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Sample records for radiation pneumonitis caused

  1. Peracute radiation pneumonitis

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    Dvorak, E

    1982-01-01

    Progressive tendencies in curative radiation therapy approach in the treatment of bronchogenic carcinoma will generally prolong a treatment course and modify the manifestation of radiation pneumonitis. There will probably be a tendency for an earlier onset of its acute phase, especially if the irradiated lung was atelectatic with or without post-obstructive pneumonia or if there were changes of chronic pulmonary disease. A peracute of radiation pneumonitis after a tumor dose of 6400 cGy in 29 fractions over 48 days starting within one week after the completion of irradiation is documented and discussed. Literature dealing with clinical, pathological, pathophysiological, and radiographic manifestations of radiation pneumonitis is shortly reviewed. Usage of corticosteroid therapy in the acute phase of radiation pneumonitis is described and controversial reports on this subject are mentioned. Beneficial effect of dexamethasone in the presented case is demonstrated on sequential radiograms.

  2. Radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shopova, V.; Salovsky, P.; Dancheva, V.

    2001-01-01

    The likelihood of toxic pulmonary lesions development as the result of radiation therapy for pulmonary carcinoma and breast cancer is discussed. Two possible forms of radiation induced changes are described, namely: classical radiation pneumonitis (RP) terminating with lung fibrosis circumscribed in the radiation zone, and sporadic RP giving rise to bilateral lymphatic alveolitis and manifestations outside the irradiation field. Attention is called to the fact that chemotherapy augments the risk of toxic lung damage occurrence. A number of markers for early RP diagnosis, including lactate dehydrogenase activity, KL-6, procollagen III, transforming growth factor β, C-reactive protein and partial oxygen pressure are listed. Therapeutic possibilities in coping with RP and pulmonary fibrosis are assayed. Apart from the standard therapeutic approach using corticosteroids and azatioprin, ideas are set forth concerning the application of some antioxidants, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and γ-interferon. It is pointed out that radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis treatment has an essential practical bearing on life expectancy and quality of life in a great number of cancer patients. (author)

  3. Radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrino, R.; Carvalho, H.A.; Gomes, H.C.; Kuang, L.F.; Aguilar, P.B.; Lederman, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-nine observations of patients with breast cancer frm 1980 to 1985 were reviewed. All of them received radiotherapy. In 44.9% radiologic findings of radiation pneumonitis were detected and only 9% presented mild or moderate respiratory symptoms. (M.A.C.) [pt

  4. Clinical and morphological aspects of radiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuh, D.; Eberhardt, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Individually different radiation tolerance with relative dose dependence of the radioreaction could be revealed. Various radiation independent diseases of the lungs are predisposing factors of radiogenic pneumonitis. Even severe diffuse pneumonias can be clinically and radiologically asymptomatic. An enhanced toxic effect of combined cytostatic and radiotherapy could be demonstrated once more. Obviously irradiation causes lasting damage of the pulmonary tissue, being a changed but stereotype reaction to different irritations

  5. Gallium-67 citrate imaging for the assessment of radiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Masaaki

    1989-01-01

    In order to evaluate its usefulness in the assessment of radiation pneumotinis, gallium-67 citrate ( 67 Ga) imaging was performed before and after radiation therapy (RT) on 103 patients with lung cancer. In 23 patients with radiation pneumonitis detected radiographically, abnormal 67 Ga uptake in sites other than tumors was found in all post-RT 67 Ga lung images. Three patterns of uptake were found: (A) focal uptake corresponding to the RT field (n=10); (B) diffuse uptake including the RT field (n=4); and (C) diffuse uptake outside the RT field (n=9). The area of 67 Ga uptake was consistent with that of interstitial pneumonitis as revealed histopathologically in 7 cases. 67 Ga uptake in pattern (C) was an indicator of poor prognosis for the patients with radiation pneumonitis. 67 Ga uptake in the patients with reversible pneumonitis disappeared with steroid therapy. Sixteen (20%) of 80 asymptomatic patients, in whose chest radiographs there was no finding of radiation pneumonitis, showed transient 67 Ga uptake. These were considered to occur in the subclinical radiation pneumonitis. These data suggest that 67 Ga imaging is more sensitive than chest radiography in the detection of radiation pneumonitis and is useful in the assessment of the extent and clinical course of radiation pneumonitis. (author)

  6. Hypofractionation does not increase radiation pneumonitis risk with modern conformal radiation delivery techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R; Westerly, David C; Cannon, George M

    2010-01-01

    To study the interaction between radiation dose distribution and hypofractionated radiotherapy with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) estimated from normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models.......To study the interaction between radiation dose distribution and hypofractionated radiotherapy with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) estimated from normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models....

  7. Radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis following breast conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoden, Eisaku; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Imajo, Yoshinari

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the frequency, degree and risk factors of radiation-induced dermatitis and pneumonitis in 255 patients receiving breast conserving therapy between April 1987 and April 1998. The majority of the patients underwent a wide excision or quadrantectomy with a level I, II axillary dissection, followed by radiotherapy consisting of 50 Gy/25 Fr/5 weeks to the preserved breast with a 4 MV beam by tangentially opposed portals using the half-field technique. Eleven patients received an additional 10 Gy/5 Fr of electron therapy to the tumor bed. Most of the patients developed radiation dermatitis which was limited to reddening or dry desquamation, with the exception of 14 patients with a localized moist reaction. The skin reaction was transient in all patients and improved with conservative treatments. Radiation pneumonitis appeared on chest X-rays in 30 patients, with a slight appearance in 21 and patchy appearance in 9. Three patients presented with persistent symptoms requiring medication. They were treated with steroids, resulting in complete resolution of the symptoms. A large volume of the chest wall within the irradiation field and a large area of irradiated skin were the risk factors of radiation dermatitis. The volume of irradiated lung significantly correlated with the frequency and degree of radiation pneumonitis. It was preferable that the maximum thickness of the involved lung should not exceed 3 cm. Complicated disease, adjuvant therapy and boost irradiation had no impact on the radiation dermatitis or pneumonitis. (author)

  8. Case report of two patients having successful surgery for lung cancer after treatment for Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis

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    Yuki Nakajima

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: Surgery for lung cancer on patients with Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis should be deferred until the patients complete steroid therapy, and the clinical pneumonitis is cured. Moreover, it is believed that it is important to remove the resolved radiation pneumonitis without leaving any residual areas and not to cut into any areas of active radiation pneumonitis as much as possible.

  9. Protective effect of corticosteroids on radiation pneumonitis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, N.J.; Narine, K.R.; Wade, R.

    1988-01-01

    We explored the protective effect of corticosteroids on the mortality of mice that received thoracic irradiation. Methylprednisolone, 100 mg/kg/week, given from 11 weeks after gamma irradiation of the thorax resulted in an increase in the LD50 (11-26 weeks) from 14.3 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- SE) Gy to 17.6 +/- 0.4 Gy, P less than 0.001, a protection factor of 1.2. Withdrawal of steroids at various times during the period of radiation pneumonitis resulted in accelerated mortality in the next 2-4 weeks, so that the cumulative mortality caught up with that of control animals by 4 weeks after steroid withdrawal. However, after the end of the usual period of pneumonitis withdrawal of steroids did not result in accelerated mortality, suggesting that the time when steroids are protective corresponds to the duration of pneumonitis. A smaller dose of steroids, 25 mg/kg/week, was found to be as protective as the larger dose used in the above experiments. The possibility that corticosteroids reduce mortality, even when given many weeks after radiation, may have important practical and theoretical implications

  10. Acute chemical pneumonitis caused by nitric acid inhalation: case report

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    Choe, Hyung Shim; Lee, In Jae; Ko, Eun Young; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Beom; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation is a rare clinical condition. The previously reported radiologic findings of this disease include acute permeability pulmonary edema, delayed bronchiolitis obliterans, and bronchiectasis. In very few published rare radiologic reports has this disease manifested as acute alveolar injury; we report a case of acute chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation which at radiography manifested as bilateral perihilar consolidation and ground-glass attenuation, suggesting acute alveolar injury.

  11. Radiation pneumonitis in a patient exposed to asbestos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashford, R.F.U.; Maher, J.; Drury, A.; Pickering, D.

    1981-01-01

    A case report is presented of a 58 year old man who had for many years run an asbestos importing and fibreizing plant. He developed radiation pneumonitis following radiotherapy to a squamous cell carcinoma of the middle 3rd of the oesophagus. Detailed lung studies at autopsy revealed asbestos bodies associated with macrophages in many alveoli and areas of subpleural fibrosis typical of asbestos exposure. This was the most florid case of radiation seen in the Westminster Hospital for some years and the first seen in patients treated for carcinoma of the oesophagus using a three field technique. It is suggested that when planning radiotherapy to an asbestos-exposed patient, a possible increase in lung sensitivity to radiation should be considered when planning dosage. (U.K.)

  12. A literature-based meta-analysis of clinical risk factors for development of radiation induced pneumonitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R; Bentzen, Søren M

    2012-01-01

    of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP). Material and methods. A systematic review of English language articles in the Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane controlled trials registers. Studies with the mesh term "radiation pneumonitis" or the search term "radiation pneumonitis" were included. Additional studies were...

  13. Analysis of radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field in breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogo, Etsuyo; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2002-01-01

    In a retrospective study of radiation-induced pulmonary changes for patients with breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer, we sent questionnaires to the main hospitals in Japan. In this study, we analyzed pulmonary changes after tangential whole-breast irradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field. The questionnaires included patients data, therapy data, and lung injury information between August 1999 and May 2000. On the first questionnaires, answer letters were received from 107 institutions out of 158 (67.7%). On the second questionnaires, response rate (hospitals which had radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field) was 21.7% (23/106). We could find no risk factors of this type of pneumonitis. We suggested that lung irradiation might trigger this type of pneumonitis which is clinically similar to BOOP (bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia). It developed in 1.5-2.1% among the patients with breast conserving surgery and tangential whole-breast irradiation. And it is likely appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy. (author)

  14. Heart irradiation as a risk factor for radiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ellen X.; El Naqa, Issam; Deasy, Joseph O.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Trovo, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the potential role of incidental heart irradiation on the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) for patients receiving definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods. Two hundred and nine patient datasets were available for this study. Heart and lung dose-volume parameters were extracted for modeling, based on Monte Carlo-based heterogeneity corrected dose distributions. Clinical variables tested included age, gender, chemotherapy, pre-treatment weight-loss, performance status, and smoking history. The risk of RP was modeled using logistic regression. Results. The most significant univariate variables were heart related, such as heart heart V65 (percent volume receiving at least 65 Gy) (Spearman Rs = 0.245, p < 0.001). The best-performing logistic regression model included heart D10 (minimum dose to the hottest 10% of the heart), lung D35, and maximum lung dose (Spearman Rs 0.268, p < 0.0001). When classified by predicted risk, the RP incidence ratio between the most and least risky 1/3 of treatments was 4.8. The improvement in risk modeling using lung and heart variables was better than using lung variables alone. Conclusions. These results suggest a previously unsuspected role of heart irradiation in many cases of RP

  15. Age factor relevant to the development of radiation pneumonitis in radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, K.; Kusumoto, S.; Watanabe, K.; Nishikawa, K.; Harada, K.; Ebihara, H.

    1988-01-01

    The significance of age factor for the development of radiation pneumonitis is evaluated in 62 patients with lung cancer between 1977 and 1985. The younger group consists of those less than 70 years old and the elderly group of those 70 years old or more. Radiation doses ranged from 1.5 to 2 Gy, 3 to 5 times per week, therefore the delivered doses were converted to nominal single doses (rets dose). Severe radiation pneumonitis was more often observed in the elderly than in the younger regardless of radiation field size and chemotherapy (n.s.). The onset of radiation pneumonitis occurred earlier in a field size of 90 sq cm or more than in that of less than 90 sq cm in both age groups; there was no significant difference between the two age groups in each field size. The pneumonitis was more frequently noted with increasing rets dose in both age groups (n.s.) regardless of field size and chemotherapy. It is concluded that there is no significant difference in the development of radiation pneumonitis between the younger group and the elderly group, but the pneumonitis is inclined to be more severe in the latter

  16. The measurements of plasma cytokines in radiation-induced pneumonitis in lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Won Joo; Youn, Seon Min; Lee, Hyung Sik; Yang, Kwang Mo; Sin, Geun Ho; Son, Choon Hee; Han, Jin Yeong; Lee, Ki Nam; Jeong, Min Ho

    2000-01-01

    To investigate whether changes in plasma concentrations of transforming growth factor-β 1(TGF-β 1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (lL -6) could be used to identify the development of radiation-induced pneumonitis in the lung cancer patients. Seventeen patients with lung cancer (11 NSCLC. 6 SCLC) were enrolled in a prospective study designed to evaluate clinical and molecular biologic correlation of radiation-induced pneumonitis. The study began in May 1998 and completed in July 1999. All patients were treated with radiotherapy with curative intent: 1.8 Gy per day, 5 fractions per week. Serial measurements of plasma TGF-β1, TNF--α and IL -6 were obtained in all patients before, weekly during radiotherapy and at each follow-up visits after completion of treatment. These measurements were quantified using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). All patients were evaluated for signs and symptoms of pneumonitis at each follow-up visits after completion of radiotherapy. High resolution CT (HRCT) scans were obtained when signs and symptoms of pneumonitis were developed after completion of radiotherapy. Thirteen patients eventually developed signs and symptoms of clinical pneumonitis while four patients did not. TGF- P 1 levels were elevated in - all 13 patients with pneumonitis, which showed characteristic pattern of elevation (38.45 ng/ml at pretreatment, 13.66 ng/ml during radiotherapy, then 60.63 ng/ml at 2-4 weeks after completion of radiotherapy). The levels of TNF--α and IL -6 were also elevated in the group of patients who developed pneumonitis but the pattern was not characteristic. Changes in plasma TGFβ-1 levels before, during and after radiotherapy appears to be a useful means by which to identify patients at risk for the development of symptomatic pneumonitis. Other cytokines like TNF--α and IL-6 shows no meaningful changes in association with radiation pneumonitis

  17. Factors predicting radiation pneumonitis in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Soo; Lee, Ji Hae; Ha, Bo Ram; Lee, Re Na

    2011-01-01

    Thoracic radiotherapy is a major treatment modality of stage III non-small cell lung cancer. The normal lung tissue is sensitive to radiation and radiation pneumonitis is the most important dose-limiting complication of thoracic radiation therapy. This study was performed to identify the clinical and dosimetric parameters related to the risk of radiation pneumonitis after definitive radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell cancer patients. The medical records were reviewed for 49 patients who completed definitive radiation therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer from August 2000 to February 2010. Radiation therapy was delivered with the daily dose of 1.8 Gy to 2.0 Gy and the total radiation dose ranged from 50.0 Gy to 70.2 Gy (median, 61.2 Gy). Elective nodal irradiation was delivered at a dose of 45.0 Gy to 50.0 Gy. Seven patients (14.3%) were treated with radiation therapy alone and forty two patients (85.7%) were treated with chemotherapy either sequentially or concurrently. Twenty-five cases (51.0%) out of 49 cases experienced radiation pneumonitis. According to the radiation pneumonitis grade, 10 (20.4%) were grade 1, 9 (18.4%) were grade 2, 4 (8.2%) were grade 3, and 2 (4.1%) were grade 4. In the univariate analyses, no clinical factors including age, sex, performance status, smoking history, underlying lung disease, tumor location, total radiation dose and chemotherapy were associated with grade ≥2 radiation pneumonitis. In the subgroup analysis of the chemotherapy group, concurrent rather than sequential chemotherapy was significantly related to grade ≥2 radiation pneumonitis comparing sequential chemotherapy. In the univariate analysis with dosimetric factors, mean lung dose (MLD), V20, V30, V40, MLDipsi, V20ipsi, V30ipsi, and V40ipsi were associated with grade ≥2 radiation pneumonitis. In addition, multivariate analysis showed that MLD and V30 were independent predicting factors for grade ≥2 radiation pneumonitis. Concurrent

  18. Radiation pneumonitis: a complication resulting from combined radiation and chemotherapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gez, E.; Sulkes, A.; Isacson, R.; Catane, R.; Weshler, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a patient with early breast carcinoma who developed clinical radiation pneumonitis during primary radiation therapy and concomitant chemotherapy that included prednisone. This syndrome developed three days following abrupt steroid withdrawal. Retrieval of steroids brought complete resolution of the clinical and radiological findings. Although this syndrome is rare, it is recommended that steroid therapy in a patient previously irradiated to the chest be avoided

  19. Radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis: Mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis and implications for future research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoutsou, Pelagia G.; Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis and subsequent radiation pulmonary fibrosis are the two main dose-limiting factors when irradiating the thorax that can have severe implications for patients' quality of life. In this article, the current concepts about the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis are presented. The clinical course of fibrosis, a postulated acute inflammatory stage, and a late fibrotic and irreversible stage are discussed. The interplay of cells and the wide variety of molecules orchestrating the immunologic response to radiation, their interactions with specific receptors, and the cascade of events they trigger are elucidated. Finally, the implications of this knowledge with respect to the therapeutic interventions are critically presented

  20. Usefulness of serum KL-6 and SP-D in the diagnosis of radiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saika, Yoshinori; Doi, Kenji; Misaki, Toshimasa; Tatsumi, Tomoaki; Komori, Tsuyoshi; Narabayashi, Isamu

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the usefulness of serum KL-6 and SP-D in the diagnosis of radiation pneumonitis. We measured serum KL-6 and SP-D in patients undergoing radiation therapy of the chest, primarily for lung cancer, in the Department of Radiology, Osaka Medical College and compared the results with the findings on plain chest X-ray films and thoracic computed tomography conducted at the same time. The sensitivity of serum KL-6 and SP-D for diagnosing radiation pneumonitis were 68.2% and 70.0%, respectively, the specificity were 86.6% and 80.0%, and the accuracy were 82.0% and 77.8%. Examination of the relationship between lesion extent and activity and serum KL-6 showed that serum KL-6 values were higher when the lesion extended beyond the irradiation field than when the lesion was confined to within the irradiation field and that the value tended to be lower for old lesions than for active lesions. In patients with radiation pneumonitis in whom serum KL-6 and SP-D could be measured over time, KL-6 tended to increase after the lesion was discovered by imaging, whereas SP-D increased prior to this in many cases. Examination of the comparison between before radiotherapy and just after radiotherapy in the patients with radiation pneumonitis showed that SP-D had a consistent tendency to increase. Both serum KL-6 and SP-D had a satisfactory degree of sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing radiation pneumonitis. Serum KL-6 correlated with the extent and activity of the lesions. The results suggested that serum SP-D may be helpful for the early detection of radiation pneumonitis. (author)

  1. Effects of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on experimental radiation pneumonitis

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    Gross, N.J.; Holloway, N.O.; Narine, K.R. (Medical Radiology Service, Hines VA Hospital, Maywood, IL (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Corticosteroids have previously been found to be protective against the mortality of radiation pneumonitis in mice, even when given well after lethal lung irradiation. The authors explored the possibility that this effect was due to their well-known anti-inflammatory actions by giving various nonsteroidal inhibitors of arachidonate metabolism to groups of mice that had received 19 Gy to the thorax (bilaterally). Treatments of four cyclooxygenase inhibitors, one lipoxygenase inhibitor, and one leukotriene receptor antagonist, given by various routes in various doses, were commenced 10 weeks after irradiation or sham irradiation and continued throughout the period when death from radiation pneumonitis occurs, 11-26 weeks after irradiation. Each of the treatments had the appropriate effect on arachidonate metabolism in the lungs as assessed by LTB4 and PGE2 levels in lung lavage fluid. The principal end point was mortality. The 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor diethylcarbamazine and the LTD4/LTE4 receptor antagonist LY 171883 markedly reduced mortality in dose-response fashion. The effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors were divergent; piroxicam and ibuprofen were marginally protective, indomethacin in all doses accelerated mortality, and aspirin reduced mortality in a dose-response fashion. These results suggest that the protective effect of corticosteroids in radiation pneumonitis can be tentatively attributed to their anti-inflammatory actions, and that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, particularly those that affect lipoxygenase products, may offer equal or better protection than corticosteroids against mortality due to radiation pneumonitis.

  2. Effects of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on experimental radiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, N.J.; Holloway, N.O.; Narine, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    Corticosteroids have previously been found to be protective against the mortality of radiation pneumonitis in mice, even when given well after lethal lung irradiation. The authors explored the possibility that this effect was due to their well-known anti-inflammatory actions by giving various nonsteroidal inhibitors of arachidonate metabolism to groups of mice that had received 19 Gy to the thorax (bilaterally). Treatments of four cyclooxygenase inhibitors, one lipoxygenase inhibitor, and one leukotriene receptor antagonist, given by various routes in various doses, were commenced 10 weeks after irradiation or sham irradiation and continued throughout the period when death from radiation pneumonitis occurs, 11-26 weeks after irradiation. Each of the treatments had the appropriate effect on arachidonate metabolism in the lungs as assessed by LTB4 and PGE2 levels in lung lavage fluid. The principal end point was mortality. The 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor diethylcarbamazine and the LTD4/LTE4 receptor antagonist LY 171883 markedly reduced mortality in dose-response fashion. The effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors were divergent; piroxicam and ibuprofen were marginally protective, indomethacin in all doses accelerated mortality, and aspirin reduced mortality in a dose-response fashion. These results suggest that the protective effect of corticosteroids in radiation pneumonitis can be tentatively attributed to their anti-inflammatory actions, and that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, particularly those that affect lipoxygenase products, may offer equal or better protection than corticosteroids against mortality due to radiation pneumonitis

  3. Prospective assessment of dosimetric/physiologic-based models for predicting radiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocak, Zafer; Borst, Gerben R.; Zeng Jing; Zhou Sumin; Hollis, Donna R.; Zhang Junan; Evans, Elizabeth S.; Folz, Rodney J.; Wong, Terrence; Kahn, Daniel; Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical and 3D dosimetric parameters are associated with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis rates in retrospective studies. Such parameters include: mean lung dose (MLD), radiation (RT) dose to perfused lung (via SPECT), and pre-RT lung function. Based on prior publications, we defined pre-RT criteria hypothesized to be predictive for later development of pneumonitis. We herein prospectively test the predictive abilities of these dosimetric/functional parameters on 2 cohorts of patients from Duke and Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI). Methods and Materials: For the Duke cohort, 55 eligible patients treated between 1999 and 2005 on a prospective IRB-approved study to monitor RT-induced lung injury were analyzed. A similar group of patients treated at the NKI between 1996 and 2002 were identified. Patients believed to be at high and low risk for pneumonitis were defined based on: (1) MLD; (2) OpRP (sum of predicted perfusion reduction based on regional dose-response curve); and (3) pre-RT DLCO. All doses reflected tissue density heterogeneity. The rates of grade ≥2 pneumonitis in the 'presumed' high and low risk groups were compared using Fisher's exact test. Results: In the Duke group, pneumonitis rates in patients prospectively deemed to be at 'high' vs. 'low' risk are 7 of 20 and 9 of 35, respectively; p = 0.33 one-tailed Fisher's. Similarly, comparable rates for the NKI group are 4 of 21 and 6 of 44, respectively, p = 0.41 one-tailed Fisher's. Conclusion: The prospective model appears unable to accurately segregate patients into high vs. low risk groups. However, considered retrospectively, these data are consistent with prior studies suggesting that dosimetric (e.g., MLD) and functional (e.g., PFTs or SPECT) parameters are predictive for RT-induced pneumonitis. Additional work is needed to better identify, and prospectively assess, predictors of RT-induced lung injury

  4. Correlation factor analysis between radiation pneumonitis and chemo-radiotherapy in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huiping; Wang Junjie; Ma Liwen; Zhang Shulan; Deng Huijing; Jia Tingzhen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between radiotherapy-induced lung injury and chemotherapy agents as well as other factors. Methods: A total of 85 breast cancer patients received radiotherapy with sequential or concurrent chemotherapy after surgery were analysed for radiation dose, chemotherapy schedule, age, and lung disease history. Results: Five patients had clinical symptoms of radiation pneumonitis, one of them was necessary to treat and 16 patients developed radiological changes (18.8%). Close relationship was noted between incidence of radiation pneumonitis and radiation dose, timing and drugs used in chemotherapy and lung disease history. Conclusion: High irradiation dose, concurrent chemotherapy, and lung disease history can increase the rate of radiotherapy-induced pulmonary injury in breast cancer patients. (authors)

  5. Effects of ongoing smoking on the development of radiation-induced pneumonitis in breast cancer and oesophagus cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, S.; Franzen, L.; Henriksson, R.; Bjermer, L.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of smoking on the development of radiation-induced pneumonitis in patients treated for breast and oesophagus cancer. Materials and methods: This is a retrospective study on 405 females diagnosed with primary unilateral breast cancer stages 1 and 2 and 201 oesophagus carcinoma patients. The possibilities in Sweden to obtain detailed information from different medical records were used to collect data on smoking habits, radiation treatment and spontaneously reported pneumonitis. Radiation-induced pneumonitis was defined as a combination of roentgenographic infiltrate in the lung field involving an irradiated area on the chest X-ray and clinical symptoms such as non-productive cough and dyspnoea. Results: Six breast cancer patients had spontaneously reported pneumonitis. Five of them were non-smokers (P=0.182) and the other was a former smoker. Eight of the oesophagus cancer patients had spontaneously reported radiation-induced clinical pneumonitis and they were all non-smokers (P=0.022), except one, who was a pipe smoker. None of the patients who were cigarette smokers were recorded as developing clinical pneumonitis after irradiation. Conclusion: These data could support the previous clinical observations and experimental studies that smoking depresses the frequency of radiation-induced pneumonitis. The present study as well as earlier observations could justify further studies concerning the possibility of an interaction of smoking with cancer treatment, both from the view of therapeutic failures and reduced adverse effects. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Radiation pneumonitis: generalised lung changes detected by radionuclide imaging following focal lung irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D.; Sephton, R.; Irving, L.; Crennan, E.

    1992-01-01

    The usefulness of a nuclear imaging technique as a means of detecting radiation-induced lung injury is examined. The technique involves the patient inhaling modified technegas TM , a gas-like radiotracer which is an ultra fine particulate dispersion. This crosses the alveolar-capillary membrane and the clearance rate of the tracer from the lungs is presumed to reflect membrane permeability. A case of a patient who, after receiving localised radiotherapy and chemotherapy for lung cancer, developed symptoms and signs of radiation pneumonitis is reported. Pre- and post-radiotherapy investigations using the nuclear technique showed acceleration of rates of tracer clearance from both lungs, consistent with generalised changes in alveolar-capillary membrane permeability. It is suggested that the symptoms of radiation pneumonitis may in part result from pathophysiologic changes in nonirradiated lung which may appear radiologically normal. 4 refs., 2 figs

  7. A case of severe radiation pneumonitis. A trial of plasma exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Tomoko; Mochizuki, Yoshirou; Nakahara, Yasuharu

    2009-01-01

    A 77-year-old man underwent radiotherapy for the squamous cell carcinoma of the right lung. Two months after the 60 Gy/30 fr irradiation was completed, he complained of dyspnea and his chest X-ray showed ground glass opacities and reticular shadows in both lung fields. Severe radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed. Two grams of methylprednisolone did not improve his symptoms and on the next day his hypoxemia worsened. We then tried plasma exchange because of his critical status. His respiratory status improved rapidly after plasma exchange and his chest X-ray showed remarkable improvement 10 days later. We think this case suggests the effectiveness of plasma exchange for severe radiation pneumonitis. (author)

  8. Correlations between Ape1/Ref-1, ICAM-1 and IL-17A Levels in Serum and Radiation Pneumonitis for Local Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiming GUO

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The main manifestations of radiation pneumonitis are injury of alveolar epithelial and endothelial cells, abnormal expression of cytokines, abnormal proliferation of fibroblasts and synthesis of fibrous matrix. The occurrence of radiation pneumonitis is associated with multiplecytokine level abnormality. These cytokines can also be used as bio-markers to predict the occurrence of radiation pneumonitis. This study was to evaluate the correlation between the change of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (Ape1/Ref-1, intercellular adhesion molecules 1 (ICAM-1 and interleukin-17A (IL-17A before and after radiotherapy and radiation pneumonitis for local advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods NSCLC patients (68 cases were treated with concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy, every patient’s normal tissue were controlled with a same radation dose. 68 local advanced NSCLC patients with concurrent chemoradiotherapy were detected the levels of Ape1/Ref-1, ICAM-1 and IL-17A in serum by ELISA before radiotherapy and in the 14th week after radiotherapy. Acute and advanced radiation pulmonary injury was graded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization For Research and Treatment (RTOG/EORTC diagnostic and grading criteria. Grade 2 or more radiation pneumonitis was taken as the main end point. Results Eighteen cases out of 68 developed radiation pneumonitis, 50 of 68 cases have no radiation pneumonia development. There was no significant change of Ape1/Ref-1 levels before and after radiotherapy in radiation pneumonitis group (P>0.05. There was no significant change of Ape1/Ref-1 concentration in serum after radiotherapy between radiation pneumonitis group and non-radiation pneumonitis group (P>0.05. Compared with before radiotherapy, upregulation degree of ICAM-1 levels in radiation pneumonitis group was significantly higher than that in

  9. Association Between Pulmonary Uptake of Fluorodeoxyglucose Detected by Positron Emission Tomography Scanning After Radiation Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Radiation Pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Manus, Michael P.; Ding Zhe; Hogg, Annette; Herschtal, Alan; Binns, David; Ball, David L.; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To study the relationship between fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in pulmonary tissue after radical radiation therapy (RT) and the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: In 88 consecutive patients, 18 F-FDG-positron emission tomography was performed at a median of 70 days after completion of RT. Patients received 60 Gy in 30 fractions, and all but 15 had concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. RT-induced pulmonary inflammatory changes occurring within the radiation treatment volume were scored, using a visual (0 to 3) radiotoxicity grading scale, by an observer blinded to the presence or absence of clinical radiation pneumonitis. Radiation pneumonitis was retrospectively graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale by an observer blinded to the PET radiotoxicity score. Results: There was a significant association between the worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring at any time after RT and the positron emission tomograph (PET) radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.033). The worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring after the PET scan was also associated with the PET radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.035). For every one-level increase in the PET toxicity scale, the risk of a higher RTOG radiation pneumonitis score increased by approximately 40%. The PET radiotoxicity score showed no significant correlation with the duration of radiation pneumonitis. Conclusions: The intensity of FDG uptake in pulmonary tissue after RT determined using a simple visual scoring system showed significant correlation with the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. 18 F-FDG-PET may be useful in the prediction, diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of radiation pneumonitis.

  10. Framework for radiation pneumonitis risk stratification based on anatomic and perfused lung dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhami, Gurleen; Zeng, Jing; Patel, Shilpen A.; Rengan, Ramesh [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); Vesselle, Hubert J.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Miyaoka, Robert S. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Bowen, Stephen R. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    To design and apply a framework for predicting symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in patients undergoing thoracic radiation, using both pretreatment anatomic and perfused lung dose-volume parameters. Radiation treatment planning CT scans were coregistered with pretreatment [{sup 99m}Tc]MAA perfusion SPECT/CT scans of 20 patients who underwent definitive thoracic radiation. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was defined as grade ≥ 2 (CTCAE v4 grading system). Anatomic lung dose-volume parameters were collected from the treatment planning scans. Perfusion dose-volume parameters were calculated from pretreatment SPECT/CT scans. Equivalent doses in 2 Gy per fraction were calculated in the lung to account for differences in treatment regimens and spatial variations in lung dose (EQD2{sub lung}). Anatomic lung dosimetric parameters (MLD) and functional lung dosimetric parameters (pMLD{sub 70%}) were identified as candidate predictors of grade ≥ 2 radiation pneumonitis (AUC > 0.93, p < 0.01). Pairing of an anatomic and functional dosimetric parameter (e.g., MLD and pMLD{sub 70%}) may further improve prediction accuracy. Not all individuals with high anatomic lung dose (MLD > 13.6 GyEQD2{sub lung}, 19.3 Gy for patients receiving 60 Gy in 30 fractions) developed radiation pneumonitis, but all individuals who also had high mean dose to perfused lung (pMLD{sub 70%} > 13.3 GyEQD2) developed radiation pneumonitis. The preliminary application of this framework revealed differences between anatomic and perfused lung dosimetry in this limited patient cohort. The addition of perfused lung parameters may help risk stratify patients for radiation pneumonitis, especially in treatment plans with high anatomic mean lung dose. Further investigations are warranted. (orig.) [German] Erstellung und Anwendung eines Rahmenwerks zur Vorhersage symptomatischer Strahlenpneumonitis bei Patienten mit einer Thorax-Bestrahlung anhand anatomischer und perfundierter Lungendosis-Volumen-Parameter in der

  11. Pre-radiotherapy FDG PET predicts radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, Richard; Guerrero, Thomas; Pham, Ngoc; Ansari, Sobiya; Meshkov, Dmitriy; Castillo, Sarah; Li, Min; Olanrewaju, Adenike; Hobbs, Brian; Castillo, Edward

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective analysis is performed to determine if pre-treatment [ 18 F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) image derived parameters can predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) clinical symptoms in lung cancer patients. We retrospectively studied 100 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who underwent FDG PET/CT imaging before initiation of radiotherapy (RT). Pneumonitis symptoms were evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv4) from the consensus of 5 clinicians. Using the cumulative distribution of pre-treatment standard uptake values (SUV) within the lungs, the 80th to 95th percentile SUV values (SUV 80 to SUV 95 ) were determined. The effect of pre-RT FDG uptake, dose, patient and treatment characteristics on pulmonary toxicity was studied using multiple logistic regression. The study subjects were treated with 3D conformal RT (n = 23), intensity modulated RT (n = 64), and proton therapy (n = 13). Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that elevated pre-RT lung FDG uptake on staging FDG PET was related to development of RP symptoms after RT. A patient of average age and V 30 with SUV 95 = 1.5 was an estimated 6.9 times more likely to develop grade ≥ 2 radiation pneumonitis when compared to a patient with SUV 95 = 0.5 of the same age and identical V 30 . Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed the area under the curve was 0.78 (95% CI = 0.69 – 0.87). The CT imaging and dosimetry parameters were found to be poor predictors of RP symptoms. The pretreatment pulmonary FDG uptake, as quantified by the SUV 95 , predicted symptoms of RP in this study. Elevation in this pre-treatment biomarker identifies a patient group at high risk for post-treatment symptomatic RP

  12. Combining multiple models to generate consensus: Application to radiation-induced pneumonitis prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Shiva K.; Chen Shifeng; Deasy, Joseph O.; Zhou Sumin; Yin Fangfang; Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The fusion of predictions from disparate models has been used in several fields to obtain a more realistic and robust estimate of the ''ground truth'' by allowing the models to reinforce each other when consensus exists, or, conversely, negate each other when there is no consensus. Fusion has been shown to be most effective when the models have some complementary strengths arising from different approaches. In this work, we fuse the results from four common but methodologically different nonlinear multivariate models (Decision Trees, Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, Self-Organizing Maps) that were trained to predict radiation-induced pneumonitis risk on a database of 219 lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (34 with Grade 2+ postradiotherapy pneumonitis). Each model independently incorporated a small number of features from the available set of dose and nondose patient variables to predict pneumonitis; no two models had all features in common. Fusion was achieved by simple averaging of the predictions for each patient from all four models. Since a model's prediction for a patient can be dependent on the patient training set used to build the model, the average of several different predictions from each model was used in the fusion (predictions were made by repeatedly testing each patient with a model built from different cross-validation training sets that excluded the patient being tested). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the fused cross-validated results was 0.79, with lower variance than the individual component models. From the fusion, five features were extracted as the consensus among all four models in predicting radiation pneumonitis. Arranged in order of importance, the features are (1) chemotherapy; (2) equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for exponent a=1.2 to 3; (3) EUD for a=0.5 to 1.2, lung volume receiving >20-30 Gy; (4) female sex; and (5) squamous cell histology. To facilitate

  13. Prevention of radiation pneumonitis from inhaled 144Ce by lung lavage in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Mauderly, J.L.; Boecker, B.B.; Hahn, F.F.; McClellan, R.O.

    1975-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate bronchopulmonary lavage and chelation therapy as a treatment method to prevent the development of radiation pneumonitis after inhalation of a radioactive aerosol. Twelve beagle dogs were exposed to an aerosol of cerium-144 in fused clay particles resulting in initial lung burdens from 47 to 64 μCi of 144 Ce per kg of body weight. Eight of the dogs were treated with a series of 10 bronchopulmonary lavages and 10 intravenous injections of calcium diethylenetriamine pentaacetate acid during the first 56 days after exposure to remove the deposited 144 Ce; the remaining 4 exposed dogs received no treatment. An additional 4 dogs were exposed to stable cerium and were given the course of treatment as an additional control group. Three of the 4 untreated dogs and 2 of the 8 treated dogs died 171 to 246 days after exposure with radiation pneumonitis or pulmonary fibrosis, or both. All but one of the remaining dogs were alive and apparently in good clinical health 550 days after exposure; the one dog had radiographic indications of pulmonary fibrosis by 365 days after exposure. The relative distribution of 144 Ce in the lungs and other major organs was similar in the treated and untreated dogs that died

  14. Lipid peroxidation in radiation pneumonitis in mouse lung and its preventation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Akihisa; Tsujino, Kayoko; Kono, Michio

    1998-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation of the lung in irradiated C57BL6J mice was analyzed by gas chromatography. Among six major fatty acids in the mouse lung tissue, the amounts of two unsaturated fatty acids, arachidonic acid and DHA reduced one day after irradiation, and then recovered up to the level of in the control group four weeks after irradiation. In contrast, the amounts of stearic and palmitic acid did not change significantly. The mice fed with vitamin E-enriched food showed no significant changes of fatty acids which were compatible with pathophysiological findings 4 weeks after irradiation. Reduction of both arachidonic acid and DHA following lipid peroxidation in lung tissue, was assumed to play an important role in development of radiation pneumonitis. Vitamin E seems to enable to prevent or reduce the occurrence and progression of radiation pneumonitis, but as a radical scavenger, it may also weaken the anti-tumor growth effect of low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation as photon. (author)

  15. IL-6 is a potential marker for radiation pneumonitis: a prospective clinical study of circulating cytokines in predicting radiation pulmonary injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yuhchyau; Rubin, Philip; McDonald, Sandra; Finkelstein, Jacob; Smudzin, Therese; Hernady, Eric; Williams, Jacqueline

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The use of radiotherapy in eradicating thoracic malignancy is limited by the normal lung tissue tolerance to ionizing radiation. Subacute and late radiation pulmonary toxicity manifests as radiation pneumonitis and ultimately lung fibrosis. Recently, the addition of chemotherapy or a biologic response modifier to radiation has become the standard therapy for inoperable lung cancer. The radiosensitizing effect of these agents is associated with an increased risk of radiation pulmonary injury and treatment related mortality. The search for a serum marker for predicting radiation pulmonary injury will help us understand the mechanism leading to such events and find possible interventions to prevent the adverse outcome. Unpublished data from our laboratory suggested that following a single dose of radiation, there was a dose-related elevation in IL-6 protein levels in the lung of radiation fibrosis prone mice. Based on this information, a prospective clinical study of circulating cytokine levels and its application to predict radiation induced pulmonary injury was conducted at University of Rochester. Preliminary results revealed promising information in identifying a circulating cytokine as a predictor for radiation pneumonitis. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients receiving thoracic irradiation for primary thoracic malignancy were registered in the study. Radiation pneumonitis was determined by subjective respiratory symptoms assessed according to RTOG morbidity scoring criteria. Pretreatment and serial post-therapy chest X-ray, chest CT scan and pulmonary function tests were obtained. Radiation fibrosis was determined by radiographic changes in irradiated normal lung using a scoring system which quantified the extent of loss of air content, degree of opacification, anatomic extent of involvement, air bronchogram, pleural thickening, or effusion. Plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), transforming growth factor

  16. An onion farmer with a case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Yamasaki, Akira; Funaki, Yoshihiro; Harada, Tomoya; Okazaki, Ryota; Hasegawa, Yasuyuki; Sueda, Yuriko; Fukushima, Takehito; Morita, Masahito; Yamamoto, Akihiro; Kodani, Masahiro; Shimizu, Eiji

    2018-01-01

    A 62-year old man was admitted to our hospital with a 2-week complaint of a dry cough, general fatigue, and dyspnea on effort. He has been an onion farmer for several years and developed these symptoms after cleaning up onion peels with air compressors. A chest roentgenogram and computed tomography showed a ground glass shadow in the bilateral upper lung field. Cellular analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed elevated total cell numbers and lymphocytes. Transbronchial lung biopsies revealed a non-caseating granuloma with both epithelioid cells and Langhans giant cells. After the admission, these symptoms and radiological findings gradually improved without any treatment. Then, a returning-home provocation test was positive only when he worked cleaning up onion peels with air compressors. A. niger was cultured from his workplace and black mold from the onion peels. The precipitation antibody and the antigen were both positive for Aspergillus . Therefore, we diagnosed this case as hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by inhalation of A. niger . Although hypersensitivity pneumonia caused by A. niger is rare, physicians should aware the possibility of this condition in farmers because A niger is ubiquitously present in several vegetables and fruits.

  17. Effects of tobacco-smoke on radiation-induced pneumonitis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, K.; Henriksson, R.; Cai, Y.-Q.; Hellstroem, S.; Bjermer, L.; Hoernqvist Bylunds, S.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the effect of exposure to tobacco smoke (TS) on the development of irradiation-induced pneumonitis in rats, five groups of animals were investigated including controls (C), tobacco smoke exposed (S), irradiated (RNS) and irradiated and tobacco smoke exposed (RS). An additional group (RS/NS) was exposed to tobacco before irradiation but not afterwards. Results indicate that smoking suppresses the radiation-induced inflammation but to a lesser degree affects the radiation-induced increase in membrane permeability as reflected by increased protein levels in BAL. Moreover, the marked effects on the numbers of mast cells and neutrophils in the RS group may indicate that these cells play an important role in the mechanism by which tobacco smoke modulates the effects of irradiation. When exposure to tobacco smoke was terminated immediately after irradiation (RS/NS), the inflammatory response was unaffected. (author)

  18. Acute radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis in Japanese breast cancer patients with whole breast hypofractionated radiotherapy compared to conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osako, Tomo; Oguchi, Masahiko; Kumada, Madoka; Nemoto, Keiko; Iwase, Takuji; Yamashita, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate acute morbidity, radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis, of Japanese patients treated with whole breast hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS), compared to conventional RT. Japanese patients who received whole breast RT after BCS between October 2003 and September 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had selected the conventional or hypofractionated schedule received whole breast irradiation of 50 Gy in 25 fractions plus boost or 40 Gy in 16 fractions plus boost. Radiation dermatitis and symptomatic pneumonitis were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Of 443 consecutive patients, 377 (85%) received the conventional schedule and 66 (15%) received the hypofractionated schedule. Of patients treated with the conventional schedule, Grade 0, 1, 2 and 3 radiation dermatitis were observed in 16 (4%), 278 (74%), 77 (20%) and 6 (2%), respectively. Of patients treated with the hypofractionated schedule, Grade 0, 1, 2 and 3 dermatitis were observed in 11 (17%), 49 (74%), 5 (8%) and 1 (1%), respectively. Grade 2-3 dermatitis by the hypofractionated schedule (9%) was observed less frequently than that by the conventional schedule (22%) (chi-square test; P=0.016). Moreover, of patients treated with the conventional schedule, 4 (1%) had Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis. No patient treated with the hypofractionated schedule had symptomatic pneumonitis. Radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis in Japanese patients treated with the hypofractionated schedule is acceptable. Especially, radiation dermatitis by the hypofractionated schedule is milder than that by the conventional schedule. (author)

  19. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Zhang Xu; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T 10 and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V 10 -V 40 and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 ≤65% before SABR (P=.012), V 20 ≥30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 ≤65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V 20 ≥30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

  20. A systemic administration of liposomal curcumin inhibits radiation pneumonitis and sensitizes lung carcinoma to radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi HS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hua-shan Shi1,* Xiang Gao,1,3,* Dan Li,1,* Qiong-wen Zhang,1 Yong-sheng Wang,2 Yu Zheng,1 Lu-Lu Cai,1 Ren-ming Zhong,2 Ao Rui,1 Zhi-yong Li,1 Hao Zheng,1 Xian-cheng Chen,1 Li-juan Chen,11State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medicine School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China; 2State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Department of Thoracic Oncology, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China; 3Deparment of Pathophysiology, College of Preclinical and Forensic Medical Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Radiation pneumonitis (RP is an important dose-limiting toxicity during thoracic radiotherapy. Previous investigations have shown that curcumin is used for the treatment of inflammatory conditions and cancer, suggesting that curcumin may prevent RP and sensitize cancer cells to irradiation. However, the clinical advancement of curcumin is limited by its poor water solubility and low bioavailability after oral administration. Here, a water-soluble liposomal curcumin system was developed to investigate its prevention and sensitizing effects by an intravenous administration manner in mice models. The results showed that liposomal curcumin inhibited nuclear factor-κB pathway and downregulated inflammatory factors including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, and transforming growth factor-β induced by thoracic irradiation. Furthermore, the combined treatment with liposomal curcumin and radiotherapy increased intratumoral apoptosis and microvessel responses to irradiation in vivo. The significantly enhanced inhibition of tumor growth also was observed in a murine lung carcinoma (LL/2 model. There were no obvious toxicities observed in mice. The current results indicate that liposomal curcumin can effectively

  1. An intractable empyema proceeded from radiation pneumonitis after operation of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuya, Daiki; Gotoh, Masashi; Nakashima, Takashi; Okamoto, Taku; Liu, Dage; Ishikawa, Shinya; Yamamoto, Yasumichi; Huang, Cheng-Long; Yokomise, Hiroyasu

    2005-01-01

    A 54-year-old man underwent left upper lobectomy with c-stage IIIA lung squamous cell carcinoma after concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Radiation pneumonitis focusing on the residual left S 6 appeared after operation. Following steroid pulse treatment, the pneumonitic focus was cavitated and proceeded to pulmonary abscess. Although chest drainage was performed, control of the pulmonary fistula was poor, so an operation was performed. Pulmonary decortication and pleurodesis were performed, but failed to control the fistula and infection. Finally, thoracoplasty, omentoplasty and free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap were filled in intrathorasic to manage the fistula. In this case of operation following concurrent chemo-radiotherapy, the original recovery power declined. We therefore conclude this was an intractable case of empyema. (author)

  2. A case of radiation pneumonitis with eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Seiko; Baba, Kenji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Daisuke; Yagi, Takeo; Hattori, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Etsuro

    2008-01-01

    A 78-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for irradiation therapy of non-resectable primary lung squamous cell carcinoma of the right middle lobe (T3N2M0). The Linac irradiation through opposing 2 gates (2 Gy per day and 60 Gy in total) was performed to the affected area including the metastatic right hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. One week after completing the irradiation therapy, fever developed with infiltrates in the area from the right middle lobe to the right lower lobe, which did not necessarily coincide with the irradiated area Antibiotic therapies were not effective. Both the serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) level and eosinophil count in the peripheral blood increased. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at the right B 8 , and differential cell counts of the lavage fluid were macrophages, 17%; lymphocytes, 60%; neutrophils, 5%; and eosinophils, 18%. No significant organisms were obtained by culture of the lavage fluid. The %VC and D LCO /VA became lower than before the irradiation therapy. Thus, the patient was given a diagnosis of radiation pneumonitis. Treatment with 40 mg/day oral prednisolone was commenced with a stepwise dose-reduction (5 mg every two weeks) until reaching the maintenance dose of 15 mg/day. The serum LDH level and blood eosinophil count recovered promptly to the normal range. The pulmonary infiltrates and the lung functions substantially improved. There have been few reports of radiation pneumonitis in which eosinophil counts increased in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after irradiation therapy. In the present case report, the possible mechanisms for the irradiation-induced eosinophilia were also reviewed. (author)

  3. Early Graphical Appearance of Radiation Pneumonitis Correlates With the Severity of Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) in Patients With Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Atsuya; Ohashi, Toshio; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate factors associated with Grade ≥3 radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 128 patients with 133 lung tumors treated with SBRT. RP was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Univariate analyses were used to identify predictive factors for RP. Results: The median follow-up period after SBRT was 12 months (range, 5-45 months). Incidences of Grades 0, 1, 2, and 3 RP were 27%, 52%, 16%, and 5%, respectively. No patients suffered Grade 4 or 5 RP. For all patients with Grade 2 or 3, symptoms occurred either simultaneously with or subsequent to graphical appearances. The latent period was the only significant factor associated with Grade ≥3 RP (p < 0.01). A latent period of 1 or 2 months indicated a 40% (6/15) risk for Grade 3. However, the risk for Grade 3 was 1.2% (1/82) 3 months after SBRT. No pretreatment clinical or dosimetric factors were significantly associated with Grade ≥3 RP. However, 4 of 7 patients with Grade 3 RP had severe pulmonary comorbidities. Conclusion: Only the latency period was a significant factor in the development of RP. No pretreatment clinical or dosimetric factors were significantly associated with Grade ≥3 RP. Patients, especially those with severe pulmonary comorbidities, should be carefully observed for the graphical appearance of RP within a few months during the follow-up period after SBRT.

  4. Preliminary analysis of the risk factors for radiation pneumonitis in patients with non- small-cell lung cancer treated with concurrent erlotinib and thoracic radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang H

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hongqing Zhuang,* Hailing Hou,* Zhiyong Yuan, Jun Wang, Qingsong Pang, Lujun Zhao, Ping WangDepartment of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, and Tianjin Lung Cancer Center, Tianjin, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate radiation pneumonitis and its associated risk factors in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with concurrent erlotinib and thoracic radiotherapy.Materials and methods: We conducted an analysis of patients with nonoperable stage IIIA–IV non-small-cell lung cancer who were treated with concurrent thoracic radiotherapy and erlotinib (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00973310. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 grading system was applied to evaluate the incidence of radiation pneumonitis. The lung dosimetric parameters were recorded in accordance with the treatment plan, and the study endpoint was radiation pneumonitis at grade 2 or more.Results: Among the 24 selected clinical cases, nine were identified with radiation pneumonitis of grade 2 or above (37.5%. This included four cases with grade 2 (16.7%, two cases with grade 3 (8.3%, and three cases with grade 5 (12.5%. The results showed that the planning target volume was a significant factor affecting the incidence of radiation pneumonitis. All lung dosimetric parameters exhibited statistically significant differences between patients with pneumonitis and patients without pneumonitis. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis showed that all lung dosimetric parameters were useful in predicting the incidence of radiation pneumonitis. In addition, the threshold values of V5, V10, V15, V20, V30, and mean lung dose were >4%, >29%, >27%, >22%, >17% and >1,027 cGy, respectively.Conclusion: Special attention

  5. Proton therapy radiation pneumonitis local dose–response in esophagus cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeverria, Alfredo E.; McCurdy, Matthew; Castillo, Richard; Bernard, Vincent; Ramos, Natalia Velez; Buckley, William; Castillo, Edward; Liu, Ping; Martinez, Josue; Guerrero, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study quantifies pulmonary radiation toxicity in patients who received proton therapy for esophagus cancer. Materials/methods: We retrospectively studied 100 esophagus cancer patients treated with proton therapy. The linearity of the enhanced FDG uptake vs. proton dose was evaluated using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Pneumonitis symptoms (RP) were assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv4). The interaction of the imaging response with dosimetric parameters and symptoms was evaluated. Results: The RP scores were: 0 grade 4/5, 7 grade 3, 20 grade 2, 37 grade 1, and 36 grade 0. Each dosimetric parameter was significantly higher for the symptomatic group. The AIC winning models were 30 linear, 52 linear quadratic, and 18 linear logarithmic. There was no significant difference in the linear coefficient between models. The slope of the FDG vs. proton dose response was 0.022 for the symptomatic and 0.012 for the asymptomatic (p = 0.014). Combining dosimetric parameters with the slope did not improve the sensitivity or accuracy in identifying symptomatic cases. Conclusions: The proton radiation dose response on FDG PET/CT imaging exhibited a predominantly linear dose response on modeling. Symptomatic patients had a higher dose response slope

  6. Factors predicting radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer patients: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rancati, T.; Ceresoli, G.L.; Gagliardi, G.; Schipani, S.; Cattaneo, G.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical and lung dose-volume histogram based factors as predictors of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in lung cancer patients (PTs) treated with thoracic irradiation. Methods and materials: Records of all lung cancer PTs irradiated at our Institution between 1994 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. Eighty-four PTs with small or non-small-cell lung cancer, irradiated at >40 Gy, with full 3D dosimetry data and a follow-up time of >6 months from start of treatment, were analysed for RP. Pneumonitis was scored on the basis of SWOG toxicity criteria and was considered a complication when grade≥II. The following clinical parameters were considered: gender, age, surgery, chemotherapy agents, presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), performance status. Dosimetric factors including prescribed dose (D iso ), presence of final conformal boost, mean lung dose (D mean ), % of lung receiving ≥20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 Gy (respectively V 20 →V 45 ), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values were analysed. DVHs data and NTCP values were collected for both lungs considered as a paired organ. Median and quartile values were taken as cut-off for statistical analysis. Factors that influenced RP were assessed by univariate (log-rank) and multivariate analyses (Cox hazard model). Results: There were 14 PTs (16.6%) who had ≥grade II pulmonary toxicity. In the entire population, the univariate analysis revealed that many dosimetric parameters (D iso , V 20 , V 30 , V 40 , V 45 ) were significantly associated with RP. No significant correlation was found between the incidence of RP and D mean or NTCP values. Multivariate analysis revealed that the use of mitomycin (MMC) (P=0.005) and the presence of COPD (P=0.026) were the most important risk factor for RP. In the group without COPD (55 PTs, seven RP) a few dosimetric factors (D mean , V 20 , V 45 ) and NTCP values (all models) were associated with RP in the univariate analysis

  7. Incidence of radiation pneumonitis after thoracic irradiation: Dose-volume correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schallenkamp, John M.; Miller, Robert C.; Brinkmann, Debra H.; Foote, Tyler; Garces, Yolanda I.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To define clinical and dosimetric parameters correlated with the risk of clinically relevant radiation pneumonitis (RP) after thoracic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records of consecutive patients treated with definitive thoracic radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of RP of Grade 2 or greater by the Common Toxicity Criteria. Dose-volume histograms using total lung volume (TL) and TL minus gross tumor volume (TL-G) were created with and without heterogeneity corrections. Mean lung dose (MLD), effective lung volume (V eff ), and percentage of TL or TL-G receiving greater than or equal to 10, 13, 15, 20, and 30 Gy (V10-V30, respectively) were analyzed by logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to estimate RP predictive values. Results: Twelve cases of RP were identified in 92 eligible patients. Mean lung dose, V10, V13, V15, V20, and V eff were significantly correlated to RP. Combinations of MLD, V eff , V20, and V30 lost significance using TL-G and heterogeneity corrections. Receiver operating characteristic analysis determined V10 and V13 as the best predictors of RP risk, with a decrease in predictive value above those volumes. Conclusions: Intrathoracic radiotherapy should be planned with caution when using radiotherapy techniques delivering doses of 10 to 15 Gy to large lung volumes

  8. Risk of radiation-induced pneumonitis after helical and static-port tomotherapy in lung cancer patients and experimental rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xianglan; Shin, You Keun; Zheng, Zhenlong; Zhu, Lianhua; Lee, Ik Jae

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is one of the major non-operative treatment modalities for treating lung cancer. Tomotherapy is an advanced type of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in which radiation may be delivered in a helical fashion. However, unexpected pneumonitis may occur in patients treated with tomotherapy, especially in combination with chemotherapy, as a result of extensive low-dose radiation of large lung volumes. The aim of our study was to investigate the risk of radiation-induced pneumonitis after helical-mode and static-mode tomotherapy in patients with lung cancer and in an animal model. A total of 63 patients with primary lung cancer who were treated with static or helical tomotherapy with or without concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) were analyzed. Additionally, rats with radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity, which was induced by the application of helical or static tomography with or without CCRT, were evaluated. Helical-mode tomotherapy resulted in a significantly higher rate of late radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer patients than static-mode tomotherapy when evaluated by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) scoring system. In the animal model, helical tomotherapy alone induced significantly higher expression of interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in lung specimens, especially on the untreated side, compared to static tomotherapy alone. Additionally, rats treated with helical tomotherapy and CCRT demonstrated significantly higher expression of inflammatory cytokines compared to those treated with static tomotherapy and CCRT. Rat models treated with tomotherapy with or without CCRT could present similar patterns of pulmonary toxicity to those shown in lung cancer patients. The models can be used in further investigations of radiation induced pulmonary toxicity

  9. A prospective study of whether radiation pneumonitis is influenced by low-dose irradiated lung volume in primary lung cancer with chronic pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibe, Yuzuru; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Masuda, Noriyuki; Yoshimura, Hirokuni

    2007-01-01

    The current study prospectively investigated the optimal dose-volume condition in cases of lung cancer with chronic pulmonary disease compared to those without chronic pulmonary disease. Cases of primary lung cancer treated with intended curative radiation therapy were registered in the current study. Their fraction size was limited to 2-3 Gy, so-called standard fractionation. They were prescribed a total dose of 60 Gy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; n=17) and a total dose of 54 Gy for small cell lung cancer (SCLC; n=4). Of the 21 patients enrolled in this study, 4 had chronic pulmonary disease (study arm), and the others had no chronic pulmonary disease (control arm). Seven received chemotherapy. Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis occurred in 5. Of the four patients in the study arm, two (50%) experienced symptomatic radiation pneumonitis; only 3 of the 17 patients in the control arm (17.6%) experienced symptomatic radiation pneumonitis. Furthermore, the median V 20 of patients who experienced symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in the study arm was 14%, which was higher than that of patients with no symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in the study arm, 5.8%. On the other hand, in the control arm, the median V 20 of patients with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis was 14.2%, about the same as that of patients with no symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in the control arm, 15.1%. The current study suggested that, as much as 15% of V 20 , might play an important role in cases of lung cancer with chronic pulmonary disease. (author)

  10. Using machine learning to predict radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Solberg, Timothy D.; Heskel, Marina; Ungar, Lyle; Simone, Charles B., II

    2016-08-01

    To develop a patient-specific ‘big data’ clinical decision tool to predict pneumonitis in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 61 features were recorded for 201 consecutive patients with stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT, in whom 8 (4.0%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Pneumonitis thresholds were found for each feature individually using decision stumps. The performance of three different algorithms (Decision Trees, Random Forests, RUSBoost) was evaluated. Learning curves were developed and the training error analyzed and compared to the testing error in order to evaluate the factors needed to obtain a cross-validated error smaller than 0.1. These included the addition of new features, increasing the complexity of the algorithm and enlarging the sample size and number of events. In the univariate analysis, the most important feature selected was the diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO adj%). On multivariate analysis, the three most important features selected were the dose to 15 cc of the heart, dose to 4 cc of the trachea or bronchus, and race. Higher accuracy could be achieved if the RUSBoost algorithm was used with regularization. To predict radiation pneumonitis within an error smaller than 10%, we estimate that a sample size of 800 patients is required. Clinically relevant thresholds that put patients at risk of developing radiation pneumonitis were determined in a cohort of 201 stage I NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. The consistency of these thresholds can provide radiation oncologists with an estimate of their reliability and may inform treatment planning and patient counseling. The accuracy of the classification is limited by the number of patients in the study and not by the features gathered or the complexity of the algorithm.

  11. Does Bleomycin Lung Toxicity Increase the Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis in Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou Yehia, Zeinab [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mikhaeel, George N. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Guy' s & St Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Smith, Grace; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Milgrom, Sarah A.; Tang, Chad; Jiang, Wen [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fanale, Michelle A.; Oki, Yasuhiro [Department of Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shank, JoAnn H.; Horace, Trisha; Reddy, Jay [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Akhtari, Mani [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Medical Branch Hospitals, Galveston, Texas (United States); Gunther, Jillian R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Suki, Tina [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Turner, Shryll [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mawlawi, Osama [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dabaja, Bouthaina S., E-mail: bdabaja@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: Bleomycin pulmonary toxicity (BPT) is a well-known complication of treatment in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). We undertook the present study to investigate the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in the setting of BPT and to determine the need for delay or omission of radiation therapy (RT) in these patients. Methods and Materials: We identified 123 HL patients treated with ABVD (Adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) followed by RT to the chest from January 2009 to December 2014. The medical records were reviewed for clinical, pathologic, and treatment information and toxicities. Our primary outcome was RP of any grade. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the association of BPT, baseline patient characteristics, and treatment variables with the incidence of RP. Results: A total of 123 patients were included, of whom 99 (80%) received consolidation intensity modulated RT after ABVD treatment. We identified 31 patients (25.2%) with BPT after frontline ABVD. Seventeen patients (13.8%) developed RP a median of 8 weeks (range 1-39) after RT completion. BPT did not correlate with the risk of developing RP (P=.36). We evaluated the RP outcomes with respect to the bleomycin to RT interval (≤6 weeks vs >6 weeks), and we found that this interval did not predict for RP risk (P=.60). Dosimetric parameters such as the volume covered by 5 Gy and the mean lung dose were analyzed. A volume covered by 5 Gy of >55% and mean lung dose >13.5 Gy increased the risk of RP by 1.14-fold (P=.002) and 4.24-fold (P=.007), respectively. Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that BPT does not increase the risk of developing RP. Furthermore, RT initiation does not need to be delayed after chemotherapy, except to allow for the completion of steroid therapy or clinical recovery from BPT.

  12. Does Bleomycin Lung Toxicity Increase the Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis in Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Yehia, Zeinab; Mikhaeel, George N.; Smith, Grace; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Milgrom, Sarah A.; Tang, Chad; Jiang, Wen; Fanale, Michelle A.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Shank, JoAnn H.; Horace, Trisha; Reddy, Jay; Akhtari, Mani; Gunther, Jillian R.; Suki, Tina; Allen, Pamela K.; Turner, Shryll; Mawlawi, Osama; Dabaja, Bouthaina S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Bleomycin pulmonary toxicity (BPT) is a well-known complication of treatment in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). We undertook the present study to investigate the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in the setting of BPT and to determine the need for delay or omission of radiation therapy (RT) in these patients. Methods and Materials: We identified 123 HL patients treated with ABVD (Adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) followed by RT to the chest from January 2009 to December 2014. The medical records were reviewed for clinical, pathologic, and treatment information and toxicities. Our primary outcome was RP of any grade. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the association of BPT, baseline patient characteristics, and treatment variables with the incidence of RP. Results: A total of 123 patients were included, of whom 99 (80%) received consolidation intensity modulated RT after ABVD treatment. We identified 31 patients (25.2%) with BPT after frontline ABVD. Seventeen patients (13.8%) developed RP a median of 8 weeks (range 1-39) after RT completion. BPT did not correlate with the risk of developing RP (P=.36). We evaluated the RP outcomes with respect to the bleomycin to RT interval (≤6 weeks vs >6 weeks), and we found that this interval did not predict for RP risk (P=.60). Dosimetric parameters such as the volume covered by 5 Gy and the mean lung dose were analyzed. A volume covered by 5 Gy of >55% and mean lung dose >13.5 Gy increased the risk of RP by 1.14-fold (P=.002) and 4.24-fold (P=.007), respectively. Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that BPT does not increase the risk of developing RP. Furthermore, RT initiation does not need to be delayed after chemotherapy, except to allow for the completion of steroid therapy or clinical recovery from BPT.

  13. Incorporating Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms Into the Lyman Model to Improve Prediction of Radiation Pneumonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Susan L., E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li Minghuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China); Xu Ting; Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yuan Xianglin [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Yu Jinming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liu Zhensheng; Yin Ming; Guan Xiaoxiang; Wang Lie; Wei Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Martel, Mary [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes associated with DNA repair, cell cycle, transforming growth factor-{beta}, tumor necrosis factor and receptor, folic acid metabolism, and angiogenesis can significantly improve the fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation pneumonitis (RP) risk among patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Sixteen SNPs from 10 different genes (XRCC1, XRCC3, APEX1, MDM2, TGF{beta}, TNF{alpha}, TNFR, MTHFR, MTRR, and VEGF) were genotyped in 141 NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy. The LKB model was used to estimate the risk of severe (grade {>=}3) RP as a function of mean lung dose (MLD), with SNPs and patient smoking status incorporated into the model as dose-modifying factors. Multivariate analyses were performed by adding significant factors to the MLD model in a forward stepwise procedure, with significance assessed using the likelihood-ratio test. Bootstrap analyses were used to assess the reproducibility of results under variations in the data. Results: Five SNPs were selected for inclusion in the multivariate NTCP model based on MLD alone. SNPs associated with an increased risk of severe RP were in genes for TGF{beta}, VEGF, TNF{alpha}, XRCC1 and APEX1. With smoking status included in the multivariate model, the SNPs significantly associated with increased risk of RP were in genes for TGF{beta}, VEGF, and XRCC3. Bootstrap analyses selected a median of 4 SNPs per model fit, with the 6 genes listed above selected most often. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that SNPs can significantly improve the predictive ability of the Lyman MLD model. With a small number of SNPs, it was possible to distinguish cohorts with >50% risk vs <10% risk of RP when they were exposed to high MLDs.

  14. ATM Polymorphisms Are Associated With Risk of Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Yang Ming; Bi Nan; Fang Mingjing; Sun Tong; Ji Wei; Tan Wen; Zhao Lujun; Yu Dianke; Lin Dongxin; Wang Luhua

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Since the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein plays crucial roles in repair of double-stranded DNA breaks, control of cell cycle checkpoints, and radiosensitivity, we hypothesized that variations in this gene might be associated with radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 253 lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation between 2004 and 2006 were included in this study. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to grade RP. Five haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ATM gene were genotyped using DNA from blood lymphocytes. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of RP for genotypes were computed by the Cox model, adjusted for clinical factors. The function of the ATM SNP associated with RP was examined by biochemical assays. Results: During the median 22-month follow-up, 44 (17.4%) patients developed grade ≥ 2 RP. In multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for other clinical predictors, we found two ATM variants were independently associated with increased RP risk. They were an 111G > A) polymorphism (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.07-5.80) and an ATM 126713G > A polymorphism (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.16-5.28). Furthermore, genotype-dependent differences in ATM expression were demonstrated both in cell lines (p < 0.001) and in individual lung tissue samples (p = 0.003), which supported the results of the association study. Conclusions: Genetic polymorphisms of ATM are significantly associated with RP risk. These variants might exert their effect through regulation of ATM expression and serve as independent biomarkers for prediction of RP in patients treated with thoracic radiotherapy.

  15. TU-CD-BRB-01: Normal Lung CT Texture Features Improve Predictive Models for Radiation Pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafft, S; Briere, T; Court, L; Martel, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Existing normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for radiation pneumonitis (RP) traditionally rely on dosimetric and clinical data but are limited in terms of performance and generalizability. Extraction of pre-treatment image features provides a potential new category of data that can improve NTCP models for RP. We consider quantitative measures of total lung CT intensity and texture in a framework for prediction of RP. Methods: Available clinical and dosimetric data was collected for 198 NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy. Intensity- and texture-based image features were extracted from the T50 phase of the 4D-CT acquired for treatment planning. A total of 3888 features (15 clinical, 175 dosimetric, and 3698 image features) were gathered and considered candidate predictors for modeling of RP grade≥3. A baseline logistic regression model with mean lung dose (MLD) was first considered. Additionally, a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) logistic regression was applied to the set of clinical and dosimetric features, and subsequently to the full set of clinical, dosimetric, and image features. Model performance was assessed by comparing area under the curve (AUC). Results: A simple logistic fit of MLD was an inadequate model of the data (AUC∼0.5). Including clinical and dosimetric parameters within the framework of the LASSO resulted in improved performance (AUC=0.648). Analysis of the full cohort of clinical, dosimetric, and image features provided further and significant improvement in model performance (AUC=0.727). Conclusions: To achieve significant gains in predictive modeling of RP, new categories of data should be considered in addition to clinical and dosimetric features. We have successfully incorporated CT image features into a framework for modeling RP and have demonstrated improved predictive performance. Validation and further investigation of CT image features in the context of RP NTCP

  16. The impact of radiation dose and fractionation on the risk factor of radiation pneumonitis on four radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) lung cancer trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, Mack; Pajak, Thomas F; Byhardt, Roger; Graham, Mary L; Asbell, Sucha O; Russell, Anthony H; Fu, Karen K; Urtasun, Raul C; Herskovic, Arnold M; Cox, James D

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To assess the relationship between total dose of radiation delivered, the fractionation scheme used, age, and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) on the risk of moderate to severe (≥ Grade 2) radiation pneumonitis in patients treated with radiotherapy alone for lung cancer on four RTOG Trials. Materials and Methods: Between February of 1984 and April of 1989, 1701 patients with clinically localized (I-IIIb) lung cancer were entered on clinical trials employing radiotherapy alone. Twelve hundred and forty-seven patients were entered on RTOG 8311 or 8407 (phase I/II trials) and 454 patients were entered on RTOG 8321 or 8403 (phase III trials). RTOG 8403 and 8321 patients received once-a-day irradiation to 60 Gy. Patients treated on RTOG 8407 were treated with a concomitant boost technique in a non-randomized fashion to 64.8, 69.6, 74.4 or 79.2 Gy. Patients treated on RTOG 8407 were treated with a concomitant boost technique in a non-randomized fashion to 63 Gy or 70.2 Gy. All patients were assessed for the incidence of Grade 2-5, radiation pneumonitis. One hundred and seven (6%) of patients were either ineligible or canceled (n=60), or were excluded because of incomplete data (n=47). The factors evaluated included total dose of radiation, the fractionation scheme, age and pre-treatment KPS. Patients treated to doses ≥ 72 Gy were considered to have received high doses (72.0 - 81.6 Gy), while the remaining patients treated to doses < 72 Gy (57.6 - 71.9 Gy) were considered to have received standard dose radiation. For the this analysis, information regarding field size and baseline pulmonary function was not available. Results: Age, sex, stage distribution, and the percentage of patients with a KPS ≥90 were similar among the patients treated on these four studies. Patients receiving hyperfractionated radiotherapy to doses ≥ 72 Gy experienced a higher incidence of radiation pneumonitis ≥ Grade 2, than patients treated with standard doses < 72

  17. A neural network model to predict lung radiation-induced pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shifeng; Zhou Sumin; Zhang Junan; Yin Fangfang; Marks, Lawrence B.; Das, Shiva K.

    2007-01-01

    A feed-forward neural network was investigated to predict the occurrence of lung radiation-induced Grade 2+ pneumonitis. The database consisted of 235 patients with lung cancer treated using radiotherapy, of whom 34 were diagnosed with Grade 2+ pneumonitis at follow-up. The network was constructed using an algorithm that alternately grew and pruned it, starting from the smallest possible network, until a satisfactory solution was found. The weights and biases of the network were computed using the error back-propagation approach. Momentum and variable leaning techniques were used to speed convergence. Using the growing/pruning approach, the network selected features from 66 dose and 27 non-dose variables. During network training, the 235 patients were randomly split into ten groups of approximately equal size. Eight groups were used to train the network, one group was used for early stopping training to prevent overfitting, and the remaining group was used as a test to measure the generalization capability of the network (cross-validation). Using this methodology, each of the ten groups was considered, in turn, as the test group (ten-fold cross-validation). For the optimized network constructed with input features selected from dose and non-dose variables, the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve for cross-validated testing was 0.76 (sensitivity: 0.68, specificity: 0.69). For the optimized network constructed with input features selected only from dose variables, the area under the ROC curve for cross-validation was 0.67 (sensitivity: 0.53, specificity: 0.69). The difference between these two areas was statistically significant (p=0.020), indicating that the addition of non-dose features can significantly improve the generalization capability of the network. A network for prospective testing was constructed with input features selected from dose and non-dose variables (all data were used for training). The optimized network architecture

  18. Cancer-causing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.; Holland, J.M.; Storer, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation causes cancer. That simple fact was known by the early 1900s. Further, radiation can induce cancer in almost any tissue in animals and humans. But the cancer-causing dose may vary by 20-fold for different tissues in animals. Such variation is also seen in people who are exposed, typically, to low radiation doses. Hence, the minimum dose that causes human cancer is not known. Thus, the crucial question becomes what factors, including amount of exposure, trigger cancer. Radiation is divided into two types, ionizing and nonionizing. Of the two, ionizing radiation involves higher energies. Thus by ejecting electrons from molecules, charged particles called ion pairs are formed. They are short-lived, and often break down to form highly reactive free radicals, which are molecular fragments containing unpaired electrons. Nonionizing radiation, which involves ultraviolet light and micro- and radiowaves, causes molecular excitations such as vibrations and electron movement, but produces no ions. And though ultraviolet light causes skin cancer, ionizing radiation is, by far, the more potent carcinogen

  19. Clinical validation of the LKB model and parameter sets for predicting radiation-induced pneumonitis from breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Rajala, J; Pitkaenen, M A; Holli, K; Ojala, A T; Hyoedynmaa, S; Jaervenpaeae, Ritva; Lind, Bengt K; Kappas, Constantin

    2006-01-01

    The choice of the appropriate model and parameter set in determining the relation between the incidence of radiation pneumonitis and dose distribution in the lung is of great importance, especially in the case of breast radiotherapy where the observed incidence is fairly low. From our previous study based on 150 breast cancer patients, where the fits of dose-volume models to clinical data were estimated (Tsougos et al 2005 Evaluation of dose-response models and parameters predicting radiation induced pneumonitis using clinical data from breast cancer radiotherapy Phys. Med. Biol. 50 3535-54), one could get the impression that the relative seriality is significantly better than the LKB NTCP model. However, the estimation of the different NTCP models was based on their goodness-of-fit on clinical data, using various sets of published parameters from other groups, and this fact may provisionally justify the results. Hence, we sought to investigate further the LKB model, by applying different published parameter sets for the very same group of patients, in order to be able to compare the results. It was shown that, depending on the parameter set applied, the LKB model is able to predict the incidence of radiation pneumonitis with acceptable accuracy, especially when implemented on a sub-group of patients (120) receiving D-bar-bar vertical bar EUD higher than 8 Gy. In conclusion, the goodness-of-fit of a certain radiobiological model on a given clinical case is closely related to the selection of the proper scoring criteria and parameter set as well as to the compatibility of the clinical case from which the data were derived. (letter to the editor)

  20. Effects of Positioning Uncertainty and Breathing on Dose Delivery and Radiation Pneumonitis Prediction in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Axelsson, Sofie; Hyoedynmaa, Simo; Rajala, Juha; Pitkaenen, Maunu A.; Lind, Bengt K.; Brahme, Anders

    2002-01-01

    The quality of the radiation therapy delivered in the treatment of breast cancer is susceptible to setup errors and organ motion uncertainties. For 60 breast cancer patients (24 resected with negative node involvement, 13 resected with positive node involvement and 23 ablated) who were treated with three different irradiation techniques, these uncertainties are simulated. The delivered dose distributions in the lung were recalculated taking positioning uncertainty and breathing effects into account. In this way the real dose distributions delivered to the patients are more closely determined. The positioning uncertainties in the anteroposterior (AP) and the craniocaudal (CC) directions are approximated by Gaussian distributions based on the fact that setup errors are random. Breathing is assumed to have a linear behavior because of the chest wall movement during expiration and inspiration. The combined frequency distribution of the positioning and breathing distributions is obtained by convolution. By integrating the convolved distribution over a number of intervals, the positions and the weights of the fields that simulate the original 'effective fields' are calculated. Opposed tangential fields are simulated by a set of 5 pairs of fields in the AP direction and 3 such sets in the CC direction. Opposed AP + PA fields are simulated by a set of 3 pairs of fields in the AP direction and 3 such sets in the CC direction. Single frontal fields are simulated by a set of 5 fields. In radiotherapy for breast cancer, the lung is often partly within the irradiated volume even though it is a sensitive organ at risk. The influence of the deviation in the dose delivered by the original and the adjusted treatment plans on the clinical outcome is estimated by using the relative seriality model and the biologically effective uniform dose concept. Radiation pneumonitis is used as the clinical endpoint for lung complications. The adjusted treatment plans show larger lung

  1. Estimated radiation pneumonitis risk after photon versus proton therapy alone or combined with chemotherapy for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Westerly, David C; Aznar, Marianne Camille

    2011-01-01

    Background. Traditionally, radiation therapy plans are optimized without consideration of chemotherapy. Here, we model the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in the presence of a possible interaction between chemotherapy and radiation dose distribution. Material and methods. Three alternative......-radiation combinations could be an interesting indication for selecting patients for proton therapy. It is likely that the IMRT plans would perform better if the CERD was accounted for during optimization, but more clinical data is required to facilitate evidence-based plan optimization in the multi-modality setting....... treatment plans are compared in 18 non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy; the tomotherapy plan, an intensity modulated proton therapy plan (IMPT) and a three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan. All plans are optimized without consideration...

  2. Predictors of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Receiving Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnix, Chelsea C., E-mail: ccpinnix@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Grace L.; Milgrom, Sarah; Osborne, Eleanor M.; Reddy, Jay P.; Akhtari, Mani; Reed, Valerie; Arzu, Isidora; Allen, Pamela K.; Wogan, Christine F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fanale, Michele A.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Turturro, Francesco; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Fowler, Nathan; Westin, Jason; Nastoupil, Loretta; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Rodriguez, M. Alma [Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); and others

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Few studies to date have evaluated factors associated with the development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), especially in patients treated with contemporary radiation techniques. These patients represent a unique group owing to the often large radiation target volumes within the mediastinum and to the potential to receive several lines of chemotherapy that add to pulmonary toxicity for relapsed or refractory disease. Our objective was to determine the incidence and clinical and dosimetric risk factors associated with RP in lymphoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed clinical charts and radiation records of 150 consecutive patients who received mediastinal IMRT for HL and NHL from 2009 through 2013. Clinical and dosimetric predictors associated with RP according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute toxicity criteria were identified in univariate analysis using the Pearson χ{sup 2} test and logistic multivariate regression. Results: Mediastinal radiation was administered as consolidation therapy in 110 patients with newly diagnosed HL or NHL and in 40 patients with relapsed or refractory disease. The overall incidence of RP (RTOG grades 1-3) was 14% in the entire cohort. Risk of RP was increased for patients who received radiation for relapsed or refractory disease (25%) versus those who received consolidation therapy (10%, P=.019). Several dosimetric parameters predicted RP, including mean lung dose of >13.5 Gy, V{sub 20} of >30%, V{sub 15} of >35%, V{sub 10} of >40%, and V{sub 5} of >55%. The likelihood ratio χ{sup 2} value was highest for V{sub 5} >55% (χ{sup 2} = 19.37). Conclusions: In using IMRT to treat mediastinal lymphoma, all dosimetric parameters predicted RP, although small doses to large volumes of lung had the greatest influence. Patients with relapsed

  3. Bayesian network ensemble as a multivariate strategy to predict radiation pneumonitis risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sangkyu; Ybarra, Norma; Jeyaseelan, Krishinima; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam; Faria, Sergio; Kopek, Neil; Brisebois, Pascale; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Robinson, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Prediction of radiation pneumonitis (RP) has been shown to be challenging due to the involvement of a variety of factors including dose–volume metrics and radiosensitivity biomarkers. Some of these factors are highly correlated and might affect prediction results when combined. Bayesian network (BN) provides a probabilistic framework to represent variable dependencies in a directed acyclic graph. The aim of this study is to integrate the BN framework and a systems’ biology approach to detect possible interactions among RP risk factors and exploit these relationships to enhance both the understanding and prediction of RP. Methods: The authors studied 54 nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients who received curative 3D-conformal radiotherapy. Nineteen RP events were observed (common toxicity criteria for adverse events grade 2 or higher). Serum concentration of the following four candidate biomarkers were measured at baseline and midtreatment: alpha-2-macroglobulin, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), transforming growth factor, interleukin-6. Dose-volumetric and clinical parameters were also included as covariates. Feature selection was performed using a Markov blanket approach based on the Koller–Sahami filter. The Markov chain Monte Carlo technique estimated the posterior distribution of BN graphs built from the observed data of the selected variables and causality constraints. RP probability was estimated using a limited number of high posterior graphs (ensemble) and was averaged for the final RP estimate using Bayes’ rule. A resampling method based on bootstrapping was applied to model training and validation in order to control under- and overfit pitfalls. Results: RP prediction power of the BN ensemble approach reached its optimum at a size of 200. The optimized performance of the BN model recorded an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.83, which was significantly higher than multivariate logistic regression (0

  4. Bayesian network ensemble as a multivariate strategy to predict radiation pneumonitis risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangkyu, E-mail: sangkyu.lee@mail.mcgill.ca; Ybarra, Norma; Jeyaseelan, Krishinima; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G1A4 (Canada); Faria, Sergio; Kopek, Neil; Brisebois, Pascale [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, H3G1A4 (Canada); Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Robinson, Clifford [Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Prediction of radiation pneumonitis (RP) has been shown to be challenging due to the involvement of a variety of factors including dose–volume metrics and radiosensitivity biomarkers. Some of these factors are highly correlated and might affect prediction results when combined. Bayesian network (BN) provides a probabilistic framework to represent variable dependencies in a directed acyclic graph. The aim of this study is to integrate the BN framework and a systems’ biology approach to detect possible interactions among RP risk factors and exploit these relationships to enhance both the understanding and prediction of RP. Methods: The authors studied 54 nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients who received curative 3D-conformal radiotherapy. Nineteen RP events were observed (common toxicity criteria for adverse events grade 2 or higher). Serum concentration of the following four candidate biomarkers were measured at baseline and midtreatment: alpha-2-macroglobulin, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), transforming growth factor, interleukin-6. Dose-volumetric and clinical parameters were also included as covariates. Feature selection was performed using a Markov blanket approach based on the Koller–Sahami filter. The Markov chain Monte Carlo technique estimated the posterior distribution of BN graphs built from the observed data of the selected variables and causality constraints. RP probability was estimated using a limited number of high posterior graphs (ensemble) and was averaged for the final RP estimate using Bayes’ rule. A resampling method based on bootstrapping was applied to model training and validation in order to control under- and overfit pitfalls. Results: RP prediction power of the BN ensemble approach reached its optimum at a size of 200. The optimized performance of the BN model recorded an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.83, which was significantly higher than multivariate logistic regression (0

  5. ATM Polymorphisms Predict Severe Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Huihua; Liao, Zhongxing; Liu, Zhensheng; Xu, Ting; Wang, Qiming; Liu, Hongliang; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel; Wang, Li-E; Wei, Qingyi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mediates detection and repair of DNA damage. We investigated associations between ATM polymorphisms and severe radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: We genotyped 3 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ATM (rs1801516 [D1853N/5557G>A], rs189037 [-111G>A] and rs228590) in 362 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who received definitive (chemo)radiation therapy. The cumulative severe RP probabilities by genotypes were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. The associations between severe RP risk and genotypes were assessed by both logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard model with time to event considered. Results: Of 362 patients (72.4% of non-Hispanic whites), 56 (15.5%) experienced grade ≥3 RP. Patients carrying ATM rs189037 AG/GG or rs228590 TT/CT genotypes or rs189037G/rs228590T/rs1801516G (G-T-G) haplotype had a lower risk of severe RP (rs189037: GG/AG vs AA, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.83, P=.009; rs228590: TT/CT vs CC, HR=0.57, 95% CI, 0.33-0.97, P=.036; haplotype: G-T-G vs A-C-G, HR=0.52, 95% CI, 0.35-0.79, P=.002). Such positive findings remained in non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions: ATM polymorphisms may serve as biomarkers for susceptibility to severe RP in non-Hispanic whites. Large prospective studies are required to confirm our findings

  6. Updated assessment of the six-minute walk test as predictor of acute radiation-induced pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Jingfang; Zhang Junan; Zhou Sumin; Das, Shiva; Hollis, Donna R.; Folz, Rodney J.; Wong, Terence Z.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) as a predictor of symptomatic radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods: As part of a prospective trial to study radiation-induced lung injury, 53 patients receiving thoracic radiotherapy (RT) underwent a pre-RT 6MWT, pulmonary function tests (PFTs), and had ≥3-month follow-up for prospective assessment of Grade 2 or worse RP (requiring medications or worse). Dosimetric parameters (e.g., the percentage of lung receiving ≥30 Gy) were extracted from the lung dose-volume histogram. The correlations between the 6MWT and PFT results were assessed using Pearson's correlation. The receiver operating characteristic technique was used in patient subgroups to evaluate the predictive capacities for RP of the dosimetric parameters, 6MWT results, and PFT results, or the combination (using discriminant analysis) of all three metrics. ROCKIT software was used to compare the receiver operating characteristic areas between each predictive model. The association of the decline in 6MWT with the development of RP was evaluated using Fisher's exact test. Results: The pre-RT PFT and 6MWT results correlated weakly (r = 0.44-0.57, p ≤ 0.001), suggesting that they measure somewhat different physiologic functions. Of the 53 patients, 9 (17%) developed RP. The dose-volume histogram-based dosimetric parameters were the best single-metric model for predicting RP (e.g., percentage of lung receiving ≥30 Gy, receiver operating characteristic area 0.73, p = 0.03). Including the PFT or 6MWT results with the percentage of lung receiving ≥30 Gy did not improve the predictions. The predictive abilities of dosimetric-based models improved when the analysis was restricted to those patients whose tumors were not causing regional lung dysfunction. No correlation was found between the decline in the 6MWT result and the RP rate (p = 0.6). Conclusion: Although the PFTs and 6MWT are related to each other, the correlation coefficients

  7. SU-D-16A-03: A Radiation Pneumonitis Dose-Response Model Incorporating Non- Local Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, J; Snyder, K; Zhong, H; Chetty, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dose-response models that can reliably predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) to guide radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer presently do not exist. A model is proposed that incorporates non-local radiationinduced bystander effect (RIBE). Methods: A single sigmoid response function, derived from published data for whole lung irradiation, relates RP probability to cumulative lung damage, regardless of fractionation scheme. Lung damage is assumed to be caused by direct local radiation damage, quantified via the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, and RIBE. Based on published data, RIBE is assumed to be activated when per-fraction dose rises above ∼0.6 Gy, but is constant with dose above that threshold. Integral RIBE damage is assumed proportional to lung volume irradiated above ∼0.6 Gy per fraction. Key model parameters include LQ α and β, and two RIBE parameters: the single-fraction probability δ of damage, and a proportionality parameter κ that relates the potential for RIBE damage to irradiated lung volume. All parameters are tentatively fitted from published data, the RIBE parameters from published RP rates for conventionally fractionated RT (CFRT) and stereotactic body RT (SBRT). Results: The model predicts dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. It provides a tentative explanation for why V20 (33 fractions), V13 (20 fractions) and V5 (<10 fractions) are observed to be correlated with RP. It also provides a plausible explanation for the success of SBRT — RIBE damage increases with the number of fractions, so penalizes CFRT relative to SBRT. Conclusion: The proposed model is relatively simple, extrapolates from published data, plausibly explains several clinical observations, and produces dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. While capable of elaboration, its ability to explain doseresponse experience with different fractionation schemes using a small number of assumptions and parameters is an

  8. SU-D-16A-03: A Radiation Pneumonitis Dose-Response Model Incorporating Non- Local Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, J; Snyder, K; Zhong, H; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Dept. Radiation Oncology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose-response models that can reliably predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) to guide radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer presently do not exist. A model is proposed that incorporates non-local radiationinduced bystander effect (RIBE). Methods: A single sigmoid response function, derived from published data for whole lung irradiation, relates RP probability to cumulative lung damage, regardless of fractionation scheme. Lung damage is assumed to be caused by direct local radiation damage, quantified via the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, and RIBE. Based on published data, RIBE is assumed to be activated when per-fraction dose rises above ∼0.6 Gy, but is constant with dose above that threshold. Integral RIBE damage is assumed proportional to lung volume irradiated above ∼0.6 Gy per fraction. Key model parameters include LQ α and β, and two RIBE parameters: the single-fraction probability δ of damage, and a proportionality parameter κ that relates the potential for RIBE damage to irradiated lung volume. All parameters are tentatively fitted from published data, the RIBE parameters from published RP rates for conventionally fractionated RT (CFRT) and stereotactic body RT (SBRT). Results: The model predicts dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. It provides a tentative explanation for why V20 (33 fractions), V13 (20 fractions) and V5 (<10 fractions) are observed to be correlated with RP. It also provides a plausible explanation for the success of SBRT — RIBE damage increases with the number of fractions, so penalizes CFRT relative to SBRT. Conclusion: The proposed model is relatively simple, extrapolates from published data, plausibly explains several clinical observations, and produces dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. While capable of elaboration, its ability to explain doseresponse experience with different fractionation schemes using a small number of assumptions and parameters is an

  9. Pneumonitis following infradiaphragmatic irradiation in Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zierhut, D.; Flentje, M.; Kalle, A. von; Moeller, P.

    1992-01-01

    A case is reported on radiation pneumonitis in the left costodiaphragmatic sinus 6 weeks following combined chemo- and radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease. Thoracotomy was performed in order to exclude a pulmonal relapse of Hodgkin's disease. Thereby the diagnosis of radiation pneumonitis was histologically proven. The development of pneumonitis after irradiation of the spleen may occur and has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of pulmonal affections. (orig.) [de

  10. Teppanyaki/Hibachi Pneumonitis: An Exotic Cause of Exogenous Lipoid Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Rahaghi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous lipoid pneumonia (ELP is a rare type of inflammatory lung disease caused by aspiration and/or inhalation of fatty substances and characterized by a chronic foreign body-type reaction to intra-alveolar lipid deposits. The usual clinical presentation occurs with insidious onset of nonspecific respiratory symptoms and radiographic findings that can mimic other pulmonary diseases. Diagnosis of ELP is often missed or delayed as it requires a high index of suspicion and familiarity with the constellation of appropriate history and radiologic and pathologic features. We herein report a case of occupational exposure to tabletop “Teppanyaki” entertainment cooking as a cause of ELP, confirmed by surgical lung biopsies in a 63-year-old Asian woman who worked as a Hibachi-Teppanyaki chef for 25 years.

  11. Correlation of the acute oxidative stress markers with radiation induced late lung disease response of pneumonitis and/or fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunwar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers which predict for the occurrence of radiation-induced lung responses of pneumonitis and/or fibrosis are largely unknown. Herein, we investigated whether markers of oxidative stress and intracellular antioxidants, measured within days of radiation exposure, correlated with the lung tissue injury response occurring weeks later. Inbred strains of mice (KK/HIJ, C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ, C3H/HeJ, A/J, AKR/J, CBA/J, NZW/LacJ) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation induced pulmonary fibrosis, and to vary in time to onset of respiratory distress post thoracic irradiation (from 10-23 weeks) were studied. Mice were unirradiated (controls) or received whole thorax irradiation (18 Gy) and were euthanized at 6h, 1d, 7d, 8w and upon presentation of respiratory distress. Pulmonary levels of antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione, and of oxidative damage (reactive oxygen species (ROS), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and numbers of γH2AX foci), were assessed

  12. Reduction of radiation pneumonitis by V20-constraints in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, Ulla Blom; Wennberg, Berit; Svane, Gunilla; Bylund, Håkan; Lind, Pehr

    2010-01-01

    Adjuvant local-regional radiotherapy (LRRT) is routinely recommended for breast cancer patients. It is well known being related to pulmonary side-effects. We studied post-RT radiological changes on X-ray and CT, and correlated the findings with Quality of Life (QoL), common dosimetric factors and co-variates. The results were compared with a previously reported cohort of 137 irradiated women. 88 women underwent chest X-ray and CT pre-and 4-5 months after 3-D planned LRRT, minimizing the dose to the ipsilateral lung to V 20 < 30%. The lung field was divided into 3 regions and the development of post-RT density changes were graded (0-3). Patients with radiological changes were compared with non-responders. Clinical symptoms were registered and data on patient and treatment related co-variates were gathered prospectively. The ipsilateral lung dosimetric factors V 13 , V 20 , V 30 and mean dose were calculated and QoL was assessed before and 4 months after RT. The use of dose-volume constraints significally reduced moderate-severe radiological changes on chest X-ray compared with our earlier study (Chi square trend test: p < 0.001). Symptomatic pneumonitis was also rare in the present study. No agreement was found between CT and chest X-ray as diagnostic tools for post-RT pneumonitis. V 13 correlated independently with radiological changes on CT (logistic regression: p = 0.04; ROC area: 0.7). The Co-variates smoking habits, age, chemotherapy, endocrine or trastuzumab therapy did not influence the outcome on multivariate analysis. QoL changes in physical function, i.e. fatigue, dyspnoea were not detected but there was a trend for a worse recovery after chemotherapy in patients with high V 13 (Spearman Rank Correlation: p < 0.05). The use of dose-volume constraints significantly reduced post-RT radiological changes on chest X-ray in LRRT for BC. The lung changes on CT were also generally limited when we used this strategy and was not always picked up on chest X

  13. Histomorphologic change of radiation pneumonitis in rat lungs: captopril reduces rat lung injury induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hee

    1999-01-01

    To assess the histomorphologic changes in the rat lung injury induced by radiation, to determine whether captopril reduces the rat lung injury and to evaluate change in TNF-α and TGF β and rat lung damage by radiation and captopril. Right lungs in male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided irradiation alone (10, 20, 30 Gy) or radiation (same dose with radiation alone group) with captopril (500 mg/L). Radiation alone group were sacrificed at twelve hours and eleven weeks after radiation and radiation with captopril group (captopril group) were sacrificed at eleven weeks after radiation with captopril. We examined the light microscope and electron microscopic features in the groups. In radiation alone group, there were patch parenchymal collapse and consolidation at twelve hours after radiation. The increase of radiation dose shows more prominent the severity and broader the affected areas. Eleven weeks after radiation, the severity and areas of fibrosis had increased in proportion to radiation dose given in the radiation alone group. There was notable decrease of lung fibrosis in captopril group than in radiation alone group. The number of mast cells rapidly increased with increase of radiation dose in radiation alone group and the degree of increase of mast cell number and severity of collagen accumulation more decreased in captopril group than in radiation alone group. In radiation alone group expression of TNF-α and TGF-β] increased according to increase of radiation dose at twelve hours after radiation in both group. At eleven weeks after radiation, expression of TGF- P increased according to increase of radiation dose in radiation group but somewhat decreased in captopril group. In the captopril group the collagen deposition increased but less dense than those of radiation alone group. The severity of perivascular thickening, capillary change, the number and degranulation of mast cells more decreased in the captopril group than in the radiation alone group. It

  14. The interstitial pneumonitis induced by cytostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrava, M.; Markova, I.; Mistina, L.

    1998-01-01

    The author presents a cause of 9-year old boy with ALL-F2B in the stage of the prevention treatment where in the its course the induced interstitial pneumonitis by cytostatics was developed. The bacterial, virus, mycological and parasitic causes of the interstitial pneumonitis on the basis of the bronchoscopy, BAL, CT, scintigraphy, laboratory and by cultivation were excluded. (authors)

  15. Dose-volume histogram analysis as predictor of radiation pneumonitis in primary lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, Michael; Tan, Alex; Fisher, Richard; Mac Manus, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Ball, David

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between various parameters derived from lung dose-volume histogram analysis and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients undergoing radical radiotherapy for primary lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 156 patients with lung cancer who had been treated with radical radiotherapy (≥45 Gy) and for whom dose-volume histogram data were available were reviewed. The incidence of symptomatic RP was correlated with a variety of parameters derived from the dose-volume histogram data, including the volume of lung receiving 10 Gy (V 10 ) through 50 Gy (V 50 ) and the mean lung dose (MLD). Results: The rate of RP at 6 months was 15% (95% confidence interval 9-22%). On univariate analysis, only V 30 (p = 0.036) and MLD (p = 0.043) were statistically significantly related to RP. V 30 correlated highly positively with MLD (r = 0.96, p 30 and MLD can be used to predict the risk of RP in lung cancer patients undergoing radical radiotherapy

  16. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I lung cancer with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Special reference to survival and radiation-induced pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Toshihiko; Shiomi, Hiroya; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate radiation-induced pneumonitis (RIP) and a related condition that we define in this report — prolonged minimal RIP (pmRIP) — after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I primary lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We assessed 136 Stage I lung cancer patients with COPD who underwent SBRT. Airflow limitation on spirometry was classified into four Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) grades, with minor modifications: GOLD 1 (mild), GOLD 2 (moderate), GOLD 3 (severe) and GOLD 4 (very severe). On this basis, we defined two subgroups: COPD-free (COPD -) and COPD-positive (COPD +). There was no significant difference in overall survival or cause-specific–survival between these groups. Of the 136 patients, 44 (32%) had pmRIP. Multivariate analysis showed that COPD and the Brinkman index were statistically significant risk factors for the development of pmRIP. COPD and the Brinkman index were predictive factors for pmRIP, although our findings also indicate that SBRT can be tolerated in early lung cancer patients with COPD. (author)

  17. A Nomogram to Predict Radiation Pneumonitis, Derived From a Combined Analysis of RTOG 9311 and Institutional Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Hope, Andrew; El Naqa, Issam; Apte, Aditya M.S.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Bosch, Walter D.Sc.; Matthews, John D.Sc.; Sause, William; Graham, Mary V.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the Washington University (WU) patient dataset, analysis of which suggested that superior-to-inferior tumor position, maximum dose, and D35 (minimum dose to the hottest 35% of the lung volume) were valuable to predict radiation pneumonitis (RP), against the patient database from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trial 9311. Methods and Materials: The entire dataset consisted of 324 patients receiving definitive conformal radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (WU = 219, RTOG 9311 = 129). Clinical, dosimetric, and tumor location parameters were modeled to predict RP in the individual datasets and in a combined dataset. Association quality with RP was assessed using Spearman's rank correlation (r) for univariate analysis and multivariate analysis; comparison between subgroups was tested using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results: The WU model to predict RP performed poorly for the RTOG 9311 data. The most predictive model in the RTOG 9311 dataset was a single-parameter model, D15 (r = 0.28). Combining the datasets, the best derived model was a two-parameter model consisting of mean lung dose and superior-to-inferior gross tumor volume position (r = 0.303). An equation and nomogram to predict the probability of RP was derived using the combined patient population. Conclusions: Statistical models derived from a large pool of candidate models resulted in well-tuned models for each subset (WU or RTOG 9311), which did not perform well when applied to the other dataset. However, when the data were combined, a model was generated that performed well on each data subset. The final model incorporates two effects: greater risk due to inferior lung irradiation, and greater risk for increasing normal lung mean dose. This formula and nomogram may aid clinicians during radiation treatment planning for lung cancer

  18. Feasibility and potential utility of multicomponent exhaled breath analysis for predicting development of radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moré, Jayaji M; Eclov, Neville C W; Chung, Melody P; Wynne, Jacob F; Shorter, Joanne H; Nelson, David D; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Burmeister, Robert; Banos, Peter; Maxim, Peter G; Loo, Billy W; Diehn, Maximilian

    2014-07-01

    In this prospective pilot study, we evaluated the feasibility and potential utility of measuring multiple exhaled gases as biomarkers of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients receiving stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung tumors. Breath analysis was performed for 26 patients receiving SABR for lung tumors. Concentrations of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), carbon monoxide (eCO), nitrous oxide (eN2O), and carbon dioxide (eCO2) were measured before and immediately after each fraction using real-time, infrared laser spectroscopy. RP development (CTCAE grade ≥2) was correlated with baseline gas concentrations, acute changes in gas concentrations after each SABR fraction, and dosimetric parameters. Exhaled breath analysis was successfully completed in 77% of patients. Five of 20 evaluable patients developed RP at a mean of 5.4 months after SABR. Acute changes in eNO and eCO concentrations, defined as percent changes between each pre-fraction and post-fraction measurement, were significantly smaller in RP versus non-RP cases (p = 0.022 and 0.015, respectively). In an exploratory analysis, a combined predictor of baseline eNO greater than 24 parts per billion and acute decrease in eCO less than 5.5% strongly correlated with RP incidence (p =0.0099). Neither eN2O nor eCO2 concentrations were significantly associated with RP development. Although generally higher in patients destined to develop RP, dosimetric parameters were not significantly associated with RP development. The majority of SABR patients in this pilot study were able to complete exhaled breath analysis. Baseline concentrations and acute changes in concentrations of exhaled breath components were associated with RP development after SABR. If our findings are validated, exhaled breath analysis may become a useful approach for noninvasive identification of patients at highest risk for developing RP after SABR.

  19. Predictive factors of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in primary and metastatic lung tumors treated with stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Pyo; Lee, Jeong Shim; Cho, Yeona; Chung, Seung Yeun; Lee, Jason Joon Bock; Lee, Chang Geol; Cho, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Although stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is widely used therapeutic technique, predictive factors of radiation pneumonitis (RP) after SABR remain undefined. We aimed to investigate the predictive factors affecting RP in patients with primary or metastatic lung tumors who received SABR. From 2012 to 2015, we reviewed 59 patients with 72 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated with SABR, and performed analyses of clinical and dosimetric variables related to symptomatic RP. SABR was delivered as 45–60 Gy in 3–4 fractions, which were over 100 Gy in BED when the α/β value was assumed to be 10. Tumor volume and other various dose volume factors were analyzed using median value as a cutoff value. RP was graded per the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.03. At the median follow-up period of 11 months, symptomatic RP was observed in 13 lesions (12 patients, 18.1%), including grade 2 RP in 11 lesions and grade 3 in 2 lesions. Patients with planning target volume (PTV) of ≤14.35 mL had significantly lower rates of symptomatic RP when compared to others (8.6% vs. 27%; p = 0.048). Rates of symptomatic RP in patients with internal gross tumor volume (iGTV) >4.21 mL were higher than with ≤4.21 mL (29.7% vs. 6.1%; p = 0.017). The incidence of symptomatic RP following treatment with SABR was acceptable with grade 2 RP being observed in most patients. iGTV over 4.21 mL and PTV of over 14.35 mL were significant predictive factors related to symptomatic RP.

  20. Changes in lung morphology and cell number in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis: a quantitative ultrastructural study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara, J.A.; Raymond, U.; Thet, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    We used stereologic-morphometric techniques to obtain a detailed quantitative picture of the changes in lung ultrastructure of rats at 12 and 26 weeks after unilateral thoracic irradiation with 3000 cGy. At 12 weeks post-radiation, the total number type 1 epithelial cells, type 2 epithelial cells and capillary endothelial cells were decreased 50-70%, total type 1 epithelial and capillary surface areas were decreased 55-60%, and the total volume of intracapillary blood was decreased 75%. The interstitial cells and matrix together accounted for more than 9% of the peripheral lung tissue volume including air, compared to 3% in controls. The numerical density of interstitial cells was increased to 3-fold the control value. The numerical density of interstitial cells was increased to 3-fold the control value. Although fibroblasts still comprised the largest interstitial cell subgroup, the numerical density of mast cells was increased over 150-fold and other inflammatory and immune cells were increased to a lesser extent. At 26 weeks post-radiation, the number, volume, and surface area of the type 1 epithelium and capillary endothelium had further decreased to only 5-10% of control values. The total number of type 2 epithelial cells was reduced by 75% but the volume density was actually increased because of a 4-fold increase in the mean cell volume. The interstitial cells and matrix now comprised over 77% of total peripheral lung tissue volume including air as compared to 6% in controls. Mast cells and plasma cells comprised 11% and 19% of all interstitial cells respectively and the densities of these cells were 540 and 180-fold the control value respectively. The relation of these morphometric findings to the results of previous morphologic studies is discussed

  1. Radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Analysis by lung scintigram with /sup 131/I-MAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, M [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    1974-12-01

    The quantitative radioisotope scanning was carried out for the measurement of the amount of the pulmonary arterial blood flow in twenty five patients receiving postoperative irradiation for breast cancer. Patients received intravenously macroaggregated /sup 131/I serum albumin immediately before the scanning. The designs of the scanning were made before and after radiation therapy in all cases. The results were summarized as follows. The amount of the blood flow in the pulmonary artery decreased obviously after irradiations in the most cases. The degree of the reduction was correlated with the extent of post-irradiated alterations in the chest-roentgenogram. Although the amount of the blood flow of the patients whose chest roentgenogram showed no particular findings or the negligible reduced slightly after irradiation, it returned again gradually to the level of 90% of the previous. In the cases accompanied with the large opacity in the chest film, the amount of the blood flow decreased drastically. The most pronounced finding was the reductions of the amount of the blood flow before the alteration of the chest roentgenogram.

  2. Final toxicity results of a radiation-dose escalation study in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Predictors for radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, F.-M.; Hayman, James A.; Griffith, Kent A.; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Arenberg, Douglas; Lyons, Susan; Turrisi, Andrew; Lichter, Allen; Fraass, Benedick; Eisbruch, Avraham; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Haken, Randall K. ten

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to report the final toxicity results on a radiation-dose escalation trial designed to test a hypothesis that very high doses of radiation could be safely administered to patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by quantifying the dose-volume toxicity relationship of the lung. Methods and Materials: A total of 109 patients with unresectable or medically inoperable NSCLC were enrolled and treated with radiation-dose escalation (on the basis of predicted normal-lung toxicity) either alone or with neoadjuvant chemotherapy by use of 3D conformal techniques. Eighty-four patients (77%) received more than 69 Gy, the trial was stopped after the dose reached 103 Gy. Estimated median follow-up was 110 months. Results: There were 17 (14.6%) Grade 2 to 3 pneumonitis and 15 (13.8%) Grade 2 to 3 fibrosis and no Grade 4 to 5 lung toxicity. Multivariate analyses showed them to be (1) not associated with the dose prescribed to the tumor, and (2) significantly (p < 0.001) associated with lung-dosimetric parameters such as the mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung that received at least 20 Gy (V20), and the normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the lung. If cutoffs are 30% for V20, 20 Gy for MLD, and 10% for NTCP, these factors have positive predictive values of 50% to 71% and negative predictive value of 85% to 89%. Conclusions: With long-term follow-up for toxicity, we have demonstrated that much higher doses of radiation than are traditionally administered can be safely delivered to a majority of patients with NSCLC. Quantitative lung dose-volume toxicity-based dose escalation can form the basis for individualized high-dose radiation treatment to maximize the therapeutic ratio in these patients

  3. Pneumonitis following infradiaphragmatic irradiation in Hodgkin's disease. Pneumonitis nach infradiaphragmaler Bestrahlung bei Morbus Hodgkin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zierhut, D.; Flentje, M. (Radiologische Klinik, Heidelberg Univ. (Germany)); Kalle, A. von (Medizinische Poliklinik, Heidelberg Univ. (Germany)); Moeller, P. (Pathologisches Inst., Heidelberg Univ. (Germany))

    1992-12-01

    A case is reported on radiation pneumonitis in the left costodiaphragmatic sinus 6 weeks following combined chemo- and radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease. Thoracotomy was performed in order to exclude a pulmonal relapse of Hodgkin's disease. Thereby the diagnosis of radiation pneumonitis was histologically proven. The development of pneumonitis after irradiation of the spleen may occur and has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of pulmonal affections. (orig.).

  4. The correlation between clinical factors and radiation pneumonitis in advanced stage non-small-cell lung cancer treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lei; Lu Bing; Fu Heyi; Hu Yinxiang; Gan Jiaying; Li Huiqin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical factors as predictors of radiation pneumonitis (RP)in advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with concurrent radio chemotherapy when gross tumor volume is 70 Gy. Methods: Data of 84 patients with histologically proved NSCLC treated with 3DCRT or IMRT were collected. To evaluate the correlation between clinical parameters and radiation pneumonitis (RP). The clinical parameters were considered: pathological type, therapy agents, age,gender, stage, karnofsky performance status (KPS), smoking status, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Results: The occurrence of grade 1, 2 RP was 63%, 33%, respectively. In univariate analysis, diabetes was significantly associated with RP of ≥ grade 1(χ 2 =4.03, P = 0.045)and ≥grade 2(χ 2 = 15.59, P =0.000). KPS was significantly associated with RP of ≥grade 1(χ 2 =3.98, P = 0.046)and ≥grade 2(χ 2 = 5.21, P = 0.023). In logistic multivariate analysis, diabetes was significantly associated with RP of ≥grade 1(χ 2 =5.50, P =0.019)and ≥grade 2(χ 2 = 12.92, P =0.000). KPS was significantly associated with RP of ≥ grade 1(χ 2 = 6.29, P = 0.012)and ≥ grade 2(χ 2 = 6.61, P =0.010). Conclusion: The definite statistical significant risk factors of RP are diabetes and KPS. (authors)

  5. Risk factors for radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic radiation therapy for lung tumours: clinical usefulness of the planning target volume to total lung volume ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueyama, Tomoko; Arimura, Takeshi; Takumi, Koji; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Higashi, Ryutaro; Ito, Soichiro; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Umanodan, Tomokazu; Nakajo, Masanori; Koriyama, Chihaya; Yoshiura, Takashi

    2018-06-01

    To identify risk factors for symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) for lung tumours. We retrospectively evaluated 68 lung tumours in 63 patients treated with SRT between 2011 and 2015. RP was graded according to the National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. SRT was delivered at 7.0-12.0 Gy per each fraction, once daily, to a total of 48-64 Gy (median, 50 Gy). Univariate analysis was performed to assess patient- and treatment-related factors, including age, sex, smoking index (SI), pulmonary function, tumour location, serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 value (KL-6), dose-volume metrics (V5, V10, V20, V30, V40 and VS5), homogeneity index of the planning target volume (PTV), PTV dose, mean lung dose (MLD), contralateral MLD and V2, PTV volume, lung volume and the PTV/lung volume ratio (PTV/Lung). Performance of PTV/Lung in predicting symptomatic RP was also analysed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The median follow-up period was 21 months. 10 of 63 patients (15.9%) developed symptomatic RP after SRT. On univariate analysis, V10, V20, PTV volume and PTV/Lung were significantly associated with occurrence of RP  ≥Grade 2. ROC curves indicated that symptomatic RP could be predicted using PTV/Lung [area under curve (AUC): 0.88, confidence interval (CI: 0.78-0.95), cut-off value: 1.09, sensitivity: 90.0% and specificity: 72.4%]. PTV/Lung is a good predictor of symptomatic RP after SRT. Advances in knowledge: The cases with high PTV/Lung should be carefully monitored with caution for the occurrence of RP after SRT.

  6. Change in Diffusing Capacity After Radiation as an Objective Measure for Grading Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Treated for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain); Gomez, Daniel, E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Eapen, George [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liu Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Scoring of radiation pneumonitis (RP), a dose-limiting toxicity after thoracic radiochemotherapy, is subjective and thus inconsistent among studies. Here we investigated whether the extent of change in diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) after radiation therapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) could be used as an objective means of quantifying RP. Patients and Methods: We analyzed potential correlations between DLCO and RP in 140 patients who received definitive RT ({>=}60 Gy) with or without chemotherapy for primary NSCLC. All underwent DLCO analysis before and after RT. Post-RT DLCO values within 1 week of the RP diagnosis (Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3) were selected and compared with that individual's preradiation values. Percent reductions in DLCO and RP grade were compared by point biserial correlation in the entire patient group and in subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Results: Patients experiencing Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3 RP had median percentage changes in DLCO after RT of 10.7%, 13%, 22.1%, or 35.2%. Percent reduction in DLCO correlated with RP Grade {<=}1 vs. {>=}2 (p = 0.0004). This association held for the following subgroups: age {>=}65 years, advanced stage, smokers, use of chemotherapy, volume of normal lung receiving at least 20 Gy {>=}30%, and baseline DLCO or forced expiratory volume in 1 second {>=}60%. Conclusions: By correlating percent change in DLCO from pretreatment values at the time of diagnosis of RP with RP grade, we were able to identify categories of RP based on the change in DLCO. These criteria provide a basis for an objective scoring system for RP based on change in DLCO.

  7. Change in Diffusing Capacity After Radiation as an Objective Measure for Grading Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Treated for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Gomez, Daniel; Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B.; Eapen, George; Liu Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Scoring of radiation pneumonitis (RP), a dose-limiting toxicity after thoracic radiochemotherapy, is subjective and thus inconsistent among studies. Here we investigated whether the extent of change in diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) after radiation therapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) could be used as an objective means of quantifying RP. Patients and Methods: We analyzed potential correlations between DLCO and RP in 140 patients who received definitive RT (≥60 Gy) with or without chemotherapy for primary NSCLC. All underwent DLCO analysis before and after RT. Post-RT DLCO values within 1 week of the RP diagnosis (Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3) were selected and compared with that individual’s preradiation values. Percent reductions in DLCO and RP grade were compared by point biserial correlation in the entire patient group and in subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Results: Patients experiencing Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3 RP had median percentage changes in DLCO after RT of 10.7%, 13%, 22.1%, or 35.2%. Percent reduction in DLCO correlated with RP Grade ≤1 vs. ≥2 (p = 0.0004). This association held for the following subgroups: age ≥65 years, advanced stage, smokers, use of chemotherapy, volume of normal lung receiving at least 20 Gy ≥30%, and baseline DLCO or forced expiratory volume in 1 second ≥60%. Conclusions: By correlating percent change in DLCO from pretreatment values at the time of diagnosis of RP with RP grade, we were able to identify categories of RP based on the change in DLCO. These criteria provide a basis for an objective scoring system for RP based on change in DLCO.

  8. Prescreening based on the presence of CT-scan abnormalities and biomarkers (KL-6 and SP-D may reduce severe radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakui Reiko

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To determine the risk factors of severe radiation pneumonitis (RP after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT for primary or secondary lung tumors. Materials and methods From January 2003 to March 2009, SBRT was performed on 117 patients (32 patients before 2005 and 85 patients after 2006 with lung tumors (primary = 74 patients and metastatic/recurrent = 43 patients in our institution. In the current study, the results on cases with severe RP (grades 4-5 were evaluated. Serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6 and serum Surfactant protein-D (SP-D were used to predict the incidence of RP. A shadow of interstitial pneumonitis (IP on the CT image before performing SBRT was also used as an indicator for RP. Since 2006, patients have been prescreened for biological markers (KL-6 & SP-D as well as checking for an IP-shadow in CT. Results Grades 4-5 RP was observed in nine patients (7.7% after SBRT and seven of these cases (6.0% were grade 5 in our institution. A correlation was found between the incidence of RP and higher serum KL-6 & SP-D levels. IP-shadow in patient's CT was also found to correlate well with the severe RP. Severe RP was reduced from 18.8% before 2005 to 3.5% after 2006 (p = 0.042. There was no correlation between the dose volume histogram parameters and these severe RP patients. Conclusion Patients presenting with an IP shadow in the CT and a high value of the serum KL-6 & SP-D before SBRT treatment developed severe radiation pneumonitis at a high rate. The reduction of RP incidence in patients treated after 2006 may have been attributed to prescreening of the patients. Therefore, pre-screening before SBRT for an IP shadow in CT and serum KL-6 & SP-D is recommended in the management and treatment of patients with primary or secondary lung tumors.

  9. Radiation nephritis causing nephrotic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennette, J.C.; Ordonez, N.G.

    1983-12-01

    Clinical symptoms of acute radiation nephritis with nephrotic syndrome developed in a fifty-six-year-old woman after abdominal radiation therapy for an astrocytoma of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of radiation nephritis was confirmed by renal biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of radiation nephritis associated with nephrotic syndrome.

  10. CT appearance of amiodarone-induced pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, A.A.; Hayward, C.

    1989-01-01

    Basal peripheral pleuroparenchymal opacities are described on CT of early cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis, asbestosis and bleomycin pneumonitis. These diseases may be caused by free radical effects on phospholipid metabolism causing cell wall damage. Amiodarone hydrochloride alters phospholipid synthesis metabolically. Amiodarone pneumonitis might be expected to show similar CT appearances. Sixteen patients who have developed new respiratory symptoms while taking amiodarone have been scanned prone and supine and at inspiration and expiration by means of a scanner with 2-mm sections at 1-cm intervals. All have been previously healthy nonsmokers with no relevant occupational history. Previous chest radiographs have been normal. Results are presented

  11. Oral exposure to culture material extract containing fumonisins predisposes swine to the development of pneumonitis caused by Pasteurella multocida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halloy, David J.; Gustin, Pascal G.; Bouhet, Sandrine; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2005-01-01

    Fumonisin B 1 (FB 1 ) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium verticillioides and F. proliferatum that commonly occurs in maize. In swine, consumption of contaminated feed induces liver damage and pulmonary edema. Pasteurella multocida is a secondary pathogen, which can generate a respiratory disorder in predisposed pigs. In this study, we examined the effect of oral exposure to fumonisin-containing culture material on lung inflammation caused by P. multocida. Piglets received by gavage a crude extract of fumonisin, 0.5 mg FB 1 /kg body weight/day, for 7 days. One day later, the animals were instilled intratracheally with a non toxin producing type A strain of P. multocida and followed up for 13 additional days. Pig weight and cough frequency were measured throughout the experiment. Lung lesions, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell composition and the expression of inflammatory cytokines were evaluated at the autopsy. Ingestion of fumonisin culture material or infection with P. multocida did not affect weight gain, induced no clinical sign or lung lesion, and only had minimal effect on BALF cell composition. Ingestion of mycotoxin extract increased the expression of IL-8, IL-18 and IFN-γ mRNA compared with P. multocida infection that increased the expression of TNF-α. The combined treatment with fumonisin culture material and P. multocida delayed growth, induced cough, and increased BALF total cells, macrophages and lymphocytes. Lung lesions were significantly enhanced in these animals and consisted of subacute interstitial pneumonia. TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-18 mRNA expression was also increased. Taken together, our data showed that fumonisin culture material is a predisposing factor to lung inflammation. These results may have implications for humans and animals consuming FB 1 contaminated food or feed

  12. Oral exposure to culture material extract containing fumonisins predisposes swine to the development of pneumonitis caused by Pasteurella multocida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halloy, David J [Department of Functional Sciences, Unit of Pharmacology, Pharmacotherapy and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liege, Liege (Belgium); Gustin, Pascal G [Department of Functional Sciences, Unit of Pharmacology, Pharmacotherapy and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liege, Liege (Belgium); Bouhet, Sandrine [INRA, UR66, Laboratory of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 180 Chemin de Tournefeuille, BP3, 31931 Toulouse (France); Oswald, Isabelle P [INRA, UR66, Laboratory of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 180 Chemin de Tournefeuille, BP3, 31931 Toulouse (France)

    2005-09-15

    Fumonisin B{sub 1} (FB{sub 1}) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium verticillioides and F. proliferatum that commonly occurs in maize. In swine, consumption of contaminated feed induces liver damage and pulmonary edema. Pasteurella multocida is a secondary pathogen, which can generate a respiratory disorder in predisposed pigs. In this study, we examined the effect of oral exposure to fumonisin-containing culture material on lung inflammation caused by P. multocida. Piglets received by gavage a crude extract of fumonisin, 0.5 mg FB{sub 1}/kg body weight/day, for 7 days. One day later, the animals were instilled intratracheally with a non toxin producing type A strain of P. multocida and followed up for 13 additional days. Pig weight and cough frequency were measured throughout the experiment. Lung lesions, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell composition and the expression of inflammatory cytokines were evaluated at the autopsy. Ingestion of fumonisin culture material or infection with P. multocida did not affect weight gain, induced no clinical sign or lung lesion, and only had minimal effect on BALF cell composition. Ingestion of mycotoxin extract increased the expression of IL-8, IL-18 and IFN-{gamma} mRNA compared with P. multocida infection that increased the expression of TNF-{alpha}. The combined treatment with fumonisin culture material and P. multocida delayed growth, induced cough, and increased BALF total cells, macrophages and lymphocytes. Lung lesions were significantly enhanced in these animals and consisted of subacute interstitial pneumonia. TNF-{alpha}, IFN-{gamma} and IL-18 mRNA expression was also increased. Taken together, our data showed that fumonisin culture material is a predisposing factor to lung inflammation. These results may have implications for humans and animals consuming FB{sub 1} contaminated food or feed.

  13. An autopsied case of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG)-producing lung cancer accompanied by bilateral radiation pneumonitis due to small doses of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tano, Yoshihiko; Adachi, Michifumi; Kimura, Makoto; Matsushima, Toshiharu; Torii, Takashi

    1990-01-01

    An autopsied case of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG)-producing lung cancer accompanied by bilateral radiation pneumonitis is reported. A 68 year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of an abnormal shadow in his chest x-ray. Lung cancer was diagnosed and treated with radiotherapy. The radiotherapy (1,200 cGy) was discontinued, however because his general condition deteriorated. Chest x-rays then showed a pneumonia-like shadow in the projected field of irradiation. The same shadow was observed in the contralateral lung field one month later. Gynecomastia and an elevated level of serum HCG were noticed during hospitalization. The patient died and an autopsy was performed. Histopathological examination upon autopsy confirmed a large cell carcinoma of the lung which stained positively for HCG with an immunoenzyme labelling technique using the PAP method. Marked fibrosis and thickening of the alveolar septae were histologically demonstrated in the projected field of irradiation and the contralateral field where chest x-rays showed the pneumonia-like shadow. (author)

  14. An autopsied case of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG)-producing lung cancer accompanied by bilateral radiation pneumonitis due to small doses of irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tano, Yoshihiko; Adachi, Michifumi; Kimura, Makoto; Matsushima, Toshiharu; Torii, Takashi (Kawasaki Medical School, Kawasaki Hospital, Okayama (Japan))

    1990-07-01

    An autopsied case of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG)-producing lung cancer accompanied by bilateral radiation pneumonitis is reported. A 68 year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of an abnormal shadow in his chest x-ray. Lung cancer was diagnosed and treated with radiotherapy. The radiotherapy (1,200 cGy) was discontinued, however because his general condition deteriorated. Chest x-rays then showed a pneumonia-like shadow in the projected field of irradiation. The same shadow was observed in the contralateral lung field one month later. Gynecomastia and an elevated level of serum HCG were noticed during hospitalization. The patient died and an autopsy was performed. Histopathological examination upon autopsy confirmed a large cell carcinoma of the lung which stained positively for HCG with an immunoenzyme labelling technique using the PAP method. Marked fibrosis and thickening of the alveolar septae were histologically demonstrated in the projected field of irradiation and the contralateral field where chest x-rays showed the pneumonia-like shadow. (author).

  15. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa

  16. Bleomycin-induced pneumonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Sleijfer (Stefan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe cytotoxic agent bleomycin is feared for its induction of sometimes fatal pulmonary toxicity, also known as bleomycin-induced pneumonitis (BIP). The central event in the development of BIP is endothelial damage of the lung vasculature due to bleomycin-induced

  17. SU-C-207A-07: Cumulative 18F-FDG Uptake Histogram Relative to Radiation Dose Volume Histogram of Lung After IMRT Or PSPT and Their Association with Radiation Pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shusharina, N; Choi, N; Bortfeld, T; Liao, Z; Mohan, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the difference in cumulative 18F-FDG uptake histogram of lung treated with either IMRT or PSPT is associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with inoperable stage II and III NSCLC. Methods: We analyzed 24 patients from a prospective randomized trial to compare IMRT (n=12) with vs. PSPT (n=12) for inoperable NSCLC. All patients underwent PET-CT imaging between 35 and 88 days post-therapy. Post-treatment PET-CT was aligned with planning 4D CT to establish a voxel-to-voxel correspondence between post-treatment PET and planning dose images. 18F-FDG uptake as a function of radiation dose to normal lung was obtained for each patient. Distribution of the standard uptake value (SUV) was analyzed using a volume histogram method. The image quantitative characteristics and DVH measures were correlated with clinical symptoms of pneumonitis. Results: Patients with RP were present in both groups: 5 in the IMRT and 6 in the PSPT. The analysis of cumulative SUV histograms showed significantly higher relative volumes of the normal lung having higher SUV uptake in the PSPT patients for both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases (VSUV=2: 10% for IMRT vs 16% for proton RT and VSUV=1: 10% for IMRT vs 23% for proton RT). In addition, the SUV histograms for symptomatic cases in PSPT patients exhibited a significantly longer tail at the highest SUV. The absolute volume of the lung receiving the dose >70 Gy was larger in the PSPT patients. Conclusion: 18F-FDG uptake – radiation dose response correlates with RP in both groups of patients by means of the linear regression slope. SUV is higher for the PSPT patients for both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases. Higher uptake after PSPT patients is explained by larger volumes of the lung receiving high radiation dose.

  18. Predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Jun; Li, Guang; Ma, Lianghua; Han, Chong; Zhang, Shuo; Yao, Lei [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)], e-mail: gl1963516@yahoo.cn; Diao, Rao [Dept. of Experimental Technology Center, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China); Zang, Shuang [Dept. of Nursing, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)

    2013-08-15

    Grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis (RP) is generally severe and life-threatening. Predictors of grade {>=}2 are usually used for grade {>=}3 RP prediction, but it is unclear whether these predictors are appropriate. In this study, predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP were investigated separately. The increased risk of severe RP in elderly patients compared with younger patients was also evaluated. Material and methods: A total of 176 consecutive patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were followed up prospectively after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. RP was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Mean lung dose (MLD), mean heart dose, ratio of planning target volume to total lung volume (PTV/Lung), and dose-volume histogram comprehensive value of both heart and lung were associated with both grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP in univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, age and MLD were predictors of both grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP; receipt of chemotherapy predicted grade {>=}3 RP only; and sex and PTV/Lung predicted grade {>=}2 RP only. Among patients who developed high-grade RP, MLD and PTV/Lung were significantly lower in patients aged {>=}70 years than in younger patients (p<0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions: The predictors were not completely consistent between grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP. Elderly patients had a higher risk of severe RP than younger patients did, possibly due to lower tolerance of radiation to the lung.

  19. Inhalative steroids as an individual treatment in symptomatic lung cancer patients with radiation pneumonitis grade II after radiotherapy – a single-centre experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkenberens, C.; Janssen, S.; Lavae-Mokhtari, M.; Leni, K.; Meyer, A.; Christiansen, H.; Bremer, M.; Dickgreber, N.

    2016-01-01

    To assess efficacy of our single-centre experience with inhalative steroids (IS) in lung cancer patients with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) grade II. Between 05/09 and 07/10, 24 patients (female, n = 8; male, n = 16) with lung cancer (non-small cell lung carcinoma [NSCLC]: n = 19; small cell lung cancer [SCLC]: n = 3; unknown histology: n = 2) and good performance status (ECOG ≤1) received definitive radiotherapy to the primary tumour site and involved lymph nodes with concurrent chemotherapy (n = 18), sequential chemotherapy (n = 2) or radiation only (n = 4) and developed symptomatic RP grade II during follow-up. No patient presented with oxygen requiring RP grade III. The mean age at diagnosis was 66 years (range: 50–82 years). Nine patients suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) before treatment, and 18 patients had a smoking history (median pack years: 48). The mean lung dose was 15.5 Gy (range: 3.0–23.1 Gy). All patients were treated with IS. If a patient’s clinical symptoms did not significantly improve within two weeks of IS therapy initiation, their treatment was switched to oral prednisolone. All 24 patients were initially treated with a high dose IS (budesonide 800 μg 1-0-1) for 14 days. Of the patients, 18 showed a significant improvement of clinical symptoms and 6 patients did not show significant improvement of clinical symptoms and were classified as non-responders to IS. Their treatment was switched to oral steroids after two weeks (starting with oral prednisolone, 0.5 mg/kg bodyweight; at least 50 mg per day). All of these patients responded to the prednisolone. None of non-responders presented with increased symptoms of RP and required oxygen and / or hospitalization (RP grade III). The median follow-up after IS treatment initiation was 18 months (range: 4–66 months). The median duration of IS treatment and prednisolone treatment was 8.2 months (range: 3.0–48.3 months) and 11.4 months (range: 5.0–44

  20. Comments on 'Reconsidering the definition of a dose-volume histogram'-dose-mass histogram (DMH) versus dose-volume histogram (DVH) for predicting radiation-induced pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Plataniotis, Georgios A; Gorka, Magdalena Adamus; Lind, Bengt K

    2006-01-01

    In a recently published paper (Nioutsikou et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 L17) the authors showed that the use of the dose-mass histogram (DMH) concept is a more accurate descriptor of the dose delivered to lung than the traditionally used dose-volume histogram (DVH) concept. Furthermore, they state that if a functional imaging modality could also be registered to the anatomical imaging modality providing a functional weighting across the organ (functional mass) then the more general and realistic concept of the dose-functioning mass histogram (D[F]MH) could be an even more appropriate descriptor. The comments of the present letter to the editor are in line with the basic arguments of that work since their general conclusions appear to be supported by the comparison of the DMH and DVH concepts using radiobiological measures. In this study, it is examined whether the dose-mass histogram (DMH) concept deviated significantly from the widely used dose-volume histogram (DVH) concept regarding the expected lung complications and if there are clinical indications supporting these results. The problem was investigated theoretically by applying two hypothetical dose distributions (Gaussian and semi-Gaussian shaped) on two lungs of uniform and varying densities. The influence of the deviation between DVHs and DMHs on the treatment outcome was estimated by using the relative seriality and LKB models using the Gagliardi et al (2000 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 46 373) and Seppenwoolde et al (2003 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 55 724) parameter sets for radiation pneumonitis, respectively. Furthermore, the biological equivalent of their difference was estimated by the biologically effective uniform dose (D-bar) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) concepts, respectively. It is shown that the relation between the DVHs and DMHs varies depending on the underlying cell density distribution and the applied dose distribution. However, the range of their deviation in terms of

  1. Functional Promoter Variant rs2868371 of HSPB1 Is Associated With Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis After Chemoradiation for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Qingsong [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Lung Cancer Center, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Wei, Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Xu, Ting [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Yuan, Xianglin [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Spain); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Liu, Zhensheng [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Zhuang, Yan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Wang, Li-E. [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To date, no biomarkers have been found to predict, before treatment, which patients will develop radiation pneumonitis (RP), a potentially fatal toxicity, after chemoradiation for lung cancer. We investigated potential associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in HSPB1 and risk of RP after chemoradiation for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Subjects were patients with NSCLC treated with chemoradiation at 1 institution. The training data set comprised 146 patients treated from 1999 to July 2004; the validation data set was 125 patients treated from August 2004 to March 2010. We genotyped 2 functional SNPs of HSPB1 (rs2868370 and rs2868371) from all patients. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis to assess the risk of grade ≥2 or ≥3 RP in both data sets and a parametric log-logistic survival model to evaluate the association of HSPB1 genotypes with that risk. Results: Grade ≥3 RP was experienced by 13% of those with CG/GG and 29% of those with CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 in the training data set (P=.028); corresponding rates in the validation data set were 2% CG/GG and 14% CC (P=.02). Univariate and multivariate analysis confirmed the association of CC of HSPB1 rs2868371 with higher risk of grade ≥3 RP than CG/GG after adjustment for sex, age, performance status, and lung mean dose. This association was validated both in the validation data set and with Harrell's C statistic. Conclusions: The CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 was associated with severe RP after chemoradiation for NSCLC.

  2. Unraveling biophysical interactions of radiation pneumonitis in non-small-cell lung cancer via Bayesian network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yi; El Naqa, Issam; McShan, Daniel L; Ray, Dipankar; Lohse, Ines; Matuszak, Martha M; Owen, Dawn; Jolly, Shruti; Lawrence, Theodore S; Kong, Feng-Ming Spring; Ten Haken, Randall K

    2017-04-01

    In non-small-cell lung cancer radiotherapy, radiation pneumonitis≥grade 2 (RP2) depends on patients' dosimetric, clinical, biological and genomic characteristics. We developed a Bayesian network (BN) approach to explore its potential for interpreting biophysical signaling pathways influencing RP2 from a heterogeneous dataset including single nucleotide polymorphisms, micro RNAs, cytokines, clinical data, and radiation treatment plans before and during the course of radiotherapy. Model building utilized 79 patients (21 with RP2) with complete data, and model testing used 50 additional patients with incomplete data. A developed large-scale Markov blanket approach selected relevant predictors. Resampling by k-fold cross-validation determined the optimal BN structure. Area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve (AUC) measured performance. Pre- and during-treatment BNs identified biophysical signaling pathways from the patients' relevant variables to RP2 risk. Internal cross-validation for the pre-BN yielded an AUC=0.82 which improved to 0.87 by incorporating during treatment changes. In the testing dataset, the pre- and during AUCs were 0.78 and 0.82, respectively. Our developed BN approach successfully handled a high number of heterogeneous variables in a small dataset, demonstrating potential for unraveling relevant biophysical features that could enhance prediction of RP2, although the current observations would require further independent validation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Electromagnetic radiation-2450 MHz exposure causes cognition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    83

    Electromagnetic radiation-2450 MHz exposure causes cognition deficit with mitochondrial. 1 ... decrease in levels of acetylcholine, and increase in activity of acetyl ...... neuronal apoptosis and cognitive disturbances in sevoflurane or propofol ...

  4. Using generalized equivalent uniform dose atlases to combine and analyze prospective dosimetric and radiation pneumonitis data from 2 non-small cell lung cancer dose escalation protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Yorke, Ellen D; Belderbos, José S A; Borst, Gerben R; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Lebesque, Joos V; Jackson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    To demonstrate the use of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) atlas for data pooling in radiation pneumonitis (RP) modeling, to determine the dependence of RP on gEUD, to study the consistency between data sets, and to verify the increased statistical power of the combination. Patients enrolled in prospective phase I/II dose escalation studies of radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) (78 pts) and the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) (86 pts) were included; 10 (13%) and 14 (17%) experienced RP requiring steroids (RPS) within 6 months after treatment. gEUD was calculated from dose-volume histograms. Atlases for each data set were created using 1-Gy steps from exact gEUDs and RPS data. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model was fit to the atlas and exact gEUD data. Heterogeneity and inconsistency statistics for the fitted parameters were computed. gEUD maps of the probability of RPS rate≥20% were plotted. The 2 data sets were homogeneous and consistent. The best fit values of the volume effect parameter a were small, with upper 95% confidence limit around 1.0 in the joint data. The likelihood profiles around the best fit a values were flat in all cases, making determination of the best fit a weak. All confidence intervals (CIs) were narrower in the joint than in the individual data sets. The minimum P value for correlations of gEUD with RPS in the joint data was .002, compared with P=.01 and .05 for MSKCC and NKI data sets, respectively. gEUD maps showed that at small a, RPS risk increases with gEUD. The atlas can be used to combine gEUD and RPS information from different institutions and model gEUD dependence of RPS. RPS has a large volume effect with the mean dose model barely included in the 95% CI. Data pooling increased statistical power. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SU-E-J-251: Incorporation of Pre-Therapy 18F-FDG Uptake with CT Texture Features in a Predictive Model for Radiation Pneumonitis Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, G; Cunliffe, A; Armato, S; Al-Hallaq, H; Castillo, R; Pham, N; Guerrero, T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the addition of standardized uptake value (SUV) statistical variables to CT lung texture features can improve a predictive model of radiation pneumonitis (RP) development in patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods: Anonymized data from 96 esophageal cancer patients (18 RP-positive cases of Grade ≥ 2) were retrospectively collected including pre-therapy PET/CT scans, pre-/posttherapy diagnostic CT scans and RP status. Twenty texture features (firstorder, fractal, Laws’ filter and gray-level co-occurrence matrix) were calculated from diagnostic CT scans and compared in anatomically matched regions of the lung. The mean, maximum, standard deviation, and 50th–95th percentiles of the SUV values for all lung voxels in the corresponding PET scans were acquired. For each texture feature, a logistic regression-based classifier consisting of (1) the average change in that texture feature value between the pre- and post-therapy CT scans and (2) the pre-therapy SUV standard deviation (SUV SD ) was created. The RP-classification performance of each logistic regression model was compared to the performance of its texture feature alone by computing areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs). T-tests were performed to determine whether the mean AUC across texture features changed significantly when SUV SD was added to the classifier. Results: The AUC for single-texturefeature classifiers ranged from 0.58–0.81 in high-dose (≥ 30 Gy) regions of the lungs and from 0.53–0.71 in low-dose (< 10 Gy) regions. Adding SUVSD in a logistic regression model using a 50/50 data partition for training and testing significantly increased the mean AUC by 0.08, 0.06 and 0.04 in the low-, medium- and high-dose regions, respectively. Conclusion: Addition of SUVSD from a pre-therapy PET scan to a single CT-based texture feature improves RP-classification performance on average. These findings demonstrate the potential for more

  6. Risk and predictors for early radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent or sequential chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Jun; Li, Guang; Zang, Shuang; Zhang, Shuo; Yao, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The rate of radiation pneumonitis (RP) for patients receiving chemoradiotherapy has been various across studies. Whether it is related to different chemotherapy schedules used in combination with radiation therapy were evaluated in this study. New factors associated with RP were also investigated. A total of 369 consecutive patients with Stage III non small cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy were followed after radiotherapy (RT). Among them 262 patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy and 107 patients received only sequential chemotherapy after RT. RP was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. The rate of grade ≥ 2 were 39.7%, 31% and 33.6% in the concurrent DP (docetaxel/cisplatin), concurrent NP (vinorelbine/cisplatin) and sequential group, and grade ≥ 3 RP were 18.4%, 9.5%, and 11.2% respectively. The rate of grade ≥ 3 RP was significantly higher in concurrent DP group than that in concurrent NP group (p = 0.04). RP occurred earlier in concurrent DP group than that in the other two groups. There were no significant differences in response rate among the three groups. In the multivariate analysis, age (OR = 1.99, p = 0.038 and OR = 8.90, p < 0.001), chemotherapy schedule (OR = 1.45, p = 0.041 and OR = 1.98, p = 0.013), mean lung dose(OR = 1.42, p < 0.001 and OR = 1.64, p < 0.001), and planning target volume(OR = 1.004, p = 0.001 and OR = 1.005, p = 0.021) were predictors for both grade ≥ 2 and grade ≥ 3 RP. Response to treatment was a new predictor for grade ≥ 3 RP only (OR = 4.39, p = 0.034). Response to treatment was found to be a new predictor for grade ≥ 3 RP. Compared to concurrent NP schedule, concurrent DP schedule achieved similar response to treatment but resulted in a higher risk of grade ≥ 3 RP

  7. Prediction of PET/CT to alleviate radiation pneumonitis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer for 3-dimentional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Heyi; Yu Jinming; Li Jianbin; Li Baosheng; Fu Zheng; Liu Tonghai

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of PET/CT on clinical staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), delineation of target volume, and prediction to alleviate radiation pneumonitis (RP) from 3-dimentional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning. Methods: From October 2002 to June 2004, 34 patients diagnosed cytologically or pathologically with NSCLC, who were candidates for radical radiotherapy or surgery, received PET/CT scanning. Both images were transmitted into treatment planning system (TPS) workstations respectively and were fused and reconstructed. All patients were staged according to the 1997 World Health Organization (WHO) staging system. The impact of PET/CT on the clinical staging of all the patients was determined. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on the CT imaging and PET/CTfused imaging respectively. Based on the two images, 3D- CRT planning was made respectively at the TPS workstation with Topslane software, the planning target volumes (PTV) being defined with a 15 mm margin around GTV of primary lumps (PTV 1 ) and 7 mm for involved lymph nodes (PTV 2 ). Evaluating indexes including V PTV (volume of PTV, V PTV = V PTV1 + V PTV2 ), V 20 (percentage of the total lung volume receiving more than 20 Gy), MLD (mean lung dose) , TCP (tumor control probability) , NTCP (normal tissue complication probability) , and Ds (dose to spinal cord) were selected to be paralleled to compare the quality of the two plans and the impact of PET/CT on RP was further analyzed. Results: In 13 of 34 (38.2%) cases, PET/CT information changed the clinical staging, 8 of which were upstaged and 5 downstaged. For 10 of 34 (29.4%) cases, PET/CT results modified their management decisions. Among 16 patients performed by surgery, 14 had consistent PET/CT staging with pathologic staging. The sensitivity of PET/CT was 93.3% and accuracy 87.5%. Difference of indexes including V PTV , V 20 and MLD between the two radiation planning was statistically significant, but Ds

  8. SU-E-J-251: Incorporation of Pre-Therapy 18F-FDG Uptake with CT Texture Features in a Predictive Model for Radiation Pneumonitis Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, G; Cunliffe, A; Armato, S; Al-Hallaq, H [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Castillo, R [Univ Texas Medical Branch of Galveston, Pearland, TX (United States); Pham, N [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Guerrero, T [Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the addition of standardized uptake value (SUV) statistical variables to CT lung texture features can improve a predictive model of radiation pneumonitis (RP) development in patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods: Anonymized data from 96 esophageal cancer patients (18 RP-positive cases of Grade ≥ 2) were retrospectively collected including pre-therapy PET/CT scans, pre-/posttherapy diagnostic CT scans and RP status. Twenty texture features (firstorder, fractal, Laws’ filter and gray-level co-occurrence matrix) were calculated from diagnostic CT scans and compared in anatomically matched regions of the lung. The mean, maximum, standard deviation, and 50th–95th percentiles of the SUV values for all lung voxels in the corresponding PET scans were acquired. For each texture feature, a logistic regression-based classifier consisting of (1) the average change in that texture feature value between the pre- and post-therapy CT scans and (2) the pre-therapy SUV standard deviation (SUV{sub SD}) was created. The RP-classification performance of each logistic regression model was compared to the performance of its texture feature alone by computing areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs). T-tests were performed to determine whether the mean AUC across texture features changed significantly when SUV{sub SD} was added to the classifier. Results: The AUC for single-texturefeature classifiers ranged from 0.58–0.81 in high-dose (≥ 30 Gy) regions of the lungs and from 0.53–0.71 in low-dose (< 10 Gy) regions. Adding SUVSD in a logistic regression model using a 50/50 data partition for training and testing significantly increased the mean AUC by 0.08, 0.06 and 0.04 in the low-, medium- and high-dose regions, respectively. Conclusion: Addition of SUVSD from a pre-therapy PET scan to a single CT-based texture feature improves RP-classification performance on average. These findings demonstrate the potential for

  9. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis: an immunopathology review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Bruce A

    2008-02-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HSP) is an immunologically mediated alveolar and interstitial lung disease caused by repeated inhalation of organic dusts and some occupational agents. The pathogenesis of HSP is uncertain. A number of unexplained features of HSP remain, namely (1) why do so few exposed individuals develop clinical HSP, (2) what triggers an acute episode after prolonged periods of previous sensitization, and (3) what leads to disease progression. This article considers these issues and aims to discuss and clarify current concepts in pathogenesis. Pertinent literature review in conjunction with the author's personal interpretive opinion. Current data suggest that individuals with a T(H)1 dominant response are likely to develop clinical disease. There is also some evidence that genetic factors such as polymorphisms in the major histocompatibility complex, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 are associated with the development of or resistance to the disease.

  10. Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carlos Ac; Gimenez, Andréa; Kuranishi, Lilian; Storrer, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HSP) is a common interstitial lung disease resulting from inhalation of a large variety of antigens by susceptible individuals. The disease is best classified as acute and chronic. Chronic HSP can be fibrosing or not. Fibrotic HSP has a large differential diagnosis and has a worse prognosis. The most common etiologies for HSP are reviewed. Diagnostic criteria are proposed for both chronic forms based on exposure, lung auscultation, lung function tests, HRCT findings, bronchoalveolar lavage, and biopsies. Treatment options are limited, but lung transplantation results in greater survival in comparison to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Randomized trials with new antifibrotic agents are necessary.

  11. Radiation injury caused by internal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petyrek, P.

    1988-01-01

    Basic data are given of radiation injury of the respiratory organs, digestive tract, hematogenous tissues and the thyroid due to internal contamination. Attention is drawn to the complexity of the problem and to the effect of the various factors affecting the picture and course of the radiation damage. The treatment is based on the assumption that fundamental is the damage of the stem cells of the critical organs. Discussed are also the basic clinical pictures that can occur due to internal contamination with activities causing radiation injury. (B.S.). 27 refs

  12. Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Reduce the Risk of Symptomatic Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer After Definitive Radiation Therapy? Analysis of a Single-Institution Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongmei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, P.R. of China (China); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan; Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Levy, Lawrence B.; O' Reilly, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gold, Kathryn A. [Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have suggested that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) can mitigate radiation-induced lung injury. We sought here to investigate possible associations between ACEI use and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) among patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients who received definitive radiation therapy for stages I to III NSCLC between 2004 and 2010 at a single tertiary cancer center. Patients must have received a radiation dose of at least 60 Gy for a single primary lung tumor and have had imaging and dosimetric data available for analysis. RP was quantified according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess potential associations between ACEI use and risk of symptomatic RP. Results: Of 413 patients analyzed, 65 were using ACEIs during RT. In univariate analysis, the rate of RP grade ≥2 seemed lower in ACEI users than in nonusers (34% vs 46%), but this apparent difference was not statistically significant (P=.06). In multivariate analysis of all patients, ACEI use was not associated with the risk of symptomatic RP (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.66; P=.07) after adjustment for sex, smoking status, mean lung dose (MLD), and concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy. Subgroup analysis showed that ACEI use did have a protective effect from RP grade ≥2 among patients who received a low (≤20-Gy) MLD (P<.01) or were male (P=.04). Conclusions: A trend toward reduction in symptomatic RP among patients taking ACEIs during RT for NSCLC was not statistically significant on univariate or multivariate analyses, although certain subgroups may benefit from use (ie, male patients and those receiving low MLD). The evidence at this point is insufficient to establish whether the use of ACEIs does or does not reduce the risk of RP.

  13. Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira CA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carlos AC Pereira,1 Andréa Gimenez,2 Lilian Kuranishi,2 Karin Storrer 2 1Interstitial Lung Diseases Program, 2Pulmonology Postgraduate, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HSP is a common interstitial lung disease resulting from inhalation of a large variety of antigens by susceptible individuals. The disease is best classified as acute and chronic. Chronic HSP can be fibrosing or not. Fibrotic HSP has a large differential diagnosis and has a worse prognosis. The most common etiologies for HSP are reviewed. Diagnostic criteria are proposed for both chronic forms based on exposure, lung auscultation, lung function tests, HRCT findings, bronchoalveolar lavage, and biopsies. Treatment options are limited, but lung transplantation results in greater survival in comparison to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Randomized trials with new antifibrotic agents are necessary. Keywords: interstitial lung diseases, extrinsic allergic alveolitis, diffuse lung disease, lung immune response, HRCT, farmers lung

  14. Carnosine may reduce lung injury caused by radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Yildiz; Turkcu, Ummuhani Ozel; Hicsonmez, Ayse; Andrieu, Meltem Nalca; Guney, H Zafer; Bilgihan, Ayse; Kurtman, Cengiz

    2006-01-01

    Ionising radiation is known one of the most effective tools in the therapy of cancer but in many thoracic cancers, the total prescribed dose of radiation that can be safely administered to the target volume is limited by the risk of complications arising in the normal lung tissue. One of the major reasons for cellular injury after radiation is the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Radiation pneumonitis is an acute phase side-effect which generally subsides after a few weeks and is followed by a chronic phase characterized by inflammation and fibrosis, that can develop months or years after irradiation. Carnosine is a dipeptide composed by the amino acids beta-histidine and l-alanine. The exact biological role of carnosine is not totally understood, but several studies have demonstrated that it possesses strong and specific antioxidant properties, protects against radiation damage,and promotes wound healing. The antioxidant mechanism of carnosine is attributed to its chelating effect against metal ions, superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity, ROS and free radicals scavenging ability . Either its antioxidant or anti-inflammatuar properties, we propose that carnosine ameliorates irradiation-induced lung injury. Thus, supplementing cancer patients to whom applied radiation therapy with carnosine, may provide an alleviation of the symptoms due to radiation-induced lung injury. This issue warrants further studies.

  15. Occupational disease caused by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluepfel, H.U.

    1983-01-01

    The study investigates the course of the disease of persons whose occupational exposure to radiation had resulted in impairment of their professional ability and entitled them to damages under the current regulations. 35 receivers of damages were found who by answering the question form and partly giving permission to study their file at the insurance institution under the conditions of data protection made is possible to carry through this investigation. 14 receivers of damages were occupied in the technical industry, 21 in the sector of medicine. The radiation disease acknowledged as professional concerned in 30 cases the skin, in two cases the lungs and in one case each the haematopoietic system, the eyes and the pelvic organs. In 8 indemnified, acute radiation exposure had caused the disease, in 25 the time of exposure had ranged from one year to several decades. The investigation describes when and under what professional circumstances the radiation exposure took place, the course of the disease, what kind of diagnostic and therapeutical measures were carried through and what personal and professional consequences the indemnified sustained. It gives suggestions to set up a future, more effective documentation system on the basis of the experience gathered on the occasion of this investigation with the currently valid registration system, which is unsuitable for further scientific studies, and with the currently practised methods of after-care. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Space storms and radiation causes and effects

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, Carolus J

    2010-01-01

    Heliophysics is a fast-developing scientific discipline that integrates studies of the Sun's variability, the surrounding heliosphere, and the environment and climate of planets. The Sun is a magnetically variable star and for planets with intrinsic magnetic fields, planets with atmospheres, or planets like Earth with both, there are profound consequences. This 2010 volume, the second in this series of three heliophysics texts, integrates the many aspects of space storms and the energetic radiation associated with them - from causes on the Sun to effects in planetary environments. It reviews t

  17. Functional Polymorphisms of Base Excision Repair Genes XRCC1 and APEX1 Predict Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Ming; Liao Zhongxing; Liu Zhensheng; Wang, Li-E; Gomez, Daniel; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Qingyi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To explore whether functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of base-excision repair genes are predictors of radiation treatment-related pneumonitis (RP), we investigated associations between functional SNPs of ADPRT, APEX1, and XRCC1 and RP development. Methods and Materials: We genotyped SNPs of ADPRT (rs1136410 [V762A]), XRCC1 (rs1799782 [R194W], rs25489 [R280H], and rs25487 [Q399R]), and APEX1 (rs1130409 [D148E]) in 165 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive chemoradiation therapy. Results were assessed by both Logistic and Cox regression models for RP risk. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated for the cumulative RP probability by the genotypes. Results: We found that SNPs of XRCC1 Q399R and APEX1 D148E each had a significant effect on the development of Grade ≥2 RP (XRCC1: AA vs. GG, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.97; APEX1: GG vs. TT, adjusted HR = 3.61, 95% CI, 1.64-7.93) in an allele-dose response manner (Trend tests: p = 0.040 and 0.001, respectively). The number of the combined protective XRCC1 A and APEX1 T alleles (from 0 to 4) also showed a significant trend of predicting RP risk (p = 0.001). Conclusions: SNPs of the base-excision repair genes may be biomarkers for susceptibility to RP. Larger prospective studies are needed to validate our findings.

  18. Recall lung pneumonitis due to carmustine after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, P.S.; Geddes, D.M. [Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Respiratory Medicine; Agrawal, S.; Gore, M. [Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-10-01

    A patient who developed pneumonitis immediately after the administration of carmustine (BCNU), within exactly the same field as previous irradiation, is presented. The patient responded partially to corticosteroids. This case suggests that irradiation causes subclinical sensitisation of the lung and can therefore have an additive effect in precipitating lung damage when another pulmonary toxin is encountered at a later date. (Author).

  19. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörr Harald

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the absorbed radiation dose and its distribution. Multi-organ-involvement and multi-organ-failure need be taken into account. The most vulnerable organ system to radiation exposure is the hematopoietic system. In addition to hematopoietic syndrome, radiation induced damage to the skin plays an important role in diagnostics and the treatment of radiation accident victims. The most important therapeutic principles with special reference to hematopoietic syndrome and cutaneous radiation syndrome are reviewed.

  20. Radiation and the lung: a reevaluation of the mechanisms mediating pulmonary injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, Graeme W.; Breit, Samuel N.

    1995-01-01

    Recent data from several investigators, including our unit, have provided additional information on the etiology of radiation-induced lung damage. These data suggest that there are two quite separate and distinct mechanisms involved: (a) classical radiation pneumonitis, which ultimately leads to pulmonary fibrosis is primarily due to radiation-induced local cytokine production confined to the field of irradiation; and (b) sporadic radiation pneumonitis, which is an immunologically mediated process resulting in a bilateral lymphocytic alveolitis that results in an 'out-of-field' response to localized pulmonary irradiation. Both animal experiments and human studies show that classical radiation pneumonitis has a threshold dose and a narrow sigmoid dose-response curve with increasing morbidity and mortality over a very small dose range. Clinical pneumonitis rarely causes death, whereas in the animal and human studies of classical radiation pneumonitis, all subjects will eventually suffer irreversible pulmonary damage and death. The description of classical radiation pneumonitis is that of an acute inflammatory response to lung irradiation, which is confined to the area of irradiation. Recent studies have also shown that irradiation induces gene transcription and results in the induction and release of proinflammatory cytokines and fibroblast mitogens in a similar fashion to other chronic inflammatory states, and which ultimately results in pulmonary fibrosis. The description of classical radiation pneumonitis does not adequately explain the following observed clinical characteristics: (a) the unpredictable and sporadic onset; (b) the occurrence in only a minority of patients; (c) the dyspnoea experienced, which is out of proportion to the volume of lung irradiated; and (d) the resolution of symptoms without sequelae in the majority of patients. We have demonstrated a bilateral lymphocytic alveolitis of activated T lymphocytes and a diffuse increase in gallium lung

  1. Can low-level radiation cause cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trosko, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    Health in a multicellular organism is maintained by homeostatic processes. Disruption of these homeostatic controls at the molecular, biochemical, cellular, and organ systems levels can be brought about by irreversible changes in the genetic material (mutagenesis), cell death (cytotoxicity), or reversible changes in the expression of genes at the transcriptional, translational, or posttranslational levels (epigenesis). While radiation is known to induce DNA damage/mutations, cell, death and epigenetic changes, in addition to cancers that are found in radiation-exposed animals, experimentally, and in humans, epidemiologically, the question is, At low-level exposure, what is the risk that cancers are open-quotes causedclose quotes by the radiation?

  2. PMMA Wettability Caused by Ultraviolet Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Dehtjars, J; Lancere, L; Poļaka, N; Soudnikovich, A; Tjuļkins, F; Valters, V

    2010-01-01

    The article is targeted to explore ultraviolet radiation (UV) influence on PMMAf or eye prostheses. UV beingt he Sun lightc omponenta nd could effect PMMA surface that in turn contributesi nteractionw ith tear. PMMA wettabilityw as poweredb y UV.

  3. Impact of Toxicity Grade and Scoring System on the Relationship Between Mean Lung Dose and Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis in a Large Cohort of Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, Susan L.; Jin Hekun; Wei Xiong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compute the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) as a function of mean lung dose (MLD), with RP scored using three grading systems and analyzed at four threshold levels of toxicity in a large cohort of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: On the basis of medical records and radiographic images, RP was scored retrospectively in 442 patients with NSCLC who had ≥6 months of follow-up after the end of RT. The severity of RP was scored for each patient using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0 (CTC2.0); the NCI Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 (CTCAE3.0); and the grading system of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). For each grading system and for each of four levels of toxicity (Grade ≥1, ≥2, ≥3, ≥4), the Lyman, logistic, and log-logistic normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models were fitted to the data as functions of MLD. The parameter estimates from the model fits are listed in table form, and the RP risk estimates are presented graphically for the Lyman and log-logistic NTCP models. Results: The results presented here illustrate the impact of scoring system and level of toxicity on the relationship between MLD and RP risk. Conclusions: These results facilitate quantitative comparisons between our data and studies of RP risk reported by others, and several examples of such comparisons are provided.

  4. Chlorambucil-Induced Acute Interstitial Pneumonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammad Shafqat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorambucil is an alkylating agent commonly used in treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. We report a case of interstitial pneumonitis developing in an 83-year-old man 1.5 months after completing a six-month course of chlorambucil for CLL. The interstitial pneumonitis responded to therapy with prednisone. We performed a systematic review of literature and identified 13 other case reports of chlorambucil-induced pulmonary toxicity, particularly interstitial pneumonitis. No unifying risk factor could be discerned and the mechanism of injury remains unknown. In contrast, major randomized trials of chlorambucil therapy in CLL have not reported interstitial pneumonitis as an adverse effect, which may be due to the rarity of the phenomenon or due to underreporting of events occurring after completion of treatment. Clinicians should consider drug-induced interstitial pneumonitis in the differential diagnosis of a suggestive syndrome developing even after discontinuation of chlorambucil.

  5. Radiation as a cause of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.; Silverstone, S.M.

    1976-01-01

    The possible role of radiation as a factor in the causation of breast cancer was investigated. Some variables said to be associated with a high risk of breast cancer include genetic factors, pre-existing breast disease, artificial menopause, family history of breast cancer, failure to breast feed, older than usual age at time of first pregnancy, high socioeconomic status, specific blood groups, fatty diet, obesity, and hormonal imbalances. To this list we must add ionizing radiation as an additional and serious risk factor in the causation of breast cancer. Among the irradiated groups which have an increase in the incidence of cancer of the breast are: tuberculous women subjected to repeated fluoroscopy; women who received localized x-ray treatments for acute post-partum mastitis; atom-bomb survivors; other x-ray exposures involving the breast, including irradiation in children and in experimental animals; and women who were treated with x rays for acne or hirsuitism. The dose of radiation received by the survivors of the atom bomb who subsequently developed cancer of the breast ranged from 80 to 800 rads, the tuberculous women who were fluoroscoped received an estimated 50 to 6,000 rads, the women who were treated for mastitis probably were exposed to 30 to 700 rads, and the patients with acne received 100 to 6,000 rads. These imprecise estimates are compared with mammographic doses in the range of 10s of rads to the breast at each examination, an imprecise estimate depending on technique and equipment. However imprecise these estimates may be, it is apparent that younger women are more likely than older women to develop cancer from exposure to radiation. It is pointed out that the American Cancer Society advises that women under 35 years should have mammography only for medical indication, not for so-called screening

  6. DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, R.K.; Peili Chen; Hahnfeldt, P.J.; Klatky, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of continuous-time Markov chain models for ionizing radiation damage to the genome of mammalian cells. In such models, immediate damage induced by the radiation is regarded as a batch-Poisson arrival process of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Enzymatic modification of the immediate damage is modeled as a Markov process similar to those described by the master equation of stochastic chemical kinetics. An illustrative example is the restitution/complete-exchange model. The model postulates that, after being induced by radiation, DSBs subsequently either undergo enzymatically mediated restitution (repair) or participate pairwise in chromosome exchanges. Some of the exchanges make irremediable lesions such as dicentric chromosome aberrations. One may have rapid irradiation followed by enzymatic DSB processing or have prolonged irradiation with both DSB arrival and enzymatic DSB processing continuing throughout the irradiation period. Methods for analyzing the Markov chains include using an approximate model for expected values, the discrete-time Markov chain embedded at transitions, partial differential equations for generating functions, normal perturbation theory, singular perturbation theory with scaling, numerical computations, and certain matrix methods that combine Perron-Frobenius theory with variational estimates. Applications to experimental results on expected values, variances, and statistical distributions of DNA lesions are briefly outlined. Continuous-time Markov chains are the most systematic of those radiation damage models that treat DSB-DSB interactions within the cell nucleus as homogeneous (e.g., ignore diffusion limitations). They contain virtually all other relevant homogeneous models and semiempirical summaries as special cases, limiting cases, or approximations. However, the Markov models do not seem to be well suited for studying spatial dependence of DSB interactions. 51 refs., 5 figs

  7. Lung nodules after whole lung radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.; Mirkin, D.L.; Provisor, A.; Hornback, N.B.; Smith, J.A.; Slabaugh, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    It is essential to recognize radiation pneumonitis after whole lung irradiation, or nodular changes in response to chemotherapy, so that such conditions are not mistaken for tumor metastases, causing grave error in patient management and the possibility of further lung damage

  8. Resonance in the restricted problem caused by solar radiation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, K.B.; Gupta, B.

    1977-01-01

    Resonance is discussed in the motion of an artificial Earth satellite caused by solar radiation pressure. The Hamiltonian and the generating functions occurring in the problem are expanded in the power series of small parameter β, which depends on solar radiation pressure. Also the perturbations in the osculating elements are obtained up to O(βsup(1/2)). (author)

  9. Ultraviolet-B radiation causes tendril coiling in Pisum sativum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosché, M.; Strid, A.

    2000-01-01

    Low dose UV-B radiation (UV-B BE,300 = 0.1 W m -2 ), but neither UV-A radiation, ozone and NaCl stress, nor wounding, caused tendril coiling in Pisum sativum. This coiling occurred with both attached and detached tendrils and can be used as a specific UV-B stress marker in pea

  10. Lung function evaluation in acute postradiation pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassem, E.; Zandwijk, N. van; Jassem, J.; Badzio, A.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was pulmonary function evaluation in patients with radiation pneumonitis (rp). Study group included 18 patients with symptomatic rp (8 with breast cancer, 6 with Hodgkin's disease and 4 with lung cancer) treated at the Netherland s Cancer inst. In Amsterdam between 1988 and 1994. The lung function tests were performed at the time of rp presentation and monthly thereafter and consisted of a standard spirometry: forced expiratory volume in 1 sec. (FEV1), vital capacity (VC) and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) performed with the use of a single breath technique. The mean values of DLCO, VC, FEV1 and TLC at the time of rp presentation were 72.2%, 91.0% and 85.8% of predicted value (pv), respectively. The results of the a bone tests at the last examination (66.4%, 85.6%, 77.2% and 76.2% of pv), respectively, were lower than those registered at the time of rp presentation. The highest degree of functional deterioration included diffusion capacity; the mean of the lowest values of DLCO was 56.4% of pv. Usually the lowest value of DLCO accompanied the exacerbation of clinical symptoms. The results of this study demonstrated pulmonary function deterioration in patients with rp. (author)

  11. Calculation of the dose caused by internal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    For the purposes of monitoring radiation exposure it is necessary to determine or to estimate the dose caused by both external and internal radiation. When comparing the value of exposure to the dose limits, account must be taken of the total dose incurred from different sources. This guide explains how to calculate the committed effective dose caused by internal radiation and gives the conversion factors required for the calculation. Application of the maximum values for radiation exposure is dealt with in ST guide 7.2, which also sets out the definitions of the quantities and concepts most commonly used in the monitoring of radiation exposure. The monitoring of exposure and recording of doses are dealt with in ST Guides 7.1 and 7.4.

  12. Chernobyl accident: Causes, consequences and problems of radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortov, V.; Ustyantsev, Yu.

    2013-01-01

    General description of Chernobyl accident is given in the review. The accident causes are briefly described. Special attention is paid to radiation situation after the accident and radiation measurements problems. Some data on Chernobyl disaster are compared with the corresponding data on Fukushima accident. It is noted that Chernobyl and Fukushima lessons should be taken into account while developing further measures on raising nuclear industry safety. -- Highlights: ► The short comparative analysis of accidents at Chernobyl and Fukushima is given. ► We note the great effect of β-radiation on the radiation situation at Chernobyl. ► We discuss the problems of radiation measurements under these conditions. ► The impact of shelter on the radiation situation near Chernobyl NPS is described

  13. Superior vena cava obstruction caused by radiation induced venous fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Putten, JWG; Schlosser, NJJ; Vujaskovic, Z; Van der Leest, AHD; Groen, HJM

    Superior vena cava syndrome is most often caused by lung carcinoma. Two cases are described in whom venous obstruction in the superior mediastinum was caused by local vascular fibrosis due to radiotherapy five and seven years earlier. The development of radiation injury to greater vessels is

  14. WE-AB-207B-02: A Bayesian Network Approach for Joint Prediction of Tumor Control and Radiation Pneumonitis (RP) in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Matuszak, M; Hobson, S; Jolly, S; Ten Haken, R; El Naqa, I [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: NSCLC radiotherapy treatment is a trade-off between controlling the tumor while limiting radiation-induced toxicities. Here we identify hierarchical biophysical relationships that could simultaneously influence both local control (LC) and RP by using an integrated Bayesian Networks (BN) approach. Methods: We studied 79 NSCLC patients treated on prospective protocol with 56 cases of LC and 21 events of RP. Beyond dosimetric information, each patient had 193 features including 12 clinical factors, 60 circulating blood cytokines before and during radiotherapy, 62 microRNAs, and 59 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The most relevant biophysical predictors for both LC and RP were identified using a Markov blanket local discovery algorithm and the corresponding BN was constructed using a score-learning algorithm. The area under the free-response receiver operating characteristics (AU-FROC) was used for performance evaluation. Cross-validation was employed to guard against overfitting pitfalls. Results: A BN revealing the biophysical interrelationships jointly in terms of LC and RP was developed and evaluated. The integrated BN included two SNPs, one microRNA, one clinical factor, three pre-treatment cytokines, relative changes of two cytokines between pre and during-treatment, and gEUDs of the GTV (a=-20) and lung (a=1). On cross-validation, the AUC prediction of independent LC was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.75–0.95) and RP was 0.83 (0.73–0.92). The AU-FROC of the integrated BN to predict both LC/RP was 0.81 (0.71–0.90) based on 2000 stratified bootstrap, indicating minimal loss in joint prediction power. Conclusions: We developed a new approach for multiple outcome utility application in radiotherapy based on integrated BN techniques. The BN developed from large-scale retrospective data is able to simultaneously predict LC and RP in NSCLC treatments based on individual patient characteristics. The joint prediction is only slightly compromised compared to

  15. WE-AB-207B-02: A Bayesian Network Approach for Joint Prediction of Tumor Control and Radiation Pneumonitis (RP) in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Matuszak, M; Hobson, S; Jolly, S; Ten Haken, R; El Naqa, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: NSCLC radiotherapy treatment is a trade-off between controlling the tumor while limiting radiation-induced toxicities. Here we identify hierarchical biophysical relationships that could simultaneously influence both local control (LC) and RP by using an integrated Bayesian Networks (BN) approach. Methods: We studied 79 NSCLC patients treated on prospective protocol with 56 cases of LC and 21 events of RP. Beyond dosimetric information, each patient had 193 features including 12 clinical factors, 60 circulating blood cytokines before and during radiotherapy, 62 microRNAs, and 59 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The most relevant biophysical predictors for both LC and RP were identified using a Markov blanket local discovery algorithm and the corresponding BN was constructed using a score-learning algorithm. The area under the free-response receiver operating characteristics (AU-FROC) was used for performance evaluation. Cross-validation was employed to guard against overfitting pitfalls. Results: A BN revealing the biophysical interrelationships jointly in terms of LC and RP was developed and evaluated. The integrated BN included two SNPs, one microRNA, one clinical factor, three pre-treatment cytokines, relative changes of two cytokines between pre and during-treatment, and gEUDs of the GTV (a=-20) and lung (a=1). On cross-validation, the AUC prediction of independent LC was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.75–0.95) and RP was 0.83 (0.73–0.92). The AU-FROC of the integrated BN to predict both LC/RP was 0.81 (0.71–0.90) based on 2000 stratified bootstrap, indicating minimal loss in joint prediction power. Conclusions: We developed a new approach for multiple outcome utility application in radiotherapy based on integrated BN techniques. The BN developed from large-scale retrospective data is able to simultaneously predict LC and RP in NSCLC treatments based on individual patient characteristics. The joint prediction is only slightly compromised compared to

  16. Hazards of the 'hard cash': hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupeli, Elif; Karnak, Demet; Sak, Serpil Dizbay; Kayacan, Oya

    2010-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is a nonimmunoglobulin E-related immune-mediated parenchymal lung disease. A 45-year-old woman who was a lifelong nonsmoker with a six-month history of frequent episodes of cough and dyspnea was admitted to hospital. She had been working as a money counter for 20 years at a central bank. Bibasilar crackles on lung auscultation, ground-glass opacities and a mosaic pattern on high-resolution computed tomography, restrictive abnormality on pulmonary function tests and mild hypoxemia were the prominent findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis revealed a predominance of CD4-positive T cells, and she tested positive on her natural challenge test. She was diagnosed with subacute HP based on established criteria. She was advised to discontinue counting fresh banknotes. Prednisolone was commenced, then tapered to discontinue in the ensuing six months. Clinical and radiological improvement was achieved within two months. To the authors' knowledge, the present report is the first to describe 'hard cash HP', possibly caused by chipping dust or printing dye.

  17. What is the probability that radiation caused a particular cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelz, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    Courts, lawyers, health physicists, physicians, and others are searching for a credible answer to the question posed in the title of this paper. The cases in which the question arises frequently stem from an individual that has cancer and they, or their next-of-kin, are convinced that a past radiation exposure - usually small - is responsible for causing it. An arithmetic expression of this problem is simple: the probability of causation by the radiation dose in question is equal to the risk of cancer from the radiation dose divided by the risk of cancer from all causes. The application of risk factors to this equation is not so simple. It must involve careful evaluation of the reliability of and variations in risk coefficients for development of cancer due to radiation exposure, other carcinogenic agents, and natural causes for the particular individual. Examination of our knowledge of these various factors indicates that a large range in the answers can result due to the variability and imprecision of the data. Nevertheless, the attempts to calculate and the probability that radiation caused the cancer is extremely useful to provide a gross perspective on the probability of causation. It will likely rule in or out a significant number of cases despite the limitations in our understandings of the etiology of cancer and the risks from various factors. For the remaining cases, a thoughtful and educated judgment based on selected data and circumstances of the case will also be needed before the expert can develop and support his opinion

  18. CO2 and solar radiation: cause of global warming?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayona Gabriel; Garcia, Yuri C.; Sarmiento Heiner R

    2010-01-01

    A cause-effect relationship between global temperature as a climatic change indicator and some of the main forcing mechanisms (Atmospheric CO 2 concentration, solar radiation and volcanic activity) are analyzed in this paper through time series analysis for the 1610-1990 AD period comparing trends and variability for the frequency spectrums. Temperature seems to fit the CO 2 trend for the last century, but we found no cause-effect relationship for this interval. The frequency analysis shows a correlation between radiation and temperature for a period of 22 years. Volcanism presents an inverse relationship with temperature better seen at a decadal scale.

  19. Pathological study about two autopsy cases of bilateral irradiation pneumonitis induced by unilateral irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Noriko; Tajima, Yo; Iio, Masaaki; Oshima, Takeo; Iino, Koichi.

    1978-01-01

    The first case is a 73-year-old man with left lung cancer. Seven days after completion of radiotherapy 7,000 rad, a chest roentgenogram showed diffuse bilateral pneumonia. The second case is a 61-year-old woman with right lung cancer and about one month after completion of radiotherapy 2,600 rad, a chest roentgenogram showed bilateral pneumonia. Pathological findings, all lobes of both lungs of these cases showed acute interstitial pneumonitis. The pathogenesis of irradiation pneumonitis is poorly understood. Several investigators thought that the pathogenesis of irradiation pneumonitis was caused by autoimmune mechanism, they carried out sero-pathological studies and demonstrated the bilateral pneumonia caused by unilateral irradiation. (author)

  20. First case of severe pneumonic tularemia in an immunocompetent patient in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigaloff, K.C.E.; Chung, P.K.; Koopmans, J.; Notermans, D.W.; Rijckevorsel, Van G.G.C.; Koene, M.; Sprengers, R.W.; Gooskens, J.; Stalenhoef, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    Tularemia is a zoonosis caused by different subspecies of the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis. We report the first case in the Netherlands of pneumonic tularemia caused by the F. tularensis subspecies holarctica after probable occupational inhalation of contaminated aerosols.

  1. First case of severe pneumonic tularemia in an immunocompetent patient in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigaloff, K C E; Chung, P K; Koopmans, J; Notermans, D W; van Rijckevorsel, G G C; Koene, M; Sprengers, R W; Gooskens, J; Stalenhoef, J E

    Tularemia is a zoonosis caused by different subspecies of the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis. We report the first case in the Netherlands of pneumonic tularemia caused by the F. tularensis subspecies holarctica after probable occupational inhalation of contaminated aerosols.

  2. Ionizing radiation causing a risk of cancer in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichardt, T.; Sandison, A.G.; Savage, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt has been made to present, in short review, the most important carcinogens that have been implicated in the development of cancer in the various organ sites of the human body and to demonstrate the relatively minor role played by ionizing radiation, especially radiotherapy, in causing a risk of cancer in man

  3. The causes and consequences of human exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Few phenomena cause as much concern in developed countries as human exposure to artificial sources of radiation, and yet there are more potent threats to health: natural radiation is more pervasive and exposures more substantial; common practices such as smoking and drinking are more detrimental. Developing countries may be more anxious to establish radiological procedures than radiological protection. This paper gives the ranges of exposure to which people are subjected from natural and artificial sources which should help to put all doses in perspective. The relationship between dose and risk is established and used to show that exposures to radiation leak to low levels of risk. Finally, the new recommendations of ICRP for the control of radiation risk are presented. (Author)

  4. [A case of flomoxef-induced pneumonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wako, Y; Hamauzu, T; Tamura, M; Yokote, M; Yokote, M; Shoji, S; Takikawa, H; Miyake, K; Yamanaka, M; Goto, H

    1992-04-01

    We report a case of flomoxef-induced pneumonitis. A 22-year-old man was treated with flomoxef following liver biopsy. A few days later he developed a high fever and severe dyspnea, and his chest X-ray film revealed diffuse reticulo-nodular shadows in both lung fields. We suspected interstitial pneumonitis due to flomoxef, and pulse therapy with methylprednisolone was started. He showed rapid recovery of symptoms and marked regression of pulmonary infiltration in his chest X-ray. Lymphocyte stimulation test was positive to flomoxef, which was compatible with the diagnosis of drug-induced pneumonitis. To our knowledge, there has been no previous case of pulmonary hypersensitivity to flomoxef reported in Japan.

  5. High-resolution computed tomography and histopathological findings in hypersensitivity pneumonitis: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Pedro Paulo Teixeira e Silva; Moreira, Marise Amaral Reboucas; Silva, Daniela Graner Schuwartz Tannus; Moreira, Maria Auxiliadora do Carmo [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil); Gama, Roberta Rodrigues Monteiro da [Hospital do Cancer de Barretos, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Sugita, Denis Masashi, E-mail: pedroptstorres@yahoo.com.br [Anapolis Unievangelica, Anapolis, GO (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a diffuse interstitial and granulomatous lung disease caused by the inhalation of any one of a number of antigens. The objective of this study was to illustrate the spectrum of abnormalities in high-resolution computed tomography and histopathological findings related to hypersensitivity pneumonitis. We retrospectively evaluated patients who had been diagnosed with hypersensitivity pneumonitis (on the basis of clinical-radiological or clinical-radiological-pathological correlations) and had undergone lung biopsy. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is clinically divided into acute, subacute, and chronic forms; high-resolution computed tomography findings correlate with the time of exposure; and the two occasionally overlap. In the subacute form, centrilobular micronodules, ground glass opacities, and air trapping are characteristic high-resolution computed tomography findings, whereas histopathology shows lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrates, bronchiolitis, variable degrees of organizing pneumonia, and giant cells. In the chronic form, high-resolution computed tomography shows traction bronchiectasis, honeycombing, and lung fibrosis, the last also being seen in the biopsy sample. A definitive diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis can be made only through a multidisciplinary approach, by correlating clinical findings, exposure history, high-resolution computed tomography findings, and lung biopsy findings. (author)

  6. Chlamydial Pneumonitis: A Creepy Neonatal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam Lun Hon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of neonatal chlamydial pneumonitis to illustrate that a high index of suspicion is necessary to make the diagnosis so that treatment can be promptly instituted. The child was afebrile and the only symptom was a cough. The respiratory equations are calculated to understand the respiratory physiology. There was no overt abnormality with ventilation, oxygenation, compliance, resistance, or ventilation-perfusion mismatch despite radiographic abnormality. The literature is searched to review if treatment with a systemic macrolide antibiotic is needed in an otherwise asymptomatic neonate with chlamydial pneumonitis.

  7. Analysis of causes of radiation overexposures for radiation workers in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, J.M.; Massand, O.P.

    2001-01-01

    About 5500 radiation workers are monitored from industrial institutions in our country out of which 3600 radiation workers are working in industrial radiography institutions. These workers have a higher potential of receiving overexposure (equivalent dose 3 10 mSv) due to their nature of work. This paper presents analysis of overexposures and their causes for radiation workers working in industrial radiography institutions during the last seven years. (author)

  8. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis: a complex lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riario Sforza, Gian Galeazzo; Marinou, Androula

    2017-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), also called extrinsic allergic alveolitis, is a respiratory syndrome involving the lung parenchyma and specifically the alveoli, terminal bronchioli, and alveolar interstitium, due to a delayed allergic reaction. Such reaction is secondary to a repeated and prolonged inhalation of different types of organic dusts or other substances to which the patient is sensitized and hyper responsive, primarily consisting of organic dusts of animal or vegetable origin, more rarely from chemicals. The prevalence of HP is difficult to evaluate because of uncertainties in detection and misdiagnosis and lacking of widely accepted diagnostic criteria, and varies considerably depending on disease definition, diagnostic methods, exposure modalities, geographical conditions, agricultural and industrial practices, and host risk factors. HP can be caused by multiple agents that are present in work places and in the home, such as microbes, animal and plant proteins, organic and inorganic chemicals. The number of environment, settings and causative agents is increasing over time. From the clinical point of view HP can be divided in acute/subacute and chronic, depending on the intensity and frequency of exposure to causative antigens. The mainstay in managing HP is the avoidance of the causative antigen, though the complete removal is not always possible due to the difficulties to identify the agent or because its avoidance may lead to major changes in life style or occupational settings. HP is a complex syndrome that needs urgently for more stringent and selective diagnostic criteria and validation, including wider panels of IgG, and a closer collaboration with occupational physicians, as part of a multidisciplinary expertise.

  9. Pneumonic Plague Transmission, Moramanga, Madagascar, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasindrazana, Beza; Andrianaivoarimanana, Voahangy; Rakotondramanga, Jean Marius; Birdsell, Dawn N; Ratsitorahina, Maherisoa; Rajerison, Minoarisoa

    2017-03-01

    During a pneumonic plague outbreak in Moramanga, Madagascar, we identified 4 confirmed, 1 presumptive, and 9 suspected plague case-patients. Human-to-human transmission among close contacts was high (reproductive number 1.44) and the case fatality rate was 71%. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Yersinia pestis isolates belonged to group q3, different from the previous outbreak.

  10. Legionnaire's disease - a puzzling pneumonic illness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, P.; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

    1981-01-01

    Three cases of a pneumonic illness are described, produced by a newly discovered causal organism. This is the weakly gram negative bacterium Legionelle pneumophila. The organisms is found intracellularly and can be recognised by direct or indirect immunofluorescence or the Dieterle staining. The clinical picture is characterised by a fulminating pneumonia with accompanying diarrhoea. Treatment of choice is intravenous erythromycin. (orig.) [de

  11. Documentation of Occupational Accidents and Diseases caused by Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehringer, F.; Seitz, G.

    2004-01-01

    . One of the major goals of the institutions for statutory accident insurance is the prevention of occupational diseases. To perform a successful prevention work it is necessary not only to count the number of accidents or diseases in the various working fields but to look for details of the conditions of work and the human response to those conditions. The institutions for statutory accident insurance have engaged the institution for statutory accident insurance in the precision engineering and electrical industry to carry out documentation, in form of a data bank, for all cases of occupational diseases which could be caused by ionising radiation. Those are not only the cases which are accepted as occupational disease but also the cases where a suspicion of an occupational disease is announced but finally rejected. At the moment about 1700 cases are included in the data bank. For preserving the anonymity information to name and residence are deleted. Various data to one single case are linked by a case-specific key-number. Information to occupation and field of working, to details of a possible exposure to ionising radiation like kind of radiation, time and duration of radiation, exposure of the whole body or of parts of the body and whole body or organ doses are collected. Additional information refers to medical aspects like diagnosis and date of diagnosis. (Author)

  12. Multiple causes of stress in the context of radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, P.T.

    1996-01-01

    In the presence of a threat from radiation, such as that posed by exposure to contamination caused by the Chernobyl accident, people are actually confronted with a variety of 'threats'. These include a mixture of components having objective and subjective elements. The management of countermeasures, in particular, contributes to the definition of the situation which labels the threats of people encounter. Some findings from the affected areas in the former Soviet Union are discussed to demonstrate the impact of several factors on the affect response of the population. (author)

  13. Complication of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imajo, Yoshinari; Suematsu, Toru; Narabayashi, Isamu; Gose, Kyuhei; Takimoto, Saeko

    1984-01-01

    The radiation pneumonitis is a major complication for patients recieving thoracic irradiation. This report describe the radiographic recognition, pathological change and imapired pulmonary functions of radiation pneumonitis. The 57 patients with lung cancer treated with radiation are analyzed on the pneumonitis by chest X-P. Among these, 50 patients (88%) develop radiation pneumonitis. Repeated CT scans give more detailed information than conventional radiograms as to exdative changes. The pathological analysis are made on the 35 patients of which affected lungs are resected after pre-operative irradiation. Three phases are recognized in the evolution of pneumonitis, the ongestive, the degenerative, and the fibrotic. Adding to the morphorogical damage, pulmonary functions also detrieorate both in ventilation and perfusion scans. (author)

  14. Clinical spectrum of cryptogenic organising pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellomo, R; Finlay, M; McLaughlin, P; Tai, E

    1991-01-01

    Cryptogenic organising pneumonitis (bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia) is an uncommon condition that often responds to steroids. It is characterised clinically by constitutional symptoms, pathologically by intra-alveolar organising fibrosis, and radiologically by patchy pulmonary infiltrates. Its full clinical spectrum and course are only partially described and understood. Six patients are described, seen over three years, with considerably diverse clinical and radiological presentations (two had diffuse lung infiltrates, two had peripheral lung infiltrates, and two had localised lobar involvement) and with very varying severity of disease (two with a life threatening illness, three with appreciable subacute constitutional symptoms, and one with mild symptoms). It is concluded that cryptogenic organising pneumonitis can present in various ways. A set of diagnostic criteria are proposed which will help in the recognition of this syndrome, which is probably underdiagnosed. Images PMID:1926023

  15. [Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis: a clinicopathologic entity, histologic pattern or unclassified group of heterogeneous interstitial pneumonitis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, António; Moura, M Conceição Souto; Cruz, M Rosa; Gomes, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (NSIP) initially described by Katzenstein and Fiorelli in 1994, seems to be a distinct clinicopathologic entity among idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis (IIP). Besides different histologic features from other IIP, NSIP is characterized by a better long-term outcome, associated with a better steroids responsiveness than idiopathic pulmonar fibrosis (IPF), where usually were included. Thus, differentiating NSIP from other IIP, namely IPF is very significant, since it has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. NSIP encloses different pathologies, namely those with inflammatory predominance (cellular subtype) or fibrous predominance (fibrosing subtype). NSIP is reviewed and discussed by the authors, after two clinical cases description.

  16. Ambient ultraviolet radiation causes mortality in salamander eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaustein, A.R.; Edmond, B.; Kiesecker, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Previous research has shown that amphibian species have differential sensitivity to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation. In some anuran species, ambient levels of UV-B cause mortality in embryonic stages and hatching success is significantly reduced. Projected increases in UV-B may affect an increasing number of species. The adverse effects of UV-B may eventually be manifested at the population level and may ultimately contribute to population declines. Using field experiments, we investigated the effects of ambient UV-B on salamander (Ambystoma gracile) embryos developing at natural oviposition sites. We show that the hatching success of eggs of A. gracile shielded from UV-B is significantly higher than those not shielded from UV-B. 27 refs., 1 fig

  17. A case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis with giant cells in a female dental technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Chung, Yun Kyung; Kim, Changhwan; Nam, Eun Suk; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Joo, Youngsu

    2013-10-04

    Dental technicians are exposed to methyl methacrylate(MMA) and hard metal dusts while working, and several cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by the exposure have been reported. The authors experienced a case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a female dental technician who had 10 years' work experience and report the case with clinical evidence. The patient's work, personal, social, and past and present medical histories were investigated based on patient questioning and medical records. Furthermore, the workplace conditions and tools and materials the patient worked with were also evaluated. Next, the pathophysiology and risk factors of pneumonitis were studied, and studies on the relationship between hypersensitivity pneumonitis and a dental technician's exposure to dust were reviewed. Any changes in the clinical course of her disease were noted for evaluation of the work-relatedness of the disease. The patient complained of cough and sputum for 1 year. In addition, while walking up the stairs, the patient was not able to ascend without resting due to dyspnea. She visited our emergency department due to epistaxis, and secondary hypertension was incidentally suspected. Laboratory tests including serologic, electrolyte, and endocrinologic tests and a simple chest radiograph showed no specific findings, but chest computed tomography revealed a centrilobular ground-glass pattern in both lung fields. A transbronchial biopsy was performed, and bronchoalveolar washing fluid was obtained. Among the findings of the laboratory tests, microcalcification, noncaseating granuloma containing foreign body-type giant cells, and metal particles within macrophages were identified histologically. Based on these results, hypersensitivity pneumonitis was diagnosed. The patient stopped working due to admission, and she completely quit her job within 2 months of restarting work due to reappearance of the symptoms. In this study, the patient did not have typical radiologic

  18. Investigation of the Relationship Between Gross Tumor Volume Location and Pneumonitis Rates Using a Large Clinical Database of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have suggested that function may vary throughout the lung, and that patients who have tumors located in the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship between gross tumor volume (GTV) location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of 547 patients with non–small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The GTV centroids of all patients were mapped onto one common coordinate system, in which the boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. The data were qualitatively analyzed by graphing all centroids and displaying the data according to the presence of severe pneumonitis, tumor stage, and smoking status. The centroids were grouped according to superior–inferior segments, and the pneumonitis rates were analyzed. In addition, we incorporated the GTV centroid information into a Lyman–Kutcher–Burman normal tissue complication probability model and tested whether adding spatial information significantly improved the fit of the model. Results: Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. The pneumonitis incidence rates were 16%, 23%, and 21% for the superior, middle, and inferior thirds of the lung, respectively. Qualitatively, the GTV centroids of nonsmokers were notably absent from the superior portion of the lung. In addition, the GTV centroids of patients who had Stage III and IV clinical staging were concentrated toward the medial edge of the lung. The comparison between the GTV centroid model and the conventional dose–volume model did not yield a statistically significant difference in model fit. Conclusions: Lower pneumonitis rates were noted for the superior portion of the lung; however the differences were not statistically significant. For our patient cohort, incorporating GTV centroid information did not lead to a statistically significant

  19. Investigation of the relationship between gross tumor volume location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L; Liao, Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K

    2012-04-01

    Studies have suggested that function may vary throughout the lung, and that patients who have tumors located in the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship between gross tumor volume (GTV) location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of 547 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. The GTV centroids of all patients were mapped onto one common coordinate system, in which the boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. The data were qualitatively analyzed by graphing all centroids and displaying the data according to the presence of severe pneumonitis, tumor stage, and smoking status. The centroids were grouped according to superior-inferior segments, and the pneumonitis rates were analyzed. In addition, we incorporated the GTV centroid information into a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal tissue complication probability model and tested whether adding spatial information significantly improved the fit of the model. Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. The pneumonitis incidence rates were 16%, 23%, and 21% for the superior, middle, and inferior thirds of the lung, respectively. Qualitatively, the GTV centroids of nonsmokers were notably absent from the superior portion of the lung. In addition, the GTV centroids of patients who had Stage III and IV clinical staging were concentrated toward the medial edge of the lung. The comparison between the GTV centroid model and the conventional dose-volume model did not yield a statistically significant difference in model fit. Lower pneumonitis rates were noted for the superior portion of the lung; however the differences were not statistically significant. For our patient cohort, incorporating GTV centroid information did not lead to a statistically significant improvement in the fit of the pneumonitis model. Copyright

  20. Pneumonic Plague: The Darker Side of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechous, Roger D; Sivaraman, Vijay; Stasulli, Nikolas M; Goldman, William E

    2016-03-01

    Inhalation of the bacterium Yersinia pestis results in primary pneumonic plague. Pneumonic plague is the most severe manifestation of plague, with mortality rates approaching 100% in the absence of treatment. Its rapid disease progression, lethality, and ability to be transmitted via aerosol have compounded fears of the intentional release of Y. pestis as a biological weapon. Importantly, recent epidemics of plague have highlighted a significant role for pneumonic plague during outbreaks of Y. pestis infections. In this review we describe the characteristics of pneumonic plague, focusing on its disease progression and pathogenesis. The rapid time-course, severity, and difficulty of treating pneumonic plague highlight how differences in the route of disease transmission can enhance the lethality of an already deadly pathogen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimation of pneumonitis risk in three-dimensional treatment planning using dose-volume histogram analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oetzel, Dieter; Schraube, Peter; Hensley, Frank; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Menke, Markus; Flentje, Michael

    1995-01-01

    a paired organ. Conclusions: Realistic assessments for the prediction of radiation-induced pneumonitis seem to be possible. In this respect, the implementation of DVH-analysis in 3D planning could be a helpful tool for the evaluation of treatment plans

  2. Radiation, waves, fields. Causes and effects on environment and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitgeb, N.

    1990-01-01

    The book discusses static electricity, alternating electric fields, magnetostatic fields, alternating magnetic fields, electromagnetic radiation, optical and ionizing radiation and their hazards and health effects. Each chapter presents basic physical and biological concepts and describes the common radiation sources and their biological effects. Each chapter also contains hints for everyday behaviour as well as in-depth information an specific scientific approaches for assessing biological effects; the latter are addressed to all expert readers working in these fields. There is a special chapter on the problem of so-called 'terrestrial radiation'. (orig.) With 88 figs., 31 tabs [de

  3. Ionizing radiation causes the stress response in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruntenko, N.E.; Zakharenko, L.P.; Raushenbakh, I.Yu.

    1998-01-01

    Potentiality of the stress-reaction arising in Drosophila melanogaster under gamma-irradiation of the source with 137 Cs (irradiation dose is 10 Gy , radiation dose rate amounts 180 c Gy/min) is studied. It is shown that radiation induces the stress-reaction in Drosophila resulting in alterations in energetic metabolism (biogenic amines metabolic system) and in reproductive function [ru

  4. Early host cell targets of Yersinia pestis during primary pneumonic plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D Pechous

    Full Text Available Inhalation of Yersinia pestis causes primary pneumonic plague, a highly lethal syndrome with mortality rates approaching 100%. Pneumonic plague progression is biphasic, with an initial pre-inflammatory phase facilitating bacterial growth in the absence of host inflammation, followed by a pro-inflammatory phase marked by extensive neutrophil influx, an inflammatory cytokine storm, and severe tissue destruction. Using a FRET-based probe to quantitate injection of effector proteins by the Y. pestis type III secretion system, we show that these bacteria target alveolar macrophages early during infection of mice, followed by a switch in host cell preference to neutrophils. We also demonstrate that neutrophil influx is unable to limit bacterial growth in the lung and is ultimately responsible for the severe inflammation during the lethal pro-inflammatory phase.

  5. An Extremely Rapid Case of Pneumonitis with the Use of Nivolumab for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Barros Costa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cancer death in the United States despite comprising a small percentage of the total number of cancer cases. The estimated 5-year overall survival (OS for patients with distant metastatic disease is approximately 3%. New treatment options are an unmet need and remain an area of active investigation. A 53-year-old male with metastatic pancreatic cancer presented to the hospital with acute-on-chronic respiratory failure approximately 24 hours after receiving a novel therapeutic combination. Chest imaging showed marked changes as concerning for pneumonitis. Infectious workup was negative. The patient had initial clinical improvement after receiving initial intravenous steroids and oxygen support but eventually deteriorated later opting for supportive measures only. With infection ruled out, drug-induced pneumonitis was felt to be the likely cause of the radiologic and clinical changes. The rapidity of onset of symptoms is the aspect being highlighted in this case.

  6. Differentiation between endobronchial tuberculosis and bronchogenic carcinoma associated with atelectasis or obstructive pneumonitis: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hwan Hoon; Oh, Yu Whan; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Jung Hyuk

    1995-01-01

    Endobronchial tuberculosis and bronchogenic cancer are common causes of atelectasis or obstructive pneumonitis in Korea. Differentiation between endobronchial tuberculosis and bronchogenic carcinoma is important for the treatment and prognosis but it is sometimes difficult to differentiate these two lesions with radiologic examinations. The purpose of this study was to find the differential points between endobronchial tuberculosis and bronchogenic carcinoma associated with atelectasis or obstructive pneumonitis. Forty patients in whom atelectasis or obstructive pneumonitis was detected on chest radiographs comprised the study. A definite mass opacity was not observed on chest radiographs in all patients. In these patients, the causes of obstruction were endobronchial tuberculosis (n = 20) and bronchogenic cancer (n = 20) which were microbiologically or pathologically confirmed. Double obstructive lesions were more frequently found in endobronchial tuberculosis (8/20) than in bronchogenic cancer (1/20). Multiple calcification along the bronchial wall and severe distortion of bronchi were observed only in endobronchial tuberculosis (4/20) and associated low density mass at obstruction site was only observed in bronchogenic cancer (6/20). Bronchial dilatation (11/20) and parenchymal calcifications (14/20) distal to obstruction site, air containing bronchogram at post obstructive bronchus (14/20) were more frequently found in endobronchial tuberculosis. Contour bulging at obstruction site (14/20), and only mucus bronchogram at post obstructive bronchus (14/20) were more frequently found in bronchogenic carcinoma. In patients with atelectasis or obstructive pneumonitis, endobronchial tuberculosis is characterized by double obstructive lesion, multiple calcifications at the bronchial wall, and severe distortion of the bronchi. Endobronchial carcinoma is characterized by a low density mass at the obstructive site

  7. Increased mortality by septicemia, interstitial pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis among bone marrow transplant recipients receiving an increased mean dose rate of total irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringden, O.; Baaryd, I.; Johansson, B.

    1983-01-01

    Seven bone marrow transplant recipients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia receiving a mean dose rate of 0.07 Gy/min of total body irradiation towards the pelvic midpoint and the lungs had an increased (p<0.01) overall death rate of 86 per cent compared with 33 per cent among 27 patients with acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with a mean dose rate of 0.04 Gy/min. Among the patients receiving the higher dose rate there was an increased mortality in causes related to radiation toxicity like early septicemia, interstitial pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis, compared with all patients receiving the lower dose rate (p<0.01) and also with 10 patients from this group with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (p<0.02). (Auth.)

  8. Complete Protection against Pneumonic and Bubonic Plague after a Single Oral Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbise, Anne; Hanada, Yuri; Khalifé, Manal; Carniel, Elisabeth; Demeure, Christian E

    2015-01-01

    No efficient vaccine against plague is currently available. We previously showed that a genetically attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis producing the Yersinia pestis F1 antigen was an efficient live oral vaccine against pneumonic plague. This candidate vaccine however failed to confer full protection against bubonic plague and did not produce F1 stably. The caf operon encoding F1 was inserted into the chromosome of a genetically attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis, yielding the VTnF1 strain, which stably produced the F1 capsule. Given orally to mice, VTnF1 persisted two weeks in the mouse gut and induced a high humoral response targeting both F1 and other Y. pestis antigens. The strong cellular response elicited was directed mostly against targets other than F1, but also against F1. It involved cells with a Th1-Th17 effector profile, producing IFNγ, IL-17, and IL-10. A single oral dose (108 CFU) of VTnF1 conferred 100% protection against pneumonic plague using a high-dose challenge (3,300 LD50) caused by the fully virulent Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, vaccination protected 100% of mice from bubonic plague caused by a challenge with 100 LD50 Y. pestis and 93% against a high-dose infection (10,000 LD50). Protection involved fast-acting mechanisms controlling Y. pestis spread out of the injection site, and the protection provided was long-lasting, with 93% and 50% of mice surviving bubonic and pneumonic plague respectively, six months after vaccination. Vaccinated mice also survived bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by a high-dose of non-encapsulated (F1-) Y. pestis. VTnF1 is an easy-to-produce, genetically stable plague vaccine candidate, providing a highly efficient and long-lasting protection against both bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by wild type or un-encapsulated (F1-negative) Y. pestis. To our knowledge, VTnF1 is the only plague vaccine ever reported that could provide high and durable protection against the two forms of plague after a single oral

  9. Complete Protection against Pneumonic and Bubonic Plague after a Single Oral Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Derbise

    Full Text Available No efficient vaccine against plague is currently available. We previously showed that a genetically attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis producing the Yersinia pestis F1 antigen was an efficient live oral vaccine against pneumonic plague. This candidate vaccine however failed to confer full protection against bubonic plague and did not produce F1 stably.The caf operon encoding F1 was inserted into the chromosome of a genetically attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis, yielding the VTnF1 strain, which stably produced the F1 capsule. Given orally to mice, VTnF1 persisted two weeks in the mouse gut and induced a high humoral response targeting both F1 and other Y. pestis antigens. The strong cellular response elicited was directed mostly against targets other than F1, but also against F1. It involved cells with a Th1-Th17 effector profile, producing IFNγ, IL-17, and IL-10. A single oral dose (108 CFU of VTnF1 conferred 100% protection against pneumonic plague using a high-dose challenge (3,300 LD50 caused by the fully virulent Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, vaccination protected 100% of mice from bubonic plague caused by a challenge with 100 LD50 Y. pestis and 93% against a high-dose infection (10,000 LD50. Protection involved fast-acting mechanisms controlling Y. pestis spread out of the injection site, and the protection provided was long-lasting, with 93% and 50% of mice surviving bubonic and pneumonic plague respectively, six months after vaccination. Vaccinated mice also survived bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by a high-dose of non-encapsulated (F1- Y. pestis.VTnF1 is an easy-to-produce, genetically stable plague vaccine candidate, providing a highly efficient and long-lasting protection against both bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by wild type or un-encapsulated (F1-negative Y. pestis. To our knowledge, VTnF1 is the only plague vaccine ever reported that could provide high and durable protection against the two forms of plague after a single

  10. Is UV-A radiation a cause of malignant melanoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moan, J.

    1994-01-01

    The first action spectrum for cutaneous malignant melanoma was published recently. This spectrum was obtained using the fish Xiphophorus. If the same action spectrum applies to humans, the following statements are true: Sunbathing products (agents to protect against the sun) that absorb UV-B radiation provide almost no protection against cutaneous malignant melanoma. UV-A-solaria are more dangerous than expected so far. If people are determined to use artificial sources of radiation for tanning, they should choose UV-B solaria rather than UV-A-solaria. Fluorescent tubes and halogen lamps may have weak melanomagenic effects. Ozone depletion has almost no effect on the incidence rates of CMM, since ozone absorbs very little UV-A radiation. Sunbathing products which contain UV-A-absorbing compounds or neutral filter (like titanium oxide) provide real protection against cutaneous malignant melanoma, at least if they are photochemically inert. 34 refs., 2 figs

  11. Changes in the oral mucous membrane caused by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terahara, Atsuro

    1997-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for head and neck cancers, but radiation damages appear in the normal mucous membrane at high frequencies because the membrane is often positioned in the radiation area. Here, the appearance patterns of such damages and the therapeutic methods for them were briefly described. Generally, there were no subjective and objective symptoms immediately after the radiation, but those often appeared from the time around 2 weeks after the initiation of radiotherapy and when the total dose reached a level near 20 Gy. The major symptoms were as follows; flare and edema, oral dryness due to decreased salivation, taste alteration reduced appetite, infections due to reduced immunoreactivity etc. For these symptoms, some symptomatic treatments are carried out along with prophylactic ones to keep the oral cavity clean. As the local treatments; spraying of steroid agent, administrations of antiphlogistic/analgesic agents, mucous membrane protecting agents, etc. are often conducted to improve the lowering of QDL. (M.N.)

  12. Molecular and Culture-Based Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Testing for the Diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus Pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Susanna K; Burgener, Elizabeth B; Waggoner, Jesse J; Gajurel, Kiran; Gonzalez, Sarah; Chen, Sharon F; Pinsky, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, with CMV pneumonitis among the most severe manifestations of infection. Although bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples are frequently tested for CMV, the clinical utility of such testing remains uncertain. Methods.  Retrospective analysis of adult patients undergoing BAL testing via CMV polymerase chain reaction (PCR), shell vial culture, and conventional viral culture between August 2008 and May 2011 was performed. Cytomegalovirus diagnostic methods were compared with a comprehensive definition of CMV pneumonitis that takes into account signs and symptoms, underlying host immunodeficiency, radiographic findings, and laboratory results. Results.  Seven hundred five patients underwent 1077 bronchoscopy episodes with 1090 BAL specimens sent for CMV testing. Cytomegalovirus-positive patients were more likely to be hematopoietic cell transplant recipients (26% vs 8%, P definition, the sensitivity and specificity of PCR, shell vial culture, and conventional culture were 91.3% and 94.6%, 54.4% and 97.4%, and 28.3% and 96.5%, respectively. Compared with culture, PCR provided significantly higher sensitivity and negative predictive value (P ≤ .001), without significantly lower positive predictive value. Cytomegalovirus quantitation did not improve test performance, resulting in a receiver operating characteristic curve with an area under the curve of 0.53. Conclusions.  Cytomegalovirus PCR combined with a comprehensive clinical definition provides a pragmatic approach for the diagnosis of CMV pneumonitis.

  13. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis in nonhuman primates: studies on the relationship of immunoregulation and disease activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, R.H.; Calvanico, N.J.; Stevens, J.O.

    1982-01-01

    We investigated the relationship of immunoregulation to disease activity in a nonhuman primate model of pigeon breeder's disease. Two Macaca arctoides monkeys developed classical symptoms of hypersensitivity pneumonitis after sensitization and prolonged bronchial challenge, whereas 2 other monkeys remained asymptomatic after in vivo challenge. There were no differences in the percentages of T cells, B cells, monocytes, or FCγ-bearing T cells between symptomatic and asymptomatic animals. Nonetheless, we found a population of concanavalin A-induced, pigeon serum- (PS) induced, and spontaneous T cells that functioned as suppressor cells in autologous in vitro co-cultures in asymptomatic animals that were missing or nonfunctional in symptomatic animals. Monocyte suppressors functioned in both groups. We used low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) to inactivate T suppressor cells. Fifteen radiation units of TBI caused no change in the physical activity, routine chemistries, or blood counts of the 4 animals. After TBI, however, the previously asymptomatic animals developed fever, tachypnea, and signs of pulmonary congestion after in vivo challenge with PS. There was no change in the response to challenge in the symptomatic group. This altered response to in vivo challenge in the previously asymptomatic group persisted for 2 wk after TBI. During this period the difference in in vitro immunoregulatory activity between Con A-induced, PS-induced, and spontaneous T cells in symptomatic and asymptomatic animals disappeared. Monocyte suppressors, however, continued to function in both groups after TBI. these data suggest that the monkey is an appropriate model for studies of human HP and that T cell immunoregulation may be an important element in the pathogenesis and disease activity of HP

  14. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis with Mycobacterium avium complex among spa workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraga-McHaley, Stephanie Ann; Landen, Michael; Krapfl, Heidi; Sewell, C Mack

    2013-01-01

    The New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) investigated the cause of two cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) in spa maintenance workers with laboratory confirmed Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). The investigation occurred in tandem with worker protection and swimming pool regulatory investigations by the New Mexico Environment Department at the spa where the workers were employed. The investigation was conducted in order to identify unreported cases, exposure source(s), and to prevent further worker exposure. NMDOH surveyed 57 spa employees about symptoms and exposures, categorized jobs according to self-reported exposure to water, and computed odds ratios for symptom reporting by exposure category. Environmental isolates from spa water and filter swabs were cultured and compared to patient isolates by the Environmental and Applied Microbiology Team, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Workers with the highest exposure reported more HP-like symptoms (OR = 9.6), as did intermediate exposure workers (OR = 6.5), compared to workers with no aerosolized water exposure. Two of 13 environmental isolates were closely related to one of the patient isolates. Workers were likely exposed during spray cleaning of cartridge filters in a poorly ventilated work space. Recommendations include inhibiting organism growth in spa systems, assuring the use of respiratory protection, and adequately ventilating work spaces where filters and equipment are cleaned.

  15. Hazards of the ‘Hard Cash’: Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Kupeli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP is a nonimmunoglobulin E-related immune-mediated parenchymal lung disease. A 45-year-old woman who was a lifelong nonsmoker with a six-month history of frequent episodes of cough and dyspnea was admitted to hospital. She had been working as a money counter for 20 years at a central bank. Bibasilar crackles on lung auscultation, ground-glass opacities and a mosaic pattern on high-resolution computed tomography, restrictive abnormality on pulmonary function tests and mild hypoxemia were the prominent findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis revealed a predominance of CD4-positive T cells, and she tested positive on her natural challenge test. She was diagnosed with subacute HP based on established criteria. She was advised to discontinue counting fresh banknotes. Prednisolone was commenced, then tapered to discontinue in the ensuing six months. Clinical and radiological improvement was achieved within two months. To the authors’ knowledge, the present report is the first to describe ‘hard cash HP’, possibly caused by chipping dust or printing dye.

  16. Change in FVC and survival in chronic fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Andrea; Storrer, Karin; Kuranishi, Lilian; Soares, Maria Raquel; Ferreira, Rimarcs Gomes; Pereira, Carlos A C

    2018-04-01

    The predictive value of the decline in FVC by ≥10% on survival in patients with fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis is unknown. Of 112 patients included, 66 (59%) had surgical lung biopsies. Patients with ≥10% decline in predicted FVC after 6-12 months had a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality (median survival 53 months, 95% CI 37 to 69 vs 139 months, 95% CI 66 to 212 months, p=0.007). On multivariate analysis remained associated with increasing mortality: decline in FVC by ≥10% (HR 4.13, 95% CI 1.96 to 8.70, p=0.005), lower FVC% (HR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.05, p=0.003) and with decreasing mortality improvement with antigen avoidance (HR 0.18, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.77, p=0.021). © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Biological activities caused by far-infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoué, Shojiro; Kabaya, Morihiro

    1989-09-01

    Contrary to previous presumption, accumulated evidence indicates that far-infrared rays are biologically active. A small ceramic disk that emist far-infrared rays (4 16 μm) has commonly been applied to a local spot or a whole part of the body for exposure. Pioneering attempts to experimentally analyze an effect of acute and chronic radiation of far-infrared rays on living organisms have detected a growth-promoting effect in growing rats, a sleep-modulatory effect in freely behaving rats and an insomiac patient, and a blood circulation-enhancing effect in human skin. Question-paires to 542 users of far-infrared radiator disks embedded in bedelothes revealed that the majority of the users subjectively evaluated an improvement of their health. These effects on living organisms appear to be non-specifically triggered by an exposure to far-infrared rays, which eventually induce an increase in temperature of the body tissues or, more basically, an elevated motility of body fluids due to decrease in size of water clusters.

  18. Patients Radiation Load Caused by Digitalised X-Ray Equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, D.; Prikazska, M.; Horvathova, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The radiation load of population all over the world from medical examinations clearly demonstrate the importance of implementation of quality assurance and quality control programmes into the activities of radiological departments. The basic aim of quality assurance programme is to ensure that the radiation dose is kept as low as reasonably practicable consistent with adequate image quality. As many other fields, the rapid development of techniques brought change-over from the conventional analogue technique to the digital technique. In this connection conventional X-ray film is being abandoned and images are being viewed on either laser film or monitor. The main advantages of using digital equipment lay in improved image quality and diagnostic accuracy through digital image processing, reduction in patient exposure, cost reduction by reduction film usage, more efficient storage and retrieval of radiographic images through picture archiving. Several studies that have been conducted for comparison of various diagnostic examinations performed on digital and analogue X-ray equipment have shown that in barium meal examinations, there is potential for dose saving in the digital image intensifier technique. The aim of this study was to compare measured values of dose-area product for colon investigations using different X-ray equipment types, on digital and one analogue. Our material consisted of 60 randomly selected patients, 24 of them were examined with digital equipment and 36 patients with the analogue equipment. (author)

  19. Energy nonlinearity in radiation detection materials: Causes and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, J.E.; Jordan, D.V.; Peurrung, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenology and present theoretical understanding of energy nonlinearity (nonproportionality) in radiation detection materials is reviewed, with emphasis on gamma-ray spectroscopy. Scintillators display varying degrees and patterns of nonlinearity, while semiconductor detectors are extremely linear, and gas detectors show a characteristic form of nonproportionality associated with core levels. The relation between nonlinear response (to both primary particles and secondary electrons) and spectrometer resolution is also discussed. We review the qualitative ideas about the origin of nonlinearity in scintillators that have been proposed to date, with emphasis on transport and recombination of electronic excitations. Recent computational and experimental work on the basic physics of scintillators is leading towards a better understanding of energy nonlinearity and should result in new, more linear scintillator materials in the near future

  20. Two cases of micrognathia caused by radiation therapy during infancy. An evaluation of their profilograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yoshiko; Shinohara, Yuji; Ohba, Takeshi; Akashi, Yuko; Ichiya, Yuichi; Miyoshi, Makoto; Masuda, Kouji.

    1995-01-01

    Two patients with micrognathia of the mandible caused by radiation therapy during infancy are reported herein. The first patient was a 25-year-old man with hemangioma of the tongue. He had previously received radiation therapy totaling 51 Gy at 1 and 2 years of age. The other patient was a 54-year-old woman who had received radiation therapy for an oral tumor during infancy. These two patients demonstrated micrognathia, and the former patient showed developmental anomaly of the teeth. In addition, the latter patient suffered from thyroid cancer at 45 years of age, and this was also thought to be radiation-related. Although reports of micrognathia caused by radiation are rare, such late effects should be taken into account when radiation therapy is planned for head and neck tumors in infants. (author)

  1. Radiation accident caused by an iridium-192 radiographic source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumatori, T.; Hirashima, K.; Ishihara, T.; Kurisu, A.; Sugiyama, H.; Hashizume, T.

    1977-01-01

    Owing to the carelessness of a radiographer, six construction workers, aged from twenty to thirty, were accidentally exposed to gamma rays of a 192 Ir source for a non-destructive radiography. These exposed persons were not directly involved with radiographic work. One case revealed severe leucopenia and thrombopenia accompanied by moderate anaemia. In three cases including the case considered, skin lesions were observed on hands and hips, arising from close contact with a 192 Ir rod. The effects to the gonads consisted of impaired spermatogenesis in all cases and elevation of follicle-stimulating hormone in the sera of four cases. The ratio of one metabolite to another seemed to be more indicative of the injuries than the level of any given metabolite itself. In the physical estimate of the dose, the thermoluminescence intensity of rubies in the wrist watches of the exposed persons was measured, which was useful for the determination of the location of the source. The mean whole-body absorbed doses ranged from 10 to 133 rads. Local radiation doses were approximately 3000 to 9000 rads to the skin and 175 rads to the gonads of one case, respectively. The biological dose estimates were made by using the dose-response relations for 60 Co gamma rays and for Linac X-rays on the basis of the yields of dicentrics and rings. The doses were in the range of about 10 to 150 rads. Skin lesions and chromosome aberrations are still observed. (author)

  2. Repair of radiation damage caused by cyclotron-produced neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, B.I.

    1979-01-01

    Hall et al. present experimental data on repair of sublethal damage in cultured mammalian cells exposed to 35 MeV neutrons and 60 Co γ rays. Hall and Kraljevic present experimental data on repair of potentially lethal damage in cultured mammalian cells exposed to 35 MeV neutrons and 210 kVp x rays. These results of Hall et al. are very difficult to explain from basic concepts in radiobiology. Contrary to Rossi, these data do not support his thesis that repair of radiation damage is dose-dependent and linear energy transfer independent. Nor do these results meet the expectations of multitarget-single hit theory which would require dose-independent repair equal to n. The observation of the same extrapolation number for neutrons and for x rays is also surprising. From the point of view of radiotherapy, the doses of interest are about 140 rad for neutrons and about 300 rad for x rays. There are no data for repair of potentially lethal damage below 800 rad for x rays and 400 rad for neutrons. The difference in survival between single and split dose is negligible up to a total of about 600 rad of x rays or of neutrons. These data of Hall et al. therefore have little significance to radiotherapists and are an enigma to radiobiologists

  3. Apparatus for the measurement of ion activety caused by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroem, S.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a linear amplifier for the monitoring of very small currents from a high pressure ionization chamber. In the traditional design of an ionization chamber current amplifier, selected semiconductors and resistors are chosen to measure the very small currents in question. As the leakage currents in these semiconductors are larger than the smallest currents to be measured, very sophisticated electronics must be employed to succeed with the design. In order to overcome this disadvantage, the invention is based on the following basic features: A capacitor is charged by the chamber ion current during a fixed time period, without loading the amplifier input. The use of a peak detector makes bouncing of the time-lag relay contacts unimportant, and allows an anlog-to-digital converter to store the voltage build-up in the capacitor as a digital value. The measuring range of the amplifier, 0.001 pA to 1000 pA, makes it suitable for measuring gamma radiation in the air, both under normal and abnormal conditions. 1 fig

  4. Central lung tumors with obstructive pneumonitis; ultrasonographic findings and usefulness of ultrasound-guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong An; Kim, Sun Su; Seon, Young Seok; Lee, Kyoung Rok; Kim, Byoung Geun; Park, Byung Ran; Kim, Se Jong [Kwangju Christian Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-02-01

    To determine the ultrasonographic findings and assess the usefulness of ultrasound (US)-guided biopsy of central lung tumors in patients with obstructive pneumonitis. Fourteen patients with central lung tumors causing obstructive pneumonitis, as seen on chest radiographs and chest CT scans, were examined between January 1997 and January 2000. In no patient conclusive histologic diagnosis obtained by means of bronchoscopic biopsy or sputum cytology. Eleven patients were men and three were women, and their ages ranged from 45 to 83 (mean, 64) years. For all examinations, real-time, linear-array, convex US units with a 3.75-and a 5.0-MHz transducer were used. The images obtained were analyzed for evidence of consolidation or atelectasis in the lung, demonstrable tumors, and tumor size and echogenicity. For US-guided percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, 19.5G automatic biopsy devices, were employed. Lung consolidation due to a wedge-shaped, homogeneous, hypoechoic lesion was revealed by sonographic fluid bronchograms, air bronchograms, air alvelograms, and visualization of intraparenchymal pulmonary vessels, which showed appropriate motion with respiration. The tumor presumed to be causing obstruction was seen as a hypoechoic nodule near the hilum or as a well-defined hyperechoic mass inside the partially consolidated lung. Pleural effusion was observed in one case. The cytologic findings indicated the presence of squamous cell carcinoma (n=4), adenocarcinoma (n=4), small cell carcinoma (n=3), non-small cell carcinoma (n=2) and large cell carcinoma (n=1). The success rate was 100%, and there were no complications. In patients with central lung tumors causing obstructive pneumonitis, chest ultrasonography and US-guided biopsy are useful adjunctive diagnostic modalities and techniques.

  5. Radiation necrosis causing failure of automatic ventilation during sleep with central sleep apnea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udwadia, Z.F.; Athale, S.; Misra, V.P.; Wadia, N.H.

    1987-01-01

    A patient operated upon for a midline cerebellar hemangioblastoma developed failure of automatic respiration during sleep, together with central sleep apnea syndrome, approximately two years after receiving radiation therapy to the brain. Clinical and CT scan findings were compatible with a diagnosis of radiation necrosis as the cause of his abnormal respiratory control

  6. The pictures of CT scan of gold pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Yoshio; Iwata, Takekuni; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Sadato, Norihiro; Tanemoto, Kiichiro; Adachi, Kazuhiko.

    1987-01-01

    We experienced two cases of gold pneumonitis and their interesting findings of CT scan. After the cessation of gold salt, both cases were treated with the corticosteroid, resulting in the disappearance of pulmonary manifestations and clearing of shadows on chest roentgenograms. The findings of CT scan on both cases were very interesting. They were the high density shadows along the bronchovascular bundles, the fluffy figures surroundings these shadows and band like shadows reached to the thoracic wall. We considered that each shadows were pathologically compatible with severe exudative changes of interstitial pneumonitis, shrinkage surroundings them and thickness of interlobular septum. (author)

  7. Lung diseases caused by /sup 60/Co irradiation combined by nebulizer therapy with Dexa-Scheroson after the operation of cancer of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saima, S; Oshiro, H; Yamamoto, Y; Naka, K; Asahara, T [Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1975-11-01

    In 29 cases in which the operation had been carried out for cancer of the breast, nebulizer therapy with Dexa-Scheroson was performed 30 minutes before /sup 60/Co irradiation. Radiation pneumonitis was observed in 17.2% of them, but there was no combination of pulmonary fibrosis. Thus, this method showed no serious side effects, and seemed effective for preventing the roentgenographic changes of the lung caused by /sup 60/Co irradiation.

  8. Plague in China 2014-All sporadic case report of pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Fang; Li, De-Biao; Shao, Hong-Sheng; Li, Hong-Jun; Han, Yue-Dong

    2016-02-19

    Yersinia pestis is the pathogen of the plague and caused three pandemics worldwide. Pneumonic plague is rarer than bubonic and septicemic plague. We report detailed clinical and pathogenic data for all the three sporadic cases of pneumonic plagues in China in 2014. All the three patients are herders in Gansu province of China. They were all infected by Yersinia pestis and displayed in the form of pneumonic plague respectively without related. We tested patient specimens from the upper (nasopharyngeal swabs) or the lower (sputum) respiratory tract and whole blood, plasma, and serum specimens for Yersinia pestis. All patients had fever, cough and dyspnea, and for patient 2 and 3, unconscious. Respiratory symptoms were predominant with acute respiratory failure. The chest X-ray showed signs consistent with necrotizing inflammation with multiple lobar involvements. Despite emergency treatment, all patients died of refractory multiple organ failure within 24 h after admission to hospital. All the contacts were quarantined immediately and there were no secondary cases. Nowadays, the plague is epidemic in animals and can infect people who contact with the infected animals which may cause an epidemic in human. We think dogs maybe an intermediate vector for plague and as a source of risk for humans who are exposed to pet animals or who work professionally with canines. If a patient has been exposed to a risk factor and has fever and dyspnea, plague should be considered. People who had contact with a confirmed case should be isolated and investigated for F1 antigen analysis and receive post-exposure preventive treatment. A vaccination strategy might be useful for individuals who are occupationally exposed in areas where endemically infected reservoirs of plague-infected small mammals co-exist.

  9. Principal disease or cause of death in nonsacrifice Segment III beagles receiving gamma radiation during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, L.; Kitchen, D.N.; Benjamin, S.A.; Stephens, L.C.; Hargis, A.M.; Lovering, S.L.; Lee, A.C.; Brewster, R.D.; Brooks, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    Epilepsy, hypothyroidism and neoplasia rank as the three leading causes of death in nonsacrifice Segment III beagles. Chronic renal disease is a fourth major disease entity occurring with increasing frequency in the experimental population. These four major diseases accounted for 57% of the deaths in 1979. Of the four leading causes of death, neoplasia alone can be related to the history of radiation exposure

  10. [Sirolimus associated pneumonitis in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Estefanía; Buenasmañanas, Diana; Martín, Carmen; Rojas, Rafael

    2015-07-06

    Sirolimus (SR) is a lipophilic macrocytic lactone with immunosuppressive properties (mTOR inhibitor) commonly used in solid organ transplantation and recently introduced in the prophylaxis and treatment of graft-versus-host disease. Its numerous side effects include: hyperlipidemia, arthralgias, noncardiac peripheral edema, thrombotic microangiopathy and interstitial pneumonitis. SR-associated pneumonitis is a rare but potentially serious complication due to its increasing utilization in transplant patients. We report the case of a patient undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with severe respiratory distress and SR therapy. Microbiological tests were all negative and other complications related to transplantation were discarded. The chest computed tomography of high-resolution showed pneumonitis. The SR therapy was interrupted and treatment was started with steroids with resolution of symptoms. SR associated pneumonitis is a potentially fatal side effect. In patients treated with SR and respiratory failure, we must suspect this complication because early recognition along with drug discontinuation and steroid treatment is essential to reverse this complication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. A case of severe rectal hemorrhage possibly caused by radiation recall after administration of gemcitabine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Koshiro; Akise, Yushi; Uchida, Atsushi; Miyazawa, Masaharu; Kutsuki, Shoji; Hashimoto, Subaru

    2016-01-01

    Radiation recall is an acute inflammatory reaction that can be triggered when systemic agents are administered long time after radiotherapy. Because radiotherapy is now indicated for many types of cancer, care should be taken regarding possible toxic events relating to radiotherapy in combination with radio-sensitizing agents. Gemcitabine, one such anti-cancer agent, is widely used, especially for urologic cancers. We report an intriguing case of possible radiation recall in the rectum caused by gemcitabine administration 37 years after radiation therapy. From a review of the literature, it appears that there have been no reported cases of radiation recall in the rectum with such a long interval between radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Here, we describe the case and provide a literature review. (author)

  12. Growth hormone used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Xia, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Zheng-Sen; Lu, Xin-Liang

    2015-08-21

    Intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis is rare. We describe a 69-year-old man with intractable hemorrhagic gastritis induced by postoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. Although anti-secretory therapy with or without octreotide was initiated for hemostasis over three months, melena still occurred off and on, and the patient required blood transfusions to maintain stable hemoglobin. Finally growth hormone was used in the treatment of hemorrhage for two weeks, and hemostasis was successfully achieved. This is the first report that growth hormone has been used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

  13. Controlling Ebola: what we can learn from China's 1911 battle against the pneumonic plague in Manchuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The pneumonic plague, which spread across Northeast China during the winter of 1910 and spring of 1911, caused numerous deaths and brought about severe social turmoil. After compulsory quarantine and other epidemic prevention measures were enforced by Dr Wu Lien-teh, the epidemic was brought to an end within 4 months. This article reviews the ways in which the plague was dealt with from a historical perspective, based on factors such as clinical manifestations, duration of illness, case fatality rate, degree of transmissibility, poverty, inadequate healthcare infrastructure, and the region's recent strife-filled history. Similarities were sought between the pneumonic plague in Northeast China in the twentieth century and the Ebola virus outbreak that is currently ravaging Africa, and an effort made to summarize the ways in which specific measures were applied successfully to fight the earlier epidemic. Our efforts highlight valuable experiences that are of potential benefit in helping to fight the current rampant Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

  14. Leukocyte-reduction filters and radiation do not cause significant changes in platelet function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagura, Yutaka; Tsuno, Hirokazu; Shibata, Yoichi; Takahashi, Koki

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of radiation and leukocyte-reduction filters on platelet function. Platelet aggregation in response to collagen and ADP were measured prior to and after irradiation and filtration, as were the platelet recovery rate and complement factor C3. Four types of leukocyte-reduction filter were used, namely positively-, negatively-, and non-charged filters (all of polyester composition), as well as a polyurethane filter. Radiation itself did not significantly affect either the platelet recovery rate, platelet function, or C3 value. On the other hand, filtration through polyester leukocyte-reduction filters resulted in a significant reduction in the platelet recovery rate, an effect not observed with the polyurethane filter. However, none of the filters caused significant changes in platelet function or in C3 value. We concluded that radiation and filtration do not cause significant changes in platelet function, but polyurethane filters are superior to polyester filters in relation to platelet recovery. (author)

  15. Intranasal delivery of a protein subunit vaccine using a Tobacco Mosaic Virus platform protects against pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaboldi, Paul M; Sambir, Mariya; D'Arco, Christina; Peters, Lauren A; Seegers, Jos F M L; Mayer, Lloyd; McCormick, Alison A; Dattwyler, Raymond J

    2016-11-11

    Yersinia pestis, one of history's deadliest pathogens, has killed millions over the course of human history. It has attributes that make it an ideal choice to produce mass casualties and is a prime candidate for use as a biological weapon. When aerosolized, Y. pestis causes pneumonic plague, a pneumonia that is 100% lethal if not promptly treated with effective antibiotics. Currently, there is no FDA approved plague vaccine. The current lead vaccine candidate, a parenterally administered protein subunit vaccine comprised of the Y. pestis virulence factors, F1 and LcrV, demonstrated variable levels of protection in primate pneumonic plague models. As the most likely mode of exposure in biological attack with Y. pestis is by aerosol, this raises a question of whether this parenteral vaccine will adequately protect humans against pneumonic plague. In the present study we evaluated two distinct mucosal delivery platforms for the intranasal (IN) administration of LcrV and F1 vaccine proteins, a live bacterial vector, Lactobacillus plantarum, and a Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) based delivery platform. IN administration of L. plantarum expressing LcrV, or TMV-conjugated to LcrV and F1 (TMV-LcrV+TMV-F1) resulted in the similar induction of high titers of IgG antibodies and evidence of proinflammatory cytokine secretion. However, only the TMV-conjugate delivery platform protected against subsequent lethal challenge with Y. pestis. TMV-LcrV+TMV-F1 co-vaccinated mice had no discernable morbidity and no mortality, while mice vaccinated with L. plantarum expressing LcrV or rLcrV+rF1 without TMV succumbed to infection or were only partially protected. Thus, TMV is a suitable mucosal delivery platform for an F1-LcrV subunit vaccine that induces complete protection against pneumonic infection with a lethal dose of Y. pestis in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Principal disease or cause of death in nonsacrifice beagles receiving gamma radiation during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, R.W.; Hargis, A.M.; Benjamin, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    Epilepsy, hypothyroidism, cor pulmonale, and neoplasia are the leading causes of death of Segment III beagles, accounting for 90 to 208 fatalities from 1968 through 1977. Of the four, only neoplasia appears to be related to radiation history. Fifteen of 16 dogs dying of neoplasia were irradiated. Nine of these were exposed at either 55 days post coitus (dpc) or 2 days post partum

  17. Agricultural measures to reduce radiation doses to man caused by severe nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorp, F. van; Eleveld, R.; Frissel, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Agricultural land and products may become contaminated after a severe nuclear accident. If radiation doses to man caused by the ingestion of contaminated agricultural products from such areas will be unacceptably high, measures to reduce this radiation dose will have to be taken. Radiation doses to man can be estimated by using models which describe quantitatively the transfer of radionuclides through the biosphere. The following processes and pathways are described in this study: accidental releases into atmospheric environments and subsequent nearby deposition; contamination of crops by direct deposition and the subsequent short term pathway (e.g. grass-cow-milk-man); contamination of soil and the subsequent long term pathway (e.g. soil-crop-man, soil-grass-cattle-milk/meat-man). Depending on the degree of contamination and on the estimated radiation doses to man, various measures are advised. (Auth.)

  18. Radiation retinopathy caused by low dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced systemic vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Koh-hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2005-01-01

    We report on a patient with Graves' disease with radiation retinopathy caused by low-dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis. A 38-year-old woman with Graves' disease presented with bilateral blurred vision, micro-aneurysms, telangiectasia, and macular edema. The patient was examined by ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography, and radiation retinopathy was diagnosed. The patient had been treated with low-dose irradiation for her Graves' ophthalmopathy a few years earlier. She also had ANCA-positive vasculitis induced by the antithyroid drug (propylthiouracil, PTU) that had been prescribed for her at that time. Because of multiple avascular areas on both retinas, she was treated by intensive retinal photocoagulation to control progressive retinopathy. The radiation doses used to treat Graves' disease ophthalmopathy are low. Nevertheless, there is still a risk of radiation retinopathy developing in patients with PTU-induced ANCA-positive vasculitis. (author)

  19. Using radiative signatures to diagnose the cause of warming during the 2013-2014 Californian drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sebastian; Yin, Dongqin; Roderick, Michael L.

    2017-10-01

    California recently experienced among the worst droughts of the last century, with exceptional precipitation deficits and co-occurring record high temperatures. The dry conditions caused severe water shortages in one of the economically most important agricultural regions of the US. It has recently been hypothesized that anthropogenic warming is increasing the likelihood of such extreme droughts in California, or more specifically, that warmer temperatures from the enhanced greenhouse effect intensify drought conditions. However, separating the cause and effect is difficult because the dry conditions lead to a reduction in evaporative cooling that contributes to the warming. Here we investigate and compare the forcing of long-term greenhouse-induced warming with the short-term warming during the 2013-2014 Californian drought. We use the concept of radiative signatures to investigate the source of the radiative perturbation during the drought, relate the signatures to expected changes due to anthropogenic warming, and assess the cause of warming based on observed changes in the surface energy balance compared to the period 2001-2012. We found that the recent meteorological drought based on precipitation deficits was characterised by an increase in incoming shortwave radiation coupled with a decline in incoming longwave radiation, which contributed to record warm temperatures. In contrast, climate models project that anthropogenic warming is accompanied by little change in incoming shortwave but a large increase in incoming longwave radiation. The warming during the drought was associated with increased incoming shortwave radiation in combination with reduced evaporative cooling from water deficits, which enhanced surface temperatures and sensible heat transfer to the atmosphere. Our analyses demonstrate that radiative signatures are a powerful tool to differentiate the source of perturbations in the surface energy balance at monthly to seasonal time scales.

  20. Bilateral acute lupus pneumonitis in a case of rhupus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhupus syndrome, the overlap of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, is an extremely uncommon condition. Organ damages found due to SLE are usually mild in rhupus. Lupus pneumonitis in rhupus syndrome has not been reported worldwide. We are reporting a 23-year-old female with bilateral symmetric erosive arthritis, oral ulcer, alopecia, polyserositis, anemia, leucopenia, positive RA-factor, anti nuclear antibody (ANA and anti ds-DNA. She presented with acute onset dyspnea, high fever, chest pain, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypoxia and respiratory alkalosis. High resolution computed tomography (HRCT-thorax showed bilateral, basal consolidation with air bronchogram. Repeated sputum and single broncho alveolar lavage (BAL fluid examination revealed no organism or Hemosiderin-laden macrophage. The diagnosis of rhupus was confirmed by combined manifestations of RA and SLE, and the diagnosis of acute lupus pneumonitis was established by clinico-radiological picture and by excluding other possibilities.

  1. Biodefense-driven murine model of pneumonic melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeddeloh, J A; Fritz, D L; Waag, D M; Hartings, J M; Andrews, G P

    2003-01-01

    A whole-body mouse model of pneumonic melioidosis was established for future evaluation of biodefense vaccine candidates. The aerosol 50% lethal doses of Burkholderia pseudomallei strain 1026b for BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and the times to death, dissemination in organs, and tissue loads after exposure of the mice to low- and high-dose aerosols are reported. In addition, rpsL mutant backgrounds were attenuated in this acute model of disease.

  2. Chronic pneumonitis of infancy: high-resolution CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Oeystein E.; Owens, Catherine M.; Sebire, Neil J.; Jaffe, Adam

    2004-01-01

    Chronic pneumonitis of infancy (CPI) is a very rare entity. We report the chest radiography and high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings in an infant with histopathologically confirmed CPI. The child was admitted for intensive care 18 h after birth and died at 39 days of age. On HRCT there was diffuse ground-glass change, interlobular septal thickening and discrete centrilobular nodules. An accurate diagnosis is crucial for correct management; however, several entities with the same HRCT findings are recognized. (orig.)

  3. A haemodynamic study of pulmonary hypertension in chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rudolf K F; Pereira, Carlos A C; Ramos, Roberta P; Ferreira, Eloara V M; Messina, Carolina M S; Kuranishi, Lilian T; Gimenez, Andrea; Campos, Orlando; Silva, Célia M C; Ota-Arakaki, Jaquelina S

    2014-08-01

    Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a common fibrotic interstitial lung disease. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension diagnosed by right heart catheterisation and its cardiopulmonary function findings in patients with chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis are unknown. Consecutive symptomatic patients with chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis were prospectively evaluated. All patients were submitted to right heart catheterisation, pulmonary function testing, a 6-min walk test, echocardiography, blood gas determination and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide analyses. Nonhypoxaemic patients also underwent incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing. 50 patients underwent right heart catheterisation; 25 (50%) of these had pulmonary hypertension and 22 (44%) had a pre-capillary haemodynamic pattern. The patients with pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension had lower forced vital capacity (mean ± sd 50 ± 17% versus 69 ± 22% predicted, p<0.01), carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (37 ± 12% versus 47 ± 14% predicted, p<0.01), arterial oxygen tension (median (interquartile range) 59.0 (47.8-69.3) versus 73.0 (62.2-78.5) mmHg, p<0.01) and saturation after the 6-min walk test (78 ± 8% versus 86 ± 7%, p<0.01). In pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension, oxygen uptake was also lower at the anaerobic threshold (41 ± 11% versus 50 ± 8% predicted, p=0.04) and at peak exercise (12.8 ± 1.6 versus 15.0 ± 2.5 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1), p=0.02). Pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension is common in symptomatic chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis and is related to interstitial lung disease severity. Additionally, pulmonary hypertension is more prevalent in hypoxaemic patients with impaired lung function and exercise capacity. ©ERS 2014.

  4. CT findings associated with survival in chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jonathan H.; Montner, Steven M.; Adegunsoye, Ayodeji; Vij, Rekha; Noth, Imre; Strek, Mary E.; Oldham, Justin M.; Husain, Aliya N.

    2017-01-01

    To identify CT findings in chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (cHP) associated with survival. Two thoracic radiologists assessed CT scans for specific imaging findings and patterns in 132 subjects with cHP. Survival analyses were performed. The majority of subjects had an inconsistent with usual interstitial pneumonitis pattern on CT (55.3%,73/132). Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) diagnosis on CT was less common in those with fibrosis (66.1%, 74/112) than those without fibrosis (85%,17/20). Smoking was associated with a lower prevalence of HP on CT (p=0.04). CT features of pulmonary fibrosis, especially traction bronchiectasis (HR 8.34, 95% CI 1.98-35.21) and increased pulmonary artery (PA)/aorta ratio (HR 2.49, 95% CI 1.27-4.89) were associated with worse survival, while ground-glass opacity (HR 0.31, 95% CI 0.12-0.79) was associated with improved survival. Survival association with imaging was less pronounced after adjustment for gender, age and physiology score. A substantial proportion of cHP cases have a non-HP-like appearance. Ground-glass opacity, pulmonary fibrosis features and elevated PA/aorta ratio on CT likely reflect varying degrees of disease severity in cHP and may inform future clinical prediction models. (orig.)

  5. CT findings associated with survival in chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jonathan H.; Montner, Steven M. [University of Chicago Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Adegunsoye, Ayodeji; Vij, Rekha; Noth, Imre; Strek, Mary E. [University of Chicago Medical Center, Section of Pulmonary/Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Oldham, Justin M. [University of California at Davis, Section of Pulmonary/Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Husain, Aliya N. [University of Chicago Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-12-15

    To identify CT findings in chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (cHP) associated with survival. Two thoracic radiologists assessed CT scans for specific imaging findings and patterns in 132 subjects with cHP. Survival analyses were performed. The majority of subjects had an inconsistent with usual interstitial pneumonitis pattern on CT (55.3%,73/132). Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) diagnosis on CT was less common in those with fibrosis (66.1%, 74/112) than those without fibrosis (85%,17/20). Smoking was associated with a lower prevalence of HP on CT (p=0.04). CT features of pulmonary fibrosis, especially traction bronchiectasis (HR 8.34, 95% CI 1.98-35.21) and increased pulmonary artery (PA)/aorta ratio (HR 2.49, 95% CI 1.27-4.89) were associated with worse survival, while ground-glass opacity (HR 0.31, 95% CI 0.12-0.79) was associated with improved survival. Survival association with imaging was less pronounced after adjustment for gender, age and physiology score. A substantial proportion of cHP cases have a non-HP-like appearance. Ground-glass opacity, pulmonary fibrosis features and elevated PA/aorta ratio on CT likely reflect varying degrees of disease severity in cHP and may inform future clinical prediction models. (orig.)

  6. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase causes increased sensitivity to radiation through a PKB-dependent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Doan, Albert; Nakamura, Jean L.; Stokoe, David; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify whether inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) causes increased radiosensitivity through inhibition of protein kinase B (PKB), implicating PKB as an important therapeutic target in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: The prostate cancer cell line LNCaP was treated with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, radiation, and combinations of the two therapies. Apoptosis and survival were measured by cell cycle analysis, Western blot analysis for cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, and clonogenic survival. To test the hypothesis that inhibition of PKB is responsible for LY294002-induced radiosensitivity, LNCaP cells expressing a constitutively active form of PKB were used. Results: The combination of PI3K inhibition and radiation caused an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in clonogenic survival when compared to either modality alone. The expression of constitutively activated PKB blocked apoptosis induced by combination of PI3K inhibition and radiation and prevented radiosensitization by LY294002. Conclusion: These data indicate that PI3K inhibition increases sensitivity of prostate cancer cell lines to ionizing radiation through inactivation of PKB. Therefore, PTEN mutations, which lead to PKB activation, may play an important role in the resistance of prostate cancer to radiation therapy. Targeted therapy against PKB could be beneficial in the management of prostate cancer patients

  7. Analyses of the Secondary Particle Radiation and the DNA Damage it Causes to Human Keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebel E. A.; Tafrov S.; Rusek, A.; Sivertz, M. B.; Yip, K.; Thompson, K. H.

    2011-11-01

    High-energy protons, and high mass and energy ions, along with the secondary particles they produce, are the main contributors to the radiation hazard during space explorations. Skin, particularly the epidermis, consisting mainly of keratinocytes with potential for proliferation and malignant transformation, absorbs the majority of the radiation dose. Therefore, we used normal human keratinocytes to investigate and quantify the DNA damage caused by secondary radiation. Its manifestation depends on the presence of retinol in the serum-free media, and is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases. We simulated the generation of secondary radiation after the impact of protons and iron ions on an aluminum shield. We also measured the intensity and the type of the resulting secondary particles at two sample locations; our findings agreed well with our predictions. We showed that secondary particles inflict DNA damage to different extents, depending on the type of primary radiation. Low-energy protons produce fewer secondary particles and cause less DNA damage than do high-energy protons. However, both generate fewer secondary particles and inflict less DNA damage than do high mass and energy ions. The majority of cells repaired the initial damage, as denoted by the presence of 53BPI foci, within the first 24 hours after exposure, but some cells maintained the 53BP1 foci longer.

  8. Analyses of the radiation-caused characteristics change in SOI MOSFETs using field shield isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Yuuichi; Maeda, Shigeru; Fernandez, Warren; Iwamatsu, Toshiaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo; Maegawa, Shigeto; Nishimura, Tadashi

    1999-01-01

    Reliability against radiation ia an important issue in silicon on insulator metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (SOI MOSFETs) used in satellites and nuclear power plants and so forth which are severely exposed to radiation. Radiation-caused characteristic change related to the isolation-edge in an irradiated environment was analyzed on SOI MOSFETs. Moreover short channel effects for an irradiated environment were investigated by simulations. It was revealed that the leakage current which was observed in local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) isolated SOI MOSFETs was successfully suppressed by using field shield isolation. Simulated potential indicated that the potential rise at the LOCOS edge can not be seen in the case of field shield isolation edge which does not have physical isolation. Also it was found that the threshold voltage shift caused by radiation in short channel regime is severer than that in long regime channel. In transistors with a channel length of 0.18μm, a potential rise of the body region by radiation-induced trapped holes can be seen in comparison with that of 1.0μm. As a result, we must consider these effects for designing deep submicron devices used in an irradiated environment. (author)

  9. Pneumonitis and pneumonitis-related death in cancer patients treated with programmed cell death-1 inhibitors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Peng-Fei Cui,1–3,* Jun-Xun Ma,1,* Fei-Xue Wang,1,* Jing Zhang,1 Hai-Tao Tao,1 Yi Hu1 1First Department of Medical Oncology, 2Department of Graduate Administration, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 3Health Bureau of the 75709 Army, Central Theater of the Chinese PLA, Wuhan, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: We conducted a meta-analysis of published clinical trials to determine the relationship between the risks of pneumonitis and pneumonitis-related death and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 inhibitor treatment in patients with cancer.Materials and methods: We examined clinical trials from the Medline and Google Scholar databases. Data from original studies and review articles were also cross-referenced and evaluated. Randomized Phase II and Phase III trials of pembrolizumab and nivolumab treatment in patients with cancer were eligible for the analysis. Information about the participants, all-grade and high-grade pneumonitis, and pneumonitis-related death was extracted from each study and analyzed.Results: After the exclusion of ineligible studies, 12 clinical trials were included in the analysis. The odds ratio (OR for all-grade pneumonitis after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 4.59 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.51–8.37; P<0.00001, and the OR for high-grade pneumonitis after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 3.83 (95% CI: 1.54–9.48; P=0.004. The OR for pneumonitis-related death after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 2.47 (95% CI: 0.41–14.81; P=0.32. Moreover, the OR for all-grade pneumonitis after nivolumab/ipilimumab combination therapy versus nivolumab monotherapy was 3.54 (95% CI: 1.52–8.23; P=0.003, and that for high-grade pneumonitis after nivolumab/ipilimumab combination therapy versus nivolumab monotherapy was 2.35 (95% CI: 0.45–12.13; P=0.31. Treated cancer appeared to have no effect on the risk of pneumonitis.Conclusion: Our data showed that PD-1 inhibitors were associated with increased risks of all

  10. Radiation therapy of a metastatic tumour of the orbit caused by prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, F.; Langmann, G.; Faulborn, J.; Poschauko, J.

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of metastatic carcinoma to the apex of the orbit in a 66-year old patient. Orbital metastasis occurred while the patient suffered from another metastatic activity especially in his bony structures. The orbital tumour caused rapid visual impairment because of compression of the optic nerve. The metastasis was treated by radiation therapy. With CT-scan, electrophysiological examination, visual field examination, and visual function we demonstrate the regression of the tumour. One year after therapy the tumor was no longer detectable. Visual function had recovered and visual fields were normally. Radiation therapy prolonged high quality life for our patient due to preservation of visual function. (authors)

  11. Reduction in emittance of thermal radiator coatings caused by the accumulation of a Martian dust simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, D. Keith; Witte, Larry C.; Hinke, Jaime [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-4006 (United States); Hurlbert, Kathryn [NASA, Johnson Space Center (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Measurements were made of the effective emittance of three types of radiator coatings as a Martian dust simulant was added to the radiator surfaces. The apparatus consisted of multiple radiator coupons on which Carbondale Red Clay dust was deposited. The coupon design employed guard heating to achieve the accuracy required for acceptable emittance calculations. The apparatus was contained in a vacuum chamber that featured a liquid-nitrogen cooled shroud that simulated the Martian sky temperature. Three high-emittance radiator coatings were tested: two while silicate paints, Z-93P and NS-43G, and a silver Teflon film. Radiator temperatures ranged from 250 to 350K with sky temperatures from 185 to 248K. As dust was added to the radiator surfaces, the effective emittance of all three coatings decreased from initial values near 0.9 to a value near 0.4. A low-emittance control surface, polished aluminum, demonstrated a rise in effective emittance for thin dust layers, and then a decline as the dust layer thickened. This behavior is attributed to the conductive resistance caused by the dust layer. (author)

  12. Radiation doses and cause-specific mortality among workers at a nuclear materials fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checkoway, H.; Pearce, N.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Cragle, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    A historical cohort mortality study was conducted among 6781 white male employees from a nuclear weapons materials fabrication plant for the years 1947-1979. Exposures of greatest concern are alpha and gamma radiation emanating primarily from insoluble uranium compounds. Among monitored workers, the mean cumulative alpha radiation dose to the lung was 8.21 rem, and the mean cumulative external whole body penetrating dose from gamma radiation was 0.96 rem. Relative to US white males, the cohort experienced mortality deficits from all causes combined, cardiovascular diseases, and from most site-specific cancers. Mortality excesses of lung and brain and central nervous system cancers were seen from comparisons with national and state rates. Dose-response trends were detected for lung cancer mortality with respect to cumulative alpha and gamma radiation, with the most pronounced trend occurring for gamma radiation among workers who received greater than or equal to 5 rem of alpha radiation. These trends diminished in magnitude when a 10-year latency assumption was applied. Under a zero-year latency assumption, the rate ratio for lung cancer mortality associated with joint exposure of greater than or equal to 5 versus less than 1 rem of both types of radiation is 4.60 (95% confidence limits (CL) 0.91, 23.35), while the corresponding result, assuming a 10-year latency, is 3.05 (95% CL 0.37, 24.83). While these rate ratios, which are based on three and one death, respectively, lack statistical precision, the observed dose-response trends indicate potential carcinogenic effects to the lung of relatively low-dose radiation. There are no dose-response trends for mortality from brain and central nervous system cancers

  13. Predicting Lung Radiotherapy-Induced Pneumonitis Using a Model Combining Parametric Lyman Probit With Nonparametric Decision Trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Shiva K.; Zhou Sumin; Zhang, Junan; Yin, F.-F.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and test a model to predict for lung radiation-induced Grade 2+ pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: The model was built from a database of 234 lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT), of whom 43 were diagnosed with pneumonitis. The model augmented the predictive capability of the parametric dose-based Lyman normal tissue complication probability (LNTCP) metric by combining it with weighted nonparametric decision trees that use dose and nondose inputs. The decision trees were sequentially added to the model using a 'boosting' process that enhances the accuracy of prediction. The model's predictive capability was estimated by 10-fold cross-validation. To facilitate dissemination, the cross-validation result was used to extract a simplified approximation to the complicated model architecture created by boosting. Application of the simplified model is demonstrated in two example cases. Results: The area under the model receiver operating characteristics curve for cross-validation was 0.72, a significant improvement over the LNTCP area of 0.63 (p = 0.005). The simplified model used the following variables to output a measure of injury: LNTCP, gender, histologic type, chemotherapy schedule, and treatment schedule. For a given patient RT plan, injury prediction was highest for the combination of pre-RT chemotherapy, once-daily treatment, female gender and lowest for the combination of no pre-RT chemotherapy and nonsquamous cell histologic type. Application of the simplified model to the example cases revealed that injury prediction for a given treatment plan can range from very low to very high, depending on the settings of the nondose variables. Conclusions: Radiation pneumonitis prediction was significantly enhanced by decision trees that added the influence of nondose factors to the LNTCP formulation

  14. Notification of occupational lung cancer caused by ionizing radiation in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrncir, E.

    1997-01-01

    In the Czech Republic decisions on the occupational character of lung cancer which could be caused by ionizing radiation are based on the probability assessment. Cases are considered occupational when according to the calculation based especially on data of the patient's exposure there is at least 0.5 (in some cases even 0.4 - 0.5) probability (PC) that the disease was caused by professional exposition to alpha radiation of the radon decay products. Coefficients derived from epidemiological surveys carried out in miners of the uranium industry are used for this calculation. New surveys provide new data for calculations. The principle of assessment of the occupational character of lung cancer in working people should be unified on an international scale. (author)

  15. Solar radiation in Germany - observed trends and an assessment of their causes. Pt. 1; Regional approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liepert, B [Muenchen Univ., Freising (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung; Fabian, P [Muenchen Univ., Freising (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung; Grassl, H [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1994-02-01

    The possible longterm variation of daily sums of global solar radiation (direct plus diffuse solar radiation) in West-Germany was analysed for twelve stations of the German Weather Service (DWD). The global solar radiation decreased remarkably at seven stations (List/Sylt, Norderney, Hamburg, Braunlage, Wuerzburg, Weihenstephan, Hohenpeissenberg) and showed no significant variations at the remaining five stations (Braunschweig, Bocholt, Gelsenkirchen, Trier and Freiburg). The average decline is 3.7[+-]1.3% per decade in the last 15 to 39 years. The locally varying causes for the decline are changes in cloud parameters, fog occurrence and tropospheric aerosol. In this part of the article some possible causes, such as solar variability, increased number of contrails, decreased surface reflectivity, increased volcanic aerosol load in the 1980's or increased water vapour column content could be excluded. With a more sophisticated statistical procedure the effect of changes in cloud parameters and the effect of changed clear sky turbidity could not only be separated for each month for Hohenpeissenberg and Wuerzburg but also made mainly responsible for the observed trend. In Part II (Grabbe, Grassl), more detailed observations of solar radiation hourly averages of Hamburg were analysed. (orig.)

  16. Epidemiologic investigation of an oil-associated pneumonic paralytic eosinophilic syndrome in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigau-Pérez, J G; Pérez-Alvarez, L; Dueñas-Castro, S; Choi, K; Thacker, S B; Germain, J L; González-de-Andrés, G; Cañada-Royo, L; Pérez-Gallardo, F

    1984-02-01

    From May 1 to December 26, 1981, a previously undescribed illness caused 277 deaths and the hospitalization of 12,656 persons in Spain. The disease was characterized by pneumonitis, eosinophilia, and marked loss of muscle mass and function. A succession of case-control studies was done in the town of Las Navas del Marqués (province of Avila) located 47 miles northeast of Madrid and with a population of 4009 people. The studies confirmed the association between illness and consumption of an illegally sold cooking oil. Other risk factors identified in the linear logistic regression analysis included involvement in various kitchen activities, increased average time spent inside the house, and the purchase of cooking oil from a specific street vendor. Although the oil was found to be a mixture of vegetable and animal fats contaminated with aniline and anilide-oil complexes, the specific etiologic mechanism of the disease has not been determined.

  17. Diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis by measurement of antibodies against environmental antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewair, M.

    1989-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), an immunologically mediated chronic pulmonary disease, is the result of an inflammatory response of the lung initiated by the inhalation of environmental organic dusts. These organic dusts usually contain substances (antigens) capable of eliciting immune responses in humans. The symptoms of HP generally present as recurrent flu-like episodes which makes it difficult to establish the proper diagnosis. However, detection in patients' sera of high-titer antibodies against the environmental antigens could be of great help in identifying those materials causing the disease and which must be avoided. A highly specific and sensitive serodiagnostic test, a radioimmuno assay (RIA), was developed for measurement of antibodies against antigens relevant to Farmer's Lung Disease (FLD), a type of HP affecting farmers

  18. Acupuncture in Treating Dry Mouth Caused By Radiation Therapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: Acupuncture may help relieve dry mouth caused by radiation therapy. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying to see how well one set of acupuncture points work in comparison to a different set of acupuncture points or standard therapy in treating dry mouth caused by radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. |

  19. Clinical outcome and predictors of survival and pneumonitis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Joe Y

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR can achieve excellent local control rates in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and has emerged as a standard treatment option for patients who cannot undergo surgery or those with isolated recurrences. However, factors that may predict toxicity or survival are largely unknown. We sought here to identify predictors of survival and pneumonitis after SABR for NSCLC in a relatively large single-institution series. Methods Subjects were 130 patients with stage I NSCLC treated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT –planned, on-board volumetric image–guided SABR to 50 Gy in 4 fractions. Disease was staged by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT and scans were obtained again at the second follow-up after SABR. Results At a median follow-up time of 26 months, the 2-year local control rate was 98.5%. The median overall survival (OS time was 60 months, and OS rates were 93.0% at 1 year, 78.2% at 2 years, and 65.3% at 3 years. No patient experienced grade 4–5 toxicity; 15 had radiation pneumonitis (12 [9.3%] grade 2 and 3 [2.3%] grade 3. Performance status, standardized uptake value (SUVmax on staging PET/CT, tumor histology, and disease operability were associated with OS on univariate analysis, but only staging SUVmax was independently predictive on multivariate analysis (P = 0.034. Dosimetric factors were associated with radiation pneumonitis on univariate analysis, but only mean ipsilateral lung dose ≥9.14 Gy was significant on multivariate analysis (P = 0.005. Conclusions OS and radiation pneumonitis after SABR for stage I NSCLC can be predicted by staging PET SUVmax and ipsilateral mean lung dose, respectively.

  20. Amiodarone induced pneumonitis and hyperthyroidism: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabczak, Elzbieta Magdalena; Zielonka, Tadeusz M; Wiwała, Joanna; Bareła, Anna Dagmara; Opuchlik, Andrzej; Potulska, Anna; Ambroziak, Urszula; Chazan, Ryszarda

    2008-09-01

    Amiodarone is a highly effective antiarrhythmic agent used in life-threatening ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias. Its long-term use may however lead to several adverse effects, including corneal deposits, liver and thyroid gland dysfunction, lung lesions, bone marrow injury, skin lesions, or neurological abnormalities. The article presents the case of a 56-year-old man with a history of a stroke, who after a few days of amiodarone therapy for an episode of atrial fibrillation was diagnosed with amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism and interstitial pulmonary lesions. Clinical and laboratory symptoms of hyperthyroidism and radiographic signs of pulmonary involvement did not occur until several weeks after discontinuation of amiodarone therapy. Differential diagnosis of causes of hyperthyroidism and diseases causing nodular pulmonary lesions did not demonstrate any other pathologies. Empirical antibiotic therapy and administration of thiamazole and high doses of propranolol failed to improve the patient's clinical status. It was not until thiamazole was given in combination with glucocorticosteroids, when a slow relief of hyperthyroidism symptoms and resolution of radiographic pulmonary signs were observed. Based on the presented case, the risk of appearance of 2 serious concomitant adverse effects was demonstrated, even following a short-term amiodarone therapy. This paper also contains an overview of adverse effects which may be encountered during or after therapy with this effective antiarrhythmic agent. It was emphasized how important it is to select patients appropriately, and to monitor potential adverse effects during amiodarone therapy.

  1. Radiation exposure of the radiological staff caused by radiography of small mammals, reptiles and birds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Radiography is often used as an advanced examination to ensure a diagnosis in avian, reptiles and small mammal's medicine. The aims of this thesis were: 1. To measure the radiation exposure of radiological staff caused by radiography of small mammals, reptiles and birds. The exposure of relevant body regions were measured during clinical routine. 2. To examine the differences of radiation exposures caused by radiography of different animal species and to determine the influence of dose-dependent parameters. 3. To present the radiation protection measures of the clinic and to discuss possible improvements. 4. To weigh the anaesthetic risk for small mammals, reptiles and birds against the radiation exposure of the radiological staff. The measurements took place during clinical routine of the Clinic for Exotic Pets, Reptiles, Pet and Feral Birds, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation. The radiation exposure of the radiological staff was measured. The radiological staff included veterinarians, veterinary-medical technical assistants, doctoral candidates and students during their practical year. Furthermore, the radiation exposure was measured at ten representative body regions using thermoluminescence dosimetry. The measuring positions included the eye-lenses, thyroid, thoracic region under the protective clothes, thoracic region above the protective clothes, gonads, fingers and the left foot. Except for one position that was measured under the protective clothes all positions measured above the protective clothes. Moreover at each examination the focus-film-distance, the kV-number, the mAs-product and the weight of the patient was recorded. Additionally the size of the examiner and the examiner's position regarding to the X-ray table were recorded as variable, dose-influencing parameters. Altogether, measurements were taken from 366 individual examiners. In all three divisions 792 X-ray images were made and 3660 dose values recorded. The

  2. Radiation pressure: A possible cause for the superrotation of the Venusian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    The superrotation of the venusian atmosphere relative to the planet's surface has long been known. Yet the process by which this vigorous circulation is maintained is poorly understood. The purpose of this report is to show that a mechanism by which the solar radiation interacts with the cloudy atmosphere of Venus could be the principle cause of the superrotation. It has been long known that Venus has a high albedo due to the scattering (similar to the reflection process) of solar radiation by the cloud droplets in its atmosphere. The radiation not scattered, but intercepted by the planet and its atmosphere, is mainly absorbed within the cloud layers. Therefore, momentum (equal, more or less, to that of the solar radiation intercepted) is continually transferred to the venusian atmosphere. The atmospheric system presents a symmetrical surface (same radiation-matter interaction) toward the solar radiation at its morning and evening limbs. If the cross-sectional areas at both limbs were equal, the momentum transfer at the morning limb would decelerate the atmosphere's rotation while at the evening limb the same transfer would accelerate the rotation an equal amount. The net result of this is that the overall rate of rotation would be unchanged. Such a symmetrical configuration is not likely since the atmosphere must be warmed as it rotates across the planet's day hemisphere and cooled as it rotates across the planet's night hemisphere. This warming and cooling must result in a formation of an asymmetrical configuration. It is apparent that the momentum transfer at the evening limb must be greater than that at the morning limb because the atmosphere's greater cross section at the evening limb intercepts a greater amount of solar radiation. It should be noted that very little of the solar radiation is transmitted through the cloud layers, especially at or near the limbs where the atmospheric path length of the radiation is long. This net momentum transfer must be

  3. Everolimus-induced pneumonitis associates with favourable outcome in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penttilä, P; Donskov, F; Rautiola, J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors may induce pneumonitis. We analysed the association of pneumonitis with outcomes in everolimus treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-five mRCC patients received everolimus at Helsinki University...

  4. Reduced anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing caused by biogenic new particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Hamish; Sengupta, Kamalika; Rap, Alexandru; Duplissy, Jonathan; Frege, Carla; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K.; Wagner, Robert; Dunne, Eimear M.; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill S.; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Fischer, Lukas; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Monks, Sarah A.; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E.; Seinfeld, John H.; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander Lucas; Wagner, Andrea C.; Wagner, Paul E.; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    2016-10-01

    The magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing caused by anthropogenic emissions depends on the baseline state of the atmosphere under pristine preindustrial conditions. Measurements show that particle formation in atmospheric conditions can occur solely from biogenic vapors. Here, we evaluate the potential effect of this source of particles on preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and aerosol-cloud radiative forcing over the industrial period. Model simulations show that the pure biogenic particle formation mechanism has a much larger relative effect on CCN concentrations in the preindustrial atmosphere than in the present atmosphere because of the lower aerosol concentrations. Consequently, preindustrial cloud albedo is increased more than under present day conditions, and therefore the cooling forcing of anthropogenic aerosols is reduced. The mechanism increases CCN concentrations by 20-100% over a large fraction of the preindustrial lower atmosphere, and the magnitude of annual global mean radiative forcing caused by changes of cloud albedo since 1750 is reduced by 0.22 W m-2 (27%) to -0.60 W m-2. Model uncertainties, relatively slow formation rates, and limited available ambient measurements make it difficult to establish the significance of a mechanism that has its dominant effect under preindustrial conditions. Our simulations predict more particle formation in the Amazon than is observed. However, the first observation of pure organic nucleation has now been reported for the free troposphere. Given the potentially significant effect on anthropogenic forcing, effort should be made to better understand such naturally driven aerosol processes.

  5. Reduced anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing caused by biogenic new particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Hamish; Sengupta, Kamalika; Rap, Alexandru; Duplissy, Jonathan; Frege, Carla; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Dunne, Eimear M; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill S; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Fischer, Lukas; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Monks, Sarah A; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty J; Richards, Nigel A D; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander Lucas; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Carslaw, Kenneth S

    2016-10-25

    The magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing caused by anthropogenic emissions depends on the baseline state of the atmosphere under pristine preindustrial conditions. Measurements show that particle formation in atmospheric conditions can occur solely from biogenic vapors. Here, we evaluate the potential effect of this source of particles on preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and aerosol-cloud radiative forcing over the industrial period. Model simulations show that the pure biogenic particle formation mechanism has a much larger relative effect on CCN concentrations in the preindustrial atmosphere than in the present atmosphere because of the lower aerosol concentrations. Consequently, preindustrial cloud albedo is increased more than under present day conditions, and therefore the cooling forcing of anthropogenic aerosols is reduced. The mechanism increases CCN concentrations by 20-100% over a large fraction of the preindustrial lower atmosphere, and the magnitude of annual global mean radiative forcing caused by changes of cloud albedo since 1750 is reduced by [Formula: see text] (27%) to [Formula: see text] Model uncertainties, relatively slow formation rates, and limited available ambient measurements make it difficult to establish the significance of a mechanism that has its dominant effect under preindustrial conditions. Our simulations predict more particle formation in the Amazon than is observed. However, the first observation of pure organic nucleation has now been reported for the free troposphere. Given the potentially significant effect on anthropogenic forcing, effort should be made to better understand such naturally driven aerosol processes.

  6. When theory and observation collide: Can non-ionizing radiation cause cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havas, Magda

    2017-02-01

    This paper attempts to resolve the debate about whether non-ionizing radiation (NIR) can cause cancer-a debate that has been ongoing for decades. The rationale, put forward mostly by physicists and accepted by many health agencies, is that, "since NIR does not have enough energy to dislodge electrons, it is unable to cause cancer." This argument is based on a flawed assumption and uses the model of ionizing radiation (IR) to explain NIR, which is inappropriate. Evidence of free-radical damage has been repeatedly documented among humans, animals, plants and microorganisms for both extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and for radio frequency (RF) radiation, neither of which is ionizing. While IR directly damages DNA, NIR interferes with the oxidative repair mechanisms resulting in oxidative stress, damage to cellular components including DNA, and damage to cellular processes leading to cancer. Furthermore, free-radical damage explains the increased cancer risks associated with mobile phone use, occupational exposure to NIR (ELF EMF and RFR), and residential exposure to power lines and RF transmitters including mobile phones, cell phone base stations, broadcast antennas, and radar installations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Finding peace from Hiroshima. One oncologist's fight to rectify the damage caused by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoufalos, M.N.

    2006-01-01

    The article informs about one oncologist's fight to rectify the damage caused by radiation. In a small town just outside Osaka, Japan, Ritsuko Komaki was born, quite literally, into the atomic age. She was just an infant in 1945 when the first atomic bomb ever detonated on a human population devastated her family's ancestral home of Hiroshima. One of her friends, Sasaki was diagnosed with leukemia, and was later hospitalized with bone marrow suppression. Her grandmother had been exposed to the same chemical radiation that Sasaki had, yet never contracted leukemia despite presenting with all the other side effects of exposure. Komaki wa wondering why her grandmother never had any leukemia, but Sadako did? She never had any cancer, but she had all the symptoms of exposure, e.g. hair loss, diarrhea and bone marrow problems. During medical school, Komaki volunteered her summers at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, the institute the United States built in Japan to examine the victims of atomic exposure. Anyone diagnosed as anemic underwent a bone marrow exam, and Komaki learned a great deal about chromosomal abnormalities by performing blood tests alongside visiting researchers from Yale University and other American hospitals. The bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki had fostered a national paranoia about radiation and radioactivity. In Japan, they hate radiation, and for so many years, they did not want to hear about radiation therapy. Patients had an illogical fear of it that delayed offering it as treatment there. In Japan, the majority of cancer treatment culminated in surgery. Radiation oncology was not a recognized specialization; oncologists were grouped in with diagnostic radiation techs. Yet today, Ritsuko Komaki, MD, is the chief operating officer of one of the most sophisticated radiation oncology treatment facilities in the United States: the 120 million US Dollar M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. And ironically, the technical equipment that forms

  8. Measurement of energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activities by a sounding balloon and ground observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, T.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activity is observed at various places, such as the ground, high mountain areas, and artificial satellites. In order to investigate the radiation source and its energy distribution, we measured energetic radiation by a sounding balloon, and the ground observation. On the measurement inside/above the thundercloud, we conducted a sounding observation using a radiosonde mounted two GM tubes (for gamma-rays, and for beta/gamma-rays), in addition to meteorological instruments. The balloon passed through a region of strong echoes in a thundercloud shown by radar image, at which time an increase in counting rate of the GM tube about 2 orders of magnitude occurred at the altitude from 5 km to 7.5 km. Furthermore, the counting rate of two GM tubes indicated the tendency different depending on movement of a balloon. This result suggests that the ratio for the gamma-rays (energetic photons) of the beta-rays (energetic electrons) varies according to the place in the thundercloud. Furthermore, we carried out a ground observation of the energetic gamma rays during winter thunderstorm at a coastal area facing the Sea of Japan. Two types of the energetic radiation have been observed at this time. We report the outline of these measurements and analysis in the session of the AGU meeting.

  9. A case of radiation enteritis with perforated peritonitis caused by a piece of eggshell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Hirotaka; Maeda, Kazuya; Miyanaga, Tamonn; Doden, Kenji; Hattori, Masakazu; Hashizume, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    The patient was a woman in her sixties who had received radiation therapy for cancer of uterine cervix 7 years earlier and had been suffering from diarrhea for these several years. The patient was seen at our emergency clinic because of a 5 hour-history of lower abdominal pain at the beginning of July 2010. An abdominal CT scan showed free air and ascites. A high density structure 1.5 cm in size was identified within the small intestine, but its relation with the perforation was obscure. Emergency operation was done with the most likely diagnosis of intestinal perforation and general peritonitis. When the lower abdomen was opened by midline incision, about 200 ml of cloudy ascites was observed and the ileum became white in color and hard resulting from the radiation therapy. A perforation was identified in the ileum about 15 cm distant from the ileocecal valve, and a 1.5-cm sized thin and hard material was palpated within the intestine at the same portion. Ilececal resection including the perforated portion was performed and functional end-to-end anastomosis was made at a grossly normal area. There was a piece of eggshell 1.5-cm in size in the perforated portion in the resected specimen. From this together with histopathologial findings, perforation of the small intestine caused by a piece of eggshell associated with radiation enteritis was finally diagnosed. Small bowel perforation must be kept in mind as a possible late complication of radiation therapy, however, no cases of small bowel perforation caused by eggshell have been reported so far. This rare case is reported here, with a review of the literature. (author)

  10. VE-821, an ATR inhibitor, causes radiosensitization in human tumor cells irradiated with high LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Nakako Izumi; Sunada, Shigeaki; Lee, Younghyun; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Yajima, Hirohiko; Fujimori, Akira; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation such as carbon ion particles is successfully used for treatment of solid tumors. The reason why high LET radiation accomplishes greater tumor-killing than X-rays is still not completely understood. One factor would be the clustered or complex-type DNA damages. We previously reported that complex DNA double-strand breaks produced by high LET radiation enhanced DNA end resection, and this could lead to higher kinase activity of ATR protein recruited to RPA-coated single-stranded DNA. Although the effect of ATR inhibition on cells exposed to low LET gamma-rays has recently been reported, little is known regarding the effect of ATR inhibitor on cells treated with high LET radiation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the ATR inhibitor VE-821 in human tumor and normal cells irradiated with high LET carbon ions. HeLa, U2OS, and 1BR-hTERT (normal) cells were pre-treated with 1 μM VE-821 for 1 hour and irradiated with either high LET carbon ions or X-rays. Cell survival, cell cycle distribution, cell growth, and micronuclei formation were evaluated. VE-821 caused abrogation of G2/M checkpoint and forced irradiated cells to divide into daughter cells. We also found that carbon ions caused a higher number of multiple micronuclei than X-rays, leading to decreased cell survival in tumor cells when treated with VE-821, while the survival of irradiated normal cells were not significantly affected by this inhibitor. ATR inhibitor would be an effective tumor radiosensitizer with carbon ion irradiation. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0464-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  11. A case of generalized peritonitis due to a rupture of the bladder caused by radiation cystitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujitake, Shin-ichi; Nozaki, Hideki; Shimizu, Minoru; Maeda, Yoshiyuki; Kataoka, Susumu

    1999-01-01

    An 83-year-old woman was admitted to the department of gastroenterology in our hospital with a diagnosis of adhesive ileus following operation for a uterine cancer on July 22, 1997. Conservative therapy was started, but three days later, peritoneal signs appeared and white blood cell count and CRP level increased. An emergency operation was performed. Upon laparotomy, there were a large volume of ascites and a rupture of the bladder of which wall had become fragile. It was thought that the cause of rupture might result from radiation cystitis because she received irradiation after operation for the uterine cancer. Ruptured site of the bladder was sutured. Possible causes of the ileus were thought to be intestinal paralysis due to generalized peritonitis and a narrowing of the ileum where inflammatory change was remarkable. For this, an excision of the ileum with ileostomy was performed. Thereafter a closure of the ileostomy and ileocolostomy were carried out. The patient had difficulty in management of evacuation for a while, but she was discharged on March 2, 1998. Spontaneous rupture of the bladder is rare. This paper presents such a rare case caused by radiation cystitis, together with 14 cases reported in Japan. It is thought that surgeons who manage acute abdomen may encounter the disease. (author)

  12. A case of generalized peritonitis due to a rupture of the bladder caused by radiation cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujitake, Shin-ichi; Nozaki, Hideki; Shimizu, Minoru; Maeda, Yoshiyuki; Kataoka, Susumu [Meitetsu Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    An 83-year-old woman was admitted to the department of gastroenterology in our hospital with a diagnosis of adhesive ileus following operation for a uterine cancer on July 22, 1997. Conservative therapy was started, but three days later, peritoneal signs appeared and white blood cell count and CRP level increased. An emergency operation was performed. Upon laparotomy, there were a large volume of ascites and a rupture of the bladder of which wall had become fragile. It was thought that the cause of rupture might result from radiation cystitis because she received irradiation after operation for the uterine cancer. Ruptured site of the bladder was sutured. Possible causes of the ileus were thought to be intestinal paralysis due to generalized peritonitis and a narrowing of the ileum where inflammatory change was remarkable. For this, an excision of the ileum with ileostomy was performed. Thereafter a closure of the ileostomy and ileocolostomy were carried out. The patient had difficulty in management of evacuation for a while, but she was discharged on March 2, 1998. Spontaneous rupture of the bladder is rare. This paper presents such a rare case caused by radiation cystitis, together with 14 cases reported in Japan. It is thought that surgeons who manage acute abdomen may encounter the disease. (author)

  13. Melioidosis: reactivation during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegasothy, B.V.; Goslen, J.B.; Salvatore, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Melioidosis is caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a gram-negative, motile bacillus which is a naturally occurring soil saprophyte. The organism is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Australia, and parts of Central and South America. Most human disease occurs from infection acquired in these countries. Infection with P pseudomallei may produce no apparent clinical disease. Acute pneumonitis or septicemia may result from inhalation of the organism, and inoculation into sites of trauma may cause localized skin abscesses, or the disease may remain latent and be reactivated months or years later by trauma, burns, or pneumococcal pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis, influenza, or bronchogenic carcinoma. The last is probably the commonest form of melioidosis seen in the United States. We present the first case of reactivation of melioidosis after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the lung, again emphasizing the need to consider melioidosis in a septic patient with a history of travel, especially to Southeast Asia

  14. Circumventing Y. pestis Virulence by Early Recruitment of Neutrophils to the Lungs during Pneumonic Plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Vagima

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonic plague is a fatal disease caused by Yersinia pestis that is associated with a delayed immune response in the lungs. Because neutrophils are the first immune cells recruited to sites of infection, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for their delayed homing to the lung. During the first 24 hr after pulmonary infection with a fully virulent Y. pestis strain, no significant changes were observed in the lungs in the levels of neutrophils infiltrate, expression of adhesion molecules, or the expression of the major neutrophil chemoattractants keratinocyte cell-derived chemokine (KC, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2 and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF. In contrast, early induction of chemokines, rapid neutrophil infiltration and a reduced bacterial burden were observed in the lungs of mice infected with an avirulent Y. pestis strain. In vitro infection of lung-derived cell-lines with a YopJ mutant revealed the involvement of YopJ in the inhibition of chemoattractants expression. However, the recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs of mice infected with the mutant was still delayed and associated with rapid bacterial propagation and mortality. Interestingly, whereas KC, MIP-2 and G-CSF mRNA levels in the lungs were up-regulated early after infection with the mutant, their protein levels remained constant, suggesting that Y. pestis may employ additional mechanisms to suppress early chemoattractants induction in the lung. It therefore seems that prevention of the early influx of neutrophils to the lungs is of major importance for Y. pestis virulence. Indeed, pulmonary instillation of KC and MIP-2 to G-CSF-treated mice infected with Y. pestis led to rapid homing of neutrophils to the lung followed by a reduction in bacterial counts at 24 hr post-infection and improved survival rates. These observations shed new light on the virulence mechanisms of Y. pestis during pneumonic plague, and have implications for the

  15. Metalworking fluid-associated hypersensitivity pneumonitis: a workshop summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiss, K; Cox-Ganser, J

    1997-10-01

    A workshop discussing eight clusters of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in the automotive industry among metalworking fluid-exposed workers concluded that a risk exists for this granulomatous lung disease where water-based fluids are used and unusual microbial contaminants predominate. Strong candidates for microbial etiology are nontuberculous mycobacteria and fungi. Cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis occur among cases with other work-related respiratory symptoms and chest diseases. Reversibility of disease has occurred in many cases with exposure cessation, allowing return to work to jobs without metalworking fluid exposures or, in some situations, to jobs without the same metalworking fluid exposures. Cases have been recognized with metalworking fluid exposures generally less than 0.5 mg/m3. The workshop participants identified knowledge gaps regarding risk factors, exposure-response relationships, intervention efficacy, and natural history, as well as surveillance needs to define the extent of the problem in this industry. In the absence of answers to these questions, guidance for prevention is necessarily limited.

  16. Radiation therapy for patients with obstructive jaundice caused by carcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Masashi; Nakagawa, Hirofumi; Kataoka, Masaaki

    1992-01-01

    From February 1980 through September 1990, 92 patients with obstructive jaundice resulting from biliary tract cancer were registered at Shikoku Cancer Center Hospital or Ehime University Hospital. Radiation therapy (RT) was used to treat 38 of these patients (30 with carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile duct, excluding ampulla of Vater, and eight patients with carcinoma of the gallbladder). Of 38 patients, 11 underwent intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), and 27 were treated by external radiation therapy (ERT) alone. In contrast, 54 patients (39 with carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile duct and eight with carcinoma of the gallbladder) were not treated by RT. All jaundiced patients received external and/or internal biliary drainage of some kind. Among patients undergoing biliary drainage with a catheter, 21 patients who underwent RT (four with IORT) survived significantly longer than 19 patients who did not (generalized Wilcoxon test: p<0.05). There were no significant differences in survival between 7 patients with recanalization and 11 patients with no recanalization. Concerning the survival of laparotomized patients, excluding those with complete resection or perioperative death, eight patients treated with postoperative ERT survived longer than 12 patients who did not have postoperative ERT (not significant). Eleven patients underwent IORT. A patient with unresectable carcinoma of the hilar bile duct survived 2 years and 3 months after a combination treatment of ERT and IOTR. In four of eight autopsied patients, radiation effects of Grade II were observed (Oboshi and Shimosato's evaluation system for the histological effects of radiation therapy). Our experience suggests that RT is effective in patients with obstructive jaundice caused by carcinoma of the biliary system. (author)

  17. [Occupational diseases caused by ionizing radiation in Poland, 1971-2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyńska, Urszula; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila

    2008-01-01

    The whole spectrum of disorders of the hematopoietic tissue, eye and skin induced by ionizing radiation covers complex pathologies termed as a postirradiation syndrome, as well as various malignancies. The aim of this work is to present the data on incidence of occupational diseases with ionizing radiation as a causative agent. The work is based on the data compiled from "Occupational Diseases Reporting Forms" for the years 1971-2006 collected in the Central Register of Occupational Diseases. The incidence of certified occupational diseases with ionizing radiation as a causative agent is expressed in absolute numbers and the rate per 100 000 employees. The data comprise information on disease entities, gender, age, exposure duration and the branch of national economy. In total, 599 diseases (0.2% of all occupational diseases) were diagnosed as those induced by ionizong radiation. Annual incidence rates per 100,000 employees fell within the range of 0.0-0.7. Miners formed the major (51.9%) occupational group affected by ionizing radiation. They were followed by health care (34.3%) and construction (6.4%) workers. Cancers made over 50% of pathologies located at 28 sites. These included cancers of lung (59.2%), skin (10.0%) and hematopoietic tissue (8.7%). Almost all (99.35) diseases recorded in the mining industry were cancers. Non-cancer diseases were more frequent in health care workers, among them postradiation cataract occupied the first place. A great deal of reported cancer sites give rise to controversy in terms of the cause-effect association with ionizing radiation exposure and also due to incomplete data on exposure level. Postradiation cancers among health care workers have not been registered over recent years, which means that occupational exposure surveillance carried out for many years proves to be effective. Distant effects of exposure to ionizing radiation, revealed in workers of no longer existing uranium mine, appeared to be a particular problem

  18. Occupational Diseases Caused by Ionizing Radiation in Poland, 1971-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilczynska, U.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.

    2008-01-01

    The whole spectrum of disorders of the hematopoietic tissue, eye and skin induced by ionizing radiation covers complex pathologies termed as a postirradiation syndrome, as well as various malignancies. The aim of this work is to present the data on incidence of occupational diseases with ionizing radiation as a causative agent. The work is based on the data compiled from 'Occupational Diseases Reporting Forms' for the years 1971-2006 collected in the Central Register of Occupational Diseases. The incidence of certified occupational diseases with ionizing radiation as a causative agent is expressed in absolute numbers and the rate per 100 000 employees. The data comprise information on disease entities, gender, age, exposure duration and the branch of national economy. In total, 599 diseases (0.2% of all occupational diseases) were diagnosed as those induced by ionizing radiation. Annual incidence rates per 100 000 employees fell within the range of 0.0-0.7. Miners formed the major (51.9%) occupational group affected by ionizing radiation. They were followed by health care (34.3%) and construction (6.4%) workers. Cancers made over 50% of pathologies located at 28 sites. These included cancers of lung (59.2%), skin (10.0%) and hematopoietic tissue (8.7%). Almost all (99.35) diseases recorded in the mining industry were cancers. Non-cancer diseases were more frequent in health care workers, among them postradiation cataract occupied the first place. A great deal of reported cancer sites give rise to controversy in terms of the cause-effect association with ionizing radiation exposure and also due to incomplete data on exposure duration. Postradiation cancers among health care workers have not been registered over recent years, which means that occupational exposure surveillance carried out for many years proves to be effective. Distant effects of exposure to ionizing radiation, revealed in workers of no longer existing uranium mine, appeared to be a particular problem

  19. Changes of ionizing radiation caused by natural radionuclides in the Curonian Spit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peciuliene, M.; Jasaitis, D.; Grigaliunaite-Vonseviciene, G. and others

    2005-01-01

    Taking into consideration a unique scenery of the Curonian Spit, dosimetric investigation of ionizing radiation caused by natural radionuclides is performed there. The influence of natural radionuclides present in the ground on the equivalent dose rate of gamma radiation in the ground surface air is established. Measurements of equivalent dose rate are carried out in the whole territory of the Curonian Spit in Lithuania. Especially numerous data have been collected on the coasts of the sea and bay, near them, in seaside dunes and by roads. The established equivalent dose rate values vary from 22 nSv/h (on the dune top) to 90 nSv/h (above an asphalt path). The values of the main gamma radiation source ( 40 K and 226 Ra) concentration are measured, and positive correlation of concentrations and equivalent dose rates in the ground surface air between 40 K and 2 '2 6 Ra is determinated. It is established that 40 K has the biggest influence on equivalent dose rate. The equivalent dose rate values in the ground surface air in the Curonian Spit are comparatively low (they can even be 1630 times lower in comparison to Guarapari beach, Brazil). (author)

  20. Microdosimetric constraints on specific adaptation mechanisms to reduce DNA damage caused by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, W.; Heusser, P.; Vijayalaxmi

    1990-01-01

    The protective effect of pre-exposure of lymphocytes to ionising radiation indicates the presence of 'adaptive repair' in mammalian cells. Microdosimetric considerations, however, raise some doubts on the advantage of such a cellular mechanism for specifically reducing the radiation damage caused by environmental exposures. Contrary to most chemicals which endanger the integrity of the mammalian genome, the local dose and dose rate from ionising radiation at the cellular level remain quite high, even at lowest exposures. A single electron or alpha particle passing through a cell nucleus already yields nuclear doses of up to about 3 mGy and 400 mGy, respectively. Macroscopic doses below these nuclear doses from a single event will only reduce the fraction of cell nuclei encountering the passage of a particle but not the dose or dose rate in the affected volume. At environmental doses in the range of 1 to 5 mGy per annum, the time between two consecutive hits in a specific cell nucleus is in the range of months to years. Very low concentrations of bleomycin, a drug with high affinity to DNA, also triggers an adaptive response. This points to a more general stress response mechanism which may benefit the cell even at environmental levels of radioactivity, e.g. by protecting the integrity of DNA from attacks by chemicals, by endogenous radicals, by acids from anoxia, etc. (author)

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of cognitive deficits caused by radiation in patients with brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiuchi, Shogo

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses about the diagnosis and evaluation of brain higher functions, feature of their impairment induced by radiotherapy for brain tumor, and association of the impairment and neurogenesis in hippocampus (H). Radiation is one of important causes of cognitive impairment in patients with brain tumor: exempli gratia (e.g.) single irradiation of 2 Gy increases its risk. The impairment is usually diagnosed and evaluated with neuropsychological tests like mini-mental state examination (MMSE), authors' Ryudai version of the brief neuropsychological test battery, etc. The neurotoxicity of radiation is classified in acute effect caused by destruction of the blood brain barrier (BBB) appearing within 2 weeks after irradiation, early-late one of demyelination as a result of BBB rupture within 1-6 months after radiotherapy and late-late effect accompanying serious symptoms like necrosis of irradiated region at later than a few months to several years. Lowered neurogenic function in H and invasion of microglia cells are observed in autopsy specimen of the irradiated brain, and single X-irradiation at 5 or 10 Gy is known to result in the arrest of neurogenesis in the mouse H dentate gyrus. Lowered cognition by irradiation of H in clinical cases is particularly reported in children. Inflammatory biomarkers like cytokines are detected in the serum of irradiated patients as well as of animals. Although fMRI alone is not satisfactory to diagnose and evaluate the radiation-induced impairment, the imaging reveals the association of anatomically different regions in cognition through neural network. It has been recently shown that the impairment can be partially protected by planning the irradiation field so as to avoid H, by medication with donepezil, memantine, erythropoietin and indomethacin, and by hyperbaric oxygen therapy. (T.T.)

  2. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (extrinsic allergic alveolitis): high-resolution computed tomography findings; Pneumonite por hipersensibilidade (alveolite alergica extrinseca): achados na tomografia computadorizada de alta resolucao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Junior, Jose Guiomar de; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: edmarchiori@zipmail.com.br; Escuissato, Dante L. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Gasparetto, Emerson L. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas; Nobre, Luiz Felipe [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Irion, Klaus L. [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Pavilhao Pereira Filho. Servico de Radiologia

    2003-12-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, or extrinsic allergic alveolitis, is an immunologic disease of the lungs caused by inhaled chemicals or organics allergens. A lymphocytic inflammatory response in the peripheral airways and surrounding interstitial tissue occurs. In this study the high-resolution computed tomography findings of 13 patients with hypersensitivity pneumonitis were analyzed and discussed. The most frequent high-resolution computed tomography findings were: ground-glass opacities (92.3%), centrilobular nodules (38.4%) and air trapping (38.4%). Other findings included bronchiectasis (23.1%), consolidation (23.1%), crazy paving (7.7%), parenchymal bands (15.4%), linear opacities (7.7%), architectural distortion (7.7%), tracheal dilatation (7.7%), intralobular reticulate (7.7%), honeycombing (7.7%), emphysema (7.7%) and atelectasis (7.7%). In two of the 13 patients there was fibrosis (architectural distortion and honeycombing), which represents the chronic phase of the disease. (author)

  3. Childhood hypersensitivity pneumonitis associated with fungal contamination of indoor hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhart, Steffen; Rietschel, Ernst; Exner, Martin; Lange, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Childhood hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is often associated with exposure to antigens in the home environment. We describe a case of HP associated with indoor hydroponics in a 14-year-old girl. Water samples from hydroponics revealed Aureobasidium pullulans as the dominant fungal micro-organism (10(4)CFU/ml). The diagnosis is supported by the existence of serum precipitating antibodies against A. pullulans, lymphocytic alveolitis on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, a corresponding reaction on a lung biopsy, and the sustained absence of clinical symptoms following the removal of hydroponics from the home. We conclude that hydroponics should be considered as potential sources of fungal contaminants when checking for indoor health complaints.

  4. Simultaneous interstitial pneumonitis and cardiomyopathy induced by venlafaxine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gonçalo Ferreira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Venlafaxine is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor used as an antidepressant. Interindividual variability and herb-drug interactions can lead to drug-induced toxicity. We report the case of a 35-year-old female patient diagnosed with synchronous pneumonitis and acute cardiomyopathy attributed to venlafaxine. The patient sought medical attention due to dyspnea and dry cough that started three months after initiating treatment with venlafaxine for depression. The patient was concomitantly taking Centella asiatica and Fucus vesiculosus as phytotherapeutic agents. Chest CT angiography and chest X-ray revealed parenchymal lung disease (diffuse micronodules and focal ground-glass opacities and simultaneous dilated cardiomyopathy. Ecocardiography revealed a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF of 21%. A thorough investigation was carried out, including BAL, imaging studies, autoimmune testing, right heart catheterization, and myocardial biopsy. After excluding other etiologies and applying the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale, a diagnosis of synchronous pneumonitis/cardiomyopathy associated with venlafaxine was assumed. The herbal supplements taken by the patient have a known potential to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzyme complex, which is responsible for the metabolization of venlafaxine. After venlafaxine discontinuation, there was rapid improvement, with regression of the radiological abnormalities and normalization of the LVEF. This was an important case of drug-induced cardiopulmonary toxicity. The circumstantial intake of inhibitors of the CYP2D6 isoenzyme and the presence of a CYP2D6 slow metabolism phenotype might have resulted in the toxic accumulation of venlafaxine and the subsequent clinical manifestations. Here, we also discuss why macrophage-dominant phospholipidosis was the most likely mechanism of toxicity in this case.

  5. The changes of fingernail microcirculation in the patients with hand skin radiation damage caused by β rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guoquan; Qian Jianjun; Wang Zuofa

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To observe the microcirculation changes in the patients with hand skin radiation damage caused by β rays. Methods: The XOX-1A type microcirculation microscope was used in observation of the microcirculation changes of fingernail, in 22 patients with III-IV degree hand skin radiation damage caused by β rays. Results: A series of abnormal signs were observed in all these patients and it was found that the microcirculation abnormality of the fingernail were the most clinical significant sign. Conclusion: The fingernail microcirculation changes can be used as an indicator for prognosis in the hand skin radiation damage patients

  6. Rectovesicovaginal fistula following rectovaginal fistula caused by radiation therapy for uterine cancer. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Tsuneo; Shiba, Masahiro; Matsuoka, Yasuhiro; Kakimoto, Ken-ichi; Oda, Masayoshi; Koide, Takuo [Osaka Koseinenkin Hospital (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    A case of rectovesicovaginal fistula caused by pelvic radiation for uterine cancer is presented. A 62-year-old woman visited our department complaining of macroscopic hematuria, mictional pain and pollakisuria. She had a history of total hysterectomy and radiation therapy for cervical cancer 26 years earlier. Melena was noted in March 1994 and an escape of stool from the vagina followed nine months later. She consulted a surgeon about it, however no active treatment was performed before coming under our care. Computed tomography demonstrated that the posterior bladder wall was extremely thin and the possibility of the formation of vesical perforation was strongly suggested. We constructed transverse-colostomy, however, a rectovesicovaginal fistula developed seven months later. Therefore, in order to regain a dry life, an ileal conduit was constructed and her quality of life began to improve. It is probable that the rectovesicovaginal fistula could have been prevented if colostomy had been carried out soon after the appearance of melena or soon after the formation of the rectovaginal fistula. (author)

  7. Rectovesicovaginal fistula following rectovaginal fistula caused by radiation therapy for uterine cancer. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Tsuneo; Shiba, Masahiro; Matsuoka, Yasuhiro; Kakimoto, Ken-ichi; Oda, Masayoshi; Koide, Takuo

    1997-01-01

    A case of rectovesicovaginal fistula caused by pelvic radiation for uterine cancer is presented. A 62-year-old woman visited our department complaining of macroscopic hematuria, mictional pain and pollakisuria. She had a history of total hysterectomy and radiation therapy for cervical cancer 26 years earlier. Melena was noted in March 1994 and an escape of stool from the vagina followed nine months later. She consulted a surgeon about it, however no active treatment was performed before coming under our care. Computed tomography demonstrated that the posterior bladder wall was extremely thin and the possibility of the formation of vesical perforation was strongly suggested. We constructed transverse-colostomy, however, a rectovesicovaginal fistula developed seven months later. Therefore, in order to regain a dry life, an ileal conduit was constructed and her quality of life began to improve. It is probable that the rectovesicovaginal fistula could have been prevented if colostomy had been carried out soon after the appearance of melena or soon after the formation of the rectovaginal fistula. (author)

  8. Treatment of disorders caused by radiation injury in the hand and fingers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshihiro

    1976-01-01

    In this paper, a report was made on 8 cases of disorders caused by radiation injury in the hand and fingers and on those treatment. In 5 cases of them, keratosis of the skin (an average of 10 years after the initial fluoloscopy) and ulceration (an average of 17 years after the initial one) due to x-ray fluoloscopy were noted. Cancer was found in 2 cases of them and precancer in the other 2 cases of them. The lesions continued to develop after radiation was stopped. In 2 cases which had received x-ray irradiation for the treatment, one case developed erosion one year after the institution of the therapy and the other had the similar change two years after that. In both of the cases, precancerous state was noticed. In the last case, erosion appeared 6 years after the patient had dealt with radium in giving treatment. Ulceration appeared 16 years after the patient had dealt with radium in giving treatment. In 4 cases in which lesions had been restricted in the corium layer, the treatment was the resection of the skin and dermatoplasty, and thus the function of the fingers recovered. In the other 4 cases in which the pathological changes had spreaded over the deeper layers, the fingers were severed. (Serizawa, K.)

  9. Interstitial pneumonitis is a frequent complication in liver transplant recipients treated with sirolimus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morcos, A

    2012-06-01

    Sirolimus is a powerful immunosuppressive drug which is being used increasingly after liver transplantation because of its renal sparing and anti-tumour effects. It has been associated with uncommon, but potentially fatal, interstitial pneumonitis.

  10. [Human herpesvirus-6 pneumonitis following autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Yuu; Gotoh, Moritaka; Yoshizawa, Seiichiro; Akahane, Daigo; Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Ito, Yoshikazu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2018-01-01

    A-46-year-old man was diagnosed with peripheral T cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. He achieved a complete remission after pirarubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone (THP-COP) therapy and successful autologous peripheral blood stem-cell transplantation (AutoSCT). However, 6 months post AutoSCT, he complained of fever. Chest computed tomography of the patient displayed bilateral interstitial pneumonitis. Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) DNA was detected in his bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Therefore, the patient was confirmed for HHV-6 pneumonitis. The treatment with foscarnet was effective, and no relapse was noticed in the patient. Besides, we have experienced pneumonitis of unknown origin in some patients after autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplantations. Moreover, most of the above patients were clinically diagnosed using serum or plasma markers. Therefore, examining respiratory symptoms after AutoSCT would enable a more accurate diagnosis as well as treatment of patients with HHV-6 pneumonitis.

  11. Everolimus-induced Pneumonitis after Drug-eluting Stent Implantation: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Susumu, E-mail: susumu1029@gmail.com; Kikuchi, Naoshi; Ichikawa, Atsuo; Sano, Go; Satoh, Keita; Sugino, Keishi; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Takai, Yujiro [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Respiratory Medicine (Japan); Shibuya, Kazutoshi [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology (Japan); Homma, Sakae [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Respiratory Medicine (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    Despite the wide use of everolimus as an antineoplastic coating agent for coronary stents to reduce the rate of restenosis, little is known about the health hazards of everolimus-eluting stents (EES). We describe a case of pneumonitis that developed 2 months after EES implantation for angina. Lung pathology demonstrated an organizing pneumonia pattern that responded to corticosteroid therapy. Although the efficacy of EES for ischemic heart disease is well established, EES carries a risk of pneumonitis.

  12. CAUSES: Attribution of Surface Radiation Biases in NWP and Climate Models near the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Weverberg, K.; Morcrette, C. J.; Petch, J.; Klein, S. A.; Ma, H.-Y.; Zhang, C.; Xie, S.; Tang, Q.; Gustafson, W. I.; Qian, Y.; Berg, L. K.; Liu, Y.; Huang, M.; Ahlgrimm, M.; Forbes, R.; Bazile, E.; Roehrig, R.; Cole, J.; Merryfield, W.; Lee, W.-S.; Cheruy, F.; Mellul, L.; Wang, Y.-C.; Johnson, K.; Thieman, M. M.

    2018-04-01

    Many Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and climate models exhibit too warm lower tropospheres near the midlatitude continents. The warm bias has been shown to coincide with important surface radiation biases that likely play a critical role in the inception or the growth of the warm bias. This paper presents an attribution study on the net radiation biases in nine model simulations, performed in the framework of the CAUSES project (Clouds Above the United States and Errors at the Surface). Contributions from deficiencies in the surface properties, clouds, water vapor, and aerosols are quantified, using an array of radiation measurement stations near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis is shown to attribute the radiation errors to specific cloud regimes. The net surface shortwave radiation is overestimated in all models throughout most of the simulation period. Cloud errors are shown to contribute most to this overestimation, although nonnegligible contributions from the surface albedo exist in most models. Missing deep cloud events and/or simulating deep clouds with too weak cloud radiative effects dominate in the cloud-related radiation errors. Some models have compensating errors between excessive occurrence of deep cloud but largely underestimating their radiative effect, while other models miss deep cloud events altogether. Surprisingly, even the latter models tend to produce too much and too frequent afternoon surface precipitation. This suggests that rather than issues with the triggering of deep convection, cloud radiative deficiencies are related to too weak convective cloud detrainment and too large precipitation efficiencies.

  13. Respiratory and oral vaccination improves protection conferred by the live vaccine strain against pneumonic tularemia in the rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Elizabeth; Smith, Le'Kneitah P; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Barry, Eileen M; Reed, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    Tularemia is a severe, zoonotic disease caused by a gram-negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis We have previously shown that rabbits are a good model of human pneumonic tularemia when exposed to aerosols containing a virulent, type A strain, SCHU S4. We further demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS), an attenuated type B strain, extended time to death when given by scarification. Oral or aerosol vaccination has been previously shown in humans to offer superior protection to parenteral vaccination against respiratory tularemia challenge. Both oral and aerosol vaccination with LVS were well tolerated in the rabbit with only minimal fever and no weight loss after inoculation. Plasma antibody titers against F. tularensis were higher in rabbits that were vaccinated by either oral or aerosol routes compared to scarification. Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4. LVS given by scarification extended time to death compared to mock-vaccinated controls. One orally vaccinated rabbit did survive aerosol challenge, however, only aerosol vaccination extended time to death significantly compared to scarification. These results further demonstrate the utility of the rabbit model of pneumonic tularemia in replicating what has been reported in humans and macaques as well as demonstrating the utility of vaccination by oral and respiratory routes against an aerosol tularemia challenge. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Meningioma Causing Visual Impairment: Outcomes and Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maclean, Jillian, E-mail: jillian.maclean@uclh.nhs.uk [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Fersht, Naomi [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Bremner, Fion [Neuro-Ophthalmology Department, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom); Stacey, Chris; Sivabalasingham, Suganya [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Short, Susan [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, St James University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologic outcomes and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with meningiomas causing visual deficits. Methods and Materials: A prospective observational study with formal ophthalmologic and clinical assessment of 30 consecutive cases of meningioma affecting vision treated with IMRT from 2007 to 2011. Prescriptions were 50.4 Gy to mean target dose in 28 daily fractions. The median follow-up time was 28 months. Twenty-six meningiomas affected the anterior visual pathway (including 3 optic nerve sheath meningiomas); 4 were posterior to the chiasm. Results: Vision improved objectively in 12 patients (40%). Improvements were in visual field (5/16 patients), color vision (4/9 patients), acuity (1/15 patients), extraocular movements (3/11 patients), ptosis (1/5 patients), and proptosis (2/6 patients). No predictors of clinical response were found. Two patients had minor reductions in tumor dimensions on magnetic resonance imaging, 1 patient had radiological progression, and the other patients were stable. One patient experienced grade 2 keratitis, 1 patient had a minor visual field loss, and 5 patients had grade 1 dry eye. Conclusion: IMRT is an effective method for treating meningiomas causing ophthalmologic deficits, and toxicity is minimal. Thorough ophthalmologic assessment is important because clinical responses often occur in the absence of radiological change.

  15. Occupational diseases caused by ionizing radiation in medical personnel in the Czech Republic in 1974-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenclova, Z.; Pelclova, D.; Lebedova, J.; Urban, P.; Petrova, K.

    1999-01-01

    During 1974-1997, the incidence of occupational diseases caused by ionizing radiation in medical personnel was low (0 to 0.4 % of all notified occupational diseases, with a decreasing tendency over this period of time). There have been 136 cases of occupational diseases caused by ionizing radiation; in this, 111 cases occurred in the health care sector. Radiation dermatitis was the most frequent disease (88 cases). Physicians constituted the most affected occupational group in the 1991 - 1997 period. The age of the affected physicians lay in the range of 45 to 77. The personnel affected by radiation dermatitis had the shortest (5 years) as well as longest (46 years) exposure. Lung cancer caused by radioactive chemicals was only diagnosed in two persons in the health care sector during 1974 - 1997. It should be noted that the occupational diseases were caused by elevated exposures experienced in previous years or developed as a consequence of radiation accidents. In view of the present advanced level of protection against ionizing radiation, the numbers of this kind of disease is not expected to grow any further

  16. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to metal working fluids: Sporadic or under reported?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amit; Rosenman, Kenneth D

    2006-06-01

    Occupational exposure to metal working fluids (MWF) is common with over 1.2 million workers in the United States involved in machine finishing, machine tooling, and other metalworking operations. MWF is a known cause of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). Recent reports of outbreaks of hypersensitivity HP secondary to exposure to MWF are reported. Cases were identified through the Occupational Disease surveillance system in the State of Michigan and from referrals for evaluation to the Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at Michigan State University (MSU). Each patient underwent a clinical examination including an occupational history, lung function studies, radiographic imaging, and in some cases lung biopsies. Following the diagnosis of definite HP, an industrial hygiene investigation was carried out, which included a plant walk-through, and review of the "Injury and Illness" log. Air monitoring and microbial sampling results were reviewed. As part of Michigan's mandatory surveillance system for occupational illnesses, seven cases of suspected HP were identified in 2003-2004 from three facilities manufacturing automobile parts in Michigan. Each plant used semi-synthetic MWFs, and conducted a MWF management program including biocide additions. Two facilities had recently changed the MWF before the cases arose. Growth of mycobacteria was found in these two MWFs. Breathing zone samples for particulates of two employees in plant A (two cases) ranged from 0.48 to 0.56 mg/m3. In plant B (four cases), two employees' sampling results ranged from 0.10 to 0.14 mg/m3. No air sampling data were available from plant C. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to exposure to MWFs is under-recognized by health care providers, and current surveillance systems are inadequate to provide a true estimate of its occurrence. HP arose from environments with exposures well below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) for MWF, and

  17. Host transcriptomic responses to pneumonic plague reveal that Yersinia pestis inhibits both the initial adaptive and innate immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiying; Wang, Tong; Tian, Guang; Zhang, Qingwen; Wu, Xiaohong; Xin, Youqian; Yan, Yanfeng; Tan, Yafang; Cao, Shiyang; Liu, Wanbing; Cui, Yujun; Yang, Ruifu; Du, Zongmin

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonic plague is the most deadly form of infection caused by Yersinia pestis and can progress extremely fast. However, our understanding on the host transcriptomic response to pneumonic plague is insufficient. Here, we used RNA-sequencing technology to analyze transcriptomic responses in mice infected with fully virulent strain 201 or EV76, a live attenuated vaccine strain lacking the pigmentation locus. Approximately 600 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected in lungs from both 201- and EV76-infected mice at 12h post-infection (hpi). DEGs in lungs of 201-infected mice exceeded 2000 at 48hpi, accompanied by sustained large numbers of DEGs in the liver and spleen; however, limited numbers of DEGs were detected in those organs of EV-infected mice. Remarkably, DEGs in lungs were significantly enriched in critical immune responses pathways in EV76-infected but not 201-infected mice, including antigen processing and presentation, T cell receptor signaling among others. Pathological and bacterial load analyses confirmed the rapid systemic dissemination of 201-infection and the confined EV76-infection in lungs. Our results suggest that fully virulent Y. pestis inhibits both the innate and adaptive immune responses that are substantially stimulated in a self-limited infection, which update our holistic views on the transcriptomic response to pneumonic plague. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiation dermatitis caused by a bolus effect from an abdominal compression device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Michael; Wei, Randy L.; Yu, Suhong; Sehgal, Varun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA (United States); Klempner, Samuel J. [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California, Orange, CA (United States); Daroui, Parima, E-mail: pdaroui@uci.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 176 evaluated the dosimetric effects caused by couch tops and immobilization devices. The report analyzed the extensive physics-based literature on couch tops, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) frames, and body immobilization bags, while noting the scarcity of clinical reports of skin toxicity because of external devices. Here, we present a clinical case report of grade 1 abdominal skin toxicity owing to an abdominal compression device. We discuss the dosimetric implications of the utilized treatment plan as well as post hoc alternative plans and quantify differences in attenuation and skin dose/build-up between the device, a lower-density alternative device, and an open field. The description of the case includes a 66-year-old male with HER2 amplified poorly differentiated distal esophageal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemo-radiation and the use of an abdominal compression device. Radiation was delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 2 arcs using abdominal compression and image guidance. The total dose was 50.4 Gy delivered over 40 elapsed days. With 2 fractions remaining, the patient developed dermatitis in the area of the compression device. The original treatment plan did not include a contour of the device. Alternative post hoc treatment plans were generated, one to contour the device and a second with anterior avoidance. In conclusion, replanning with the device contoured revealed the bolus effect. The skin dose increased from 27 to 36 Gy. planned target volume (PTV) coverage at 45 Gy was reduced to 76.5% from 95.8%. The second VMAT treatment plan with an anterior avoidance sector and more oblique beam angles maintained PTV coverage and spared the anterior wall, however at the expense of substantially increased dose to lung. This case report provides an important reminder of the bolus effect from external devices such as abdominal compression. Special

  19. Radiation dermatitis caused by a bolus effect from an abdominal compression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Michael; Wei, Randy L.; Yu, Suhong; Sehgal, Varun; Klempner, Samuel J.; Daroui, Parima

    2016-01-01

    American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 176 evaluated the dosimetric effects caused by couch tops and immobilization devices. The report analyzed the extensive physics-based literature on couch tops, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) frames, and body immobilization bags, while noting the scarcity of clinical reports of skin toxicity because of external devices. Here, we present a clinical case report of grade 1 abdominal skin toxicity owing to an abdominal compression device. We discuss the dosimetric implications of the utilized treatment plan as well as post hoc alternative plans and quantify differences in attenuation and skin dose/build-up between the device, a lower-density alternative device, and an open field. The description of the case includes a 66-year-old male with HER2 amplified poorly differentiated distal esophageal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemo-radiation and the use of an abdominal compression device. Radiation was delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 2 arcs using abdominal compression and image guidance. The total dose was 50.4 Gy delivered over 40 elapsed days. With 2 fractions remaining, the patient developed dermatitis in the area of the compression device. The original treatment plan did not include a contour of the device. Alternative post hoc treatment plans were generated, one to contour the device and a second with anterior avoidance. In conclusion, replanning with the device contoured revealed the bolus effect. The skin dose increased from 27 to 36 Gy. planned target volume (PTV) coverage at 45 Gy was reduced to 76.5% from 95.8%. The second VMAT treatment plan with an anterior avoidance sector and more oblique beam angles maintained PTV coverage and spared the anterior wall, however at the expense of substantially increased dose to lung. This case report provides an important reminder of the bolus effect from external devices such as abdominal compression. Special

  20. Biostimulation effects on wheat seeds (Triticum Aestivum L) caused by low level red laser radiation with λ = 660 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, M.; Michtchenko, A.

    2009-01-01

    The principal objective is to study the biostimulation effects caused by a semiconductor low level laser radiation with ? = 660 nm on wheat seeds (Triticum Aestivum L). Seeds were treated before sowing with this laser light source. An increase in the growth of the stem of 12% with respect to control seeds was registered for seeds radiated by an intensity of 15mW/cm 2 and an irradiation time of 60 seconds. (Author)

  1. Causes of Accidents Near Accelerators and Radiation Protection Arrangements; Causes d'accidents aupres des accelerateurs et dispositions de radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joffre, H; Vialettes, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The authors present, first, some typical accidents mentioned in bibliography or happened in CEA Research Centers. The accidents are analysed to precise the main cause and get some experience. Then the authors study the interest of a centralized control for security, detection and signalling devices used near every important accelerator. (author) [French] Les auteurs presentent, tout d'abord, quelques accidents typiques rapportes dans la bibliographie ou survenus dans les Centres de Recherches du CEA. Ces accidents sont analyses pour en preciser la cause principale et en degager les enseignements. Enfin les auteurs etudient l'interet d'un controle centralise des dispositifs de securite, de detection et de signalisation mis en oeuvre aupres de tout accelerateur important. (auteur)

  2. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R., E-mail: akennedy@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials: Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results: The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD{sub 50}) of the ferrets was established at ∼1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions: Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD{sub 50} in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals.

  3. Guidelines for the clinical evaluation of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Report of the Subcommittee on Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richerson, H.B.; Bernstein, I.L.; Fink, J.N.; Hunninghake, G.W.; Novey, H.S.; Reed, C.E.; Salvaggio, J.E.; Schuyler, M.R.; Schwartz, H.J.; Stechschulte, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    In general, a history of exposure to moldy hay, birds, or other incriminated occupational or environmental inhalants in a patient with clinical and radiologic features consistent with HSP should lead to the demonstration of serum precipitins to the suspected antigen and an established diagnosis, confirmed by avoidance of the agent involved. Occasionally, other diagnostic procedures are required. The diagnosis is often difficult in domestic exposures, such as humidification and air conditioning systems. A careful environmental history is essential, and at times the physician must inspect the patient's environment personally. In most cases, the diagnosis is established if (1) the history and physical findings and pulmonary function tests indicate an interstitial lung disease, (2) the x-ray film is consistent, (3) there is exposure to a recognized cause, and (4) there is antibody to that antigen. In other exceptional circumstances, bronchoalveolar lavage may help. Biopsy is rarely needed. Special environmental studies and identification of new antigens require research facilities. Provocation tests are research procedures, not necessary for the diagnosis, and not needed in contested workmen's compensation adjudications

  4. Outcomes of immunosuppressive therapy in chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodeji Adegunsoye

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (CHP, lack of improvement or declining lung function may prompt use of immunosuppressive therapy. We hypothesised that use of azathioprine or mycophenolate mofetil with prednisone reduces adverse events and lung function decline, and improves transplant-free survival. Patients with CHP were identified. Demographic features, pulmonary function tests, incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs and transplant-free survival were characterised, compared and analysed between patients stratified by immunosuppressive therapy. A multicentre comparison was performed across four independent tertiary medical centres. Among 131 CHP patients at the University of Chicago medical centre (Chicago, IL, USA, 93 (71% received immunosuppressive therapy, and had worse baseline forced vital capacity (FVC and diffusing capacity, and increased mortality compared with those who did not. Compared to patients treated with prednisone alone, TEAEs were 54% less frequent with azathioprine therapy (p=0.04 and 66% less frequent with mycophenolate mofetil (p=0.002. FVC decline and survival were similar between treatment groups. Analyses of datasets from four external tertiary medical centres confirmed these findings. CHP patients who did not receive immunosuppressive therapy had better survival than those who did. Use of mycophenolate mofetil or azathioprine was associated with a decreased incidence of TEAEs, and no difference in lung function decline or survival when compared with prednisone alone. Early transition to mycophenolate mofetil or azathioprine may be an appropriate therapeutic approach in CHP, but more studies are needed.

  5. Sirolimus-associated interstitial pneumonitis in a liver transplant recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claire Berrouet, Marie; Aristizabal, Julian Miguel; Restrepo, Juan Carlos; Correa, Gonzalo

    2005-01-01

    Sirolimus is an immunosuppressive drug that has been used during the past few years. Sirolimus is indicated in rescue therapies and to reduce the secondary toxic effects of calcineurin inhibitors. This drug has been associated with infrequent but severe pulmonary toxicity. Cases of interstitial pneumonitis, bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia, and alveolar proteinosis have been described. We describe a case of pulmonary toxicity associated with the use of sirolimus in a 59-yr-old liver transplant recipient. We also review all reported cases of sirolimus-associated lung toxicity among liver transplantation recipients, with the intention of understanding the risk factors, the clinical picture and the outcomes of this complication. Five cases have been reported since January 2000, including the present case. Clinical presentation is similar, with fever, dyspnoea, fatigue, cough, and hemoptysis. Discontinuation of the drug led to resolution of clinical and radiographic findings. Sirolimus-induced pulmonary toxicity is a serious condition and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of liver recipients presenting with respiratory findings. Discontinuation of the drug is associated with resolution of the pulmonary compromise

  6. Spontaneous electromagnetic radiation caused by binary ion-atom collisions in the quasiresonant case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihajlov, A.A.; Popovic, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    The process of spontaneous electromagnetic radiation in the reaction A + + B → A + B + + hω is studied. Here A and B are the same kind of atoms or atoms with small differences in ionization potentials (quasiresonant case). Differential cross section, energy spectrum of the emitted photons, and total intensity of electromagnetic radiation are determined for thermal velocities of relative motion. Results are applicable in a wide range of temperatures: 500< or = T< or = 50,000 K. It is shown that the radiation spectrum is very broad and the radiation intensity is considerable

  7. A case of leukoencephalopathy caused by radiation and chemotherapy for brain metastasis of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Shigeru; Sonoo, Hiroshi; Nomura, Tsunehisa; Ohkubo, Sumiko; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Tanaka, Katsuhiro; Kurebayashi, Junichi; Hiratsuka, Junichi [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    A case of treatment-related leukoencephalopathy is presented. A patient with breast cancer metastasis to the brain, liver, bone and distant lymph nodes was treated with whole brain radiation and docetaxcel. Eleven months after radiation, magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse leukoencephalopathy. Twenty-two months after radiation, the patient had gait disturbance, parkinsonism, dementia and urinary incontinence. From this experience, stereotactic radiosurgery such as cyber knife and gamma knife therapy, representing a new modality for delivering intense focal radiation, should be come preferred techniques for treating patients with brain metastases, to avoid the potential cognitive side effects of fractionated whole-brain radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Result of radiation therapy for non-resectable lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Kawamura, Masashi; Kimura, Makoto; Mogami, Hiroshi; Kimura, Yoshiko; Hamamoto, Ken

    1988-01-01

    A total of 122 patients with non-resectable lung cancer, comprising 98 with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 24 with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), who were treated from November 1976 through December 1985 with definitive radiation therapy (RT), were retrospectively analyzed for the outcome of RT. Overall, the 5-year survival rate was 6 %: it was 8 % for SCLC and 4 % for NSCLC. For NSCLC, survival was significantly better in stages I-III patients than stage IV patients (p < 0.01), although it was independent of histology, the combination of chemotherapy, and fractionation schedule. Local recurrence and distant metastasis were found to be the cause of death in 42 % and 13 %, respectively, in the stages I-II NSCLC group; and in 19 % and 52 %, respectively, in the SCLC group. The SCLC patients tended to have better survival when given chemotherapy before RT. Ten patients surviving for three years or more were characterized by having early stage of NSCLC, less than 100 cm of irradiated field, and a total dose of 60 Gy or more. Twelve patients (10 %) had severe radiation pneumonitis that resulted in death. Acute and fetal pneumonitis tended to be frequent when chemotherapy was combined with RT. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. Blast cells transfer experimental hypersensitivity pneumonitis in guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuyler, M.; Cook, C.; Listrom, M.; Fengolio-Preiser, C.

    1988-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that experimental hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) can be transferred by lymph node cells (LNC) cultured in vitro with antigen. The purpose of this study was to identify the cells responsible for transfer and to determine if pulmonary cells can transfer HP. We cultured LNC from sensitized Strain 2 guinea pigs with a soluble extract of Micropolyspora faeni for 72 h, separated lymphoblasts from small lymphocytes, and transferred both subpopulations intravenously to syngeneic recipients. We also transferred irradiated lymphoblasts (1,500 rads), macrophage-depleted, lymphoblast-enriched populations, and pulmonary cells either without culture or after culture with M. faeni. Control animals received an equal volume of medium. All recipient animals were challenged intratracheally (i.t.) with M. faeni 48 h after the cell transfer, and they were killed 4 days after i.t. challenge. Randomly selected microscopic fields of the lung (250/animal) were judged to be normal or abnormal without knowledge of treatment. This measurement was reproducible (r = 0.95 for duplicate measurements, n = 55). All guinea pigs were maintained in HEPA-filtered air. There was a low level of pulmonary response to an i.t. challenge of M. faeni in animals that received medium. Animals that received pulmonary cells, either cultured or noncultured, did not differ from those in the control group. There was a substantial increase (p less than 0.01) in the extent of pulmonary abnormalities in the recipients of the lymphoblast population, with significant correlation (r = 0.87, p less than 0.01) between the number of lymphoblasts transferred and the extent of pulmonary abnormalities

  10. Dose response and factors related to interstitial pneumonitis after bone marrow transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampath, Sagus; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy are common components of conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation. Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) is a known regimen-related complication. Using published data of IP in a multivariate logistic regression, this study sought to identify the parameters in the bone marrow transplantation conditioning regimen that were significantly associated with IP and to establish a radiation dose-response function. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of articles that reported IP incidence along with lung dose, fractionation, dose rate, and chemotherapy regimen. In the final analysis, 20 articles (n = 1090 patients), consisting of 26 distinct TBI/chemotherapy regimens, were included in the analysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influenced the incidence of IP. Results: A logistic model was generated from patients receiving daily fractions of radiation. In this model, lung dose, cyclophosphamide dose, and the addition of busulfan were significantly associated with IP. An incidence of 3%-4% with chemotherapy-only conditioning regimens is estimated from the models. The α/β value of the linear-quadratic model was estimated to be 2.8 Gy. The dose eliciting a 50% incidence, D 50 , for IP after 120 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide was 8.8 Gy; in the absence of chemotherapy, the estimated D 50 is 10.6 Gy. No dose rate effect was observed. The use of busulfan as a substitute for radiation is equivalent to treating with 14.8 Gy in 4 fractions with 50% transmission blocks shielding the lung. The logistic regression failed to find a model that adequately fit the multiple-fraction-per-day data. Conclusions: Dose responses for both lung radiation dose and cyclophosphamide dose were identified. A conditioning regimen of 12 Gy TBI in 6 daily fractions induces an IP incidence of about 11% in the absence of lung shielding. Shielding the lung

  11. Yacht-maker's lung: A case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in yacht manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkman, Kristen K; Merrick, James G; Zacharisen, Michael C

    2006-10-01

    We present a case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a 46-year-old female working at a yacht manufacturing company. She reported a 2-month history of progressive dyspnea, chest tightness, and daytime, nocturnal, and exertional cough in temporal relationship to work where she was exposed to chemicals involved in the manufacture of yachts. Treatment with systemic antibiotic therapy, inhaled bronchodilators, and inhaled corticosteroids provided minimal relief of symptoms. Spirometry revealed a restrictive defect and a chest x-ray demonstrated a diffuse interstitial pattern. She improved on oral corticosteroids and with avoidance of her work environment had resolution of her symptoms and normalization of her spirometry. Among the various chemicals the patient was exposed to, the most likely causative agents for her symptoms were dimethyl phthalate and styrene. Although the specific chemical or antigen could not be determined, the history and objective findings are consistent with occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis. This represents a case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis related to the manufacture of yachts.

  12. Cytomegalovirus pneumonitis complicated by a central peribronchial pattern of organising pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Maria M; Ahmed, Asia; Carpenter, Ben; Brown, Jeremy S

    2017-01-01

    We present five cases of cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonitis occurring in patients after recent T cell deplete allogeneic stem cell transplantation (AlloHSCT). These cases were complicated by an organising pneumonia (during the recovery period) with a predominantly central peribronchial pattern. All patients presented with evidence of active CMV pneumonitis which was treated successfully with anti-viral therapy but was followed by persistent severe dyspnoea, cough and hypoxia. High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) imaging showed widespread central peribronchial consolidation with traction bronchiectasis. There was a marked clinical and physiological improvement after treatment with systemic corticosteroids. However, in all patients the lung function remained abnormal and in some cases imaging revealed a fibrosing lung disease. These cases represent a previously undescribed central peribronchial pattern of organising pneumonia complicating CMV pneumonitis that can result in chronic lung damage.

  13. Two Cases of Nivolumab Re-Administration after Pneumonitis as Immune-Related Adverse Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Imafuku

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nivolumab is a recently approved medication for the treatment of unresectable malignant melanoma. Many immune-related adverse events (irAEs associated with nivolumab have been reported, such as pneumonitis, hepatitis, dermatitis, and thyroiditis. Prednisolone can effectively treat irAEs. However, it is unclear how or if nivolumab should be administered to patients after they have experienced an irAE. Herein, we show 2 patients who underwent pneumonitis as irAE. Case 1 demonstrated a cryptogenic organizing pneumonia pattern in the CT scan and case 2 had a diffuse alveolar damage (DAD pattern. Oral corticosteroids improved chest shadow of CT scan in both cases. However, when nivolumab was re-administrated, case 1 demonstrated no symptoms, but case 2 demonstrated pneumonia again. From our cases, it is difficult to re-administrate nivolumab for the patients with pneumonitis which shows a DAD pattern in CT, even if oral corticosteroids improve their symptoms.

  14. Do Good Without Causing Undue Harm. Experts Tackle Patient Radiation Safety During IAEA's Scientific Forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, Sasha

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, about four billion X-ray exams, 35 million nuclear medicine exams and eight million radiation therapy treatment courses are undertaken each year. With millions exposed to ionizing radiation for medical purposes, and developing countries acquiring more machines to treat and diagnose cancer, the safety of patients is an ever-increasing concern. During the IAEA´s Scientific Forum, cancer experts and regulators put their heads together to explore the problems and possible solutions relating to the safe and appropriate use of new radiation medicine technology in developed and developing countries

  15. Role of postoperative radiation therapy after stabilization of fractures caused by metastatic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, Patrick W; Smalley, Stephen R; Cozad, Scott C; Rosenthal, Howard G; Hassanein, Ruth E S

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Although orthopedic stabilization is frequently performed for pathological fractures caused by metastatic disease, no data is available to support the value of postoperative radiation therapy (S+RT) in this setting. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 64 orthopedic stabilization procedures in 60 consecutive patients with metastatic disease to previously unirradiated weight-bearing bones with pathological or impending pathological fracture (femur 91%). Thirty-five sites that received adjuvant S+RT were compared to 29 sites that were treated with surgery alone (SA). Many potential prognostic variables were evaluated. Endpoints were: functional status (FS) of the extremity (1 = normal pain free use; 2 = normal use with pain, 3 significantly limited use; 4 = nonfunctional extremity), subsequent orthopedic procedures to the same site, and survival following surgery. Results: At the univariate level, S+RT (p = 0.02) and prefracture FS (p 0.04) were the only significant predictors of patients achieving an FS of 1 or 2 after surgery. On multivariate analysis, only postoperative RT was significantly (p = 0.02) associated with attaining FS of 1 or 2 after surgery. The predicted probability of achieving FS 1 or 2 at any time was 53% for S+RT vs. 11.5% or SA (multiple logistic regression, p < 0.01). Evaluation of FS following surgery revealed that S+RT group had significantly better function in the 1-3, 3-6, and 6-12 month postoperative periods (chi-square, p < 0.04 for each time period). Second orthopedic procedures to the same site were more common in the SA group than the S+RT group (log rank, p = 0.03). Actuarial median survival of S group was 3.3 months compared with 12.4 months for the S+RT group (log rank, p = 0.02), confirming the beneficial association with survival shown by the multivariate Cox regression analysis (p = 0.025). Conclusion: Although this retrospective study is subject to possible biases, several analyses adjusting for numerous prognostic

  16. Radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation from cell phone causes defective testicular function in male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewopo, A O; Olaniyi, S K; Oyewopo, C I; Jimoh, A T

    2017-12-01

    Cell phones have become an integral part of everyday life. As cell phone usage has become more widespread, concerns have increased regarding the harmful effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation from these devices. The current study was undertaken to investigate the effects of the emitted radiation by cell phones on testicular histomorphometry and biochemical analyses. Adult male Wistar rats weighing 180-200 g were randomly allotted to control, group A (switched off mode exposure), group B (1-hr exposure), group C (2-hr exposure) and group D (3-hr exposure). The animals were exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation of cell phone for a period of 28 days. Histomorphometry, biochemical and histological investigations were carried out. The histomorphometric parameters showed no significant change (p electromagnetic radiation of cell phone leads to defective testicular function that is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased gonadotropic hormonal profile. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Impact of oxygen concentration on yields of DNA damages caused by ionizing radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Václav; Davídková, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 101, 012015 (2008), s. 1-4 ISSN 1742-6588. [Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems, RADAM'07. Dublin, 19.06.2007-22.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD202/05/H031; GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : radiation damage to DNA * oxygen concentration * theoretical modeling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  18. Concomitant Human Herpes Virus 6 and nivolumab-related pneumonitis: Potential pathogenetic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Periklis G. Foukas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of immune system modulating agents, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs, has revolutionized cancer treatment. Nivolumab, a human monoclonal antibody against PD-1, has emerged as an efficient treatment for various malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; however, it is associated with important immune related side-effects, attributed to organ-specific inflammation, such as immune-mediated pneumonitis, a relatively uncommon, albeit potentially fatal adverse event. We herein present the unique case of severe interstitial pneumonitis with concomitant detection of Human Herpes Virus 6 (HHV-6 in a nivolumab treated patient with NSCLC. Potential pathogenetic mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Inhaled /sup 147/Pm and/or total-body gamma radiation: Early mortality and morbidity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipy, R.E.; Lauhala, K.E.; McGee, D.R.; Cannon, W.C.; Buschbom, R.L.; Decker, J.R.; Kuffel, E.G.; Park, J.F.; Ragan, H.A.; Yaniv, S.S.; Scott, B.R.

    1989-05-01

    Rats were given doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation and/or lung burdens of /sup 147/Pm (in fused aluminosilicate particles) within lethal ranges in an experiment to determine and compare morbidity and mortality responses for the radiation insults within 1 year after exposure. Radiation-induced morbidity was assessed by measuring changes in body weights, hematologic parameters, and pulmonary-function parameters. Acute mortality and morbidity from inhaled promethium were caused primarily by radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis that occurred more than 53 days after exposure. Acute mortality and morbidity from total-body gamma irradiation occurred within 30 days of exposure and resulted from the bone-marrow radiation syndrome. Gamma radiation caused transient morbidity, reflected by immediately depressed blood cell levels and by reduced body weight gain in animals that survived the acute gamma radiation syndrome. Inhaled promethium caused a loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function, but its only effect on blood cell levels was lymphocytopenia. Combined gamma irradiation and promethium lung burdens were synergistic, in that animals receiving both radiation insults had higher morbidity and mortality rates than would be predicted based on the effect of either kind of radiation alone. Promethium lung burdens enhanced the effect of gamma radiation in rats within the first 30 days of exposure, and gamma radiation enhanced the later effect of promethium lung burdens. 70 refs., 68 figs., 21 tabs.

  20. Principal disease or cause of death in nonsacrifice Segment III beagles receiving gamma radiation during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargis, A.M.; Lovering, S.L.; Benjamin, S.A.; Thomassen, R.W.; Lee, A.C.; Brewster, R.D.; Brooks, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    Epilepsy, hypothyroidism, neoplasia, and cor pulmonale remain the leading causes of death in Segment III beagles. This past year neoplasia became the third leading cause of death with the addition of 10 animals in this category. Of the four leading causes of death, neoplasia alone can be related to history of irradiation

  1. Regulatory T Cells Contribute to the Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation via Bee Venom Phospholipase A₂ in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dasom; Lee, Gihyun; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Park, Soojin; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Ji Min; Yang, Jieun; Cho, Jaeho; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-04-30

    Bee venom has long been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Previously, we reported that bee venom phospholipase A₂ (bvPLA₂) has an anti-inflammatory effect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Radiotherapy is a common anti-cancer method, but often causes adverse effects, such as inflammation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of bvPLA₂ in radiation-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice were focally irradiated with 75 Gy of X-rays in the lung and administered bvPLA₂ six times after radiation. To evaluate the level of inflammation, the number of immune cells, mRNA level of inflammatory cytokine, and histological changes in the lung were measured. BvPLA₂ treatment reduced the accumulation of immune cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. In addition, bvPLA₂ treatment decreased inflammasome-, chemokine-, cytokine- and fibrosis-related genes' mRNA expression. The histological results also demonstrated the attenuating effect of bvPLA₂ on radiation-induced lung inflammation. Furthermore, regulatory T cell depletion abolished the therapeutic effects of bvPLA₂ in radiation-induced pneumonitis, implicating the anti-inflammatory effects of bvPLA₂ are dependent upon regulatory T cells. These results support the therapeutic potential of bvPLA₂ in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis treatments.

  2. Radiation-induced osteochondroma of the T4 vertebra causing spinal cord compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorospe, Luis; Madrid-Muniz, Carmen; Royo, Aranzazu; Garcia-Raya, Pilar [Department of Radiology, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid (Spain); Alvarez-Ruiz, Fernando [Department of Neurosurgery, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid (Spain); Lopez-Barea, Fernando [Department of Pathology, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-04-01

    A case of a radiation-induced osteochondroma arising from the vertebral body of T4 in an 18-year-old man is reported. The patient presented with a history of progressive left lower extremity weakness. At 7 years of age, he had undergone resection of a cerebellar medulloblastoma and received adjunctive craniospinal irradiation and systemic chemotherapy. Both CT and MR imaging revealed an extradural mass contiguous with the posteroinferior endplate of the T4 vertebral body. This case indicates that radiation-induced osteochondroma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with symptoms of myelopathy or nerve root compression and a history of radiation therapy involving the spine in childhood. (orig.)

  3. Molecular changes in copolymers of styrene and methyl methacrylate caused by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busfield, W.K.; O'Donnell, J.H.; Smith, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    Homopolymers of styrene and methyl methacrylate and copolymers of these monomers were irradiated in vacuo at room temperature using 60 Co γ-radiation to various doses. The gaseous radiolysis products of the polymers were analysed by gas chromatography. The radiation chemical yield, G values, of the gaseous and liquid products were calculated for the homopolymers and copolymers. The G values obtained for the homopolymers were compared with those obtained by previous workers. The graphs of G value versus composition (% Styrene) showed a marked deviation from linearity which indicated that the styrene in the copolymer had a greater effect on the behaviour than did the methyl methacrylate units. It has been postulated that the benzene ring on the styrene unit acts in some way as an energy sink, and hence protects the copolymer from radiation damage in an analogous way to that suggested for hydrocarbon mixtures. Mechanisms for the process are discussed. (author)

  4. Pathological findings in the fatal case (the late Mr. Kuboyama) of the radiation sickness caused by Bikini ashes. [In Japanese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, S; Hashimoto, K; Fukushima, N; Tashiro, K; Sugano, H; Mori, W

    1955-01-01

    Autopsy findings and the case history are summarized from a case diagnosed as radiation sickness caused by exposure to fall-out from a thermonuclear explosion. The patient died 207 days following exposure while on a fishing boat said to be located about 100 mi east of Bikini at the time of the explosion. Evidence was also found of a secondary virus hepatitis and aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia.

  5. Physical and chemical changes in water pollutants caused by ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, K.

    1978-01-01

    Ionization and excitation as primary effects of ionizing radiation form secondary activated intermediary products (H and OH radicals and hydrated electrons esub(aq) - ) in water systems, which act on all in substances present in water. Physical and chemical changes speeding the sludge sedimentation in waste-water show complex dependences. It is, however, possible to prove them even at low radiation doses (0.07 to 0.35 kJ/kg). Chemical effects can be observed at higher radiation doses (1 to 10 kJ/kg) and are based on oxidative destruction of pollutants. Some of these reactions may be based on chain mechanisms (phenol oxidizing in water), but there are limited chances for application of these chain mechanisms in waste-water systems. Slight damage of biologically important macromolecules leads to changes, or even stops biological processes. Therefore, biological effects of ionizing radiation have the most remarkable impact. The utilization of these reactions in water management may be possible in suppressing biological ochration (ochre sedimentation) in wells and for ensuring hygienic conditions of sludge in waste-water processing for agrotechnical purposes. (author)

  6. Radiation conditions in the Oryol region territory impacted by radioactive contamination caused by the Chernobyl NPP accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Zakharchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research objective is retrospective analysis of radiation conditions in the Oryol region during 1986- 2015 and assessment of efficacy of the carried out sanitary and preventive activities for population protection against radiation contamination caused by the Chernobyl NPP accident.Article materials were own memoirs of events participants, analysis of federal state statistic surveillance forms 3-DOZ across the Oryol region, f-35 “Data on patients with malignant neoplasms, f-12 “Report on MPI activities”. Risk assessment of oncological diseases occurrence is carried out on the basis of AAED for 1986- 2014 using the method of population exposure risk assessment due to long uniform man-made irradiation in small doses. Results of medical and sociological research of genetic, environmental, professional and lifestyle factors were obtained using the method of cancer patients’ anonymous survey. Data on "risk" factors were obtained from 467 patients hospitalized at the Budgetary Health Care Institution of the Oryol region “Oryol oncology clinic”; a specially developed questionnaire with 60 questions was filled out.The article employs the method of retrospective analysis of laboratory and tool research and calculation of dose loads on the Oryol region population, executed throughout the whole period after the accident.This article provides results of the carried out laboratory research of foodstuff, environment objects describing the radiation conditions in the Oryol region since the first days after the Chernobyl NPP accident in 1986 till 2015.We presented a number of activities aimed at liquidation of man-caused radiation accident consequences which were developed and executed by the experts of the Oryol region sanitary and epidemiology service in 1986-2015. On the basis of the above-stated one may draw the conclusions listed below. Due to interdepartmental interaction and active work of executive authorities in the Oryol region, the

  7. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winther, J.F.; Ulbak, K.; Dreyer, L.; Pukkala, E.; Oesterlind, A.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  8. Dynamics of the pneumonic plague epidemic in Madagascar, August to October 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Shinya; Lee, Hyojung; Miura, Fuminari; Chan, Yat Hin; Jung, Sung-Mok; Akhmetzhanov, Andrei R; Nishiura, Hiroshi

    2017-11-01

    Transmission potential and severity of pneumonic plague in Madagascar were assessed. Accounting for reporting delay, the reproduction number was estimated at 1.73. The case fatality risk was estimated as 5.5%. Expected numbers of exported cases from Madagascar were estimated across the world and all estimates were below 1 person from August to October, 2017.

  9. [Primary pneumonic plague with nosocomial transmission in La Libertad, Peru 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaires, Luis F; Céspedes, Manuel; Valencia, Pedro; Salas, Juan Carlos; Luna, María E; Castañeda, Alex; Peralta, Víctor; Cabezas, César; Pachas, Paul E

    2010-09-01

    Pneumonic plague is one of the clinical forms of plague, of low frequency and high mortality, transmitted by direct inhalation of Yersinia pestis coming from an animal or from person to person. To describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of the cases of primary pneumonic plague in an outbreak in the north of Peru. The clinical records of the confirmed cases of primary pneumonic plague presenting in an outbreak occurring in La Libertad, in July 2010, were reviewed, also the search and contact investigation was performed. The index case was identified, as well as three additional cases, out of these, two were nosocomial infections related to the index case. The initial clinical presentation was characterized by sudden onset of fever, chills, myalgia and chest pain, which in less than 24 hours evolved to hypotension and cyanosis. The initiation of specific treatment varied from 2 to 12 days, and cases with prompt initiation of treatment had a better clinical outcome. The lethality was 50% (2/4). Nosocomial transmission of pneumonic plague in Peru is evidenced, with severe clinical manifestations and high lethality.

  10. Primary observing pulmonary function variety following three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of III phase non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Feng; Li Guang; Zhao Yuxia; Dang Jun; Yao Lei; Wu Chunli

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pulmonary function, DVH and radiation pneumonitis after three-dimensional conformal radiation treatment of III phase non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods: 71 patients (male 52, female 19, median age 63, KPS≥80) were evaluated by pulmonary function tests before radiotherapy and in M1 and M3 after radiotherapy respectively. After 3 months of follow-up time, it reviewed the appearance and grade of radiation pneumonitis. Then V 20 , V 30 and MLD were worked out from dose volume histogram. Results: All patients completed radiotherapy, and total dose was 66-70 Gy. FVC (L), FEV 1 (L) and C L CO were (2.58±0.65) L, (1.85±0.58) L and (15.15±4.65)ml/(min) before radio- therapy, with(2.96±0.76) L, (2.13±0.65) L and (14.71±3.92) ml/(min) in M1 after radiotherapy, with (2.65±0.61) L, (1.92±0.52) L and (13.15±3.71)ml/(min)in M3 after radiotherapy. The accidence of radiation pneumonitis was 30%, moderate and severe radiation pneumonitis was 7%. With V 20 , V 30 and MLD increasing, the grade of radiation pneumonitis was increasing. V 20 , V 30 and MLD were related to the change in C L CO value among before, M1 and M3 after radiotherapy, and the correlation coefficient was more than 0.2. Conclusions: There is a relationship in the pulmonary fiction, DVH and radiation pneumonitis surely. The change in C L CO value between before radiotherapy and M1 after radiotherapy could predict the radiation pneumonitis. V 20 , V 30 and MLD are not only correlated to radiation pneumonitis evidently but the change in FEV 1 and C L CO after radiotherapy. (authors)

  11. Late morphological and functional changes caused by ionizing radiation in eggs of Japanese quail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, J; Grom, A; Csuka, J; Stasko, J; Kindlova, L [Vyskumny Ustav Chovu a Slachtenia Hydiny, Ivanka pri Dunaji (Czechoslovakia)

    1976-01-01

    Eggs of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were irradiated before incubation with doses of 300, 500, 800, 1500, 2000 and 2500 R of /sup 60/Co gamma rays at a dose rate of 187 R/min. The parameters of hatchability, embryonic morphology in the last phases of development, growth changes, viability, sex ratio and production of eggs in the control and experimental groups were followed. Embryonic mortality was proportional to the dose, irradiation weakened the embryos, at doses of 800 R and more the radiation evoked various teratogenic changes and slightly lengthened the incubation period. For the period of embryonic development, LD/sub 50/ approximately equal to 800 R and LD/sub 100/=2500 R was determined. Radiation slightly suppressed growth, viability in the postembryonic stage was influenced very slightly. Irradiation of eggs did not influence the sex ratio; the production of eggs was significantly reduced only at a dose of 1500 R and more.

  12. Late morphological and functional changes caused by ionizing radiation in eggs of Japanese quail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, J.; Grom, A.; Csuka, J.; Stasko, J.; Kindlova, L.

    1976-01-01

    Eggs of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were irradiated before incubation with doses of 300, 500, 800, 1500, 2000 and 2500 R of 60 Co gamma rays at a dose rate of 187 R/min. The parameters of hatchability, embryonic morphology in the last phases of development, growth changes, viability, sex ratio and production of eggs in the control and experimental groups were followed. Embryonic mortality was proportional to the dose, irradiation weakened the embryos, at doses of 800 R and more the radiation evoked various teratogenic changes and slightly lengthened the incubation period. For the period of embryonic development, LD 50 approximately equal to 800 R and LD 100 =2500 R was determined. Radiation slightly suppressed growth, viability in the postembryonic stage was influenced very slightly. Irradiation of eggs did not influence the sex ratio; the production of eggs was significantly reduced only at a dose of 1500 R and more. (author)

  13. Radiation Damage in Silicon Detectors Caused by Hadronic and Electromagnetic Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fretwurst, E.; Stahl, J.; Pintilie, I.

    2002-01-01

    The report contains various aspects of radiation damage in silicon detectors subjected to high intensity hadron and electromagnetic irradiation. It focuses on improvements for the foreseen LHC applications, employing oxygenation of silicon wafers during detector processing (result from CERN-RD48). An updated survey on hadron induced damage is given in the first article. Several improvements are outlined especially with respect to antiannealing problems associated with detector storage during LHC maintenance periods. Open questions are outlined in the final section, among which are a full understanding of differences found between proton and neutron induced damage, process related effects changing the radiation tolerance in addition to the oxygen content and the lack of understanding the changed detector properties on the basis of damage induced point and cluster defects. In addition to float zone silicon, so far entirely used for detector fabrication,Czochralski silicon was also studied and first promising re...

  14. Study on the cause of discoloration of radiation-exposed polyolefin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeun, Joonpyo; Kang, Philhyun; Oh, Seunghwan; Kim, Hyunbin

    2013-01-15

    Olefinic polymers, such as polyethylene and polypropylene, have a wide variety of known end use applications. Olefinic polymers have been disclosed to be useful in the manufacture of shaped articles for medical used and for food packaging uses where the articles must undergo stabilization for be disinfected. Notwithstanding the significant known advantages of sterilization by means of high energy radiation, several disadvantages are known to be associated with such sterilization techniques. Most of all, when treated with radiation energy in an amount sufficient to achieve the desired sterilization, such polyolefin compositions may become discolored. This coloration may occur for a variety of reasons such as the use of certain additives in the polymer, as well as the presence of high amounts of catalytic residues. In this study, effects of structure of antioxidant and UV stabilizer on the discoloration of olefinic polymer resin were investigated. Furthermore, The mechanism of discoloration of olefinic polymer was suggested.

  15. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia; Crudeli, Cintia

    2010-01-01

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  16. Radiation therapy in carcinoma of the prostate: a contributing cause of urinary incontinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, J.J.; Smith, R.B.; Raz, S.

    1984-01-01

    The authors believe that radiation therapy as a postoperative adjuvant or preceding salvage prostatectomy for carcinoma is particularly conducive to the complication of urinary incontinence by virtue of its sclerosing effect on residual sphincter mechanisms. Obviously, such dual therapy will continue to prevail in the foreseeable future but patients should be notified of the added risk and be prepared for further treatment of the incontinence. Unfortunately, these patients have an extra risk of complications and failure from anti-incontinence operations

  17. Idiopathic epidural lipomatosis as a cause of pain and neurological symptoms attributed initially to radiation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millwater, C J; Jacobson, I; Howard, G C

    1992-09-01

    Epidural lipomatosis is a rare condition in which overgrowth of extradural fat can lead to back pain, spinal cord compression and radiculopathy. A 51-year-old man developed back pain and reduced mobility following a standard course of radiotherapy for a Stage I seminoma. His symptoms and radiological appearances were initially attributed to radiation fibrosis. Further investigations and operative intervention revealed epidural lipomatosis. The excess lipomatous tissue was removed with complete resolution of his symptoms.

  18. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia (Inst. de Genetica Veterinaria, Univ. Nacional de La Plata CONICET, La Plata (Argentina)), e-mail: aseoane@fcv.unlp.edu.ar; Crudeli, Cintia (Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, La Plata (Argentina))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  19. A case of chronic effusive-constrictive pericarditis with slight myocardial involvement caused by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horimoto, Masashi; Funayama, Naoki; Takenaka, Takashi; Igarashi, Takeki; Sekiguchi, Morie.

    1985-01-01

    A 25-year-old female was admitted with shortness of breath and abdominal swelling. Six years before the admission, she had received resection of 7th to 9th left ribs and subsequent radiation of 5,000 rads to the thorax for the treatment of rib osteoblastoma. One year after the radiation, marked pericardial effusion associated with acute pericarditis was observed and was improved by digitalization and diuretic therapy. Since two years after the radiation, she had felt easy fatigability, swelling of face and foot, and transient faintness on more than 10 meters running. On admission, chest X-ray photograph showed increased pulmonary vascularity without cardiac enlargement. Electrocardiogram indicated systolic right ventricular strain, mitral P, and nonspecific S-T segment depression in left precordial leads. Two-dimensional echocardiography presented pericardial effusion with posterior pericardial thickening, while M-mode echocardiography showed diastolic posterior movement of interventricular septum and diastolic flattening of left ventricular posterior wall. Cardiac catheterization revealed marked elevation of mean right atrial pressure, pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure, right and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, accompanied with their equalization. In addition, pressure waves of right and left ventricle showed diastolic dip and plateau. Phono-cardiogram and apexcardiogram presented pericardial knock sound and systolic retraction, respectively. Cardiac angiography showed diastolic restriction of left ventricle without any stenosis of coronary artery. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest revealed thickening of anterior and left lateral pericardium with expansion of inferior vena cava, and abdominal CT revealed ascites with slight enlargements of liver and spleen. From above obtained data, chronic effusive-constrictive pericarditis, which was attributed to radiation, was strongly suggested. (J.P.N.)

  20. His+ reversions caused in Salmonella typhimurium by different types of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, H.; Thomas, W.H.; Fitzek, M.; Kellerer, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The yield of his+ reversions in the Ames Salmonella tester strain TA2638 has been determined for 60Co gamma rays, 140 kV X rays, 5.4 keV characteristic X rays, 2.2 MeV protons, 3.1 MeV alpha particles, and 18 MeV/U Fe ions. Inactivation studies were performed with the same radiations. For both mutation and inactivation, the maximum effectiveness per unit absorbed dose was obtained for the characteristic X rays, which have a dose averaged linear energy transfer (LET) of roughly 10 keV/micron. The ratio of the effectiveness of this radiation to gamma rays was 2 for inactivation and about 1.4 for the his+ reversion. For both end points the effectiveness decreases substantially at high LET, i.e., for the alpha particles and the Fe ions. The composition of the bottom and the top agar was the one recommended by Maron and Ames for application in chemical mutagenicity tests. The experiments with the less penetrating radiations differed from the usual protocol by utilization of a technique of plating the bacteria on the surface of the top agar. As in an earlier study greatly enhanced yields of mutations, relative to the spontaneous reversion rate, were obtained in these experiments by performing the irradiations 6 h after plating, which differs from the conventional procedure to irradiate the bacteria shortly after plating

  1. Radiation exposure and cause specific mortality among nuclear workers in Belgium (1969-1994)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, H.; Swaen, G. M. H.; Slangen, J.; Van Amersvoort, L.; Holmstock, L.; Van Mieghem, E.; Van Regenmortel, I.; Wambersie, A.

    2005-01-01

    Cause specific mortality was studied in nuclear workers from five nuclear facilities in Belgium and compared to the general population. For the 1969-1994 period, mortality in male nuclear workers is significantly lower for all causes of death and for all cancer deaths. The same conclusions are reached if one assumes a latency period of 20 y between the first irradiation and cancer induction. In female workers, mortality due to all causes and all cancer deaths is not different from that of the general population. Analysis of cause specific mortality was performed for male and female workers for three endpoints: specific cancer sites, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. No significant increase in mortality was observed. In male workers, the influence of cumulative dose was also investigated using four dose levels: No significant correlation was found. Smoking habits may be a confounding factor in smoking related health conditions. (authors)

  2. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis among wind musicians - an overlooked disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Janne; Hyldgaard, Charlotte; Kronborg-White, Sissel Brix

    2017-01-01

    antigen is important for the prognosis. We report two cases of HP caused by molds and atypical mycobacteria isolated from wind instruments. We present the first case of HP caused by bassoon playing and another case of HP caused by molds in a trombone. HP caused by fungi and bacteria in wind instruments...... may be much more common than previously thought. HP caused by fungi and bacteria in wind instruments is probably underdiagnosed; this calls for more clinical attention when HP is suspected....

  3. Cumulative radiation dose caused by radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Patrick K; Gracias, Vicente H; Maidment, Andrew D A; O'Shea, Michael; Reilly, Patrick M; Schwab, C William

    2004-09-01

    Critically ill trauma patients undergo many radiologic studies, but the cumulative radiation dose is unknown. The purpose of this study was to estimate the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation resulting from radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients. The study group was composed of trauma patients at an urban Level I trauma center with surgical intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) greater than 30 days. The radiology records were reviewed. A typical effective dose per study for each type of plain film radiograph, computed tomographic scan, fluoroscopic study, and nuclear medicine study was used to calculate CED. Forty-six patients met criteria. The mean surgical intensive care unit and hospital LOS were 42.7 +/- 14.0 and 59.5 +/- 28.5 days, respectively. The mean Injury Severity Score was 32.2 +/- 15.0. The mean number of studies per patient was 70.1 +/- 29.0 plain film radiographs, 7.8 +/- 4.1 computed tomographic scans, 2.5 +/- 2.6 fluoroscopic studies, and 0.065 +/- 0.33 nuclear medicine study. The mean CED was 106 +/- 59 mSv per patient (range, 11-289 mSv; median, 104 mSv). Among age, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, and LOS, there was no statistically significant predictor of high CED. The mean CED in the study group was 30 times higher than the average yearly radiation dose from all sources for individuals in the United States. The theoretical additional morbidity attributable to radiologic studies was 0.78%. From a radiobiologic perspective, risk-to-benefit ratios of radiologic studies are favorable, given the importance of medical information obtained. Current practice patterns regarding use of radiologic studies appear to be acceptable.

  4. Plasma Wave Turbulence and Particle Heating Caused by Electron Beams, Radiation and Pinches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    current as dP K .2 Td - _c 2 . dt (K 2 (28a) where r 2 2 [ W (r)] , (28b) is the principal wave vector of the emitted radiation, and w p(r) is the...resulting from the angular average of coa 260, Tis research was supported In part by Hughes In the lowest bound state, which t an a state. TD . F. DuBois ad...Pbs.-JEW7, 21. 1127). and Sbsvchenko. V. 1. 1975, Fiz. Plasmy. 1, 10 (English Smith, D. F. 1977, J~ . (Leoaer). 214. L53 . tram!. in Soviet J. Plasim

  5. Public meetings on radiation and its health effects caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, K.; Ayame, J.; Takashita, H.; Yamamoto, R.

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has held public meetings on radiation and its health effects mainly for parents of students in kindergartens, elementary schools, and junior high schools in Fukushima and Ibaraki prefectures after the Fukushima nuclear accident. These meetings are held based on our experience of practicing risk communication activities for a decade in JAEA with local residents. By analyzing questionnaires collected after the meetings, we confirmed that interactive communication is effective in increasing participants' understanding and in decreasing their anxiety. Most of the participants answered that they understood the contents and that it eased their mind. (authors)

  6. Surgical intervention for complications caused by late radiation damage of the small bowel; a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halteren, H.K. van; Gortzak, E.; Taal, B.G.; Helmerhorst, Th.J.M.; Aleman, B.M.P.; Hart, A.A.M.; Zoetmulder, F.A.N.

    1993-01-01

    The authors studied the records of 46 patients who had been operated on between 1974 and 1990 in the Netherlands Cancer Institute because of complications due to late radiation damage of the small bowel. The following factors led to an increase in complication-risk: hypalbuminemia. more than one laparotomy prior to irradiation and a short interval (< 12 months) between irradiation and surgical intervention. The following factors related to a poorer survival: incomplete resection of the primary tumor and a short interval (< 12 months) between irradiation and surgical intervention. The type f surgical intervention did not have cumulative prognostic value in relation to complication-risk or survival. (author)

  7. Degradation of the photoluminescence of porous silicon caused by 60Co γ radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrova, E.V.; Emtsev, V.V.; Lebedev, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Two series of experiments were carried out. In the first, as-grown porous silicon was bombarded with 60 Co γ radiation to a dose ∼ 10 20 cm -2 . The photoluminescence intensity fell off by a factor ∼ 50 as a result, although the peak of the band underwent essentially no shift. In the second series, single-crystal silicon was bombarded to the same dose, and then porous silicon was fabricated on it. The intensity and spectra of these samples were the same as usual. Possible degradation mechanisms are discussed. 12 refs., 2 figs

  8. The influence of exposure to ultraviolet radiation in simulated sunlight on ascospores causing Black Sigatoka disease of banana and plantain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, Mark; Burt, P. J. A.; Wilson, Kate

    The influence of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in simulated natural sunlight on the viability of ascospores of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the cause of Black Sigatoka disease in banana and plantain, has been investigated as part of a study to assess the windborne spread of this pathogen from mainland Central and South America into the Caribbean. Spores were killed following continuous exposure to UV radiation for periods of 6 h or over. This relatively short exposure time suggests that the distances over which viable spores can be transported will be determined not only by the speed of the wind but also the amount of cloud cover and the time off day that spore release occurs. On this basis, wind dispersal of viable spores over distances greater than a few hundred kilometres is unlikely. These conclusions are reinforced by an examination of historical reports of the arrival of the disease in previously uninfected areas of the Americas and Africa.

  9. Radiation impact caused by activation of air from the future GSI accelerator facility fair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutermuth, F.; Wildermuth, H.; Radon, T.; Fehrenbacher, G.

    2005-01-01

    The Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt is planning a new accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). Two future experimental areas are regarded to be the most decisive points concerning the activation of air. One is the area for the production of antiprotons. A second crucial experimental area is the so-called Super Fragment Separator. The production of radioactive isotopes in air is calculated using the residual nuclei option of the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The results are compared with the data for the activation of air given by Sullivan and in IAEA report 283. The resulting effective dose is calculated using a program package from the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection, the Bundesamt fuer Stranlenschutz. The results demonstrate that a direct emission of the total radioactivity produced into the air will probably conflict with the limits of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance. Special measures have to be planned in order to reduce the amount of radioactivity released into the air. (authors)

  10. 'Radiation-induced electrolysis'. A potential root cause of hydrogen explosions in the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, Genn

    2014-01-01

    Although water radiolysis, decomposition of water by radiation, is a well-known phenomenon the exact mechanism is not well characterized especially for potential hydrogen generation during severe accidents. The author first reviewed the water radiolysis phenomena in LWRs during normal operation to severe accidents (e.g., TMI- and Chernobyl accidents) and performed a scoping estimation of H_2 generation modeled for the Fukushima Daiichi accident. The estimation incorporates the decay heat curve combined with G-values. When a set of radiological chain reactions are incorporated the resultant reverse reactions were found to reduce the hydrogen generation substantially. In view of the observation that the water radiolysis is not likely induced appreciable effects in H_2 generation during the accident, this author investigated his basic theory named 'radiation-induced electrolysis' in the estimation of amounts of H_2 generation during the active phase of the Fukushima accident. The author's theory was originally developed by including Faraday's Law of Electrolysis into the basic time-dependent material balance equation of radiation-chemical species for his study on accelerated corrosion phenomena which is widely observed in aged plants. With this mechanism as much as 5,300 m"3-STP of accumulated hydrogen gas is estimated to be inside the PCV just prior to the hydrogen explosion which occurred a day after the reactor trip in Unit 1. For Units 2 and 3, the estimated volumes are 5,900 m"3-STP. Within just several hours after the initiation of SBO, as much as a few thousand cubic meters in STP of hydrogen gas is generated due to a high decay heat. With these large volumes of hydrogen gas the hydrogen explosion was a viable possibility upon the 'venting' operation. For the 1F4 Spent Fuel Pool where the entire core loading had been evacuated, SBO was found to have induced a rapid on-set of electrolysis when the pool water temperature reached as high as 50°C with a range of

  11. Causes of Mortality After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Hunter, Grant K.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Abdel-Wahab, May; Stephenson, Andrew J.; Klein, Eric A.; Mahadevan, Arul; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Men with high-risk prostate cancer have other competing causes of mortality; however, current risk stratification schema do not account for comorbidities. We aim to identify the causes of death and factors predictive for mortality in this population. Methods and Materials: A total of 660 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with definitive high-dose external beam radiation therapy (≥74 Gy) and androgen deprivation (AD) between 1996 and 2009 at a single institution. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine factors predictive of survival. Results: The median radiation dose was 78 Gy, median duration of AD was 6 months, and median follow-up was 74 months. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 60.6%. Prostate cancer was the leading single cause of death, with 10-year mortality of 14.1% (95% CI 10.7-17.6), compared with other cancers (8.4%, 95% CI 5.7-11.1), cardiovascular disease (7.3%, 95% CI 4.7-9.9), and all other causes (10.4%, 95% CI 7.2-13.6). On multivariate analysis, older age (HR 1.55, P=.002) and Charlson comorbidity index score (CS) ≥1 (HR 2.20, P<.0001) were significant factors predictive of OS, whereas Gleason score, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, duration of AD, radiation dose, smoking history, and body mass index were not. Men younger than 70 years of age with CS = 0 were more likely to die of prostate cancer than any other cause, whereas older men or those with CS ≥1 more commonly suffered non-prostate cancer death. The cumulative incidences of prostate cancer-specific mortality were similar regardless of age or comorbidities (P=.60). Conclusions: Men with high-risk prostate cancer are more likely to die of causes other than prostate cancer, except for the subgroup of men younger than 70 years of age without comorbidities. Only older age and presence of comorbidities significantly predicted for OS, whereas prostate cancer- and treatment-related factors did not

  12. Radiation therapy and late reactions in normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Takashi; Kuroda, Yasumasa

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments in cancer therapy have made us increasingly aware that the quality of life of a patient is as valuable as other benefits received from therapy. This awareness leads to an emphasis on organ and/or function preservation in the course of therapy. In line with this new thinking, greater consideration is placed on radiation therapy as an appropriate modality of cancer therapy. Possible complications in normal tissues, especially those of late reaction type after the therapy must be overcome. This review, therefore, focuses on recent progress of studies on mechanisms of the complications of the late reaction type. An observation of a clinical case concerning a late reaction of spinal cord (radiation myelopathy) and surveys of experimental studies on the mechanisms of late reactions (including radiation pneumonitis and lung fibrosis, and radiation response of vascular endothelial cells) provide a hypothesis that apoptosis through the pathway starting with radiation-induced sphingomyelin hydrolysis may play an important role in causing a variety of late reactions. This insight is based on the fact that radiation also activates protein kinase C which appears to block apoptosis. The mechanisms of late reactions, therefore, may involve a balance between radiation-induced apoptotic death and its down regulation by suppressor mechanisms through protein kinase C. (author)

  13. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Altman, K.I.

    1998-01-01

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts

  14. Malignancy as a cause of death in nonsacrifice Segment III beagles receiving gamma radiation during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, S.A.; Hargis, A.M.; Lovering, S.L.; Thomassen, R.W.; Angleton, G.M.; Lee, A.C.; Brewster, R.D.; Brooks, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    As of December 31, 1978, 31 Segment III beagles had died or been euthanatized because of a malignant neoplasm. Twenty-five of the 31 had been irradiated. Fifteen of the 25 irradiated dogs were exposed at either 55 days postcoitus (dpc) or 2 days postpartum (dpp) to 20 or 100R. Of these 15, 4 dogs irradiated at either 55 dpc or 2 dpp died with malignancies prior to 2 years of age, an unusual occurrence in the dog. Eight irradiated and no control dogs developed malignant lymphoma. Four of the dogs with lymphoma were irradiated at 55 dpc. These findings suggest a relatively high sensitivity for radiation carcinogenesis in dogs exposed in the perinatal period

  15. Relevance, distant effect, penalty for the radiation caused by a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    1) A suit or an appeal is not successful if a first partial operating license which has been enforced in the meantime, has not violated any protective rights or interests of the plaintiff. 2) This is especially true if the distant effects of the licensed facility, which have been explained by the plaintiff, don't reach the extent or duration of a violation or endangering of his own rights or legally protected rights. 3) The maximum permissible radiation exposure according to the dose limits occurs in case of distant effects according to paragraph 45 of the Radiological Protection Ordinance. 4) Here, it is the matter of a long-term problem with regard to the management and disposal of nuclear waste, provided that an individual interest is given. 5) The required causal connection cannot be proved in case of only statistically recorded emissions. The mere increase of risk, even if it is accurately founded by statistics, is not sufficient. (orig.) [de

  16. Case of radiation gastroduodenitis caused by /sup 60/Co-irradiation therapy for hepatoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, H; Hayashi, N; Morise, K; Tunekawa, J; Kaneshiro, K [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1981-02-01

    A 56-year-old man with hepatoma, who had been treated with total 3,960 rad of /sup 60/Co-irradiation 2 months previously, was readmitted to the hospital because of fever and anemia. Following admission, he passed tarry stools every day. Barium meal examination revealed esophageal varices and erosive gastritis of the antrum. At endoscopy, many hemorrhagic erosions were found in the gastric antrum and the first part of duodenum, which were located in the irradiation area. Since repeated blood transfusion failed to improve anemia, a complete fasting with intravenous hyperalimentation and antacid therapy were started. Two months later, feeding was started and thereafter continued without any appreciable GI bleeding or worsening of anemia. Endoscopic examination at this time revealed only a few erosions scattered over the edematous antral mucosa as well as the proximal duodenum. IVH, antacids and abstinence from food seem to be an effective measure in the treatment of radiation injury of the gut.

  17. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.; Bond, V.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Sondhaus, C.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Control Office; Altman, K.I. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts.

  18. Matlab fractal techniques used to study the structural degradation caused by alpha radiation to laser mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioan, M.-R.

    2018-01-01

    Almost all optical diagnostic systems associated with classical particle accelerators or with new state-of-the-art particle accelerators, such as those developed within the European Collaboration ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics) (involving extreme power laser beams), contain in their infrastructure high quality laser mirrors, used for their reflectivity and/or their partial transmittance. These high quality mirrors facilitate the extraction and handling of optical signals. When optical mirrors are exposed to high energy ionizing radiation fields, their optical and structural properties will change over time and their functionality will be affected, meaning that they will provide imprecise information. In some experiments, being exposed to mixed laser and accelerated particle beams, the deterioration of laser mirrors is even more acute, since the destruction mechanisms of both types of beams are cumulated. The main task of the work described in this paper was to find a novel specific method to analyse and highlight such degradation processes. By using complex fractal techniques integrated in a MATLAB code, the effects induced by alpha radiation to laser mirrors were studied. The fractal analysis technique represents an alternative approach to the classical Euclidean one. It can be applied for the characterization of the defects occurred in mirrors structure due to their exposure to high energy alpha particle beams. The proposed method may be further integrated into mirrors manufacturing process, as a testing instrument, to obtain better quality mirrors (enhanced resistance to high energy ionizing beams) by using different types of reflective coating materials and different deposition techniques. Moreover, the effect of high energy alpha ionizing particles on the optical properties of the exposed laser mirrors was studied by using spectrophotometric techniques.

  19. Effect of surface wettability caused by radiation induced surface activation on leidenfrost condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamasa, T.; Hazuku, T.; Tamura, N.; Okamoto, K.; Mishima, K.; Furuya, M.

    2003-01-01

    Improving the limit of boiling heat transfer or critical heat flux requires that the cooling liquid can contact the heating surface, or a high-wettability, highly hydrophilic heating surface, even if a vapor bubble layer is generated on the surface. From this basis, we investigated surface wettability and Leidenfrost condition using metal oxides irradiated by γ-rays. In our previous study, contact angle, an indicator of macroscopic wettability, of a water droplet on metal oxide at room temperature was measured by image processing of the images obtained by a CCD video camera. The results showed that the surface wettability on metal oxide pieces of titanium, Zircaloy No. 4, SUS-304, and copper was improved significantly by the Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) phenomenon. To delineate the effect of Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) on heat transferring phenomena, the Leidenfrost condition and quenching of metal oxides irradiated by γ-rays were investigated. In the Leidenfrost experiment, when the temperature of the heating surface reached the wetting limit temperature, water-solid contact vanished because a stable vapor film existed between the droplet and the metal surface; i.e., a Leidenfrost condition obtained. The wetting limit temperature increased with integrated irradiation dose. After irradiation, the wet length and the duration of contact increased, and the contact angle decreased. In the quenching test, high surface wettability, or a highly hydrophilic condition, of a simulated fuel rod made of SUS was achieved, and the quenching velocities were increased up to 20-30% after 300 kGy 60Co γ-ray irradiation

  20. Effect of surface wettability caused by radiation induced surface activation on leidenfrost condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamasa, T.; Hazuku, T.; Tamura, N.; Okamoto, K. [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Mishima, K. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); Furuya, M. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Improving the limit of boiling heat transfer or critical heat flux requires that the cooling liquid can contact the heating surface, or a high-wettability, highly hydrophilic heating surface, even if a vapor bubble layer is generated on the surface. From this basis, we investigated surface wettability and Leidenfrost condition using metal oxides irradiated by {gamma}-rays. In our previous study, contact angle, an indicator of macroscopic wettability, of a water droplet on metal oxide at room temperature was measured by image processing of the images obtained by a CCD video camera. The results showed that the surface wettability on metal oxide pieces of titanium, Zircaloy No. 4, SUS-304, and copper was improved significantly by the Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) phenomenon. To delineate the effect of Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) on heat transferring phenomena, the Leidenfrost condition and quenching of metal oxides irradiated by {gamma}-rays were investigated. In the Leidenfrost experiment, when the temperature of the heating surface reached the wetting limit temperature, water-solid contact vanished because a stable vapor film existed between the droplet and the metal surface; i.e., a Leidenfrost condition obtained. The wetting limit temperature increased with integrated irradiation dose. After irradiation, the wet length and the duration of contact increased, and the contact angle decreased. In the quenching test, high surface wettability, or a highly hydrophilic condition, of a simulated fuel rod made of SUS was achieved, and the quenching velocities were increased up to 20-30% after 300 kGy 60Co {gamma}-ray irradiation.

  1. Effect of gamma radiation treatment on some fungi causing storage diseases of banana fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Ashmawi, A.M.M.

    1982-01-01

    Banana is one of the most popular fruits in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. in recent years, the quality of egyptian banana markedly declined. A major factor contributing to this decline is the development of fruit rot, which is the most widely occurring disease either in the field or in storage. Different fungi attack banana fruits causing considerable losses. Most of the fungi responsible for post harvest rots of banana are usually carried from the field, on the surface of the fruit itself or in injured and rotting fruits causing severe rats during storage. These rots make the fruits difficult to handle and undesirable to the consumers. Botryodiplodia theobromae is known to be the most important pathogen responsible for the infection in storage

  2. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  3. Abscess of the iliopsoas muscle associated external fistula of the rectum caused by radiation proctitis. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Shigeru; Imazu, Hiroki; Matubara, Toshiki; Sakurai, Yoichi; Ochiai, Masahiro; Funabiki, Takahiko [Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-12-01

    This paper deals with a case of abscess of the iliopsoas muscle, an intractable external fistula of the rectum caused by radiation proctitis in a 68-year-old man. There were previous histories of undergoing an A-C bypass operation for coronary stricture 10 years before; and undergoing aportial resection of the bladder with radiation therapy for urinary bladder cancer, followed by colostomy for hemorrhage and stricture of the rectum for radiation proctitis 2 years before admission. In April, 1997 when he had been treated at outpatient clinic, exhumation of pusfrom the sacurred that was diagnosed external fistula of the rectum on a fistulography and he was continuously treated on an ambulant basis. On November 17, 1997, the patient had a temperature 38.7deg C, the white blood cell count increased to 35 x 10{sup 4} /ml, inflammation reaction increased, and unconsciousness appeared. An emergency CT revealed retention of fluid in the retroperitoneum covering from the fistulation through the iliopsoas muscle to pelvis. An abscess of the iliopsoas muscle was diagnosed. It was determined that any operations under general anesthesia were impossible due to poor general condition, and an emergency incision drainage was performed under local anesthesia. Thereafter, the patient developed MRSA septicemia which demanded redrainage and strict general management, but he was successfully freed from the management. Although the intractable fistula in persistently present, he was discharged after a resection of sequestrum and is followed on an ambulant basis. (author)

  4. Comparative Analyses of Transcriptional Profiles in Mouse Organs Using a Pneumonic Plague Model after Infection with Wild-Type Yersinia pestis CO92 and Its Braun Lipoprotein Mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristi L. Galindo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We employed Murine GeneChips to delineate the global transcriptional profiles of the livers, lungs, and spleens in a mouse pneumonic plague infection model with wild-type (WT Y. pestis CO92 and its Braun lipoprotein (Δlpp mutant with reduced virulence. These organs showed differential transcriptional responses to infection with WT Y. pestis, but the overall host functional processes affected were similar across all three tissues. Gene expression alterations were found in inflammation, cytokine signaling, and apoptotic cell death-associated genes. Comparison of WT and Δlpp mutant-infected mice indicated significant overlap in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- associated gene expression, but the absence of Lpp perturbed host cell signaling at critical regulatory junctions resulting in altered immune response and possibly host cell apoptosis. We generated a putative signaling pathway including major inflammatory components that could account for the synergistic action of LPS and Lpp and provided the mechanistic basis of attenuation caused by deletion of the lpp gene from Y. pestis in a mouse model of pneumonic plague.

  5. Progressive alterations of central nervous system structure and function are caused by charged particle radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, G. A.; Cns Nscor Team

    A new NASA-sponsored program project (NSCOR) has been organized to conduct the first comprehensive investigation of the response of a mammalian brain structure (mouse hippocampus) to charged-particle radiation. The NSCOR collaboration has three main goals. The first goal is to quantify the time- and dose-dependent changes in cellular composition and architecture. By using stereology on preserved brains, subsets of cells (neurons, glia, endothelia and stem cells) will be quantified out to 2 years after irradiation with accelerated protons and iron ions. To further characterize changes in vasculature architecture a polymer infusion technique will be used to produce a three-dimensional vasculature cast that then will be mapped by x-ray tomography to determine topological changes, and microscopic infarcts associated with amyloid protein deposits. The 2nd goal is to quantify hippocampal function(s). The primary measurement of function will be extracellular electrical recordings from hippocampal ``brain slices'' that reflect underlying functions such as connectivity, action potential generation & conduction, and neurotransmitter formation, secretion, and uptake. Individual nerve membrane properties will be assessed by ``patch clamp'' recordings. Two non-invasive methods will evaluate brain function and the evolution of changes with time. Electroencephalograms will map macroscopic spontaneous electrical activity while two state-of-the-art MRI magnetization sequences will visualize and quantify local oxygen utilization and white matter fiber tracts structural integrity. To quantify the brains' overall performance under stress, animals will receive a systemic shock mediated by the immune system in the form of a reaction to lipopolysaccharide. A second strategy will employ the APP23 transgenic mouse that develops the pathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease. Measurements of irradiated mice will determine whether radiation exposure affects the latency and

  6. Radiation asymmetries during disruptions on DIII-D caused by massive gas injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commaux, N.; Baylor, L. R.; Jernigan, T. C.; Foust, C. R.; Combs, S.; Meitner, S. J.; Hollmann, E. M.; Izzo, V. A.; Moyer, R. A.; Humphreys, D. A.; Wesley, J. C.; Eidietis, N. W.; Parks, P. B.; Lasnier, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges that the ITER tokamak will have to face during its operations are disruptions. During the last few years, it has been proven that the global consequences of a disruption can be mitigated by the injection of large quantities of impurities. But one aspect that has been difficult to study was the possibility of local effects inside the torus during such injection that could damage a portion of the device despite the global heat losses and generated currents remaining below design parameter. 3D MHD simulations show that there is a potential for large toroidal asymmetries of the radiated power during impurity injection due to the interaction between the particle injection plume and a large n = 1 mode. Another aspect of 3D effects is the potential occurrence of Vertical Displacement Events (VDE), which could induce large poloidal heat load asymmetries. This potential deleterious effect of 3D phenomena has been studied on the DIII-D tokamak, thanks to the implementation of a multi-location massive gas injection (MGI) system as well as new diagnostic capabilities. This study showed the existence of a correlation between the location of the n = 1 mode and the local heat load on the plasma facing components but shows also that this effect is much smaller than anticipated (peaking factor of ∼1.1 vs 3-4 according to the simulations). There seems to be no observable heat load on the first wall of DIII-D at the location of the impurity injection port as well as no significant radiation asymmetries whether one or 2 valves are fired. This study enabled the first attempt of mitigation of a VDE using impurity injection at different poloidal locations. The results showed a more favorable heat deposition when the VDE is mitigated early (right at the onset) by impurity injection. No significant improvement of the heat load mitigation efficiency has been observed for late particle injection whether the injection is done “in the way” of the VDE

  7. Radiation asymmetries during disruptions on DIII-D caused by massive gas injectiona)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commaux, N.; Baylor, L. R.; Jernigan, T. C.; Hollmann, E. M.; Humphreys, D. A.; Wesley, J. C.; Izzo, V. A.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Parks, P. B.; Foust, C. R.; Combs, S.; Meitner, S. J.

    2014-10-01

    One of the major challenges that the ITER tokamak will have to face during its operations are disruptions. During the last few years, it has been proven that the global consequences of a disruption can be mitigated by the injection of large quantities of impurities. But one aspect that has been difficult to study was the possibility of local effects inside the torus during such injection that could damage a portion of the device despite the global heat losses and generated currents remaining below design parameter. 3D MHD simulations show that there is a potential for large toroidal asymmetries of the radiated power during impurity injection due to the interaction between the particle injection plume and a large n = 1 mode. Another aspect of 3D effects is the potential occurrence of Vertical Displacement Events (VDE), which could induce large poloidal heat load asymmetries. This potential deleterious effect of 3D phenomena has been studied on the DIII-D tokamak, thanks to the implementation of a multi-location massive gas injection (MGI) system as well as new diagnostic capabilities. This study showed the existence of a correlation between the location of the n = 1 mode and the local heat load on the plasma facing components but shows also that this effect is much smaller than anticipated (peaking factor of ˜1.1 vs 3-4 according to the simulations). There seems to be no observable heat load on the first wall of DIII-D at the location of the impurity injection port as well as no significant radiation asymmetries whether one or 2 valves are fired. This study enabled the first attempt of mitigation of a VDE using impurity injection at different poloidal locations. The results showed a more favorable heat deposition when the VDE is mitigated early (right at the onset) by impurity injection. No significant improvement of the heat load mitigation efficiency has been observed for late particle injection whether the injection is done "in the way" of the VDE (upward VDE

  8. Simulation of the occupational radiation dose caused by contamination of primary circuit media in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artmann, Andreas; Bruhn, Gerd; Schneider, Sebastian [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany); Strub, Erik [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Abt. Nuklearchemie

    2016-11-15

    The occupational radiation exposure of workers in NPPs during overall maintenance and refueling inspections and decommissioning is determined by numerous parameters. Radiation exposure caused by contamination of components may be minimised by the chemical operation mode and by applying systematic decontamination techniques. Data on occupational exposure in German NPPs as well as information about the radionuclide concentration in the coolant are available. The generic 3D model of the primary circuit presented is based on the analysis of technical documentation of German PWRs. Tasks are modeled as a combination of retention times at related local positions in the surroundings of work areas. The generic model allows the calculation of the resulting occupational doses generated by definable jobs and tasks. The KWU/Siemens- PWR generations are characterised by nuclide vectors, the thickness of shielding, and the material composition of components. It was possible to show that for a pre-Konvoi plant, the calculated occupational dose caused by a specific working task is close to measurements.

  9. Simulation of the occupational radiation dose caused by contamination of primary circuit media in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artmann, Andreas; Bruhn, Gerd; Schneider, Sebastian; Strub, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The occupational radiation exposure of workers in NPPs during overall maintenance and refueling inspections and decommissioning is determined by numerous parameters. Radiation exposure caused by contamination of components may be minimised by the chemical operation mode and by applying systematic decontamination techniques. Data on occupational exposure in German NPPs as well as information about the radionuclide concentration in the coolant are available. The generic 3D model of the primary circuit presented is based on the analysis of technical documentation of German PWRs. Tasks are modeled as a combination of retention times at related local positions in the surroundings of work areas. The generic model allows the calculation of the resulting occupational doses generated by definable jobs and tasks. The KWU/Siemens- PWR generations are characterised by nuclide vectors, the thickness of shielding, and the material composition of components. It was possible to show that for a pre-Konvoi plant, the calculated occupational dose caused by a specific working task is close to measurements.

  10. A method to adjust radiation dose-response relationships for clinical risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane Lindegaard; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    Several clinical risk factors for radiation induced toxicity have been identified in the literature. Here, we present a method to quantify the effect of clinical risk factors on radiation dose-response curves and apply the method to adjust the dose-response for radiation pneumonitis for patients...

  11. Clinical study of lesions caused by accidental local exposure to ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menoux, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    During the last few years the radiopathology service of the Curie Foundation has admitted more than a hundred patients who were followed and treated for irradiation or suspected irradiation after a work accident. Accidents followed by clinical symptoms account for about half the cases examined. Some of these clinical signs were benign whereas others developed very seriously, all possible conditions between these two extremes being represented. This report neglects cases of high total exposure and deals only with those of partial irradiation where local symptoms predominate, usually at the distal extremities of the upper limbs and exceptionally at the root or distal extremity of the lower limbs. Six clinical cases were selected as particularly revealing and are discussed below: accidental exposure of both hands to an iridium-192 source; chronic exposure to X-rays (left hand and right lower half-lip); accidental exposure of the right hand and antero-external face of the right thigh to a iridium-192 source; acute accidental exposure of the left hand to X-rays emitted under 50 kV; accidental exposure of both hands to cobalt-60 radiation; radiolesions of the left lower limb following a critical power excursion (gamma rays and neutrons) [fr

  12. Estimation of the radiation burden to man caused by phosphogypsum discharges in the New Waterway near Rotterdam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koester, H.W.

    1991-07-01

    The phosphate fertiliser industries near Rotterdam dispose their waste product phosphogypsum as a slurry into the river Rhine. Phospho-gypsum contains elevated levels of several radionuclides of the U-238 series. Consequently radionuclides such as Th-230, Ra-226, Pb-210 and Po-210 are emitted into the Rhine in quantities of some TBq per year. Estimates of the increase of the radiation exposure due to these emissions are calculated for some critical groups. As there are no specific data of activity concentrations in fishproducts nor in soils of polders filled with harbour sludge, these were estimated from data of the activity concentrations in respectively the water and the bottom sediment in the area. A dose of 0,1 mSv.a -1 is estimated for those anglers and fishermen who, fishing in this environment and the nearby coast, consume very frequently a part of their own catch. Locally elevated levels of Ra-226 are likely to occur in harbour sludge soils, which may cause increased levels of Rn-222 in indoor air of houses built on these soils. Consequently, the radiation exposure to inhabitants may increase with more than 1 mSv.a -1 . Radiation exposure estimates for the consumption of drinking water from private wells and from locally produced milk and beef are in the order of 0,1 mSv.a -1 . The radiation exposure estimates are likely to exceed the allowable levels employed by the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Physical Planning and Environment. In order to obtain information on the validity of the estimates further research in the area is required. (author). 26 refs.; 3 tabs

  13. Histographical presentation of frequency distribution of attenuation numbers of hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Akira; Nishitani, Hiromu; Onitsuka, Hideo; Baba, Hiromi; Kawahira, Kozaburo

    1981-01-01

    Based on the attenuation numbers in computed tomography of the chest, histograms for 5 patients with hypersensitivity pneumonitis were analysed. For analysis of histograms, we established 3 parameters: A, tan theta, and M. Of histograms in normal subjects, maximum inspiration scan was more stable than maximum expiration scan, and parameter A was most stable. In patients with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, histograms shifted to the range of higher attenuation numbers than normal subjects. Follow up studies showed decrease in the shift, but parameter A and M of maximum inspiration scan never reached to normal ranges. This suggested that organic parenchymal changes never disappeared completely, even in clinical remission stage. Therefore, parameter A or M of maximum inspiration scan was adequate for analysis, and histographic analysis of chest CT scan was considered to be useful also for early detections and follow-up studies of all diffuse pulmonary disorders. (author)

  14. Role of Some Antioxidants in Ameliorating Disturbances Caused by Gamma Radiation in Female Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sherbiny, E. M.; Bayomi, M. M.; Addel-Aziz, S. M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the role of supplemental antioxidant vitamins against some sex hormone and trace element disturbances in female rats 1 hour post exposure to 7.0 Gy of gamma radiation as a single dose using 60 Co source. Vitamins C and E were orally administered daily for 2 weeks in doses of 100 mg/kg and 25 mg/kg body weight, respectively. Total number of 48 female albino rats were equally divided into 4 groups; irradiated group (n = 12), vitamin C administered group (n = 12), vitamin E administered group (n = 12) and rats administered vitamin C followed immediately by vitamin E (n =12) post irradiation, in addition to the normal control group (n = 10). The results of this study revealed a significant reduction in serum estradiol level and highly significant reductions in serum progesterone level, zinc and selenium concentrations of female rats exposed to gamma rays, compared to control. Concerning groups administered vitamins, rats administered vitamin C showed a significant improvement in estradiol and progesterone levels, reaching the levels of control group and a non-significant improvement in serum zinc and selenium concentrations was recorded. Vitamin E administered group revealed a high significant increase in serum estradiol level accompanied with an improvement in progesterone, whereas a significant decrease in zinc was found and a significant amelioration in selenium concentration was recorded in comparison with control values. Administration of vitamin E followed immediately by vitamin C resulted in a significant increase in estradiol level and a remarkable improvement in the level of progesterone. Slight significant reduction in zinc was noticed, whereas selenium concentrations were reached normal levels in both E and C and and E groups in comparison with the other groups

  15. Possible cause for altered spatial cognition of prepubescent rats exposed to chronic radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sareesh Naduvil; Kumar, Raju Suresh; Karun, Kalesh M; Nayak, Satheesha B; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2015-10-01

    The effects of chronic and repeated radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RFEMR) exposure on spatial cognition and hippocampal architecture were investigated in prepubescent rats. Four weeks old male Wistar rats were exposed to RF-EMR (900 MHz; SAR-1.15 W/kg with peak power density of 146.60 μW/cm(2)) for 1 h/day, for 28 days. Followed by this, spatial cognition was evaluated by Morris water maze test. To evaluate the hippocampal morphology; H&E staining, cresyl violet staining, and Golgi-Cox staining were performed on hippocampal sections. CA3 pyramidal neuron morphology and surviving neuron count (in CA3 region) were studied using H&E and cresyl violet stained sections. Dendritic arborization pattern of CA3 pyramidal neuron was investigated by concentric circle method. Progressive learning abilities were found to be decreased in RF-EMR exposed rats. Memory retention test performed 24 h after the last training revealed minor spatial memory deficit in RF-EMR exposed group. However, RF-EMR exposed rats exhibited poor spatial memory retention when tested 48 h after the final trial. Hirano bodies and Granulovacuolar bodies were absent in the CA3 pyramidal neurons of different groups studied. Nevertheless, RF-EMR exposure affected the viable cell count in dorsal hippocampal CA3 region. RF-EMR exposure influenced dendritic arborization pattern of both apical and basal dendritic trees in RF-EMR exposed rats. Structural changes found in the hippocampus of RF-EMR exposed rats could be one of the possible reasons for altered cognition.

  16. Changes in properties of DNA caused by gamma and ultraviolet radiation. Dependence of conformational changes on the chemical nature of the damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorlickova, M; Palacek, E [Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Biofysikalni Ustav

    1978-02-16

    Changes in the pulse-polarographic behaviour and circular dichroism spectra of DNA were investigated after gamma and ultraviolet irradiations and after degradation by DNAase I. It was found that moderate doses of radiation cause local conformational changes in the double helix which are dependent on the chemical nature of the damage. Only the accumulation of structural changes after high doses of the radiations or after extensive enzymic treatment may cause formation of single-standed regions in DNA.

  17. Inhalational Gentamicin Treatment Is Effective Against Pneumonic Plague in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gur

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonic plague is an infectious disease characterized by rapid and fulminant development of acute pneumonia and septicemia that results in death within days of exposure. The causative agent of pneumonic plague, Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis, is a Tier-1 bio-threat agent. Parenteral antibiotic treatment is effective when given within a narrow therapeutic window after symptom onset. However, the non-specific “flu-like” symptoms often lead to delayed diagnosis and therapy. In this study, we evaluated inhalational gentamicin therapy in an infected mouse model as a means to improve antibiotic treatment efficacy. Inhalation is an attractive route for treating lung infections. The advantages include directly dosing the main infection site, the relative accessibility for administration and the lack of extensive enzymatic drug degradation machinery. In this study, we show that inhalational gentamicin treatment administered 24 h post-infection, prior to the appearance of symptoms, protected against lethal intranasal challenge with the fully virulent Y. pestis Kimberley53 strain (Kim53. Similarly, a high survival rate was demonstrated in mice treated by inhalation with another aminoglycoside, tobramycin, for which an FDA-approved inhaled formulation is clinically available for cystic fibrosis patients. Inhalational treatment with gentamicin 48 h post-infection (to symptomatic mice was also successful against a Y. pestis challenge dose of 10 i.n.LD50. Whole-body imaging using IVIS technology demonstrated that adding inhalational gentamicin to parenteral therapy accelerated the clearance of Y. pestis from the lungs of infected animals. This may reduce disease severity and the risk of secondary infections. In conclusion, our data suggest that inhalational therapy with aerosolized gentamicin may be an effective prophylactic treatment against pneumonic plague. We also demonstrate the benefit of combining this treatment with a conventional parenteral

  18. An encapsulated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a highly efficient vaccine against pneumonic plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Derbise

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plague is still a public health problem in the world and is re-emerging, but no efficient vaccine is available. We previously reported that oral inoculation of a live attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, the recent ancestor of Yersinia pestis, provided protection against bubonic plague. However, the strain poorly protected against pneumonic plague, the most deadly and contagious form of the disease, and was not genetically defined. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The sequenced Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 has been irreversibly attenuated by deletion of genes encoding three essential virulence factors. An encapsulated Y. pseudotuberculosis was generated by cloning the Y. pestis F1-encoding caf operon and expressing it in the attenuated strain. The new V674pF1 strain produced the F1 capsule in vitro and in vivo. Oral inoculation of V674pF1 allowed the colonization of the gut without lesions to Peyer's patches and the spleen. Vaccination induced both humoral and cellular components of immunity, at the systemic (IgG and Th1 cells and the mucosal levels (IgA and Th17 cells. A single oral dose conferred 100% protection against a lethal pneumonic plague challenge (33×LD(50 of the fully virulent Y. pestis CO92 strain and 94% against a high challenge dose (3,300×LD(50. Both F1 and other Yersinia antigens were recognized and V674pF1 efficiently protected against a F1-negative Y. pestis. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The encapsulated Y. pseudotuberculosis V674pF1 is an efficient live oral vaccine against pneumonic plague, and could be developed for mass vaccination in tropical endemic areas to control pneumonic plague transmission and mortality.

  19. Strategic Assessment of Causes, Impacts and Mitigation of Radiation Embrittlement of RPV steel in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, Jubair Ahmed; Bhowmik, Palash Kumar; Gairola, Abhinav; Suh, Kune Y.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power has been emerged as a proven technology in the present day world to beget electricity after its first successful demonstration in 1942. Due to world's increasing concern over the augmented concentration of 'Greenhouse Gas' emissions primarily caused by burning of fossil fuel, it is not surprising that there will be a galloping demand for nuclear power in near future. As per data of World Nuclear Association, there are currently 435 operable civil nuclear power reactors around the world, with a further 71 under construction, among which the most common type is LWR. Pressure vessel of LWR is the most vital pressure boundary component of Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) as it houses the core under elevated pressure and temperature. It also provides structural support to RPV internals and attempts to protect against possible rupture under all postulated transients that the NSSS may undergo. LWR pressure vessel experiences service at a temperature of 250-320 .deg. C and receives significant level of fast neutron fluence, ranging from about 5*10 22 to 3*10 24 n/m 2 depending on plant design. There are also differences in materials used for various designed reactors. Weldments also vary in type and impurity level. Accordingly, the assessment of degradation of major components such as RPV steel caused by aging and corrosion is a common objective for safe operation of all LWRs. The purpose of this paper is to assess how neutron irradiation contributes to the degradation of mechanical properties of RPV steel and how these effects can be minimized. Since RPV is the only irreplaceable component in NPPs, the degradation of mechanical properties of RPV is the life-limiting feature of LWR nuclear power plant operation. Although there are a number of ways (e.g. thermal neutrons, fast neutrons and gamma-ray irradiation) that may contribute to the displacement of atoms (hence RPV embrittlement and degradation of mechanical properties), most of the

  20. Strategic Assessment of Causes, Impacts and Mitigation of Radiation Embrittlement of RPV steel in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamim, Jubair Ahmed; Bhowmik, Palash Kumar; Gairola, Abhinav; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Nuclear power has been emerged as a proven technology in the present day world to beget electricity after its first successful demonstration in 1942. Due to world's increasing concern over the augmented concentration of 'Greenhouse Gas' emissions primarily caused by burning of fossil fuel, it is not surprising that there will be a galloping demand for nuclear power in near future. As per data of World Nuclear Association, there are currently 435 operable civil nuclear power reactors around the world, with a further 71 under construction, among which the most common type is LWR. Pressure vessel of LWR is the most vital pressure boundary component of Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) as it houses the core under elevated pressure and temperature. It also provides structural support to RPV internals and attempts to protect against possible rupture under all postulated transients that the NSSS may undergo. LWR pressure vessel experiences service at a temperature of 250-320 .deg. C and receives significant level of fast neutron fluence, ranging from about 5*10{sup 22} to 3*10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2} depending on plant design. There are also differences in materials used for various designed reactors. Weldments also vary in type and impurity level. Accordingly, the assessment of degradation of major components such as RPV steel caused by aging and corrosion is a common objective for safe operation of all LWRs. The purpose of this paper is to assess how neutron irradiation contributes to the degradation of mechanical properties of RPV steel and how these effects can be minimized. Since RPV is the only irreplaceable component in NPPs, the degradation of mechanical properties of RPV is the life-limiting feature of LWR nuclear power plant operation. Although there are a number of ways (e.g. thermal neutrons, fast neutrons and gamma-ray irradiation) that may contribute to the displacement of atoms (hence RPV embrittlement and degradation of mechanical properties

  1. Fulminant mulch pneumonitis: an emergency presentation of chronic granulomatous disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddiqui, Sophia; Anderson, Victoria L.; Hilligoss, Diane M.; Abinun, Mario; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Masur, Henry; Witebsky, Frank G.; Shea, Yvonne R.; Gallin, John I.; Malech, Henry L.; Holland, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is associated with multiple and recurrent infections. In patients with CGD, invasive pulmonary infection with Aspergillus species remains the greatest cause of mortality and is typically insidious in onset. Acute fulminant presentations of fungal

  2. Radiation-Induced Esophagitis is Mitigated by Soy Isoflavones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Fountain

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy present with acute esophagitis and chronic fibrosis, as a result of radiation injury to esophageal tissues. We have shown that soy isoflavones alleviate pneumonitis and fibrosis caused by radiation toxicity to normal lung. The effect of soy isoflavones on esophagitis histopathological changes induced by radiation was investigated. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 Gy or 25 Gy single thoracic irradiation and soy isoflavones for up to 16 weeks. Damage to esophageal tissues was assessed by H&E, Masson’s Trichrome and Ki-67 staining at 1, 4, 10, 16 weeks after radiation. The effects on smooth muscle cells and leukocyte infiltration were determined by immunohistochemistry using anti-αSMA and anti-CD45 respectively. Results: Radiation caused thickening of esophageal tissue layers that was significantly reduced by soy isoflavones. Major radiation alterations included hypertrophy of basal cells in mucosal epithelium and damage to smooth muscle cells in muscularis mucosae as well as disruption of collagen fibers in lamina propria connective tissue with leukocyte infiltration. These effects were observed as early as one week after radiation and were more pronounced with a higher dose of 25 Gy. Soy isoflavones limited the extent of tissue damage induced by radiation both at 10 and 25 Gy.Conclusions: Soy isoflavones have a radioprotective effect on the esophagus, mitigating the early and late effects of radiation injury in several esophagus tissue layers. Soy could be administered with radiotherapy to decrease the incidence and severity of esophagitis in lung cancer patients receiving thoracic radiation therapy.

  3. Control of root rot of chickpea caused by Sclerotium rolfsii by different agents and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasha Mohammed Fathy El- Said, R.M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii causes root rot disease in several crops including chickpea that result in low yield. Artificial infection of chickpea seedlings by S. rolfsii in vitro demonstrated that different tissues of the plant completely disintegrated by fungal infection. In vitro and green house pot experiments demonstrated that inducers in combination with fungicides, oils and bio agents resulted in about 80 % suppression of root rot disease. Treatments have no phyto toxic effect on chickpea seedlings at low doses. Gliocladium virens and Gliocladium deliquescens were effective as biocontrol agents against Sclerotium rolfsii. The percent of survival plants, fresh weight, dry weight and plant height of chickpea plants increased with different treatments with inducers compared with the control. Chlorophyll a, b, and total chlorophyll amounts increased to the maximum values. The activity of two plant enzymes, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase increased. In this study, gamma irradiation of chickpea seeds at doses 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 Gy have negative effect on survival, plant height, fresh weight and dry weight of chickpea. The effect of gamma irradiation at doses 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 kGy on the antagonistic effect of Gliocladium virens and Gliocladium deliquescens against S. rolfsii were investigated. The results revealed that gamma irradiation increase the antagonistic effect of Gliocladium virens and Gliocladium deliquescens against S. rolfsii . Effect of gamma irradiation at doses of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 5 kGy on the mycelial growth and pathogenicity of S. rolfsii were investigated. The results revealed that gamma irradiation at doses 0.25 up to 3.0 kGy increase the pathogenicity of S. rolfsii but gamma irradiation at dose 5.0 kGy completely inhibited the growth of S. rolfsii. Extracellular polygalacturonase was characterized and purified by precipitation with 70 % ammonium sulfate, dialysis and gel filtration through Sephadex 75

  4. Study of physical, chemical and structural effects caused by ionizing radiation and preservation on human costal cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinho Junior, Antonio Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Tissue Banks around the world have stored human cartilages obtained from cadaver donors for use in several kinds of reconstructive surgeries. To ensure that such tissues are not contaminated, they have been sterilized with ionizing radiation. However, high doses of gamma radiation may cause undesirable changes in the tissues, decreasing the mechanical properties of the grafts. In this work, we evaluate physical/chemical and structural changes in deep-frozen (-70 deg C) or high concentration of glycerol (> 98%) preserved costal cartilage, before and after sterilization by ionizing radiation at 3 different doses (15, 25 and 50 kGy). Samples of human costal cartilage were obtained from 20 cadaver donors ranging between 18 and 55 years old. A 60 Co irradiator was used as irradiation source. Thermogravimetry (TG), Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and mechanical tension and compression tests were carried out to evaluate the changes in the cartilage. Regarding the thermogravimetric results, the obtained data has shown that the TG curves have the same pattern independently of the sample irradiated or not. On the other hand, non-irradiated samples showed great variability of thermogravimetric curves among different donors and for the same donor. Concerning the mechanical tests, when cartilages were irradiated with 15 kGy, their mechanical strength to tension was increased about 24%, in both deep-froze and preserved in glycerol samples. Samples deep-frozen, when irradiated with 25 and 50 kGy, presented a decrease of their mechanical behavior smaller than those preserved in high concentrations of glycerol and irradiated with the same dose. Therefore, deep-frozen cartilages can be sterilized with doses until 50 kGy and cartilages preserved in high concentrations of glycerol can be sterilized with doses until 25 kGy without significant changes in their bio-mechanical properties.(author)

  5. AFM studies of a new type of radiation defect on mica surfaces caused by highly charged ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruehlicke, C.; Briere, M.A.; Schneider, D.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation induced defects on mica caused by the impact of slow very highly charged ions (SVHCI) have been investigated with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Freshly cleaved surfaces of different types of muscovite were irradiated with SVHCI extracted from the LLNL electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at velocities of ca. 2 keV/amu. Atomic force microscopy of the surface reveals the formation of blisterlike defects associated with single ion impact. The determined defect volume which appears to increase linearly with the incident charge state and exhibits a threshold incident charge state has been determined using the AFM. These results indicate that target atoms are subjected to mutual electrostatic repulsion due to ionization through potential electron emission upon approach of the ion. If the repulsion leads to permanent atomic displacement, surface defects are formed

  6. Intensity of diffracted X-rays from biomolecules with radiation damage caused by strong X-ray pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Takeshi; Tokuhisa, Atsushi; Moribayashi, Kengo; Fukuda, Yuji; Kono, Hidetoshi; Go, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    In order to realize the coherent X-ray diffractive imaging of single biomolecules, the diffraction intensities, per effective pixel of a single biomolecule with radiation damage, caused by irradiation using a strong coherent X-ray pulse, were examined. A parameter survey was carried out for various experimental conditions, using a developed simulation program that considers the effect of electric field ionization, which was slightly reported on in previous studies. The two simple relationships among the parameters were identified as follows: (1) the diffraction intensity of a biomolecule slightly increases with the incident X-ray energy; and that (2) the diffraction intensity is approximately proportional to the target radius, when the radius is longer than 400 Å, since the upper limit of the incident intensity for damage to the biomolecules marginally changes with respect to the target radius. (author)

  7. Secondary radiation damage as the main cause for unexpected volume effects: A histopathologic study of the parotid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konings, Antonius W.T.; Faber, Hette; Cotteleer, Femmy; Vissink, Arjan; Coppes, Rob P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To elucidate with a histopathological study the mechanism of region-dependent volume effects in the partly irradiated parotid gland of the rat. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were locally X-irradiated with collimators with conformal radiation portals for 100% volume and 50% cranial/caudal partial volumes. Single doses up to 40 Gy were applied. Parotid saliva samples were collected, and the three lobes of the parotid gland were examined individually on the macro- and micromorphologic level up to 1 year after irradiation. Results: Dose-dependent loss of gland weight was observed 1 year after total or partial X-irradiation. Weight loss of the glands correlated very well with loss of secretory function. Irradiating the cranial 50% volume (implicating a shielded lateral lobe) resulted in substantially more damage in terms of weight loss and loss of secretory function than 50% caudal irradiation (shielding the ventral and dorsal lobe). Histologic examinations of the glands 1 year after irradiation revealed that the shielded lateral lobe was severely affected, in contrast to the shielded ventral and dorsal lobes. Time studies showed that irradiation of the cranial 50% volume caused late development of secondary damage in the shielded lateral lobe, becoming manifest between 240 and 360 days after irradiation. The possible clinical significance of this finding is discussed. Conclusion: It is concluded that the observed region-dependent volume effect for late function loss in the rat parotid gland after partial irradiation is mainly caused by secondary events in the shielded lateral lobe. The most probable first step (primary radiation event) in the development of this secondary damage is radiation exposure to the hilus region (located between the ventral and dorsal lobe). By injuring major excretory ducts and supply routes for blood and nerves in this area, the facility system necessary for proper functioning of the nonexposed lateral lobe is seriously affected

  8. Is superficial burn caused by ultraviolet radiation (sunburn) comparable to superficial burn caused by heat--a histomorphological comparison by in vivo Reflectance-Mode-Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, M A; Altintas, A A; Guggenheim, M; Busch, K H; Niederbichler, A D; Aust, M C; Vogt, P M

    2009-12-01

    Regardless of the underlying cause, both sunburn and superficial thermal injuries are classified as first-degree burns, since data on morphological differences are scarce. Reflectance-Mode-Confocal Microscopy (RMCM) enables high-resolution non-invasive investigation of the human skin. We studied in vivo histomorphological alterations in both sunburn and superficial thermal injuries using RMCM. Ten patients (6 female, 4 male; aged 28.4 +/- 10.6 years) with first-degree thermal-contact Injuries (TI group), and 9 sunburned patients (SB group; 7 female, 2 male; aged 30.2 +/- 16.4 years), to a maximum extent of 10% of the body surface were evaluated 24 h after burn injury using RMCM. The following parameters were obtained using RMCM: stratum corneum thickness, epidermal thickness, basal layer thickness, granular cell size. Compared to the controls (12.8 +/- 2.5 microm), stratum corneum thickness decreased significantly to 10.6 +/- 2.1 microm in the TI group, whereas it increased significantly to 16.4 +/- 3.1 microm in the SB group. The epidermal thickness did not differ significantly in the TI group (47.9 +/- 2.3 microm) and SB group (49.1 +/- 3.5 microm); however, both increased significantly compared to their respective controls (41.8 +/- 1.4 microm). The basal layer thickness increased more in the SB group compared to the TI group (17.9 +/- 1.4 microm vs. 15.6 +/- 1.1 microm). Both differed also significantly compared to their controls (13.8 +/- 0.9 microm). The granular cell size increased significantly in both groups compared to the controls (731 +/- 42 microm); however, a significantly higher increase was observed in the TI group (852 +/- 58 microm) compared to the SB group (784 +/- 61 microm). Ultraviolet radiation seems to influence predominantly deeper epidermal layers, whereas heat-induced burns affect more superficial epidermal layers. The term 'First-degree burn' should not be used synonymously for sunburn and superficial thermal burn injuries. Conflicts of

  9. An experimental study on the radiation-induced injury of the rabbit lung: Correlation of soft-tissue radiograph and high- resolution CT findings with pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Nam; Nam, Kyung Jin; Park, Byeoung Ho; Jeong, Jin Sook; Lee, Hyung Sik

    1994-01-01

    To describe soft-tissue radiographic and high-resolution CT findings of radiation-induced lung injury of rabbit over time and to correlate them with pathologic findings. 15 rabbits were irradiated in the right lung with one fracture of 2000 cGy. After 4, 6, 12, 20, 24 weeks 3 rabbits in each group were sacrificed and soft-tissue radiographs and high-resolution CT of their lung tissue were obtained. Radiological findings were correlated with pathologic findings. On soft-tissue radiogram, radiation pneumonitis shown as consolidation with air- bronchogram occurred in 3 cases after 6 weeks , and in 1 case after 12 weeks of irradiation. In addition, pneumonic consolidation with adjacent pleural contraction was seen in 2 cases after 12 weeks of irradiation. Fibrotic changes indicated by decreased volume occurred after 20 weeks and combined bronchiectatic change and bronchial wall thickening appeared after 20 weeks(N=1), and 24 weeks(N=3). HRCT findings of radiation pneumonitis were homogeneous, increased attention after 4 weeks(N=3), 6 and 12 weeks(each N=1), patchy consolidation after 6 and 12 weeks(each N=2), discrete consolidation after 12, 20 and 24 weeks(each N=1) and solid consolidation after 20 and 24 weeks(each N=2). Pathologically radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary congestion were seen after 4 and 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, collagen and reticulin fibers were detected along alveolar wall. Mixed radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis were detected after 12 weeks. 20 weeks after irradiation, fibrosis was well defined in interstitium and in 24 weeks, decreased number of alveoli and thickening of bronchial wall were defined. Radiation pneumonitis was provoked 4 weeks after irradiation on rabbit lung and progressed into radiation fibrosis 20 weeks after irradiation on soft-tissue radiographs and high-resolution CT. High-resolution CT is more precise in detecting early radiation pneumonitis and detailed pathologic findings

  10. Radiation-Induced Differentiation in Human Lung Fibroblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sa-Rah; Ahn, Ji-Yeon; Han, Young-Soo; Shim, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Song, Jie-Young

    2007-01-01

    One of the most common tumors in many countries is lung cancer and patients with lung cancer may take radiotherapy. Although radiotherapy may have its own advantages, it can also induce serious problems such as acute radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by excessive production of α-SMA and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) such as collagen and fibronectin. There has been a great amount of research about fibrosis but the exact mechanism causing the reaction is not elucidated especially in radiation-induced fibrosis. Until now it has been known that several factors such as transforming growth factor (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) are related to fibrosis. Among them TGF-β with Smad signaling is known to be the main stream and other signaling molecules such as MAPK, ERK and JNK (3) also participates in the process. In addition to those above factors, it is thought that more diverse and complicate mechanisms may involve in the radiationinduced fibrosis. Therefore, to investigate the underlying mechanisms in radiation induced fibrosis, first of all, we confirmed whether radiation induces trans differentiation in human normal lung fibroblasts. Here, we suggest that not only TGF-β but also radiation can induce trans differentiation in human lung fibroblast WI-38 and IMR-90

  11. Vitamins as radioprotectors in vivo II. protection by vitamin A and soybean oil against radiation damage caused by internal radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harapanhalli, R.S.; Narra, V.R.; Yaghmai, V.; Azure, M.T.; Goddu, M.; Howell, R.W.; Rao, D.V.

    1994-01-01

    Tissue-incorporated radionuclides impart radiation energy over extended periods of time depending on their effective half-lives. The capacity of vitamin A dissolved in soybean oil to protect against the biological effects caused by internal radionuclides is investigated. The radiochemicals examined are DNA-binding 125 IdU, cytoplasmically localized H 125 IPDM and the α-particle emitter 210 Po citrate. As in our previous studies, spermatogenesis in mice is used as the experimental model and spermatogonial cell survival is the biological end point. Surprisingly, soybean oil itself provides substantial and equal protection against the Auger effect of 125 IdU, which is comparable to a high-LET radiation effect, as well as the low-LET effects of H 125 IPDM, the dose modification factors (DMFs) being 3.6 ± 0.9 (SEM) and 3.4 ± 0.9, respectively. The protection afforded by the oil against the effects of 5.3 MeV α particles emitted by 210Po is also significant (DMF = 2.2 ± 0.4). The presence of vitamin A in the oil further enhanced the radioprotection against the effect of 125 IdU (DMF = 4.8 ± 1.3) and H 125 IKPDM (DMF = 5.1 ± 0.6); however, no enhancement is provided against the effects of α particles. These interesting results with soybean oil and vitamin A, together with data on the subcellular distribution of the protectors, provide clues regarding the mechanistic aspects of the protection. In addition, the data for vitamin A reaffirm our earlier conclusion that the mechanism by which DNA-bound Auger emitters impart biological damage is primarily indirect in nature. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  12. CT findings of pulmonary consolidation: focused on tuberculosis, malignant obstructive pneumonitis, and lung abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wang Jung; Kim, Sung Jin; Cha, Sang Hoon; Park, Kit Sun; Kim, Dae Young [College of Medicine, Chung Buk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Gi Seuk [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    The aim of our study was to identify the CT features helpful in the differential diagnosis of Iobar consolidation. We evaluated the CT findings in 52 consecutive patients with lobar consolidation which were proved to be pulmonary tuberculosis(n=24), malignant obstructive pneumonitis due to bronchogenic carcinoma(n=21), and lung abscess(n=7). We retrospectively reviewed CT scans with respect to 1) number of cavities or low attenuation area suggesting necrosis(we described these as cavity), 2) the contour of cavity, 3) enhancement of the cavity wall, 4) enhancement of pleura, 5) small nodules adjacent to the consolidation, 6) similar lesion in other location in lung, 7) air-bronchogram 8) mediastinal lymph node enlargement, and 9) extrapleural change. The helpful CT findings in the patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were multiple cavities(more than three; 79.2%), small nodules adjacent to the lobar consolidation(75.0%), similar lesion in another lobe or lung(91.7%), air-bronchogram(91.7%), and mediastinal lymph node enlargement(58.3%). Although extrapleural change had low sensitivity it was highly specific for pulmonary tuberculosis(sensitivity, 43.5%; specificity, 91.7%). Multiple cavities(61.9%) and mediastinal lymph node enlargement(52.4%) were common findings of malignant obstructive pneumonitis. In the patients with lung abscess, the common findings were small number of cavities(one or two, 85.7%) and air-bronchogram(85.7%). However, other findings of pulmonary tuberculosis were rarely seen in the patients with malignant obstructive pneumonitis or lung abscess. The CT findings of lobar consolidation may be used as useful adjuncts in the differential diagnosis of lobar consolidation.

  13. CT findings of pulmonary consolidation: focused on tuberculosis, malignant obstructive pneumonitis, and lung abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wang Jung; Kim, Sung Jin; Cha, Sang Hoon; Park, Kit Sun; Kim, Dae Young; Han, Gi Seuk

    1994-01-01

    The aim of our study was to identify the CT features helpful in the differential diagnosis of Iobar consolidation. We evaluated the CT findings in 52 consecutive patients with lobar consolidation which were proved to be pulmonary tuberculosis(n=24), malignant obstructive pneumonitis due to bronchogenic carcinoma(n=21), and lung abscess(n=7). We retrospectively reviewed CT scans with respect to 1) number of cavities or low attenuation area suggesting necrosis(we described these as cavity), 2) the contour of cavity, 3) enhancement of the cavity wall, 4) enhancement of pleura, 5) small nodules adjacent to the consolidation, 6) similar lesion in other location in lung, 7) air-bronchogram 8) mediastinal lymph node enlargement, and 9) extrapleural change. The helpful CT findings in the patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were multiple cavities(more than three; 79.2%), small nodules adjacent to the lobar consolidation(75.0%), similar lesion in another lobe or lung(91.7%), air-bronchogram(91.7%), and mediastinal lymph node enlargement(58.3%). Although extrapleural change had low sensitivity it was highly specific for pulmonary tuberculosis(sensitivity, 43.5%; specificity, 91.7%). Multiple cavities(61.9%) and mediastinal lymph node enlargement(52.4%) were common findings of malignant obstructive pneumonitis. In the patients with lung abscess, the common findings were small number of cavities(one or two, 85.7%) and air-bronchogram(85.7%). However, other findings of pulmonary tuberculosis were rarely seen in the patients with malignant obstructive pneumonitis or lung abscess. The CT findings of lobar consolidation may be used as useful adjuncts in the differential diagnosis of lobar consolidation

  14. Radiation pneumonitis in non‑small‑cell lung cancer patients treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: We found that ... lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who underwent radiotherapy with HT in our ..... might have a different effect on lung toxicity in the subject undergoing the ...

  15. Molecular analysis of radiation-induced albino (c)-locus mutations that cause death at preimplantation stages of development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinchik, E.M.; Toenjes, R.R.; Paul, D.; Potter, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Deletion mutations at the albino (c) locus have been useful for continuing the development of fine-structure physical and functional maps of the Fes-Hbb region of mouse chromosome 7. This report describes the molecular analysis of a number of radiation-induced c deletions that, when homozygous, cause death of the embryo during preimplantation stages. The distal extent of these deletions defines a locus, pid, (preimplantation development) genetically associated with this phenotype. The proximal breakpoints of eight of these deletions were mapped with respect to the Tyr (tyrosinase; albino) gene as well as to anonymous loci within the Fah-Tyr region that are defined by the Pmv-31 viral integration site and by chromosome-microdissection clones. Rearrangements corresponding to the proximal breakpoints of two of these deletions were detected by Southern blot analysis, and a size-altered restriction fragment carrying the breakpoint of one of them was cloned. A probe derived from this deletion fusion fragment defines a locus, D7Rn6, which maps within (or distal to) the pid region, and which discriminates among the distal extents of deletions eliciting the pid phenotype. Extension of physical maps from D7Rn6 should provide access both to the pid region and to loci mapping distal to pid that are defined by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced lethal mutations. 36 refs., 10 figs

  16. Investigation report on causes of radiation underexposure accident at Yamagata University Hospital and Prevention of Similar accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The accident in the title was announced on February 18, 2004 by the hospital, which asked its investigation immediately. The group based on 4 academic societies concerned, thereby started investigations of the in-house reports on the accident and of subsequent hospital visit in March, which involved hearing from personnel concerned, physical/technological examinations and clinical evaluation, with respect to the hospital system for radiation treatment, flow of the treatment, accident details, estimation of the actual expose dose and classification of patients. The investigational group found for the actual number of patients underexposed to be 36 (63, in the in-house report) in 1,377. The cause of the accident was thought essentially the input error for the correct power coefficient 1.032 to be a wrong one 1.320 for 15 x 15 cm 4 MV X-ray. The error had been overlooked by the contract operator from the introduction of the treatment planning equipment in 1999. For prevention, setting up of quality assurance (QA) program by the hospital, the user itself, was pointed out necessary. Making the guideline for introducing the new equipment was conceivably an important work of the trader. (N.I.)

  17. Neumonitis por hipersensibilidad en la ciudad de México Hypersensitivity pneumonitis in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Carrillo-Rodríguez

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar la asociación entre la zona urbana de origen del paciente en la ciudad de México y la prevalencia de neumonitis por hipersensibilidad inducida por antígeno aviario. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se trata de un estudio de casos y controles realizado en el Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias, en la ciudad de México, en el año de 1999. Se estudiaron 109 casos con neumonitis por hipersensibilidad y 184 controles: de éstos, 39, con fibrosis pulmonar idiopática; 63, con tuberculosis pulmonar, y 82, con asma. La ciudad de México y las zonas conurbadas se dividieron en cinco zonas geográficas: centro, noreste, sureste, noroeste y el suroeste. Se calcularon las prevalencias de las diferentes enfermedades por zona urbana de los pacientes que participaron en el estudio; como medida de asociación, se estimó la razón de momios, con un intervalo de confianza al 95%. Asimismo, se realizó regresión logística múltiple ajustando por edad, sexo y estrato socioeconómico. RESULTADOS: Ochenta casos de neumonitis por hipersensibilidad se concentraron en el sur del noreste de las zonas conurbadas y la parte norte del sureste de la ciudad de México, 48 y 32, respectivamente (RM= 3.86, IC 95% 2.17-6.96. Treinta y seis controles de asma se localizaron en el suroeste de la ciudad de México, zona donde se ubica el Intituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias (pOBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between the urban area of origin of patients and the prevalence of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP, induced by avian antigens. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A case-control study was conducted in 1999 at the National Institute of Respiratory Diseases (NIRD. Cases were 109 consecutive HP patients and controls were 184 patients: 39 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, 63 with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB, and 82 with asthma. Mexico City and surrounding counties (SC were divided into 5 geographical areas: 1 Downtown; 2 North-East (NE; 3

  18. ROS Mediates Radiation-Induced Differentiation in Human Lung Fibroblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sa Rah; Ahn, Ji Yeon; Kim, Mi Hyeung; Lim, Min Jin; Yun, Yeon Sook; Song, Jie Young

    2009-01-01

    One of the most common tumors worldwide is lung cancer and the number of patients with lung cancer received radiotherapy is increasing rapidly. Although radiotherapy may have lots of advantages, it can also induce serious adverse effects such as acute radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by excessive production of smooth muscle actin-alpha (a-SMA) and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) such as collagen and fibronectin. There has been a great amount of research about fibrosis but the exact mechanism causing the reaction is not elucidated especially in radiation-induced fibrosis. Until now it has been known that several factors such as transforming growth factor (TGF-b), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-6, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and reactive oxygen species are related to fibrosis. It is also reported that reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be induced by radiation and can act as a second messenger in various signaling pathways. Therefore we focused on the role of ROS in radiation induced fibrosis. Here, we suggest that irradiation generate ROS mainly through NOX4, result in differentiation of lung fibroblast into myofibroblast

  19. Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis: high resolution computed tomography patterns and pulmonary function indices as prognostic determinants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Simon L.F.; Devaraj, Anand; Hansell, David M. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Sverzellati, Nicola [University of Parma, Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiology, Parma (Italy); Wells, Athol U. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Interstitial Lung Diseases Unit, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    To investigate high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function indices (PFTs) for determining prognosis in patients with chronic fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (CHP). Case records, PFTs (FEV{sub 1}, FVC and DLco) and HRCTs of ninety-two patients with chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis were evaluated. HRCT studies were scored by two observers for total disease extent, ground-glass opacification, fine and coarse reticulation, microcystic and macrocystic honeycombing, centrilobular emphysema and consolidation. Traction bronchiectasis within each pattern was graded. Using Cox proportional hazards regression models the prognostic strength of individual HRCT patterns and pulmonary function test variables were determined. There were forty two deaths during the study period. Increasing severity of traction bronchiectasis was the strongest predictor of mortality (HR 1.10, P < 0.001, 95%CI 1.04-1.16). Increasing global interstitial disease extent (HR 1.02, P = 0.02, 95%CI 1.00-1.03), microcystic honeycombing (HR 1.09, P = 0.019, 95%CI 1.01-1.17) and macrocystic honeycombing (HR 1.06, P < 0.01, 95%CI 1.01-1.10) were also independent predictors of mortality. In contrast, no individual PFT variable was predictive of mortality once HRCT patterns were accounted for. HRCT patterns, in particular, severity of traction bronchiectasis and extent of honeycombing are superior to pulmonary function tests for predicting mortality in patients with CHP. (orig.)

  20. Impact of the Pla protease substrate α2-antiplasmin on the progression of primary pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Justin L; Schroeder, Jay A; Zimbler, Daniel L; Bellows, Lauren E; Lathem, Wyndham W

    2015-12-01

    Many pathogens usurp the host hemostatic system during infection to promote pathogenesis. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, expresses the plasminogen activator protease Pla, which has been shown in vitro to target and cleave multiple proteins within the fibrinolytic pathway, including the plasmin inhibitor α2-antiplasmin (A2AP). It is not known, however, if Pla inactivates A2AP in vivo; the role of A2AP during respiratory Y. pestis infection is not known either. Here, we show that Y. pestis does not appreciably cleave A2AP in a Pla-dependent manner in the lungs during experimental pneumonic plague. Furthermore, following intranasal infection with Y. pestis, A2AP-deficient mice exhibit no difference in survival time, bacterial burden in the lungs, or dissemination from wild-type mice. Instead, we found that in the absence of Pla, A2AP contributes to the control of the pulmonary inflammatory response during infection by reducing neutrophil recruitment and cytokine production, resulting in altered immunopathology of the lungs compared to A2AP-deficient mice. Thus, our data demonstrate that A2AP is not significantly affected by the Pla protease during pneumonic plague, and although A2AP participates in immune modulation in the lungs, it has limited impact on the course or ultimate outcome of the infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. [Human plague and pneumonic plague : pathogenicity, epidemiology, clinical presentations and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehm, Julia M; Löscher, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Yersinia pestis is a highly pathogenic gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of human plague. In the last 1500 years and during three dreaded pandemics, millions of people became victims of Justinian's plague, the Black Death, or modern plague. Today, Y. pestis is endemic in natural foci of Asian, African and American countries. Due to its broad dissemination in mammal species and fleas, eradication of the pathogen will not be possible in the near future. In fact, plague is currently classified as a "re-emerging disease". Infection may occur after the bite of an infected flea, but also after oral ingestion or inhalation of the pathogen. The clinical presentations comprise the bubonic and pneumonic form, septicemia, rarely pharyngitis, and meningitis. Most human cases can successfully be treated with antibiotics. However, the high transmission rate and lethality of pneumonic plague require international and mandatory case notification and quarantine of patients. Rapid diagnosis, therapy and barrier nursing are not only crucial for the individual patient but also for the prevention of further spread of the pathogen or of epidemics. Therefore, WHO emergency schedules demand the isolation of cases, identification and surveillance of contacts as well as control of zoonotic reservoir animals and vectors. These sanctions and effective antibiotic treatment usually allow a rapid containment of outbreaks. However, multiple antibiotic resistant strains of Y. pestis have been isolated from patients in the past. So far, no outbreaks with such strains have been reported.

  2. Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis: high resolution computed tomography patterns and pulmonary function indices as prognostic determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, Simon L.F.; Devaraj, Anand; Hansell, David M.; Sverzellati, Nicola; Wells, Athol U.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function indices (PFTs) for determining prognosis in patients with chronic fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (CHP). Case records, PFTs (FEV 1 , FVC and DLco) and HRCTs of ninety-two patients with chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis were evaluated. HRCT studies were scored by two observers for total disease extent, ground-glass opacification, fine and coarse reticulation, microcystic and macrocystic honeycombing, centrilobular emphysema and consolidation. Traction bronchiectasis within each pattern was graded. Using Cox proportional hazards regression models the prognostic strength of individual HRCT patterns and pulmonary function test variables were determined. There were forty two deaths during the study period. Increasing severity of traction bronchiectasis was the strongest predictor of mortality (HR 1.10, P < 0.001, 95%CI 1.04-1.16). Increasing global interstitial disease extent (HR 1.02, P = 0.02, 95%CI 1.00-1.03), microcystic honeycombing (HR 1.09, P = 0.019, 95%CI 1.01-1.17) and macrocystic honeycombing (HR 1.06, P < 0.01, 95%CI 1.01-1.10) were also independent predictors of mortality. In contrast, no individual PFT variable was predictive of mortality once HRCT patterns were accounted for. HRCT patterns, in particular, severity of traction bronchiectasis and extent of honeycombing are superior to pulmonary function tests for predicting mortality in patients with CHP. (orig.)

  3. Root cause study on hydrogen generation and explosion through radiation-induced electrolysis in the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Genn, E-mail: sajig@bd5.so-net.ne.jp

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Reviewed how LWRs have coped with “water radiolysis”, during normal operation to severe accidents. • Concluded “water radiolysis” is not likely a route course of the hydrogen explosions at Fukushima. • Performed modeling studies based on “radiation-induced electrolysis” on Unit 1–Unit 4. • Generation of several tens of thousands cubic meters hydrogen gas is predicted before the hydrogen explosions. • Upon SBO, early safe disposal of hydrogen from RPVs is indispensable in BWRs. - Abstract: Since the scientific cause for a series of hydrogen explosions during the Fukushima accident has not been established, the author investigated his basic theory named “radiation-induced electrolysis (RIE)” by applying the estimation of the amounts of H{sub 2} generation during the active phase of the Fukushima accident. The author's theory was originally developed by including Faraday's law of electrolysis into the basic time-dependent material balance equation of radiation-chemical species for his study on accelerated corrosion phenomena which is widely observed in aged plants. As such this theory applies to the early phase of the accident before the loss of water levels in the reactor cores, although the simulations were performed from the time of seismic reactor trip to the hydrogen explosions in this paper. Through this mechanism as much as 29,400 m{sup 3}-STP of hydrogen gas is estimated to be accumulated inside the PCV just prior to the hydrogen explosion which occurred one day after the reactor trip in 1F1. With this large volume of hydrogen gas the explosion was a viable possibility upon the “venting” operation. In view of this observation, hydrogen generation from the spent fuel pools was also investigated. For the investigation of the 1F4 SFP, the pool water temperature and flow velocity due to natural circulation were changed widely to identify conditions of large hydrogen generation. During the trial calculations

  4. The doppler frequency shift caused by the inhomogeneities of a medium induced by pulses of intense laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, N. N.; Kiselev, Al. S.; Kiselev, An. S.

    2008-08-01

    Self-reflection of pulses of intense laser radiation from an inhomogeneity induced by them in a medium with fast optical nonlinearity is analyzed. The reflected radiation is characterized by a considerable Doppler shift and by a signal magnitude that is sufficient for experimental detection.

  5. Salvage radiation therapy for residual superficial esophageal cancer after endoscopic mucosal resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Kenji; Takai, Kenji; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Sakayauchi, Toru; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Jingu, Ken-ichi; Wada, Hitoshi; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Shogo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcomes of radiation therapy for patients with residual superficial esophageal cancer (rSEC) after endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Methods and Materials: From May 1996 to October 2002, a total of 30 rSEC patients without lymph node metastasis received radiation therapy at Tohoku University Hospital and associated hospitals. The time interval from EMR to start of radiation therapy ranged from 9 to 73 days (median interval, 40 days). Radiation doses ranged from 60 Gy to 70 Gy (mean dose, 66 Gy). Chemotherapy was used in 9 of 30 patients (30%). Results: The 2-year, 3-year, and 5-year overall survival rates and cause-specific survival rates were 91%, 82%, and 51%, respectively, and 95%, 85%, and 73%, respectively. The 2-year, 3-year, and 5-year local control rates for mucosal cancer were 91%, 91%, and 91%, respectively, and those for submucosal cancer were 89%, 89%, and 47%, respectively. These differences in survival rates for patients with two types of cancer were not statistically significant. Local recurrence and lymph node recurrence were more frequent in patients with submucosal cancer than in patients with mucosal cancer (p = 0.38 and p 0.08, respectively). Esophageal stenosis that required balloon dilatation developed in 3 of the 30 patients, and radiation pneumonitis that required steroid therapy developed in 1 patient. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is useful for preventing local recurrence after incomplete EMR

  6. The role of radiation therapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ung, Yee C.; Yu, Edward; Falkson, Conrad; Haynes, Adam E.; Stys-Norman, Denise; Evans, William K.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation therapy may offer patients presenting with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) symptom palliation and improvements in quality of life. This systematic review will address the role of radiation therapy in the management of MPM. Methods: A thorough systematic search of the literature was conducted for published articles and conference proceedings for applicable abstracts. Relevant trials were selected and assessed. Results: Three small randomized controlled trials compared prophylactic external beam radiation therapy to no radiation therapy for patients with thoracic tracts caused by drainage tubes or diagnostic procedures. None of those trials reported any serious adverse effects. A pooled analysis found no significant reduction in the frequency of procedure tract metastases. Four non-comparative studies have shown that hemithoracic irradiation alone resulted in significant toxicity, including radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis, radiation pneumonitis, and bronchopleural fistula, without any survival benefit. Few of the identified studies reported on symptom control, and no studies included formal measures of quality of life. Conclusion: There is limited evidence for the role of radiotherapy in the management of patients with MPM. Future studies including radiotherapy for the treatment of such patients should include formal measures of quality of life and symptom control

  7. Solar radiation in Germany - observed trends and an assessment of the causes. Pt. 2; Detailed trend analysis for Hamburg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabbe, G C [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Meteorologisches Inst.; Grassl, H [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Meteorologisches Inst. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1994-02-01

    In Part II, more detailed observations of solar radiation hourly averages of Hamburg were analysed. Global solar radiation, strongly influenced by clouds, decreased with a low significance between 1964 and 1989. The significance of the trend of increasing direct solar radiation in the same period is very weak, because the clouds play the dominant role. The diffuse solar radiation, which is a safe indicator for trends in solar irradiance, because it is relatively independent of the weather, decreased between 1964 and 1989. The reasons for this decrease are the measures to clean the air. Between 1975 and 1987 the diffuse solar radiation increased slightly. The reason for this fact is a doubling of optically active aerosol particles in the atmospheric boundary layer in this time period. (orig.)

  8. Adjuvant Hypofractionated Versus Conventional Whole Breast Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Long-Term Hospital-Related Morbidity From Cardiac Causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Elisa K.; Woods, Ryan; McBride, Mary L.; Virani, Sean; Nichol, Alan; Speers, Caroline; Wai, Elaine S.; Tyldesley, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The risk of cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (HF-WBI) compared with conventional whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (CF-WBI) in women with left-sided breast cancer remains a concern. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increase in hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Methods and Materials: Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women ≤80 years of age with early-stage breast cancer were treated with postoperative radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor, and treatment factors. Hospital administrative records identified baseline cardiac risk factors and other comorbidities. Factors between radiation therapy groups were balanced using a propensity-score model. The first event of a hospital admission for cardiac causes after radiation therapy was determined from hospitalization records. Ten- and 15-year cumulative hospital-related cardiac morbidity after radiation therapy was estimated for left- and right-sided cases using a competing risk approach. Results: The median follow-up was 13.2 years. For left-sided cases, 485 women were treated with CF-WBI, and 2221 women were treated with HF-WBI. Mastectomy was more common in the HF-WBI group, whereas boost was more common in the CF-WBI group. The CF-WBI group had a higher prevalence of diabetes. The 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes (95% confidence interval) was not different between the 2 radiation therapy regimens after propensity-score adjustment: 21% (19-22) with HF-WBI and 21% (17-25) with CF-WBI (P=.93). For right-sided cases, the 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes was also similar between the radiation therapy groups (P=.76). Conclusions: There is no difference in morbidity leading to hospitalization from cardiac causes among women with left-sided early-stage breast

  9. Adjuvant Hypofractionated Versus Conventional Whole Breast Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Long-Term Hospital-Related Morbidity From Cardiac Causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Elisa K. [Department of Oncology, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John (Canada); Woods, Ryan; McBride, Mary L. [Cancer Control Research Department, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Virani, Sean [Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Nichol, Alan [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Speers, Caroline [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Wai, Elaine S. [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott, E-mail: styldesl@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The risk of cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (HF-WBI) compared with conventional whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (CF-WBI) in women with left-sided breast cancer remains a concern. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increase in hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Methods and Materials: Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women ≤80 years of age with early-stage breast cancer were treated with postoperative radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor, and treatment factors. Hospital administrative records identified baseline cardiac risk factors and other comorbidities. Factors between radiation therapy groups were balanced using a propensity-score model. The first event of a hospital admission for cardiac causes after radiation therapy was determined from hospitalization records. Ten- and 15-year cumulative hospital-related cardiac morbidity after radiation therapy was estimated for left- and right-sided cases using a competing risk approach. Results: The median follow-up was 13.2 years. For left-sided cases, 485 women were treated with CF-WBI, and 2221 women were treated with HF-WBI. Mastectomy was more common in the HF-WBI group, whereas boost was more common in the CF-WBI group. The CF-WBI group had a higher prevalence of diabetes. The 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes (95% confidence interval) was not different between the 2 radiation therapy regimens after propensity-score adjustment: 21% (19-22) with HF-WBI and 21% (17-25) with CF-WBI (P=.93). For right-sided cases, the 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes was also similar between the radiation therapy groups (P=.76). Conclusions: There is no difference in morbidity leading to hospitalization from cardiac causes among women with left-sided early-stage breast

  10. Occupational Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Reported to the Czech National Registry of Occupational Diseases in the Period 1992-2005

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fenclová, Z.; Pelclová, D.; Urban, P.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Klusáčková, P.; Lebedová, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 4 (2009), s. 443-448 ISSN 0019-8366 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Hypersensitivity pneumonitis * Incidence * Branch of economic activity * Occupation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.215, year: 2009

  11. A comprehensive study on the role of the Yersinia pestis virulence markers in an animal model of pneumonic plague

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaman, W.E.; Hawkey, S.; Kleij, D. van der; Broekhuijsen, M.P.; Silman, N.J.; Bikker, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    We determined the role of Yersinia pestis virulence markers in an animal model of pneumonic plague. Eleven strains of Y. pestis were characterized using PCR assays to detect the presence of known virulence genes both encoded by the three plasmids as well as chromosomal markers. The virulence of all

  12. A comprehensive study on the role of the Yersinia pestis virulence markers in an animal model of pneumonic plague

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E. Kaman (Wendy); S. Hawkey; D. van der Kleij (Desiree); M.P. Broekhuijsen; N.J. Silman; F.J. Bikker (Floris)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe determined the role of Yersinia pestis virulence markers in an animal model of pneumonic plague. Eleven strains of Y. pestis were characterized using PCR assays to detect the presence of known virulence genes both encoded by the three plasmids as well as chromosomal markers. The

  13. Chemical pneumonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cleaning materials such as chlorine bleach, during industrial accidents, or near swimming pools) Grain and fertilizer dust ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Chemical Emergencies ... about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy , editorial process and privacy policy . A.D.A.M. is ...

  14. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breed animals or birds, cheese washers, woodworkers, and wine makers—have a greater chance of exposure to ... this test, talk to your doctor about the benefits and possible risks of this procedure. Lung biopsies ...

  15. PENINGKATAN CD8 DAN IFN-γ PADA HYPERSENSITIVITY PNEUMONITIS (HP AKIBAT PAJANAN DEBU PENGGILINGAN PADI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Ma'rufi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak     Masalah klinis kesehatan kerja pada pekerja penggilingan padi saat ini adalah penyakit saluran pernafasan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis peningkatan CD8 dan IFN-γ pada Pneumonitis Hipersensitif (HP akibat pajanan debu penggilingan padi pada mencit  (Musmusculus BALB/C. Penelitian yang dilakukan adalah penelitian eksperimental laboratoris dengan hewan coba mencit (Musmusculus BALB/C,  rancangan penelitian yang digunakan adalah Randomized the post test only control group design. Mencit  (Musmusculus BALB/C dipajan dengan debu penggilingan padi selama empat jam/hari selama tiga puluh hari dengan konsentrasi 0.50 mg/m3, 0.75 mg/m3, 1.00 mg/m3. Variabel bebas adalah debu penggilingan padi, sedangkan variabel tergantung adalah   CD8 dan IFN-γ, serta gambaran histopatologis paru mencit, sedangkan variabel kendali adalah strain, berat badan, dan umur. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa terjadi peningkatan kadar CD8 antara kontrol dengan perlakuan, dan secara statistik  ada perbedaan yang bermakna. Kemudian terjadi peningkatan IFN-γ dan secara statistik ada perbedaan yang bermakna antara kontrol dan perlakuan pada mencit  (Musmusculus BALB/C. Hasil penelitian dapat digunakan sebagai dasar upaya pencegahan dan pemberian terapi penyakit HP lebih dini sehingga dapat meningkatkan kualitas paru.   Kata Kunci: CD8, IFN-γ,  debu penggilingan padi     Abtract   The purpose of this research was to analyze increase of CD8  and IFN-γ of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis (HP as a result from the exposure of dust from paddy milling on mice (MusmusculusBALB/C. The research done was a laboratory experimental research with mice (MusMusculus as experimental animal.  The research design used was the post only control group design using mice (MusMusculus Balb/c as experimental animal.  Mice (Musmusculus Balb/c were exposed to dust from paddy milling for four (4 hours/day and it was done for thirty (30 days with the exposed

  16. [A Case of Central Diabetes Insipidus That Was Caused by Pituitary Metastasis of Lung Adenocarcinoma and Was Controlled by Radiation Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Yusuke; Masuda, Takeshi; Nabeshima, Shinji; Horimasu, Yasushi; Nakashima, Taku; Miyamoto, Shintaro; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Fujitaka, Kazunori; Murakami, Yuji; Hamada, Hironobu; Nagata, Yasushi; Hattori, Noboru

    2017-06-01

    Pituitary metastasis of lung cancer is rare; however, it often causes diabetes insipidus. Although the majority of such patients are treated with radiation therapy, it remains unclear whether diabetes insipidus can be controlled by radiation therapy. A 72-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for hemosputum, headache, and polyuria. A chest CT scan showed a 3.0 cm mass in the left upper lobe of his lung. Bronchofiberscopy results confirmed the pathological diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma. Based on the findings from PET-CT, head MRI, and endocrine tests, the diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma( cT1bN0M1b, stage IV)accompanied with central diabetes insipidus caused by pituitary metastasis was made. Oral administration of desmopressin reduced urine volumes; however, chemotherapy for achieving stable disease in the primary tumor was ineffective in controlling the symptoms of diabetes insipidus. Chemotherapy was discontinued after 4 months because of severe hematological toxicity. During 2 months after the cessation of chemotherapy, polyuria worsened and, therefore, radiation therapy for pituitary metastasis was started. Following the radiation therapy, an apparent reduction in urine volume was observed. Our experience of this case suggests that radiation therapy for pituitary metastasis should be considered at the time when diabetes insipidus becomes clinically overt.

  17. A case of central diabetes insipidus that was caused by pituitary metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma and was controlled by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Yusuke; Masuda, Takeshi; Nabeshima, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Pituitary metastasis of lung cancer is rare; however, it often causes diabetes insipidus. Although the majority of such patients are treated with radiation therapy, it remains unclear whether diabetes insipidus can be controlled by radiation therapy. A 72-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for hemosputum, headache, and polyuria. A chest CT scan showed a 3.0 cm mass in the left upper lobe of his lung. Bronchofiberscopy results confirmed the pathological diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma. Based on the findings from PET-CT, head MRI, and endocrine tests, the diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma (cT1bN0M1b, stage four) accompanied with central diabetes insipidus caused by pituitary metastasis was made. Oral administration of desmopressin reduced urine volumes; however, chemotherapy for achieving stable disease in the primary tumor was ineffective in controlling the symptoms of diabetes insipidus. Chemotherapy was discontinued after 4 months because of severe hematological toxicity. During 2 months after the cessation of chemotherapy, polyuria worsened and, therefore, radiation therapy for pituitary metastasis was started. Following the radiation therapy, an apparent reduction in urine volume was observed. Our experience of this case suggests that radiation therapy for pituitary metastasis should be considered at the time when diabetes insipidus becomes clinically overt. (author)

  18. Radiological fundamentals for decision making on public radiation protection measures in case of accident caused radionuclide release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genkel, Simone

    2009-01-01

    Following the accepted revised version of the recommendations concerning in the frame of emergency management by the German SSK (radiation protection commission) the radiological fundamentals dating from 1990 were revised. The corrections of the dose benchmarks for children and juveniles for the case of iodine tablets intake that were included, in the chapter on radiation protection for the field and rescue personnel of fire brigade and police the new regulations of the radiation protection ordinance were added. The volume includes two parts: Guidelines for emergency planning in the environment of nuclear facilities; guideline on public information in nuclear emergency situations.

  19. Infrared light-emitting diode radiation causes gravitropic and morphological effects in dark-grown oat seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. F.; Brown, C. S.; Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.; Chapman, D. K.; Deitzer, G. F.

    1996-01-01

    Oat (Avena sativa cv Seger) seedlings were irradiated with IR light-emitting diode (LED) radiation passed through a visible-light-blocking filter. Infrared LED irradiated seedlings exhibited differences in growth and gravitropic response when compared to seedlings grown in darkness at the same temperature. Thus, the oat seedlings in this study were able to detect IR LED radiation. These findings call into question the use of IR LED as a safe-light for some photosensitive plant response experiments. These findings also expand the defined range of wavelengths involved in radiation-gravity (light-gravity) interactions to include wavelengths in the IR region of the spectrum.

  20. The Cynomolgus Macaque Natural History Model of Pneumonic Tularemia for Predicting Clinical Efficacy Under the Animal Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guina, Tina; Lanning, Lynda L.; Omland, Kristian S.; Williams, Mark S.; Wolfraim, Larry A.; Heyse, Stephen P.; Houchens, Christopher R.; Sanz, Patrick; Hewitt, Judith A.

    2018-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious Gram-negative bacterium that is the etiologic agent of tularemia in animals and humans and a Tier 1 select agent. The natural incidence of pneumonic tularemia worldwide is very low; therefore, it is not feasible to conduct clinical efficacy testing of tularemia medical countermeasures (MCM) in human populations. Development and licensure of tularemia therapeutics and vaccines need to occur under the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Animal Rule under which efficacy studies are conducted in well-characterized animal models that reflect the pathophysiology of human disease. The Tularemia Animal Model Qualification (AMQ) Working Group is seeking qualification of the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of pneumonic tularemia under Drug Development Tools Qualification Programs with the FDA based upon the results of studies described in this manuscript. Analysis of data on survival, average time to death, average time to fever onset, average interval between fever and death, and bacteremia; together with summaries of clinical signs, necropsy findings, and histopathology from the animals exposed to aerosolized F. tularensis Schu S4 in five natural history studies and one antibiotic efficacy study form the basis for the proposed cynomolgus macaque model. Results support the conclusion that signs of pneumonic tularemia in cynomolgus macaques exposed to 300–3,000 colony forming units (cfu) aerosolized F. tularensis Schu S4, under the conditions described herein, and human pneumonic tularemia cases are highly similar. Animal age, weight, and sex of animals challenged with 300–3,000 cfu Schu S4 did not impact fever onset in studies described herein. This study summarizes critical parameters and endpoints of a well-characterized cynomolgus macaque model of pneumonic tularemia and demonstrates this model is appropriate for qualification, and for testing efficacy of tularemia therapeutics under Animal Rule. PMID

  1. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  2. Evaluation of systematic uncertainties caused by radiative corrections in experiments on deep inelastic νsub(l)N-scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardin, D.Yu.

    1979-01-01

    Basing on the simple quark-parton model of strong interaction and on the Weinberg-Salam theory compact formulae are derived for the radiative correction to the charged current induced deep inelastic scattering of neutrinos on nucleons. The radiative correction is found to be around 20-30%, i.e., the value typical for deep inelastic lN-scattering. The results obtained are rather different from the presently available estimations of the effect under consideration

  3. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis. A series of nine cases with surgical lung biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A Gómez Tejada

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In a series of nine patients with histopathological diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis, we retrospectively evaluated clinical data, exposure related factors, pulmonary function tests and chest computed tomography scans. A restrictive abnormality with reduction of diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide was mainly found. Chest scans showed fibrotic patterns in most cases; ground glass attenuation areas with mosaic pattern and consolidation in the rest. Exposure to avian antigens, cereal grains and air conditioners contaminated with fungi yeasts and bacteria, were suspected from clinical data in two-thirds of the cases. Since there are no unique features that allow differentiation from other interstitial lung diseases, a high clinical suspicion is required and a careful search of environmental exposure to possible antigens is needed that, together with clinical, radiological and pathological data, may lead to diagnosis.

  4. Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujol Mora, J.

    1999-01-01

    The exposition to ionizing radiations is a constant fact in the life of the human being and its utilization as diagnostic and therapeutic method is generalized. However, it is notorious how as years go on, the fear to the ionizing radiation seems to persist too, and this fact is not limited to the common individual, but to the technical personnel and professional personnel that labors with them same. (S. Grainger) [es

  5. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  6. Interleukin-17A and Neutrophils in a Murine Model of Bird-Related Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ishizuka

    Full Text Available Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP is an immune mediated lung disease induced by the repeated inhalation of a wide variety of antigens. Bird-related hypersensitivity pneumonitis (BRHP is one of the most common forms of HP in human and results from the inhalation of avian antigens. The findings of a recent clinical analysis suggest that in addition to Th1 factors, the levels of interleukin(IL-17 and IL-17-associated transcripts are increased in the setting of HP, and that both IL-17A and neutrophils are crucial for the development of pulmonary inflammation in murine models of HP. Our objectives were to investigate the roles of IL-17A and neutrophils in granuloma-forming inflammation in an acute HP model. We developed a mouse model of acute BRHP using pigeon dropping extract. We evaluated the process of granuloma formation and the roles of both IL-17A and neutrophils in a model. We found that the neutralization of IL-17A by the antibody attenuated granuloma formation and the recruitment of neutrophils, and also decreased the expression level of chemokine(C-X-C motif ligand 5 (CXCL5 in the acute HP model. We confirmed that most of the neutrophils in the acute HP model exhibited immunoreactivity to the anti-IL-17 antibody. We have identified the central roles of both IL-17A and neutrophils in the pathogenesis of granuloma formation in acute HP. We have also assumed that neutrophils are an important source of IL-17A in an acute HP model, and that the IL-17A-CXCL5 pathway may be responsible for the recruitment of neutrophils.

  7. Radiation-induced Pulmonary Damage in Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Su Mi; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Kang, Mi Mun; Kim, In Ah; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1993-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate the incidence of radiation induced lung damage after the radiation therapy for the patients with carcinoma of the lung. Method and Materials: Sixty-six patients with lung cancer (squamous cell carcinoma 27, adenocarcinoma 14, large cell carcinoma 2, small cell carcinoma 13, unknown 10) were treated with definitive, postoperative or palliative radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy between July 1987 and December 1991. There were 50 males and 16 females with median age of 63 years(range: 33-80 years). Total lung doses ranged from 500 to 6,660 cGy (median 3960 cGy) given in 2 to 38 fractions (median 20) over a range of 2 to 150 days (median 40 days) using 6 MV or 15 MV linear accelerator. To represent different fractionation schedules of equivalent biological effect, the estimated single dose(ED) model, ED=D·N-0.377·T-0.058 was used in which D was the lung dose in cGy, N was the number of fractions, and T was the overall treatment time in days. The range of ED was 370 to 1357. The endpoint was a visible increase in lung density within the irradiated volume on chest X-ray as observed independently by three diagnostic radiologists. Patients were grouped according to ED, treatment duration, treatment modality and age, and the percent incidence of pulmonary damage for each group was determined. Result: In 40 of 66 patients, radiation induced change was seen on chest radiographs between 11 days and 314 days after initiation of radiation therapy. The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was increased according to increased ED, which was statistically significant (p=0.001). Roentgenographic charges consistent with radiation pneumonitis were seen in 100% of patients receiving radiotherapy after lobectomy or pneumonectomy, which was not statistically significant. In 32 patients who also received chemotherapy, there was no difference in the incidence of radiation induced charge between the group with radiation

  8. Radiation sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exposure to ionizing radiation. There are two main types of radiation: nonionizing and ionizing. Nonionizing radiation comes in the form of light, radio waves, microwaves and radar. These forms usually don't cause tissue damage. ...

  9. Is UV-A radiation a cause of malignant melanoma. Er UV-A aarsak til malignt melanom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moan, J. (Det Norske Radiumhospital, Oslo (Norway))

    1994-03-01

    The first action spectrum for cutaneous malignant melanoma was published recently. This spectrum was obtained using the fish Xiphophorus. If the same action spectrum applies to humans, the following statements are true: Sunbathing products (agents to protect against the sun) that absorb UV-B radiation provide almost no protection against cutaneous malignant melanoma. UV-A-solaria are more dangerous than expected so far. If people are determined to use artificial sources of radiation for tanning, they should choose UV-B solaria rather than UV-A-solaria. Fluorescent tubes and halogen lamps may have weak melanomagenic effects. Ozone depletion has almost no effect on the incidence rates of CMM, since ozone absorbs very little UV-A radiation. Sunbathing products which contain UV-A-absorbing compounds or neutral filter (like titanium oxide) provide real protection against cutaneous malignant melanoma, at least if they are photochemically inert. 34 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Morfologic anomalies in the spermatozoid heads caused by isolated and combined effects of external ionizing radiation and chemical factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shopova, V.; Nechev, Khr.; Sylovski, P.

    1985-01-01

    The test for recording morphologic anomalies in the spermatozoid heads and the genotoxic effect of isolated and combined treatment with the preparation chloracetophone and external ionizing radiation was applied on of mice line C 57 Bl. Evaluation of the morphologic anomalies in the spermatozoa rested upon two staining method, one of which helped to distinguish the acrosome. It was demonstrated that chloracetophone given in a single high dose (1/2 and 1/4 LD 50 ) was genotoxic. Ionizing radiation induced the expected positive effect. After combined application of 5x1/5 LD 50 chloracetophone and 1 and 4 Gy irradiation dose, it was the effect of radiation that was recorded. Only in the group in which both noxious agents were combined in effective doses (1/2 LD 50 chloracetophone and 1 Gy) there was a tendency toward additive effect

  11. DNA-to-protein crosslinks and backbone breaks caused by far- and near-ultraviolet, and visible light radiations in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, M.J.; Peak, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral responses for DNA damages caused by far-uv, near-uv, and visible light radiations have been studied. The near congruence of the spectra for far-uv damages and the spectrum of DNA is good evidence that the mechanism is the same for the induction of breaks, crosslinks, and pyrimidine dimers. For near-uv, the different spectra imply that at least several nonDNA sensitizer molecules act as primary chromophores, but that DNA damage eventually results. With the understanding that near-uv and visible radiations produce a variety of chemically potent reactive oxygen species within the cell, we recognize the possibility for many types of DNA damage. If we assume that SSBs and DNA-to-protein crosslinks are random single events along the genome, it is possible to compute the number of events per cell genome per lethal event caused by the different energies used. In the near-uv and visible region, many more breaks and crosslinks are formed per lethal event than by far-uv. About 20 times more SSBs per lethal event are caused by 365-nm radiation than by x-rays, strong evidence that these breaks are effectively repaired. It is therefore likely that SSBs are not a serious event with regard to cellular lethality. The role of crosslinks and their repair in lethal events is less clear. The lack of any correlation at all between the action spectra for SSBs, or crosslinks, and lethality and mutagenesis in the same cells is evidence that another lesion or lesions are involved in these events. The multitude of chemical events that can be caused in cellular metabolites by the reactive species generated by these long wavelengths of radiation means that death is attributable to the total spectrum of changed chemicals delivered by a lethal dose, only some of which are DNA changes leading to SSBs and crosslinks. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Updated estimates of the proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain that may be caused by natural background ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, Mark P; Wakeford, Richard; Kendall, Gerald M

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of childhood leukaemia remains generally unknown, although exposure to moderate and high levels of ionising radiation, such as was experienced during the atomic bombings of Japan or from radiotherapy, is an established cause. Risk models based primarily upon studies of the Japanese A-bomb survivors imply that low-level exposure to ionising radiation, including to ubiquitous natural background radiation, also raises the risk of childhood leukaemia. In a recent paper (Wakeford et al 2009 Leukaemia 23 770-6) we estimated the proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain attributable to natural background radiation to be about 20%. In this paper we employ the two sets of published leukaemia risk models used previously, but use recently published revised estimates of natural background radiation doses received by the red bone marrow of British children to update the previous results. Using the newer dosimetry we calculate that the best estimate of the proportion of cases of childhood leukaemia in Great Britain predicted to be attributable to this source of exposure is 15-20%, although the uncertainty associated with certain stages in the calculation (e.g. the nature of the transfer of risk between populations and the pertinent dose received from naturally occurring alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides) is significant. The slightly lower attributable proportions compared with those previously derived by Wakeford et al (Leukaemia 2009 23 770-6) are largely due to the lower doses (and in particular lower high LET doses) for the first year of life.

  13. Fractionated irradiation of H69 small-cell lung cancer cells causes stable radiation and drug resistance with increased MRP1, MRP2, and topoisomerase IIα expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henness, Sheridan; Davey, Mary W.; Harvie, Rozelle M.; Davey, Ross A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: After standard treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) often develops resistance to both treatments. Our aims were to establish if fractionated radiation treatment alone would induce radiation and drug resistance in the H69 SCLC cell line, and to determine the mechanisms of resistance. Methods and Materials: H69 SCLC cells were treated with fractionated X-rays to an accumulated dose of 37.5 Gy over 8 months to produce the H69/R38 subline. Drug and radiation resistance was determined using the MTT (3,-4,5 dimethylthiazol-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide) cell viability assay. Protein expression was analyzed by Western blot. Results: The H69/R38 subline was resistant to radiation (2.0 ± 0.2-fold, p<0.0001), cisplatin (14 ± 7-fold, p < 0.001), daunorubicin (6 ± 3-fold, p<0.05), and navelbine (1.7 ± 0.15-fold, p<0.02). This was associated with increased expression of the multidrug resistance-associated proteins, MRP1 and MRP2, and topoisomerase IIα and decreased expression of glutathione-S-transferase π (GSTπ) and bcl-2 and decreased cisplatin accumulation. Treatment with 4 Gy of X-rays produced a 66% decrease in MRP2 in the H69 cells with no change in the H69/R38 cells. This treatment also caused a 5-fold increase in topoisomerase IIα in the H69/R38 cells compared with a 1.5-fold increase in the H69 cells. Conclusions: Fractionated radiation alone can lead to the development of stable radiation and drug resistance and an altered response to radiation in SCLC cells

  14. [Experience of the development special medical technical laboratory for studies of effects caused by potent electromagnetic radiation in biologic objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, B N; Kalyada, T V; Petrov, S V

    2015-01-01

    This article covers topics of creating special medical technical laboratory for medial and biologic studies concerning influence of potent high-frequency elecromagnetic radiation on various biologic objects. The authors gave example of such laboratory, described its construction features, purpose and main characteristics of the included devices.

  15. Effects of an Amifostine analogue on radiation induced lung inflammation and fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Aastha; Bhuria, Vikas; Soni, Ravi; Singh, Saurabh; Hazari, Puja Panwar; Bhatt, Anant Narayan; Dwarakanath, B.S.; Pathak, Uma; Mathur, Shweta; Sandhir, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity causes significant morbidity and mortality in patients irradiated for thoracic malignancies as well as in victims of accidental radiation exposure. We have recently established the efficacy of an analogue of Amifostine (DRDE-30) in reducing the mortality of whole body irradiated mice. The widely used radioprotector Amifostine has been found to reduce the incidence of radiation induced pneumonitis during radiation therapy for non small cell lung carcinoma. In the present study, we investigated the potential of DRDE-30 in ameliorating the radiation induced lung damage. Intra-peritoneal administration of DRDE-30 at 220 mg/kg b.wt 30 min. prior to 13.5 Gy thoracic radiation enhanced the 24-month survival of C57BL/6 mice to 80% compared to 0% with radiation alone. Reduced protein content and cell number in the broncheo-alveolar lavage fluid suggested reduction in radiation induced vascular permeability in DRDE-30 treated mice. Higher levels of MnSOD and Catalase observed under these conditions indicated that strengthening of the anti-oxidant defense system by DRDE-30 could also contribute to the protection against radiation induced lung damage. Reduced levels of p-p38 observed under these conditions suggested down-regulation of the p38/MAP kinase pathway as one of the plausible mechanisms underlying anti-inflammatory effects of DRDE-30, while lower levels of Vimentin seen, indicated inhibition of epithelial to mesenchymal transition revealing its anti-fibrotic effect as well. Structural analysis with X-ray CT indicated comparable lung architecture in control and drug treated mice in terms of reduced opacity, which correlated well with the lung morphology (H and E staining) and reduced collagen deposition (trichrome staining). These results demonstrate the potential of DRDE-30 in reducing radiation induced pulmonary toxicity by attenuating the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. (author)

  16. Fatal pneumonia by Legionella in a farmer with hypersensitivity pneumonitis Neumonía por Legionella con desenlace fatal en un granjero con neumonitis por hipersensibilidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega García López

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The retrospective investigation of a fatal sporadic Legionnaires' disease identified an unknown case of occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a swine breeder. Methods: Chest high-resolution computed tomography, bronchoalveolar lavage, lung biopsy, arterial gasometry, pulmonary function tests and autopsy were performed. It was studied the presence of Legionella by serology and risk water samples were analyzed to identify the Legionella's source. Results: HP and Legionella pneumophila pneumonia diagnostics were confirmed. Lung fibrosis, a restrictive functional pattern, decreased diffusion, hypoxemia and bronchoalveolar lavage lymphocytosis were evidenced. Legionella´s source was detected in a shower and a positive serology in the patient. Autopsy verified pulmonary fibrosis and the septic shock leaded to Legionella causing the death. Conclusions: Chronic cough and pulmonary infiltrates in a farmer should suspect the presence of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Later diagnosis carries a worse prognosis, the offending antigens exposure can't be avoided and fibrotic stage enhanced opportunity infection disease.Introducción: La investigación retrospectiva sobre un fallecimiento aislado por Legionelosis, hizo aflorar un caso de neumonitis por hipersensibilidad en un granjero cuidador de cerdos. Métodos: Se realizaron las siguientes pruebas: tomografía axial computerizada de alta resolución, lavado broncoalveolar, biopsia pulmonar, gasometría arterial, pruebas de función respiratoria y autopsia. Se estudió la presencia de Legionella por serología y se analizaron las muestras de fuentes de riesgo para identificar el foco de Legionella. Resultados: El estudio confirmó los diagnósticos de neumonitis por hipersensibilidad y neumonía por Legionella pneumophila. Las pruebas realizadas objetivaron la fibrosis pulmonar, un patrón respiratorio funcional restrictivo, un descenso de la difusión pulmonar, hipoxemia y la presencia de

  17. Multiple Pyogenic Abscess of the Hybrid Mice on the Course of Radiation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Heon; Shin, Sei One; Kim, Myung Se; Choi, Won Hee; Kim, Seung Hoon [Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-12-15

    Even though the mechanism and the nature of radiation induced pneumonitis, esophagitis and gastroenteritis were detailed by many authors, complicated secondary infection is still serious problem, sometimes fatal, even today. We experience a case of multiple pyogenic abscess in subcutaneous tissue of the back and both kidneys which could not differentiate from multiple metastatic sarcoma grossly, and report with review of literatures, lab. findings.

  18. Effect of ionizing and non ionizing radiation on Protozoan and Parasites Ova causing gastroenteritis presents in sewage sludge wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamma, M.; Al-Adawi, M.A.; Sharabi, N.

    2005-06-01

    The efficacy of Adra wastewater treatment plant for removing of parasitic eggs and other pathogens was various as the results of this work showed many eggs detected on and numeration referenced methods were applied for liquid and dried sledges. Helminths eggs viability was determined by aid of methods and techniques which depend on the morphological parameters, studying the motility incubation and applying the vital staining. The protozoa viability was studied by using vital staining, but applying culture techniques on specific composed media did not give any results. The disinfection results for ascaris eggs, protozoa and amoeba oocysts irradiated by 6 KGy of gamma (Co 6 0) which was sufficient to kill all types of such parasites. In conflict the UV radiation was able to motivate the division of the ascaris eggs embryo nations. Also, the viability of the Giardia and Entamoeba oocysts not affected. Therefor the UV technique couldn't be the alternative technology of ionizing radiation. (author)

  19. Effect of ionizing and non ionizing radiation on Protozoan and Parasites Ova causing gastroenteritis presents in sewage sludge wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamma, M.; Al-Adawi, M.A.; Sharabi, N.

    2006-01-01

    Helminths eggs viability was determined by aid of methods and techniques which depend on the morphological parameters, studying the motility incubation and applying the vital staining. The protozoa viability was studied by using many vital staining, but applying culture techniques on specific composed media did not give any results. The disinfection results showed that for ascaris eggs, protozoa and amoeba oocysts irradiated by 6 KGy of gamma (Co 6 0) which was sufficient to kill all types of such parasites. On the contrary, conflict the UV radiation was able to motivate the ascaris eggs embryonations. Also, the viability of the Giardia and Entamoeba oocysts were not affected. In the light of the current experiments, it is possible to conclude that using the UV technique instead of the ionizing radiation for killing the helminths eggs and protozoa is not usable. (Authors)

  20. Is "pelvic radiation disease" always the cause of bowel symptoms following prostate cancer intensity-modulated radiotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Myo; Chua, Benjamin; Guttner, Yvonne; Abraham, Ned; Aherne, Noel J; Hoffmann, Matthew; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-02-01

    Pelvic radiation disease (PRD) also widely known as "radiation proctopathy" is a well recognised late side-effect following conventional prostate radiotherapy. However, endoscopic evaluation and/or specialist referral for new or persistent post-prostate radiotherapy bowel symptoms is not routine and serious diagnoses may potentially be missed. Here we report a policy of endoscopic evaluation of bowel symptoms persisting >90 days post radiotherapy for prostate cancer. A consecutive series of 102 patients who had radical prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)/image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and who had new or ongoing bowel symptoms or positive faecal occult blood tests (FOBT) on follow up visits more than three months after treatment, were referred for endoscopic examination. All but one (99%) had full colonoscopic investigation. Endoscopic findings included gastric/colonic/rectal polyps (56%), diverticular disease (49%), haemorrhoids (38%), radiation proctopathy (29%), gastritis/oesophagitis (8%) and rarer diagnoses, including bowel cancer which was found in 3%. Only four patients (4%) had radiation proctopathy without associated pathology and 65 patients (63%) had more than one diagnosis. If flexible sigmoidoscopy alone were used, 36.6% of patients and 46.6% patients with polyp(s) would have had their diagnoses missed. Our study has shown that bowel symptoms following prostate IMRT/IGRT are due to numerous diagnoses other than PRD, including malignancy. Routine referral pathways should be developed for endoscopic evaluation/specialist review for patients with new or persistent bowel symptoms (or positive FOBT) following prostate radiotherapy. This recommendation should be considered for incorporation into national guidelines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Is “pelvic radiation disease” always the cause of bowel symptoms following prostate cancer intensity-modulated radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Myo; Chua, Benjamin; Guttner, Yvonne; Abraham, Ned; Aherne, Noel J.; Hoffmann, Matthew; McKay, Michael J.; Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pelvic radiation disease (PRD) also widely known as “radiation proctopathy” is a well recognised late side-effect following conventional prostate radiotherapy. However, endoscopic evaluation and/or specialist referral for new or persistent post-prostate radiotherapy bowel symptoms is not routine and serious diagnoses may potentially be missed. Here we report a policy of endoscopic evaluation of bowel symptoms persisting >90 days post radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and materials: A consecutive series of 102 patients who had radical prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)/image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and who had new or ongoing bowel symptoms or positive faecal occult blood tests (FOBT) on follow up visits more than three months after treatment, were referred for endoscopic examination. All but one (99%) had full colonoscopic investigation. Results: Endoscopic findings included gastric/colonic/rectal polyps (56%), diverticular disease (49%), haemorrhoids (38%), radiation proctopathy (29%), gastritis/oesophagitis (8%) and rarer diagnoses, including bowel cancer which was found in 3%. Only four patients (4%) had radiation proctopathy without associated pathology and 65 patients (63%) had more than one diagnosis. If flexible sigmoidoscopy alone were used, 36.6% of patients and 46.6% patients with polyp(s) would have had their diagnoses missed. Conclusions: Our study has shown that bowel symptoms following prostate IMRT/IGRT are due to numerous diagnoses other than PRD, including malignancy. Routine referral pathways should be developed for endoscopic evaluation/specialist review for patients with new or persistent bowel symptoms (or positive FOBT) following prostate radiotherapy. This recommendation should be considered for incorporation into national guidelines

  2. Significance of 8-oxoG in the spectrum of DNA damages caused by ionising radiation of different quality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Václav; Davídková, Marie

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 122, 1-4 (2007), s. 113-115 ISSN 0144-8420. [Symposium on Microdosimetry /14./. Venezia, 13.11.2005-18.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4048401; GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : DNA damage * 8-oxoguanine * ionizing radiation * theoretical modeling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.528, year: 2007

  3. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis associated with mushroom worker's lung: an update on the clinical significance of the importation of exotic mushroom varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John E; Convery, Rory P; Millar, B Cherie; Rao, Juluri R; Elborn, J Stuart

    2005-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis remains an important industrial disease in mushroom workers. It has a significant morbidity, and early diagnosis and removal from exposure to the antigen are critically important in its management. Recently, several new allergens have been described, particularly those from mushroom species originating in the Far East, which are of clinical significance to workers occupationally exposed to such allergens in cultivation, picking, and packing of commercial mushroom crops. Importing of exotic mushrooms including Shiitake is common in EU countries, and some of the exotic species of mushrooms are cultivated for local markets. This practice may contribute to an increase in clinical cases of mushroom hypersensitivity pneumonitis. This update reviews the recent literature and examines changing trends of mushroom worker's lung, with increased movement of commercial product and labour markets worldwide.

  4. Root cause analysis of the radiation workers (radiography) in excess doses of NBD (case study: PT. XYZ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arifin M Wibowo; Fajariadi; Aditia Anamta

    2013-01-01

    Negligence and non-compliance is the main factor of causing an incident in radiography. It shown as the result of TLD evaluation of PT. XYZ workers exceeding the dose limit (NBD). Root cause analysis stage begin in collecting data such as license, workers permit, dose, and incident sequence report. Causal chart is a tool to identification root cause to make easier of the analysis. Results of collecting data are to be clarified in BAPETEN investigation and then there are some a recommendation to facility. (author)

  5. Early detection of drug-induced pneumonitis by gallium-67 lung scan in six patients with normal chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, H; Sawa, H; Takashima, S [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    1981-06-01

    Increased pulmonary accumulation of Gallium-67-citrate was observed in 6 patients (4 with malignant lymphoma, 1 with uterine cancer and 1 with acute myelocytic leukemia) preceding the appearance of any abnormal findings in both chest X-ray and blood gas data. All of them had received multiple courses of chemotherapy. In these patients, the anticancer drugs were administered for 13 to 22 weeks (mean 15 weeks). One patient with malignant lymphoma showed abnormal /sup 67/Ga lung uptake greater than hepatic activity, 3 patients (malignant lymphoma, 2 and uterine cancer, 1) visualized abnormal /sup 67/Ga lung uptake equal to hepatic activity and 2 cases (malignant lymphoma, 1 and acute myelocytic leukemia, 1) demonstrated abnormal accumulation of /sup 67/Ga in the lung greater than background activity. In 4 patients (3 with malignant lymphoma and 1 with uterine cancer) out of 6, transbronchial lung biopsy obtained after the /sup 67/Ga scans showed non-specific interstitial pneumonitis with infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages compatible with drug-induced pneumonitis. In the other 2 patients, cytology and cultures were negative and follow up /sup 67/Ga lung scans revealed a reduction in intensity of uptake after treatment with corticosteroid. Therefore, we considered that the /sup 67/Ga lung scan was useful for early detection of drug-induced pneumonitis.

  6. Adaptive Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Automated Daily Plan Reoptimization Prevents Dose Delivery Degradation Caused by Anatomy Deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinders, Suzanne M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Méndez Romero, Alejandra [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Schaart, Dennis [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Seppenwoolde, Yvette, E-mail: y.seppenwoolde@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate how dose distributions for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can be improved by using automated, daily plan reoptimization to account for anatomy deformations, compared with setup corrections only. Methods and Materials: For 12 tumors, 3 strategies for dose delivery were simulated. In the first strategy, computed tomography scans made before each treatment fraction were used only for patient repositioning before dose delivery for correction of detected tumor setup errors. In adaptive second and third strategies, in addition to the isocenter shift, intensity modulated radiation therapy beam profiles were reoptimized or both intensity profiles and beam orientations were reoptimized, respectively. All optimizations were performed with a recently published algorithm for automated, multicriteria optimization of both beam profiles and beam angles. Results: In 6 of 12 cases, violations of organs at risk (ie, heart, stomach, kidney) constraints of 1 to 6 Gy in single fractions occurred in cases of tumor repositioning only. By using the adaptive strategies, these could be avoided (<1 Gy). For 1 case, this needed adaptation by slightly underdosing the planning target volume. For 2 cases with restricted tumor dose in the planning phase to avoid organ-at-risk constraint violations, fraction doses could be increased by 1 and 2 Gy because of more favorable anatomy. Daily reoptimization of both beam profiles and beam angles (third strategy) performed slightly better than reoptimization of profiles only, but the latter required only a few minutes of computation time, whereas full reoptimization took several hours. Conclusions: This simulation study demonstrated that replanning based on daily acquired computed tomography scans can improve liver stereotactic body radiation therapy dose delivery.

  7. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer - brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  8. Alteration of chromophoric dissolved organic matter by solar UV radiation causes rapid changes in bacterial community composition†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, Claudia; Conde, Daniel; Pernthaler, Jakob; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of photochemical alterations of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) on bacterial abundance, activity and community composition in a coastal lagoon of the Atlantic Ocean with high dissolved organic carbon concentration. On two occasions during the austral summer, bacteria-free water of the lagoon was exposed to different regions of the solar spectrum (full solar radiation, UV-A + PAR, PAR) or kept in the dark. Subsequently, dilution cultures were established with bacterioplankton from the lagoon that were incubated in the pre-exposed water for 5 h in the dark. Cell abundance, activity, and community composition of bacterioplankton were assessed before and after incubation in the different treatments. Changes in absorption, fluorescence, and DOC concentration were used as proxies for CDOM photoalteration. We found a significant CDOM photobleaching signal, DOC loss, as well as a stimulation of bacterial activity in the treatments pre-exposed to UV radiation, suggesting increased bioavailability of DOM. Bacterial community analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that this stimulation was mainly accompanied by the specific enrichment of Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria. Thus, our results suggest that CDOM photoalteration not only stimulates bacterioplankton growth, but also induces rapid changes in bacterioplankton composition, which can be of relevance for ecosystem functioning, particularly considering present and future changes in the input of terrestrial CDOM to aquatic systems. PMID:19707620

  9. Alteration of chromophoric dissolved organic matter by solar UV radiation causes rapid changes in bacterial community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, Claudia; Conde, Daniel; Pernthaler, Jakob; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2009-09-01

    We evaluated the effect of photochemical alterations of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) on bacterial abundance, activity and community composition in a coastal lagoon of the Atlantic Ocean with high dissolved organic carbon concentration. On two occasions during the austral summer, bacteria-free water of the lagoon was exposed to different regions of the solar spectrum (full solar radiation, UV-A+PAR, PAR) or kept in the dark. Subsequently, dilution cultures were established with bacterioplankton from the lagoon that were incubated in the pre-exposed water for 5 h in the dark. Cell abundance, activity, and community composition of bacterioplankton were assessed before and after incubation in the different treatments. Changes in absorption, fluorescence, and DOC concentration were used as proxies for CDOM photoalteration. We found a significant CDOM photobleaching signal, DOC loss, as well as a stimulation of bacterial activity in the treatments pre-exposed to UV radiation, suggesting increased bioavailability of DOM. Bacterial community analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that this stimulation was mainly accompanied by the specific enrichment of Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria. Thus, our results suggest that CDOM photoalteration not only stimulates bacterioplankton growth, but also induces rapid changes in bacterioplankton composition, which can be of relevance for ecosystem functioning, particularly considering present and future changes in the input of terrestrial CDOM to aquatic systems.

  10. Activation of lavage lymphocytes in lung injuries caused by radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Yasuhiro; Makino, Shigeki; Fukuda, Yasuki; Min, Kyong-Yob; Shimizu, Akira; Ohsawa, Nakaaki

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis sometimes extends beyond the irradiated area of a lung and can also affect the opposite lung. Some immunological mechanisms, in addition to simple direct injury of the lungs by radiation, seem to be involved in the onset of radiation pneumonitis. To clarify such mechanisms, the effects of radiation on local inflammatory cells in lungs, in particular, lymphocytes, were examined. Methods and Materials: A comparison was made of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) findings from 13 irradiated patients (RT group) and 15 nonirradiated patients (non-RT group) with lung cancer. Patients who later developed radiation pneumonitis (RP group) and those who did not (RP-free group) were also compared. Using a two-color flowcytometer, radiation-induced changes in local inflammatory cells in lungs were analyzed. This included analyses of human leukocyte-associated antigen (HLADR) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression on T-cells, which are thought to be involved in cell activation and interactions between cells. Results: The following aspects of BALF were higher in the RT group than in the non-RT group: (a) the percentage of lymphocytes and eosinophiles; (b) the incidence of HLADR-positive CD4+T-cells and HLADR-positive CD8+T-cells; and (c) the incidence of ICAM-1-positive T-cells. The following aspects of BALF were higher in the RP group than in the RP-free group: (a) the total cell counts; (b) the percentage of lymphocytes; and (c) the incidence of ICAM-1-positive T-cells. A significant relationship was seen between the incidence of ICAM-1 expression on T-cells and the number of days from the initiation of radiotherapy to the onset of radiation pneumonitis. Conclusion: These data suggest that irradiation can induce accumulation of activated T-cells (HLADR and ICAM-1-positive T-cells) in the lung. This accumulation may be closely linked to radiation-induced lung injury. It is also suggested that the incidence of ICAM-1-positive T

  11. Effect of certain natural antioxidants in protecting against damage caused by gamma radiation in ischemic rat intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, T.A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in various clinical pathologies one of which is ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)- induced injury. Intestinal I/R enhances production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inflammatory mediators and induces apoptosis. In other hand. the intestinal tract shows a high sensitivity to ionizing radiation due to a rapid cell turnover and is often implicated in radiation sickness the radiation damage may either be a consequence of a direct effect resulting in disruption of critical molecule (such as an enzyme or DNA) or an indirect effect through ionization of water molecules and formation of ROS. consequently, supplementation of antioxidants may be a beneficial approach to protect against cellular damages associated with oxidative stress. the current study was aimed to evaluate the possible protective effects of vitamin E (100 mg/kg p.o.), tomato extract (67 mg/kg. p.o.) and turmeric (100 mg/kg, p.o) against ileal injury induced in rats by total occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery for 30 min followed by reperfusion for another 30 min. Furthermore, this protective effect of the mentioned drugs was extended into injury that could happened in ileal tissues of rats exposed to (6 Gy) gamma radiation followed by intestinal I/R. Drugs were administered one daily for 14 consecutive days prior to the ischemic insult. Damage induced by I/R was manifested by depletion of ileal content of reduced glutathion (GSH) as well as Lactate dehydrogenas (LDH) activity, associated with elevation of ileal contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), nitrite, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Intestinal ischemic insults were exacerbated by radiation injury on comparing different untreated controls; except the ileal content of GSH which has elevated due to the preconditioning effect of irradiation. Vitamin E provided a significant protection against the decrease in LDH activity as well as the increase in TBARS

  12. Toll-like Receptor 5 Agonist Protects Mice From Dermatitis and Oral Mucositis Caused by Local Radiation: Implications for Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdelya, Lyudmila G.; Gleiberman, Anatoli S.; Toshkov, Ilia; Aygun-Sunar, Semra; Bapardekar, Meghana; Manderscheid-Kern, Patricia; Bellnier, David; Krivokrysenko, Vadim I.; Feinstein, Elena; Gudkov, Andrei V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Development of mucositis is a frequent side effect of radiotherapy of patients with head-and-neck cancer. We have recently reported that bacterial flagellin, an agonist of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), can protect rodents and primates from acute radiation syndrome caused by total body irradiation. Here we analyzed the radioprotective efficacy of TLR5 agonist under conditions of local, single dose or fractionated radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Mice received either single-dose (10, 15, 20, or 25 Gy) or fractioned irradiation (cumulative dose up to 30 Gy) of the head-and-neck area with or without subcutaneous injection of pharmacologically optimized flagellin, CBLB502, 30 min before irradiation. Results: CBLB502 significantly reduced the severity of dermatitis and mucositis, accelerated tissue recovery, and reduced the extent of radiation induced weight loss in mice after a single dose of 15 or 20 Gy but not 25 Gy of radiation. CBLB502 was also protective from cumulative doses of 25 and 30 Gy delivered in two (10 + 15 Gy) or three (3 × 10 Gy) fractions, respectively. While providing protection to normal epithelia, CBLB502 did not affect the radiosensitivity of syngeneic squamous carcinoma SCCVII grown orthotopically in mice. Use of CBLB502 also elicited a radiation independent growth inhibitory effect upon TLR5-expressing tumors demonstrated in the mouse xenograft model of human lung adenocarcinoma A549. Conclusion: CBLB502 combines properties of supportive care (radiotherapy adjuvant) and anticancer agent, both mediated via activation of TLR5 signaling in the normal tissues or the tumor, respectively.

  13. Toll-like Receptor 5 Agonist Protects Mice From Dermatitis and Oral Mucositis Caused by Local Radiation: Implications for Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdelya, Lyudmila G. [Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Gleiberman, Anatoli S.; Toshkov, Ilia [Cleveland BioLabs, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States); Aygun-Sunar, Semra [Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Bapardekar, Meghana [Cleveland BioLabs, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States); Manderscheid-Kern, Patricia; Bellnier, David [Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Krivokrysenko, Vadim I.; Feinstein, Elena [Cleveland BioLabs, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States); Gudkov, Andrei V., E-mail: andrei.gudkov@roswellpark.org [Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Cleveland BioLabs, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Development of mucositis is a frequent side effect of radiotherapy of patients with head-and-neck cancer. We have recently reported that bacterial flagellin, an agonist of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), can protect rodents and primates from acute radiation syndrome caused by total body irradiation. Here we analyzed the radioprotective efficacy of TLR5 agonist under conditions of local, single dose or fractionated radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Mice received either single-dose (10, 15, 20, or 25 Gy) or fractioned irradiation (cumulative dose up to 30 Gy) of the head-and-neck area with or without subcutaneous injection of pharmacologically optimized flagellin, CBLB502, 30 min before irradiation. Results: CBLB502 significantly reduced the severity of dermatitis and mucositis, accelerated tissue recovery, and reduced the extent of radiation induced weight loss in mice after a single dose of 15 or 20 Gy but not 25 Gy of radiation. CBLB502 was also protective from cumulative doses of 25 and 30 Gy delivered in two (10 + 15 Gy) or three (3 Multiplication-Sign 10 Gy) fractions, respectively. While providing protection to normal epithelia, CBLB502 did not affect the radiosensitivity of syngeneic squamous carcinoma SCCVII grown orthotopically in mice. Use of CBLB502 also elicited a radiation independent growth inhibitory effect upon TLR5-expressing tumors demonstrated in the mouse xenograft model of human lung adenocarcinoma A549. Conclusion: CBLB502 combines properties of supportive care (radiotherapy adjuvant) and anticancer agent, both mediated via activation of TLR5 signaling in the normal tissues or the tumor, respectively.

  14. Changes in the specific migration characteristics of packaging-food simulant combinations caused by ionizing radiation: Effect of food simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zygoura, Panagiota D., E-mail: me00806@cc.uoi.g [Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Technology, Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Paleologos, Evangelos K.; Kontominas, Michael G. [Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Technology, Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2011-08-15

    The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which the affinity of the surrounding medium for the migrant, as well as the packaging material, affects the specific migration characteristics of the latter. For this purpose, migration tests were conducted with vinylidene chloride copolymer (PVDC/PVC) in contact with the EU specified solvents simulating all food types: namely, distilled water, 3% w/v acetic acid, 10% v/v ethanol and isooctane. Migration testing was carried out at 40 {sup o}C for 10 days for the aqueous simulants, and at 20 {sup o}C for 2 days for the fatty food simulant (). In addition, food-grade saran film was subjected to ionizing radiation treatment with a [{sup 60}Co] source at doses equal to 5, 15 and 25 kGy. Acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC) plasticizer levels were monitored as a function of time for untreated, as well as gamma-irradiated packaging material, with a secondary objective to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on polymer/migrant/surrounding medium interactions. Depending on the food simulant, determination of the analyte was performed by either direct gas chromatographic analysis, or surfactant (Triton X-114) mediated extraction followed by gas chromatographic-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). ATBC concentrations determined in aqueous and fatty food simulants were 0.216-0.497 and 5.0-5.9 mg/L, respectively. Therefore, the most efficient extracting medium of plasticizers in vinyl chloride copolymers is the non-polar isooctane. Moreover, an extremely high rate of ATBC migration into isooctane during the early stages of contact was observed. The above observation verifies the aggressiveness of isooctane towards plastic packaging materials. Amongst the aqueous food simulants tested, the 10% ethanol solution demonstrated the highest migration levels. Gamma-irradiation enhanced ATBC migration; specific migration levels increased with increasing contact time and radiation dose. This was expected, since

  15. Changes in the specific migration characteristics of packaging-food simulant combinations caused by ionizing radiation: Effect of food simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygoura, Panagiota D.; Paleologos, Evangelos K.; Kontominas, Michael G.

    2011-08-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which the affinity of the surrounding medium for the migrant, as well as the packaging material, affects the specific migration characteristics of the latter. For this purpose, migration tests were conducted with vinylidene chloride copolymer (PVDC/PVC) in contact with the EU specified solvents simulating all food types: namely, distilled water, 3% w/v acetic acid, 10% v/v ethanol and isooctane. Migration testing was carried out at 40 °C for 10 days for the aqueous simulants, and at 20 °C for 2 days for the fatty food simulant (EC, 1997; EEC, 1993). In addition, food-grade saran film was subjected to ionizing radiation treatment with a [60Co] source at doses equal to 5, 15 and 25 kGy. Acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC) plasticizer levels were monitored as a function of time for untreated, as well as gamma-irradiated packaging material, with a secondary objective to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on polymer/migrant/surrounding medium interactions. Depending on the food simulant, determination of the analyte was performed by either direct gas chromatographic analysis, or surfactant (Triton X-114) mediated extraction followed by gas chromatographic-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). ATBC concentrations determined in aqueous and fatty food simulants were 0.216-0.497 and 5.0-5.9 mg/L, respectively. Therefore, the most efficient extracting medium of plasticizers in vinyl chloride copolymers is the non-polar isooctane. Moreover, an extremely high rate of ATBC migration into isooctane during the early stages of contact was observed. The above observation verifies the aggressiveness of isooctane towards plastic packaging materials. Amongst the aqueous food simulants tested, the 10% ethanol solution demonstrated the highest migration levels. Gamma-irradiation enhanced ATBC migration; specific migration levels increased with increasing contact time and radiation dose. This was expected

  16. Changes in the specific migration characteristics of packaging-food simulant combinations caused by ionizing radiation: Effect of food simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zygoura, Panagiota D.; Paleologos, Evangelos K.; Kontominas, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which the affinity of the surrounding medium for the migrant, as well as the packaging material, affects the specific migration characteristics of the latter. For this purpose, migration tests were conducted with vinylidene chloride copolymer (PVDC/PVC) in contact with the EU specified solvents simulating all food types: namely, distilled water, 3% w/v acetic acid, 10% v/v ethanol and isooctane. Migration testing was carried out at 40 o C for 10 days for the aqueous simulants, and at 20 o C for 2 days for the fatty food simulant (). In addition, food-grade saran film was subjected to ionizing radiation treatment with a [ 60 Co] source at doses equal to 5, 15 and 25 kGy. Acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC) plasticizer levels were monitored as a function of time for untreated, as well as gamma-irradiated packaging material, with a secondary objective to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on polymer/migrant/surrounding medium interactions. Depending on the food simulant, determination of the analyte was performed by either direct gas chromatographic analysis, or surfactant (Triton X-114) mediated extraction followed by gas chromatographic-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). ATBC concentrations determined in aqueous and fatty food simulants were 0.216-0.497 and 5.0-5.9 mg/L, respectively. Therefore, the most efficient extracting medium of plasticizers in vinyl chloride copolymers is the non-polar isooctane. Moreover, an extremely high rate of ATBC migration into isooctane during the early stages of contact was observed. The above observation verifies the aggressiveness of isooctane towards plastic packaging materials. Amongst the aqueous food simulants tested, the 10% ethanol solution demonstrated the highest migration levels. Gamma-irradiation enhanced ATBC migration; specific migration levels increased with increasing contact time and radiation dose. This was expected, since ATBC did not

  17. Determination of radiation doses caused by release into the atmosphere by nuclear power plants, based on measurement of emission and immission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekler, B.; Deme, S.

    2006-01-01

    The radiation impact of nuclear facilities, and the nuclear power plants as well, can be determined by using two methods. The first one calculates the dose of critical group of population based on the release, meteorological and hydrological parameters. The second method gives an estimate of the additional dose caused by the nuclear facility from the radiological measurements in the environment. This article compares this two methods for the release in the atmosphere, and gives an estimate of the relative error. The comparison can be applied for cases when the atmospheric pollution is released from a point type source, so for the conventional power plants as well. (author)

  18. Chest radiographic features of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis in HIV-infected children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitcher, R.D., E-mail: pitcher@iafrica.co [Division of Paediatric Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Cape Town (South Africa); Beningfield, S.J. [Division of Radiology, New Groote Schuur Hospital and University of Cape Town (South Africa); Zar, H.J. [Department of Paediatric Pulmonology, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, School of Child and Adolescent Health, University of Cape Town (South Africa)

    2010-02-15

    Aim: To review the radiological features of biopsy-proven lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and establish whether these are based on systematic radiological analysis, and to investigate whether more specific radiological diagnostic criteria can be developed. Materials and methods: A Medline search of English-language articles on the radiological features of biopsy-proven LIP in HIV-infected children was conducted for the period 1982 to 2007 inclusive. Radiological findings were compared with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria for a presumptive diagnosis of LIP. Results: Pulmonary pathology was recorded as 'diffuse' and 'bilateral' in 125 (97.6%) of 128 reported cases of LIP. Twenty-five different terms were used to describe the pulmonary parenchyma. In 96 (75%), the terminology was consistent with CDC diagnostic criteria. Radiological evolution was documented in 43 (33.5%). Persistent focal opacification superimposed on diffuse pulmonary nodularity was demonstrated in 10 (7.8%). The method of radiological evaluation was described in six (4.6%). In no instance was the terminology defined. Conclusion: The radiological features of LIP have not been systematically analysed. However, CDC criteria remain reliable, allowing diagnosis of at least 75% of cases. The sensitivity of these criteria may be increased by including cases with persistent focal pulmonary opacification superimposed on diffuse nodularity. Longitudinal studies utilizing standardized radiographic analysis are needed to elucidate the natural history of LIP.

  19. Automated computer-based CT stratification as a predictor of outcome in hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Joseph; Mak, S.M.; Mok, W.; Hansell, D.M.; Bartholmai, B.J.; Rajagopalan, S.; Karwoski, R.; Della Casa, G.; Sugino, K.; Walsh, S.L.F.; Wells, A.U.

    2017-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) has a variable clinical course. Modelling of quantitative CALIPER-derived CT data can identify distinct disease phenotypes. Mortality prediction using CALIPER analysis was compared to the interstitial lung disease gender, age, physiology (ILD-GAP) outcome model. CALIPER CT analysis of parenchymal patterns in 98 consecutive HP patients was compared to visual CT scoring by two radiologists. Functional indices including forced vital capacity (FVC) and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLco) in univariate and multivariate Cox mortality models. Automated stratification of CALIPER scores was evaluated against outcome models. Univariate predictors of mortality included visual and CALIPER CT fibrotic patterns, and all functional indices. Multivariate analyses identified only two independent predictors of mortality: CALIPER reticular pattern (p = 0.001) and DLco (p < 0.0001). Automated stratification distinguished three distinct HP groups (log-rank test p < 0.0001). Substitution of automated stratified groups for FVC and DLco in the ILD-GAP model demonstrated no loss of model strength (C-Index = 0.73 for both models). Model strength improved when automated stratified groups were combined with the ILD-GAP model (C-Index = 0.77). CALIPER-derived variables are the strongest CT predictors of mortality in HP. Automated CT stratification is equivalent to functional indices in the ILD-GAP model for predicting outcome in HP. (orig.)

  20. Automated computer-based CT stratification as a predictor of outcome in hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Joseph; Mak, S.M.; Mok, W.; Hansell, D.M. [Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Bartholmai, B.J. [Mayo Clinic Rochester, Division of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Rajagopalan, S.; Karwoski, R. [Mayo Clinic Rochester, Biomedical Imaging Resource, Rochester, MN (United States); Della Casa, G. [Universita degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena, Emilia-Romagna (Italy); Sugino, K. [Toho University Omori Medical Centre, Tokyo (Japan); Walsh, S.L.F. [Kings College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Wells, A.U. [Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, Interstitial Lung Disease Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) has a variable clinical course. Modelling of quantitative CALIPER-derived CT data can identify distinct disease phenotypes. Mortality prediction using CALIPER analysis was compared to the interstitial lung disease gender, age, physiology (ILD-GAP) outcome model. CALIPER CT analysis of parenchymal patterns in 98 consecutive HP patients was compared to visual CT scoring by two radiologists. Functional indices including forced vital capacity (FVC) and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLco) in univariate and multivariate Cox mortality models. Automated stratification of CALIPER scores was evaluated against outcome models. Univariate predictors of mortality included visual and CALIPER CT fibrotic patterns, and all functional indices. Multivariate analyses identified only two independent predictors of mortality: CALIPER reticular pattern (p = 0.001) and DLco (p < 0.0001). Automated stratification distinguished three distinct HP groups (log-rank test p < 0.0001). Substitution of automated stratified groups for FVC and DLco in the ILD-GAP model demonstrated no loss of model strength (C-Index = 0.73 for both models). Model strength improved when automated stratified groups were combined with the ILD-GAP model (C-Index = 0.77). CALIPER-derived variables are the strongest CT predictors of mortality in HP. Automated CT stratification is equivalent to functional indices in the ILD-GAP model for predicting outcome in HP. (orig.)

  1. Primary Sjogren’s Syndrome Presenting as Acute Interstitial Pneumonitis/Hamman-Rich Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abidullah Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A previously well, 45-year-old Pakistani lady was admitted to the medical unit on-call of Khyber Teaching Hospital (KTH Peshawar with a 5-day history of fever, productive cough with copious mucoid sputum, dyspnea, and pleuritic chest pain. She also complained of dry eyes, mouth, and vagina. Her chest X-ray showed diffuse alveolar shadowing and arterial gas analysis confirmed type 1 respiratory failure. Over the next few days, she deteriorated rapidly making an urgent transfer to the medical intensive care unit (MICU necessary, where she was mechanically ventilated. An HRCT followed by bronchoscopic biopsies made a diagnosis of acute interstitial pneumonitis (AIP, formerly known as Hamman-Rich syndrome. She also turned out to be positive for both anti-SS-A/Ro and anti-SS-B/La antibodies along with a positive Schirmer’s test and lower lip biopsy. She received intravenous steroids and supportive care. The patient had a complete recovery after approximately three weeks’ stay in the hospital with lung function returning back to normal. This is most probably the first ever case of primary Sjogren syndrome (pSjS presenting as AIP, recovering completely in less than a month time.

  2. Immune complexes, gallium lung scans, and bronchoalveolar lavage in idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis-fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelb, A.F.; Dreisen, R.B.; Epstein, J.D.; Silverthorne, J.D.; Bickel, Y.; Fields, M.; Border, W.A.; Taylor, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    We obtained results of lung immune complexes (LIC), circulating immune complexes (CIC), 48-hour gallium lung scans (scans), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and pulmonary function tests in 20 patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis-fibrosis. Sixteen patients had predominantly interstitial (13 cases UIP) and/or intraalveolar (3 cases DIP) cellular disease (group 1). Prior to corticosteroid therapy in group 1, scans were positive in 75 percent, CIC were elevated in 86 percent, LIC were present in 64 percent, and BAL was abnormal in 90 percent. Duration of follow-up after treatment was 3.5 +/- 1.0 year. In group 1 after treatment with corticosteroids in 13 patients and corticosteroids and penicillamine (three patients) and plasmapheresis (one patient), only four patients remain stable or improved. After corticosteroid therapy, elevated CIC returned to normal values despite progressive patient deterioration. In three patients, lung immune complexes were still detected after circulating immune complexes had returned to normal after corticosteroid therapy. In group 2 were four patients with fibrotic disease; scans and CIC were uniformly negative, LIC were weakly present in only one patient, and BAL was abnormal in all. Despite corticosteroid therapy, all have died or deteriorated. These results suggest that positive gallium lung scans, BAL, circulating immune complexes, and to a lesser extent, lung immune complexes are associated with the cellular phase of interstitial pneumonia, but do not reliably identify a corticosteroid-responsive group

  3. The value of family history in the diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Cardoso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP, or extrinsic allergic alveolitis, is an immunologically mediated disease resulting from the inhalation of organic substances that trigger an inflammatory response in the alveolar wall, bronchioles, and interstitium in susceptible individuals. Although HP is predominantly an occupational disease, seen in adulthood, cases in children have been described. The diagnosis of HP requires a high degree of suspicion. The treatment consists in avoiding contact with the antigen, and, in some cases, systemic corticosteroids might be necessary in order to prevent its progression to pulmonary fibrosis. We report the clinical cases of three children with a history of contact with birds and a family history of HP. All three patients presented with cough and dyspnea on exertion. The disease was diagnosed on the basis of the clinical history and ancillary diagnostic test results consistent with the diagnosis, including a predominance of lymphocytes (> 60%, CD8+ T lymphocytes in particular in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and a ground-glass pattern seen on HRCT of the chest. Early diagnosis is crucial in order to prevent HP from progressing to pulmonary fibrosis. Hereditary factors seem to influence the onset of the disease.

  4. Chest radiographic features of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis in HIV-infected children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, R.D.; Beningfield, S.J.; Zar, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To review the radiological features of biopsy-proven lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and establish whether these are based on systematic radiological analysis, and to investigate whether more specific radiological diagnostic criteria can be developed. Materials and methods: A Medline search of English-language articles on the radiological features of biopsy-proven LIP in HIV-infected children was conducted for the period 1982 to 2007 inclusive. Radiological findings were compared with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria for a presumptive diagnosis of LIP. Results: Pulmonary pathology was recorded as 'diffuse' and 'bilateral' in 125 (97.6%) of 128 reported cases of LIP. Twenty-five different terms were used to describe the pulmonary parenchyma. In 96 (75%), the terminology was consistent with CDC diagnostic criteria. Radiological evolution was documented in 43 (33.5%). Persistent focal opacification superimposed on diffuse pulmonary nodularity was demonstrated in 10 (7.8%). The method of radiological evaluation was described in six (4.6%). In no instance was the terminology defined. Conclusion: The radiological features of LIP have not been systematically analysed. However, CDC criteria remain reliable, allowing diagnosis of at least 75% of cases. The sensitivity of these criteria may be increased by including cases with persistent focal pulmonary opacification superimposed on diffuse nodularity. Longitudinal studies utilizing standardized radiographic analysis are needed to elucidate the natural history of LIP.

  5. A nested case-control approach to interactions between radiation dose and other factors as causes of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, Charles E [Department of Epidemiology, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, US National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Often a nested case-control study is the most practicable approach to estimating the interaction of two cancer risk factors in a large cohort. If one of the factors has already been evaluated for the entire cohort, however, more information is already available about its relationship to risk than could be obtained from a nested study. A modified case-control approach is proposed, in which information about the second, unknown factor is sought for cases and controls matched on the first factor. The approach requires, for interaction models other than the multiplicative, a nonstandard analytical approach incorporating cohort-based information about the first factor. The problem is discussed in the context of breast cancer risk in a defined cohort of female Japanese atomic bomb survivors, in relation to radiation dose and reproductive history. (author)

  6. Conformational changes in DNA caused by DNA-ase I, gamma and ultraviolet radiation as revealed by differential pulse polarography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorlickova, M.

    1979-01-01

    The height, potential and half width of differential pulse-polarographic peaks of DNA were investigated in dependence on degradation by DNA-ase I and gamma and UV radiation. It was found that in all cases studied growth of peak II (reflecting conformational changes in the DNA double helix) was limited, and only after it reached a certain height further degradation induced the appearance of peak III of single-stranded DNA. This course is explained as reflecting the limited extent of conformational changes in the framework of the double helix, which probably follows from a limited number of sites that can undergo certain types of conformational changes. The character of the conformational changes is dependent on the chemical nature of the damage. (author)

  7. The investigation of the light radiation caused polyethylene based materials deterioration by means of atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikora, A; Moroń, L; Wałecki, M; Kryla, P; Grabarek, A

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the environmental conditions on the materials used in various devices and constructions, in particular in electrotechnical applications, has an critical impact in terms of their reliability and utilization range in specific climatic conditions. Due to increasing utilitarian requirements, technological processes complexity and introducing new materials (for instance nanomaterials), advanced diagnostic techniques are desired. One of such techniques is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows to study the changes of the roughness and mechanical properties of the surface at the submicrometer scale, enabling the investigation of the degradation processes. In this work the deterioration of selected group of polyethylene based materials have been measured by means of AFM, as the samples were exposed to the simulated solar light and UV-C radiation. Such an analysis of the environmental conditions impact on the deterioration process using AFM methods for various versions of specific material was not presented before. (paper)

  8. Formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks caused by ionizing radiation in the Epstein-Barr virus minichromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Kumala, Slawomir

    2012-01-01

    L’ADN dans nos cellules est exposé continuellement à des agents génotoxiques. Parmi ceux-ci on retrouve les rayons ultraviolets, les agents mutagènes chimiques d’origine naturelle ou synthétique, les agents radiomimétiques, et les dérivés réactifs de l’oxygène produits par les radiations ionisantes ou par des processus tels que les cycles métaboliques redox. Parmi les dommages infligés par ces agents, les plus dangereux sont les cassures simples- et double-brin de l’ADN qui brisent son intégr...

  9. Causes of defects and accuracy of structure reproduction in deep-etch X-ray lithography using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, J.; Ehrfeld, W.; Muenchmeyer, D.

    1988-07-01

    Under the LIGA process plastic microstructures with extraordinarily high aspect ratios are produced by means of deep-etch synchrotron radiation lithography. These microstructures are used as templates for the fabrication by electroforming of metallic microstructures. The several hundred micrometer thick resist layers required in the process are polymerized directly on a metal base plate using a methacrylate based resin. This provides sufficient stability during the production process and also a reliable plating base for the electrodeposition of the metal. Perfect adhesion of micron-sized microstructures on a smooth surface can be achieved if the polished metal surface is sputtered with titanium and chemically oxidized afterwards. Alternatively it is also possible to add an internal adhesion promoter like methacryl oxypropyl trimethoxy silane to the resin. By means of this adhesion promoter chemical bonding between the metal surface and the polymer is achieved. (orig.)

  10. Functional changes of the gustatory organ caused by local radiation exposure during radiotherapy of the head-and-neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamprad, F.; Hildebrandt, G.; Ranft, D.; Weber, A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this prospective study was to investigate how often and at which dose levels gustatory disturbances appear during radiotherapy of the tongue and to which extent permanent gustatory deficiencies occur. Patients and Methods: The study included 44 patients treated by definitive irradiation for malignant head-and-neck tumors. In 22 patients the posterior two thirds of the tongue (group 1), and in the other 22 patients the entire tongue (group 2) were exposed to radiation. The control group comprised 30 patients with non-small cell lung cancer receiving definitive radiation therapy (group 3). The dose distribution in the tongue area was calculated using CT-based three-dimensional planning. Before, during and after irradiation the gustatory function was determined by means of gustometry and correlated with the corresponding results of enoral inspection and the patients' subjective statements on gustatory function. Results: The gustatory ability of the control group was not affected, whereas patients in the locally irradiated groups in parallel with enoral mucositis suffered from loss of gustatory function after a total dose of 20 Gy with a maximum between 40 and 60 Gy. Supportive measures had little influence on acute side effects. The gustatory disturbances regressed within 8 weeks after radiotherapy in patients with partial-tongue irradiation and almost completely after 6 months in patients with entire-tongue irradiation. Conclusion: The severity of gustatory disturbances and the longer recovery time in patients with entire-tongue irradiation suggest an influence of the volume exposed. Therefore, reduction of the highly exposed tongue volume by intensity-modulated radiotherapy opens up possibilities for a reduction of this undesirable side effect. (orig.)

  11. Functional changes of the gustatory organ caused by local radiation exposure during radiotherapy of the head-and-neck region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamprad, F.; Hildebrandt, G. [University Hospital Leipzig AoeR (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology; Ranft, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald GmbH (Germany). MVZ-Medizinisches Versorgungszentrum; Weber, A. [Sana Klinikum Remscheid (Germany). ENT Dept.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this prospective study was to investigate how often and at which dose levels gustatory disturbances appear during radiotherapy of the tongue and to which extent permanent gustatory deficiencies occur. Patients and Methods: The study included 44 patients treated by definitive irradiation for malignant head-and-neck tumors. In 22 patients the posterior two thirds of the tongue (group 1), and in the other 22 patients the entire tongue (group 2) were exposed to radiation. The control group comprised 30 patients with non-small cell lung cancer receiving definitive radiation therapy (group 3). The dose distribution in the tongue area was calculated using CT-based three-dimensional planning. Before, during and after irradiation the gustatory function was determined by means of gustometry and correlated with the corresponding results of enoral inspection and the patients' subjective statements on gustatory function. Results: The gustatory ability of the control group was not affected, whereas patients in the locally irradiated groups in parallel with enoral mucositis suffered from loss of gustatory function after a total dose of 20 Gy with a maximum between 40 and 60 Gy. Supportive measures had little influence on acute side effects. The gustatory disturbances regressed within 8 weeks after radiotherapy in patients with partial-tongue irradiation and almost completely after 6 months in patients with entire-tongue irradiation. Conclusion: The severity of gustatory disturbances and the longer recovery time in patients with entire-tongue irradiation suggest an influence of the volume exposed. Therefore, reduction of the highly exposed tongue volume by intensity-modulated radiotherapy opens up possibilities for a reduction of this undesirable side effect. (orig.)

  12. Discovery of a Leptospirosis Cluster Amidst a Pneumonic Plague Outbreak in a Miners’ Camp in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertherat, Eric; Mueller, Melissa J.; Shako, Jean-Christophe; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Conditions in the Democratic Republic of the Congo provide an ideal environment for leptospirosis and plague, both of which can cause severe pulmonary manifestations. In December 2004, an outbreak of lethal pneumonia occurred in a local mining camp, affecting 130 persons and killing 57 of them. Clinical signs, fast disease spread, and initial laboratory investigations suggested pneumonic plague. While leptospirosis had not recently been described in the region, it was considered as a differential diagnosis. Anti-Leptospira antibodies were detected by microscopic agglutination test (MAT). A confirmed case of leptospirosis was defined as having consistent clinical signs and any one of the following: seroconversion or four-fold increase in MAT titre for paired serum samples, or a MAT titre ≥ 1:400 for acute-phase serum samples. Twenty-nine of the 54 patients or convalescents tested for leptospirosis were seropositive. Two cases showed a confirmed infection for both plague and leptospirosis. While evidence supports the plague nature of this outbreak, the results suggest that some of the suspected plague cases might be due to leptospirosis. In any case, this diagnosis will have to be evoked in the future if a similar outbreak occurs in this region of Africa. PMID:24514425

  13. Discovery of a leptospirosis cluster amidst a pneumonic plague outbreak in a miners' camp in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertherat, Eric; Mueller, Melissa J; Shako, Jean-Christophe; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2014-02-07

    Conditions in the Democratic Republic of the Congo provide an ideal environment for leptospirosis and plague, both of which can cause severe pulmonary manifestations. In December 2004, an outbreak of lethal pneumonia occurred in a local mining camp, affecting 130 persons and killing 57 of them. Clinical signs, fast disease spread, and initial laboratory investigations suggested pneumonic plague. While leptospirosis had not recently been described in the region, it was considered as a differential diagnosis. Anti-Leptospira antibodies were detected by microscopic agglutination test (MAT). A confirmed case of leptospirosis was defined as having consistent clinical signs and any one of the following: seroconversion or four-fold increase in MAT titre for paired serum samples, or a MAT titre ≥ 1:400 for acute-phase serum samples. Twenty-nine of the 54 patients or convalescents tested for leptospirosis were seropositive. Two cases showed a confirmed infection for both plague and leptospirosis. While evidence supports the plague nature of this outbreak, the results suggest that some of the suspected plague cases might be due to leptospirosis. In any case, this diagnosis will have to be evoked in the future if a similar outbreak occurs in this region of Africa.

  14. ESTE AI (Annual Impacts) - the program for calculation of radiation doses caused by effluents in routine releases to the atmosphere and to the hydrosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carny, P.; Suchon, D.; Smejkalova, E.; Fabova, V.

    2009-01-01

    ESTE AI is a program for calculation of radiation doses caused by effluents in routine releases to the atmosphere and to the hydrosphere. Doses to the members of critical groups of inhabitants in the vicinity of NPP are calculated and as a result, critical group is determined. The program enables to calculate collective doses as well. Collective doses to the inhabitants living in the vicinity of the NPP are calculated. ESTE AI calculates doses to the whole population of Slovakia from the effluents of the specific plant. In this calculation, global nuclides are included and assumed, as well. The program enables to calculate and to document beyond-border radiological impacts of effluents caused by routine operation of NPP. ESTE AI was approved by the 'Public Health Authority of the Slovak Republic' and is used as legal instrument by Slovenske elektrarne a.s., NPP Bohunice. (authors)

  15. ESTE AI (Annual Impacts) - the program for calculation of radiation doses caused by effluents in routine releases to the atmosphere and to the hydrosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carny, P.; Suchon, D.; Smejkalova, E.; Fabova, V.

    2008-01-01

    ESTE AI is a program for calculation of radiation doses caused by effluents in routine releases to the atmosphere and to the hydrosphere. Doses to the members of critical groups of inhabitants in the vicinity of NPP are calculated and as a result, critical group is determined. The program enables to calculate collective doses as well. Collective doses to the inhabitants living in the vicinity of the NPP are calculated. ESTE AI calculates doses to the whole population of Slovakia from the effluents of the specific plant. In this calculation, global nuclides are included and assumed, as well. The program enables to calculate and to document beyond-border radiological impacts of effluents caused by routine operation of NPP. ESTE AI was approved by the 'Public Health Authority of the Slovak Republic' and is used as legal instrument by Slovenske elektrarne a.s., NPP Bohunice. (authors)

  16. Influence of thiamine on the post-irradiation effect caused by fast neutrons or gamma radiation in callus cultures of Haplopappus gracilis (Nutt) A. Gray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wajda, L.; Korzonek, M.

    1979-01-01

    Influence of thiamine within the investigated range of concentrations 1.5 to 12.0 mg/l on the postirradiation effect caused by fast neutrons or gamma irradiation was found in cultures of Haplopappus gracilis callus. The lowest sensitivity to fast neutrons was noticed in callus grown on nutrient combination 1.5 to 3.0 and 12.0 to 3.0 mg/l of thiamine. On the contrary the highest sensitivity to gamma radiation was shown by cultures grown on nutrient media: 1.5 to 3.0 mg/l; all the other investigated thiamine concentrations caused a marked decrease in the sensitivity of the callus. (author)

  17. Study on temperature measurement of gas turbine blade based on analysis of error caused by the reflected radiation and emission angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Feng, Chi; Gao, Shan; Chen, Liwei; Daniel, Ketui

    2018-06-01

    Accurate measurement of gas turbine blade temperature is of great significance as far as blade health monitoring is concerned. An important method for measuring this temperature is the use of a radiation pyrometer. In this research, error of the pyrometer caused by reflected radiation from the surfaces surrounding the target and the emission angle of the target was analyzed. Important parameters for this analysis were the view factor between interacting surfaces, spectral directional emissivity, pyrometer operating wavelength and the surface temperature distribution on the blades and the vanes. The interacting surface of the rotor blade and the vane models used were discretized using triangular surface elements from which contour integral was used to calculate the view factor between the surface elements. Spectral directional emissivities were obtained from an experimental setup of Ni based alloy samples. A pyrometer operating wavelength of 1.6 μm was chosen. Computational fluid dynamics software was used to simulate the temperature distribution of the rotor blade and the guide vane based on the actual gas turbine input parameters. Results obtained in this analysis show that temperature error introduced by reflected radiation and emission angle ranges from  ‑23 K to 49 K.

  18. The electronics in fluorescent bulbs and light emitting diodes (LED), rather than ultraviolet radiation, cause increased malignant melanoma incidence in indoor office workers and tanning bed users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milham, Samuel; Stetzer, Dave

    2018-07-01

    The epidemiology of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) has a number of facets that do not fit with sunlight and ultraviolet light as the primary etiologic agents. Indoor workers have higher incidence and mortality rates of CMM than outdoor workers; CMM occurs in body locations never exposed to sunlight; CMM incidence is increasing in spite of use of UV blocking agents and small changes in solar radiation. Installation of two new fluorescent lights in the milking parlor holding area of a Minnesota dairy farm in 2015 caused an immediate drop in milk production. This lead to measurement of body amperage in humans exposed to modern non-incandescent lighting. People exposed to old and new fluorescent lights, light emitting diodes (LED) and compact fluorescent lights (CFL) had body amperage levels above those considered carcinogenic. We hypothesize that modern electric lighting is a significant health hazard, a carcinogen, and is causing increasing CMM incidence in indoor office workers and tanning bed users. These lights generate dirty electricity (high frequency voltage transients), radio frequency (RF) radiation, and increase body amperage, all of which have been shown to be carcinogenic. This could explain the failure of ultraviolet blockers to stem the malignant melanoma pandemic. Tanning beds and non-incandescent lighting could be made safe by incorporating a grounded Faraday cage which allows passage of ultraviolet and visible light frequencies and blocks other frequencies. Modern electric lighting should be fabricated to be electrically clean. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Surgical considerations in the management of combined radiation blast injury casualties caused by a radiological dirty bomb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Geraint; O'Malley, Michael

    2010-09-01

    The capacity for surgical teams to respond appropriately to the consequences caused by the detonation of a radiological dirty bomb will be determined by prior knowledge, familiarity and training for this type unique terrorist event. This paper will focus on the surgical aspects of this scenario with particular emphasis on the management of combined trauma-radiological injury. The paper also describes some of the more serious explosion-contamination incidents from nuclear industrial sources, summarises learning points and parallels taken from these scenarios in relation to subject of a radiological dirty bomb and describes the likely radioactive substances involved. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of loperamide and delay of bowel motility on bile acid malabsorption caused by late radiation damage and ileal resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes Olmos, R. (Nederlands Kanker Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Hartog Jager, F. den; Hoefnagel, C.; Taal, B. (Nederlands Kanker Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Gastroenterology)

    1991-05-01

    Selenium-75 homocholic acid conjugated with taurine ({sup 75}Se-HCAT) was used during loperamide administration in seven patients suspected of having bile acid malabsorption due to late radiation damage and small-bowel resection in order to document the aetiology of ileal dysfunction and to adjust therapeutic mamagement. In two patients with ileal resection up to 50 cm and in one patient without resection, a reduction of bowel motility by loperamide resulted in marked normalization of the {sup 75}Se-HCAT retention measurements. Sequential scintigraphic {sup 75}Se-HCAT imaging demonstrated a significant improvement in the {sup 75}Se-HCAT reabsorption and recirculation, accompanied in one case by prolongation of colonic retention of the radiopharmaceutical. In four patients with more than 80 cm resection, the {sup 75}Se-HCAT test was abnormal during loperamide administration. In two of these patients for whom baseline values were available, no improvement in the pattern of {sup 75}Se-HCAT absorption was observed. In conclusion, the first results of loperamide {sup 75}Se-HCAT in patients suspected of having bile acid malabsorption and abnormal baseline {sup 75}Se-HCAT are promising. Intervention with loperamide is easy and seems to improve the clinical value of the test with direct therapeutic implications. Sequential {sup 75}Se-HCAT imaging is essential for interpreting changes in the {sup 75}Se-HCAT retention measurements. (orig.).

  1. Radiation impact caused by the rupture of a radioactive tank within the Reactor Auxiliary Building of Angra 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passos, Erivaldo Mario dos; Alves, Antonio Sergio de Martin

    2002-01-01

    This paper aims to show the methodology, the parameters and some results of the radionuclide migration simulation in order to determine the radiation impact to the biosphere due to an accidental radionuclide release associated with the rupture of a radioactive tank within the Reactor Auxiliary Building of Angra 2. After tank rupture, the radionuclides are supposed to reach the sea via the aquifer of the Angra 2 site. This radiological impact is evaluated with the aid of the activity concentration at the sea and dose received by members of the public. Activity concentration for each radionuclide is calculated according to the ANSI/ANS - 2.17 - 1980, which shows the methodology for calculation of activity concentration in the aquifer in case of accidental radionuclide releases of nuclear power plants, whereas the dose calculation follows recognized international procedures. The migration analysis for the mentioned radionuclides is performed through the aquifer and allows to estimate the maximum activity concentration near the sea boundary and the annual dose to the member of the public. Based on the safety analysis performed for the investigated case one can conclude the annual dose impact is lower than that corresponding to one year of normal operation of the Angra 2 plant. (author)

  2. System Re-set: High LET Radiation or Transient Musculoskeletal Disuse Cause Lasting Changes in Oxidative Defense Pathways Within Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akhilesh; Chatterjee, A.; Alwood, Joshua S.; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.

    2011-01-01

    Six months post-IR, there were no notable changes in skeletal expression of 84 principal genes in the p53 signaling pathway due to low dose IR (0.5Gy), HU, or both. In contrast, numerous genes relevant to oxidative stress were regulated by the treatments, typically in a direction indicative of increased oxidative stress and impaired defense. IR and HU independently reduced (between 0.46 to 0.88 fold) expression levels of Noxa1, Gpx3, Prdx2, Prdx3, and Zmynd17. Surprisingly, transient HU alone (sham-irradiated) decreased expression of several redox-related genes (Gpx1,Gstk1, Prdx1, Txnrd2), which were not affected significantly by IR alone. Irradiation increased (1.13 fold) expression of a gene responsible for production of superoxides by neutrophils (NCF2). Of interest, only combined treatment with HU and IR led to increased expression levels of Ercc2, (1.19 fold), a DNA excision repair enzyme. Differences in gene expression levels may reflect a change in gene expression on a per cell basis, a shift in the repertoire of specific cell types within the tissue, or both. Serum nitrite/nitrate levels were elevated to comparable levels (1.6-fold) due to IR, HU or both, indicative of elevated systemic nitrosyl stress. CONCLUSIONS The magnitude of changes in skeletal expression of oxidative stress-related genes six months after irradiation and/or transient unloading tended to be relatively modest (0.46-1.15 fold), whereas the p53 pathway was not affected. The finding that many different oxidative stress-related genes differed from controls at this late time point implicates a generalized impairment of oxidative defense within skeletal tissue, which coincides with both profound radiation damage to osteoprogenitors/stem cells in bone marrow and impaired remodeling of mineralized tissue.

  3. Simulation study of CD variation caused by field edge effects and out-of-band radiation in EUVL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weimin; Niroomand, Ardavan; Lorusso, Gian F.; Boone, Robert; Lucas, Kevin; Demmerle, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    Although extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) remains a promising candidate for semiconductor device manufacturing of the 1x nm half pitch node and beyond, many technological burdens have to be overcome. The "field edge effect" in EUVL is one of them. The image border region of an EUV mask,also known as the "black border" (BB), reflects a few percent of the incident EUV light, resulting in a leakage of light into neighboring exposure fields, especially at the corner of the field where three adjacent exposures take place. This effect significantly impacts on CD uniformity (CDU) across the exposure field. To avoid this phenomenon, a light-shielding border is introduced by etching away the entire absorber and multi-layer (ML)at the image border region of the EUV mask. In this paper, we present a method of modeling the field edge effect (also called the BB effect) by using rigorous lithography simulation with a calibrated resist model. An additional "flare level" at the field edge is introduced on top of the exposure tool flare map to account for the BB effect. The parameters in this model include the reflectivity and the width of the BB, which are mainly determining the leakage of EUV light and its influence range, respectively. Another parameter is the transition width which represents the half shadow effect of the reticle masking blades. By setting the corresponding parameters, the simulation results match well the experimental results obtained at the imec's NXE:3100 EUV exposure tool. Moreover, these results indicate that the out-of-band (OoB) radiation also contributes to the CDU. Using simulation we can also determine the OoB effect rigorouslyusing the methodology of an "effective mask blank". The study in this paper demonstrates that the impact of BB and OoB effects on CDU can be well predicted by simulations.

  4. Study of CD variation caused by the black border effect and out-of-band radiation in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weimin; Niroomand, Ardavan; Lorusso, Gian F.; Boone, Robert; Lucas, Kevin; Demmerle, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    Although extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) remains a promising candidate for semiconductor device manufacturing of the 1× nm half pitch node and beyond, many technological burdens have to be overcome. The "field edge effect" in EUVL is one of them. The image border region of an EUV mask, also known as the "black border" (BB), reflects a few percent of the incident EUV light, resulting in a leakage of light into neighboring exposure fields, especially at the corner of the field where three adjacent exposures take place. This effect significantly impacts on critical dimension (CD) uniformity (CDU) across the exposure field. To avoid this phenomenon, a light-shielding border is introduced by etching away the entire absorber and multilayer at the image border region of the EUV mask. We present a method of modeling the field edge effect (also called the BB effect) by using rigorous lithography simulation with a calibrated resist model. An additional "flare level" at the field edge is introduced on top of the exposure tool flare map to account for the BB effect. The parameters in this model include the reflectivity and the width of the BB, which are mainly determining the leakage of EUV light and its influence range, respectively. Another parameter is the transition width which represents the half shadow effect of the reticle masking blades. By setting the corresponding parameters, the simulation results match well the experimental results obtained at the IMEC's NXE:3100 EUV exposure tool. Moreover, these results indicate that the out-of-band (OoB) radiation also contributes to the CDU. Using simulation, we can also determine the OoB effect rigorously using the methodology of an "effective mask blank." The study demonstrates that the impact of BB and OoB effects on CDU can be well predicted by simulations.

  5. How much radiation dose, to whom? Long-term storage, surveillance, retrieval and long processes cause additional dose to employees; Wie viel Strahlendosis fuer wen? Lange Lagerung, Offenhaltung und ein langer Entsorgungsprozess bedeuten zusaetzliche Dosis fuer Beschaeftigte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walther, Clemens [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiooekologie und Strahlenschutz; Riemann, Moritz [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Philosophie und Ethik der Umwelt

    2017-09-01

    In the case of final nuclear waste disposal there are concurrent interests with respect to radiation protection: The realization of a disposal option with minimum required follow-up care needs time causing additional radiation exposure for the employees, also the option of long-term storage, surveillance and retrieval possibilities cause additional dose to employees. The contribution discusses possible consideration of requests for the different options.

  6. Storm-time electron flux precipitation in the inner radiation belt caused by wave-particle interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tadokoro

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been believed that electrons in the inner belt do not show the dynamical variation during magnetic storms except for great magnetic storms. However, Tadokoro et al. (2007 recently disclosed that low-altitude electrons in the inner belt frequently show flux variations during storms (Storm Time inner belt Electron Enhancement at the Low altitude (STEEL. This paper investigates a possible mechanism explaining STEEL during small and moderate storms, and shows that it is caused not by radial transport processes but by pitch angle scattering through wave-particle interactions. The waves related to wave-particle interactions are attributed to be banded whistler mode waves around 30 kHz observed in the inner magnetosphere by the Akebono satellite. The estimated pitch angle distribution based on a numerical calculation is roughly consistent with the observed results.

  7. Temporal Progression of Pneumonic Plague in Blood of Nonhuman Primate: A Transcriptomic Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Hammamieh

    Full Text Available Early identification of impending illness during widespread exposure to a pathogenic agent offers a potential means to initiate treatment during a timeframe when it would be most likely to be effective and has the potential to identify novel therapeutic strategies. The latter could be critical, especially as antibiotic resistance is becoming widespread. In order to examine pre-symptomatic illness, African green monkeys were challenged intranasally with aerosolized Yersinia pestis strain CO92 and blood samples were collected in short intervals from 45 m till 42 h post-exposure. Presenting one of the first genomic investigations of a NHP model challenged by pneumonic plague, whole genome analysis was annotated in silico and validated by qPCR assay. Transcriptomic profiles of blood showed early perturbation with the number of differentially expressed genes increasing until 24 h. By then, Y. pestis had paralyzed the host defense, as suggested by the functional analyses. Early activation of the apoptotic networks possibly facilitated the pathogen to overwhelm the defense mechanisms, despite the activation of the pro-inflammatory mechanism, toll-like receptors and microtubules at the port-of-entry. The overexpressed transcripts encoding an early pro-inflammatory response particularly manifested in active lymphocytes and ubiquitin networks were a potential deviation from the rodent models, which needs further verification. In summary, the present study recognized a pattern of Y. pestis pathogenesis potentially more applicable to the human system. Independent validation using the complementary omics approach with comprehensive evaluation of the organs, such as lungs which showed early bacterial infection, is essential.

  8. Immunoglobulin free light chains are increased in hypersensitivity pneumonitis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Groot Kormelink

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, a devastating lung disorder of unknown aetiology, and chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP, a disease provoked by an immunopathologic reaction to inhaled antigens, are two common interstitial lung diseases with uncertain pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we have shown in other upper and lower airway diseases that immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs are increased and may be involved in initiating a local inflammation. In this study we explored if such a mechanism may also apply to HP and IPF. METHODS: In this study we examined the presence of FLC in serum and BAL fluid from 21 IPF and 22 HP patients and controls. IgG, IgE and tryptase concentrations were measured in BAL fluid only. The presence of FLCs, plasma cells, B cells and mast cells in lung tissue of 3 HP and 3 IPF patients and 1 control was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: FLC concentrations in serum and BAL fluid were increased in IPF and HP patients as compared to control subjects. IgG concentrations were only increased in HP patients, whereas IgE concentrations were comparable to controls in both patient groups. FLC-positive cells, B cells, plasma cells, and large numbers of activated mast cells were all detected in the lungs of HP and IPF patients, not in control lung. CONCLUSION: These results show that FLC concentrations are increased in serum and BAL fluid of IPF and HP patients and that FLCs are present within affected lung tissue. This suggests that FLCs may be involved in mediating pathology in both diseases.

  9. Toxicity risk of non-target organs at risk receiving low-dose radiation: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shueng, Pei-Wei; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Chang, Hou-Tai; Chong, Ngot-Swan; Chen, Yu-Jen; Wang, Li-Ying; Hsieh, Yen-Ping; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2009-01-01

    The spine is the most common site for bone metastases. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for palliation of pain and for prevention or treatment of spinal cord compression. Helical tomotherapy (HT), a new image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), delivers highly conformal dose distributions and provides an impressive ability to spare adjacent organs at risk, thus increasing the local control of spinal column metastases and decreasing the potential risk of critical organs under treatment. However, there are a lot of non-target organs at risk (OARs) occupied by low dose with underestimate in this modern rotational IMRT treatment. Herein, we report a case of a pathologic compression fracture of the T9 vertebra in a 55-year-old patient with cholangiocarcinoma. The patient underwent HT at a dose of 30 Gy/10 fractions delivered to T8-T10 for symptom relief. Two weeks after the radiotherapy had been completed, the first course of chemotherapy comprising gemcitabine, fluorouracil, and leucovorin was administered. After two weeks of chemotherapy, however, the patient developed progressive dyspnea. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed an interstitial pattern with traction bronchiectasis, diffuse ground-glass opacities, and cystic change with fibrosis. Acute radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed. Oncologists should be alert to the potential risk of radiation toxicities caused by low dose off-targets and abscopal effects even with highly conformal radiotherapy

  10. Influence of misonidazole on the radiation response of murine tumors of different size: possible artifacts caused by pentobarbital sodium anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.; van der Schueren, E.; van den Hoeven, H.; Breur, K.

    1981-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of a transplantable murine adenocarcinoma decreased with increasing tumor volume. In unanesthetized mice this phenomenon (based on the effect of the hypoxic cell sensitizer misonidazole), in the range of volumes studied, can largely be explained by the appearance of hypoxic cells in the tumor during growth. The use of pentobarbital sodium during irradiation is confiremd to be a disturbing factor, as it may increase the hypoxic cell fraction in the tumors. No evidence was found for a direct radiochemical protection because of pentobarbital sodium. The radioprotective effect of the anesthetic could only be demonstrated in conditions where there is already a fraction of hypoxic cells; no influence of the anesthesia was found in small tumors in which the fraction of hypoxic cells was relatively small. This may account for the previously conflicting data on the influence of pentobarbital sodium anesthesia. The vascularization of larger tumors is apparently inferior to smaller tumors and this has important repercussions in the case of anesthesia. Changes in blood flow induced by pentobarbital sodium in larger tumors cause an insufficient oxygenation and hence acute hypoxia

  11. Field Test Of Capability To Prevent Cabbage Clubroot Disease Caused By Plasmodiophora brassicae Of Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized By Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Thi Le Ha; Nguyen Tan Man; Nguyen Duy Hang; Le Hai; Tran Thi Tam; Pham Thi Sam; Le Huu Tu; Tran Thu Hong; Tran Thi Thuy; Nguyen Tuong Ly Lan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of four dose rates 0.27; 0.90; 1.80 and 3.60 kGy/h on the solution of silver (Ag + 10 -2 M, PVP 2%, ethylenglycol 6%) irradiated at 25 kGy were investigated. The results showed that as the dose rates increased, the absorption peak shifted to blue wavelengths and also the particles decreased in size. For field test, nano particles were prepared by irradiation of silver solution at 25 kGy with the dose rate of 3.60 kGy/h. The absorption peaks of the synthesized nanoparticles were obtained at wavelengths of 412 nm and the average diameter of particles were 14 nm. Using two concentrations of 15 and 20 ppm, silver nanoparticles had not affected the growth and development of cabbage but showed antifungal activity against Plasmodiophora brassicae cause club root in cabbage. Using nano particles, the clubroot disease index were 9-10% compared to 5% of nebijin (fungicide), and 12% of control. The yield of cabbage were 55 tons/ha, 63 tons/ha and 70 tons/ha for the control, nanosilver group, and nebijin group, respectively. (author)

  12. Sensitivity of spiral ganglion neurons to damage caused by mobile phone electromagnetic radiation will increase in lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wen-Qi; Hu, Yu-Juan; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Xue-Yan; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Kong, Wen; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2015-05-29

    With the increasing popularity of mobile phones, the potential hazards of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) on the auditory system remain unclear. Apart from RF-EMR, humans are also exposed to various physical and chemical factors. We established a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in vitro model to investigate whether the possible sensitivity of spiral ganglion neurons to damage caused by mobile phone electromagnetic radiation (at specific absorption rates: 2, 4 W/kg) will increase. Spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) were obtained from neonatal (1- to 3-day-old) Sprague Dawley® (SD) rats. After the SGN were treated with different concentrations (0, 20, 40, 50, 100, 200, and 400 μg/ml) of LPS, the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and alkaline comet assay were used to quantify cellular activity and DNA damage, respectively. The SGN were treated with the moderate LPS concentrations before RF-EMR exposure. After 24 h intermittent exposure at an absorption rate of 2 and 4 W/kg, DNA damage was examined by alkaline comet assay, ultrastructure changes were detected by transmission electron microscopy, and expression of the autophagy markers LC3-II and Beclin1 were examined by immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was quantified by the dichlorofluorescin-diacetate assay. LPS (100 μg/ml) induced DNA damage and suppressed cellular activity (P 0.05); therefore, 40 μg/ml was used to pretreat the concentration before exposure to RF-EMR. RF-EMR could not directly induce DNA damage. However, the 4 W/kg combined with LPS (40 μg/ml) group showed mitochondria vacuoles, karyopyknosis, presence of lysosomes and autophagosome, and increasing expression of LC3-II and Beclin1. The ROS values significantly increased in the 4 W/kg exposure, 4 W/kg combined with LPS (40 μg/ml) exposure, and H2O2 groups (P spiral ganglion neurons, but it could cause the changes of cellular ultrastructure at special SAR 4

  13. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in 68Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L.; Jackson, Price; Siva, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: 68 Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration. Conclusions

  14. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in {sup 68}Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas, E-mail: nick.hardcastle@gmail.com [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Callahan, Jason [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Clayton (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Victoria (Australia); MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Jackson, Price [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: {sup 68}Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration

  15. The involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in the degradation of NAD caused by γ-radiation and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skidmore, C.J.; Davies, M.I.; Goodwin, P.M.; Halldorsson, H.; Lewis, P.J.; Shall, S.; Zia'ee, A.

    1979-01-01

    Both N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and γ-radiation lower cellular NAD in mouse leukaemia cells (L1210) in a dose-dependent way. The minimum NAD level is reached 2 h after a brief exposure to N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, but within 15 min of γ-irradiation. The cells remain metabolically active; they are able to recover their control NAD levels and are impermeable to trypan blue. Several inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibit the drop in cellular NAD caused by these two agents: 2 mM 5-methylnicotinamide, 1 mM theophylline or 1 mM theobromine inhibit the effect of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea on cellular NAD level; 200 μM thymidine, 500 μM 5-methylnicotinaminde, 500 μM thephylline and 500 μM theobromine prevent the lowering of cellular NAD by γ-irradiation. The extent to which the drop in cellular NAD is inhibited is dependent on both the concentration of cytotoxic agent and of polymerase inhibitor. Caffeine will inhibit the drop in NAD but only at 10 mM, while nicotonic acid is ineffictive even at this dose. The activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is permeabilized cells immediately after γ-radiation increases with dose up to 12 krad, giving a maximal 3.4-fold stimulation of the enzyme activity, whereas the degradation of NAD under conditions optimal for NAD glycohydrolase does not change. The activity of the polymerase shows a close temporal correlation with the NAD drop following both γ-radiation and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. The enzyme activity is maximal when the NAD content. (orig./AJ) 891 AJ/orig.- 892 HIS [de

  16. Analysis of causes of death of population of Altai region settlements exposed to radiation during nuclear test on august 29, 1949 at the Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoikhet, Ya.N.; Kiselev, V.I.; Algazin, A.I.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of causes of death of individuals exposed to radiation during nuclear test of 1949 in the effective dose 0.05 - 2.8 Sv was conducted. An increase in spontaneous mortality rate from solid malignant neoplasm in general was detected among individuals exposed at the age of 20 years and more, during the first 29 years of observation with the effective dose 0.5 Sv and higher. The highest excess mortality rates were observed during the first 10 - 29 years with the effective dose 1 Sv. In the same period after the test the excess mortality rates from respiratory organs cancer were detected with the effective dose 0.5 Sv and higher and from digestive organs cancer - with the dose 1 Sv and higher

  17. Molecular and genetic characterization of a radiation-induced structural rearrangement in mouse chromosome 2 causing mutations at the limb deformity and agouti loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woychik, R.P.; Generoso, W.M.; Russell, L.B.; Cain, K.T.; Cacheiro, N.L.; Bultman, S.J.; Selby, P.B.; Dickinson, M.E.; Hogan, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular characterization of mutations in the mouse, particularly those involving agent-induced major structural alterations, is proving to be useful for correlating the structure and expression of individual genes with their function in the whole organism. Here we present the characterization of a radiation-induced mutation that simultaneously generated distinct alleles of both the limb deformity (ld) and agouti (a) loci, two developmentally important regions of chromosome 2 normally separated by 20 centimorgans. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that an interstitial segment of chromosome 17 (17B- 17C; or, possibly, 17A2-17B) had been translocated into the distal end of chromosome 2, resulting in a smaller-than-normal chromosome 17 (designated 17del) and a larger form of chromosome 2 designated 2(17). Additionally, a large interstitial segment of the 2(17) chromosome, immediately adjacent and proximal to the insertion site, did not match bands 2E4-2H1 at corresponding positions on a normal chromosome 2. Molecular analysis detected a DNA rearrangement in which a portion of the ld locus was joined to sequences normally tightly linked to the a locus. This result, along with the genetic and cytogenetic data, suggests that the alleles of ld and a in this radiation-induced mutation, designated ldIn2 and ajIn2, were associated with DNA breaks caused by an inversion of an interstitial segment in the 2(17) chromosome

  18. A Review of Root Causes of SCC Phenomena in BWR/RBMK: An Overview of Radiation-Induced Long Cell Action Relevant to SCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genn Saji

    2004-01-01

    The author suggests a new hypothetical mechanism: radiation-induced 'long cell action' may cause electrolytic corrosion. In this mechanism, SCC (stress corrosion cracking) results from auto-catalytic growth of cracks in crevice water chemistry that is kept acidic by a combination of hydration of cations released from crack tips. The acidic chemistry is maintained by radiation-induced 'long cell action' in pits which are maintained by a trans-passive corrosion process under a stress field. The pivotal point of the thesis is 'long cell action' which appears not to have been investigated in the nuclear community. It is because the reactor water used in BWR/RBMK systems has a very low electrical conductivity. For 'long cell action' to take place, there must be an unknown ion transport mechanism. One potential mechanism can be the high flow rate of the reactor water, carrying ionic species from the anode to the cathode. The other is the effective removal of ferrous ions by deposition as crud, which enhanced by the decomposition of H 2 O 2 . There are also some surprising similarities between SCC in the reactor systems and the basic mechanism of underground corrosion by long cell action. In this mechanism, the 'long cell action' is induced by a difference in availability of oxygen inside the soil. Conduction of electrons through an electric conductor over a long distance plays a significant role as they are released by dissolution of metallic ions and sucked up from the metal surface. (author)

  19. Exposure to 16O-particle radiation causes aging-like decrements in rats through increased oxidative stress, inflammation and loss of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulose, Shibu M; Bielinski, Donna F; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Rabin, Bernard M; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Exposing young rats to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles), a ground-based model for exposure to cosmic rays, enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation, disrupts the functioning of neuronal communication, and alters cognitive behaviors. Even though exposure to HZE particles occurs at low fluence rates, the cumulative effects of long-term exposure result in molecular changes similar to those seen in aged animals. In the present study, we assessed markers of autophagy, a dynamic process for intracellular degradation and recycling of toxic proteins and organelles, as well as stress and inflammatory responses, in the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats irradiated at 2 months of age with 5 and 50 cGy and 1 Gy of ionizing oxygen particles ((16)O) (1000 MeV/n). Compared to nonirradiated controls, exposure to (16)O particles significantly inhibited autophagy function in the hippocampus as measured by accumulation of ubiquitin inclusion bodies such as P62/SQSTM1, autophagosome marker microtubule-associated protein 1 beta light chain 3 (MAP1B-LC3), beclin1 and proteins such as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). The molecular changes measured at short (36 h) and long (75 days) intervals after (16)O-particle exposure indicate that the loss of autophagy function occurred shortly after exposure but was recovered via inhibition of mTOR. However, HZE-particle radiation caused significant sustained loss of protein kinase C alpha (PKC-α), a key G protein modulator involved in neuronal survival and functions of neuronal trophic factors. Exposure to (16)O particles also caused substantial increases in the levels of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), indicating glial cell activation 75 days after exposure. This is the first report to show the molecular effects of (16)O-particle radiation on oxidative stress, inflammation and loss of autophagy in the brain of young rats.

  20. Risk Factors: Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation of certain wavelengths, called ionizing radiation, has enough energy to damage DNA and cause cancer. Ionizing radiation includes radon, x-rays, gamma rays, and other forms of high-energy radiation.

  1. CT manifestations of radiation-induced change in chest tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagani, J.J.; Libshitz, H.I.

    1982-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of acute and chronic radiation change in the thorax is described. Acute radiation pneumonitis demonstrates patchy, confluent regions of increased pulmonary attenuation. Chronic changes include soft tissue density fibrotic changes that blend smoothly with the pleural surfaces and adjacent mediastinal structures. Also seen are bronchiectatic changes and distortion of normal intrathoracic anatomic relationships. Both the acute and chronic changes usually make linear lateral margins with adjacent aerated lung. Development of a discrete mass or focal cavitation after the radiation changes have become stable is suspect for recurrent tumor or infection

  2. Sub-acute occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to low-level exposure to diisocyanates in a secretary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, J; Knolle, J; Sennekamp, J; Schulz, K T; Hahn, J U; Hering, K G; Raulf-Heimsoth, M; Merget, R

    2008-09-01

    There is virtually no information in the literature about the exposure levels needed to induce hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) by diisocyanates. The present study reports a case of occupational HP due to diisocyanates after low-level exposure. A 53-yr-old female never-smoker developed progressive shortness of breath on exertion, cough, fatigue and flu-like symptoms shortly after she began work as a secretary of a car body repair shop. A diagnosis of HP was made 2 yrs later, based on a restrictive ventilatory defect, a reticulonodular and discrete ground-glass pattern on high-resolution computed tomography, lymphocytosis in bronchoalveolar lavage and specific immunoglobulin G antibodies to diisocyanate human serum albumin conjugates in the patient's serum. The diagnosis was confirmed by recovery after exposure cessation and deterioration after re-exposure. Ambient monitoring revealed air concentrations of different diisocyanate monomers below the detection limit in both the patient's work station and in front of the paint spray booths, with the exception of one measurement that showed 4,4-methylenediphenyl diisocyanate concentrations of 3 microg x m(-3) in front of one booth (corresponding to a total reactive isocyanate group concentration of 1 microg