis, supported by an effects database; and, guidance for interpretation. The framework provides practical and scientific support to the international development of recommendations for radiological protection of the environment through the International Commission on Radiological Protection (cf. ICRP Publication 91). However, on the basis of experiences from FASSET and other recent developments, it can be concluded that there are challenges remaining before environmental radiological protection can be seen as a natural component of general environmental protection. The major future challenge is the development of an integrated approach where decision-making can be guided by sound scientific judgements. This requires, inter alia, filling in gaps in basic knowledge of relevance to assessment and protection, through targeted experimental, theoretical (including expert judgements) and real case studies; development of risk characterisation methodologies, based on both theoretical and experimental studies; development of screening standards, where appropriate; development of user-friendly assessment tools; and stakeholder involvement, including development of supporting communication strategies. A new EC-funded project, ERICA (Environmental Risk from Ionising Contaminants: Assessment and management), has recently started. The project has four operational work packages, being devoted to

  7. Understanding of radiation protection in medicine. Pt. 2. Occupational exposure and system of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Hiroji; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    1997-01-01

    Using a questionnaire we investigated whether radiation protection is correctly understood by medical doctors (n=140) and nurses (n=496). Although medical exposure is usually understood by medical doctors and dentists, their knowledge was found to be insufficient. Sixty-eight percent of medical doctors and 50% of dentists did not know about the system of radiation protection. Dose monitoring was not correctly carried out by approximately 20% of medical staff members, and medical personnel generally complained of anxiety about occupational exposure rather than medical exposure. They did not receive sufficient education on radiation exposure and protection in school. In conclusion, the results of this questionnaire suggested that they do not have adequate knowledge about radiation exposure and protection. The lack of knowledge about protection results in anxiety about exposure. To protect oneself from occupational exposure, individual radiation doses must be monitored, and medical practice should be reconsidered based on the results of monitoring. To eliminate unnecessary medical and occupational exposure and to justify practices such as radiological examinations, radiation protection should be well understood and appropriately carried out by medical doctors and dentists. Therefore, the education of medical students on the subject of radiation protection is required as is postgraduate education for medical doctors, dentists and nurses. (author)

  8. Re-enactment of the Radiation Protection ordinance - explanations for its application in practice. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegl, A.; Bischof, W.

    2001-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Association (Fachverband fuer Strahlenschutz) decided to publish explanations for the practical application of the amended Radiation Protection Ordinance, if possible immediately at the time of promulgation. The purpose of this publication is to provide as many advice seekers as possible with whatever information they need for their purposes. The material has therefore been divided into chapters each dedicated to a specific user group. Dedicated chapters containing all the important information for the respective target group have been provided for hospitals and physicians, general and special applications of ionising radiation in industry and trade, companies that perform services in areas or installations exposed to radiation, nuclear power plants and companies affected by the new protective regulations concerning natural radiation. These chapters are supplemented with contributions on generic topics such as the principles of radiation protection, new developments in dosimetry, transport and storage of radioactive substances, expertise and instruction and qualification approval. The section on general topics is rounded off by the transitory regulations, which are crucially important

  9. Applying the ionising radiation regulations to radon in the UK workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    As a response to the identification of a health risk from workplace radon in the UK, the Ionising Radiations Regulations include the protection of workers from excessive levels of radon. Employers are required to make risk assessments, and the interpretation of the Health and Safety Executive is that the regulations apply to workplace premises in locations already designated as Radon Affected Areas for domestic purposes, with the difference that in workplaces, it is the maximum winter radon concentration rather than the annual average which is the parameter of interest. This paper discusses the rationale behind the current regulatory environment, outlines the role and duties of Accredited Radiation Protection Advisers and summarises the strategies necessary to conform to the regulations. (authors)

  10. Recent advances in radiation protection instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, D.A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation protection instrumentation plays very important role in radiation protection and surveillance programme. Radiation detector, which appears at the frontal end of the instrument, is an essential component of these instruments. The instrumental requirement of protection level radiation monitoring is different from conventional radiation measuring instruments. Present paper discusses the new type of nuclear radiation detectors, new protection level instruments and associated electronic modules for various applications. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, such as nuclear power plants; mining and milling; medical institutions; educational and research establishments; and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection to workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radioactive materials for different applications. The radiation exposures to the individual radiation workers and records of their cumulative radiation doses need to be routinely monitored and recorded

  11. Radiation protection glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The glossary is intended to be used as a terminology standard for IAEA documentation on radiation protection. An effort has been made to use definitions contained in internationally accepted publications such as recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), reports of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), with only slight modifications in order to tailor them more closely to IAEA needs. The glossary is restricted to ionizing radiation

  12. Radiation protection guidelines for radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessard, E.T.; Meinhold, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    The system of dose limitation and present guidance for emergency workers and guidance for intervention on behalf of the public are discussed. There are three elements for the system of dose limitation: justification, optimization and dose limits. The first element is basically a political process in this country. Justification is based on a risk-benefit analysis, and justification of the use of radioactive materials or radiation is generally not within the authority of radiation protection managers. Radiation protection managers typically assess detriments or harm caused by radiation exposure and have very little expertise in assessing the benefits of a particular practice involving nuclear material

  13. Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection in France in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    In 2005, the Asn pursued its significant investment in radiation protection and reaffirms its ambition to become as efficient in radiation protection as it is in nuclear safety as of 2009. 2005 was a year of great progress for the Asn as it consolidated its organisation and working methods, in accordance with the 2005-2007 strategic plan it set for itself. The Asn continued progress in the field of radiation protection has given rise to various new regulations to improve the legislative and regulatory framework in this area. The Asn plans to step up its efforts to ensure better monitoring of patient exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide better management of radon-related risks, particularly in housing. Fully aware that its newfound power in this area requires outside evaluation, the Asn has asked the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to organize an I.R.R.S. (Integrated Regulatory Review Service) assignment consisting of a peer-conducted audit. The IAEA has confirmed that this audit will take place in November 2006. (N.C.)

  14. In-service training and expertise requirements in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klener, V.; Heribanova, A.

    2003-01-01

    Proper selection of staff and their special education and training in radiation protection are important factors when assuring faultless man-machine interaction and thereby a reduced likelihood of human factor failure in hazardous practices. University-level institutions can only provide education in the individual partial segments of the multidisciplinary area of radiation protection, whereas the proper practices are learned by graduate personnel on the job, by performing operational tasks at their particular workplace. The scope o expertise of subjects providing radiation protection surveillance and the requirements for their special education and training are outlined. Supervising persons appointed by the radiation source handling licensee to perform a number of operational tasks at the workplace assume a prominent position. Alternatively, systematic supervision at the workplace can be contracted by the licensee from an external body, provided that the latter has acquired appropriate licence from the State Office for Nuclear Safety. The provisions of the Atomic Act and the related implementing regulations with respect to special training and to the examination of professional competence before an expert commission are briefly outlined. (author)

  15. Dose evaluation and protection of cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Satoshi; Takagi, Toshiharu

    2004-01-01

    This paper explained the effects of cosmic radiation on aircraft crews and astronauts, as well as related regulations. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommends the practice of radiation exposure management for the handling/storage of radon and materials containing natural radioactive substances, as well as for boarding jet aircraft and space flight. Common aircraft crew members are not subject to radiation exposure management in the USA and Japan. In the EU, the limit value is 6 mSv per year, and for the crew group exceeding this value, it is recommended to keep records containing appropriate medical examination results. Pregnant female crewmembers are required to keep an abdominal surface dose within 1 mSv. For astronauts, ICRP is in the stage of thinking about exposure management. In the USA, National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement has set dose limits for 30 days, 1 year, and lifetime, and recommends lifetime effective dose limits against carcinogenic risk for each gender and age group. This is the setting of the dose limits so that the risk of carcinogenesis, to which space radiation exposure is considered to contribute, will reach 3%. For cosmic radiation environments at spacecraft inside and aircraft altitude, radiation doses can be calculated for astronauts and crew members, using the calculation methods for effective dose and dose equivalent for tissue. (A.O.)

  16. 4. European forum of radiation protection sciences. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    This 4. European forum of radiation protection sciences was the occasion for nuclear professionals to share their experience and to present the tools and techniques implemented in dismantling operations in the respect of radiation protection rules. This document brings together the abstracts and the available presentations given at this forum: 1 - Dismantling organisation and management - regulations: dismantling environment (A. Gay, Areva NC); Dismantling at the CEA (Ph. Guiberteau, DEN-Saclay); Optimisation of future dismantlement at the design and operation stage of facilities (P. Poncet, Areva); Action of the labour Ministry for workers radiation protection (T. Lahaye, DGT); 2 - Dismantling experience feedbacks 1: Radiation protection and dismantlement at Marcoule (J. Chardin, Areva NC); INB 106 dismantling (N. Pauwels, UDIL); Dismantling wastes management and valorisation of ALS and Saturne accelerators at Saclay (C. Salmon, CEA-Saclay); Chooz power plant deconstruction (L. Bardou, EDF); 3-4 - Dismantling projects: Phenix power plant dismantling (C. Beretti, CEA-Marcoule); Radiological characterization impact on the DGB project (H.C. Turbatte, F. Lemperiere, DGB Eurodif); Contribution of scientific calculations to reactor dismantling studies (A. Van Lauwe, CEA-Saclay); Acceptance committee of radiological cleansing companies (S. Faure, DPSN); Externalizing of the radiation protection skilled person (J.P. Piferrer, ATSR); International network of radiation protection professionals (G. Abela, EDF); 5 - Dismantling experience feedback 2: gloveboxes dismounting at La Hague plant (R. Choquet, P. Mougnard, Areva NC); Nuclear submarines dismantling in Russia (C. Deregel, Topp-Decide); Radioactive waste management of CERN accelerators (Y. Algoet, CERN); Nuclear facilities decommissioning (M. Berton, CEA, B. Marc, DRIM Sogeris); Asbestos removal in radiological environment (R. Blanc, Areva NC); 6-7-8 - Tools and methods: Aspilaser, decontamination by laser ablation (F

  17. Radiation Protection: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos, M.

    2007-01-01

    As a federal research Centre, SCK-CEN has the statutory assignment to give priority to research related to safety, radioactive waste management, protection of man and environment, management of fissile and other strategic materials and social implications as part of the pursuit of sustainable development and to develop and gather the necessary knowledge and spread this knowledge through formation and communication. At the Division of Radiation Protection at SCK-CEN we are therefore active to maintain and enhance knowledge and expertise in each aspect of radiation protection: we study the risk of exposure - the way that radioactive materials spread in the environment and the potential for human contact - and the risk from exposure - how radiation affects human health; we perform health physics measurements; we are involved in emergency planning and preparedness and support to risk governance and decision taking. These activities are supported by radiation specific analysis and measurement techniques. These activities are not performed in isolation but in context of national and international collaborations or demands

  18. 33. Days of Radiation Protection. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    The publication has been set up as presentations of the conference dealing with health protection during work with ionizing radiation for different activities which involve the handling of ionizing radiation sources. The main conference topics are focused on the current problems in radiation protection and radioecology. On the web-page totally 103 presentations or posters are published. The Conference consists of the following sections: (I) Effects of ionizing radiation (radiology, health effects, risk factors); (II) General aspects of radiation protection (recommendations and legislative in radiation protection); (III): Dosimetry and metrology of ionizing radiation (metrology, instrumentation, use of computational methods); (IV) Radiation protection in nuclear power industry (working environment in the nuclear industry, the impact on the environment, nuclear power shutdown management); (V) Emergency management (emergencies, accidents, waste); (VI) Radiation load and protection in diagnostics, nuclear medicine and radiation oncology (burden on patients, staff, size of population exposure from medical sources of ionizing radiation, security, and quality control, optimization); (VII) Natural sources of radiation in workplaces and the environment (radon and other radionuclides, the risk estimation, optimization); (VIII) Education (new trends in education of radiation experts, medical physicists and stake-holders).

  19. Concepts in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncescu, M.

    1996-01-01

    This monograph provides basic notions and principles in dosimetry and radiation protection in compliance with two fundamental works: IAEA Safety Series No.115 - International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources - and Publication no. 60 of International Commission on Radiological Protection. After the review of quantities and units necessary in radiation protection, the book presents the new values of dose limits as well as the values of 'radiation weighting factor', 'tissue weighting factor' and 'conversion factor intake-dose' (committed effective dose per unit intake) by ingestion and inhalation for 30 most important radionuclides. The new values of dose limits, lower than the old values, are a challenge for the radiation protection, especially of the 'public' where the dose limit diminished by a factor of five relative to the earlier edition. The new value of dose limit for public, 1 mSv per year (obviously over the natural exposure of 2.4 mSv per year), imposes new action ways and levels in radiation protection, especially in some cases of exacerbated natural radioactivity. The book provides the calculus of external exposure with the Gamma constant expressed in adequate units, to make the calculation easier. In the calculus of protection shield for gamma sources one uses a method, which while approximate helps save time. The calculus of internal exposure is made using the conversion factor intake-dose. Finally, the 'dosimetric watch' of the natural and artificial radioactivity of the atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere is intended to comply with the International Basic Safety Standards. Each chapter ends with a set of illustrative problems which enhances the reader's understanding of underlying concepts and current methods used in the field

  20. The future of environmental protection: A U.S. regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicus, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. has the largest number of nuclear installations of any country in the world. This puts us at an extreme end of the spectrum. As a result, I have touched on many issues relative to environmental protection. Therefore in summary, let me list these issues: Before moving ahead, look at what has been done thus far. Executive policy and a national regulatory infrastructure. - Environmental Impact Statements. - Environmental Justice. Standards determined by law or courts. Consultation with other national agencies and countries. Improving the timetable for issuing regulations and supporting guidance. Improved communications and training of staff. Transparency and flexibility throughout the regulatory process. Differences in regulatory approaches are OK, as long as the end result is to achieve sound national environmental and public health and safety policy. I believe that this series of conferences represents an excellent opportunity to come to resolution about the future of environmental regulations and policies. Having this information will assist us in harmonizing any proposed recommendation(s) for radiological protection of the environment involving commodities containing radioactive materials or unrestricted release of slightly radioactive materials by using the existing environmental radiation protection framework as a starting point. Doing so in an open, encompassing manner will, in my opinion, go a long way towards resolving some of the current controversies about radiation protection standards in the U.S., as well as around the world, with the desirable end result of increasing public confidence in our environmental radiation protection programs. (author)

  1. Transition of radiation protection standards in ICRP recommendations and Japan's response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirabe, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Radiation protection standards are the standards set for the purpose of preventing radiation hazard and other damage. This paper confirm what the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommended against the standard value on public exposure in Japan's laws and regulations, and how the Japanese government responded in introducing it into Japan's laws and regulations. There were delays of 6 to 12 years for the introduction of ICRP recommendations into the laws and regulations. Compared with response to the copyright treaty, which was extremely quick with the delays of only 1 to 2 years, these delays were very large. In Japan's laws and regulations, there are no regulations on the standard value for public exposure, and introduction of the recommended standard value of 1 mSv/year from ICRP has been avoided by the government. It is supposed that the reason for not introducing radiation dose limit and dose constraint value of public exposure was due to the lobbying of electric companies. After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, the former Nuclear Safety Commission set the reference level for emergency exposure situation at 20 mSv/year. Although there is the long-term target of 1 mSv/year for existing exposure, no reference level has been set yet. Due to these delays or avoidances, the rights of people suffering from radiation exposure are restricted, while perhaps the benefits of electric companies are being protected. (A.O.)

  2. Some perspectives on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review of the history and organizational structure of the NCRP is given. Summaries are given of a number of NCRP radiation protection guides dealing with hazards from 85 Kr, radiation exposures from consumer products, basic radiation protection criteria, and doses from natural background radiation

  3. Standards for radiation protection instrumentation: design of safety standards and testing procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, Frank

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes by means of examples the role of safety standards for radiation protection and the testing and qualification procedures. The development and qualification of radiation protection instrumentation is a significant part of the work of TUV NORD SysTec, an independent expert organisation in Germany. The German Nuclear Safety Standards Commission (KTA) establishes regulations in the field of nuclear safety. The examples presented may be of importance for governments and nuclear safety authorities, for nuclear operators and for manufacturers worldwide. They demonstrate the advantage of standards in the design of radiation protection instrumentation for new power plants, in the upgrade of existing instrumentation to nuclear safety standards or in the application of safety standards to newly developed equipment. Furthermore, they show how authorities may proceed when safety standards for radiation protection instrumentation are not yet established or require actualization. (author)

  4. Radiation protection, measurements and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The introductory lectures discuss subjects such as radiation protection principles and appropriate measuring techniques; methods, quantities and units in radiation protection measurement; technical equipment; national and international radiation protection standards. The papers presented at the various sessions deal with: Dosimetry of external radiation (27 papers); Working environment monitoring and emission monitoring (21 contributions); Environmental monitoring (19 papers); Incorporation monitoring (9 papers); Detection limits (4 papers); Non-ionizing radiation, measurement of body dose and biological dosimetry (10 papers). All 94 contributions (lectures, compacts and posters) are retrievable as separate records. (HP) [de

  5. Pros and cons of the revolution in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latek, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    In 1959, the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) chose the LNT (Linear No-Threshold) model as an assumption to form the basis for regulating radiation protection. During the 1999 UNSCEAR session, held in April in Vienna, the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis was discussed. Among other LNT-related subjects, the Committee discussed the problem of collective dose and dose commitment. These concepts have been introduced in the early 1960s, as the offspring of the linear no-threshold assumption. At the time they reflected a deep concern about the induction of hereditary effects by nuclear tests fallout. Almost four decades later, collective dose and dose commitment are still widely used, although by now both the concepts and the concern should have faded into oblivion. It seems that the principles and concepts of radiation protection have gone astray and have led to exceedingly prohibitive standards and impractical recommendations. Revision of these principles and concepts is now being proposed by an increasing number of scientists and several organisations

  6. Review of the general regulation of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes C, A.

    2008-12-01

    As a result of advances in radiation protection at the international level, the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards has been given the task of revising the General Regulation of Radiation Safety to cover such developments, especially those contained in the safety basic standards No. 115 of the IAEA, published in 1977. In addition, the working group has considered issues that need to be regulated to avoid unnecessary dose received by the public due to exposure to ionizing radiation. Related to the public exposure believes the preliminary deal with situations of chronic exposure in homes, as well as human activities involving natural sources of ionizing radiation exposure to cause the public to levels that exceed the dose limits laid down in the Regulation. It is also envisaged that they will be subject to monitoring by the Commission, the concentration levels due to radon in homes, radon outdoor, radio and radon in drinking water, and external radiation levels due to naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials. Thus, the processes that may be subject to surveillance by the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards include water treatment, some metallurgical processes, some of the mining industry and some industrial processes in which waste increase activity concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides. With the revision of the General Regulation of Radiation Safety, certain standards must be reviewed and further developed such as the concentration of radon levels in homes room, outdoor radon, radon and radio in drinking water, radiation levels out sourcing due to naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials, and standards governing (and identify) the radioactive material generation in the processes mentioned previously. (Author)

  7. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H. [eds.

    1991-10-01

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

  8. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H.

    1991-10-01

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database

  9. Eighth meeting of the radiation protection-skilled persons - Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhel, Thierry; Lahaye, Thierry; Rousse, Carole; Perrin, Marie-Line; Billarand, Yann; Scanff, Pascale; Celier, David; El Jammal, Marie-Helene; Jacob, Sophie; Vecchiola, Sophie; Bulla, Giuseppina; Guillalmon, Christophe; Mechin, Guillaume; Guersen, Joel; Blaise, Philipp; Ammerich, Marc; Bordy, Jean-Marc; Sevestre, Bernard; Massiot, Philippe; Michel, Xavier; Raffoux, Yann; Kernisant, Billy; Lefaure, Christian; Balduyck, Sebastien; Wassilieff, Serge; Ouabdelkader, Said; Lecu, Alexis; Roy, Catherine; Pigree, Gilbert; Barbey, Pierre; Bergeron, Christophe; Schieber, Caroline

    2012-12-01

    This eighth meeting of the radiation protection skilled persons celebrated the 15. anniversary of this type of meetings. It is the occasion for radiation protection specialists to share information and their experience on various topics, in particular the recent evolutions of the regulation. This document gathers the available presentations given during this conference: 1 - Opening talk (T. Juhel); 2 - Regulatory evolutions in the domain of protection of workers exposed to ionising radiations (T. Lahaye); 3 - Evolution of the regulatory documents on the basis of the French public health law (C. Rousse); 4 - Relations between IRSN and Companies - regulatory obligations from the perspective of the radiation protection-skilled person (Y. Billarand); 5 - IRSN's follow up of workers' exposure (P. Scanff); 6 - Contribution of a 18 F preparation and injection system to the radiation protection of workers (D. Celier); 7 - Workplace analysis in interventional radiology (G. Bulla, C. Guillalmon); 8 - Interest of Workplace analyses in risk information (G. Mechin); 9 - Running of a joint operators/contractors club of radiation protection skilled persons at the scale of a CEA centre (P. Blaise); 10 - Radiological exposure of the maintenance personnel of aerial monitoring radars (X. Michel); 11 - The IRSN barometer (M.H. El Jammal); 12 - An original network of professional radiation protection: the GoogleGroup for dental radiation protection-skilled persons (Y. Raffoux); 13 - Cirkus radiation protection association - a portal for a practical and operational radiation protection (B. Kernisant); 14 - Situation of networks - what do we do in a network? What is the role of the national coordination? (S. Balduyck, C. Lefaure); 15 - Update on the situation at Fukushima (M. Ammerich); 15 - Radio-induced cataracts: why lowering the eye lens legal limit? (S. Wassilieff); 16 - O'CLOC study - Radio-induced cataracts among interventional Cardiologists (S. Jacob); 17 - Photon dosimetry of

  10. 1989 annual work report of the KFA Department for Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.; Frenkler, K.L.

    1990-03-01

    The Department for Safety and Radiation Protection continues to be responsible for coordinating radiation protection, safety and protection at the KFA. It supports the other institutes and departments in performing the safety tasks allotted to them. The principal tasks of the Department are in administrative and technical assistance to these organization units and in safeguards. Administrative assistance involves, for example, regulation of the radiation protection organization in the institutes, including the appointment of radiation protection officers (Strahlenschutzbeauftrage). Furthermore, this includes the central handling of the registration system with the authorities and dealing with outside firms thus considerably relieving the institutes of their administrative tasks. Handling licensing procedures and the central accountancy of radioactive materials is also to be mentioned in this context. Technical assistance largely consists of developing, maintaining and repairing radiation measuring instruments and in the monitoring of personnel by evaluating personnel dosimeters and incorporation controls for radioactive sources. The safeguards tasks of the Department concern the very staff-intensive physical protection, as well as environmental protection and industrial safety. (orig.) [de

  11. Nevada National Security Site Radiation Protection Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-04-30

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, “Occupational Radiation Protection,” establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This RPP section consists of general statements that are applicable to the NNSS as a whole. The RPP also includes a series of appendices which provide supporting detail for the associated NNSS Tennant Organizations (TOs). Appendix H, “Compliance Demonstration Table,” contains a cross-walk for the implementation of 10 CFR 835 requirements. This RPP does not contain any exemptions from the established 10 CFR 835 requirements. The RSPC and TOs are fully compliant with 10 CFR 835 and no additional funding is required in order to meet RPP commitments. No new programs or activities are needed to meet 10 CFR 835 requirements and there are no anticipated impacts to programs or activities that are not included in the RPP. There are no known constraints to implementing the RPP. No guides or technical standards are adopted in this RPP as a means to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  12. Radiation Protection Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, H.M.; Schnuer, K.

    1992-01-01

    The contributions presented during the seminar provided clear evidence that radiation protection of the patient plays an increasingly important role for manufacturers of radiological equipment and for regulatory bodies, as well as for radiologists, doctors and assistants. The proceedings of this seminar reflect the activities and work in the field of radiation protection of the patient and initiate further action in order to harmonize dosimetric measurements and calculations, to ameliorate education and training, to improve the technical standards of the equipment and to give a push to a more effective use of ionising radiation in the medical sector

  13. Radiation protection optimization of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents the contribution of CEPN (study center on protection evaluation in nuclear area) to the Days of the French Radiation Protection Society (SFRP) on optimization of workers radiation protection in electronuclear, industrial and medical areas

  14. Waste control guidelines according to the Amendment of the Radiation Protection Ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, B.

    2003-01-01

    Up to now, the Waste Control Guidelines are considered one of the essential evaluation standards for giving an expert opinion about an application for radioactive material disposal. When the new Radiation Protection Ordinance became effective, some parts of the Waste Control Guidelines have become legal regulation. Nevertheless, the Waste Control Guidelines have not been repealed and both regulations exist simultaneously. Therefore, it is now being under discussion how a new subordinate regulation should look like. 14 years of experience with the Waste Control Guidelines have shown that it is not only desirable but necessary to have nationwide standardized regulations for the disposal of radioactive waste. In the following parts, the results of a search made by the TUeV Nord e.V. have been summed up. This search shows for which aspects legal regulation will be necessary in future as well. Those parts of the Waste Control Guidelines, which have been transferred into the Radiation Protection Ordinance, can be found in 72-75 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. Besides this, other parts are or will be determined by other regulations (AtAV, GGVSE for transport procedures, planned regulations for intermediate storage and clearance). Furthermore, there are some aspects which have hardly been applied in every day's practice (e.g. qualified procedures). In addition to this, there all still some aspects which have to be determined by the Waste Control Guidelines. This refers to the demand for a waste disposal concept, the obligatory application of the Waste Acceptance Criteria for Final Disposal for conditioning, rules for mixing of waste as well as regulations concerning recycling and reuse of radioactive residues. (orig.)

  15. On ethical issues in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, L.

    1996-01-01

    From an ethical viewpoint the author surveys existing international radiation protection recommendations and standards. After outlining previous work on the ethics of radiation protection, professional ethics, and the ethics of human radiation experiments, the author discusses ethical thinking on seven key issues related to radiation protection and ethics. (author)

  16. Legislations for regulating the work with ionizing radiations in the arab counties a comparative analytical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Baroudy, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of the developments taking place in nuclear sciences and technologies during the twentieth century and the resulting increase of useful applications of these technologies, the international efforts aiming at helping different countries to establish nuclear safety systems. This was also increased through the promulgation of legislations that render the practices, which could be accompanied with exposure to ionizing radiations, more safe within a firm legal system that is also backed by promulgating suitable executive regulations. Most Arab countries are keen to promulgate their legislations for regulating the work with ionizing radiations and protection against their dangers. Those legislations usually get their genesis and provisions from the international recommendations as well as from the general legal system of the country. The present work consists of four chapters. The first chapter deals with the definition of legislations for regulating the work with ionizing radiations. Chapter two discusses the international trend to promulgate legislations for protection against ionizing radiations. Chapter three includes an analytical comparative study on the legislations that regulates the work with ionizing radiations in the Arab countries. Finally, chapter four deals with the legislations for protection against ionizing radiations in the Arab Republic of Egypt

  17. The German Radiation Protection Ordinance as amended in 2000. The new regulations and their potential to initiate changes in practice. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guglhoer, P.

    2000-01-01

    The papers presented at the meeting of experts focus on the new regulations of the statutory ordinance on radiation protection (StrlSchV) and the resulting changes in practical implementation, as for instance with respect to occupational exposure and population exposure. All papers of the meeting have been analysed and indexed for separate retrieval from the ENERGY database. (orig./CB) [de

  18. Analysis of the regulation on protective and remedial measures on the radioactive contaminated territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutkov, V.A.; Demin, V.F.; Vasiliev, A.; Ivanov, E.; Tsyb, A.

    2002-01-01

    The current regulation and decisions on the radiation and social protection and rehabilitation of the radioactive contaminated territories are analyzed with purpose to learn all lessons needed for improvement of the regulation and activity in restoration phase and in the preparedness to possible future radiological accidents. Necessity to go beyond the simple radiation protection approach in the decision making and to use risk analysis considering both radiological and non-radiological factors is one of the lessons. The conceptual aspects of risk analysis together with dose assessment in decision making are considered. (author)

  19. The Radio Protection and Radiation Hygiene Centre activity during the period of 1995-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghetoi, Z.

    2009-01-01

    During the period of 1995-2003 the Radiation Protection and Hygiene Department has developed regulating documentation and has defined the priorities of its activity: personnel training, authorization of radiation monitoring laboratories, foundation of facilities and equipment, which would be responsible for modern requirements, cooperation with IAEA and other government and non-government organizations, elaboration of legislative documents and standard acts in the field of radiation protection and studying of medical and biological effects of ionizing radiations after the accident at Chernobyl NPP

  20. Ethics and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansson, Sven Ove

    2007-01-01

    Some of the major problems in radiation protection are closely connected to issues that have a long, independent tradition in moral philosophy. This contribution focuses on two of these issues. One is the relationship between the protection of individuals and optimisation on the collective level, and the other is the relative valuation of future versus immediate damage. Some of the intellectual tools that have been developed by philosophers can be useful in radiation protection. On the other hand, philosophers have much to learn from radiation protectors, not least when it comes to finding pragmatic solutions to problems that may be intractable in principle

  1. Ethics and radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, Sven Ove [Department of Philosophy and the History of Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 78 B, 2tr, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-06-01

    Some of the major problems in radiation protection are closely connected to issues that have a long, independent tradition in moral philosophy. This contribution focuses on two of these issues. One is the relationship between the protection of individuals and optimisation on the collective level, and the other is the relative valuation of future versus immediate damage. Some of the intellectual tools that have been developed by philosophers can be useful in radiation protection. On the other hand, philosophers have much to learn from radiation protectors, not least when it comes to finding pragmatic solutions to problems that may be intractable in principle.

  2. Inspecting the medical use of radiation at five large hospitals in 2004 - to new radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmark, Anders; Bjerke, Hans; Unhjem, Jan Frede; Friberg, Eva; Hult, Elin Agathe; Boerretzen, Ingelin; Olerud, Hilde

    2005-01-01

    An audit has been performed in five health enterprises. The audit was carried out in relation to new radiation protection legislation and comprised all use of medical radiation at the enterprises. This report summarizes some of the findings and also gives an evaluation on the level of implementation of the legislation and what challenges that are left for the enterprises. (Author)

  3. Terms and definitions in the field of radiological technique. Radiation protection. Begriffe und Benennungen in der radiologischen Technik. Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    The standard contains terms that are connected with radiation protection and serve to judge questions concerning radiation protection. It also comprises such terms that are not mentioned in other standards, but that are required to comprehend the special facts to be regulated in the radiation protection standards.

  4. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998. Act No 133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A set of legislation consisting of three Acts in the field of radiation protection and nuclear safety was passed by both Houses of Parliament on 10 December 1998 and was proclaimed on 5 February 1999. Act No. 133 - Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act, which is a framework Law, established the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) as the regulatory body for radiation protection and nuclear safety, in place of the Nuclear Safety Bureau. The Chief Executive Officer of ARPANSA, who is appointed by the Governor-General for a term of up to 5 years, is obliged to submit annual and quarterly reports to the Minister on the operations of the Chief Executive Officer, ARPANSA, the Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee. The Council is a consultative body which examines issues relating to radiation protection and nuclear safety and advises the Chief Executive Officer on these issues as well as on the adoption of recommendations, policies and codes. The Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee are to be established as advisory committees to the Chief Executive Officer or the Council. Both committees should draft national policies, codes and standards in their respective fields and review their effectiveness periodically. The second in this series of legislation, Act No. 134, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (License Charges) Act requires holders of both facility and source licenses to pay an annual charge, to be prescribed by the regulations. The third, Act No. 135 , Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (Consequential Amendments) Act repeals those provisions of the 1987 Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation Act which concern the Nuclear Safety Bureau, and the 1978 Environment Protection Act as a whole

  5. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998. Act No 133

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    A set of legislation consisting of three Acts in the field of radiation protection and nuclear safety was passed by both Houses of Parliament on 10 December 1998 and was proclaimed on 5 February 1999. Act No. 133 - Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act, which is a framework Law, established the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) as the regulatory body for radiation protection and nuclear safety, in place of the Nuclear Safety Bureau. The Chief Executive Officer of ARPANSA, who is appointed by the Governor-General for a term of up to 5 years, is obliged to submit annual and quarterly reports to the Minister on the operations of the Chief Executive Officer, ARPANSA, the Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee. The Council is a consultative body which examines issues relating to radiation protection and nuclear safety and advises the Chief Executive Officer on these issues as well as on the adoption of recommendations, policies and codes. The Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee are to be established as advisory committees to the Chief Executive Officer or the Council. Both committees should draft national policies, codes and standards in their respective fields and review their effectiveness periodically. The second in this series of legislation, Act No. 134, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (License Charges) Act requires holders of both facility and source licenses to pay an annual charge, to be prescribed by the regulations. The third, Act No. 135 , Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (Consequential Amendments) Act repeals those provisions of the 1987 Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation Act which concern the Nuclear Safety Bureau, and the 1978 Environment Protection Act as a whole

  6. Radiation protection data sheets for the use of Americium 241 in unsealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This radiation protection data sheet is intended for supervisors and staff in the different medical, hospital, pharmaceutical, university and industrial laboratories and departments where Americium 241 is handled, and also for all those involved in risk prevention in this field. It provides essential data on radiation protection measures during the use of Americium 241 in unsealed sources: physical characteristics, risk assessment, administrative procedures, recommendations, regulations and bibliography

  7. Radiation protection data sheets for the use of iodine 125 in unsealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This radiation protection data sheet is intended for supervisors and staff in the different medical, hospital, pharmaceutical, university and industrial laboratories and departments where Iodine 125 is handled, and also for all those involved in risk prevention in this field. It provides essential data on radiation protection measures during the use of Iodine 125 in unsealed sources: physical characteristics, risk assessment, administrative procedures, recommendations, regulations and bibliography

  8. Radiation protection data sheets for the use of Phosphorus 32 in unsealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This radiation protection data sheet is intended for supervisors and staff in the different medical, hospital, pharmaceutical, university and industrial laboratories and departments where Phosphorus 32 is handled, and also for all those involved in risk prevention in this field. It provides essential data on radiation protection measures during the use of Phosphorus 32 in unsealed sources: physical characteristics, risk assessment, administrative procedures, recommendations, regulations and bibliography

  9. Radiation protection data sheets for the use of iodine 131 in unsealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This radiation protection data sheet is intended for supervisors and staff in the different medical, hospital, pharmaceutical, university and industrial laboratories and departments where Iodine 131 is handled, and also for all those involved in risk prevention in this field. It provides essential data on radiation protection measures during the use of Iodine 131 in unsealed sources: physical characteristics, risk assessment, administrative procedures, recommendations, regulations and bibliography

  10. Radiation protection regulations in Slovakia and application of BSS and EC council directives provisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktory, D.

    2003-01-01

    Slovakia, a part of the former Czechoslovak Federation, has been on the map of Europe as an independent country for only 10 years. It is a relatively small country with 5,5 million of inhabitants. The use of radiation sources in medicine, industry and research is extensive, but it corresponds with the size of country and the number of inhabitants. Nowadays here are nearly 600 licensee holders in medicine and in industry and 5 000 radiation sources in national registry. The nuclear industry is relatively developed in Slovakia. In the former Czechoslovakia, the responsibilities for nuclear safety and radiation protection were divided between two authorities. The federal authority for nuclear safety and regional authorities - regional hygienist for the radiation protection were responsible. Regional health protection authorities were managed by two separate Ministries of the Health of Czech and Slovak federal Republics. After the splitting of Czechoslovakia the development differs slightly in both countries. In the Czech Republic both authorities have merged, in Slovakia the people in power were not able to carry out such a radical change, so here the model of two independent authorities have remained. This system has been working since 1950's. (author)

  11. A new career path in radiation protection training. Certified power plant shift supervisor. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terbeek, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Apart from theoretical knowledge, effective day-to-day radiation protection operations also require a certain measure of practical experience. Therefore, the professional degree of 'Certified Radiation Worker', issued by the Chamber of Industry and Commerce (CIC) Aachen, Germany, established at an early stage. In order to provide experienced radiation protection specialists with an attractive career path, POWERTECH TRAINING CENTER e.V., in co-operation with VGB PowerTech. e.V., the Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland) and the Swiss Atomic Energy Agency (ENSI), has devised a new power plant shift supervisor training course specialising in radiation protection. The vocational training degree called 'Certified Power Plant Shift Supervisor - Radiation Protection' is awarded after successful completion of the advanced training examination conducted by the CIC in Essen, Germany. (orig.)

  12. Adaptation of the present concept of dosimetric radiation protection quantities for external radiation to radiation protection practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, J.; Thompson, I. M. G.

    2004-01-01

    The present concept of dosimetric radiation protection quantities for external radiation is reviewed. For everyday application of the concept some adaptations are recommended. The check of the compliance with dose limits should be performed either by the comparison with values of the respective operational quantities directly or by the calculation of the protection quantity by means of the operational quantity, the appertaining conversion coefficient and additional information of the radiation field. Only four operational quantities are regarded to be sufficient for most applications in radiation protection practice. The term equivalent should be used in the connection dose equivalent only. Proposals are made for names of frequently used operational quantities which are denoted up to now by symbols only. (authors)

  13. Establishment of a national radiation protection infrastructure. The Philippine experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdezco, E.M. [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Department of Science and Technology (Philippines)

    2000-05-01

    Radiation and radioactive materials have been used widely in the Philippines for the last four decades and have made substantial contributions to the improvement of the life and welfare of the Filipino people. In spite of the unsuccessful attempt to operate a nuclear power, plant, the country, through the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute has consistently pursued an active small nuclear applications program to promote the peaceful applications of nuclear energy while also mandated to ensure radiation safety through nuclear regulations and radioactive materials licensing. Another government agency, the Radiation Health Services (RHS) of the Department of Health was created much later to address the growing concern on radiation hazards from electrically generated radiation devices and machines. The RHS has been strengthened later to include non-ionizing radiation health hazards and has expanded to include a biomedical engineering and non-radiation related medical equipment. The paper will describe the historical perspective highlighting the basis of the national regulatory framework to ensure that only qualified individuals are authorized to use radioactive materials and radiation emitting machines/devices. The development of national training programs in radiation protection and experiences in implementing these programs will be presented. National efforts to strengthen the radiation protection infrastructure through the establishment, improvement and upgrading of a number of facilities and capabilities in radiation protection related work activities will be discussed including participation in national, regional and international intercomparison programs to ensure accuracy, reliability, reproducibility and comparability of dose measurements. Lastly, data on the status of small nuclear applications and related activities in the country will be presented including a number of current issues related to the adoption of the new international basic safety standards

  14. Establishment of a national radiation protection infrastructure. The Philippine experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdezco, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation and radioactive materials have been used widely in the Philippines for the last four decades and have made substantial contributions to the improvement of the life and welfare of the Filipino people. In spite of the unsuccessful attempt to operate a nuclear power, plant, the country, through the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute has consistently pursued an active small nuclear applications program to promote the peaceful applications of nuclear energy while also mandated to ensure radiation safety through nuclear regulations and radioactive materials licensing. Another government agency, the Radiation Health Services (RHS) of the Department of Health was created much later to address the growing concern on radiation hazards from electrically generated radiation devices and machines. The RHS has been strengthened later to include non-ionizing radiation health hazards and has expanded to include a biomedical engineering and non-radiation related medical equipment. The paper will describe the historical perspective highlighting the basis of the national regulatory framework to ensure that only qualified individuals are authorized to use radioactive materials and radiation emitting machines/devices. The development of national training programs in radiation protection and experiences in implementing these programs will be presented. National efforts to strengthen the radiation protection infrastructure through the establishment, improvement and upgrading of a number of facilities and capabilities in radiation protection related work activities will be discussed including participation in national, regional and international intercomparison programs to ensure accuracy, reliability, reproducibility and comparability of dose measurements. Lastly, data on the status of small nuclear applications and related activities in the country will be presented including a number of current issues related to the adoption of the new international basic safety standards

  15. Summary of radiation protection in exploitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcier, Yves; Guers, Rene; Bidard, Francoise; Colson, Philippe; Gonin, Michele; Delabre, Herve; Hemidy, Pierre-Yves; Corgnet, Bruno; Perrin, Marie-Claire; Phan Hoang, Long; Abela, Gonzague; Crepieux, Virginie; Guyot, Pierre; Haranger, Didier; Warembourg, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    This document proposes a large and detailed overview of notions and practices regarding radiation protection in relationship with an NPP exploitation framework. It presents the main notions: matter structure, radioactivity, interactions between matter and radiations, types of ionizing radiation, magnitudes and measurement units, exposure modes, main principles of radiation protection, means of protection against internal and external exposures. The second part proposes an overview of the origin of radiological risks in a nuclear power plant. This origin can be found in fission products, activation products, actinides, designed protections, or circuit contaminations. These radiological risks are more precisely identified and described in terms of detection and prevention (internal exposure risk, contamination risk, iodine-related risk, alpha radiation-related risk, access to the reactor building). The next part addresses the medical and radiological follow-up of exposed workers by a special medical control, by an individual exposure control, by a specific control of female personnel, and by attention to exceptional exposures. Measurement means are presented (detection principles, installation continuous control, workspaces control, personnel contamination control, follow-up of individual dose) as well as collective and individual protection means. The management of radiation protection is addressed through a presentation of decision and management structures for radiation protection, and of EDF objectives and ambitions in this domain. The organization of radiation protection during exploitation is described: responsibilities for radiation protection in a nuclear power station, requirements for workers, preparation of interventions in controlled zone, work execution in controlled zone, zone controls and radiological cleanness of installations. The two last chapters address issues and practices of radiation protection in the case of deconstruction or dismantling, and

  16. Radiation protection/shield design: a need for a systems approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation protection/shielding design of a nuclear facility requires a coordinated effort of many engineering disciplines to meet the requirements imposed by regulations. The system approach to Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) radiation protection is described, and the program developed to implement this approach is defined. In addition, the principal shielding design problems for LMFBR nuclear reactor systems are discussed in relation to LWR nuclear reactor system shielding designs. The methodology used to analyze these problems in the U.S. LMFBR program, the resultant design solutions, and the experimental verification of these designs and/or methods are discussed

  17. Radiation protection in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Holmberg, O.; Perez, M. R.; Ortiz, P.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic, interventional and therapeutic used of ionizing radiation are beneficial for hundreds of millions of people each year by improving health care and saving lives. In March 2001, the first International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients was held in Malaga, Spain, which led to an international action plan for the radiation protection of patients. Ten years after establishing the international action plan, the International Conference on Radiation Protection in Medicine: Setting the Scene for the Next Decade was held in Bonn, Germany, in December 2012. the main outcome of this conference was the so called Bonn Call for Action that identifies then priority actions to enhance radiation protection in medicine for the next decade. The IAEA and WHO are currently working in close cooperation to foster and support the implementation of these ten priority actions in Member States, but their implementation requires collaboration of national governments, international agencies, researchers, educators, institutions and professional associations. (Author)

  18. Radiation protection in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E.; Holmberg, O.; Perez, M. R.; Ortiz, P.

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic, interventional and therapeutic used of ionizing radiation are beneficial for hundreds of millions of people each year by improving health care and saving lives. In March 2001, the first International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients was held in Malaga, Spain, which led to an international action plan for the radiation protection of patients. Ten years after establishing the international action plan, the International Conference on Radiation Protection in Medicine: Setting the Scene for the Next Decade was held in Bonn, Germany, in December 2012. the main outcome of this conference was the so called Bonn Call for Action that identifies then priority actions to enhance radiation protection in medicine for the next decade. The IAEA and WHO are currently working in close cooperation to foster and support the implementation of these ten priority actions in Member States, but their implementation requires collaboration of national governments, international agencies, researchers, educators, institutions and professional associations. (Author)

  19. Radiation protection, optimization and justification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordoliani, Y.S.; Brisse, H.; Foucart, J.M.; Clement, J.P.; Ribeiro, A.; Gomes, H.; Marcus, C.; Rehel, J.L.; Talbot, A.; Aubert, B.; Scanff, P.; Roudier, C.; Donadieu, J.; Pirard, P.; Bar, O.; Maccia, C.; Benedittini, M.; Bouziane, T.; Brat, H.; Bricoult, M; Heuga, O.; Hauger, O.; Bonnefoy, O.; Diard, F.; Chateil, J.F.; Schramm, R.; Reisman, J.; Aubert, B.

    2005-01-01

    Nine articles in the field of radiation protection relative to the medical examinations concern the new legislation in radiation protection, the optimization of this one in order to reduce the radiation doses delivered to the patients, the side effects induced by irradiation and to give an evaluation of the medical exposure of french population to ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  20. The German Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrlSchV). 3. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinrichs, O.

    1992-01-01

    The German Radiation Protection Ordinance constitutes the central statutory instrument containing the main protective provisions for all fields of application of radioactive materials and ionizing radiation, with the exception of the field covered by the X-ray Ordinance. The current text of the Ordinance is that promulgated on 30.06.1989 with the subsequent amendments, as last amended through the Unification Treaty (Einigungsvertrag) of 23.09.1990. The Radiation Protection Ordinance was adopted on the basis of the German Nuclear Energy Act (Atomgesetz), which contains, inter alia, the necessary empowerments to issue statutory ordinances. Further fields containing relevant protective provisions are, above all, the law of dangerous substances (which concerns the transport of radioactive materials), the law of pharmaceutical products and the law of foodstuffs. The whole regulatory package is a part of EC and Euratom law. The limit values of the Euratom Directives were transposed into the Radiation Protection Ordinance. In order to reduce the bulk of the Ordinance, the legislator has only included the limit values for the most important radionuclides, and has made provision for the separate promulgation of the other limit values. In order to enhance the practical use of the book, the provisions governing the radiation pass, which are regulated in a separate administrative instruction, are also reproduced. (orig./HSCH) [de

  1. International Society of Radiology and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the International Society of Radiology (ISR), as being the global organization of radiologists, is to promote and help co-ordinate the progress of radiology throughout the world. In this capacity and as a co-operating organization of the IAEA, the ISR has a specific responsibility in the global radiological protection of patients. Globally, there are many users of medical radiation, and radiology may be practised in the most awkward circumstances. The individuals performing X ray studies as well as those interpreting them may be well trained, as in industrialized parts of the world, but also less knowledgeable, as in developing areas. The problems of radiological protection, both of patients and of radiation workers, still exist, and radiation equipment is largely diffused throughout the world. That is why a conference like this is today as important as ever. Radiation protection is achieved through education, on the one hand, and legislation, on the other. Legislation and regulation are the instruments of national authorities. The means of the ISR are education and information. Good radiological practice is something that can be taught. The ISR is doing this mainly through the biannual International Congress of Radiology (ICR), now arranged in an area of radiological need; the three previous ICRs were in China, in India and in South America; the next one is going to be in Mexico in 2002. The goal of the ICR is mainly to be an instructive and educational event, especially designed for the needs of its surrounding region. The ISR is aiming at producing educational material. The International Commission on Radiological Education (ICRE), as part of the ISR, is launching the production of a series of educational booklets, which also include radiation protection. The ICRE is actively involved in shaping and organizing the educational and scientific programme of the ICRs

  2. MO-E-213-01: Increasing Role of Medical Physicist in Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehani, M.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of work of medical physicists in 1980’s was on quality control and quality assurance. Radiation safety was important but was dominated by occupational radiation protection. A series of over exposures of patients in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and observation of skin injuries among patients undergoing interventional procedures in 1990’s started creating the need for focus on patient protection. It gave medical physicists new directions to develop expertise in patient dosimetry and dose management. Publications creating awareness on cancer risks from CT in early part of the current century and over exposures in CT in 2008 brought radiation risks in public domain and created challenging situations for medical physicists. Increasing multiple exposures of individual patient and patient doses of few tens of mSv or exceeding 100 mSv are increasing the role of medical physicists. Expansion of usage of fluoroscopy in the hands of clinical professionals with hardly any training in radiation protection shall require further role for medical physicists. The increasing publications in journals, recent changes in Safety Standards, California law, all increase responsibilities of medical physicists in patient protection. Newer technological developments in dose efficiency and protective devices increase percentage of time devoted by medical physicists on radiation protection activities. Without radiation protection, the roles, responsibilities and day-to-day involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic radiology becomes questionable. In coming years either medical radiation protection may emerge as a specialty or medical physicists will have to keep major part of day-to-day work on radiation protection. Learning Objectives: To understand how radiation protection has been increasing its role in day-to-day activities of medical physicist To be aware about international safety Standards, national and State regulations that require higher attention to radiation

  3. MO-E-213-01: Increasing Role of Medical Physicist in Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehani, M. [Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The focus of work of medical physicists in 1980’s was on quality control and quality assurance. Radiation safety was important but was dominated by occupational radiation protection. A series of over exposures of patients in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and observation of skin injuries among patients undergoing interventional procedures in 1990’s started creating the need for focus on patient protection. It gave medical physicists new directions to develop expertise in patient dosimetry and dose management. Publications creating awareness on cancer risks from CT in early part of the current century and over exposures in CT in 2008 brought radiation risks in public domain and created challenging situations for medical physicists. Increasing multiple exposures of individual patient and patient doses of few tens of mSv or exceeding 100 mSv are increasing the role of medical physicists. Expansion of usage of fluoroscopy in the hands of clinical professionals with hardly any training in radiation protection shall require further role for medical physicists. The increasing publications in journals, recent changes in Safety Standards, California law, all increase responsibilities of medical physicists in patient protection. Newer technological developments in dose efficiency and protective devices increase percentage of time devoted by medical physicists on radiation protection activities. Without radiation protection, the roles, responsibilities and day-to-day involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic radiology becomes questionable. In coming years either medical radiation protection may emerge as a specialty or medical physicists will have to keep major part of day-to-day work on radiation protection. Learning Objectives: To understand how radiation protection has been increasing its role in day-to-day activities of medical physicist To be aware about international safety Standards, national and State regulations that require higher attention to radiation

  4. Safety and radiation protection in mining and milling facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Maisa H.; Schenato, Flavia; Cruz, Paulo R., E-mail: maisahm@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: schenato@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: pcruz@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Xavier, Ana M., E-mail: axavier@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (ESPOA/CNEN-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Escritorio de Porto Alegre

    2011-07-01

    Federal Legislation in Brazil establishes that the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission - CNEN - is responsible for the surveillance of the industrialization of nuclear ores and the production and commerce of nuclear materials in such way that activities such as buying, selling, import and export, are subject to previous licensing and surveillance. Regulation CNEN-NN-4.01 on Safety and Radiation Protection in Mining and Milling Facilities of conventional ores containing naturally occurring radioactive materials, NORM, was issued in 2004 establishing both a methodology for classification of these facilities into three Categories, taking into account both the contents of uranium and thorium in the ores and the applicable radiation and safety requirements based on a graded approach. Although the lack of a licensing process in the above mentioned Regulation made its implementation a difficult task, CNEN, by means of an initial survey, identified ca. 30 mining and milling industries of conventional ores containing uranium and thorium with concentrations above 10 Bq/g. More recently, a new juridical understanding of the legislation concluded that CNEN must issue licences and authorizations for the possession and storage of all ores with uranium and thorium concentrations above exemption levels. A proper surveillance programme encompassing 13 of these mining facilities was then put forward aiming at the improvement of their safety and radiation protection. This article presents an overview of NORM exploitation in Brazil and put forward suggestions for achieving viable solutions for the protection of workers, general public and environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. (author)

  5. Procedure and methodology of Radiation Protection optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hengde

    1995-01-01

    Optimization of Radiation Protection is one of the most important principles in the system of radiation protection. The paper introduces the basic principles of radiation protection optimization in general, and the procedure of implementing radiation protection optimization and methods of selecting the optimized radiation protection option in details, in accordance with ICRP 55. Finally, some economic concepts relating to estimation of costs are discussed briefly

  6. Radiation protection in newer medical imaging techniques: CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Multislice/detector computed tomography (CT) scanning, applied to visualization of the colon in CT colonography (CTC), also known as virtual colonoscopy (VC), is a relatively new application of CT introduced in recent years. The possibility of its application in population screening techniques raises a number of questions. Effort is required to ensure that the benefit of this new practice will not pose an undue level of detriment to the individual in multiple examinations. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that innovation has been driven by both the imaging industry and by an ever increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practice lag (inevitably) behind the industrial and clinical innovations being achieved. This series of Safety Reports (Nos 58, 60 and 61) is designed to help fill this growing vacuum, by bringing up to date and timely advice to bear on the problems involved. Under its statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for worldwide application of these standards, the IAEA has developed the Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS). The BSS was issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO), and requires radiation protection of patients undergoing medical exposures through justification of the procedures involved and through optimization. The IAEA programme on radiation protection of patients encourages the reduction of patient doses without losing diagnostic benefits. To facilitate this

  7. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamalaksh Shenoy, K.

    2013-01-01

    Three main pillars underpin the IAEA's mission: Safety and Security - The IAEA helps countries to upgrade their infrastructure for nuclear and radiation safety and security, and to prepare for and respond to emergencies. Work is keyed to international conventions, the development of international standards and the application of these standards. The aim is to protect people and the environment from the harmful effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. Science and Technology - The IAEA is the world's focal point for mobilizing peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology for critical needs in developing countries. The work contributes to alleviating poverty, combating disease and pollution of the environment and to other goals of sustainable development. Safeguards and Verification - The IAEA is the nuclear inspectorate, with more than four decades of verification experience. Inspectors work to verify that nuclear material and activities are not diverted towards military purposes. Quantities and Units: Dose equivalent is the product of absorbed dose of radiation and quality factor (Q). For absorbed dose in rads, dose equivalent is in rems. If absorbed dose is in gray, the dose equivalent is in sievert. Quality factor is defined without reference to any particular biological end point. Quality factors are recommended by committees such as the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) or the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), based on experimental RBE values but with some judgment exercised. Effective Dose Equivalent: It is the sum of the weighted dose equivalents for all irradiated tissues, in which the weighting factors represent the different risks of each tissue to mortality from cancer and hereditary effects. Committed dose equivalent: It is the integral over 50 years of dose equivalent following the intake of a radionuclide. Collective effective dose equivalent: It is a quantity for a population and is

  8. Radiation protection of non-human species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leith, I.S.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of radiation on non-human species, both animals and plants, have long been investigated. In the disposal of radioactive wastes, the protection of non-human species has been investigated. Yet no radiation protection standard for exposure of animals and plants per se has been agreed. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has long taken the view that, if human beings are properly protected from radiation, other species will thereby be protected to the extent necessary for their preservation. However, the International Atomic Energy Agency has found it necessary to investigate the protection of non-human species where radioactivity is released to an environment unpopulated by human beings. It is proposed that the basis of such protection, and the knowledge of radiation effects on non-human species on which it is based, suggest a practical radiation protection standard for non-human species. (1 tab.)

  9. The Radman Guide to the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, D.

    1986-01-01

    The guidance given in the handbook is of general nature for the assistance of senior managers and administrators (rather than scientific or technical staff), involved in or responsible for work with ionising radiations. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: 1) Digest of the Regulations. 2) Application of Regulations (division of responsibility between employer, employee, supervisors, medical personnel etc., role of the Health and Safety Executive.) 3) Designation of work areas and persons 4) Radiation Protection Supervisors and Local Rules 5) Hazard assessments and contingency plans 6) Notifications and Record Keeping 7) Routines in source control. (UK)

  10. Legal verification of the dosimetric instrumentation using for radiation protection in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walwyn, A.; Morales, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    By April of 1998 the Decree law 183 of Metrology was published at the Gaceta Oficial de la Republica de Cuba. It establishes the principles and general regulations for the organisation and juridical system of the metrological activity in Cuba. In the radiation protection field this legislation promote the establishment of a verification service of radiation measuring instruments used in the practices with radiation sources in the country. The limitations of old Cuban standards of verification related to dosimetric quantities and to the types of instruments for those which these standards are applicable; and in addition, the publication of new international standards that includes the operational quantities used for the measurement of instruments, led to the elaboration of the X and Gamma Radiation Meters Used in Radiation Protection standard. The requirements of metrological aptitude are taken from some test procedures described in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards on photon monitoring equipment. The Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory of the Centre for Radiation Protection and Higiene will start the verification service of Radiation Protection instruments. The beginning of the service is an essential element in the improvement of the accuracy of ionisation radiation metrology in Cuba, and have an evident impact in the protection of the occupationally exposed workers, because having the instruments in good technical condition became a legal exigency to the users of ionisation radiation

  11. Basic safety standards for radiation protection and their application to internal exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dousset, M.

    Following a summary of the basic concepts on radiation protection units, the safety standards now in effect in France and those recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP Publication 9, 1965) to be used as a basis to the next Euratom regulations are developed [fr

  12. Estonian experience in establishing the national radiation protection infrastructure in the newly independent State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalam, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Estonian Radiation Protection Centre (ERPC) was established on 4 January 1996 as the regulatory authority for radiation protection and safety of radiation sources. The report explains the ERPC's structure and its main functions and activities, and provides information on the regulations that have been approved or are planned to be adopted. Reference is made to radiological emergency preparedness and, in particular, to the status of development of the system of regulatory control by authorization and inspection of radiation practices in the country. (author)

  13. Radiation protection in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, E.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fry, R.J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The challenge for planning radiation protection in space is to estimate the risk of events of low probability after low levels of irradiation. This work has revealed many gaps in the present state of knowledge that require further study. Despite investigations of several irradiated populations, the atomic-bomb survivors remain the primary basis for estimating the risk of ionizing radiation. Compared to previous estimates, two new independent evaluations of available information indicate a significantly greater risk of stochastic effects of radiation (cancer and genetic effects) by about a factor of three for radiation workers. This paper presents a brief historical perspective of the international effort to assure radiation protection in space.

  14. Radiation protection in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakely, E.A.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The challenge for planning radiation protection in space is to estimate the risk of events of low probability after low levels of irradiation. This work has revealed many gaps in the present state of knowledge that require further study. Despite investigations of several irradiated populations, the atomic-bomb survivors remain the primary basis for estimating the risk of ionizing radiation. Compared to previous estimates, two new independent evaluations of available information indicate a significantly greater risk of stochastic effects of radiation (cancer and genetic effects) by about a factor of three for radiation workers. This paper presents a brief historical perspective of the international effort to assure radiation protection in space

  15. Percutaneous coronary interventions - an investigation of radiation protection in Swedish hospitals; Percutan coronar intervention PCI - en straalskyddsutredning av verksamheten paa landets sjukhus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almen, Anja; Cederlund, Torsten; Zaar, Britta

    2005-05-01

    The Swedish Radiation Protection Authority has investigated the status of radiation protection in connection with percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in Swedish hospitals. A questionnaire was send to hospitals concerning basic radiation protection procedures stated in the Swedish regulations. A questionnaire was also sent out to radiologists and cardiologists and the answers from those who performed interventions were analysed. The study indicates a strong need for improving radiation protection, as an example many hospitals could not present any documents describing methods or radiation protection procedures in connection with these interventions. Moreover, the radiation dose to hands and eyes of the personnel is rarely measured and the fluoroscopic time used for the interventions is not properly analysed. SSI is convinced that many hospitals need to improve radiation protection to meet the demands of the regulations. This could be accomplished by more efficient organized radiation protection work in the hospitals.

  16. A regulatory perspective on whether the system of radiation protection is fit for purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The system of radiation protection has its origins in the early efforts to protect people from x rays and radium. It was at the Second International Congress of Radiology in Stockholm in 1928 where the first radiation protection recommendations were adopted. The system of protection steadily evolved as new sources of exposure arose and understanding of radiation-related health risks improved. Safeguarding against these risks has required regulators to set enforceable (i.e. measurable) standards. From erythema dose to tolerance dose, critical organ dose to effective dose equivalent, and now effective dose, the units used to set these limits have evolved along with the science underpinning them. Similarly, the definition of the person or group being protected has changed – from Standard Man to Reference Man to Reference Person, with age and gender differences now considered explicitly. As regulators look towards implementing the changes in the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), there remain questions about how to translate an optimisation-based system of constraints and reference levels into the more familiar regime of enforceable limits. Nevertheless, as the new ICRP Recommendations are refinements of a system that did the job it was designed to do more than adequately, so too will the new system of radiation protection be fit for purpose.

  17. Radiation protection officers in customs : an experience in Paraguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oscar Bordon

    2008-01-01

    The September 11, 2001 events unleashed an offensive of the United States government to detect devices that could suppose a terrorist threat. One U.S. program entitled the Container Security Initiative affected all the customs in the world. All the countries desiring commerce with the USA must be signatory to the program; otherwise its products will not arrive to the U.S. ports. With that imposition Customs began to invest more in non-intrusive means of detection. The introduction of new equipment into the Customs environment forced the institution to enter a new area called radiation protection. The beginning was difficult due to the lack of knowledge concerning procedures in the ionizing radiation field. Not one legal regulation was known. Fortunately, the regulatory authority followed the purchase of the scanner and communicated the necessity of a license to operate and demanded that a qualified person in the radiation protection area be hired. Initially the main goal required the officer to obtain the license; however, this took some time because neither national nor international norms for scanners in Customs existed. At that time the recommendations of the regulatory authority were essential. Therefore, several procedures were adapted, thus reinforcing the necessity of specific rules for scanners in Customs. The support of the Customs director was essential. A department of radiation protection was created. Immediately a series of informative classes about radiation protection was administered producing changes in the minds of the employees, especially concerning the safety of working with ionizing radiation. This paper discusses the role of the radiation protection officer within Customs, the difficulties of this position, and the benefits that the collaboration of the officer can bring towards the construction of a safety culture in this institution. (author)

  18. Radiation protection aspects of design for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to establish safety standards to protect health and minimize danger to life and property - standards which the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which a State can apply by means of its regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. A comprehensive body of safety standards under regular review, together with the IAEA's assistance in their application, has become a key element in a global safety regime. In the mid-1990s, a major overhaul of the IAEA's safety standards programme was initiated, with a revised oversight committee structure and a systematic approach to updating the entire corpus of standards. The new standards that have resulted are of a high calibre and reflect best practices in Member States. With the assistance of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its safety standards. Safety standards are only effective, however, if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services - which range in scope from engineering safety, operational safety, and radiation, transport and waste safety to regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations - assist Member States in applying the standards and appraise their effectiveness. These safety services enable valuable insights to be shared and continue to urge all Member States to make use of them. Regulating nuclear and radiation safety is a national responsibility, and many Member States have decided to adopt the IAEA's safety standards for use in their national regulations. For the Contracting Parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions. The standards are also applied by designers, manufacturers and operators around the world to enhance nuclear and radiation safety in power generation, medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education

  19. Radiation protection and dosimetry issues in the medical applications of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The technological advances that occurred during the last few decades paved the way to the dissemination of CT-based procedures in radiology, to an increasing number of procedures in interventional radiology and cardiology as well as to new techniques and hybrid modalities in nuclear medicine and in radiotherapy. These technological advances encompass the exposure of patients and medical staff to unprecedentedly high dose values that are a cause for concern due to the potential detrimental effects of ionizing radiation to the human health. As a consequence, new issues and challenges in radiological protection and dosimetry in the medical applications of ionizing radiation have emerged. The scientific knowledge of the radiosensitivity of individuals as a function of age, gender and other factors has also contributed to raising the awareness of scientists, medical staff, regulators, decision makers and other stakeholders (including the patients and the public) for the need to correctly and accurately assess the radiation induced long-term health effects after medical exposure. Pediatric exposures and their late effects became a cause of great concern. The scientific communities of experts involved in the study of the biological effects of ionizing radiation have made a strong case about the need to undertake low dose radiation research and the International System of Radiological Protection is being challenged to address and incorporate issues such as the individual sensitivities, the shape of dose–response relationship and tissue sensitivity for cancer and non-cancer effects. Some of the answers to the radiation protection and dosimetry issues and challenges in the medical applications of ionizing radiation lie in computational studies using Monte Carlo or hybrid methods to model and simulate particle transport in the organs and tissues of the human body. The development of sophisticated Monte Carlo computer programs and voxel phantoms paves the way to an accurate

  20. Protective effect of plant polysaccharides against radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bingji; Huang Shafei; Cheng Lurong

    1989-01-01

    A series of polysaccharides have been isolated from Chinese traditional medicinal herbs and tested in mice subjected to ionizing radiation for their protective action. The polysaccharides from different origins showed various degrees of radioprotection. Those isolated from Hericium erinaceus and Armillaria mellea showed a higher radioprotective effect than some other polysaccharides. They could increase the survival rate of irradiated mice to 60%. But the polysaccheride separated from Apocynum venetum has negligible effect. In general, most of these polysaccharides are effective only on administration before irradiation. No apparent protection was observed when given post irradiation. The polysaccharide isolated from Armillaria venetum could raise the survival rate of mice irradiated by lethal dose of γ-rays to 58%. It is effective even when administered after irradiation. Some work has been carried out to clarify the mechanism of radioprotective action of polysaccharides. Protection of hemapoietic organs, regulation of immunological system, induction of release of some endogeneous bioactive substances in the organism and reduction of oxygen tension in some vital tissues may be correlated with the protection of organism against radiation injury

  1. Occupational safety meets radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severitt, S.; Oehm, J.; Sobetzko, T.; Kloth, M.

    2012-01-01

    The cooperation circle ''Synergies in operational Security'' is a joint working group of the Association of German Safety Engineers (VDSI) and the German-Swiss Professional Association for Radiation Protection (FS). The tasks of the KKSyS are arising from the written agreement of the two associations. This includes work on technical issues. In this regard, the KKSyS currently is dealing with the description of the interface Occupational Safety / Radiation Protection. ''Ignorance is no defense'' - the KKSyS creates a brochure with the working title ''Occupational Safety meets radiation protection - practical guides for assessing the hazards of ionizing radiation.'' The target groups are entrepreneurs and by them instructed persons to carry out the hazard assessment. Our aim is to create practical guides, simple to understand. The practical guides should assist those, who have to decide, whether an existing hazard potential through ionizing radiation requires special radiation protection measures or whether the usual measures of occupational safety are sufficient. (orig.)

  2. Radiation safety standards and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermolina, E.P.; Ivanov, S.I.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation protection laws of Russia concerning medical application of ionizing radiation are considered. Main concepts of the documents and recommendations are presented. Attention was paid to the ALARA principle, safety standrds for paietients, personnel and population, radiation protection. Specific feature of the standardization of radiation factors is the establishment of two classes of norms: main dose limits and permissible levels. Maximum dose commitment is the main standard. Three groups of critical organs and three categories of the persons exposed to radiation are stated. Main requirements for radiation protection are shown

  3. Environmental radiation protection - a brief history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapantis, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of ionising radiation on man has been studied intensely for decades, and the system of radiation protection for man has been continually refined in the light of those studies. That system assumes that if man is protected, non-human biota at the species level will also be adequately protected. However, an increasing recognition of the need to protect the environment, and international agreements signed in 1992, have resulted in that paradigm being questioned, with the onus shifting slowly towards demonstrating that the environment is protected. Further, radiation protection agencies and environmental protection agencies around the world have now started considering the issue of developing a system of radiation protection for the environment. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are also active in this area. The purpose of this paper is to briefly outline some of the issues confronting environmental and radiation protection specialists, and to mention some of the initiatives being taken by the international community to resolve those issues

  4. Days of Radiation Protection 2001. Conference Proceedings of the 24th Days of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohunice NPP

    2001-11-01

    Already the 24 th annual international conference 'Days of Protection from Radiation' was taking place in Jan Sverma Hotel in Demaenova dolina on 26-29 November 2001. More than 180 participants from the Slovak Republic and the Czech Republic participated in the meetings of experts on protection from radiation. Representative of IAEA Division for Protection from Radiation and the representatives of several European companies securing the project, advisory and supplier's activities in dosimetry of ionising radiation also participated in the conference. The participants discussed in 7 expert panels the issue of protection from radiation in the legislative field, in the nuclear facilities operation and in medicine. The expert part of the other panels concerned the issues of ionising radiation impact on the environment and working environment, natural radio-nuclides, including radon and biologic impacts of radiation. One separate panel was dedicated to device techniques and methods of dosimetry of ionising radiation. More than 45 expert lectures and more than 40 poster presentations were presented at the conference during 3 days. The exhibition and presentation of measuring technique products and devices and of materials used in the area of radiation protection and nuclear medicine was prepared during the course of the conference. Participation in the conference showed that a great interest in problems of protection from radiation persists. This was proved by rich lecturing activity and wide discussions on the floor and during the poster presentations. Participants were satisfied since the organisers of the event prepared a worthy event with the rich expert themes at a good organisational and social level in a beautiful environment of Low Tatras

  5. Applied radiation biology and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granier, R.; Gambini, D.-J.

    1990-01-01

    This book grew out of a series of courses in radiobiology and radiation protection which were given to students in schools for radiology technicians, radiation safety officers and to medical students. Topics covered include the sources of ionizing radiation and their interactions with matter; the detection and measurement of ionizing radiation; dosimetry; the biological effects of ionizing radiation; the effects of ionizing radiation on the human body; natural radioexposure; medical radio-exposure; industrial radioexposure of electronuclear origin; radioexposure due to experimental nuclear explosions; radiation protection; and accidents with external and/or internal radio-exposure. (UK)

  6. Registration of qualified radiation protection experts in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamse, J.C.; Kops, J.A.M.M.; Vermeulen, A.M.T.I.; Zuur, C.

    2002-01-01

    In Euratom Directive 96/29 (1) the Euratom Basic Safety Standards are given. The member states of the EC have to implement this directive in their national legislation. In the Netherlands this is done in the new radiation protection legislation (Radiation Protection Decree 2002 (2)), which came into force in the first half of 2002. In this new regulation is stated that radiological activities must be done by or under supervision of a qualified radiation protection expert. With respect to the qualified expert is stated that: the qualified expert must be registered in a notified registration system; rules will be formulated with respect to the demanded qualification levels of the experts. These demands can be different for different tasks rules will be formulated for the notification of the register, the way to become registered, the costs and so on. Mid 2001 a project is started to prepare the registration system. Information was gained from and discussions took place with the important parties on the radiological playing field in the Netherlands (employers, organisations of experts and education institutes). Furthermore information is obtained from certification institutes. It was decided to accept as starting point the education levels obtained from the radiation protection education institutes, which are approved at the moment. At a later phase will be evaluated whether this system needs to be changed. In section 2 of this paper the radiation protection system in the Netherlands will be discussed in more detail. Section 2 deals with the target group and in section 3 the outlines of the registration system to be developed are discussed

  7. Safety Culture on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sollet, E.

    1996-01-01

    It can be defined radiation protection culture as the set of technical and social standards applied to the management of the operation of a nuclear facility concerning the reduction of the exposure to radiation of workers and members of the public, together with the behaviour and attitudes of the individuals from the organization towards that objective. Because the basic principles of radiation protection are self-evident and are totally justified, and the thesis drawn from the article is that no effective radiation protection culture yet exists within the organization, it must be concluded that what is wrong from the system are the attitudes and behavior of the individuals. In this article some factors and elements needed to motivate all persons within the organization towards the creation of a radiation protection culture are delineated and presented. (Author)

  8. Si no. 43 of 1991 - European Communities (ionizing radiation) regulations, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    These Regulations entered into force on 5 April 1991 and repeal the Factories Ionizing Radiations (Sealed Sources) Regulations, 1972 and the Factories Ionizing Radiations (Unsealed Sources) Regulations, 1972. They were made in implementation of the European Communities' Council Directive 80/836 Euratom of 15 July 1980, as amended by Council Directive 84/467 Euratom of 3 September 1984, laying down the basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionizing radiation. They also complement the Nuclear Energy (General Control of Fissile Fuels, Radioactive Substances and Irradiation Apparatus) Order, 1977 with regard to licensing requirements. They apply to the production, processing, handling, use, transport, storage, etc. of natural and artificial radioactive substances and to any other activity which involves a hazard arising from ionizing radiation. (NEA) [fr

  9. Operational radiation protection: A guide to optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide practical guidance on the application of the dose limitation system contained in the Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection to operational situations both in large nuclear installations and in much smaller facilities. It is anticipated that this Guide will be useful to both the management and radiation protection staff of operations in which there is a potential for occupational radiation exposures and to the competent authorities with responsibilities for providing a programme of regulatory control. Contents: Dose limitation system; Optimization and its practical application to operational radiation protection; Major elements of an effective operational radiation protection programme; Review of selected parts of the basic safety standards with special reference to operational radiation protection; Optimization of radiation protection; Techniques for the systematic appraisal of operational radiation protection programmes. Refs and figs

  10. Approach to NORM/TENORM Problem based on Radiation Protection Principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, T.; Sugiura, N.

    2004-01-01

    Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) and Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (TENORM) are recent discussion issues in radiation protection. Relating materials are phosphate fertilizer, rare earth material, oil and gas, coal, metal ore, cement, ceramics, mineral sand, titanium pigment, building materials etc. These related industries, workers and public should be protected from radiations by including radioactive materials like uranium, thorium, radium etc. In this article, typical states of these materials and management are briefly reviewed and radiation protection principles how to consider NORM/TENORM based on ICRP recommendations and IAEA standards are discussed. Originally, the natural materials are excluded for its un-amenability of control. But under several conditions, an intervention concept should be applied and some consumer products are to be controlled based on a practice concept. The regulatory management is examined through a classification of NORM/TENORM and development of concepts; practice and intervention, exclusion and exemption, optimization of protection, etc. The optimization of protection is one of the most important discussion points. The origin of radioisotopes is natural. Therefore, the criteria or standard should be different from that of artificial source. Too strict regulation will cause much social and economical confusion. The harmonization of radiation protection system on NORM/TENORM in FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia) countries was also tried by information exchange and intercomparison. (Author)

  11. Consequences of the new radiation protection law on the radiation protection register and the occupational radiation protection; Auswirkungen des neuen Strahlenschutzgesetzes auf das Strahlenschutzregister und die berufliche Strahlenueberwachung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasch, Gerhard

    2017-08-01

    The implementation of the guideline 2013/59/EURATOM has been performed in the new radiation protection law. The most important consequences of the new radiation protection law for the occupational radiation protection are the following: the introduction of an explicit personal indicator and the actualization of occupational categories for employees. These facts require technical and administrative reorganization in data transmission of the licensee to the regulatory monitoring executive and the radiation protection register.

  12. Radiation protecting clothing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mio, Kotaro; Ijiri, Yasuo.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To provide radiation protecting clothing materials excellent in mechanical strength, corrosion resistance, flexibility and flexing strength. Constitution: The radiation protecting clothing materials according to this invention has pure lead sheets comprising a thin pure lead foil of 50 to 150 μm and radiation resistant organic materials, for example, polyethylene with high neutron shielding effect disposed to one or both surfaces thereof. The material are excellent in the repeating bending fatigue and mechanical strength, corrosion resistance and flexibility and, accordingly, radiation protecting clothings prepared by using them along or laminating them also possess these excellent characteristics. Further, they are excellent in the handlability, particularly, durability to the repeated holding and extension, as well as are preferable in the physical movability and feeling upon putting. The clothing materials may be cut into an appropriate size, or stitched into clothings made by radiation-resistant materials. In this case, pure lead sheets are used in lamination. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. Radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitch, J.

    1983-11-01

    Topics covered include biological radiation effects, radiation protection principles, recommendations of the ICRP and the National Health and Medical Research Council, and dose limits for individuals, particularly the limit applied to the inhalation of radon daughters

  14. Proceedings of Asia congress on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    203 articles were collected in the proceedings. The contents of the proceedings included the principle and practices of radiation protection, biological effects of radiation, radiation monitoring, protection in medical and other fields, radiation dosimetry, nuclear energy and the environment, natural radiation, radioactive waste management, and other radiation protection issues

  15. State Radiation Protection Supervision and Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Radiation Protection Centre is carrying state supervision and control of radiation protection. The main objective of state supervision and control of radiation protection is assessing how licensees comply with requirements of the appropriate legislation and enforcement. Summary of inspections conducted in 2002 is presented

  16. State Radiation Protection Supervision and Control

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Radiation Protection Centre is carrying state supervision and control of radiation protection. The main objective of state supervision and control of radiation protection is assessing how licensees comply with requirements of the appropriate legislation and enforcement. Summary of inspections conducted in 2002 is presented.

  17. Radiation protection for the illegal governmental use of radiation sources. A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    2000-01-01

    Probably for the first time, illegal governmental uses of radiation sources, including the administrative infrastructure such as special radiation protection regulation, an advisory body etc., have been documented by the evaluation of the documents of the Ministry of State Security in the former German Democratic Republic (East Germany). Over a thousand persons, but also documents, money bills etc. were marked with a wide variety of radionuclides and traced with specially developed detectors. Among the many different nuclides provided regularly from the Rossendorf Research Center near Dresden, in particular 46 Sc was popular. (orig.) [de

  18. Project Radiation protection, Annual report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.M.

    1994-12-01

    According to the action plan for the period 1991-1995, the main objective of this project during 1994 was to provide operational basis, methods and procedures for solving the radiation protection problems that might appear under routine working conditions and handling of radiation sources. The aim was also to provide special methods for action in case of accidents that could affect the employed staff and the population. Overall activity was directed to maintaining and providing personnel, instrumentation, and methods for the following special radiation protection measures: operational control of the radiation field and contamination; calibration of the radiation and dosimetry instruments-secondary dosimetry metrology laboratory; instrumentation and measuring systems for radiation protection; control of environmental transfer of radioactive material; medical radiation protection [sr

  19. Occupational radiation protection legislation in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.; Schlesinger, T.; Lemesch, C.

    1980-01-01

    Various governmental agencies, including the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Labor and the Israel AEC are responsible for the control of the use of radioactive materials and medical X-ray machines in Israel. Present legislation deals mainly with the legal aspects of the purchase, transport and possession of radioactive materials and the purchase and operation of medical X-ray machines. No legislation refers explicitly to the protection of the worker from ionizing (and non-ionizing) radiation. A special group of experts appointed by the Minister of Labor recently worked out a comprehensive draft law concerning all legal aspects of occupational radiation protection in Israel. Among the main chapters of the draft are: general radiation protection principles, national radiation protection standards, medical supervision of radiation workers, personal monitoring requirements. The present situation with regard to radiation hazard control in Israel and details of the proposed radiation protection law is discussed. (Author)

  20. BEIR-III report and its implications for radiation protection and public health policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-03-01

    A general background is given of the implications the BEIR-III Report may have on societal decision-making in the regulation of activities concerned with the health effects of low-level radiation. The scientific basis for establishing appropriate radiation protection guides are discussed

  1. Recommendations of International Commission of Radiation Protection 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The book summarizes the recommendations on radiation protection of International of Radiation Protection. The main chapters are: 1.- Rates in radiation protection 2.- Biological aspects of radiation protection 3.- Framework of radiation protection. 4.- System of protection. 5.- Implantation of commission's recommendations. 6.- Summary of recommendations

  2. Radiation and radiation protection; Strahlung und Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomaeus, Melanie (comp.)

    2017-04-15

    The publication of the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz covers the following issues: (i) Human beings in natural and artificial radiation fields; (ii) ionizing radiation: radioactivity and radiation, radiation exposure and doses; measurement of ionizing radiation, natural radiation sources, artificial radiation sources, ionizing radiation effects on human beings, applied radiation protection, radiation exposure of the German population, radiation doses in comparison; (iii) non-ionizing radiation; low-frequency electric and magnetic fields, high-frequency electromagnetic fields, optical radiation; (iiii) glossary, (iv) units and conversion.

  3. Radiation protection and personnel safety in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Alok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Due to availability of a variety of radioisotopes from BRIT, a considerable number of industrial organizations have come up in India which employ radiation sources in one form or the other. More such organizations may come up in the near future due to the 'Make in India' policy of the Government. All ionizing radiations, whether electromagnetic (gamma- ã ) or corpuscular (particles of alpha-á, or beta-â-), and neutrons (0n1) are harmful to the human body. The damage done by radiations is sinister as human senses are not capable of detecting even lethal doses of radiation. The dose of radiations absorbed by human body which take into account the biological effectiveness of different types of radiations as noted above. The overall outcome of exposure to radiation is initiated by damage to the cells of the organism. The effects of radiation may be deterministic or stochastic, early or late, of somatic or genetic type. The somatic effects (physical) can either be immediate or delayed when the whole body is acutely irradiated with radiation doses. All countries including India have brought their national laws/standards on ionizing radiation in line with the ICRP codes. The conditions for registration, transport, storage, protection and use of radiation sources have been laid down in regulations. The purpose of practical protection against radiation is to prevent any individual receiving a harmful dose. Radiation measurement Instruments like dose meter, pocket dosimeter, NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and recording instruments such as film/TLD badge have been briefly described

  4. radiation safety culture for developing country: Basis for s minimum operational radiation protection programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozental, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a methodology for an integrated strategy aiming at establishing an adequate radiation Safety infrastructure for developing countries, non major power reactor programme. Its implementation will allow these countries, about 50% of the IAEA's Member States, to improve marginal radiation safety, specially to those recipients of technical assistance and do not meet the Minimum radiation Safety Requirements of the IAEA's Basic Safety Standards for radiation protection Progress in the implementation of safety regulations depends on the priority of the government and its understanding and conviction about the basic requirements for protection against the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. There is no doubt to conclude that the reasons for the deficiency of sources control and dose limitation are related to the lack of an appropriate legal and regulatory framework, specially considering the establishment of an adequate legislation; A minimum legal infrastructure; A minimum operational radiation safety programme; Alternatives for a Point of Optimum Contact, to avoid overlap and conflict, that is: A 'Memorandum of Understanding' among Regulatory Authorities in the Country, dealing with similar type of licensing and inspection

  5. Application of the Ionizing Radiations Regulations 1985 to a research establishment in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, I.; Walker, J.M.G.

    1988-01-01

    Three important reasons for the UK Health and Safety Executive to embark on the preparation of the Ionising Radiation Regulations were: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 26 revised the basic recommendations for radiation protection on which national provisions are based; As members of the European Commission the UK is bound by the Euratom Directives to align its national legislation with other member states. The Directives lay down the basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionising radiation; The UK Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 allows outdated legislation to be progressively replaced by a system of regulations and approved codes of practice designed to maintain or improve the standards of health, safety and welfare in the workplace

  6. The evolution of the system of radiological protection: the programme of the Nea committee on radiation protection and public health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundigl, S.

    2004-01-01

    The primary aim of radiological protection has always been to provide an appropriate standard of protection for the public and workers without unduly limiting the beneficial practices giving rise to radiation exposure. Over the past few decades, many studies concerning the effects of ionising radiation have been conducted, ranging from those that examine the effects of radiation on individual cells, to epidemiological studies that examine the effects on large populations exposed to different radiation sources. Using information gained from these studies to estimate the consequences of radiation exposure, together with the necessary social and economic judgements, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has put forward a series of recommendations to structure an appropriate system for radiological protection, and to ensure a high standard of protection for the public and for occupational exposed workers. The ICRP system of radiological protection that has evolved over the years now covers many diverse radiological protection issues. Emerging issues have been dealt with more or less on an individual basis resulting in an overall system, which while very comprehensive, is also complex. With such a complex system it is not surprising that some perceived inconsistencies or incoherence may lead to concerns that radiation protection issues are not being adequately addressed. Different stakeholders in decisions involving radiological protection aspects tend to focus on different elements of this perceived incoherence. To advance solutions to these issues, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has been working for some time to contribute to the evolution of a new radiological protection system, through its Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). This group of senior regulators and expert practitioners has, throughout its existence, been interested in the development of recommendations by the ICRP. Recently, this interest has

  7. Radiation protection in radio-oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartz, Juliane Marie; Joost, Sophie; Hildebrandt, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Based on the high technical status of radiation protection the occupational exposure of radiological personnel is no more of predominant importance. No defined dose limits exist for patients in the frame of therapeutic applications in contrary to the radiological personnel. As a consequence walk-downs radiotherapeutic institutions twice the year have been initiated in order to guarantee a maximum of radiation protection for patient's treatment. An actualization of radiation protection knowledge of the radiological personnel is required.

  8. Improving of health and safety contribution of OECD/NEA Radiation Protection Committee and Public Health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.

    2004-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear energy Agency, has, since 1957, been addressing issues in radiological protection through its Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). The Committee is made up of regulators and radiation protection experts, with the broad mission to provide timely identification of new and emerging issues, to analyse their possible implications and to recommend or take action to address these issues to further enhance radiation protection regulation and implementation. The regulatory and operational consensus developed by the CRPPH on these emerging issues supports policy and regulation development in Member countries, and disseminates good practice. To best serve the needs of its Member countries, the CRPPH has been focusing its work in recent years on a few key topic areas. These induce the evolution of the system of radiological protection, the advancement of preparedness for nuclear emergency accidents, and the improvement of occupational exposure management at nuclear power plants. With the International Commission on Radiological Protection about to issue new recommendations, due out in 2005, the CRPPH will take advantage of the radiological protection community's recent focus on emerging policy and strategic issues to develop a new CRPPH Collective Opinion. This document, to be published in 2005, will serve the Committee as a guide for its programme of work for the coming 5 to 10 years. (Author) 13 refs

  9. The current state of science in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, A.

    1985-01-01

    The qualification 'according to the current state of science and technology' is regularly found in radiation protection laws. It is assumed that the state of science and technology is codified in the publications of ICRP and ICRU, the International Comissions on Radiological Protection and - Units respectively, and in the UN publication USCEAR. An investigation is made on the extent the regulations of FRD comply with this requirement. Stochastic and non-stochastic damages are differentiated and the problem of assigning equivalent whole-body doses to exposures of specific body organs is considered. (G.Q.)

  10. CERN Radiation Protection (RP) calibration facilities

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082069; Macián-Juan, Rafael

    Radiation protection calibration facilities are essential to ensure the correct operation of radiation protection instrumentation. Calibrations are performed in specific radiation fields according to the type of instrument to be calibrated: neutrons, photons, X-rays, beta and alpha particles. Some of the instruments are also tested in mixed radiation fields as often encountered close to high-energy particle accelerators. Moreover, calibration facilities are of great importance to evaluate the performance of prototype detectors; testing and measuring the response of a prototype detector to well-known and -characterized radiation fields contributes to improving and optimizing its design and capabilities. The CERN Radiation Protection group is in charge of performing the regular calibrations of all CERN radiation protection devices; these include operational and passive dosimeters, neutron and photon survey-meters, and fixed radiation detectors to monitor the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), inside CERN accelera...

  11. Radiation protection; Proteccion Radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ures Pantazi, M [Universidad de la Republica, Facultad de Quimica (Uruguay)

    1994-12-31

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection.

  12. Workstations studies and radiation protection; Etudes de postes et radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahaye, T. [Direction des relations du travail, 75 - Paris (France); Donadille, L.; Rehel, J.L.; Paquet, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Beneli, C. [Paris-5 Univ., 75 (France); Cordoliani, Y.S. [Societe Francaise de Radioprotection, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Vrigneaud, J.M. [Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, 75 (France); Gauron, C. [Institut National de Recherche et de Securite, 75 - Paris (France); Petrequin, A.; Frison, D. [Association des Medecins du Travail des Salaries du Nucleaire (France); Jeannin, B. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Charles, D. [Polinorsud (France); Carballeda, G. [cabinet Indigo Ergonomie, 33 - Merignac (France); Crouail, P. [Centre d' Etude sur l' Evaluation de la Protection dans le Domaine Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Valot, C. [IMASSA, 91 - Bretigny-sur-Orge (France)

    2006-07-01

    This day on the workstations studies for the workers follow-up, was organised by the research and health section. Devoted to the company doctors, for the competent persons in radiation protection, for the engineers of safety, it presented examples of methodologies and applications in the medical, industrial domain and the research, so contributing to a better understanding and an application of regulatory measures. The analysis of the workstation has to allow a reduction of the exposures and the risks and lead to the optimization of the medical follow-up. The agenda of this day included the different subjects as follow: evolution of the regulation in matter of demarcation of the regulated zones where the measures of workers protection are strengthened; presentation of the I.R.S.N. guide of help to the realization of a workstation study; implementation of a workstation study: case of radiology; the workstation studies in the research area; Is it necessary to impose the operational dosimetry in the services of radiodiagnostic? The experience feedback of a competent person in radiation protection (P.C.R.) in a hospital environment; radiation protection: elaboration of a good practices guide in medical field; the activities file in nuclear power plant: an evaluation tool of risks for the prevention. Methodological presentation and examples; insulated workstation study; the experience feedback of a provider; Contribution of the ergonomics to the determiners characterization in the ionizing radiation exposure situations;The workstations studies for the internal contamination in the fuel cycle facilities and the consideration of the results in the medical follow-up; R.E.L.I.R. necessity of workstation studies; the consideration of the human factor. (N.C.)

  13. Review of existing issues, ethics and practices in general medical research and in radiation protection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner-Karoussou, A.

    2008-01-01

    A literature review was carried out in relation to general medical research and radiation protection research. A large number of documents were found concerning the subject of ethics in general medical research. For radiation protection research, the number of documents and the information available is very limited. A review of practices in 13 European countries concerning general medical research and radiation protection research was carried out by sending a questionnaire to each country. It was found that all countries reviewed were well regulated for general medical research. For research that involves ionising radiation, the UK and Ireland are by far the most regulated countries. For other countries, there does not seem to be much information available. From the literature review and the review of practices, a number of existing ethical issues were identified and exposed, and a number of conclusions were drawn. (authors)

  14. BEIR-III report and its implications for radiation protection and public health policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-03-01

    A general background is given of the implications the BEIR-III Report may have on societal decision-making in the regulation of activities concerned with the health effects of low-level radiation. The scientific basis for establishing appropriate radiation protection guides are discussed. (ACR)

  15. History of radiation protection in the Czech Republic. Ten years of the National Radiation Protection Institute, 1995-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabkova, A.

    2006-01-01

    The first part of the publication, highlighting the history of radiation protection in the country which today is the Czech Republic, is divided into the following sections: Inception of the field of science and applications 'Protection from ionizing radiation'; Beginnings of work with ionizing radiation in the Czech lands; Formulation of the first health physics and radiation protection requirements in the Czech lands; Beginnings of institutionalization of radiation protection in Czechoslovakia after World War II; The Clinic and Institute of Occupational Medicine in Prague; Institute of Occupational Hygiene and Occupational Diseases in Prague and the regional Institute of Occupational Hygiene and Occupational Diseases in Bratislava; Peaceful uses of atomic energy in Czechoslovakia; First man-made radioisotopes in Czechoslovakia; Health rules and standards applicable to work with ionizing radiation; The responsibilities of the Ministry of Health in the area of health physics and radiation protection within peaceful uses of atomic energy in the Czech Socialist Republic; Research Institute of Health Physics; Institute of Occupational Hygiene and Prevention of Occupational Diseases in the Mining and Processing of Radioactive Raw Materials; Health physics and radiation protection in sectorial and national research plans; Health Physics Centre, Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology; National Radiation Protection Institute (as a subsidiary of the State Office for Nuclear Safety). The second part of the publication gives details of the recent history of the National Radiation Protection Institute. (P.A.)

  16. Judgement in achieving protection against radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    This article includes the following topics: Ionizing radiation as a toxic agent; value judgement in establishing protection standards; origin of radiation protection standards; numerical radiation protection standards; exposure of populations; the proportional dose-effect relationship; assumptions involved in the proportional dose-effect relationship and a continued need for value judgement

  17. Critical Issues in Radiation Protection Knowledge Management for Preserving Radiation Protection Research and Development Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewji, Shaheen Azim

    2017-02-01

    As a hub of domestic radiation protection capabilities, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has a mandate to develop and actuate a formal knowledge management (KM) effort. This KM approach exceeds recruitment and training efforts but focuses on formalized strategies for knowledge transfer from outgoing subject matter experts in radiation protection to incoming generations. It is envisioned that such an effort will provide one avenue for preserving domestic capabilities to support stakeholder needs in the federal government and the nuclear industry while continuing to lead and innovate in research and development on a global scale. However, in the absence of broader coordination within the United States, preservation of radiation protection knowledge continues to be in jeopardy in the absence of a dedicated KM effort.

  18. Precautionary radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, W.

    2006-01-01

    The German federal government annually reports about the development of radioactivity in the environment, providing the most important data and changes in environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure. These reports are based on the Act on Precautionary Protection of the Public against Radiation Exposure (Radiation Protection Provisions Act) of December 19, 1986 as a consequence of the Chernobyl reactor accident. The purpose of the Act is protection of the public from health hazards arising from a nuclear accident or any other event with comparable radiological consequences, and to create the foundations for correct evaluation of the risks resulting from specific radiation exposures. After 1986, the Act was soon given concrete shape by legal ordinances, which made it a workable tool. The following points, among others, can be summarized form the report for 2004: - The calculated natural and manmade overall exposure is 4.0 mSv/a, as in the previous year, and happens to be exactly the same figure as in the report for 1994. - The contribution to radiation exposure by nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities is less than 0.01 mSv/a. Over a period of nearly twenty years, the Act and the annual reporting regime have proved to work. Standardized criteria prevent data abuse and misinterpretation, respectively. Definitions of limits have contributed to more transparency and more objectivity. (orig.)

  19. National Sessions of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sociedad Argentina de Radioproteccion

    2012-01-01

    The Radioprotection Argentine Society (SAR) was organized the National Sessions on Radiation Protection 2012 in order to continue the exchange in the radiation protection community in the country, on work areas that present a challenge to the profession. The new recommendations of the ICRP and the IAEA Safety Standards (2011), among others, includes several topics that are necessary to develop. The SAR wants to encourage different organizations from Argentina, to submit projects that are developing in order to strengthen radiation protection.

  20. Radiation protection programme progress report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The progress report of the radiation protection programme outlines the research work carried out in 1988 under contracts between the Commission of the European Communities and research groups in the Member States. Results of more than 350 projects are reported. They are grouped into six sectors: Radiation dosimetry and its interpretation; Behaviour and control of radionuclides in the environment; Nonstochastic effects of ionizing radiation; Radiation carcinogenesis; Genetic effects of ionizing radiation; Evaluation of radiation risks and optimization of protection. Within the framework programme, the aim of this scientific research is to improve the conditions of life with respect to work and protection of man and his environment and to assure a safe production of energy, i.e.: (i) to improve methods necessary to protect workers and the population by updating the scientific basis for appropriate standards; (ii) to prevent and counteract harmful effects of radiation; (iii) to assess radiation risks and provide methods to cope with the consequences of radiation accidents

  1. Melatonin as Protection Against Radiation Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetner, D.; Andersen, L. P H; Rosenberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation is widely used in the treatment of various cancers and in radiological imaging procedures. Ionizing radiation causes adverse effects, leading to decreased quality of life in patients, by releasing free radicals that cause oxidative stress and tissue damage. The sleep......-hormone melatonin is a free radical scavenger, and induces several anti-oxidative enzymes. This review investigates the scientific literature on the protective effects of melatonin against exposure to ionizing radiation, and discusses the clinical potential of melatonin as prophylactic treatment against ionizing...... and protected against radiation enteritis. These protective effects were only documented when melatonin was administered prior to exposure to ionizing radiation. Discussion: This review documents that melatonin effectively protects animals against injury to healthy tissues from ionizing radiation. However...

  2. Argentina, regional training center on radiation protection for Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrado, Carlos A.; Menossi, Carlos A.

    2008-01-01

    Argentina has an extensive background in education and training on Radiation Protection. Since the beginning of the nuclear activity in the country, prominence was given to the aspects related to radiation protection and training of the personnel involved in the use of ionizing radiation. These educative activities have been delivered for more than 50 years, having accumulated an important experience in the field. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority has the statutory obligation to address, among other matters, the control of the aspects of nuclear safety and radiation protection on the whole country, to protect the people of the harmful effects of ionizing radiation resulting from the nuclear activities. This includes the responsibility to develop and enforce the regulations, standards and other requirements, particularly, establishing the requests and promoting activities regarding education and training on radiation protection. Argentina, currently through the Nuclear Regulatory Authority, has performed postgraduate courses on radiation protection and nuclear safety at inter regional and regional level for 28 years without interruption. This important experience has been valued and exploited to form a Regional Center on Education and Training for Latin America and the Caribbean, sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Regional Center that in fact has been running in Argentina, trained 404 foreign participants and 327 local participants since 1980, totalizing 731 graduates from our annual post graduate courses. Our commitment is that all the effort made in education and training on radiation protection and nuclear safety contributes to a better use of the benefits of nuclear development. Since 2001 the International Atomic Energy Agency raised the need to develop plans and establish agreements to ensure a long-term sustainability of the education and training programs, allowing a better use of the resources in this area. In order to achieve this goal

  3. Principles of radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamourtzounis, J. N. [World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1969-05-15

    In the rapidly developing areas of occupational and public health devoted to the protection of people from both immediate and delayed harmful (and sometimes Irreversible) effects of radiation exposure, industrial hygienists, radiological physicists and radiologists must now assume the additional responsibility of protection against radiation. Everyone during his life will have had one or more X-rays taken for diagnostic purposes. The doses received, depending upon the site, are not harmful to the individual, from the genetic aspect, however, the increasing use of X-ray examinations does present a danger,since almost the whole population is involved. Rapid progress in the development of nuclear energy and the practical extension of its use in medicine, agriculture and industry are steadily increasing the potential danger of large groups of the population being exposed to radiation, and radiation hazards are becoming an important aspect of industrial and public hygiene. WHO is concerned with the overall evaluation of population exposure from peaceful uses of atomic energy and through medical practice, the evaluation of radiation risks,and the control of medical radiation exposure. WHO stimulates and provides technical assistance for the development of appropriate programs of radiation protection with respect to the agricultural, industrial and medical applications of radioisotopes. X-rays and radium. (author)

  4. Ethical problems in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrader-Frechette, K.; Persson, Lars

    2001-05-01

    In this report the authors survey existing international radiation-protection recommendations and standards of the ICRP, the IAEA, and the ILO. After outlining previous work on the ethics of radiation protection, professional ethics, and the ethics of human radiation experiments, the authors review ethical thinking on seven key issues related to radiation protection and ethics. They formulate each of these seven issues in terms of alternative ethical stances: (1) equity versus efficiency, (2) health versus economics, (3) individual rights versus societal benefits, (4) due process versus necessary sacrifice, (5) uniform versus double standards, (6) stake holder consent versus management decisions, and (7) environmental stewardship versus anthropocentric standards.

  5. Ethical problems in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrader-Frechette, K.; Persson, Lars

    2001-05-01

    In this report the authors survey existing international radiation-protection recommendations and standards of the ICRP, the IAEA, and the ILO. After outlining previous work on the ethics of radiation protection, professional ethics, and the ethics of human radiation experiments, the authors review ethical thinking on seven key issues related to radiation protection and ethics. They formulate each of these seven issues in terms of alternative ethical stances: (1) equity versus efficiency, (2) health versus economics, (3) individual rights versus societal benefits, (4) due process versus necessary sacrifice, (5) uniform versus double standards, (6) stake holder consent versus management decisions, and (7) environmental stewardship versus anthropocentric standards

  6. ASN report abstracts on the state of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection in France in 2008. ASN annual report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    ASN is an independent administrative authority tasked, on behalf of the state, with regulating nuclear safety and radiation protection in order to protect workers, patients and the environment from the hazards involved in nuclear activities. It also contributes to informing the public. ASN, run by a five-member commission, regulates the whole of the sector, acting in a completely impartial manner. The ASN Commission presents its report on the state of nuclear safety and radiation protection in France in 2008. Contents: A - Introduction: The year 2008. B - Key topics: 1. ASN actions to promote greater transparency; 2. EDF nuclear power plant ageing and operating life: the conditions for continued operation; 3. The prevention of malicious acts; 4. ASN regulation of the radiotherapy sector; 5. Regulating and monitoring the construction of the Flamanville 3 EPR reactor; 6. ASN's international nuclear safety responsibilities; 7. The new nuclear countries; 8. Decommissioning of basic nuclear installations and the low-level, long-lived waste disposal project. C - Overview: 1 - Nuclear activities: ionising radiations and health risks; 2 - Principles and stakeholders in the regulation of nuclear safety and radiation protection; 3 - Regulation; 4 - Regulation of nuclear activities and exposure to ionising radiations; 5 - Environmental protection; 6 - Public information and transparency; 7 - International relations; 8 - Radiological emergencies; 9 - Medical uses of ionising radiations; 10 - Industrial and research activities; 11 - Transport of radioactive materials; 12 - EDF nuclear power plants; 13 - Nuclear fuel cycle installations; 14 - Nuclear research facilities and various nuclear installations; 15 - Safe decommissioning of basic nuclear installations; 16 - Radioactive waste and polluted sites. D - Appendices: List of basic nuclear installations; ASN decisions and opinions published in 2008 in its Official Bulletin; Acronyms, abbreviations and names

  7. Radiation protection research and training programme review radiation protection programme 1960-89 synopsis of results 1985-89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This document aims to trace the evolution of the CEC radiation protection programme over its 30 years of existence. During this time, research carried out in the framework of the Community programme has made major contributions to the scientific understanding of the action of ionizing radiation and the protection of man and his environment. This information was crucial for developing better radiation protection management for existing and new technologies and for providing the scientific basis for the regulatory activities of the Commission. One important feature of the programme was the success of bringing together scientists from different Member States to cooperate in the various fields of radiation protection and to integrate different areas of radiation protection research into a coherent approach. The structures thus developed within the programme have enabled research in radiation protection to be conducted in a cost-effective manner on behalf of the Member States. This document aims also to give a synopsis of the most important results of the 1985-89 radiation protection programme. This period was characterized by two challenges, the integration of two Member States into Community research and the impact of the Chernobyl accident. The programme has, in spite of reduced funding, continued to provide a high degree of expertise for the Community in the context of the needs in radiation protection. This has been explicity acknowledged in the evaluation of the 1980-89 programmes carried out by an independent panel

  8. 78 FR 59982 - Revisions to Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0268] Revisions to Radiation Protection AGENCY: Nuclear..., ``Radiation Sources,'' Section 12.3 -12.4, ``Radiation Protection Design Features,'' and Section 12.5, ``Operational Radiation Protection Program.'' DATES: The effective date of this Standard Review Plan update is...

  9. Radiation protection at nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, K.; Momose, T.; Furuta, S.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation protection methodologies concerning individual monitoring, workplace monitoring and environmental monitoring in nuclear fuel facilities have been developed and applied to facilities in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories (NCL) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for over 40 y. External exposure to photon, beta ray and neutron and internal exposure to alpha emitter are important issues for radiation protection at these facilities. Monitoring of airborne and surface contamination by alpha and beta/photon emitters at workplace is also essential to avoid internal exposure. A critical accident alarm system developed by JAEA has been proved through application at the facilities for a long time. A centralised area monitoring system is effective for emergency situations. Air and liquid effluents from facilities are monitored by continuous monitors or sampling methods to comply with regulations. Effluent monitoring has been carried out for 40 y to assess the radiological impacts on the public and the environment due to plant operation. (authors)

  10. Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection in Europe - a common approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, Ann

    2010-01-01

    In Europe, the European Union has adopted directives and implemented other measures which form the basis of a common approach to nuclear safety and radiation protection across all Member States. In particular, there are EU directives setting out radiation protection standards and establishing a Community framework for the nuclear safety of nuclear installations. There are also arrangements in place to provide for an effective response to nuclear emergencies and to facilitate high quality research into nuclear and radiation protection related topics. Inevitably the stage of development in each area is somewhat different, but generally progress is ongoing in each area. From the point of view of a small country like Ireland, the development of common standards and arrangements across Europe is beneficial as they are based on the best available knowledge and expertise; they provide for greater transparency; they facilitate public confidence and make best use of the available resources. However, there are some areas in which common approaches could be further advanced. For example, the medical exposure of patients is increasingly of concern across Europe and the further development of common approaches in this area would be helpful. It would also be useful to develop a more integrated approach to nuclear safety and radiation protection regulation and to better integrate nuclear and radiation issues with other public health and environment concerns. (author)

  11. Radiation protection technologist training and certification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this program is to establish training requirements and methods for certifying the technical competence of Radiation Protection Technologists. This manual delineates general requirements as well as academic training, on-the-job training, area of facility training, and examination or evaluation requirements for Radiation Protection Trainees (Trainees), Junior Radiation Protection Technologists (JRPT), Radiation Protection Technologists (RPT), and Senior Radiation Protection Technologists (SRPT). This document also includes recertification requirements for SRPTs. The appendices include training course outlines, on-the-job training outlines, and training certification record forms

  12. External dosimetry - Applications to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faussot, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Dosimetry is the essential component of radiation protection. It allows to determine by calculation and measurement the absorbed dose value, i.e. the energy amounts deposited in matter by ionizing radiations. It deals also with the irradiation effects on living organisms and with their biological consequences. This reference book gathers all the necessary information to understand and master the external dosimetry and the metrology of ionizing radiations, from the effects of radiations to the calibration of radiation protection devices. The first part is devoted to physical dosimetry and allows to obtain in a rigorous manner the mathematical formalisms leading to the absorbed dose for different ionizing radiation fields. The second part presents the biological effects of ionizing radiations on living matter and the determination of a set of specific radiation protection concepts and data to express the 'risk' to develop a radio-induced cancer. The third part deals with the metrology of ionizing radiations through the standardized study of the methods used for the calibration of radiation protection equipments. Some practical exercises with their corrections are proposed at the end of each chapter

  13. A review of current radiation protection in radiological diagnostics in Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mijovic, Slavoljub; Kovacevic, Zarko; Vuceljic, Mira; Scepanovic, Mara; Picuric, Ivana; Mardjokic, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    After getting independence 2006 year and became 192nd member of UN, Montenegro state is conducting measures for radiation protection autonomously. Because of complexity of such issues, Montenegro faced a lot of problems: lack of a national legal system in this field, expertise, appropriate equipments etc. Some estimates have shown that the major exposures of populations in Montenegro to ionizing radiation are due to the medical care. The purpose of this work is to analyze current protection in radiological diagnostics in Montenegro and compare it with international standards. It could be clearly stated where they are in agreement or disagreement. The method of analyzing is a holistic one, starting from the law, regulations and decisions through the protocols of quality controls and finishing with the reports and database of important parameters and data. The main findings are stated as follows: although the current radiation protection in radiological diagnostics is conducting according the law of former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) and its regulations and decisions, the overall legal system is still satisfactory; Identification and location of radiation sources through a system of notification and maintaining a national inventory is not satisfactory; There are a lack of expertise and equipments for the technical services, although the procedures and protocols of the quality control are at a satisfactory level; There is a lack of knowledge of professional staff working in this field. The practice is sometimes operated carelessly; The patients protection is satisfactory but there is not care to decrease a level of exposure according the ALARA principle. (author)

  14. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1993, RA research reactor, Part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.; Pavlovic, R.; Mandic, M.; Sipka, V.; Grsic, Z.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation protection tasks which enable safe operation of the RA reactor, and are defined according the the legal regulations and IAEA safety recommendations are sorted into four categories in this report: (1) Control of the working environment, dosimetry and radiation protection at the RA reactor; (2) decontamination, collecting and treatment of fluid effluents and solid wastes; (3) Radioactivity control in the vicinity of the reactor and (4)meteorology measurements; (3). Each of the category is described as a separate annex of this report [sr

  15. Radiation protection in newer medical imaging techniques: Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Medical imaging has seen many developments as it has evolved since the mid-1890s. In the last 30-40 years, the pace of innovation has increased, starting with the introduction of computed tomography (CT) in the early 1970s. During the last decade, the rate of change has accelerated further, in terms of continuing innovation and its global application. Most patient exposure now arises from practices that barely existed two decades ago. These developments are evident in the technology on which this volume is based - multislice/detector CT scanning and its application in cardiac imaging. However, this advance is achieved at the cost of a radiation burden to the individual patient, and possibly to the community, if its screening potential is exploited. Much effort will be required to ensure that the undoubted benefit of this new practice will not pose an undue level of detriment to the individual in multiple examinations. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that innovation has been driven by both the imaging industry and an increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practices lag (inevitably) behind the industrial and clinical innovations. This series of Safety Reports (Nos 58, 60 and 61) is designed to help fill this growing vacuum, by bringing up to date and timely advice from experienced practitioners to bear on the problems involved. The advice in this report has been developed as part of the IAEA's statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for the worldwide application of these standards. The Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) were issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by organizations including the Food and Agriculture

  16. Critical issues in radiation protection knowledge management for preserving radiation protection research and development capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewji, Shaheen Azim

    2017-01-01

    As a hub of domestic radiation protection capabilities, Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has a mandate to develop and actuate a formal knowledge management (KM) effort. This KM approach exceeds recruitment and training efforts but focuses on formalized strategies for knowledge transfer from outgoing subject matter experts in radiation protection to incoming generations. It is envisioned that such an effort will provide one avenue for preserving domestic capabilities to support stakeholder needs in the federal government and the nuclear industry while continuing to lead and innovate in research and development on a global scale. Furthermore, in the absence of broader coordination within the United States, preservation of radiation protection knowledge continues to be in jeopardy in the absence of a dedicated KM effort.

  17. Radiation protection - radiographer's role and responsibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popli, P.K.

    2002-01-01

    Ever since discovery of x-rays, radiographers has been the prime user of radiation. With the passage of time, the harmful effects of radiation were detected. Some of radiographers, radiologists and public were affected by radiation, but today with enough knowledge of radiation, the prime responsibility of radiation protection lies with the radiographers only. The radiologist and physicist are also associated with radiation protection to some extent

  18. Radiation protection in the Brazilian universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, K.C.S.; Borges, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    A research covering 91 institutions was undertaken in order to elucidate how radiation protection were indeed fulfilled. A questionary including technical administrative and legal subjects was sent by mail and 36% of which were answered propitiating substantial data for analysis. Only in few cases universities have knowledge of basic procedures in radiation protection, claiming for the elaboration of a plan that could guide supervisors and workers in radiation protection in these institution. Based on the tree analysis technique proposed by IAEA, a Reference Radiation protection Program has been elaborated and proposed for Brazilian universities. (author). 14 refs, 1 figs

  19. Radiation protection in dental radiodiagnostic. La radioprotection en chirurgie dentaire (radiodiagnostic)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellerin, Y

    1976-01-01

    Medical irradiation, and mostly radiodiagnostic is, at present time, the most important artificial source of irradiation. Reasons of this importance are reviewed for dental radiodiagnostic and different solutions to decrease it, are considered. French regulations concerning standardization of dental X-ray equipment and agreement of installations are reported. Radiological practice associated with this equipment in accordance with radiation protection regulations are examined.

  20. Special radiation protection aspects of radiotherapy and nuclear medicine in a medium-sized Swiss hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benes, I.; Heinzel, F.; Mueller-Duysing, W.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of radiation protection in Switzerland caused the Triemli City Hospital to implement building modifications throughout its 13 years of existence which have not been completed todate. However, modest methods allowed to find practicable solutions which largely comply with today's radiation protection regulation. Radiation protection provisions have been rendered more stringent thus resulting in more jobs. At least one additional staff member is required in order to discharge all supervisory functions required like incorporation controls, controls of cleaning and technical staff for their working correctly, contamination controls of floors and working areas, exit controls of special working clothes, etc. The best solution for the hospital would be to have one health physics man specifically commissioned with and employed for radiation protection. (orig./HSCH) [de

  1. Decree of the 29. december 2003 relative to the education modes of the competent person in radiation protection and the trainer certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This decree details the content of the training of the radiation protection competent person that must allow to the applicant to execute the missions assigned by the article R.231-106 from the Labour code. The different chapters are as follow: radioactivity; radiation-matter interaction; protection principle against external exposure; protection principle against contamination; radiation detection; biological radiation effects; exposure sources for man; regulation; the work of the competent person in radiation protection; optimization in radiation protection. (N.C.)

  2. Ethical issues in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrader-Frechette, K.; Persson, L.

    1997-01-01

    In this note the authors survey existing international radiation-protection recommendations of the ICRP, the IAEA, and the ILO. After outlining previous work on the ethics of radiation protection and risk assessment/management, the authors review ethical thinking on five key issues related to radiation protection and ethics. They formulate each of these five issues in terms of alternative ethical stances: (1) Equity vs. Efficiency, (2) Health vs. Economics, (3) Individual Rights vs. Societal Benefits, (4) Due Process vs. Necessary Sacrifice, and (5) Stakeholder Consent vs. Management Decisions (authors)

  3. Radiation risks and radiation protection at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation exposure is an occupational hazard at CRNL. The predicted health effects of low levels of radiation are described and compared with other hazards of living. Data related to the health of radiation workers are also considered. Special attention is given to the expected effects of radiation on the unborn child. Measures taken to protect CRNL employees against undue occupational exposure to radiation are noted

  4. Practical X-ray diagnostics orthopedics and trauma surgery. Indication, adjustment technique and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechtenmacher, Johannes; Sabo, Desiderius

    2014-01-01

    The book on X-ray diagnostics in orthopedics and trauma surgery includes the following chapters: 1. Introduction: radiation protection, equipment technology radiological diagnostics of skeleton carcinomas, specific aspects of trauma surgery, special aspects of skeleton radiology for children. 2. X-ray diagnostics of different anatomical regions: ankle joint, knee, hips and pelvis, hand and wrist joint, elbow, shoulder, spinal cord. 3. Appendix: radiation protection according to the X-ray regulations.

  5. Radiation protection of workers in the mining and milling of radioactive ores. Code of practice and technical addendum. 1983 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This Code of Practice sets forth the means of ensuring protection against ionizing radiation for workers engaged in mining and milling of radioactive ores: general provisions outlining the responsibilities of the employer and the worker, limits of radiation exposure, administrative organization of radiation protection, radiation surveillance, engineering and administrative protective measures and medical surveillance. It is designed to facilitate the preparation and adoption of national and local regulations and factory rules for radiation protection in mining and milling of radioactive ores.

  6. Radiation protection to firemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, E.S. de.

    1985-01-01

    The basic Knowledge about ionizing radiation oriented for firemen, are presented. The mainly damage and effects caused by radiation exposure as well as the method of radiation protection are described in simple words. The action to be taken in case of fire involving radiation such as vehicles transporting radioactive materials are emphasized. (author)

  7. The radiologist obligations for the workers radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehel, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    After analysis of risks by the person competent in radiation protection (P.C.R.) the leader of any facility holder of a ionizing radiation source bounds around this one a controlled area. When the exposure exceeds the levels set by the regulations, he bounds areas specially regulated (yellow or orange) or forbidden. The studies of workstations realised by the P.C.R., must correlate the usual conditions of work. They allow the workers classification in two categories A or B according to their level of exposure. These workers must be the object of a medical and dosimetry follow-up by passive dosimetry. The access in controlled area implies a complementary operational dosimetry. An exposure card must be established for every exposed worker and transmitted to the work physician that will adapt the dosimetry surveillance. (N.C.)

  8. Encouraging the radiation protection practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Natanael O.; Cunha, Paulo C.N.; Junior, Jose N.S.; Silva, Jessyca B.

    2013-01-01

    The radiological protection of workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation (X-ray diagnoses, Nuclear Medicine, Radiotherapy and Dental) is essential to minimize the appearance of radiation effects. The ways to reduce the potential for exposure of workers are: Time, Distance , and Shielding. The most important purpose of radiation protection is to provide safe conditions for activities involving ionizing radiation, basic safety conditions that must be observed in professional practice. The professional must have full knowledge of the subject and deepen in the revision of norms and guidelines related to radiation protection establish by the Vigilancia Sanitaria - ANVISA, and Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear - CNEN, Brazil. The study was conducted in a technical school for the Technical Training Course in Radiology, where the students are invited to think deeply about the radiation protection of themselves, the patients and the environment. Developed since July 2012, with the participation of 30 students, with a leading class -three teachers assisting in the development of the project . With this project there was an awareness of both students, as instructors stage accompanying the daily lives of students and their own colleagues. Following the same objective in 2013 the project continues with more adept at radioprotection

  9. Radiation protection aspects in the design of nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to establish safety standards to protect health and minimize danger to life and property - standards which the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which a State can apply by means of its regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. A comprehensive body of safety standards under regular review, together with the IAEA's assistance in their application, has become a key element in a global safety regime. In the mid-1990s, a major overhaul of the IAEA's safety standards programme was initiated, with a revised oversight committee structure and a systematic approach to updating the entire corpus of standards. The new standards that have resulted are of a high calibre and reflect best practices in Member States. With the assistance of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its safety standards. Safety standards are only effective, however, if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services - which range in scope from engineering safety, operational safety, and radiation, transport and waste safety to regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations - assist Member States in applying the standards and appraise their effectiveness. These safety services enable valuable insights to be shared and continue to urge all Member States to make use of them. Regulating nuclear and radiation safety is a national responsibility, and many Member States have decided to adopt the IAEA's safety standards for use in their national regulations. For the Contracting Parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions. The standards are also applied by designers, manufacturers and operators around the world to enhance nuclear and radiation safety in power generation, medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education

  10. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations on x-ray diagnostics; issued on April 28, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-01

    These regulations are applicable to practices with ionising radiation with respect to medical and dental diagnostics by means of external radiation sources like x-rays or radioactive substances. The regulations are also applicable to medical or dental use of such radiation sources for planning and guidance, for research and for legal and insurance related examinations.

  11. Basic safety standards for radiation protection in the Syrian Arab Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The aim of these standards is to insure safety and protection from ionizing radiation in the Syrian Arab Republic. Licensing regulations, dose limits,maximum permissible dose and all kinds of exposure such as occupational, medical and public exposure are presented

  12. Basic safety standards for radiation protection in the Syrian Arab Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-07-01

    The aim of these standards is to insure safety and protection from ionizing radiation in the Syrian Arab Republic. Licensing regulations, dose limits,maximum permissible dose and all kinds of exposure such as occupational, medical and public exposure are presented.

  13. Radiation protection for humans and environment. 50 years competence in the professional association; Strahlenschutz fuer Mensch und Umwelt. 50 Jahre Kompetenz im Fachverband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucher, Benno [Eidgenoessisches Nuklearsicherheitsinspektorat, Brugg (Switzerland); Wilhelm, Christoph (ed.) [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The conference proceedings of the IRPA (International radiation protection association) annual meeting 2016 contain the contribution of invited referents, other contributions and poster contributions concerning radiation protection in nuclear facilities, radiation protection of the public and environment, radioactive waste management, uranium mining, environmental monitoring, natural radioactivity, and radiation protection laws and regulations.

  14. Basic standards for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The basic standards for radiation protection have been based, for many years, on the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiological Protection. The three basic standards recommended by the Commission may be summarized as ''justification, optimization of protection and adherence to dose limitations. The applications of these basic principles to different aspects of protection are briefly summarized and the particular ways in which they have been applied to waste described in more detail. The application of dose limits, both in the control of occupational exposure and in regulating routine discharges of radioactive effluents is straight forward in principle although the measurement and calculational requirements may be substantial. Secondary standards such as derived limits may be extremely useful and the principles underlying their derivation will be described. Optimization of protection is inherently a more difficult concept to apply in protection and the various techniques used will be outlined by with particular emphasis on the use of cost benefit analysis are recommended by the ICRP. A review will be given of the problems involved in extending these basic concepts of the ICRP to probabilistic analyses such as those required for assessing the consequences of accidents or disruptive events in long term repositories. The particular difficulties posed by the very long timescales involved in the assessment of waste management practices will be discussed in some detail. (orig./RW)

  15. New radiobiological, radiation risk and radiation protection paradigms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodhead, Dudley T.

    2010-01-01

    The long-standing conventional paradigm for radiobiology has formed a logical basis for the standard paradigm for radiation risk of cancer and heritable effects and, from these paradigms, has developed the internationally applied system for radiation protection, but with many simplifications, assumptions and generalizations. A variety of additional radiobiological phenomena that do not conform to the standard paradigm for radiobiology may have potential implications for radiation risk and radiation protection. It is suggested, however, that the current state of knowledge is still insufficient for these phenomena, individually or collectively, to be formulated systematically into a new paradigm for radiobiology. Additionally, there is at present lack of direct evidence of their relevance to risk for human health, despite attractive hypotheses as to how they might be involved. Finally, it remains to be shown how incorporation of such phenomena into the paradigm for radiation protection would provide sufficient added value to offset disruption to the present widely applied system. Further research should aim for better mechanistic understanding of processes such as radiation-induced genomic instability (for all radiation types) and bystander effects (particularly for low-fluence high-LET particles) and also priority should be given to confirmation, or negation, of the relevance of the processes to human health risks from radiation.

  16. Basic principles of radiation protection in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The major goal of radiation protection in Canada is to ensure that individuals are adequately protected against the harm that might arise from unwarranted exposure to ionizing radiation. This report deals with the basic principles and organizations involved in protection against ionizing radiation. Three basic principles of radiation protection are: 1) that no practice shall be adopted unless its introduction produces a positive net benefit for society, 2) that all exposures shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable, relevant economic and social factors being taken into account, and 3) that doses to individuals should not exceed specified annual limits. The limit for radiation workers is currently 50 mSv per year, and exposures of the general public should not exceed a small fraction of that of radiation workers. Other specific areas in radiation protection which have received considerable attention in Canada include limitations on collective dose (the sum of the individual doses for all exposed individuals), exemption rules for extremely small radiation doses or amounts of radioactive materials, occupational hazards in uranium mining, and special rules for protection of the foetus in pregnant female radiation workers. Implementation of radiation protection principles in Canada devolves upon the Atomic Energy Control Board, the Department of National Health and Welfare, provincial authorities, licensees and radiation workers. A brief description is given of the roles of each of these groups

  17. New radiation protection law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The structure of the existing legislation and its contents and aims are reconsidered. New rules which correspond to the present situation are to be established. Also the fundamental principles of the task and methods of radiation protection are to be changed. The main effort will be to create conditions so that all human beings will be protected against the harmful effects of radiation. The effects on plants, animals and on the environment should be considered as well. The legislation should include both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The main responsibility of protection should stay with the central authority. Licensing of apparatus, liability for medical applications and radioactive waste is discussed. Granting of permissions and control should be accomplished by the authority. Cooperation with other national and international authorities is dealt with. (G.B.)

  18. Methods radiation protection data sheets for the use radionuclides in unsealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    These radiation protection data sheets are devoted to responsible persons and employees of vario