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Sample records for radiation mucositis results

  1. Radiation induced oral mucositis

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    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  2. Head and neck radiation and mucositis.

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    Garden, Adam S; Chambers, Mark S

    2007-04-01

    We will review the recent literature that has provided new insights into the pathogenesis, metrics and therapeutics of mucositis. Radiation techniques include conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy that attempt to minimize dose to normal tissues while still delivering high doses to tumor targets. Drugs used to prevent or treat mucositis typically fall into three classes: antimicrobials, growth factors and radioprotectors. To date, drugs in all three categories have had little success in preventing radiation-induced mucositis, but palifermin, a keratinocyte growth factor, and RK-0202, a topical radioprotector, hold promise and are under investigation. Treatment of patients with head and neck cancers often requires multimodality therapy, and radiotherapy is often a critical component of this approach. Unfortunately, the dose intense regimens required to treat patients often results in mucositis. While this treatment sequela has long been recognized, only recently have researchers clearly identified its incidence and developed metrics to quantify mucositis and its resultant symptoms. Efforts to minimize mucositis have involved both advances in radiation physics, and the development of pharmacologic agents to prevent or treat mucositis. While no drug to date has shown significant efficacy in reducing the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis for head and neck cancer patients, several agents are currently being tested and hold promise.

  3. Functional Data Analysis Applied to Modeling of Severe Acute Mucositis and Dysphagia Resulting From Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

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    Dean, Jamie A., E-mail: jamie.dean@icr.ac.uk [Joint Department of Physics, The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Wong, Kee H. [Head and Neck Unit, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Gay, Hiram [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Welsh, Liam C.; Jones, Ann-Britt; Schick, Ulrike [Head and Neck Unit, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Newbold, Kate L.; Bhide, Shreerang A.; Harrington, Kevin J. [Head and Neck Unit, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Nutting, Christopher M. [Head and Neck Unit, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Gulliford, Sarah L. [Joint Department of Physics, The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: Current normal tissue complication probability modeling using logistic regression suffers from bias and high uncertainty in the presence of highly correlated radiation therapy (RT) dose data. This hinders robust estimates of dose-response associations and, hence, optimal normal tissue–sparing strategies from being elucidated. Using functional data analysis (FDA) to reduce the dimensionality of the dose data could overcome this limitation. Methods and Materials: FDA was applied to modeling of severe acute mucositis and dysphagia resulting from head and neck RT. Functional partial least squares regression (FPLS) and functional principal component analysis were used for dimensionality reduction of the dose-volume histogram data. The reduced dose data were input into functional logistic regression models (functional partial least squares–logistic regression [FPLS-LR] and functional principal component–logistic regression [FPC-LR]) along with clinical data. This approach was compared with penalized logistic regression (PLR) in terms of predictive performance and the significance of treatment covariate–response associations, assessed using bootstrapping. Results: The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the PLR, FPC-LR, and FPLS-LR models was 0.65, 0.69, and 0.67, respectively, for mucositis (internal validation) and 0.81, 0.83, and 0.83, respectively, for dysphagia (external validation). The calibration slopes/intercepts for the PLR, FPC-LR, and FPLS-LR models were 1.6/−0.67, 0.45/0.47, and 0.40/0.49, respectively, for mucositis (internal validation) and 2.5/−0.96, 0.79/−0.04, and 0.79/0.00, respectively, for dysphagia (external validation). The bootstrapped odds ratios indicated significant associations between RT dose and severe toxicity in the mucositis and dysphagia FDA models. Cisplatin was significantly associated with severe dysphagia in the FDA models. None of the covariates was significantly associated with severe

  4. Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis

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    Osama Muhammad Maria

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT, which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  5. Low-level laser therapy in chemo- and radiation-induced mucositis: results of multicenter phase III studies

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    Bensadoun, Rene-Jean

    2001-04-01

    Low of middle energy irradiation with helium-neon laser (LLLT) appears to be a simple atraumatic technique for the prevention and treatment of mucositis of various origins. Preliminary findings obtained by Ciais et al prompted randomized multi-center, double-blind trials to evaluate LLLT for the prevention of a acute chemo- and radiation- induced stomatitis. Irradiation by LLLT corresponds to local application of a high photon density monochromatic light source. Activation of epithelial healing on LLL-treated surfaces, the most commonly recognized effect, has been confirmed by numerous in vitro studies, and is a function of cell type, wavelength, and energy dose. The mechanism of action at a molecular and enzymatic level is currently being studied (detoxification of free-radicals).

  6. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

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    Cotrim, Ana P. [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yoshikawa, Masanobu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baum, Bruce J., E-mail: bbaum@dir.nidcr.nih.gov [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  7. Effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: A randomized clinical trial

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    Satheeshkumar P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral care in cancer patients is an important aspect in the quality of life of patients undergoing cancer therpay. Mucositis, trismus, salivary gland dysfunction are the main complications of the cancer therapy, which lead to long-term comlications such as radiation caries, poor oral hygiene and osteoradionecrosis. A timely oral evaluation and intervention in these patients can reduce the severity of the potential complications. Triclosan is an antibacterial agent widely used in periodontal therapy, the effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation induced oral mucositis is evaluated here. Aims: 1 To determine the effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis. 2 To compare the effectiveness of triclosan mouth rinse with conventional sodium bicarbonate mouth rinse. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four patients who underwent radiation therapy for oral cancer and subsequently developed oral mucositis were included in the study. They were randomly allocated into two groups on noticing grade I mucositis (erythema. The study group was advised to use triclosan mouthwash containing triclosan 0.03% W/V and sodium bicarbonate 2 mg mouth wash for the control group. A weekly follow-up evaluation of body weight, food intake, pain and grading of mucositis were made during the radiation treatment period and post radiation treatment period. Results: Both the groups were statistically identical. All the 24 patients in both the groups passed through grade 3 mucositis on the last day of radiotherapy. However, 10 patients in the control group and only one patient in the study group entered to grade 4 mucositis. A definite change was noticed in the severity of the mucositis, food intake and weight loss. The control group took more than 45 days to resolve while the study group took only less than 28 days. Discussion: The results of the study were evaluated and tried to formulate a hypothesis so as to explain

  8. Modification of radiation-induced acute oral mucositis in the rat.

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    Rezvani, M; Ross, G A

    2004-02-01

    A new non-toxic drug (compound A) consisting of curcumin, alpha-tocopherol and sunflower oil was developed and its efficacy tested in the treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis in the rat. Mature (12 weeks old, 200-225 g) female Sprague-Dawley rats were used. While under general anaesthesia, the tongues of the animals were slightly extended outside and a region of the underside of the tongue was irradiated in-situ with single doses of 2.27 MeV beta-rays from a 5-mm diameter 90Sr/90Y plaque. The dose-rate of the source was about 10 Gy min(-1) at the surface of the mucus membrane. Irradiations and subsequent assessment of the lesion were carried out under general anaesthesia maintained by a 1.5% halothane/oxygen mixture. Six groups of animals were irradiated with single doses of 13.5, 15.0, 16.5 or 18Gy. One subgroup (radiation only) received no further treatment, while the other five groups received 0.5 ml day(-1) of either compound A, sunflower oil, alpha-tocopherol, curcumin or water containing 10% ethanol by oral gavage until the end of experiments. Mucosal ulceration (erosion of mucosal epithelium) was considered as an end-point. From the day after irradiation until any acute radiation-induced oral mucosal lesion had healed, the tongues of the animals were assessed daily for the presence of radiation-induced mucositis (mucosal ulceration). Quantal data for the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis were analysed using logit analysis and a dose-modification factor was obtained. There was a modest increase in ED50, the dose expected to cause mucositis in 50% of the animals after both alpha-tocopherol and sunflower oil were administered. This resulted in dose-modification factors of 1.05. While curcumin treatment resulted in a dose-modification factor of 1.09. Compound A significantly reduced the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis with a statistically significant dose-modification factor of 1.2 +/- 0.1. Curcumin and other components of compound A

  9. Effect of epicatechin against radiation-induced oral mucositis: in vitro and in vivo study.

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    Yoo Seob Shin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Radiation-induced oral mucositis limits the delivery of high-dose radiation to head and neck cancer. This study investigated the effectiveness of epicatechin (EC, a component of green tea extracts, on radiation-induced oral mucositis in vitro and in vivo. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The effect of EC on radiation-induced cytotoxicity was analyzed in the human keratinocyte line HaCaT. Radiation-induced apoptosis, change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and changes in the signaling pathway were investigated. In vivo therapeutic effects of EC for oral mucositis were explored in a rat model. Rats were monitored by daily inspections of the oral cavity, amount of oral intake, weight change and survival rate. For histopathologic evaluation, hematoxylin-eosin staining and TUNEL staining were performed. RESULTS: EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis, change of MMP, and intracellular ROS generation in HaCaT cells. EC treatment markedly attenuated the expression of p-JNK, p-38, and cleaved caspase-3 after irradiation in the HaCaT cells. Rats with radiation-induced oral mucositis showed decreased oral intake, weight and survival rate, but oral administration of EC significantly restored all three parameters. Histopathologic changes were significantly decreased in the EC-treated irradiated rats. TUNEL staining of rat oral mucosa revealed that EC treatment significantly decreased radiation-induced apoptotic cells. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in keratinocytes and rat oral mucosa and may be a safe and effective candidate treatment for the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis.

  10. [Radiation-induced mucositis of the aerodigestive tract: prevention and treatment. MASCC/ISOO mucositis group's recommendations].

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    Bensadoun, René-Jean; Le Page, Fabien; Darcourt, Vincent; Bensadoun, Francis; Ciais, Gaston; Rostom, Yousri A; Poissonnet, Gilles; Dassonville, Olivier; Demard, François

    2006-02-01

    Acute mucositis is the main intensity-limiting toxicity in the management of head and neck (H&N) and digestive track carcinomas with radiotherapy. New radiation modalities (hyperfractionation and/or acceleration) as well as combined modality regimens in this situation induce higher rates of acute toxicity. Hyperfractionation for example allows higher control rates, with few late toxicities, but it slightly increases acute mucositis. The addition of chemotherapy introduces systemic toxicity and can exacerbate local tissue reactions when used concurrently with radiation. Mucositis is recognized as the principal limiting factor to further treatment intensification. As local-regional control and overall survival are related to dose-intensity in this case, further research into the assessment, analysis, prevention and treatment of mucosal toxicity is not only crucial to the improvement in quality of life, but certainly to improved rates of disease control as well. Several topical and systemic treatments are directed to the decrease and the acceptance of this acute toxicity, but few have shown significant preventive effect. Improvement of technical aspects of H&N radiotherapy (3D conformal radiation, intensity-modulated radiotherapy) should have a major impact in the prevention of mucositis. The efficacy of low level laser therapy in the management of such a toxicity could hence yield important development of this method in the field of oncology. MASCC/ISOO mucositis group's recommendations for the management of acute radiation-induced mucositis are here summarized.

  11. Radiation induced oral mucositis: a review of current literature on prevention and management.

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    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Rath, G K

    2016-09-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a major limiting acute side effect of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. The spectrum of problems associated with mucositis includes oral pain, odynophagia, reduced oral intake, and secondary infections. Incidence of mucositis is increased with addition of concurrent chemotherapy as well as altered fractionation schedules. This leads to treatment interruption and suboptimal disease control. Hence, prevention as well as timely management of OM is necessary for optimum tumor control. We reviewed the English literature with key words "Radiation induced mucositis, Mucositis, Oral Mucositis" to find relevant articles describing incidence, pathophysiology, prophylaxis, and treatment of oral mucositis. Prevention and treatment of OM is an active area of research. Maintenance of oral hygiene is an important part in prevention of OM. A battery of agents including normal saline and alkali (soda bicarbonate) mouth washes, low level laser therapy, and benzydamine (non-steroidal analgesic and anti-inflammatory) have effectiveness in the prevention and treatment of radiation induced oral mucositis. Chlorhexidine mouth gargles are recommended for prevention of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis but is not recommended for radiotherapy associated mucositis. Treatment of co-existing infection is also important and both topical (povidone iodine) and systemic anti fungals should be used judiciously. Radiation induced oral mucositis is a common problem limiting the efficacy of radiation by increasing treatment breaks. Adequate prophylaxis and treatment may limit the severity of radiation mucositis and improve compliance to radiation which may translate in better disease control and survival.

  12. Pathological study on the mucosal damage of gastric replacement of the esophagus after the postoperative radiation

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    Iwata, Takashi; Kuniyasu, Hiroki; Hirai, Toshihiro; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Yoshimoto, Akihiro; Kuwahara, Masaki; Toge, Tetsuya [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine

    1997-12-01

    Mucosal damage to the whole stomach as an esohageal substitute, via the postmediastinal route, was pathologically investigated to elucidate the influence of postoperative radiation therapy. Subjects were 26 and 16 operated cases of esophageal cancer with and without postoperative radiation therapy, respectively. Endoscopic biopsy of the replaced stomach was performed preoperatively, before and after the radiation, and then at various different times for 2 years. The biopsy specimens obtained by endoscopic examination from the upper, middle and lower sites of the stomach were evaluated for the following pathological factors; atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, neutrophil infiltration, edema, erosion, necrosis and atypia. These findings were rated in score and changes in scores were studied. In both radiation and non-radiation groups, the degree of inflammatory change was strongest in the upper site, following middle and lower site in this order, in that some hematogenic involvement was considered. When the both groups compared for the inflammatory change, the changes in the radiation group were stronger than the other group in all sites. Necrosis and especially atypia were seen only in the upper and middle sites of radiated patients. Chronological inflammatory changes in each patient revealed that, as the site went up, the inflammation became stronger and was intensified by radiation therapy. But these inflammatory changes and atypia disappeared within a year after radiation therapy. These results suggest that postoperative radiation therapy would not be contraindicated for patients undergoing an esophageal substitution. (author)

  13. Clinical effects of flurbiprofen tooth patch on radiation-induced oral mucositis. A pilot study

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    Stokman, MA; Spijkervet, FKL; Burlage, FR; Roodenburg, JLN

    Background: Mucositis is an oral sequela of radiotherapy. In the development of mucositis several mechanisms play a role, such as inflammation and the effect of radiation on the high proliferation rate of oral basal epithelial cells. Therefore, administration of a drug with antiinflammatory and

  14. Assessment of the hamster cheek pouch as a model for radiation-induced oral mucositis, and evaluation of the protective effects of keratinocyte growth factor using this model.

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    Watanabe, Shinichi; Suemaru, Katsuya; Nakanishi, Miki; Nakajima, Noriko; Tanaka, Mamoru; Tanaka, Akihiro; Araki, Hiroaki

    2014-10-01

    Oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy impacts quality of life. Previous studies have reported on the use of the hamster as a model for radiation-induced oral mucositis; however, details regarding factors such as radiation dose response, effects on myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and related histopathological changes remain unclear. In the present study using the hamster, we evaluated the dose dependency of radiation-induced oral mucositis and the effects of keratinocyte growth factor (palifermin). Oral mucositis was induced in the cheek pouch by X-irradiation using single doses in the range 20-50 Gy. To evaluate the protective effect of palifermin, administration was carried out (5 mg/kg) on days 1, 2 and 3 or on days 9, 10 and 11 after single irradiation at a dose of 40 Gy. The oral mucositis score, MPO activity and histopathological findings of inflammation increased in a dose dependent manner. Palifermin treatment stimulated the proliferation of mucosal epithelial cells. Additionally, palifermin when administered on days 1, 2 and 3 after irradiation (40 Gy) reduced the severity of oral mucositis. The hamster was found to be a suitable model for radiation-induced oral mucositis, with excellent results regarding the evaluation of radiation dose response and drug reactivity.

  15. Acute mucosal radiation reactions in patients with head and neck cancer. Patterns of mucosal healing on the basis of daily examinations

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    Wygoda, A.; Skladowski, K.; Rutkowski, T.; Hutnik, M.; Golen, M.; Pilecki, B.; Przeorek, W.; Lukaszczyk-Widel, B. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland). 1st Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The goal of this research was to evaluate the healing processes of acute mucosal radiation reactions (AMRR) in patients with head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: In 46 patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients irradiated with conventional (n = 25) and accelerated (n = 21) dose fractionation AMRR was evaluated daily during and after radiotherapy. Complex of morphological and functional symptoms according to the Dische score were collected daily until complete healing. Results: Duration of healing after the end of radiotherapy ranged widely (12-70 days). It was on the average 8 days longer for accelerated than for conventional radiotherapy (p = 0.016). Duration of dysphagia was also longer for accelerated irradiation (11 days, p = 0.027). Three types of morphological symptoms were observed as the last symptom at the end of AMRR healing: spotted and confluent mucositis, erythema, and edema. Only a slight correlation between healing duration and area of irradiation fields (r = 0.23) was noted. In patients with confluent mucositis, two morphological forms of mucosal healing were observed, i.e., marginal and spotted. The spotted form was noted in 71% of patients undergoing conventional radiotherapy and in 38% of patients undergoing accelerated radiotherapy. The symptoms of mucosal healing were observed in 40% patients during radiotherapy. Conclusion: The wide range of AMRR healing reflects individual potential of mucosa recovery with longer duration for accelerated radiotherapy. Two morphological forms of confluent mucositis healing were present: marginal and spotted. Healing of AMRR during radiotherapy can be observed in a significant proportion of patients. (orig.)

  16. Pilot study of ice-ball cryotherapy for radiation-induced oral mucositis

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    Ohyama, Waichiro; Ebihara, Satoshi [National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-02-01

    Oral mucositis caused by radiotherapy is intractable and may worsen the patient`s nutritional condition and interrupt treatment. To reduce the incidence and severity of oral mucositis induced by cancer therapy and promote early improvement of its symptoms, we devised cryotherapy by ice balls using Elase (fibrinolysin and deoxyribonuclease, combined). The therapeutic effect of ice-ball cryotherapy was evaluated in 10 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity and pharynx who were undergoing radiotherapy. Cryotherapy was continued from the development of oral mucositis until its disappearance. The severity of various symptoms of mucositis were reduced by cryotherapy. Healing required 3 to 16 days (median, 7 days) after the end of radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was not interrupted in any cases. This preliminary report suggests that ice-ball cryotherapy is an effective treatment for radiation-induced oral mucositis. (author).

  17. Oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer during postoperative irradiation. An alleviating effect on acute radiation mucositis

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    Katsura, Kouji; Masuko, Noriko; Hayashi, Takafumi [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry; Sugita, Tadashi; Sakai, Kunio; Tsuchida, Emiko; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Sasamoto, Ryuta

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer on alleviating acute radiation mucositis. Eighteen patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy for tongue and oral floor cancer were evaluated. Radiotherapy was given in 2 Gy per fraction, 5 times a week for a total dose of 50 Gy in most patients. Radiation field included the tongue and oral floor. During radiotherapy, 8 patients were treated by dento-maxillofacial radiologists with special concern on oral hygiene (oral hygiene group) and the remaining 10 patients were treated with routine dental care (standard medication group). Mucositis were evaluated using JCOG grade and EORTC/RTOG score by radiotherapists or dento-maxillofacial radiologists at 10 Gy intervals. Oral hygiene plans comprised motivation to maintain oral hygiene and establishing the habits of oral self care 4 times per day. Once a week, oral hygiene and oral cleaning of patients were checked by dento-maxillofacial radiologists. Oral self care included mechanical tooth brushing and a chemical mouthwash. No patients with grade 3 and score 4 mucositis were noted in the oral hygiene group. Severe mucositis occurred less frequently in the oral hygiene group than in the standard medication group. Interruption of radiotherapy due to severe mucositis did not occur in the oral hygiene group. On the other hand, interruption of radiotherapy occurred in four patients in the standard medication group, and in three it was due to severe oral pain. Our results suggested that our method of oral hygiene was more effective for alleviating acute radiation mucositis than other methods so far reported. In addition, our method is considered to be useful in preventing rampant dental caries and severe periodontitis due to the xerostomia induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  18. Inhibition of Protease-activated Receptor 1 Ameliorates Intestinal Radiation Mucositis in a Preclinical Rat Model

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    Wang, Junru; Kulkarni, Ashwini [Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Chintala, Madhu [Schering-Plough Research Institute, Kenilworth, New Jersey (United States); Fink, Louis M. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Hauer-Jensen, Martin, E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu [Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Surgery Service, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, using a specific small-molecule inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling, whether the beneficial effect of thrombin inhibition on radiation enteropathy development is due to inhibition of blood clotting or to cellular (PAR1-mediated) thrombin effects. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent fractionated X-irradiation (5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 9) of a 4-cm small-bowel segment. Early radiation toxicity was evaluated in rats receiving PAR1 inhibitor (SCH602539, 0, 10, or 15 mg/kg/d) from 1 day before to 2 weeks after the end of irradiation. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis was evaluated in animals receiving SCH602539 (0, 15, or 30 mg/kg/d) until 2 weeks after irradiation, or continuously until termination of the experiment 26 weeks after irradiation. Results: Blockade of PAR1 ameliorated early intestinal toxicity, with reduced overall intestinal radiation injury (P=.002), number of myeloperoxidase-positive (P=.03) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive (P=.04) cells, and collagen III accumulation (P=.005). In contrast, there was no difference in delayed radiation enteropathy in either the 2- or 26-week administration groups. Conclusion: Pharmacological blockade of PAR1 seems to reduce early radiation mucositis but does not affect the level of delayed intestinal radiation fibrosis. Early radiation enteropathy is related to activation of cellular thrombin receptors, whereas platelet activation or fibrin formation may play a greater role in the development of delayed toxicity. Because of the favorable side-effect profile, PAR1 blockade should be further explored as a method to ameliorate acute intestinal radiation toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer and to protect first responders and rescue personnel in radiologic/nuclear emergencies.

  19. Modulation of radiation-induced oral mucositis by pentoxifylline: Preclinical studies

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    Gruber, Sylvia; Bozsaky, Eva [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Schmidt, Margret [Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site Dresden; Wolfram, Kathrin; Haagen, Julia; Habelt, Bettina; Puttrich, Martin [Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-10-29

    Oral mucositis is a frequent early side effect of radio(chemo)therapy of head-and-neck malignancies. The epithelial radiation response is accompanied by inflammatory reactions; their interaction with epithelial processes remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of pentoxifylline (PTX) on the oral mucosal radiation response in the mouse tongue model. Irradiation comprised fractionation (5 fractions of 3 Gy/week) over 1 (days 0-4) or 2 weeks (days 0-4, 7-11), followed by graded local top-up doses (day 7/14), in order to generate complete dose-effect curves. PTX (15 mg/kg subcutaneously) was applied once daily over varying time intervals. Ulceration of mouse tongue epithelium, corresponding to confluent mucositis, was analyzed as the clinically relevant endpoint. With fractionated irradiation over 1 week, PTX administration significantly reduced the incidence of mucosal reactions when initiated before (day - 5) the onset of fractionation; a trend was observed for start of PTX treatment on day 0. Similarly, PTX treatment combined with 2 weeks of fractionation had a significant effect on ulcer incidence in all but one experiment. This clearly illustrates the potential of PTX to ameliorate oral mucositis during daily fractionated irradiation. PTX resulted in a significant reduction of oral mucositis during fractionated irradiation, which may be attributed to stimulation of mucosal repopulation processes. The biological basis of this effect, however, needs to be clarified in further, detailed mechanistic studies. (orig.) [German] Die orale Mukositis ist eine haeufige fruehe Nebenwirkung der Radio(chemo)therapie von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Die epitheliale Strahlenreaktion wird von Entzuendungserscheinungen begleitet; deren Interaktion mit epithelialen Prozessen ist derzeit unklar. Ziel der vorliegenden Untersuchung war die quantitative Erfassung des Effekts einer Behandlung mit Pentoxifyllin (PTX) auf die Strahlenreaktion der Mundschleimhaut

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of topical application of natural honey and benzydamine hydrochloride in the management of radiation mucositis

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    Sadaksharam Jayachandran

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Pure natural honey can be an effective agent in managing radiation induced oral mucositis. Honey could be a simple, potent and inexpensive agent, which is easily available, and it can be a better therapeutic agent in managing radiation mucositis in developing countries like India for the management of this morbidity.

  1. Patch Test Results in Patients with Allergic Contact Dermatitis / Mucositis

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    Özlem Su

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: The aims of our study were to determine the frequency of positive patch reactions and the most common allergens in patients with allergic contact dermatitis (ACD and/or mucositis(M who underwent with T.R.U.E. “Thin-layer Rapid-Use Epicutaneous” test and evaluate supplemantal series used with T.R.U.E. test effect on patch test results.Material and Method: In this study 161 ACD, 5 ACM, 1 ACD and ACM were enrolled. While 139 of all patients were patch tested with T.R.U.E. test alone,out of 28 patients were tested for T.R.U.E. test and also with supplemental series that included textile colours (9 of tested patients, plastic and glues (9, dental screening (6, backery (2, cosmetic (1 and plastic and glues and dental screening (1. Supplemental series were chosen according to patient’s occupation and clinic presentation. The data from our patients were analyzed as percentage. The relationship between contact sensitization and atopic status was evaluated with Yate’s correlation x2 test.Results: Eighty-six male, 81 female were taken into this study. The median age was 36.5.While 25.9% of 139 patients tested with T.R.U.E. test alone,46.4% of 28 patients applied supplemental series in addition to T.R.U.E. test showed positive reaction to one or more allergens. The most common allergens were nickel sulphate (14.4%, potassium dichromate (4.8%, fragrance mix (2.9% and colophony (2.9%. The most common supplemental allergens were octil gallat (50% in bakery and copper sulphate, goldsodiumthiosulphate (42.8% in dental screening. Positive patch reactions were detected 83.3% in 6 patients with AKM, 80% of these positive reactions was againts dental screening. The rate of contact sensitization between atopics and non-atopics was not significant (p>0.05. Conclusion: We suggest in presence of mucositis and/or occupational dermatoses using supplemental series in addition to T.R.U.E. test would be more beneficial in identifing the

  2. Mucosite bucal rádio e quimioinduzida Radiation therapy and chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis

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    Luiz Evaristo Ricci Volpato

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O aumento da intensidade da quimioterapia e radioterapia no tratamento do câncer tem elevado a incidência de efeitos colaterais, em especial da mucosite bucal. OBJETIVO E MÉTODO: Através de revisão bibliográfica realizou-se atualizar informações quanto à definição, características clínicas, incidência, etiologia, patofisiologia, morbidade associada, prevenção e tratamento dessa manifestação clínica. RESULTADOS: Estudos atuais definem a mucosite bucal como uma inflamação e ulceração dolorosa bastante freqüente na mucosa bucal apresentando formação de pseudomembrana. Sua incidência e severidade são influenciadas por variáveis associadas ao paciente e ao tratamento a que ele é submetido. A mucosite é conseqüência de dois mecanismos maiores: toxicidade direta da terapêutica utilizada sobre a mucosa e mielossupressão gerada pelo tratamento. Sua patofisiologia é composta por quatro fases interdependentes: fase inflamatória/vascular, fase epitelial, fase ulcerativa/bacteriológica e fase de reparação. É considerada fonte potencial de infecções com risco de morte, sendo a principal causa de interrupção de tratamentos antineoplásicos. Algumas intervenções mostraram-se potencialmente efetivas para sua prevenção e tratamento. Entretanto, faz-se necessária a realização de novos estudos clínicos mais bem conduzidos para obtenção de melhor evidência científica acerca do agente terapêutico de escolha para o controle da mucosite bucal, permitindo a realização da quimioterapia e radioterapia do câncer em parâmetros ideais.Tincreasing the intensity of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the management of cancer has increased the incidence of adverse effects, especially oral mucositis. AIM AND METHODS: a bibliographical review was conducted on the definition of oral mucositis, its clinical findings, the incidence, its etiology, the pathofisiology, associated morbidity, prevention and treatment

  3. Bone and mucosal dosimetry in skin radiation therapy: a Monte Carlo study using kilovoltage photon and megavoltage electron beams

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    Chow, James C. L.; Jiang, Runqing

    2012-06-01

    This study examines variations of bone and mucosal doses with variable soft tissue and bone thicknesses, mimicking the oral or nasal cavity in skin radiation therapy. Monte Carlo simulations (EGSnrc-based codes) using the clinical kilovoltage (kVp) photon and megavoltage (MeV) electron beams, and the pencil-beam algorithm (Pinnacle3 treatment planning system) using the MeV electron beams were performed in dose calculations. Phase-space files for the 105 and 220 kVp beams (Gulmay D3225 x-ray machine), and the 4 and 6 MeV electron beams (Varian 21 EX linear accelerator) with a field size of 5 cm diameter were generated using the BEAMnrc code, and verified using measurements. Inhomogeneous phantoms containing uniform water, bone and air layers were irradiated by the kVp photon and MeV electron beams. Relative depth, bone and mucosal doses were calculated for the uniform water and bone layers which were varied in thickness in the ranges of 0.5-2 cm and 0.2-1 cm. A uniform water layer of bolus with thickness equal to the depth of maximum dose (dmax) of the electron beams (0.7 cm for 4 MeV and 1.5 cm for 6 MeV) was added on top of the phantom to ensure that the maximum dose was at the phantom surface. From our Monte Carlo results, the 4 and 6 MeV electron beams were found to produce insignificant bone and mucosal dose (oral or nasal cavity. While the dose distribution in the pharynx region is unavailable due to the lack of a commercial treatment planning system commissioned for kVp beam planning in skin radiation therapy, our study provided an essential insight into the radiation staff to justify and estimate bone and mucosal dose.

  4. The optimal use of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor in radiation induced mucositis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Patni Nidhi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluation of response of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF on acute radiation toxicity profile in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Thirty three patients with proven stage I or II head & neck carcinoma received conventional external beam radiation therapy. Out of these, six patients received postoperative adjuvant therapy while remaining 27 received definitive RT. Patients were given 100 mcg GM-CSF subcutaneously per day along with radiation after they developed grade 2 mucositis and /or grade 2 dysphagia and / or complained of moderate pain. GM-CSF was administered till there was a subjective relief or objective response. Patients were evaluated for oral ulceration, swallowing status, pain and weight loss. Response to the treatment and patient outcome was assessed. Results: There was a decreased severity of mucositis and dysphagia in the evaluated patients. None of the patients suffered severe pain or required opioids. The mean weight loss was only 1.94%. Minimal side effects were experienced with GM-CSF. Conclusions: GM-CSF reduces the severity of acute side effects of radiation therapy thereby allowing completion of the treatment without interruption. Its remarkable response needs to be evaluated further in large randomized trials. The time of initiation and cessation of GM-CSF during radiation therapy and the required dose needs to be established.

  5. The effect of three mouthwashes on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck malignancies: A randomized control trial

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    Madan Kumar P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The present study was done to assess the effect of three alcohol-free mouthwashes on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck malignancies. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with head and neck malignancies, scheduled to undergo curative radiotherapy, were randomly assigned to receive one of the three alcohol-free test mouthwashes (0.12% chlorhexidine, 1% povidone-iodine, or salt/soda or a control. The patients were instructed to rinse with 10 ml of the mouthwash, twice a day, for a period of 6 weeks. Mucositis was assessed at baseline and at weekly intervals during radiation therapy, using the World Health Organization criteria for grading of mucositis. The baseline demography of the four groups was matched for age, sex, stage of cancer, and whether the patient had cancer of oral or extraoral regions. A post hoc test for repeated measures was used to find the difference of mean mucositis scores between the groups at various week intervals. Results: Among the 76 patients who completed the study, patients in the povidone-iodine group had significantly lower mucositis scores when compared to the control group from the first week of radiotherapy. Their scores were also significantly lower when compared to the salt/soda and chlorhexidine groups from the fourth and fifth week, respectively, after radiotherapy. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that use of alcohol-free povidone-iodine mouthwash can reduce the severity and delay the onset of oral mucositis due to antineoplastic radiotherapy.

  6. Early inflammatory changes in radiation-induced oral mucositis. Effect of pentoxifylline in a mouse model

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    Gruber, Sylvia; Bozsaky, Eva; Roitinger, Eva; Schwarz, Karoline [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Applied and Translational Radiobiology, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Vienna (Austria); Schmidt, Margret [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dept. Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Applied and Translational Radiobiology, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Vienna (Austria); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dept. Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Early inflammation is a major factor of mucosal reactions to radiotherapy. Pentoxifylline administration resulted in a significant amelioration of radiation-induced oral mucositis in the mouse tongue model. The underlying mechanisms may be related to the immunomodulatory properties of the drug. The present study hence focuses on the manifestation of early inflammatory changes in mouse tongue during daily fractionated irradiation and their potential modulation by pentoxifylline. Daily fractionated irradiation with 5 fractions of 3 Gy/week (days 0-4, 7-11) was given to the snouts of mice. Groups of 3 animals per day were euthanized every second day between day 0 and 14. Pentoxifylline (15 mg/kg, s. c.) was administered daily from day 5 to the day before sacrifice. The expression of the inflammatory proteins TNFα, NF-κB, and IL-1β were analysed. Fractionated irradiation increased the expression of all inflammatory markers. Pentoxifylline significantly reduced the expression of TNFα and IL-1β, but not NF-κB. Early inflammation, as indicated by the expression of the inflammatory markers TNFα, NF-κB, and IL-1β, is an essential component of early radiogenic oral mucositis. Pentoxifylline differentially modulated the expression of different inflammatory markers. The mucoprotective effect of pentoxifylline does not appear to be based on modulation of NF-κB-associated inflammation. (orig.) [German] Fruehe entzuendliche Veraenderungen sind ein bedeutender Faktor waehrend der Strahlenreaktion der Schleimhaut. Die Behandlung mit Pentoxifyllin erzielte eine signifikante Minderung strahleninduzierter oraler Mukositis im Mauszungenmodel. Die zugrundeliegenden Mechanismen sind potenziell auf die immunomodulatorischen Eigenschaften des Wirkstoffs zurueckzufuehren. Die vorliegenden Untersuchungen fokussieren daher auf die Manifestation frueher entzuendlicher Veraenderungen in der Mauszunge waehrend taeglich fraktionierter Bestrahlung und deren potenzieller Modifikation

  7. Effect of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy on the Risk of Mucositis During Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer

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    Sanguineti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gsangui1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sormani, Maria Pia [Department of Biostatistics, University of Genoa (Italy); Marur, Shanthi [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Gunn, G. Brandon; Rao, Nikhil; Cianchetti, Marco [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Ricchetti, Francesco; McNutt, Todd; Wu Binbin [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Forastiere, Arlene [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To define the roles of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the risk of Grade 3+ mucositis during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: 164 consecutive patients treated with IMRT at two institutions in nonoverlapping treatment eras were selected. All patients were treated with a dose painting approach, three dose levels, and comprehensive bilateral neck treatment under the supervision of the same radiation oncologist. Ninety-three patients received concomitant chemotherapy (cCHT) and 14 received induction chemotherapy (iCHT). Individual information of the dose received by the oral mucosa (OM) was extracted as absolute cumulative dose-volume histogram (DVH), corrected for the elapsed treatment days and reported as weekly (w) DVH. Patients were seen weekly during treatment, and peak acute toxicity equal to or greater than confluent mucositis at any point during the course of IMRT was considered the endpoint. Results: Overall, 129 patients (78.7%) reached the endpoint. The regions that best discriminated between patients with/without Grade 3+ mucositis were found at 10.1 Gy/w (V10.1) and 21 cc (D21), along the x-axis and y-axis of the OM-wDVH, respectively. On multivariate analysis, D21 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.016, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.009-1.023, p < 0.001) and cCHT (OR = 4.118, 95% CI, 1.659-10.217, p = 0.002) were the only independent predictors. However, V10.1 and D21 were highly correlated (rho = 0.954, p < 0.001) and mutually interchangeable. cCHT would correspond to 88.4 cGy/w to at least 21 cc of OM. Conclusions: Radiotherapy and chemotherapy act independently in determining acute mucosal toxicity; cCHT increases the risk of mucosal Grade 3 toxicity Almost-Equal-To 4 times over radiation therapy alone, and it is equivalent to an extra Almost-Equal-To 6.2 Gy to 21 cc of OM over a 7-week course.

  8. Development of oral mucositis model induced by radiation in hamsters: prevention and treatment with low power laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galletta, Vivian C.; Folgosi-Correa, Melissa S.; Zezell, Denise M., E-mail: vivian.galletta@gmail.com, E-mail: melfolgosi@gmail.com, E-mail: zezell@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gouw-Soares, Sheila, E-mail: sheilagouw@hotmail.com [Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul (UNICSUL), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia; Correa, Luciana, E-mail: lcorrea@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FO/USP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia

    2013-07-01

    Despite the benefits for the prognosis of patients treated with radiotherapy for oral cancer treatment, it might cause local side effects such as oral mucositis. The oral mucositis is a pathological condition that may appear in affected oral mucosa by ionizing radiation, and the pain related can alter and even stop the antineoplastic treatment, decreasing tumor control rates. Oral mucositis has several treatment modalities, although it remains as a problem since therapies available are not enough to treat efficiently this inflammatory process. Many pharmacological solutions (anti-inflammatory, antibiotics, antiseptic, lubricant agents) are used to alleviate oral mucositis symptoms. Laser treatment has been used as an option, but there is lack of studies to verify the process of laser therapy in oral mucositis caused by ionizing radiation. This work accomplishes follow-up of oral mucositis evolution, comparing laser and benzydamine therapies in an animal model. Forty-two animals were irradiated at head and neck in a single dose of 30 Grays, by means of a Co{sup 60} source. After irradiation, treatments were applied daily, once a day, for 20 days, in which severity of lesions were clinically classified by two calibrated examiners. Histological evaluation was performed to search for mucosal alterations at treated tissues. Statistical analysis of data showed that laser treatment was more efficient than benzydamine treatment, diminishing severity and duration of oral mucosal lesions caused by ionizing irradiation. (author)

  9. Chemotherapy-Induced and/or Radiation Therapy-Induced Oral Mucositis-Complicating the Treatment of Cancer

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    Maddireddy Umameshwar Rao Naidu

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The term mucositis is coined to describe the adverse effects of radiation and chemotherapy treatments. Mucositis is one of the most common adverse reactions encountered in radiation therapy for head and neck cancers, as well as in chemotherapy, in particular with drugs affecting DNA synthesis (Sphase-specific agents such as fluorouracil, methotrexate, and cytarabine. Mucositis may limit the patient's ability to tolerate chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and nutritional status is compromised. It may drastically affect cancer treatment as well as the patient's quality of life. The incidence and severity of mucositis will vary from patient to patient. It will also vary from treatment to treatment. It is estimated that there is 40% incidence of mucositis in patients treated with standard chemotherapy and this will not only increase with the number of treatment cycles but also with previous episodes. Similarly, patients who undergo bone marrow transplantation and who receive high doses of chemotherapy have a 76% chance of getting mucositis. Patients receiving radiation, in particular to head and neck cancers, have a 30% to 60% chance. The exact pathophysiology of development is not known, but it is thought to be divided into direct and indirect mucositis. Chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy will interfere with the normal turnover of epithelial, cells leading to mucosal injury; subsequently, it can also occur due to indirect invasion of Gram-negative bacteria and fungal species because most of the cancer drugs will cause changes in blood counts. With the advancement in cytology, a more precise mechanism has been established. With this understanding, we can select and target particular mediators responsible for the mucositis. Risk factors such as age, nutritional status, type of malignancy, and oral care during treatment will play important roles in the development of mucositis. Many treatment options are available to prevent and treat this

  10. Management of radiation therapy-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Part I: Clinical significance, pathophysiology and prevention

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    Wei Cheong Ngeow

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal mucositis is the acute inflammatory and ulcerative reaction of the oral mucosa following radiation therapy to the head and neck region. It is such a common problem that nearly all head and neck cancer patients develop some degree of mucositis. This complication is usually transient in nature but it also represents an important clinical problem as it is a painful, debilitating, dose-dependent side effect for which there is no widely acceptable prophylaxis or effective treatment. As several authoritative groups have recently either undertaken systematic reviews or issued guidelines on the management of mucositis, it is the aim of this review to provide instead an overview of all the possible remedies available, as well as highlighting to researchers the gaps that need to be filled. The first part of this review outlines the clinical significance and pathophysiology of radiation-induced mucositis, and looks into some of the preventive approaches available.

  11. Therapeutic management of radiation-induced oral mucositis; Therapeutische Beeinflussung der radiogenen oralen Mukositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, W. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Doelling-Jochem, I. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Baumann, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Herrmann, T. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    Background: Acute reactions of oral mucosa are a frequent side effect of radiotherapy, which often necessitates interruption of the treatment. Marked proliferation of tumor stem cells during treatment interruptions may occur in squamous cell carcinomata, which represent the majority of tumors in the head and neck area. Hence a fatal consequence of treatment breaks may be a significant decrease in tumor cure rates. Furthermore, marked acute responses frequently result in increased late sequelae (`consequential damage`). Therefore, amelioration of the mucosal response aiming at avoiding treatment breaks and at reduction of late reactions coul definitely increase the therapeutic success of radiation treatment. Results: A variety of prophylactic and therapeutic methods have been proposed for the management of acute radiation reactions of the oral mucosa. Frequently, their efficiacy has been established for chemotherapy or in combination with other immunosuppressive treatments. Hence, systemical rather than local effects have to be considered. Conclusions: In general, prophylaxis of oral mucositis is mainly based on dental restoration or edentation, in combination with frequent oral hygienic measures after the meals and with antiseptic mouthwashes. Intensive personal care is recommended. The necessity of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostoma is dependent on the status of the patient and on size and localization of the treatment area, i.e. the impairment of food uptake which is to be expected. Therapeutic intervention is restricted to local or systemic treatment of pain and local application of antimycotics and antibiotics. (orig./VHE) [Deutsch] Die akute Reaktion der Mundschleimhaut ist eine regelmaessige Nebenwirkung der klinischen Strahlentherapie von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren, die in vielen Faellen eine Unterbrechung der Behandlung erzwingt. In den Behandlungspausen besteht gerade bei den im Kopf-Hals-Bereich haeufigen Plattenepithelkarzinomen die Gefahr der verstaerkten

  12. Effect of low level helium-neon (He-Ne) laser therapy in the prevention & treatment of radiation induced mucositis in head & neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun Maiya, G; Sagar, M S; Fernandes, Donald

    2006-10-01

    Oral mucositis is a common debilitating complication of radiotherapy occurring in about 60 per cent of cancer patients. Considerable buccal toxicity of radiotherapy or chemotherapy in cancer patients to become discouraged and can affect their quality of life. In addition, such toxicity can alter the treatment plan. At present, there is no clinically appropriate prophylaxis efficacious antidote for mucositis. The low level laser (LEL) appears to be a simple, non-traumatic technique for the prevention and treatment of radiation induced mucositis. Therefore the present study was carried out to find out the effect of low-level helium-neon (He-Ne) laser in the prevention and treatment of radiation induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. The patients with carcinoma of oral cavity with stages II-IV a being uniformly treated with curative total tumour dose of 66 Gy in 33 fractions over 6 wk were selected for the study. The patients were divided based on computer generated randamosization into laser (study group) and control groups with 25 patients in each group. Both study and control groups were comparable in terms of site of the lesion, stage of the cancer and histology. The study group patients were treated with He-Ne laser (wavelength 632.8 nm and output of 10mW) and control group patients were given oral analgesics, local application of anaesthetics, 0.9 per cent saline and povidine wash during the course of radiotherapy. All patients tolerated the laser treatment without any adverse effect or reactions. The result showed a significant difference in pain and mucositis (Pmucositis grade were significantly lower (Plow-level He-Ne laser therapy during the radiotherapy treatment was found to be effective in preventing and treating the mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Further studies need to be done on a larger sample to find the mechanism.

  13. The effect of clove-based herbal mouthwash on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer: a single-blind randomized preliminary study

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    Kong M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Moonkyoo Kong,1 Deok-Sang Hwang,2 Seong Woo Yoon,3 Jinsung Kim4 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, 2Department of Korean Medicine Obstetrics & Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, 3Department of Korean Internal Medicine, Korean Medicine Cancer Center, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, 4Department of Korean Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of clove-based herbal mouthwash in ameliorating radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients were prospectively enrolled in this study and randomized to either an experimental group or a control group. The patients of the experimental group swished their mouths with a clove-based herbal mouthwash during radiotherapy (RT, while the patients of the control group swished with clear water. The primary end point of this study was incidence of radiation-induced oral mucositis. The secondary end points were time to onset of radiation-induced oral mucositis, duration of radiation-induced oral mucositis, incidence of supplemental nutrition through feeding tube, maximum pain score, body weight loss, incidence of RT interruption, and duration of RT interruption. Results: The use of clove-based herbal mouthwash shortened the duration of grade ≥2 mucositis (24.3 days vs 37.1 days, P=0.044 and reduced body weight loss during RT (3.1% vs 7.4%, P=0.023 compared with clear water. The use of clove-based herbal mouthwash also reduced the incidence of grade 3 mucositis (28.6% vs 57.1%, supplemental nutrition (0% vs 28.6%, and RT interruption (14.3% vs 28.6%, and reduced the duration of grade 3 mucositis (5.1 days vs 17.7 days and RT interruption (1 days vs 8.5 days. In addition, clove-based herbal mouthwash

  14. Comparative Efficacy of Aloe vera and Benzydamine Mouthwashes on Radiation-induced Oral Mucositis: A Triple-blind, Randomised, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebjamee, Mahnaz; Mansourian, Arash; Hajimirzamohammad, Mohammad; Mohammad, Haji Mirza Mohammad; Zadeh, Mohsen Taghi; Bekhradi, Reza; Kazemian, Ali; Manifar, Soheila; Ashnagar, Sajjad; Doroudgar, Kiavash

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of an Aloe vera mouthwash with a benzydamine mouthwash in the alleviation of radiation- induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients using a triple-blind, randomised controlled trial. Twenty-six eligible head and neck cancer patients who were to receive conventional radiation therapy at the radiation oncology department were randomised to receive an Aloe vera mouthwash or a benzydamine mouthwash. Mucositis severity was assessed during the course of radiation therapy using the WHO grading system. At baseline, there was no difference in the distribution of mucositis severity between the two groups. The mean interval between radiation therapy and onset of mucositis was similar for both groups (Aloe vera 15.69±7.77 days, benzydamine 15.85±12.96 days). The mean interval between the start of radiation therapy and the maximum severity of mucositis were was also similar in both the Aloe vera and benzydamine groups (Aloe vera 23.38±10.75 days, benzydamine 23.54±15.45 days). Mean changes of mucositis severity over time in both groups were statistically similar and the effect of both treatments did not change signficantly with time (p=0.09). Aloe vera mouthwash was as beneficial as benzydamine mouthwash in alleviating the severity of radiation-induced mucositis and showed no side effects. The Aloe vera mouthwash could be an alternative agent in the treatment of radiation-induced mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers.

  15. Prediction of Acute Radiation Mucositis using an Oral Mucosal Dose Surface Model in Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors.

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    Atsushi Musha

    Full Text Available To evaluate the dose-response relationship for development of acute radiation mucositis (ARM using an oral mucosal dose surface model (OMDS-model in carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT for head and neck tumors.Thirty-nine patients receiving C-ion RT for head and neck cancer were evaluated for ARM (once per week for 6 weeks according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, version 4.0, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG scoring systems. The irradiation schedule typically used was 64 Gy [relative biological effectiveness (RBE] in 16 fractions for 4 weeks. Maximum point doses in the palate and tongue were compared with ARM in each patient.The location of the ARM coincided with the high-dose area in the OMDS-model. There was a clear dose-response relationship between maximum point dose and ARM grade assessed using the RTOG criteria but not the CTCAE. The threshold doses for grade 2-3 ARM in the palate and tongue were 43.0 Gy(RBE and 54.3 Gy(RBE, respectively.The OMDS-model was useful for predicting the location and severity of ARM. Maximum point doses in the model correlated well with grade 2-3 ARM.

  16. Endoscopic findings of rectal mucosal damage after pelvic radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma: correlation of rectal mucosal damage with radiation dose and clinical symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    To describe chronic rectal mucosal damage after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for cervical cancer and correlate these findings with clinical symptoms and radiation dose. Thirty-two patients who underwent pelvic RT were diagnosed with radiation-induced proctitis based on endoscopy findings. The median follow-up period was 35 months after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and intracavitary radiotherapy (ICR). The Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS) was used to describe the endoscopic findings and compared to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) morbidity score and the dosimetric parameters of RT (the ratio of rectal dose calculated at the rectal point [RP] to the prescribed dose, biologically effective dose [BED] at the RP in the ICR and EBRT plans, {alpha}/{beta} = 3). Rectal symptoms were noted in 28 patients (rectal bleeding in 21 patients, bowel habit changes in 6, mucosal stools in 1), and 4 patients had no symptoms. Endoscopic findings included telangiectasia in 18 patients, congested mucosa in 20, ulceration in 5, and stricture in 1. The RP ratio, BEDICR, BEDICR+EBRT was significantly associated with the VRS (RP ratio, median 76.5%; BEDICR, median 37.1 Gy3; BEDICR+EBRT, median 102.5 Gy3; p < 0.001). The VRS was significantly associated with the EORTC/RTOG score (p = 0.038). The most prevalent endoscopic findings of RT-induced proctitis were telangiectasia and congested mucosa. The VRS was significantly associated with the EORTC/RTOG score and RP radiation dose.

  17. Management of radiation therapy-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Part II: supportive treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cheong Ngeow

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal mucositis is the acute inflammatory and ulcerative reaction of the oral mucosa following radiation therapy to the head and neck region. It is such a common problem that nearly all head and neck cancer patients develop some degree of mucositis. This complication is usually transient in nature but it also represents an important clinical problem as it is a painful, debilitating, dose-dependent side effect for which there is no widely acceptable prophylaxis or effective treatment. As several authoritative groups have recently either undertaken systematic reviews or issued guidelines on the management of mucositis, it is the aim of this review instead, to provide an overview of all the remedies and pharmaceutical agents available, as well as highlighting to researchers the gaps that need to be filled.

  18. Treatment of oral mucositis pain following radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer using a bioadhesive barrier-forming lipid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjieva, Tatiana; Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva; Linden, Margareta; Tiberg, Fredrik

    2014-06-01

    CAM2028, a vehicle that forms a bioadhesive lipid barrier when applied to the oral mucosa, was developed as a carrier system for local delivery of benzydamine, an NSAID used for pain relief in oral mucositis. This trial compared the analgesic effect of CAM2028 plus benzydamine (CAM2028-benzydamine) with unmedicated CAM2028 (CAM2028-control) for the treatment of oral mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Thirty-eight study participants were enrolled during their 3rd to 4th week of radiation therapy. Participants were required to have symptomatic oral mucositis (WHO Grade 2 or above) at screening and pain scores of at least 6 on an 11-point Likert scale at screening and on each day before treatment with study medication. After undergoing radiation, patients were administered a single dose of CAM2028-control or CAM2028-benzydamine 2 days apart, in a randomized crossover fashion. Pain was assessed over the following 8 h. With both treatments, patients experienced a mean 40 % decrease in pain intensity at 6 h (the primary study endpoint). Both treatments resulted in significant pain relief within 5 min of application that was evident during the entire 8-h assessment period. There was no difference in pain relief between the two interventions at any time point. Both treatments were safe and well tolerated. CAM2028-benzydamine and CAM2028-control were both efficacious in reducing pain in patients with oral mucositis related to radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Analgesic effects of both medications were immediate, clinically significant, and persistent for up to 8 h.

  19. Low-energy laser in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: report of two cases; Laser de baixa intensidade no tratamento da mucosite oral induzida pela radioterapia: relato de casos clinicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelner, Natalie; Castro, Jurema Freire Lisboa de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Disciplina de Patologia Oral]. E-mail: nataliekelner@yahoo.com.br

    2007-01-15

    Oral mucositis is a common, dose-limiting, and potentially serious complication of cancer therapy. Severe mucositis can lead to modifications of treatment planning and even suspension of therapy, with a negative impact on local tumor control and patient survival, increasing the risk of local and systemic infections. The lesions generally develop in non-keratinized mucosa, which is most vulnerable to this complication. Symptoms can range from a burning sensation to severe pain that impairs nutrient and fluid intake. Low-energy laser has been proposed for treatment of mucositis, with good clinical and functional results, accelerating the healing process and decreasing the pain. The aim of this article, illustrated by two clinical cases at the Pernambuco Cancer Hospital in Recife, Brazil, was to report on the efficacy of low-energy laser in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis.(author)

  20. Salivary Cytokine Levels and Oral Mucositis in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, Paolo, E-mail: Paolo.bossi@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Bergamini, Cristiana [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Miceli, Rosalba [Clinical Epidemiology and Trial Organization Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Cova, Agata [Unity of Immunotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Orlandi, Ester [Radiotherapy 2 Unity, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Resteghini, Carlo; Locati, Laura; Alfieri, Salvatore; Imbimbo, Martina; Granata, Roberta [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Mariani, Luigi [Clinical Epidemiology and Trial Organization Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Iacovelli, Nicola Alessandro [Radiotherapy 2 Unity, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Huber, Veronica [Unity of Immunotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Cavallo, Anna [Department of Physics and Radiation Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Licitra, Lisa [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Rivoltini, Licia [Unity of Immunotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: We assessed the presence of salivary cytokines, their modulation during chemoradiation therapy (CTRT), and their association with oral mucositis severity in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: The present prospective observational study enrolled 55 patients with locally advanced HNC requiring CTRT. We also studied 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with other cancers. The salivary levels of 13 cytokines were analyzed. We constructed a cytokine predictive score of oral mucositis severity. Results: The baseline salivary cytokine levels were not associated with the severity of treatment-induced oral mucositis. The cytokine levels overall increased during treatment, especially in patients with worse mucositis. In particular, on univariable analysis, an increase of interleukin (IL)-1β (area under the curve [AUC] 0.733; P=.009), IL-6 (AUC 0.746; P=.005), and tumor necrosis factor-α (AUC 0.710; P=.005) at the third week of treatment was significantly associated with the development of severe oral mucositis. On multivariable analysis, the predictive score based on the IL-1β and IL-6 changes from baseline to week 3 was an early strong predictor of higher grade oral mucositis. Conclusions: The treatment of HNC patients with concurrent CTRT induces a significant increase in the salivary levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, all positively associated with the severity of mucosal toxicity. A greater increase of IL-1β and IL-6 3 weeks after treatment initiation is predictive of worse oral mucositis, representing a potential tool for the early identification of patients at risk.

  1. Low-energy He/Ne laser in the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis. A multicenter phase III randomized study in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensadoun, R J; Franquin, J C; Ciais, G; Darcourt, V; Schubert, M M; Viot, M; Dejou, J; Tardieu, C; Benezery, K; Nguyen, T D; Laudoyer, Y; Dassonville, O; Poissonnet, G; Vallicioni, J; Thyss, A; Hamdi, M; Chauvel, P; Demard, F

    1999-07-01

    Use of the low-energy helium-neon laser (LEL) appears to be a simple atraumatic technique for the prevention and treatment of mucositis of various origins. Preliminary findings, and significant results obtained for chemotherapy-induced mucositis in a previous phase III study, prompted a randomized multicenter double-blind trial to evaluate LEL in the prevention of acute radiation-induced stomatitis. Irradiation by LEL corresponds to local application of a high-photon-density monochromatic light source. Activation of epithelial healing for LEL-treated surfaces, the most commonly recognized effect, has been confirmed by numerous in vitro studies. The mechanism of action at a molecular and enzymatic level is presently being studied. From September 1994 to March 1998, 30 patients were randomized. Technical specification: 60 mW (25 mW at Reims, 1 patient), He-Ne, wavelength 632.8 nm. The trial was open to patients with carcinoma of the oropharynx, hypopharynx and oral cavity, treated by radiotherapy alone (65 Gy at a rate of 2 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions per week) without prior surgery or concomitant chemotherapy. The malignant tumor had to be located outside the tested laser application areas (9 points): posterior third of the internal surfaces of the cheeks, soft palate and anterior tonsillar pillars. Patients were randomized to LEL or placebo light treatment, starting on the first day of radiotherapy and before each session. The treatment time (t) for each application point was given by the equation : t(s)= energy (J/cm2) x surface (cm2)/Power (W). Objective assessment of the degree of mucositis was recorded weekly by a physician blinded to the type of treatment, using the WHO scale for grading of mucositis and a segmented visual analogue scale for pain evaluation. Protocol feasibility and compliance were excellent. Grade 3 mucositis occured with a frequency of 35.2% without LEL and of 7.6% with LEL (Ptherapy is capable of reducing the severity and duration of oral

  2. Dependences of mucosal dose on photon beams in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy: a Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, James C.L., E-mail: james.chow@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Owrangi, Amir M. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Dependences of mucosal dose in the oral or nasal cavity on the beam energy, beam angle, multibeam configuration, and mucosal thickness were studied for small photon fields using Monte Carlo simulations (EGSnrc-based code), which were validated by measurements. Cylindrical mucosa phantoms (mucosal thickness = 1, 2, and 3 mm) with and without the bone and air inhomogeneities were irradiated by the 6- and 18-MV photon beams (field size = 1 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm{sup 2}) with gantry angles equal to 0 Degree-Sign , 90 Degree-Sign , and 180 Degree-Sign , and multibeam configurations using 2, 4, and 8 photon beams in different orientations around the phantom. Doses along the central beam axis in the mucosal tissue were calculated. The mucosal surface doses were found to decrease slightly (1% for the 6-MV photon beam and 3% for the 18-MV beam) with an increase of mucosal thickness from 1-3 mm, when the beam angle is 0 Degree-Sign . The variation of mucosal surface dose with its thickness became insignificant when the beam angle was changed to 180 Degree-Sign , but the dose at the bone-mucosa interface was found to increase (28% for the 6-MV photon beam and 20% for the 18-MV beam) with the mucosal thickness. For different multibeam configurations, the dependence of mucosal dose on its thickness became insignificant when the number of photon beams around the mucosal tissue was increased. The mucosal dose with bone was varied with the beam energy, beam angle, multibeam configuration and mucosal thickness for a small segmental photon field. These dosimetric variations are important to consider improving the treatment strategy, so the mucosal complications in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy can be minimized.

  3. Randomized trial of opioids versus tricyclic antidepressants for radiation-induced mucositis pain in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrnrooth, E.; Grau, C.; Zachariae, R.; Andersen, Joern [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    2001-11-01

    Patients who receive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are likely to develop painful mucositis. The pain is characterized by a burning or stinging sensation similar to neuropathic pain sensations. The purpose of the present study was to compare the analgesic effect of a tricyclic antidepressant (TC), commonly used in the treatment of neuropathic pain, with the effect of opioids on radiation-induced mucositis pain. Forty-three patients receiving 66-68 Gy external radiation according to the DAHANCA guidelines (the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Study Group) were randomized to either morphine or TC when mucositis pain was insufficiently managed with weak analgesics. Patients with insufficient pain control in either treatment arm received supplementary medication from the opposite treatment arm. Pain was evaluated weekly using a VAS scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The degree of mucositis and the degree of depression were measured at the same time intervals. Twenty-two patients entered the opioid arm and 21 the TC arm. Two patients in each arm were non-evaluable. VAS pain scores were significantly reduced in the opioid treatment arm one week after randomization (p=0.01). Eight patients in the TC arm were managed with TC alone, but for 11 patients it was necessary to add morphine. The 20 evaluable patients in the morphine arm required no additional treatment. There were no significant differences in side effects between the two groups. Higher pain scores in the TC arm, but not in the opioid arm, were significantly correlated with higher BDI scores. Some head and neck cancer patients with radiation-induced nucositis pain may have sufficient pain control on TC alone. This might be useful in patients with relative counter-indications to opioid treatment.

  4. Effect of Traumeel S on pain and discomfort in radiation-induced oral mucositis: a preliminary observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Diana; Eilers, Viktorija; Beynenson, Dimitry; Buhck, Hartmut; Fink, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Painful oral mucositis is an almost inevitable side effect of radiotherapy of head and neck tumors that simultaneous chemotherapy intensifies and that is notoriously difficult to treat. In a previous study, chemotherapy-induced stomatitis in children undergoing bone marrow transplantation responded well to the homeopathic complex remedy Traumeel S. To evaluate the efficacy of Traumeel S in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck tumors. The research team designed a nonrandomized, prospective, observational study with matched pairs. The research team performed the study in a tertiary cancer-care center at the Institute of Radiotherapy and Special Oncology, Medical School Hanover, Germany. The participants were 20 patients who were receiving radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy for head and neck tumors. Five times per day during the observational period, participants self-administered daily mouth rinses with either sage tea (Salvia officinalis, control group) or Traumeel S solution (intervention group). Two independent physicians determined the grade of oral mucositis at least once per week, and the research team derived the degree of oral pain from diaries that participants kept. Both groups were comparable in terms of tumor and treatment characteristics. The research team could not confirm any appreciable specific effect of Traumeel S on the primary endpoints; the limited reduction in pain for the intervention group compared to the control group was not significant, and the more frequent analgesia in the Traumeel S group most likely explained that reduction. Among the secondary endpoints, loss of taste and swallowing difficulty responded to Traumeel S to some extent. Traumeel S may have some potential in the treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis, but its possible effects need confirmation by further studies. This article discusses some methodological requirements.

  5. PROTOCOL FOR THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF ORAL SEQUELAE RESULTING FROM HEAD AND NECK RADIATION-THERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JANSMA, J; VISSINK, A; SPIJKERVET, FKL; ROODENBURG, JLN; PANDERS, AK; VERMEY, A; SZABO, BG; SGRAVENMADE, EJ

    1992-01-01

    In addition to the desired antitumor effects, head and neck radiation therapy induces damage in normal tissues that may result in oral sequelae such as mucositis, hyposalivation, radiation caries, taste loss, trismus, soft-tissue necrosis, and osteoradionecrosis. These sequelae may be dose-limiting

  6. Transcriptional profiling of radiation damage and preventive treatments in a 3-dimensional (3D human cell culture model of oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P. Lambros

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients who receive radiation are often afflicted by oral mucositis, a debilitating disease, characterized by mouth sores and difficulty in swallowing. Oftentimes, cancer patients afflicted with mucositis must stop life-saving therapies. Thus it is very important to prevent mucositis before it develops. Using a validated organotypic model of human oral mucosa, a 3-dimensional cell culture model of human oral keratinocytes, it has been shown that a mixture (NAC–QYD of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC and a traditional Chinese medicine, Qingre Liyan decoction (QYD, prevented radiation damage (Lambros et al., 2014. Here we provide detailed methods and analysis of microarray data for non-irradiated and irradiated human oral mucosal tissue with and without pretreatment with NAC, QYD and NAC-QYD. The microarray data been deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO: GSE62397. These data can be used to further elucidate the mechanisms of irradiation damage in oral mucosa and its prevention.

  7. Transcriptional profiling of radiation damage and preventive treatments in a 3-dimensional (3D) human cell culture model of oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambros, Maria P; DeSalvo, Michael K; Moreno, Jonathan; Mulamalla, Hari Chandana; Kondapalli, Lavanya

    2015-12-01

    Cancer patients who receive radiation are often afflicted by oral mucositis, a debilitating disease, characterized by mouth sores and difficulty in swallowing. Oftentimes, cancer patients afflicted with mucositis must stop life-saving therapies. Thus it is very important to prevent mucositis before it develops. Using a validated organotypic model of human oral mucosa, a 3-dimensional cell culture model of human oral keratinocytes, it has been shown that a mixture (NAC-QYD) of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and a traditional Chinese medicine, Qingre Liyan decoction (QYD), prevented radiation damage (Lambros et al., 2014). Here we provide detailed methods and analysis of microarray data for non-irradiated and irradiated human oral mucosal tissue with and without pretreatment with NAC, QYD and NAC-QYD. The microarray data been deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO): GSE62397. These data can be used to further elucidate the mechanisms of irradiation damage in oral mucosa and its prevention.

  8. Toll-like Receptor 5 Agonist Protects Mice From Dermatitis and Oral Mucositis Caused by Local Radiation: Implications for Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdelya, Lyudmila G. [Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Gleiberman, Anatoli S.; Toshkov, Ilia [Cleveland BioLabs, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States); Aygun-Sunar, Semra [Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Bapardekar, Meghana [Cleveland BioLabs, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States); Manderscheid-Kern, Patricia; Bellnier, David [Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Krivokrysenko, Vadim I.; Feinstein, Elena [Cleveland BioLabs, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States); Gudkov, Andrei V., E-mail: andrei.gudkov@roswellpark.org [Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Cleveland BioLabs, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Development of mucositis is a frequent side effect of radiotherapy of patients with head-and-neck cancer. We have recently reported that bacterial flagellin, an agonist of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), can protect rodents and primates from acute radiation syndrome caused by total body irradiation. Here we analyzed the radioprotective efficacy of TLR5 agonist under conditions of local, single dose or fractionated radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Mice received either single-dose (10, 15, 20, or 25 Gy) or fractioned irradiation (cumulative dose up to 30 Gy) of the head-and-neck area with or without subcutaneous injection of pharmacologically optimized flagellin, CBLB502, 30 min before irradiation. Results: CBLB502 significantly reduced the severity of dermatitis and mucositis, accelerated tissue recovery, and reduced the extent of radiation induced weight loss in mice after a single dose of 15 or 20 Gy but not 25 Gy of radiation. CBLB502 was also protective from cumulative doses of 25 and 30 Gy delivered in two (10 + 15 Gy) or three (3 Multiplication-Sign 10 Gy) fractions, respectively. While providing protection to normal epithelia, CBLB502 did not affect the radiosensitivity of syngeneic squamous carcinoma SCCVII grown orthotopically in mice. Use of CBLB502 also elicited a radiation independent growth inhibitory effect upon TLR5-expressing tumors demonstrated in the mouse xenograft model of human lung adenocarcinoma A549. Conclusion: CBLB502 combines properties of supportive care (radiotherapy adjuvant) and anticancer agent, both mediated via activation of TLR5 signaling in the normal tissues or the tumor, respectively.

  9. [Mucosal tolerance and low level laser therapy: Is the delegation to radiation technicians possible?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchosal, S

    2015-10-01

    Mucositis remains a frequent complication of radiotherapy. Low level laser applications are used to accelerate the healing process. This technique is used routinely in our centre. It is performed by delegation by radiotherapists. The conditions of this delegation of tasks are addressed here. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  10. Efficacy of glutamine in the prevention of oral mucositis and acute radiation-induced esophagitis: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Calleja-Fernández, Alicia; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D; Cano-Rodríguez, Isidoro

    2013-01-01

    Glutamine is a nutraceutic with antioxidant and immune functions that can protect from adverse effects associated with radiation therapy (RT). The aim of this study was to test whether oral glutamine prevents oral mucositis (OM) or acute radiation-induced esophagitis (ARIE) and favors nutritional status. This retrospective, cohort study included patients treated with RT for cancer on head and neck (HN) or chest areas during the 2008-2010 period. Data on glutamine treatment (initiated before RT, during RT, or no glutamine), appearance of mucositis (according to World Health Organization criteria), weight loss (WL) during RT, moderate [body mass index (BMI) 5%) or severe (BMI 10%) malnutrition, and nutritional support were collected. Quantitative data were compared using Student's t-test and analysis of variance, and qualitative data using the chi-square test. The risk difference was calculated with its 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The sample included 117 patients. Overall, glutamine was associated with a significant reduction of mucositis, WL, and enteral nutrition. The risk difference for developing OM in patients receiving glutamine when compared with controls was -9.0% (95% CI = -18.0% to -1.0%), and for ARIE it was -14.0% (95% CI = -26.0% to -1.0%). More of the patients not receiving glutamine developed severe malnutrition when compared with those receiving this supplement, but there were no differences in other outcomes such as interruption of RT, hospitalization, use of opioid analgesics, or death during RT. Glutamine may have a protective effect during RT, reducing the risk and severity of OM and ARIE, preventing weight loss, and reducing the need for nutritional support. Prospective trials are required.

  11. Management of gastrointestinal mucositis due to cancer therapies in pediatric patients: results of a case series with SAMITAL(®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoglio, Juan Carlos; Folatre, Isabel; Bombardelli, Ezio; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Ronchi, Massimo; Petrangolini, Giovanna

    2012-11-01

    Gastrointestinal mucositis is a common debilitating complication of chemotherapy and one for which there is currently no effective long-term treatment. To report our experience with the use of SAMITAL(®), a new oral suspension formulation based on the combination of three standardized extracts from Vaccinium myrtillus, Macleaya cordata fruits and Echinacea angustifolia roots in the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in pediatric patients. 20 pediatric patients undergoing chemotherapy for a range of oncological conditions were followed. Patients initially received oral SAMITAL(®) to treat gastrointestinal mucositis and were then given SAMITAL(®) prophylactically to prevent recurrences with successive cycles of chemotherapy. SAMITAL(®) significantly decreased gastrointestinal mucositis grade after the first episode with a reduction of mean scores from 3.2 ± 0.7 at baseline to 0.4 ± 0.6 at the end of treatment (p patients' overall condition and quality of life after the first administration and lowered the need for parenteral nutrition. Importantly, it allowed chemotherapy cycles to be continued without complications. Results from this case series suggest that SAMITAL(®) may play an important role in the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in children and adolescents and as such warrants investigation in controlled studies.

  12. Efficacy of benzydamine oral rinse in prevention and management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibani, Khosro M; Mafi, Ahmad R; Moghaddam, Shiva; Taslimi, Farnaz; Amiran, Ahmadreza; Ameri, Ahmad

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated positive effects of benzydamine oral rinse in prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of this medication in reducing the signs and symptoms of oral mucositis in patients receiving radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Fifty-one patients with head and neck carcinoma 2012 received external beam radiotherapy for 5 days/week to total planned cumulative radiotherapy doses of at least 5000 cGy. Patients were randomized to treatment with either benzydamine oral rinse or placebo, initiated the day before radiotherapy and continued for 2 weeks after the end of treatment. Oral cavity was divided into 14 anatomical sites and relevant sites were examined weekly, with a score given to each site based on the degree of mucositis using a 4-point scale, and then a "mean mucositis score" was calculated. Up to the end of third week, two groups did not show any difference in the severity of mucositis. However, by the end of week 4, the mean score of placebo group was more than that of treatment group (1.81 vs 1.27, P=0.001). This trend continued to end of week 7 (1.98 vs 1.43, P=0.001). Benzydamine oral rinse can be considered as an effective, safe and well-tolerated medication for prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis and alleviating its symptoms. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Identifying cell and molecular stress after radiation in a three-dimensional (3-D) model of oral mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambros, Maria Polikandritou, E-mail: mlambros@westernu.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Parsa, Cyrus [Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Mulamalla, HariChandana [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Orlando, Robert [Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Lau, Bernard [Center for Advancement of Drug Research and Evaluation (CADRE), Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Huang, Ying [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Center for Advancement of Drug Research and Evaluation (CADRE), Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Pon, Doreen [Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Chow, Moses [Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Center for Advancement of Drug Research and Evaluation (CADRE), Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States)

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} We irradiated a 3-D human oral cell culture of keratinocytes and fibroblasts with 12 and 2 Gy. {yields} 6 h after irradiation the histopathology and apoptosis of the 3-D culture were evaluated. Microarrays were used to assess the gene expression in the irradiated 3-D tissue. {yields} 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic changes and cellular apoptosis. {yields} 12 Gy significantly affected genes of the NF-kB pathway, inflammatory cytokines and DAMPs. -- Abstract: Mucositis is a debilitating adverse effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. It is important to develop a simple and reliable in vitro model, which can routinely be used to screen new drugs for prevention and treatment of mucositis. Furthermore, identifying cell and molecular stresses especially in the initiation phase of mucositis in this model will help towards this end. We evaluated a three-dimensional (3-D) human oral cell culture that consisted of oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts as a model of oral mucositis. The 3-D cell culture model was irradiated with 12 or 2 Gy. Six hours after the irradiation we evaluated microscopic sections of the cell culture for evidence of morphologic changes including apoptosis. We used microarrays to compare the expression of several genes from the irradiated tissue with identical genes from tissue that was not irradiated. We found that irradiation with 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic effects including cellular apoptosis. Irradiation significantly affected the expression of several genes of the NF-kB pathway and several inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1B, 1L-8, NF-kB1, and FOS compared to tissue that was not irradiated. We identified significant upregulation of several genes that belong to damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as HMB1, S100A13, SA10014, and SA10016 in the 3-D tissues that received 12 Gy but not in tissues that received 2 Gy. In conclusion, this model quantifies radiation damage and this

  14. Cell phone radiation effects on cytogenetic abnormalities of oral mucosal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daroit, Natália Batista; Visioli, Fernanda; Magnusson, Alessandra Selinger; Vieira, Geila Radunz; Rados, Pantelis Varvaki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of exposure to cell phone electromagnetic radiation on the frequency of micronuclei, broken eggs cells, binucleated cells, and karyorrhexis in epithelial cells of the oral mucosa. The sample was composed of 60 cell phone users, who were non-smokers and non-drinkers, and had no clinically visible oral lesions. Cells were obtained from anatomical sites with the highest incidence of oral cancer: lower lip, border of the tongue, and floor of the mouth. The Feulgen reaction was used for quantification of nuclear anomalies in 1,000 cells/slide. A slightly increase in the number of micronucleated cells in the lower lip and in binucleated cells on the floor of the mouth was observed in individuals who used their phones > 60 minutes/week. The analysis also revealed an increased number of broken eggs in the tongue of individuals owning a cell phone for over eight years. Results suggest that exposure to electromagnetic waves emitted by cell phones can increase nuclear abnormalities in individuals who use a cell phone for more than 60 minutes per week and for over eight years. Based on the present findings, we suggest that exposure to electromagnetic radiation emitted by cell phones may interfere with the development of metanuclear anomalies. Therefore, it is demonstrated that, despite a significant increase in these anomalies, the radiation emitted by cell phones among frequent users is within acceptable physiological limits.

  15. Cell phone radiation effects on cytogenetic abnormalities of oral mucosal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Batista DAROIT

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of exposure to cell phone electromagnetic radiation on the frequency of micronuclei, broken eggs cells, binucleated cells, and karyorrhexis in epithelial cells of the oral mucosa. The sample was composed of 60 cell phone users, who were non-smokers and non-drinkers, and had no clinically visible oral lesions. Cells were obtained from anatomical sites with the highest incidence of oral cancer: lower lip, border of the tongue, and floor of the mouth. The Feulgen reaction was used for quantification of nuclear anomalies in 1,000 cells/slide. A slightly increase in the number of micronucleated cells in the lower lip and in binucleated cells on the floor of the mouth was observed in individuals who used their phones > 60 minutes/week. The analysis also revealed an increased number of broken eggs in the tongue of individuals owning a cell phone for over eight years. Results suggest that exposure to electromagnetic waves emitted by cell phones can increase nuclear abnormalities in individuals who use a cell phone for more than 60 minutes per week and for over eight years. Based on the present findings, we suggest that exposure to electromagnetic radiation emitted by cell phones may interfere with the development of metanuclear anomalies. Therefore, it is demonstrated that, despite a significant increase in these anomalies, the radiation emitted by cell phones among frequent users is within acceptable physiological limits.

  16. Increased skin and mucosal toxicity in the combination of vemurafenib with radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merten, Ricarda; Hecht, Markus; Haderlein, Marlen; Distel, Luitpold; Fietkau, Rainer; Semrau, Sabine [Department of Radiation Oncology University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Heinzerling, Lucie [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Dermatology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Palliative radiotherapy is often required for patients with metastatic malignant melanoma in the case of bone or brain metastases. Since BRAF inhibitor therapy is highly efficient in V600-mutated melanomas, there is hesitation to stop it during radiotherapy. Consequently, radiotherapy under simultaneous vemurafenib treatment is frequently needed. We report the case of a patient receiving palliative radiotherapy of spinal bone metastases before and during vemurafenib therapy. The skin reactions were quantitatively scored using computer-assisted digital image evaluation. Radiotherapy without vemurafenib was tolerated very well, whereas radiotherapy under simultaneous vemurafenib treatment resulted in accentuated skin reactions. Furthermore, the patient developed dysphagia and had to be hospitalized for parenteral nutrition. In the quantitative analysis, there was a twofold increase in pigmentation and erythema of the irradiated skin area of the thoracic spine when vemurafenib was combined with radiotherapy compared with radiotherapy treatment alone. This is the first reported case of a patient showing no complications during radiotherapy without vemurafenib but remarkable skin and mucosal toxicity under concurrent vemurafenib therapy. Thus, a genetically conditioned individually elevated radiosensitivity can definitely be excluded. Compared with other reported cases, radiosensitization was not limited to the skin, but also affected the esophageal mucosa. Vemurafenib is a strong radiosensitizer. Patients receiving radiotherapy under simultaneous vemurafenib treatment should be monitored very closely. (orig.) [German] Bei Patienten mit metastasiertem Melanom ist die palliative Bestrahlung von Knochen- oder Hirnmetastasen haeufig erforderlich. Da eine Therapie mit BRAF-Inhibitoren bei Patienten mit V600-mutierten Melanomen hoch effektiv ist, sollte man sie waehrend einer Strahlentherapie nicht unterbrechen. Daher ist eine Strahlentherapie unter laufender Behandlung mit

  17. Comparative study of the effects of rhKGF, CBLB502 and WR2721 on radiation-induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao YANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the protective effect of rhKGF, CBLB502 and WR2721 on radiation-induced oral mucositis (ROM. Methods Fifty male 6-8-week-old C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into normal group, irradiation control group, rhKGF group, CBLB502 group, and WR2721 group (n=10 each. The 30-day survival rate and change in body weight of mice that had received 17Gy irradiation of head and neck area were recorded. In another group of 20 mice, 1% toluidine blue staining and HE staining were used to observe oral ulcers and pathological changes in the tongue tissue. The proliferation of keratinocyte cells was assessed by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Results Compared with the irradiation control group, administration of rhKGF and WR2721 could significantly improve the 30-day survival rate, accelerate the recovery of body weight, and promote the proliferation of keratinized epithelial cells of mice after irradiation, without inducing obvious oral mucositis. However, There was no significant difference between CBLB502 group and irradiation control group in survival rate, body weight and pathological changes in tongue tissues of mice. Conclusion rhKGF and WR2721 could alleviate ROM and improve the survival of mice, while CBLB502 has no such effect. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.05.19

  18. 8-prenylnaringenin and tamoxifen inhibit the shedding of irradiated epithelial cells and increase the latency period of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Cell culture and murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryck, Tine de; Impe, Annouchka van; Bracke, Marc E. [Ghent University, Laboratory of Experimental Cancer Research, Department Radiation Oncology and Experimental Cancer Research, Ghent (Belgium); Vanhoecke, Barbara W. [Ghent University, Laboratory of Experimental Cancer Research, Department Radiation Oncology and Experimental Cancer Research, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University, Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent (Belgium); Heyerick, Arne [Ghent University, Laboratory of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Ghent (Belgium); Vakaet, Luc; Neve, Wilfried de [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent (Belgium); Mueller, Doreen [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Schmidt, Margret [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site Dresden and German Cancer Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, CCC, and CD-Laboratory RadOnc, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-05-01

    The major component in the pathogenesis of oral radiation-induced mucositis is progressive epithelial hypoplasia and eventual ulceration. Irradiation inhibits cell proliferation, while cell loss at the surface continues. We conceived to slow down this desquamation by increasing intercellular adhesion, regulated by the E-cadherin/catenin complex. We investigated if 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) or tamoxifen (TAM) decrease the shedding of irradiated human buccal epithelial cells in vitro and thus delay the ulcerative phase of radiation-induced mucositis in vivo. In vitro, aggregates of buccal epithelial cells were irradiated and cultured in suspension for 11 days. 8-PN or TAM were investigated regarding their effect on cell shedding. In vivo, the lower tongue surface of mice was irradiated with graded single doses of 25 kV X-rays. The incidence, latency, and duration of the resulting mucosal ulcerations were analyzed after topical treatment with 8-PN, TAM or solvent. 8-PN or TAM prevented the volume reduction of the irradiated cell aggregates during the incubation period. This was the result of a higher residual cell number in the treated versus the untreated irradiated aggregates. In vivo, topical treatment with 8-PN or TAM significantly increased the latency of mucositis from 10.9 to 12.1 and 12.4 days respectively, while the ulcer incidence was unchanged. 8-PN and TAM prevent volume reduction of irradiated cell aggregates in suspension culture. In the tongues of mice, these compounds increase the latency period. This suggests a role for these compounds for the amelioration of radiation-induced mucositis in the treatment of head and neck tumors. (orig.) [German] Die wesentliche Komponente in der Pathogenese der radiogenen Mukositis ist eine progressive epitheliale Hypoplasie und letztendlich Ulzeration. Die Bestrahlung hemmt die Zellproliferation, waehrend der Zellverlust an der Oberflaeche fortbesteht. Wir versuchten, diese Desquamation durch eine Stimulation der

  19. Changes and predictors of radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with oral cavity cancer during active treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Ching; Lai, Yeur-Hur; Huang, Bing-Shen; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chien

    2015-06-01

    Radiation-induced oral mucositis (OM) is the most debilitating side effect of radiation treatment in oral cavity cancer. The purpose of the study was to investigate change of prevalence of severe OM, OM-related symptoms, and predictors in oral cavity cancer patients during active treatment. Longitudinal study design with repeated measures was used. Patients with oral cavity cancer were recruited from a head and neck outpatient radiation department at a major medical center in Taiwan. Patients' OM-related symptoms were measured at three time points. Patients' oral mucosa was assessed at nine time points. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to analyze the predictive factors of prevalence of severe OM and OM-related symptoms. Patients reported highest prevalence of severe OM at T5 (5 weeks after beginning RT) and T6 (6 weeks after beginning radiation therapy, RT), with the combined chemotherapy and RT (CCRT) patients reporting a higher prevalence than those receiving RT alone. The peak of OM-related symptoms was at T8 (8 week after beginning RT), with primary symptoms of mouth pain, mouth dryness, eating difficulties, swallowing difficulties, and taste change. Patients with CCRT, a higher cumulative radiation dose, smoking, and lower body mass index (BMI) were at high risk to develop severe OM. OM-related symptoms were predicted by type of treatment, cumulative radiation dose, and smoking. Patients with oral cavity cancer suffer from OM and OM-related symptoms during aggressive RT or CCRT. Patient-specific oral care and emotional support are needed to relieve distressful OM-related symptoms during active treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy of Wobe-Mugos {sup registered} E for reduction of oral mucositis after radiotherapy. Results of a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, triple-blind phase III multicenter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, W.; Herrmann, T. [Univ. of Technology, Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy and safety of Wobe-Mugos {sup registered} E (proteolytic enzymes) for amelioration of early side effects of radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors, particularly oral mucositis. Patients and Methods: The study was a prospective, randomized, multicenter, placebo-controlled, triple-blind phase III study with parallel groups. 69 patients with carcinomas of the oropharynx or the oral cavity were enrolled between 1996 and 2000 in five centers; 54 of these were recruited in Dresden. Of the 69 patients, 61 (Dresden: 46) were available for analysis. The proteolytic enzymes tested (Wobe-Mugos {sup registered} E) comprised papain 100 mg, trypsin 40 mg, and chymotrypsin 40 mg. Results: Wobe-Mugos {sup registered} E was well tolerated. For the maximum mucositis scores, no statistically significant differences were found between the placebo and the verum group. The average mucositis score over weeks 1-6 revealed a significant difference in favor of the placebo arm, based on an earlier onset of mucositis in the Wobe-Mugos {sup registered} E group. Conclusion: The present study failed to demonstrate any effect of treatment with Wobe-Mugos {sup registered} E on radiotherapy side effects in patients treated for head-and-neck tumors. In particular, there was no beneficial effect on radiation-induced early oral mucositis. (orig.)

  1. Preventive intervention possibilities in radiotherapy- and chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis : Results of meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, M A; Spijkervet, F K L; Boezen, H M; Schouten, J.P.; Roodenburg, J L N; de Vries, E. G. E.

    The aim of these meta-analyses was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis in cancer patients treated with head and neck radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, with a focus on randomized clinical trials. A literature search was performed for reports of

  2. Phase 3 Trial of Domiciliary Humidification to Mitigate Acute Mucosal Toxicity During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: First Report of Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 07.03 RadioHUM Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macann, Andrew, E-mail: amacann@adhb.govt.nz [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Fua, Tsien [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Milross, Chris G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales (Australia); Porceddu, Sandro V. [Oncology Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Penniment, Michael [Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Wratten, Chris [Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Krawitz, Hedley [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Poulsen, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radiation Oncology Mater Centre, South Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Tang, Colin I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Morton, Randall P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Middlemore Hospital, Otahuhu, Auckland (New Zealand); Hay, K. David [Department of Oral Health, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Thomson, Vicki [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Bell, Melanie L.; King, Madeleine T. [Psycho-oncology Cooperative Research Group, Univerity of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Fraser-Browne, Carol L. [Adult Oncology Research Centre, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Hockey, Hans-Ulrich P. [Biometrics Matters Ltd, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of domicile-based humidification on symptom burden during radiation therapy (RT) for head-and-neck (H and N) cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2007 through June 2011, 210 patients with H and N cancer receiving RT were randomized to either a control arm or to receive humidification using the Fisher and Paykel Healthcare MR880 humidifier. Humidification commenced on day 1 of RT and continued until Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0, clinical mucositis (CMuc) grade ≤1 occurred. Forty-three patients (42%) met a defined benchmark for humidification compliance and contributed to per protocol (PP) analysis. Acute toxicities, hospitalizations, and feeding tube events were recorded prospectively. The McMaster University Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ) was used for patient-reported outcomes. The primary endpoint was area under the curve (AUC) for CMuc grade ≥2. Results: There were no significant differences in AUC for CMuc ≥2 between the 2 arms. Humidification patients had significantly fewer days in hospital (P=.017). In compliant PP patients, the AUC for CTCAE functional mucositis score (FMuc) ≥2 was significantly reduced (P=.009), and the proportion who never required a feeding tube was significantly greater (P=.04). HNRQ PP analysis estimates also in the direction favoring humidification with less symptom severity, although differences at most time points did not reach significance. Conclusions: TROG 07.03 has provided efficacy signals consistent with a role for humidification in reducing symptom burden from mucositis, but the influence of humidification compliance on the results moderates recommendations regarding its practical utility.

  3. Predictors of mucositis in oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancer in patients treated with volumetric modulated radiation treatment: A dose-volume analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Fersino, Sergio; Fiorentino, Alba; Giaj Levra, Niccolò; Di Paola, Gioacchino; Ruggieri, Ruggero; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess predictors of mucositis in oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancer after definitive or adjuvant volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) +/- chemotherapy. Fifty patients were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed for the following parameters as potential predictors of mucositis ≥ G2: total oral mucosa and oral mucosa minus target high-low radiation dose regions (planning target volumes [PTVs]), mean dose (Dmean ), maximum dose (Dmax ), chemotherapy, weight loss, and dysphagia. Mucositis ≥ G2 was found to be statistically related to chemotherapy, weight loss, dysphagia ≥ G2, total oral mucosa Dmean ≥50 Gy and Dmax ≥65 Gy, V45 Gy >40%, V50 Gy >30%, and V55 Gy >20% of the oral mucosa minus target PTVs. A ratio between total oral mucosa and oral mucosa minus target PTVs >2.5 is related to G3 mucositis (p = .03). New parameters were found as predictors of moderate-severe mucositis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E815-E819, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cell phone radiation effects on cytogenetic abnormalities of oral mucosal cells

    OpenAIRE

    DAROIT,Natália Batista; Visioli, Fernanda; Magnusson, Alessandra Selinger; Vieira, Geila Radunz; Rados, Pantelis Varvaki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of exposure to cell phone electromagnetic radiation on the frequency of micronuclei, broken eggs cells, binucleated cells, and karyorrhexis in epithelial cells of the oral mucosa. The sample was composed of 60 cell phone users, who were non-smokers and non-drinkers, and had no clinically visible oral lesions. Cells were obtained from anatomical sites with the highest incidence of oral cancer: lower lip, border of the tongue, and floor of the m...

  5. Results of PWO Radiation Hardness Optimization.

    CERN Document Server

    Drobychev, Gleb; Auffray, Etiennette; Borisevich, A E; Korzhik, Mikhail; Kostylev, V; Lecoq, Paul; Ligoun, V D; Peigneux, Jean-Pierre

    1999-01-01

    The results of analysis of the PWO radiation hardness depending of crystal growth technology are presented. The PWO crystals of different crystallization numbers with one kind of doping and double doped as well as crystals grown from recycled raw materials were analyzed. The presented results show high level of crystal technology reproducibility. More than 95% of double doped crystals satisfy to the CMS ECAL specification requirements.

  6. Clinical, biological, histological features and treatment of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy: a literature review; Aspectos clinicos, biologicos, histopatologicos e tratamentos propostos para a mucosite oral induzida por radioterapia: revisao da literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonan, Paulo Rogerio Ferreti [Universidade Estadual de Montes Claros e Faculdades Unidas do Norte de Minas, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Odontologia]. E-mail: pbonan@yahoo.com; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; Almeida, Oslei Paes de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Diagnostico Oral; Alves, Fabio de Abreu [Hospital do Cancer AC Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Estomatologia

    2005-07-01

    The oral mucositis is a main side effect of radiotherapy on head and neck, initiating two weeks after the beginning of the treatment. It is characterized by sensation of local burning to intense pain, leading in several cases, to the interruption of the treatment. The purpose of this work is to review the main published studies that discuss the clinical, biological and histopathological features of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and to describe the main approaches recommended to prevent or to treat it. Although the clinical features of mucositis are intensively described in the literature, few studies address the histopathological alterations in oral mucositis and only recently, its biological processes have been investigated. The biological mechanisms involved in the radiation tissue damage have been only recently discussed and there is no consensus among treatment modalities. Yet, the progressive knowledge in the histopathology and biological characteristics of oral mucositis probably will lead to more effective in prevention and control strategies. (author)

  7. Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck. A treatment result of 25 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakura, Kohji; Kataura, Akikatsu; Harabuchi, Yasuaki; Himi, Tetsuo; Hamamoto, Makoto; Hareyama, Masato; Sakata, Kouichi [Sapporo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    A retrospective review of 25 primary patients with head and neck mucosal melanoma, treated at Sapporo Medical University from 1970 to 1996, was performed. The disease-specific 5-year cumulative survival rate was 37.2% for all the cases, and 39.6% for cases with nasal cavity melanoma. The patients with tumors confined within one anatomical site showed a better prognosis than those with more advanced tumors. In relation to the treatment methods, the 5-year survival rate was 75% in the patients that received pre-operative radiotherapy, and 100% in those that received an adjuvant immunotherapy of daily intratumorous injections of OK432 during radiotherapy. The patients with poor prognoses tended to show a high incidence of residual tumors and earlier local recurrences than those with good prognoses. No recurrences have been noted in the long-term survivors that received adjuvant immunotherapy during radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Late results of mucosal proctectomy and colo-anal sleeve anastomosis for chronic irradiation rectal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browning, G.G.P.; Varma, J.S.; Smith, A.N.; Small, W.P.; Duncan, W.

    1987-01-01

    Ten patients with severe chronic irradiation injury to the rectum were treated by mucosal proctectomy and colo-anal sleeve anastomosis. The indications were: recurrent rectal bleeding (five), stricture (three), fistula (one) and intractable pain (one). Overall follow-up has ranged from 8 to 77 months (mean 40 months). In the present survivors (n=7) the follow-up ranges from 18 to 77 months (mean 52 months). Six patients have been followed up for more than 3 years and four for more than 5 years. There was no operative mortality. Three anastomotic strictures occurred but the protecting stoma could be closed in all but one patient. Continence was acceptable although urgency and frequency of defaecation were troublesome symptoms. The operation is recommended for life-threatening, haemorrhagic chronic irradiation injury to the rectum.

  9. Mucosal vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  10. Multicenter Study of Carbon-Ion Radiation Therapy for Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck: Subanalysis of the Japan Carbon-Ion Radiation Oncology Study Group (J-CROS) Study (1402 HN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koto, Masashi, E-mail: koto.masashi@qst.go.jp [Hospital of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Chiba (Japan); Demizu, Yusuke [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno (Japan); Saitoh, Jun-ichi [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Suefuji, Hiroaki [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA-HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi [Hospital of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Chiba (Japan); Okimoto, Tomoaki [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA-HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Takagi, Ryo [Hospital of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Chiba (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi [Hospital of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Chiba (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of carbon-ion radiation therapy (RT) for mucosal melanoma of the head and neck (MMHN) in the Japan Carbon-Ion Radiation Oncology Study Group study. Methods and Materials: Patients with MMHN with N0-1M0 status who were treated with carbon-ion RT at 4 institutions in Japan between November 2003 and December 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Two hundred sixty patients (male, 111; female, 149; median age, 68 years) with histologically proven MMHN were enrolled. Results: Primary sites included the nasal cavity in 178 patients, paranasal sinuses in 43, oral cavity in 27, and pharynx in 12. Eighty-six patients had T3 tumors, 147 had T4a tumors, and 27 had T4b tumors. Two hundred fifty-one patients were diagnosed with N0 disease, and 9 with N1 disease. The median total dose and number of fractions were 57.6 Gy RBE (relative biological effectiveness) and 16, respectively. Chemotherapy including dimethyl traizeno imidazole carboxamide was used concurrently in 129 patients. The median follow-up duration was 22 months (range, 1-132 months). The 2-year overall survival and local control rates were 69.4% and 83.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that gross tumor volume and concurrent chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors for overall survival. Grade 3 and grade 4 late morbidities were observed in 27 and 7 patients (5 developed ipsilateral blindness, 1 mucosal ulcer, and 1 second malignant disease in the irradiated volume), respectively. No patients developed grade 5 late morbidities. Conclusion: Carbon-ion RT is a promising treatment option for MMHN.

  11. Radiation damage at LHCb, results and expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    Faerber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb Detector is a single-arm spectrometer at the LHC designed to detect new physics through measuring CP violation and rare decays of heavy flavor mesons. The detector consists of vertex detector, tracking system, dipole magnet, 2 RICH detectors, em. calorimeter, hadron calorimeter, muon detector which all use different technologies and suffer differently from radiation damage. These radiation damage results and the investigation methods will be shown. The delivered luminosity till July 2011 was about 450 pb−1. The Vertex detector receives the highest particle flux at LHCb. The currents drawn by the silicon sensors are, as expected, increasing proportional to the integrated luminosity. The highest irradiaton regions of the n-bulk silicon sensors are observed to have recently undergone space charge sign inversion. The Silicon Trackers show increasing leakage currents comparable with earlier predictions. The electromagentic calorimeter and hadron calorimeter suffer under percent-level signal decrease whi...

  12. Antioxidant capacity of calendula officinalis flowers extract and prevention of radiation induced oropharyngeal mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers: a randomized controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaee, Neda; Moslemi, Dariush; Khalilpour, Mohammad; Vejdani, Fatemeh; Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Bijani, Ali; Baradaran, Mahmoud; Kazemi, Mohammad Taghi; Khalilpour, Asieh; Pouramir, Mahdi; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2013-03-07

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group). Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30-35 fractions within 4-7 weeks). The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist), using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019), week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect.

  13. Treatment modalities of oral mucositis after radiation of head and neck cancers; Prise en charge des mucites apres radiotherapie des cancers des voies aerodigestives superieures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapeyre, M.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Kaminsky, M.C.; Geoffrois, L.; Dolivet, G.; Pourel, N.; Marchal, C.; Bey, P.; Maire, F.; Simon, M. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Toussaint, B. [Hopital Central, Service de Chirurgie ORL, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2001-11-01

    Acute mucositis is common after radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. During the past 3 decades, there was a gradual evolution in the treatment modalities for locally advanced carcinomas (concomitant radio-chemotherapy, accelerated radiotherapy). These new strategies are accompanied by an increase in early mucosal reactions. At the present time, there is no widely accepted prophylaxis or effective treatment. Many traditional remedies or new agents seem ineffective (Sucralfate, Chlorhexidine, GM-CSF, Silver nitrate, Prostaglandin, anti-oxidants, Benzydamine hydrochloride), while others seem promising (Povidone-iodine, nonabsorbable antibiotic lozenges and anti-fungal, local GM-CSF, Glutamide, Low-energy laser, corticosteroids). Radioprotectors are controversial and should be only used in experimental protocols and not in routine practice. However, some recommendations can be proposed: general prevention and global care before cancer therapy should be systematic (oral hygiene, dental and periodontal treatment, advice to avoid the use of tobacco and alcohol); frequent oral rinsing with a bland mouthwash (Povidone-iodine or others) should be used at the start of treatment because there are significant modifications of the oral microflora increased by a disturbed salivary flow; these mouthwashes could be associated with nonabsorbable antibiotic lozenges or anti-fungal topical (bicarbonates, Amphotericine B); Systematic percutaneous fluoroscopic gastrostomy should be decided before any aggressive treatments (concomitant radio-chemotherapy, accelerated radiotherapy); pain should be controlled; finally, the radiation technique should be optimized (mucosal sparing block, conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy). (authors)

  14. Oral Mucosa Dose Parameters Predicting Grade ≥3 Acute Toxicity in Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Treated With Concurrent Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy: An Independent Validation Study Comparing Oral Cavity versus Mucosal Surface Contouring Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaixin Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine whether volumes based on the contours of the mucosal surface instead of the oral cavity can be used to predict grade ≥3 acute oral mucosa toxicity in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LANPC treated with concurrent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and chemotherapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A standardized method for the oral cavity (oral cavity contours, OCC and a novel method for the mucosal surface (mucosal surface contours, MSC were developed for the oral mucosa and prospectively applied to the radiation treatment plans of 92 patients treated with concurrent IMRT and chemotherapy for LANPC. Dose–volume histogram (DVH data were extracted and then toxicity was analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were carried out for both contouring methods. RESULTS: Grade ≥3 acute oral mucosa toxicity occurred to 20.7% (19/92 of patients in the study. A highly significant dose–volume relationship between oral mucosa irradiation and acute oral mucosa toxicity was supported by using both oral cavity and mucosal surface contouring techniques. In logistic regression, body weight loss was an independent factor related to grade ≥3 acute toxicity for OCC and MSC (P = .017 and 0.005, respectively, and the independent factor of dosimetric parameters for OCC and MSC were V30Gy (P = .003 and V50Gy (P = .003 respectively. In the receiver operating characteristics curve, the areas under V30Gy of the OCC curves was 0.753 (P = .001, while the areas under V50Gy of MSC curves was 0.714 (P = .004; the cut-off value was 73.155% (sensitivity, 0.842; specificity, 0.671 and 14.32% (sensitivity, 0.842; specificity, 0.575, respectively. CONCLUSION: DVH analysis of mucosal surface volumes accurately predicts grade ≥3 acute oral mucosa toxicity in patients with LANPC receiving concurrent IMRT and chemotherapy, but in clinical practice the MSC method appears no better than

  15. The Impact Of Oral Vitamin E In Preventing Mucositis (Bucal Mucous Inflammation Resulting From The Radiotherapy In Tumors Of Head And Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahador M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mucositis [bucal Mucous inflamation] is the most common complication resulting from the radiotherapy in tumors of head and neck. These malignancies are often curable through radiotherapy. This complication, however, may impair the treatment process and cause malnutrition. So far no medicine has been Known to prevent this complication. Vitamin E is a stabilizer of cell membrane and is also used in mucositis treatment. The survey of oral vitamin E effect on mucositis prophylaxis in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients afflicted with head and neck malignancies referring to Imam Khomeini Hospital were randomly divided into 2groups, two of whom died during treatment process. The first group (The case group consisting of 34 patients Consumed oral vitamin E 200 mg daily for seven days. The second group (The control group did not use any medicine at all. The two group underwent radiotherapy. They were compared and contrasted as to mucositis severity and dysphagia during treatment. Results: In the first group, since the fourth week up to the end of the treatment, there was a lower frequency and grade of mucositis in contrast with the control group. In the fourth week, the grade two mucositis in the first group (Case group was 20.6% and 47.5% in the control group the difference was statistically significant (P=0.024. There was also a lower frequency and grade of dysphagia in the case group since the fourth week versus the control group. In the fourth week, moderate dysphagia was 29.4% in the case group and 55.9% in the control group. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.023. Conclusion: Oral vitamin E has Proved to be effective in the Prophylaxis of Moderate and severe mucositis and dysphagia resulting from radiotherapy. It is advisable to conduct more research with more cases, lengthier duration and heavier doses.

  16. A cat with suspected laryngeal metastasis with mucosal irregularity resulting from apocrine/salivary gland adenocarcinoma in the head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara-Igarashi, Aki; Shimizu, Koichi; Michishita, Masaki; Yu, Yoshihiko; Hamamoto, Yuji; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Fujita, Michio

    2017-10-11

    A 16-year-old castrated male mongrel cat presented with swelling under the left pinna and a 3 -month history of voice change. Laryngeal endoscopy revealed circumferential oedema around the arytenoid cartilages and hypersecretion of saliva. Histopathological examination of the mass around the left ear canal was considered the primary lesion that originated from cutaneous apocrine adenocarcinoma or parotid gland adenocarcinoma, and it metastasized to the larynx, lung and medial retropharyngeal lymph nodes. This report provides new insights into feline laryngeal diseases which could result in laryngeal metastasis with slight mucosal irregularity alone and without obvious radiographic abnormalities. Therefore, histopathological examination should be performed when a cat presents clinical signs such as stridor, dysphonia, or voice change without any mass-forming laryngeal lesion.

  17. Analysis of negative result in serum anti-H. pylori IgG antibody test in cases with gastric mucosal atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kyoichi; Mishiro, Tomoko; Tanaka, Shino; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-09-01

    The purpose is to elucidate factors related to negative results of anti-H. pylori antibody test in cases with gastric mucosal atrophy. A total of 859 individuals without past history of eradication therapy for H. pylori (545 males, 314 females; mean age 52.4 years) who underwent an upper GI endoscopy examination and serological test were enrolled as subjects. Serological testing was performed using SphereLight H. pylori antibody J®, and endoscopic findings of gastric mucosal atrophy by the classification of Kimura and Takemoto and post-eradication findings were analyzed. The positive rates for the anti-H. pylori antibody test in subjects with and without gastric mucosal atrophy were 85.6% and 0.9%, respectively. In analysis of subjects with gastric mucosal atrophy, a low positive rate and serum titer was observed in subjects with C1, C2 and O3 atrophy. When the analysis was performed separately in male and female subjects, low positive rate was observed in males with O3 atrophy and females with C2 atrophy. Suspected post-eradication endoscopic findings were more frequently observed in cases with C2 atrophy. In conclusion, negative result of anti-H. pylori antibody test was frequently observed in middle-aged subjects with C1, C2 and O3 gastric mucosal atrophy.

  18. Perspectives on mucosal vaccines: is mucosal tolerance a barrier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestecky, Jiri; Russell, Michael W; Elson, Charles O

    2007-11-01

    Mucosal administration of Ags induces specific Abs in external secretions and systemic unresponsiveness termed oral or mucosal tolerance. The dominant response depends on the species studied, the nature, dose, frequency, route of Ag application, and the use of adjuvants. The temporal sequence of Ag exposure determines the quality of the ensuing immune response; although initial mucosal Ag exposure results in systemic T cell hyporesponsiveness, pre-existing systemic responses are refractory to the tolerizing effects of mucosal Ag encounter. Mucosal and systemic humoral responses may be induced concomitantly with diminished systemic T cell responses, thereby permitting Ab-mediated containment of mucosal Ags without stimulation of the systemic immune compartment. B cell Ig isotype switching and differentiation toward IgA production share common regulatory mechanisms with the suppression of T cells. Optimization of mucosal vaccination strategies has the potential for enhancing protective immune responses and suppressing systemic responses to autoantigens desirable for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  19. New results on muon radiative decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocanic, Dinko

    2012-10-01

    The PIBETA and PEN experiments, a series of precise measurements of rare pion and muon decays at PSI, have acquired a substantial set of &+circ;->e^+ νν γ, radiative muon decay (RMD), events. The measurements were made using a stopped pion beam decaying in an active target, and positron and photon detection in a segmented spherical pure-CsI electromagnetic shower calorimeter covering δφ˜3π sr, with MWPC central tracking and particle identification. The present RMD study has resulted in approximately 30-fold improvement in the precision of the decay branching ratio for (Eγ> 10 MeV, and θγ-e> 30^o), compared to previous work. Our 1% result is in excellent agreement with standard model theoretical predictions. Focusing on a narrower range of phase space, we were able to improve significantly the upper limit on the Michel paramter η, which is sensitive to non-(V-A) admixtures in the weak lagrangian.

  20. Antioxidant Capacity of Calendula Officinalis Flowers Extract and Prevention of Radiation Induced Oropharyngeal Mucositis in Patients with Head and Neck Cancers: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Kazemi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group. Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30–35 fractions within 4–7 weeks. The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist, using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS. Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019, week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p < 0.0001 and week 6 (score: 11.4 vs. 13.35, p = 0.031. Total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents and quercetin concentration of the 2% extract were 2353.4 ± 56.5 μM, 313.40 ± 6.52 mg/g, 76.66 ± 23.24 mg/g, and 19.41 ± 4.34 mg/l, respectively. Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect.

  1. Oral mucositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heals by itself when there is no infection. Healing usually takes 2 to 4 weeks. Mucositis caused ... March 20, 2016. Read More Bone marrow transplant HIV/AIDS Mastectomy Patient Instructions After chemotherapy - discharge Bleeding ...

  2. Low level laser therapy against radiation induced oral mucositis in elderly head and neck cancer patients-a randomized placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Ajay Prashad; Fernandes, Donald J; Vidyasagar, Mamidipudi S; Maiya, Arun G; Guddattu, Vausudev

    2015-03-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is treatment of choice for Elderly Head and Neck Cancer (HNC) patients. Oral mucositis (OM) during RT affects patient's routine oral activities and overall health. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) provided some promising results against cancer therapy induced OM in children and adults. No study specifically evaluated effects of LLLT against RT induced OM in elderly HNC patients until date, hence we did this study. This double blinded study randomized 46 elderly HNC patients scheduled for RT [Dosage=66 Gray (2 Gy/fraction), 5 fractions/week, total 33 fractions for 6.5 weeks], into laser (22) and placebo (24) groups. Laser group patients received LLLT [Helium-Neon, λ=632.8 nm, power density=0.024 W/cm(2), dosage=3.0 J/point at six anatomical sites bilaterally i.e. 12 locations, total dose/session=36 J, beam aperture diameter=0.6 mm, beam spot size=1 cm(2), irradiated area diameter=1 cm(2), irradiation time/point=125 s, 5 sessions/week, non-contact method-distance between probe and irradiated tissues laser. OM grades (RTOG/EORTC Scale), oral pain, weight loss, need for morphine analgesics and tube feeding, and RT break were recorded by a blinded assessor. Descriptive statistics and repeated measures ANOVA were used for analysis keeping plaser than placebo group. No difference was found for enteral feeding use (p=0.667) between two groups. LLLT decreased the severity of OM and oral pain in elderly HNC patients. Also, lesser weight loss, morphine analgesic use and radiation break happened in laser group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular Signatures in the Prevention of Radiation Damage by the Synergistic Effect of N-Acetyl Cysteine and Qingre Liyan Decoction, a Traditional Chinese Medicine, Using a 3-Dimensional Cell Culture Model of Oral Mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P. Lambros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Qingre Liyan decoction (QYD, a Traditional Chinese medicine, and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC have been used to prevent radiation induced mucositis. This work evaluates the protective mechanisms of QYD, NAC, and their combination (NAC-QYD at the cellular and transcriptional level. A validated organotypic model of oral mucosal consisting of a three-dimensional (3D cell tissue-culture of primary human keratinocytes exposed to X-ray irradiation was used. Six hours after the irradiation, the tissues were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (H and E and a TUNEL assay to assess histopathology and apoptosis, respectively. Total RNA was extracted and used for microarray gene expression profiling. The tissue-cultures treated with NAC-QYD preserved their integrity and showed no apoptosis. Microarray results revealed that the NAC-QYD caused the upregulation of genes encoding metallothioneins, HMOX1, and other components of the Nrf2 pathway, which protects against oxidative stress. DNA repair genes (XCP, GADD45G, RAD9, and XRCC1, protective genes (EGFR and PPARD, and genes of the NFκB pathway were upregulated. Finally, tissue-cultures treated prophylactically with NAC-QYD showed significant downregulation of apoptosis, cytokines and chemokines genes, and constrained damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. NAC-QYD treatment involves the protective effect of Nrf2, NFκB, and DNA repair factors.

  4. Oral mucositis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Elad, S.; Barasch, A.

    2010-01-01

    Mucosal damage is one of the most common adverse effects of radiotherapy and of cytotoxic therapy for cancer. With prevalence between 10% and 100%, depending of the cytotoxic regimen and patient-associated variables, this morbid condition represents a significant problem in oncology. In this paper

  5. Effectiveness of tapentadol prolonged release for the management of painful mucositis in head and neck cancers during intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Mazzola; Francesco, Ricchetti; Sergio, Fersino; Niccolò, Giaj Levra; Alba, Fiorentino; Maurizio, Nicodemo; Sergio, Albanese; Stefania, Gori; Filippo, Alongi

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability profile of tapentadol prolonged release (PR) in a cohort of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients affected by background pain due to painful mucositis during intensity modulated radiation therapy with or without cisplatin with definitive and adjuvant intent. Tapentadol PR was administered at the moment of pain onset in opioid-naive patients at the dosage of 50 mg BID. The dosage was increased 50 mg twice a day until the optimal dose of no more than 500 mg/day of tapentadol PR. Primary endpoint of the analysis was the evaluation of improved assessment using the numerical rating scale (NRS). Secondary endpoints were as follows: (1) assessment of the treatment received using the patients' global impression of change (PGIC) scale; (2) weight increase/stability; (3) sleep quality; and (4) tolerability. The period of observation was 90 days from the start of antineoplastic treatment. Between September 2014 and May 2015, 30 HNC patients were observed. The average age was 64.9 years (range, 36-80). Twenty-two days after the start of antineoplastic treatment, tapentadol PR was administered to 25 % of patients. This percentage was increased to 50 % after 39 days and to 75 % after 43 days. Considering the efficacy of tapentadol PR on daily pain, there was a reduction of 30 % (95 % C.I. 69.3 ÷ 96.2 %) in the pain score in 26 patients (86.7 %), and a reduction of 50 % (95 % C.I. 57.7 ÷ 90.1 %) in 23 patients (76.7 %). The use of tapentadol PR is feasible and well tolerated in HNC patients affected by background pain due to painful mucositis during intensity modulated radiotherapy with or without cisplatin. Further studies are needed to enhance current findings.

  6. Mucosal delivery of vaccines in domestic animals

    OpenAIRE

    Gerdts, Volker; Mutwiri, George; Tikoo, Suresh; Babiuk, Lorne

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Mucosal vaccination is proving to be one of the greatest challenges in modern vaccine development. Although highly beneficial for achieving protective immunity, the induction of mucosal immunity, especially in the gastro-intestinal tract, still remains a difficult task. As a result, only very few mucosal vaccines are commercially available for domestic animals. Here, we critically review various strategies for mucosal delivery of vaccines in domestic animals. This incl...

  7. Acetylcysteine Rinse in Reducing Saliva Thickness and Mucositis in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-21

    Mucositis; Oral Complications; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Mucoepidermoid

  8. Results of Radiation Therapy in Stage III Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang Woo; Shin, Byung Chul; Yum, Ha Yong; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yoo, Myung Jin [Kosin University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    Purpose : The aim of this study is to analyze the survival rate, treatment failure and complication of radiation therapy alone in stage III uterine cervical cancer. Materials and Methods : From January 1980 through December 1985, 227 patients with stage II uterine cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy at Kosin Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Among 227 patients, 72 patients(31.7%) were stage IIIa, and 155 patients(68.3%) were stage IIIb according to FIGO classification. Age distribution was 32-71 years(median: 62 years). Sixty nine patients(95.8%) in stage IIIa and 150 patients(96.8%) in stage IIIb were squamous cell carcinoma. Pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial diagnosis was 8 patients (11.1%) in stage IIIa and 29 patients(18.7%) in stage IIIb. Among 72 patients with stage IIIa, 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone by conventional technique (180-200 cGy/fr). And 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy with intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR) with Cs137 sources, and among 155 patients with stage IIIb, 80 patients(51.6%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone and 75 patients(48.4%) were treated with external radiation therapy with ICR. Total radiation doses of stage IIIa and IIIb were 65-105 Gy(median : 78.5 Gy) and 65-125.5 Gy (median :83.5 Gy). Survival rate was calculated by life-table method. Results : Complete response rates were 58.3% (42 patients) in state IIIa and 56.1%(87 patients) in stage Iiib. Overall 5 year survival rates were 57% in stage IIIa and 40% in stage IIIb. Five year survival rates by radiation technique in stage IIIa and IIIb were 64%, 40% in group treated in combination of external radiation and ICR, and 50%, 40% in the group of external radiation therapy alone(P=NS). Five year survival rates by response of radiation therapy in stage IIIa and IIIb were 90%, 66% in responder group, and 10%, 7% in non-responder group (P<0.01). There were statistically no

  9. Acute Radiation Effects Resulting from Exposure to Solar Particle Event-Like Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann; Cengel, Keith

    2012-07-01

    A major solar particle event (SPE) may place astronauts at significant risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which may be exacerbated when combined with other space flight stressors, such that the mission or crew health may be compromised. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is focused on the assessment of risks of adverse biological effects related to the ARS in animal models exposed to space flight stressors combined with the types of radiation expected during an SPE. As part of this program, FDA-approved drugs that may prevent and/or mitigate ARS symptoms are being evaluated. The CARR studies are focused on the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to the types of radiation, at the appropriate energies, doses and dose-rates, present during an SPE (and standard reference radiations, gamma rays or electrons). The ARS is a phased syndrome which often includes vomiting and fatigue. Other acute adverse biologic effects of concern are the loss of hematopoietic cells, which can result in compromised bone marrow and immune cell functions. There is also concern for skin damage from high SPE radiation doses, including burns, and resulting immune system dysfunction. Using 3 separate animal model systems (ferrets, mice and pigs), the major ARS biologic endpoints being evaluated are: 1) vomiting/retching and fatigue, 2) hematologic changes (with focus on white blood cells) and immune system changes resulting from exposure to SPE radiation with and without reduced weightbearing conditions, and 3) skin injury and related immune system functions. In all of these areas of research, statistically significant adverse health effects have been observed in animals exposed to SPE-like radiation. Countermeasures for the management of ARS symptoms are being evaluated. New research findings from the past grant year will be discussed. Acknowledgements: This research is supported by the NSBRI Center of Acute

  10. Mucosal delivery of vaccines in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdts, Volker; Mutwiri, George K; Tikoo, Suresh K; Babiuk, Lorne A

    2006-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination is proving to be one of the greatest challenges in modern vaccine development. Although highly beneficial for achieving protective immunity, the induction of mucosal immunity, especially in the gastro-intestinal tract, still remains a difficult task. As a result, only very few mucosal vaccines are commercially available for domestic animals. Here, we critically review various strategies for mucosal delivery of vaccines in domestic animals. This includes live bacterial and viral vectors, particulate delivery-systems such as polymers, alginate, polyphosphazenes, immune stimulating complex and liposomes, and receptor mediated-targeting strategies to the mucosal tissues. The most commonly used routes of immunization, strategies for delivering the antigen to the mucosal surfaces, and future prospects in the development of mucosal vaccines are discussed.

  11. The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: Results from Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Mlawer, Eli; Delamere, Jennifer; Shippert, Timothy; Cole, Jason; Iacono, Michael; Jin, Zhonghai; Li, Jiangnan; Manners, James; Raisanen, Petri; hide

    2011-01-01

    The computer codes that calculate the energy budget of solar and thermal radiation in Global Climate Models (GCMs), our most advanced tools for predicting climate change, have to be computationally efficient in order to not impose undue computational burden to climate simulations. By using approximations to gain execution speed, these codes sacrifice accuracy compared to more accurate, but also much slower, alternatives. International efforts to evaluate the approximate schemes have taken place in the past, but they have suffered from the drawback that the accurate standards were not validated themselves for performance. The manuscript summarizes the main results of the first phase of an effort called "Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes" (CIRC) where the cases chosen to evaluate the approximate models are based on observations and where we have ensured that the accurate models perform well when compared to solar and thermal radiation measurements. The effort is endorsed by international organizations such as the GEWEX Radiation Panel and the International Radiation Commission and has a dedicated website (i.e., http://circ.gsfc.nasa.gov) where interested scientists can freely download data and obtain more information about the effort's modus operandi and objectives. In a paper published in the March 2010 issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society only a brief overview of CIRC was provided with some sample results. In this paper the analysis of submissions of 11 solar and 13 thermal infrared codes relative to accurate reference calculations obtained by so-called "line-by-line" radiation codes is much more detailed. We demonstrate that, while performance of the approximate codes continues to improve, significant issues still remain to be addressed for satisfactory performance within GCMs. We hope that by identifying and quantifying shortcomings, the paper will help establish performance standards to objectively assess radiation code quality

  12. Efficacy of benzydamine hydrochloride, chlorhexidine, and povidone iodine in the treatment of oral mucositis among patients undergoing radiotherapy in head and neck malignancies: A drug trail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Roopashri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Oral mucositis is a common and debilitating complication of radiotherapy, which is associated with significant morbidity. It is therefore extremely important that mucositis be prevented, or at least treated to reduce its severity and sequelae. The objective of the study was to manage oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy and to reduce pain by using Benzydamine hydrochloride (0.15%, Chlorhexidine (0.2%, and Povidone iodine (5%. Results: Benzydamine hydrochloride was observed to be effective and delayed the development of severe form of mucositis and appears more efficient in the management of radiation-induced mucositis. Conclusion: Benzydamine hydrochloride (0.15% is safe, well tolerated, helps not just in delaying the progression of mucositis but also reduces the intensity of pain.

  13. NASA Space Radiation Risk Project: Overview and Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattnig, Steve R.; Chappell, Lori J.; George, Kerry A.; Hada, Megumi; Hu, Shaowen; Kidane, Yared H.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Kovyrshina, Tatiana; Norman, Ryan B.; Nounu, Hatem N.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Risk project is responsible for integrating new experimental and computational results into models to predict risk of cancer and acute radiation syndrome (ARS) for use in mission planning and systems design, as well as current space operations. The project has several parallel efforts focused on proving NASA's radiation risk projection capability in both the near and long term. This presentation will give an overview, with select results from these efforts including the following topics: verification, validation, and streamlining the transition of models to use in decision making; relative biological effectiveness and dose rate effect estimation using a combination of stochastic track structure simulations, DNA damage model calculations and experimental data; ARS model improvements; pathway analysis from gene expression data sets; solar particle event probabilistic exposure calculation including correlated uncertainties for use in design optimization.

  14. Randomized trial of standard pain control with or without gabapentin for pain related to radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Tomoko; Kiyota, Naomi; Shimada, Takanobu; Funakoshi, Yohei; Chayahara, Naoko; Toyoda, Masanori; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nibu, Ken-Ichi; Komori, Takahide; Sasaki, Ryohei; Mukohara, Toru; Minami, Hironobu

    2016-12-01

    Radiation-induced mucositis (RIM) in chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC) causes severe pain and worsens CRT compliance, QOL and outcome. Following retrospective reports, we conducted a randomized trial of the safety and efficacy of gabapentin for RIM-associated pain during CRT. HNC patients (pts) receiving CRT were randomized to standard pain control (SPC) with acetaminophen and opioids, or SPC plus gabapentin (SPC+G). Gabapentin was maintained at 900mg/day for 4 weeks after CRT. Primary endpoint was maximum visual analogue scale (VAS) score during CRT, and secondary endpoints were total opioid dose, changes in QOL (EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-HN 35) from baseline to 4 weeks after CRT, and adverse events. Twenty-two eligible Stage III or IV pts were randomly assigned to SPC or SPC+G (n=11 each). Twelve were treated in a locally advanced setting and 10 in a postoperative setting. Median maximum VAS scores, median total dose of opioids at maximum VAS and total dose of opioids at 4 weeks after CRT tended to be higher in the SPC+G arm (47 in SPC vs. 74 in SPC+G, p=0.517; 215mg vs. 745.3mg, p=0.880; and 1260mg vs. 1537.5mg, p=0.9438, respectively), without significance. QOL analysis showed significantly worse scores in the SPC+G arm for weight gain (p=0.005). Adverse events related to gabapentin were manageable. This pilot study is the first prospective randomized trial of gabapentin for RIM-related pain. Gabapentin had no apparent beneficial effect. Further research into agents for RIM-related pain is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. LISA PathFinder radiation monitor proton irradiation test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, I.; Diaz-Aguiló, M.; Gibert, F.; Grimani, C.; Hollington, D.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.

    2012-06-01

    The design of the Radiation Monitor in the LISA Technology Package on board LISA Pathnder is based on two silicon PIN diodes, placed parallel to each other in a telescopic configuration. One of them is able to record spectral information of the particle hitting the diode. A test campaign for the flight model Radiation Monitor was done in the Paul Scherrer Institute Proton Irradiation Facility in September 2010. Its purpose was to check correct functionality of the Radiation Monitor under real high energy proton fluxes. Here we present the results of the experiments done and their assessment by means of a simulated flight model geometry using GEANT4 toolkit. No deviation from nominal RM performance was detected, which means the instrument is fully ready for flight.

  16. Asian expert recommendation on management of skin and mucosal effects of radiation, with or without the addition of cetuximab or chemotherapy, in treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guopei; Lin, Jin-Ching; Kim, Sung-Bae; Bernier, Jacques; Agarwal, Jai Prakash; Vermorken, Jan B; Thinh, Dang Huy Quoc; Cheng, Hoi-Ching; Yun, Hwan Jung; Chitapanarux, Imjai; Lertsanguansinchai, Prasert; Reddy, Vijay Anand; He, Xia

    2016-01-27

    With increasing numbers of patients with unresectable locoregionally advanced (LA) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) receiving cetuximab/radiotherapy (RT), several guidelines on the early detection and management of skin-related toxicities have been developed. Considering the existing management guidelines for these treatment-induced conditions, clinical applicability and standardization of grading methods has remained a cause of concern globally, particularly in Asian countries. In this study, we attempted to collate the literature and clinical experience across Asian countries to compile a practical and implementable set of recommendations for Asian oncologists to manage skin- and mucosa-related toxicities arising from different types of radiation, with or without the addition of cetuximab or chemotherapy. In December 2013, an international panel of experts in the field of head and neck cancer management assembled for an Asia-Pacific head and neck cancer expert panel meeting in China. The compilation of discussion outcomes of this meeting and literature data ultimately led to the development of a set of recommendations for physicians with regards to the approach and management of dermatological conditions arising from RT, chemotherapy/RT and cetuximab/RT, and similarly for the approach and management of mucositis resulting from RT, with or without the addition of chemotherapy or cetuximab. These recommendations helped to adapt guidelines published in the literature or text books into bedside practice, and may also serve as a starting point for developing individual institutional side-effect management protocols with adequate training and education.

  17. Long Term Results of Radiation Therapy in Early Glottic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Byun, Sang Jun [Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    This study was designed to evaluate long-term results in terms of failure, survival and voice preservation after radiation therapy for early glottic cancer. From February 1988 to December 2003, 70 patients with early glottic cancer were treated with radiation therapy at Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. Patient age distribution was from 39 to 79 years, with a median age of 62 years. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma. According to the TNM stage, 58 patients had stage I disease, 12 patients had stage II disease; 67 patients were male. The laryngeal area was irradiated with the use of bilateral opposing fields with/without a wedge filter with 6 MV photons at a total dose of 54{approx}70.2 Gy in 1.8{approx}2.2 Gy fractions over 6{approx}8 weeks. We delivered a median radiation dose of 60 Gy for stage I patients and a median radiation dose of 66 Gy for stage II patients. Salvage surgery was performed in patients with local recurrence. The voice preservation rate was analyzed after all treatments including salvage surgery. Follow-up periods were from 13 to 180 months, with a median follow-up period of 77.5 months. The survival rate was analyzed by the use of the Kaplan Meier method and log rank test. A comparison of two groups was performed with the use of the chi-squared test. The local control rate was 98.5% (69/70). The five-year-overall survival rate was 93.9%. The five-year disease free survival rate (5YDFS) was 84.1% and the 5YDFS after radiation and salvage surgery was 92.8%. According to stage, the 5YDFS was 93.1% and 91.7% for stage I and stage II respectively. Thirteen patients (18.5%) had local failure with 24 months of median time to local failure and nine patients received salvage surgery; however, four patients were lost to follow-up after a diagnosis of recurrence. Only two patients died due to a distant metastasis at 33 months and 71 months after radiation therapy, respectively. Nine patients died due to other diseases with a median time

  18. The Results of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    Purpose: Despite apparently complete resection of cancer of the rectum, local recurrence rate was high. Radiation therapy has been used either alone or in combination with chemotherapy as an adjunct to surgery to reduce the risk of recurrence. This study was designed to evaluate the prognostic factors, survival rate and local recurrence rate of the rectal cancer who had received postoperative radiation therapy by retrospective analysis. Method: From 1982 to 1990, 63 patients with cancer of the rectum surgically staged as B2 or C disease received postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy after curative resection of tumor for cure. Postoperative radiation therapy was given to the whole pelvis (mean dose: 5040 cGy in 5-6weeks) and perineum was included in irradiated field in case of abdominoperineal resection. Results: Three-year actuarial survival rate was 73.2% overall, 87.7% in stage B2+3 and 62.9% in stage C2+3. Three-year disease-free survival rate was 69.5% overall, 87.7% in stage B2+3 and 56.8% in stage C2+3. Three-year disease-free survival rate in anterior resection was 77.8% and 44.4% in abdominoperineal resection. The local recurrence rate was 15.9% and distant failure rate was 20.6%. Severe late complication was small bowel obstruction in 6 patients and surgery was required in 4 patients (6.3%). The prognostic factors were stage (p=0.0221) and method of surgery(p=0.0414) (anterior resection vs abdominoperineal resection). Conclusion: This study provides evidence supporting the use of postoperative radiation therapy for reducing the local recurrence rate in patients who have had curative resection of rectal cancer with involvement of perirectal fat or regional nodes or both (stage B2 and C)

  19. Oral Mucosa Dose Parameters Predicting Grade ≥3 Acute Toxicity in Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Treated With Concurrent Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy: An Independent Validation Study Comparing Oral Cavity versus Mucosal Surface Contouring Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaixin; Yang, Ling; Hu, Qiang-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Zhong; Chen, Ming; Chen, Yuanyuan

    2017-10-01

    To determine whether volumes based on the contours of the mucosal surface instead of the oral cavity can be used to predict grade ≥3 acute oral mucosa toxicity in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LANPC) treated with concurrent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and chemotherapy. A standardized method for the oral cavity (oral cavity contours, OCC) and a novel method for the mucosal surface (mucosal surface contours, MSC) were developed for the oral mucosa and prospectively applied to the radiation treatment plans of 92 patients treated with concurrent IMRT and chemotherapy for LANPC. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data were extracted and then toxicity was analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were carried out for both contouring methods. Grade ≥3 acute oral mucosa toxicity occurred to 20.7% (19/92) of patients in the study. A highly significant dose-volume relationship between oral mucosa irradiation and acute oral mucosa toxicity was supported by using both oral cavity and mucosal surface contouring techniques. In logistic regression, body weight loss was an independent factor related to grade ≥3 acute toxicity for OCC and MSC (P=.017 and 0.005, respectively), and the independent factor of dosimetric parameters for OCC and MSC were V30Gy (P=.003) and V50Gy (P=.003) respectively. In the receiver operating characteristics curve, the areas under V30Gy of the OCC curves was 0.753 (P=.001), while the areas under V50Gy of MSC curves was 0.714 (P=.004); the cut-off value was 73.155% (sensitivity, 0.842; specificity, 0.671) and 14.32% (sensitivity, 0.842; specificity, 0.575), respectively. DVH analysis of mucosal surface volumes accurately predicts grade ≥3 acute oral mucosa toxicity in patients with LANPC receiving concurrent IMRT and chemotherapy, but in clinical practice the MSC method appears no better than the OCC one. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Long-Term Results of 2-Dimensional Radiation Therapy in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Yang, Dae Sik; Yoon, Won Sup; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To analyze the treatment outcomes, complications, prognostic factors after a long-term follow-up of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone or concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Between December 1981 and December 2006, 190 eligible patients with non-metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated at our department with a curative intent. Of these patients, 103 were treated with RT alone and 87 patients received CCRT. The median age was 49 years (range, 8-78 years). The distributions of clinical stage according to the AJCC 6th edition included I: 7 (3.6%), IIA: 8 (4.2%), IIB: 33 (17.4%), III: 82 (43.2%), IVA: 31 (16.3%), IVB: 29 (15.3%). The accumulated radiation doses to the primary tumor ranged from 66.6-87.0 Gy (median, 72 Gy). Treatment outcomes and prognostic factors were retrospectively analyzed. Acute and late toxicities were assessed using the RTOG criteria. A total of 96.8% (184/190) of patients completed the planned treatment. With a mean follow-up of 73 months (range, 2-278 months; median, 52 months), 93 (48.9%) patients had relapses that were local 44 (23.2%), nodal 13 (6.8%), or distant 49 (25.8%). The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 55.6% and 44.5%, 54.8% and 51.3%, in addition to 65.3% and 57.4%, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that CCRT, age, gender, and stage were significant prognostic factors for OS. The CCRT and gender were independent prognostic factors for both DFS and DSS. There was no grade 4 or 5 acute toxicity, but grade 3 mucositis and hematologic toxicity were present in 42 patients (22.1%) and 18 patients (9.5%), respectively. During follow-up, grade 3 hearing loss in 9 patients and trismus in 6 patients were reported. The results of our study were in accordance with findings of previous studies and we confirmed that CCRT, low stage, female gender, and young age were related to improvement in OS

  1. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Roses, Daniel [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Speyer, James [Department of Medical Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Fenton Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: Silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  2. Systematic review of natural agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarom, Noam; Ariyawardana, Anura; Hovan, Allan

    2013-01-01

    , suggestion, and no guideline possible. RESULTS: A total of 49 papers across 15 interventions were examined. A new suggestion was developed in favor of systemic zinc supplements administered orally in the prevention of oral mucositis in oral cancer patients receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation (Level...

  3. Assigning a Price to Radiative Forcing: Methods, Results, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, D. A.; Howarth, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change mitigation frameworks have increasingly begun to include components that involve active management of the land surface. Predominantly, these programs focus on the sequestration of greenhouse gasses in vegetation and soils, generating offset credits for projects which demonstrate considerable storage. However, it is widely known that biogeophysical interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere, such as latent and sensible heat flux, albedo radiative forcing, and surface roughness, can in many cases outweigh the influence of greenhouse gas storage on global and local climate. Surface albedo, in particular, has attracted attention in the context of these frameworks because it has been shown to influence the overall climate benefits of high-latitude forest growth through tradeoffs between carbon sequestration and radiative forcing from seasonal snow cover albedo. Here we review a methodology for pricing albedo-related radiative forcing through the use of an integrated assessment model, present the results under several emissions and social preference scenarios, and describe the implications that this pricing methodology may have on forest land management in the Northeastern United States. Additionally, we investigate the consequences of projected decreased winter precipitation on the net climate benefits of snow albedo throughout the state of New Hampshire, USA.

  4. Fentanyl pectin nasal spray for painful mucositis in head and neck cancers during intensity-modulated radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, R; Ricchetti, F; Fiorentino, A; Giaj-Levra, N; Fersino, S; Tebano, U; Albanese, S; Gori, S; Alongi, F

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the current analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of rapid onset opioid in a cohort of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients affected by painful mucositis influencing swallowing function during RT ± ChT with definitive or adjuvant intent. A retrospective analysis was conduct on HNC patients during RT ± ChT that received fentanyl pectin na sal spray (FPNS) for incidental BTP due to painful mucositis 13 min before the main meals. The period of observation has been 90 days starting from the beginning of RT ± ChT. Forty HNC patients with incidental BTP due to painful mucositis treated with FPNS were analyzed. The mean NRS of untreated episodes of BTP was 5.73 ± 1.54 decreasing to 2.25 ± 2.45 with FPNS (median dose 100 mcg). During the pain treatment, the number of meals increased from 2.08 ± 0.35 to 2.868 ± 0.4 (p = 0.000), and the BMI remained stable (from 25.086 ± 3.292 to 25.034 ± 3.090; p = 0.448). The 94.9% of patients was satisfied or very satisfied for the rapidity of the effect, and 97.4% for the easiness and convenience in the use. FPNS showed an acceptable safety activity profile in predictable BTP due to painful mucositis in HNC patients during RT ± ChT. FPNS was also effective in reducing the mucositis sequelae and allowing the completion of RT scheduled scheme. Moreover, patients declared satisfaction in terms of ease of use.

  5. Long-term functional results of radiation after coloanal anastomosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAC Mathias

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is the only treatment that can cure most patients with colorectal cancer. Radiation therapy (pre or postoperative has been shown to improve results by decreasing local recurrence and improving survival. Our aim was to analyze whether postoperative radiation influenced long-term functional outcomes and the probability of stricture of anastomosis in patients who underwent coloanal anastomosis for rectal cancer. Methods: The records of 84 patients with coloanal anastomosis for rectal cancer were studied between 1980 and 1996. There were 82 males and 28 females. Mean age was 57.8 years (range 24 to 78 years. Mean distal resection margin was 2.6 cm (range 0 to 14cm. Twenty-three patients received postoperative irradiation therapy. Patients who received chemotherapy were not included in the study. Results were analysed by examination , telephone or questionnaire. Mean follow-up was 3.8 years (range 0 to 13 years. Results: There was no operative mortality. Functional variables were much better in non-irradiated patients. The irradiated group had more number of stools/day (p>0.05, more number of stools/ night (p>0.05, more incontinence/day (p0.05. Conclusion: Postoperative irradiation after colo-anal anastomosis for rectal cancer is safe, but may increase the risk of stricture of anastomosis and does affect functional results adversely.

  6. Low-Level Laser Therapy for Treatment of Oral Mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Ravina Naomi Tarigan; Yuniardini Septorini Wimardhani

    2012-01-01

    Radiation and chemotherapy are the treatment options for head and neck cancer. Several side effects related to those treat-ment have been shown. Oral mucositis is a common side effect in patients undergoing those treatment. The presence of oral mucositis in these patients would influencing quality of life therefore compromising treatment outcome. The spec-trum of oral mucositis can be clinically seen as thinning of oral mucosa, oral discomfort to painful oral lesion causing mastication impair...

  7. L-lysine in Treating Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy With or Without Chemotherapy For Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Mucositis; Oral Complications of Chemotherapy; Oral Complications of Radiation Therapy; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage

  8. The effectiveness of a saline mouth rinse regimen and education programme on radiation-induced oral mucositis and quality of life in oral cavity cancer patients: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B-S; Wu, S-C; Lin, C-Y; Fan, K-H; Chang, J T-C; Chen, S-C

    2018-01-09

    Radiation therapy (RT) and concurrent chemotherapy RT (CCRT) generate radiation-induced oral mucositis (OM) and lower quality of life (QOL). This study assessed the impact of a saline mouth rinse regimen and education programme on radiation-induced OM symptoms, and QOL in oral cavity cancer (OCC) patients receiving RT or CCRT. Ninety-one OCC patients were randomly divided into a group that received saline mouth rinses and an education programme and a control group that received standard care. OM symptoms and QOL were assessed with the WHO Oral Toxicity Scale, MSS-moo and UW-QOL. Data were collected at the first postoperative visit to the radiation department (T0) and at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after beginning RT or CCRT. Patients in both groups had significantly higher levels of physical and social-emotional QOL at 8 weeks after beginning RT or CCRT compared to the first visit. Patients in the saline rinse group had significantly better physical and social-emotional QOL as compared to the standard care group at 8 weeks. Radiation-induced OM symptoms and overall QOL were not different between the groups. We thus conclude the saline rinse and education programme promote better physical and social-emotional QOL in OCC patients receiving RT/CCRT. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Recent Radiation Test Results for Trench Power MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Phan, Anthony M.; Kim, Hak S.; Topper, Alyson D.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Label, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Single-event effect (SEE) radiation test results are presented for various trench-gate power MOSFETs. The heavy-ion response of the first (and only) radiation-hardened trench-gate power MOSFET is evaluated: the manufacturer SEE response curve is verified and importantly, no localized dosing effects are measured, distinguishing it from other, non-hardened trench-gate power MOSFETs. Evaluations are made of n-type commercial and both n- and p-type automotive grade trench-gate device using ions comparable to of those on the low linear energy transfer (LET) side of the iron knee of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum, to explore suitability of these parts for missions with higher risk tolerance and shorter duration, such as CubeSats. Part-to-part variability of SEE threshold suggests testing with larger sample sizes and applying more aggressive derating to avoid on-orbit failures. The n-type devices yielded expected localized dosing effects including when irradiated in an unbiased (0-V) configuration, adding to the challenge of inserting these parts into space flight missions.

  10. Titanium-Water Thermosyphon Gamma Radiation Effects and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzi, James L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Goodenow, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-water thermosyphons are being considered for use in heat rejection systems for fission power systems. Their proximity to the nuclear reactor will result in some exposure to gamma irradiation. Non-condensable gas formation from radiation may breakdown water over time and render a portion of the thermosyphon condenser inoperable. A series of developmental thermosyphons were operated at nominal operating temperature with accelerated gamma irradiation exposures on the same order of magnitude that is expected in eight years of heat rejection system operation. Temperature data were obtained during exposure at three locations on each thermosyphon; evaporator, condenser, and condenser end cap. Some non-condensable gas was evident, however thermosyphon performance was not affected because the non-condensable gas was compressed into the fill tube region at the top of the thermosyphon, away from the heat rejecting fin. The trend appeared to be an increasing amount of non-condensable gas formation with increasing gamma irradiation dose. Hydrogen is thought to be the most likely candidate for the non-condensable gas and hydrogen is known to diffuse through grain boundaries. Post-exposure evaluation of selected thermosyphons at temperature and in a vacuum chamber revealed that the non-condensable gas likely diffused out of the thermosyphons over a relatively short period of time. Further research shows a number of experimental and theoretical examples of radiolysis occurring through gamma radiation alone in pure water.

  11. Titanium-Water Thermosyphon Gamma Radiation Exposure and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzi, James, L.A; Jaworske, Donald, A.; Goodenow, Debra, A.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-water thermosyphons are being considered for use in heat rejection systems for fission power systems. Their proximity to the nuclear reactor will result in some gamma irradiation. Noncondensable gas formation from radiation-induced breakdown of water over time may render portions of the thermosyphon condenser inoperable. A series of developmental thermosyphons were operated at nominal operating temperature under accelerated gamma irradiation, with exposures on the same order of magnitude as that expected in 8 years of heat rejection system operation. Temperature data were obtained during exposure at three locations on each thermosyphon: evaporator, condenser, and condenser end cap. Some noncondensable gas was evident; however, thermosyphon performance was not affected because the noncondensable gas was compressed into the fill tube region at the top of the thermosyphon, away from the heat rejecting fin. The trend appeared to be an increasing amount of noncondensable gas formation with increasing gamma irradiation dose. Hydrogen is thought to be the most likely candidate for the noncondensable gas and hydrogen is known to diffuse through grain boundaries. Post-exposure evaluation of one thermosyphon in a vacuum chamber and at temperature revealed that the noncondensable gas diffused out of the thermosyphon over a relatively short period of time. Further research shows a number of experimental and theoretical examples of radiolysis occurring through gamma radiation alone in pure water.

  12. Ion chambers compliance results of Brazilian radiation therapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joana, Georgia Santos; Salata, Camila; Leal, Paulo; Oliveira, Renato; Couto, Nozimar do; Teixeira, Flavia Cristina; Soares, Abner Duarte; Santini, Eduardo Sergio; Gonçalves, Marcello Gomes

    2017-12-07

    Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (cnen) has been making a constant effort to keep updated with international standards and national needs to strengthen the status of radiological protection of the country. The guidelines related to radiation therapy facilities have been revised in the last five years in order to take in consideration the most relevant aspects of the growing technology as well as to mitigate the accidents or incidents observed in practice. Hence, clinical dosimeters have gained special importance in this matter. In the present work we discuss the effectiveness of regulation and inspections to the enforcement of instrument calibration accuracy for improvement of patient dosimetry and quality control. As a result, we observed that the number of calibrated instruments, mainly well-chambers, is increasing each year. The same behavior is observed for instruments employed in technologically advanced radiation treatments such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (imrt), volumetric therapy and stereotatic radiosurgery (srs). We ascribe this behavior to the new regulation. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  13. Health survey of radiation workers. Results of questionnaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Kaoru [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School; Aoyama, Takashi; Kawagoe, Yasumitsu; Sunayashiki, Tadashi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Nishitani, Motohiro; Yoshinaga, Nobuharu

    1998-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Radiological Technology asked radiation workers about the radiation doses and the state of their health as well as family. The reports by the Health and Welfare Ministry were referenced to compare radiation workers with others. The questionnaire was sent to about 4,000 members, and returned from 2,479. The survey showed that 684 persons (27.6%) felt health anxiety, 455 persons (18.4%) had medical check for recent one year, and 1,645 persons (66.4%) had anamnesis. Radiation doses for one year and cumulated doses varied according to engaging duration. (K.H.)

  14. Mucosal Immunosenescence In The Gastrointestinal Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shintaro; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that pathogen-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody (Ab) is the major player at mucosal surfaces for host defense. However, alterations in the mucosal immune system occur in advanced aging which results in a failure of induction of SIgA Abs for protection from infectious diseases. Signs of mucosal senescence first appear in the gut immune system. Further, changes in the intestinal microbiota most likely influence mucosal immunity. To overcome the immunological aging decline in mucosal immunity, several adjuvant systems including mucosal dendritic cell (DC) targeting have been shown to be attractive and effective immunological strategies. Similarly, antigen (Ag) uptake-M cells are ideal targets for facilitating Ag-specific mucosal immune responses. However, the numbers of M cells are reduced in aged mice. In this regard, Spi-B, an essential transcription factor for the functional and structural differentiation of M cells could be a potent strategy for the induction of effective mucosal immunity in aging. PMID:25531743

  15. Anthropogenic influence on SOA and the resulting radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hoyle

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of chemical changes in the atmosphere since the pre-industrial period on the distributions and burdens of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA has been calculated using the off-line aerosol chemistry transport model Oslo CTM2. The production of SOA was found to have increased from about 35 Tg yr−1 to 53 Tg yr−1 since pre-industrial times, leading to an increase in the global annual mean SOA burden from 0.33 Tg to 0.50 Tg, or about 51%. The effect of allowing semi-volatile species to partition to sulphate aerosol was also tested, leading to an increase in SOA production from about 43 Tg yr−1 to 69 Tg yr−1 since pre-industrial times, while the annual mean SOA burden increased from 0.44 Tg to 0.70 Tg, or about 59%. The increases were greatest over industrialised areas, especially when partitioning to sulphate aerosol was allowed, as well as over regions with high biogenic precursor emissions. The contribution of emissions from different sources to the larger SOA burdens has been calculated. The results suggest that the majority of the increase was caused by emissions of primary organic aerosols (POA, from fossil fuel and bio fuel combustion. As yet, very few radiative forcing estimates of SOA exist, and no such estimates were provided in the latest IPCC report. In this study, we found that the change in SOA burden caused a radiative forcing (defined here as the difference between the pre-industrial and the present day run of −0.09 W m−2, when SOA was allowed to partition to both organic and sulphate aerosols, and −0.06 W m−2 when only partitioning to organic aerosols was assumed. Therefore, the radiative forcing of SOA was found to be stronger than the best estimate for POA in the latest IPCC assessment.

  16. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brawley, Otis W. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Emory University, and American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  17. Results of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osteen, R.T.; Smith, B.L. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    For stage I or II breast cancer, conservative surgery and radiation therapy are as effective as modified radical or radical mastectomy. In most cases, cosmetic considerations and the availability of therapy are the primary concerns. The extent of a surgical resection less than a mastectomy has not been a subject of a randomized trial and is controversial. It appears that removal of a quadrant of the breast for small lesions is safe but excessive. It may be possible to limit the breast resection to gross tumor removal for most patients while using wider resections for patients with an extensive intraductal component or for invasive lobular carcinoma. It also appears that excluding patients from breast conservation on the basis of positive margins on the first attempt at tumor excision may be unnecessarily restrictive. Although patients with an extensive intraductal component or invasive lobular carcinoma should have negative margins, it appears that a patient with predominantly invasive ductal carcinoma can be treated without re-excision if all gross tumor has been resected and there is no reason to suspect extensive microscopic disease. Patients with indeterminate margins should have a re-excision. Axillary dissection provides prognostic information and prevents progression of the disease within the axilla. Axillary dissections limited to level I will accurately identify a substantial number of patients who have pathologically positive but clinically negative nodes. When combined with radiation therapy to the axilla, a level I dissection results in a limited number of patients with progressive axillary disease. Patients with pathologically positive axillas and patients at particularly high risk for systemic disease because of the extent of axillary node involvement can be identified by dissections of levels I and II. 60 references.

  18. Mucosal vaccine design and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, Kim A; Bennett, Kaila M; Lo, David D

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are a major portal of entry for many human pathogens that are the cause of infectious diseases worldwide. Vaccines capable of eliciting mucosal immune responses can fortify defenses at mucosal front lines and protect against infection. However, most licensed vaccines are administered parenterally and fail to elicit protective mucosal immunity. Immunization by mucosal routes may be more effective at inducing protective immunity against mucosal pathogens at their sites of entry. Recent advances in our understanding of mucosal immunity and identification of correlates of protective immunity against specific mucosal pathogens have renewed interest in the development of mucosal vaccines. Efforts have focused on efficient delivery of vaccine antigens to mucosal sites that facilitate uptake by local antigen-presenting cells to generate protective mucosal immune responses. Discovery of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants are also being sought to enhance the magnitude and quality of the protective immune response.

  19. Isolated mucosal Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak Sundriyal; Naveen Kumar; Raj Kumar; Brijesh Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a term used to define a group of clinical syndrome caused by various species of parasite Leishmania. Three main clinical types of leishmaniasis are visceral leishmaniasis, cutaneous leishmaniasis and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. However, isolated presentation as mucosal disease is rare. We report a case of primarily mucosal leishmaniasis.

  20. Preliminary results of a three-dimensional radiative transfer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hirok, W. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Clouds act as the primary modulator of the Earth`s radiation at the top of the atmosphere, within the atmospheric column, and at the Earth`s surface. They interact with both shortwave and longwave radiation, but it is primarily in the case of shortwave where most of the uncertainty lies because of the difficulties in treating scattered solar radiation. To understand cloud-radiative interactions, radiative transfer models portray clouds as plane-parallel homogeneous entities to ease the computational physics. Unfortunately, clouds are far from being homogeneous, and large differences between measurement and theory point to a stronger need to understand and model cloud macrophysical properties. In an attempt to better comprehend the role of cloud morphology on the 3-dimensional radiation field, a Monte Carlo model has been developed. This model can simulate broadband shortwave radiation fluxes while incorporating all of the major atmospheric constituents. The model is used to investigate the cloud absorption anomaly where cloud absorption measurements exceed theoretical estimates and to examine the efficacy of ERBE measurements and cloud field experiments. 3 figs.

  1. Low energy Helium-Neon laser in the prevention of oral mucositis in patients undergoing bone marrow transplant: results of a double blind randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, D; Tardieu, C; Schubert, M; Peterson, D; Resbeut, M; Faucher, C; Franquin, J C

    1997-07-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of Helium-Neon (He-Ne) laser in the prevention of oral mucositis induced by high dose chemoradiotherapy before autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Between 1993 and 1995, 30 consecutive patients receiving an autologous peripheral stem-cell or bone marrow transplant (BMT) after high dose chemoradiotherapy were randomized to possibly receive prophylactic laser to the oral mucosa after giving informed consent. Chemotherapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, 60 mg/kg intravenously (I.V.) on day (d)-5 and d-4 in 27 cases, or melphalan 140 mg/kg I.V. on d-4 in three cases. Total body irradiation (TBI) consisted of 12 Gy midplane dose in six fractions (4 Gy/day for three days). He-Ne laser (632.8 nm wavelength, power 60 mW) applications were performed daily from d-5 to d-1 on five anatomic sites of the oral mucosa. Oral examination was performed daily from d0 to d + 20. Mucositis was scored according to an oral exam guide with a 16 item scale of which four were assessed by the patients themselves. Mean daily self assessment scores for oral pain, ability to swallow and oral dryness were measured. A daily mucositis index (DMI) and a cumulative oral mucositis score (COMS) were established. Requirement for narcotics and parenteral nutrition was recorded. The COMS was significantly reduced among laser treated (L+) patients (p = 0.04). The improvement of DMI in L+ patients was also statistically significant (p parenteral nutrition was not reduced (p = NS). Helium-Neon laser treatment was well tolerated, feasible in all cases, and reduced high dose chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Optimal laser treatment schedules still needs to be defined.

  2. Effects in Plant Populations Resulting from Chronic Radiation Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geras' kin, Stanislav A.; Volkova, Polina Yu.; Vasiliyev, Denis V.; Dikareva, Nina S.; Oudalova, Alla A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249032, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Human industrial activities have left behind a legacy of ecosystems strongly impacted by a wide range of contaminants, including radionuclides. Phyto-toxic effects of acute impact are well known, but the consequences of long-term chronic exposure to low pollutant concentrations is neither well understood nor adequately included in risk assessments. To understand effects of real-world contaminant exposure properly we must pay attention to what is actually going on in the field. However, for many wildlife groups and endpoints, there are no, or very few, studies that link accumulation, chronic exposure and biological effects in natural settings. To fill the gaps, results of field studies carried out on different plant species (winter rye and wheat, spring barley, oats, Scots pine, wild vetch, crested hair-grass) in various radioecological situations (nuclear weapon testing, the Chernobyl accident, uranium and radium processing) to investigate effects of long-term chronic exposure to radionuclides are discussed. Because each impacted site developed in its own way due to a unique history of events, the experience from one case study is rarely directly applicable to another situation. In spite of high heterogeneity in response, we have detected several general patterns. Plant populations growing in areas with relatively low levels of pollution are characterized by the increased level of both cytogenetic alterations and genetic diversity. Accumulation of cellular alterations may afterward influence biological parameters important for populations such as health and reproduction. Presented data provide evidence that in plant populations inhabiting heavily contaminated territories cytogenetic damage were accompanied by decrease in reproductive ability. In less contaminated sites, because of the scarcity of data available, it is impossible to establish exactly the relationship between cytogenetic effects and reproductive ability. Radioactive contamination of the plants

  3. [X-ray endoscopic semiotics and diagnostic algorithm of radiation studies of preneoplastic gastric mucosa changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akberov, R F; Gorshkov, A N

    1997-01-01

    The X-ray endoscopic semiotics of precancerous gastric mucosal changes (epithelial dysplasia, intestinal epithelial rearrangement) was examined by the results of 1574 gastric examination. A diagnostic algorithm was developed for radiation studies in the diagnosis of the above pathology.

  4. Comparison of results between numerical simulation and experiment for radiative ablation of CH foil

    CERN Document Server

    Sheng Jia Tian; Feng Ting Gui; Zhang Li; Li Meng; Yang Jia Min; Ding Yao Nan; Jiang Shao En

    2002-01-01

    The radiation ablation experiments of CH foils are simulated using the experiment radiation flow in the hohlraum by 1-D radiation transfer code RDMG. The results of simulation show that influence of Non-LTE radiation source on the ablation of CH foil is very obvious. The results of simulation and experiment including radiation flow total intensity and the variation of radiation temperature with time at the rear of CH foil, as well as the time delay of 400 eV photon arriving at the rear of CH foil are consistent basically

  5. A Novel Peptide to Treat Oral Mucositis Blocks Endothelial and Epithelial Cell Apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Xiaoyan; Chen Peili [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sonis, Stephen T. [Division of Oral Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Biomodels, Watertown, Massachusetts (United States); Lingen, Mark W. [Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Berger, Ann [NephRx Corporation, Kalamazoo, Michigan (United States); Toback, F. Gary, E-mail: gtoback@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: No effective agents currently exist to treat oral mucositis (OM) in patients receiving chemoradiation for the treatment of head-and-neck cancer. We identified a novel 21-amino acid peptide derived from antrum mucosal protein-18 that is cytoprotective, mitogenic, and motogenic in tissue culture and animal models of gastrointestinal epithelial cell injury. We examined whether administration of antrum mucosal protein peptide (AMP-p) could protect against and/or speed recovery from OM. Methods and Materials: OM was induced in established hamster models by a single dose of radiation, fractionated radiation, or fractionated radiation together with cisplatin to simulate conventional treatments of head-and-neck cancer. Results: Daily subcutaneous administration of AMP-p reduced the occurrence of ulceration and accelerated mucosal recovery in all three models. A delay in the onset of erythema after irradiation was observed, suggesting that a protective effect exists even before injury to mucosal epithelial cells occurs. To test this hypothesis, the effects of AMP-p on tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced apoptosis were studied in an endothelial cell line (human dermal microvascular endothelial cells) as well as an epithelial cell line (human adult low-calcium, high-temperature keratinocytes; HaCaT) used to model the oral mucosa. AMP-p treatment, either before or after cell monolayers were exposed to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, protected against development of apoptosis in both cell types when assessed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry or ligase-mediated polymerase chain reaction. Conclusions: These observations suggest that the ability of AMP-p to attenuate radiation-induced OM could be attributable, at least in part, to its antiapoptotic activity.

  6. Intercomparison of shortwave radiative transfer schemes in global aerosol modeling: results from the AeroCom Radiative Transfer Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Randles

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examine the performance of 31 global model radiative transfer schemes in cloud-free conditions with prescribed gaseous absorbers and no aerosols (Rayleigh atmosphere, with prescribed scattering-only aerosols, and with more absorbing aerosols. Results are compared to benchmark results from high-resolution, multi-angular line-by-line radiation models. For purely scattering aerosols, model bias relative to the line-by-line models in the top-of-the atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing ranges from roughly −10 to 20%, with over- and underestimates of radiative cooling at lower and higher solar zenith angle, respectively. Inter-model diversity (relative standard deviation increases from ~10 to 15% as solar zenith angle decreases. Inter-model diversity in atmospheric and surface forcing decreases with increased aerosol absorption, indicating that the treatment of multiple-scattering is more variable than aerosol absorption in the models considered. Aerosol radiative forcing results from multi-stream models are generally in better agreement with the line-by-line results than the simpler two-stream schemes. Considering radiative fluxes, model performance is generally the same or slightly better than results from previous radiation scheme intercomparisons. However, the inter-model diversity in aerosol radiative forcing remains large, primarily as a result of the treatment of multiple-scattering. Results indicate that global models that estimate aerosol radiative forcing with two-stream radiation schemes may be subject to persistent biases introduced by these schemes, particularly for regional aerosol forcing.

  7. Cone Penetrometer Load Cell Temperature and Radiation Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2013-08-28

    This report summarizes testing activities performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to verify the cone penetrometer load cell can withstand the tank conditions present in 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106. The tests demonstrated the load cell device will operate under the elevated temperature and radiation levels expected to be encountered during tank farm deployment of the device.

  8. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is most often done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be ...

  9. Mucosal Lactobacillus vectored vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qinghua; Zhu, Liqi; Kang, Haihong; Yang, Qian

    2013-04-01

    Traditional non-gastrointestinal vaccines can prevent effectively the invasion of pathogens; however, these vaccines are less effective against mucosal infections because there is not a sufficient immune response at the mucosa. Most pathogens invade via a mucosal pathway (oral, intranasal, or vaginal). It is widely accepted that Lactobacillus species play a critical role as commensals in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Their ability to survive in the digestive tract, their close association with the intestinal epithelium, their immunomodulatory properties and their safety even when consumed in large amounts make lactobacilli attractive candidates for live vehicles for the delivery of immunogens to the intestinal mucosa. The oral or intranasal administration of Lactobacillus-based vaccines is a promising method to control mucosal infection because these vaccines could induce strong humoral and cellular immune responses both in the blood and at mucosal sites.

  10. Radiation Therapy Did Not Induce Long-Term Changes in Rectal Mucosa: Results From the Randomized Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group 7 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slagsvold, Jens Erik, E-mail: Jens.Erik.Slagsvold@stolav.no [Cancer Clinic, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Viset, Trond [Department of Pathology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Wibe, Arne [Institute of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Department of Surgery, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Kaasa, Stein [Cancer Clinic, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); European Palliative Care Research Center, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Widmark, Anders [Department of Radiation Sciences, Cancercentrum, Umeå (Sweden); Lund, Jo-Åsmund [Cancer Clinic, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); European Palliative Care Research Center, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate long-term changes in the rectal mucosa after curative external beam radiation therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group 7 trial, 880 men with locally advanced prostate cancer were randomized to hormonal therapy alone versus hormonal therapy plus radiation therapy to 70 Gy. A subcohort from this trial being randomized at our center (n=178) was invited to a study on late anorectal side effects during 2003-2005, approximately 5 years after treatment, including measuring health-reported quality of life and physician-assessed toxicity score by the Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force/Subjective, Objective, Management, Analytic (LENT/SOMA) and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group score. Sixty-seven patients had a rectal mucosa biopsy. Sixty-four biopsies were included in the final analysis, of which 33 patients were randomized to hormonal treatment and 31 to hormonal treatment plus radiation therapy. The presence of fibrosis, number of capillaries, and lymphocyte infiltration was then evaluated by light microscopy. Results: The group receiving radiation therapy had significantly higher LENT/SOMA and function/bother scale scores than the group that only received hormonal treatment, but there was no significant difference in the presence of fibrosis, ectasia, number of capillaries in the lamina propria, or lymphocyte infiltration between the groups. Conclusion: Radiation therapy to 70 Gy to the prostate does not induce long-term microscopic mucosal changes in the rectum 5 years after treatment. This is in contrast to the general assumption that structural changes, including fibrosis, seen after radiation therapy include the mucosa. We speculate that the main late effects of radiation therapy on the structure of the rectum are located in the deeper layers of the rectal wall than the mucosa.

  11. Earth Radiation Budget Experiment scanner radiometric calibration results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Gibson, M. A.; Thomas, Susan; Meekins, Jeffrey L.; Mahan, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanning radiometers are producing measurements of the incoming solar, earth/atmosphere-reflected solar, and earth/atmosphere-emitted radiation fields with measurement precisions and absolute accuracies, approaching 1 percent. ERBE uses thermistor bolometers as the detection elements in the narrow-field-of-view scanning radiometers. The scanning radiometers can sense radiation in the shortwave, longwave, and total broadband spectral regions of 0.2 to 5.0, 5.0 to 50.0, and 0.2 to 50.0 micrometers, respectively. Detailed models of the radiometers' response functions were developed in order to design the most suitable calibration techniques. These models guided the design of in-flight calibration procedures as well as the development and characterization of a vacuum-calibration chamber and the blackbody source which provided the absolute basis upon which the total and longwave radiometers were characterized. The flight calibration instrumentation for the narror-field-of-view scanning radiometers is presented and evaluated.

  12. Low energy laser in prevention of oral mucositis in patients receiving radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy in Pernambuco Cancer Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelner, Natalie; Castro, Jurema Freire Lisboa de [Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil). Dept. of Clinics and Preventive Dentistry. Discipline of Oral Pathology]. E-mail: jlisboa72@hotmail.com

    2007-07-01

    Oral mucositis induced by antineoplastic therapy causes wide-range pain and discomfort resulting in decreased quality of life. The present study evaluated the benefits of low intensity laser and 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate in the prevention of oral mucositis induced by radiation, associated or not with chemotherapy, and considered degrees/severity, time of appearance of the lesions and functional loss. Eighty-four outpatients were considered and 49 were included in this study and divided into two groups: Group 1 received laser treatments in three stages, starting three days before treatment until the end of therapy. Group 2 was instructed to do daily mouth rinses with chlorhexidine gluconate. The prevalence of clinical mucositis was 49%, and of functional mucositis, 28.6%, when the two groups were considered together. This percentage was smaller in the laser group, 44% for the clinical mucositis group and 24% for the functional. The two protocols were well tolerated and showed benefits, mainly from the point of view of functionality, and delayed the onset and development of mucositis. (author)

  13. The Results of Radiation Therapy Alone vs Radiation Plus Chemotherapy of Uterine Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Za; Choi, Suk Young; Chun, Ha Jeong [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    Purpose : Radiation therapy(RT) is conventionally standard treatment for locally advanced stage for uterine cervix cancer. Recently to improve treatment results, combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy was tried. We retrospectively analysed our experience of 122 patients. Comparison of the results in 45 patients treated with RT alone and 77 patients treated with RT plus chemotherapy was made. Materials and Methods : from January 1985 to December 1991, 122 patients with cervix cancer were treated with whole pelvic external RT and ICR(34 1 ICR, 77 2 ICR, 11 high dose rate ICR) in our department. Forty five patients were treated with RT alone, and 77 patients were treated with combined plus chemotherapy. Mean age was 58 years(range:29-81). Histologic types were 111 squamous cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, 3 adenocarcinoma, and 2 adenosquamous cell carcinoma. According to the FIGO stage 6 had stage IA94.9%, 11 had IIA(9.0%), 37 had IIB(30.3%), 3 had IIA(2.5%), 63 had IIB(51.6%), and 2 had stage IV(1.6%). In 77 patients with RT plus chemotherapy, 36 patients were treated with VBP(vinblastin, bleoycin, cisplainum), 39 patients with cisplatinum plus 5-FU and 2 patients with 5-FU. Results : Complete response after external RT(3960cGy-5500cGy)was achieved in 61 patients(50%). He actuarial 5 year and 9 year survival rate was 57.8% and 53.9%, respectively. Five year actuarial survival rate was 63.1% with RT alone(n=45) and 55.9% with RT plus chemotherapy(n=77). Their 5 year survival rate was 35.5% for 1 course of ICR and 67% for 2 courses of ICR. There was statistically significant advantage of survival with RT alone group who were treated with 2 coursed of ICR and dose to the A point{>=}8000cGy(4/25 died). In RT plus chemotherapy group, dose response was not seen and there was no difference in 5 year survival between 1 course and 2 course of ICR(50% vs 56.8%), and dose to point A less than 8000cGy and more than 8000 cGy(55.6% vs 55.7%). There was no significant

  14. Expected Results From Channeling Radiation Experiments at Fast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab; Broemmelsiek, Daniel [Fermilab; Edstrom, Dean [Fermilab; Hyun, Jibong [JAEA, Ibaraki; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [NICADD, DeKalb; Rush, Wade [Kansas U.

    2016-06-01

    The photoinjector at the new Fermilab FAST facility will accelerate electron beams to about 50 GeV. After initial beam commissioning, channeling radiation experiments to generate hard X-rays will be performed. In the initial stage, low bunch charge beams will be used to keep the photon count rate low and avoid pile up in the detector. We report here on the optics solutions, the expected channaling spectrum including background from bremmstrahlung and the use of a Compton scatterer for higher bunch charge operation.

  15. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Hughes

    Full Text Available Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible.To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10-15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension.Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes.

  16. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Sean M; Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N; Ferre, April L; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M; Veazey, Ronald S; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A R; Shacklett, Barbara L; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10-15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes.

  17. Mometasone Furoate Cream Reduces Acute Radiation Dermatitis in Patients Receiving Breast Radiation Therapy: Results of a Randomized Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindley, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.hindley@lthtr.nhs.uk [Rosemere Cancer Centre, Royal Preston Hospital, Preston (United Kingdom); Zain, Zakiyah [College of Arts and Sciences, Universiti Utara Malaysia, Kedah (Malaysia); Wood, Lisa [Department of Social Sciences, Lancaster Medical School, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Whitehead, Anne [Medical and Pharmaceutical Statistics Research Unit, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Sanneh, Alison; Barber, David; Hornsby, Ruth [Rosemere Cancer Centre, Royal Preston Hospital, Preston (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: We wanted to confirm the benefit of mometasone furoate (MF) in preventing acute radiation reactions, as shown in a previous study (Boström et al, Radiother Oncol 2001;59:257-265). Methods and Materials: The study was a double-blind comparison of MF with D (Diprobase), administered daily from the start of radiation therapy for 5 weeks in patients receiving breast radiation therapy, 40 Gy in 2.67-Gy fractions daily over 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was mean modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score. Results: Mean RTOG scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.046). Maximum RTOG and mean erythema scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.018 and P=.012, respectively). The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score was significantly less for MF than for D at weeks 4 and 5 when corrected for Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) questionnaire scores. Conclusions: MF cream significantly reduces radiation dermatitis when applied to the breast during and after radiation therapy. For the first time, we have shown a significantly beneficial effect on quality of life using a validated instrument (DLQI), for a topical steroid cream. We believe that application of this cream should be the standard of care where radiation dermatitis is expected.

  18. Radiation effects in nematodes: Results from IML-1 experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, G. A.; Schubert, W. W.; Kazarians, G. A.; Richards, G. F.; Benton, E. V.; Benton, E. R.; Henke, R.

    1994-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to natural space radiation using the ESA biorack facility aboard Spacelab on International Microgravity Laboratory 1, STS-42. For the major experimental objective dormant animals were suspended in buffer or on agar or immobilized next to CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors to correlate fluence of HZE particles with genetic events. This configuration was used to isolate mutations in a set of 350 essential genes as well as in the unc-22 structural gene. From flight samples 13 mutants in the unc-22 gene were isolated along with 53 lethal mutations from autosomal regions balanced by a translocation eT1(III;V). Preliminary analysis suggests that mutants from worms correlated with specific cosmic ray tracks may have a higher proportion of rearrangements than those isolated from tube cultures on a randomly sampled basis. Flight sample mutation rate was approximately 8-fold higher than ground controls which exhibited laboratory spontaneous frequencies.

  19. Clinical audit in radiation oncology: results from one centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, G.; Firth, I. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1996-02-01

    Patient, tumour and treatment-related data were collected for courses of radiation treatment that were commenced within two 6-month periods. In both time periods, 45-49% of patients were treated with curative intent. Of these, one-third were irradiated definitively and two-thirds in an adjuvant setting. Most of the remainder were treated with palliative intent. In both time periods, breast and lung tumours represented approximately 20% each of the total treatment courses. Skin, head and neck, gynaecological, urological and haematological primary tumours accounted for 5-10% each. Treatment intents differed for different primary sites, thus in 1993 65% of patients with breast primaries were treated curatively compared with 6% of patients with lung primaries. Treatment schedules for curative intent were similar in both time periods. Median fraction numbers were 25 (excluding skin primaries), reflecting conventional daily fractionation. Treatment schedules for palliation showed greater variation and there was a trend towards shorter treatment courses in 1993. For palliative treatment of bone, brain and lung, from either primary or metastatic disease, treatment schedules with 10-15 fractions were used most frequently in 1988. In 1993, however, the majority of patients received 1-5 fractions. Patients living in areas with rural postcodes were more likely to receive palliative irradiation and had a higher incidence of melanoma than patients living in areas with Sydney metropolitan postcodes. As approximately 50% of patients were treated with palliative intent, changes in the fractionation patterns used can alter the utilization and availability of megavoltage equipment. However, any reduction in attendances caused by hypofractionation for palliation may be offset by the trend to use hyperfractionation for curative treatments. The data support the hypothesis of reduced availability and use of radiation therapy in patients with cancer from rural areas.

  20. Advances in mucosal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeusen, Els N T; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y; Wattegedera, Sean; Entrican, Gary

    2004-12-01

    Pathogens that enter the body via mucosal surfaces face unique defense mechanisms that combine the innate barrier provided by the mucus layer with an adaptive response typified by the production and transepithelial secretion of pathogen-specific IgA. Both the measurement and induction of mucosal responses pose significant challenges for experimental and practical application and may need to be adapted to the species under study. In particular, for livestock, immunization procedures developed in small rodent models are not always effective in large animals or compatible with management practices. This paper reviews the latest advances in our understanding of the processes that lead to secretory IgA responses and how this relates to the development of mucosal immunization procedures and adjuvants for veterinary vaccines. In addition, it highlights the complex interactions that can take place between the pathogen and the host's immune response, with specific reference to Chlamydia/Chlamydophila infections in sheep.

  1. Mucosal delivery of vaccines: role of mucoadhesive/biodegradable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neeraj K; Mangal, Sharad; Khambete, Hemant; Sharma, Pradeep K; Tyagi, Rajeev K

    2010-06-01

    Majority of infectious microorganism make their gateway to the host through mucosal surfaces, such as gastrointestinal tract, nasal and vaginal tract. Mucosal immune response structured as sIgA can effectively prevent the attachment and invasion of the microorganism from mucosal surface and thereby serves as an efficient tool against infectious disease. There has been an increased demand for the development of novel vaccine that leads to the induction of immune response in systemic circulation as well as at mucosal surfaces against infectious disease. Mucosal delivery of vaccine provides basis for induction of both mucosal as well as systemic immune responses against the infectious organisms. However, a variety of factors such as mucociliary clearance, presence of deteriorating enzymes, pH extremes (GIT), low permeation and metabolic degradation limit the mucosal delivery of vaccine. Numerous strategies have been explored in the meadow of mucosal vaccination for the purpose of efficient antigen delivery through mucosal route(s). Polymeric carrier(s) such as nanoparticles and microparticles loaded with the antigen can serve as the basis for creation of important formulations for improved vaccine. Biodegradable and mucoadhesive polymeric carrier(s) seems to be most promising candidate for mucosal vaccine delivery. Several polymers from natural and synthetic origin, such as polylactide-co-glycolide, chitosan, alginate, carbopol, gelatin etc., have been explored for the efficient mucosal vaccine delivery and significant results have been obtained. This review outlines the polymers used in mucosal vaccine delivery with special reference to mucoadhesive/biodegradable polymers. This article also covers the recent patent granted in the field on polymeric carrier mediated mucosal vaccination.

  2. Effect of Transplantation of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Platelets Rich Plasma on Experimental Model of Radiation Induced Oral Mucosal Injury in Albino Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basma Elsaadany

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal tissue damage following radiotherapy is still a major problem in cancer treatment. Therefore, the current work aimed at exploring the possible role of systemically injected bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs and/or locally injected platelet rich plasma (PRP in ameliorating the side effects of ionizing radiation on the rat’s tongue. Twelve rats served as control group (N and 48 rats received a single radiation dose of 13 Gy to the head and neck region; then, they were equally divided into 4 experimental groups: irradiated only (C, irradiated + MSCs (S, irradiated + (PRP (P, and combined group (PS. Animal scarification occurred in 3 and 7 days after radiation. Then, tongues were dissected and examined histologically and for expression of bcl-2 by RT-PCR. Histological examination of the treated groups (S, (P, and (PS revealed an obvious improvement in the histological structure of the tongue, compared to group (C, in addition to upregulated expression of bcl-2, indicating decreased apoptotic activity. Conclusion. BM-MSCs and PRP have shown positive effect in minimizing the epithelial atrophy of normal oral mucosa after regional radiotherapy, which was emphasized by decreasing apoptotic activity in these tissues. Nevertheless, combined use of BM-MSCs and PRP did not reveal the assumed synergetic effect in oral tissue protection.

  3. Probiotic supplements and debridement of peri-implant mucositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallström, Hadar; Lindgren, Susann; Widén, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of probiotic supplements in adjunct to conventional management of peri-implant mucositis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-nine adult patients with peri-implant mucositis were consecutively recruited...... debridement and oral hygiene reinforcement resulted in clinical improvement of peri-implant mucositis and a reduction in cytokine levels. Probiotic supplements did not provide added benefit to placebo....

  4. Vaccines against mucosal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Jan; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2012-06-01

    There remains a great need to develop vaccines against many of the pathogens that infect mucosal tissues or have a mucosal port of entry. Parenteral vaccination may protect in some instances, but usually a mucosal vaccination route is necessary. Mucosal vaccines also have logistic advantages over injectable vaccines by being easier to administer, having less risk of transmitting infections and potentially being easier to manufacture. Still, however, only relatively few vaccines for human use are available: oral vaccines against cholera, typhoid, polio, and rotavirus, and a nasal vaccine against influenza. For polio, typhoid and influenza, in which the pathogens reach the blood stream, there is also an injectable vaccine alternative. A problem with available oral live vaccines is their reduced immunogenicity when used in developing countries; for instance, the efficacy of rotavirus vaccines correlates closely with the national per capita income. Research is needed to define the impact of factors such as malnutrition, aberrant intestinal microflora, concomitant infections, and preexisting immunity as well as of host genetic factors on the immunogenicity of these vaccines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mucosal vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Kiron, V.

    2014-01-01

    Among the novel vaccination methods, mucosal vaccination seems to possess all the desired criteria. The chapter reviews the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding this type of vaccination with a focus on their uptake, immune stimulation, and where possible, discusses their potential as future

  6. Some new results on irradiation characteristics of synthetic quartz crystals and their application to radiation hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, H.; Parshad, R.

    1983-01-01

    The paper reports some new results on irradiation characteristics of synthetic quartz crystals and their application to radiation hardening. The present results show how the frequency shift in quartz crystals can be influenced by heat processing prior to irradiation and how this procedure can lead to radiation hardening for obtaining precise frequencies and time intervals from quartz oscillators in space.

  7. Engineering immunity in the mucosal niche against sexually transmitted infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Renuka; Woodrow, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces of the genital tract are the site of entry to over 30 different bacterial, parasitic, and viral pathogens that are the cause of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. Women and adolescent girls are more severely impacted by STIs than men due in part to a greater biological susceptibility for acquiring infections and differences in disease sequelae. While it is widely accepted that preventative vaccines against the most commonly transmitted STIs would have a major impact on decreasing the global health burden of STIs for women worldwide, several challenges preclude their development. The female genital tract is a complex niche of microflora, hormonal influences, and immune tissues and cells that result in a mucosal immune system that is distinct from other mucosal sites and from our systemic immune system. An appreciation of these differences and their effect on shaping mucosal immunity to sexually transmitted pathogens is an important determinant for the design of effective STI vaccines. Here we describe the anatomy and mucosal immune system of the female reproductive tract, and discuss bioengineering strategies to design mucosal vaccines that overcome delivery challenges and coordinate the presentation kinetics and compartmentalization of antigens and adjuvants to relevant mucosal immune cell subsets. In particular, we describe recent progress in understanding the role of specific mucosal dendritic cell subsets in facilitating immune responses to pathogenic microbes in the genital mucosa. We also discuss the development of pathogen-mimicking materials that may be useful for engineering protective immunity in this mucosal niche. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Oral mucositis prevention and management by therapeutic laser in head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekrazad, Reza; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is considered a severe complication in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy for head and neck cancer. The aim of this review study was to assess the effect of low level laser therapy for prevention and management of oral mucositis in cancer patients. The electronic databases searched included Pubmed, ISI Web of Knowledge and Google scholar with keywords as "oral mucositis", "low level laser therapy" from 2000 to 2013. The results of most studies showed that photobiomodulation (PBM) reduced the severity of mucositis. Also, it can delay the appearance of severe mucositis. Low level laser therapy is a safe approach for management and prevention of oral mucositis.

  9. First results of the indoor natural radiation survey in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochicchio, F.; Campos Venuti, G.; Risica, S. (Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)); Mancioppi, S.; Piermattei, S.; Tommasino, L.; Torri, G. (ENEA, Rome (Italy))

    1992-01-01

    A survey based on a statistically representative sample of 5000 dwellings distributed in 200 administrative districts has been planned in Italy to evaluate exposure indoors. Knowledge of the distribution of radon concentration and gamma absorbed doses in air allows a determination of the average risk to which the population is subjected and of the number of dwellings exceeding a given action level. Radon concentration is monitored for two 6 month periods, while the [gamma] exposure is measured for only one semester. Duplicate radon measurements are performed by using etched track detectors (typically LR-115 II type and CR-39). The survey is carried out at district level by local laboratories, under the coordination of the two central institutions ENEA/DISP and ISS. The overall structure of the survey is described together with the first results obtained. (author).

  10. The Results of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Perihilar Cholangiocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yu Sun; Park, Jae Won; Park, Jin Hong [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2009-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of postoperative radiotherapy in a case of perihilar cholagiocarcinoma by analyzing overall survival rate, patterns of failure, prognostic factors for overall survival, and toxicity. Between January 1998 and March 2008, 38 patients with perihilar cholangiocarcinoma underwent a surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy. The median patient age was 59 years (range, 28 to 72 years), which included 23 men and 15 women. The extent of surgery was complete resection in 9 patients, microscopically positive margins in 25 patients, and a subtotal resection in 4 patients. The tumor bed and regional lymphatics initially received 45 Gy or 50 Gy, but was subsequently boosted to a total dose of 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy in incompletely resected patients. The median radiotherapy dose was 59.4 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered in 30 patients. The median follow-up period was 14 months (range, 6 to 45 months). The 3-year overall survival and 3-year progression free survival rates were 30% and 8%, respectively. The median survival time was 28 months. A multivariate analysis showed that differentiation was the only significant factor for overall survival. The 3-year overall survival was 34% in R0 patients and 20% in R1 patients. No statistically significant differences in survival were found between the 2 groups (p=0.3067). The first site of failure was local in 18 patients (47%). No patient experienced grade 3 or higher acute toxicity and duodenal bleeding developed in 2 patients. Our results suggest that adjuvant RT might be a significant factor in patients with a positive margin following a radical resection. However, there was still a high locoregional recurrence rate following surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. Further study is necessary to enhance the effect of the adjuvant radiotherapy.

  11. Postoperative radiation therapy for malignant glioma. Results of conventional radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, T.; Inoue, T.; Chatani, M.; Hata, K.; Taki, T.; Nii, Y.; Nakagawa, H.

    1987-02-01

    From December 1977 through September 1984, a total of 39 cases of malignant glioma were treated with radiation therapy (RT) postoperatively. Twenty-nine cases were classified into glioblastoma (GM) and 10 astrocytoma (AS) (low grade : 6 and anaplastic : 4) histologically. One third of cases received 50 Gy/25 FRX/5 WKS of whole brain RT. Another two thirds of cases underwent 60 Gy/30 FRX/6 WKS of whole brain or 50 Gy/25 FRX/5 WKS of whole brain + additional 20 Gy/10 FRX/2 WKS of localized field RT. Chemotherapy (BLM, MeCCNU and ACNU) was given for 34 cases. Survivals at 3 years for GM and AS were 12 % and 68 %, respectively. Prognostic factors for GM were age, neurologic function (RTOG), AJC-staging T-factor, pre-RT LDH level and volume of residual tumor. Corresponding factors for AS were histological subclassification and neurologic function (RTOG). However, RT dose and field did not impact on survival significantly. Acute adverse effects of RT were otitis media or externa (70 %) and conjunctivitis (8 %). Retinal bleeding was noted in three long-term survivors at 2 years after RT.

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines: Important Immunoregulatory Factors Contributing to Chemotherapy-Induced Gastrointestinal Mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masooma Sultani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available “Mucositis” is the clinical term used to describe ulceration and damage of the mucous membranes of the entire gastrointestinal tract (GIT following cytotoxic cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy common symptoms include abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhoea, vomiting, and constipation resulting in both a significant clinical and financial burden. Chemotherapeutic drugs cause upregulation of stress response genes including NFκB, that in turn upregulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. These proinflammatory cytokines are responsible for initiating inflammation in response to tissue injury. Anti-inflammatory cytokines and specific cytokine inhibitors are also released to limit the sustained or excessive inflammatory reactions. In the past decade, intensive research has determined the role of proinflammatory cytokines in development of mucositis. However, a large gap remains in the knowledge of the role of anti-inflammatory cytokines in the setting of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This critical paper will highlight current literature available relating to what is known regarding the development of mucositis, including the molecular mechanisms involved in inducing inflammation particularly with respect to the role of proinflammatory cytokines, as well as provide a detailed discussion of why it is essential to consider extensive research in the role of anti-inflammatory cytokines in chemotherapy-induced mucositis so that effective targeted treatment strategies can be developed.

  13. Low-level laser for prevention and therapy of oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Klastersky, Jean

    2005-05-01

    Oral mucositis is a common morbid condition associated with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for which there is no standard prophylaxis or treatment. There is increasing evidence that the use of low-level laser can reduced the severity of mucositis associated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the available evidence for it. For most approaches commonly used to prevent or treat chemotherapy-associated or radiotherapy-associated oral mucositis, a recent panel of experts could not find sufficient levels of evidence to recommend or suggest their use. As for low-level laser therapy, the results are difficult to assess and compare because of interoperator variability and because clinical trials are difficult to conduct in that field. Nevertheless, there is accumulating evidence in support of low-level laser therapy. On the basis of literature data, it is reasonable to conclude that the evidence that low-level laser therapy may be useful in decreasing the severity of chemotherapy-associated or radiotherapy-associated mucositis is substantial, even though there have been few controlled studies in the field of prevention.

  14. Voice disorders in mucosal leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Nunes Ruas

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases-Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. RESULTS: 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81% were male and five (19% female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years. The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%, followed by dysphonia (38.5%, odynophagia (30.8% and dysphagia (26.9%. 23 patients (84.6% presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. CONCLUSION: We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some

  15. Mucosal immunology and probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongarrà, Maria Luisa; Rizzello, Valeria; Muccio, Letizia; Fries, Walter; Cascio, Antonio; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2013-02-01

    The cross-talk between the mucosa-associated immune system and microbiota is critical in mucosal tissue homeostasis as well as in protection against infectious and inflammatory diseases occurring at mucosal sites. This recent evidence has paved the way to therapeutic approaches aimed at modulating the mucosa-associated immune system using probiotics. Different strains of probiotics possess the ability to finely regulate dendritic cell (DC) activation, polarizing the subsequent T cell activity toward Th1 (e.g. Lactobacillus (Lb) acidophilus), Th2 (Lb.reuteri and Bifidobacterium bifidum) or, as more recently demonstrated, Th17 responses induced by specific strains such as Lb.rhamnosus GG and Lac23a, the latter isolated in our laboratory. Here, we review some recent advances in our understanding of probiotics effects on mucosal immunology, particularly on cells of the innate immunity such as DCs. We also highlight our own experiences in modulating DC functions by commensal bacteria and discuss the relevance of probiotics administration in the treatment of human immunopathologies.

  16. Electrochemotherapy of mucosal head and neck tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plaschke, Christina Caroline; Gothelf, Anita; Gehl, Julie

    2016-01-01

    with head and neck cancer treated across the mucosal surface with electrochemotherapy. The search resulted in 11 studies with a total of 72 patients. RESULTS: Overall complete response was reported as good, especially in primary small tumors. Side effects were minor in primary tumors whereas large......, recurrent tumors displayed more frequent side effects and some serious adverse events. Design and structure of the studies differed considerably, making general comparisons difficult. CONCLUSION: Few studies concerning electrochemotherapy on mucosal head and neck tumors are available and they are not easily...

  17. Early Results from the Advanced Radiation Protection Thick GCR Shielding Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Clowdsley, Martha; Slaba, Tony; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Zeitlin, Cary; Kenny, Sean; Crespo, Luis; Giesy, Daniel; Warner, James; McGirl, Natalie; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced Radiation Protection Thick Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Shielding Project leverages experimental and modeling approaches to validate a predicted minimum in the radiation exposure versus shielding depth curve. Preliminary results of space radiation models indicate that a minimum in the dose equivalent versus aluminum shielding thickness may exist in the 20-30 g/cm2 region. For greater shield thickness, dose equivalent increases due to secondary neutron and light particle production. This result goes against the long held belief in the space radiation shielding community that increasing shielding thickness will decrease risk to crew health. A comprehensive modeling effort was undertaken to verify the preliminary modeling results using multiple Monte Carlo and deterministic space radiation transport codes. These results verified the preliminary findings of a minimum and helped drive the design of the experimental component of the project. In first-of-their-kind experiments performed at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, neutrons and light ions were measured between large thicknesses of aluminum shielding. Both an upstream and a downstream shield were incorporated into the experiment to represent the radiation environment inside a spacecraft. These measurements are used to validate the Monte Carlo codes and derive uncertainty distributions for exposure estimates behind thick shielding similar to that provided by spacecraft on a Mars mission. Preliminary results for all aspects of the project will be presented.

  18. Mucosal barrier injury laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection: results from a field test of a new National Healthcare Safety Network definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Isaac; Iwamoto, Martha; Allen-Bridson, Kathy; Horan, Teresa; Magill, Shelley S; Thompson, Nicola D

    2013-08-01

    To assess challenges to implementation of a new National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance definition, mucosal barrier injury laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (MBI-LCBI). Multicenter field test. Selected locations of acute care hospitals participating in NHSN central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) surveillance. Hospital staff augmented their CLABSI surveillance for 2 months to incorporate MBI-LCBI: a primary bloodstream infection due to a selected group of organisms in patients with either neutropenia or an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant with gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease or diarrhea. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) staff reviewed submitted data to verify whether CLABSIs met MBI-LCBI criteria and summarized the descriptive epidemiology of cases reported. Eight cancer, 2 pediatric, and 28 general acute care hospitals including 193 inpatient units (49% oncology/bone marrow transplant [BMT], 21% adult ward, 20% adult critical care, 6% pediatric, 4% step-down) conducted field testing. Among 906 positive blood cultures reviewed, 282 CLABSIs were identified. Of the 103 CLABSIs that also met MBI-LCBI criteria, 100 (97%) were reported from oncology/BMT locations. Agreement between hospital staff and CDC classification of reported CLABSIs as meeting the MBI-LCBI definition was high (90%; κ = 0.82). Most MBI-LCBIs (91%) occurred in patients meeting neutropenia criteria. Some hospitals indicated that their laboratories' methods of reporting cell counts prevented application of neutropenia criteria; revised neutropenia criteria were created using data from field testing. Hospital staff applied the MBI-LCBI definition accurately. Field testing informed modifications for the January 2013 implementation of MBI-LCBI in the NHSN.

  19. Mucosal Immune Regulation in Early Infancy: Monitoring and Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hol (Jeroen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe mucosal immune system of infants is dependent on the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Homeostasis results from the interaction between the mucosa and exogenous factors such as dietar and microbial agents. Induction and maintenance of homeostasis is a highly regluated system that

  20. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR): Analysis, Results, and Lessons Learned From the June 1997 ER-2 Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W. (Editor); Jones, I. W. (Editor); Maiden, D. L. (Editor); Goldhagen, P. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The United States initiated a program to assess the technology required for an environmentally safe and operationally efficient High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) for entrance on the world market after the turn of the century. Due to the changing regulations on radiation exposures and the growing concerns over uncertainty in our knowledge of atmospheric radiations, the NASA High Speed Research Project Office (HSRPO) commissioned a review of "Radiation Exposure and High-Altitude Flight" by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). On the basis of the NCRP recommendations, the HSRPO funded a flight experiment to resolve the environmental uncertainty in the atmospheric ionizing radiation levels as a step in developing an approach to minimize the radiation impact on HSCT operations. To minimize costs in this project, an international investigator approach was taken to assure coverage with instrument sensitivity across the range of particle types and energies to allow unique characterization of the diverse radiation components. The present workshop is a result of the flight measurements made at the maximum intensity of the solar cycle modulated background radiation levels during the month of June 1997.

  1. Radiation degradation of alginate and some results of biological effect of degraded alginate on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hien, N.Q.; Hai, L.; Luan, L.Q.; Hanh, T.T. [Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam); Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Yoshii, Fumio; Makuuchi, Keizo; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Radiation degradation yields (Gd) of alginate in aqueous solution with different concentration were determined by viscometry method. The relationship between Gd and the alginate concentration was found out as: Gd=33.5 x C{sup -0.68}, with C% (w/v) and dry alginate referred to C=100%. An empirical equation for preparing degraded alginate with the desired low viscometry average molecular weight (Mv) by radiation was proposed. Alginate extracted directly horn seaweed'Sagassum, degraded by radiation was used for field experiments and results of the biological effect on plants (tea, carrot, chrysanthemum) were presented. (author)

  2. Preliminary study on radio-chemo-induced oral mucositis and low level laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merigo, Elisabetta; Fontana, Matteo; Fornaini, Carlo; Clini, Fabio; Cella, Luigi; Vescovi, Paolo; Oppici, Aldo

    2012-09-01

    Background: Oral mucositis remains one of the most common and troubling side effects of antineoplastic radiation and drug therapy: its incidence in onco-hematological radio-chemotreated patients is variable between 50 and 100% and its impact on this populations is directly linked with the experience of intense pain causing reduction and modification of therapy regimens, decreased survival rates and increased cost of care. Purpose: Aim of this study is the preliminary evaluation of a Low Level Laser therapy (LLLT) protocol on healing process of oral mucositis and on pain and quality of life of patients experiencing this dramatic side-effect. Materials and methods: Patients were evaluated and treated at the Unita` Operativa Semplice Dipartimentale di Odontostomatologia e Chirurgia Maxillo-Facciale of the Hospital of Piacenza were they were treated for primary disease with protocols of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. LLLT protocol was performed with a diode laser (808 nm -XD Smile - Fotona -Slovenia) on a two weeks-6 treatments schedule with power of 0.5 W and application of 30 seconds. Mucositis grading was scored on the basis of WHO classification by two blind operators at each treatment and at 1 and 2 weeks after treatment. Pain and capability of deglutition were described by patients by means questionnaires based on Visual Analogue Scale, Numerical Rating Scale and Quality of Life. Results: A relevant improvement of healing of oral mucositis, in terms of reduction of grading score, and of pain, swallowing discomfort and quality of life was recorded. Discussion and conclusion: Results of this preliminary study are encouraging for the realization of larger studies focused on the application of LLLT protocols in management of radio-chemotreated patients with oral mucositis.

  3. Mucosal immunology and virology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tyring, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    .... A third chapter focuses on the proximal end of the gastrointestinal tract (i.e. the oral cavity). The mucosal immunology and virology of the distal end of the gastrointestinal tract is covered in the chapter on the anogenital mucosa. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) plays a role in protection against all viral (and other) infections except those that enter the body via a bite (e.g. yellow fever or dengue from a mosquito or rabies from a dog) or an injection or transfusion (e.g. HIV, Hepatitis B). ...

  4. Preliminary Results on Design and Implementation of a Solar Radiation Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorentz Jäntschi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a solar radiation monitoring system, using two scientificpyranometers and an on-line computer home-made data acquisition system. The firstpyranometer measures the global solar radiation and the other one, which is shaded,measure the diffuse radiation. The values of total and diffuse solar radiation arecontinuously stored into a database on a server. Original software was created for dataacquisition and interrogation of the created system. The server application acquires the datafrom pyranometers and stores it into a database with a baud rate of one record at 50seconds. The client-server application queries the database and provides descriptivestatistics. A web interface allow to any user to define the including criteria and to obtainthe results. In terms of results, the system is able to provide direct, diffuse and totalradiation intensities as time series. Our client-server application computes also derivateheats. The ability of the system to evaluate the local solar energy potential is highlighted.

  5. Preliminary Results on Design and Implementation of a Solar Radiation Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Mugur C; Damian, Mihai; Jäntschi, Lorentz

    2008-02-19

    The paper presents a solar radiation monitoring system, using two scientificpyranometers and an on-line computer home-made data acquisition system. The firstpyranometer measures the global solar radiation and the other one, which is shaded,measure the diffuse radiation. The values of total and diffuse solar radiation arecontinuously stored into a database on a server. Original software was created for dataacquisition and interrogation of the created system. The server application acquires the datafrom pyranometers and stores it into a database with a baud rate of one record at 50seconds. The client-server application queries the database and provides descriptivestatistics. A web interface allow to any user to define the including criteria and to obtainthe results. In terms of results, the system is able to provide direct, diffuse and totalradiation intensities as time series. Our client-server application computes also derivateheats. The ability of the system to evaluate the local solar energy potential is highlighted.

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION MONITORING IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - HISTORY AND RESULTS 25 YEARS AFTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    This article describes results of the radiation environmental monitoring performed in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ) during the period following the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. This article presents a brief overview of five comprehensive reports generated under Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 (Washington Savannah River Company LLC, Subcontract No. AC55559N, SOW No. ON8778) and summarizes characteristics of the ChEZ and its post-accident status and the history of development of the radiation monitoring research in the ChEZ is described. This article addresses characteristics of the radiation monitoring in the ChEZ, its major goals and objectives, and changes of these goals and objectives in the course of time, depending on the tasks associated with the phase of mitigation of the ChNPP accident consequences. The results of the radiation monitoring in the ChEZ during the last 25 years are also provided.

  7. Regulation of Colonic Mucosal Blood Flow by Exogenous Ecosanoids in the Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Noboru; Makiyama, Kazuya; Hoshiko, Tatsuhide

    1994-01-01

    We measured colonic mucosal blood flow using a reflectance spectrophotometry in Wistar rats during and after continuous injection of prostaglandins (PGs: PGE1, PGE2 and PGI2), as vasodilators, and thromboxane A2 (TXA2) as a vasoconstrictor. Administration of PGs increased colonic mucosal blood volume and oxyhemoglobin saturation of the colonic mucosal tissue, representing a parameter of mucosal oxygenation. The dose used did not change arterial blood pressure. These results suggest that PGs r...

  8. Topical morphine for oral mucositis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bettina Nygaard; Aagaard, Gitte; Henneberg, Steen W

    2012-01-01

    Systemic opioids for painful chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in children often result in unsatisfactory pain relief and a high frequency of side effects. Opioids applied topically can produce analgesia by binding to opioid receptors on peripheral terminals of sensory neurons. These receptors...

  9. Recent results on the development of radiation-hard diamond detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Conway, J S; Bauer, C; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Dabrowski, W; Da Graca, J; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Jamieson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Karl, C; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; Manfredi, P F; Manfredotti, C; Marshall, R D; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Plano, R; Polesello, P; Prawer, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Procario, M; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Schnetzer, S; Sciortino, S; Somalwar, S V; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R; Thomson, G B; Trawick, M; Trischuk, W; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; White, C; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    Charged particle detectors made from chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond have radiation hardness greatly exceeding that of silicon- based detectors. The CERN-based RD42 Collaboration has developed and tested CVD diamond microstrip and pixel detectors with an eye to their application in the intense radiation environment near the interaction region of hadron colliders. This paper presents recent results from tests of these detectors. (4 refs).

  10. Mucosal delivery routes for optimal immunization: targeting immunity to the right tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerkinsky, C; Holmgren, J

    2012-01-01

    The mucosal immune system exhibits a high degree of anatomic compartmentalization related to the migratory patterns of lymphocytes activated at different mucosal sites. The selective localization of mucosal lymphocytes to specific tissues is governed by cellular "homing" and chemokine receptors in conjunction with tissue-specific addressins and epithelial cell-derived chemokines that are differentially expressed in "effector" tissues. The compartmentalization of mucosal immune responses imposes constraints on the selection of vaccine administration route. Traditional routes of mucosal immunization include oral and nasal routes. Other routes for inducing mucosal immunity include the rectal, vaginal, sublingual, and transcutaneous routes. Sublingual administration is a new approach that results in induction of mucosal and systemic T cell and antibody responses with an exceptionally broad dissemination to different mucosae, including the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, and the genital mucosa. Here, we discuss how sublingual and different routes of immunization can be used to generate immune responses in the desired mucosal tissue(s).

  11. How does the mass media report and interpret radiation data? The results of media content analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perko, T. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK.CEN, Institute for Environment Health and Safety (Belgium); Cantone, M.C. [University of Milano, Faculty of Medicine (Italy); Tomkiv, Y. [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (Norway); Prezelj, I. [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Social Sciences (Slovenia); Gallego, E. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Melekhova, E. [Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    In communication with the general population, experts often provide quantitative information related to ionizing radiation, expressed with different units of radioactivity. However, quantitative information about radiation risks may be meaningful only to people who have the ability to comprehend basic numerical concepts and possess knowledge related to radiation. Thus, the media, as a bridge between experts and the general population, has to 'translate' quantitative information into a qualitative one. How successful and accurate are the mass media in this transformation of scientific results into publicly understandable information? Our research investigates media reporting on the concept of ionizing radiation in a case of nuclear emergencies. The presentation is focused on summarizing the 'lessons learned' from the use of radiation data in media reporting about the Fukushima nuclear accident. The in-depth media content analysis was conducted in twelve quality newspapers in Belgium, Slovenia, Italy, Spain, Norway and Russia using the same scientific methodology and analyzing the same time period. Preliminary results identified miss concepts of radiation data by media and even within emergency responders and decision makers. The research is a result of FP7 project Innovative integrated tools and platforms for radiological emergency preparedness and post-accident response in Europe - PREPARE and upgraded with a Russian experience. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  12. Low-Level Laser Therapy for Treatment of Oral Mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravina Naomi Tarigan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation and chemotherapy are the treatment options for head and neck cancer. Several side effects related to those treat-ment have been shown. Oral mucositis is a common side effect in patients undergoing those treatment. The presence of oral mucositis in these patients would influencing quality of life therefore compromising treatment outcome. The spec-trum of oral mucositis can be clinically seen as thinning of oral mucosa, oral discomfort to painful oral lesion causing mastication impairment with increasing risk of infection. The Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC/International Society for Oral Oncology (ISOO has recommended some means that have important role in the management oral mucositis. The low-level laser therapy (LLLT is a relatively new way of reducing the severity of oral mucositis, although the true mechanism of action is still under study. This review aimed in exploring update about the usage of LLLT for oral mucositis treatment.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v17i3.42

  13. HAMLET -Human Model MATROSHKA for Radiation Exposure Determination of Astronauts -Current status and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Guenther; Berger, Thomas; Bilski, Pawel; Burmeister, Soenke; Labrenz, Johannes; Hager, Luke; Palfalvi, Jozsef K.; Hajek, Michael; Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    contribute essentially to radiation risk estimations for future interplanetary space exploration by humans, putting them on a solid experimental and theoretical basis. The talk will give an overview of the current status of the MATROSHKA data evaluation and results and comparisons of the first three MTR experimental phases (MTR-1, 2A and 2B). The HAMLET project is funded by the European Commission under the EUs Seventh Frame-work Programme (FP7) under Project Nr: 218817 and coordinated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) http://www-fp7-hamlet.eu

  14. SU-E-T-200: IBA ProteusOne Compact Proton Therapy System Radiation Survey Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Syh, J; Syh, J; White, M; Patel, B; Song, X; Wu, H [Willis-Knighton Cancer Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study summarizes the results of an initial radiation survey of the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center in Shreveport, Louisiana. The facility houses an IBA ProteusOne compact single room proton therapy unit coupled with a C230 cyclotron that operates at a maximum energy of 230 MeV. Methods: A calibrated survey meter was used for the photon measurements to obtain reliable results. A neutron detector was used as the measuring instrument for neutrons. The locations of the survey and measurements were planned carefully in order to get a proper evaluation of the facility shielding configuration. The walls, ceiling, vault entrance, and the adjacent environment were each surveyed with suitable measurement instruments. A total of 22 locations were chosen for radiation survey. Dose equivalent values were calculated for both the photon and the neutron radiation using measured data. Results: All measured dose values are presented in millisievert per year. The highest dose measured at the vault entrance is 0.34 mSv/year. A dedicated shielding door was not present at the time of the measurement. The vault entrance area is considered as a controlled area. The shielding design goals are not to exceed 5 mSv/year for the controlled area and 1 mSv/year the uncontrolled area. The total combined neutron and photon dose equivalent values were found to be compliant with the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality radiation protection regulatory codes. Conclusion: In our efforts to evaluate the radiation levels at the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center proton treatment facility, we have found that all the measured values of the radiation shielding are below the critical radiation limits per year. Since the total dose measured at the vault entrance is below the shielding design goal, a shielding door is not required at this proton treatment vault.

  15. Double-blind, randomized pilot study of bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel in the prevention and treatment of mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Sanchez, Rosa-Maria; Pachón-Ibáñez, Jerónimo; Marín-Conde, Fátima; Rodríguez-Caballero, Ángela; Gutierrez-Perez, Jose-Luis; Torres-Lagares, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    to evaluate, in an initial way, the effectiveness of bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel 0.2% versus placebo as a preventive and therapeutic intervention of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and chemotherapy in patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy. In this pilot study, 7 patients (range of age: 18- 65), having histological documented diagnosis of squamous carcinoma on the head and neck region in stage III and IV, and receiving combined radiation treatment and chemotherapy (cisplatin 100 mg/m2 IV on days 1, 22, and 43 of irradiation) were studied. Simultaneously, a topical application was performed with bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel 0.2% in the study group, and the placebo gel for the control group in 5 applications per day, from the time of initiation of cancer treatment to 2 weeks after completion of chemo-radiotherapy treatment (11 weeks of follow-up). The gradation of mucositis, pain, analgesic consumption, infectious complications, and treatment tolerance was measured. After 7 patients completed the protocol, any differences were observed between groups in an interval analysis. Mucositis, pain, and tolerance was similar in both groups. Our results must be interpreted with caution due to the reduced sample size, but the use of bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel 0.2% didn't contribute clinical improvement to the oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

  16. Customized mouthpieces designed to reduce tongue mucositis in carbon-ion radiotherapy for tumors of the nasal and paranasal sinuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Musha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mouthpieces are used to fix the positions of the lower jaw and teeth during carbon-ion radiotherapy for head and neck tumors. We used a customized mouthpiece to reduce radiation mucositis by displacing the tongue. Acute radiation mucositis gradually increased for the palate and tongue after approximately six irradiation fractions (maximal mean grade: palate, 2.5 during radiation fractions 15; tongue, 0.8 during radiation fractions 12 and 13. The mean grade of mucositis was significantly lower for the tongue than for the palate from irradiation fraction six until two weeks after irradiation.

  17. Regulation of gastrointestinal mucosal growth during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, A P N

    2003-12-01

    The increase in the aging population has led to a growing interest in achieving a better understanding of the aging process and of diseases that are predominantly expressed during advancing age. Since the structural and, in turn, the functional integrity of the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract (GI) are maintained by constant renewal of cells, a detailed knowledge of the events that initiate and regulate mucosal proliferative processes is essential for a better understanding of the normal aging process as well as age-associated dysfunctions, including malignancy that represent disorders of tissue growth. In Fischer-344 rats, aging is associated with increased mucosal proliferative activity in much of the GI tract. On the other hand, the functional properties are either decreased or remain unchanged during advancing age. Basal gastric acid and pepsin output decline during aging, as is gastrin secretion. In contrast, antral gastrin levels increase during this period, as is mucosal histidine decarboxylase activity. The age-related decline in gastrin secretion could partly be attributed to a higher ratio of somatostatin (D) to gastrin (G) cells in the antral mucosa. The age-related rise in GI mucosal proliferative activity could not be attributed to the trophic action of either gastrin or bombesin, since they caused no significant change in mucosal proliferation in aged rats. On the other hand, EGF and TGF-alpha appear to be involved in regulating mucosal proliferation during aging. Aging is associated with increased activation of EGF-receptor (EGFR), the common receptor for EGF and TGF-alpha. This could be due to (a) increased levels of membrane-bound precursor form(s) of TGF-alpha resulting in increased activation EGFR signaling processes through an autocrine/paracrine mechanism, (b) heightened sensitivity of mucosal EGFR to EGF and TGF-alpha such that comparatively lower levels of these peptides are required to activate EGFR in aged than in young animals and

  18. New advances in mucosal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Charani

    2014-10-01

    The ICI 2013 Mucosal Vaccine Workshop presentations covered a wide range of topics, these mainly fell into three categories: (i) Understanding the interactions of host and microbes, specifically commensal pathogens and improving the antigen uptake via the (microfold cells) M cells to induce effective IgA antibody immunity at the gut mucosa; (ii) effective plant-based vaccines and (iii) development of prophylactic and therapeutic mucosal-based vaccine strategies for virus infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), influenza and human papillomavirus (HPV) associated head and neck cancers. How to improve the efficacy of oral vaccines, novel intranasal mucosal adjuvants and a unique intra-cheek delivery method were also discussed. Presenters emphasized the differences associated with systemic and mucosal vaccination, specifically, how mucosal vaccines unlike systemic delivery can induce effective immunity at the first line of defence. Collectively, the workshop provided insights into recent developments in the mucosal vaccine research field, highlighting the complexities associated with designing safe and effective mucosal vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Protective effects of hot spring water drinking and radon inhalation on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etani, Reo; Kataoka, Takahiro; Kanzaki, Norie; Sakoda, Akihiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ishimori, Yuu; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro; Taguchi, Takehito; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2017-09-01

    Radon therapy using radon (222Rn) gas is classified into two types of treatment: inhalation of radon gas and drinking water containing radon. Although short- or long-term intake of spa water is effective in increasing gastric mucosal blood flow, and spa water therapy is useful for treating chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer, the underlying mechanisms for and precise effects of radon protection against mucosal injury are unclear. In the present study, we examined the protective effects of hot spring water drinking and radon inhalation on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in mice. Mice inhaled radon at a concentration of 2000 Bq/m3 for 24 h or were provided with hot spring water for 2 weeks. The activity density of 222Rn ranged from 663 Bq/l (start point of supplying) to 100 Bq/l (end point of supplying). Mice were then orally administered ethanol at three concentrations. The ulcer index (UI), an indicator of mucosal injury, increased in response to the administration of ethanol; however, treatment with either radon inhalation or hot spring water inhibited the elevation in the UI due to ethanol. Although no significant differences in antioxidative enzymes were observed between the radon-treated groups and the non-treated control groups, lipid peroxide levels were significantly lower in the stomachs of mice pre-treated with radon or hot spring water. These results suggest that hot spring water drinking and radon inhalation inhibit ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  20. The Results and Prognostic Factors of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Early Stages of Endometrial Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    To evaluate the results and prognostic factors for postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy in patients at stages I and II of endometrial cancer. Materials and Methods: Between January 1991 and December 2006, 35 patients with FIGO stages I and II disease, who received adjuvant radiation therapy following surgery for endometrial cancer at Ewha Womans University Hospital, were enrolled in this study. A total of 17 patients received postoperative pelvic external beam radiation therapy; whereas, 12 patients received vaginal brachytherapy alone, and 6 patients received both pelvic radiation therapy and vaginal brachytherapy. Results: The median follow-up period for all patients was 54 months. The 5-yr overall survival and disease-free survival rates for all patients were 91.4% and 81.7%, respectively. The 5-yr overall survival rates for low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups were 100%, 100% and 55.6%, respectively. In addition, the 5-yr disease-free survival rates were 100%, 70.0%, and 45.7%, respectively. Although no locoregional relapses were identified, distant metastases were observed in 5 patients (14%). The most common site of distant metastases was the lung, followed by bone, liver, adrenal gland, and peritoneum. A univariate analysis revealed a significant correlation between distant metastases and risk-group (p=0.018), pathology type (p=0.001), and grade (p=0.019). A multivariate analysis also revealed that distant metastases were correlated with pathology type (p=0.009). Papillary, serous and clear cell carcinoma cases demonstrated a poor patient survival rate compared to cases of endometrioid adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma. The most common complication of pelvic external beam radiation therapy was enteritis (30%), followed by proctitis, leucopenia, and lymphedema. All these complications were of RTOG grades 1 and 2; no grades 3 and 4 were observed. Conclusion: For the low-risk and intermediate-risk groups (stages 1 and 2) endometrial

  1. Evaluation of low-level laser therapy in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced mucositis: a double-blind randomized study in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, P A G; Jaguar, G C; Pellizzon, A C; Prado, J D; Lopes, R N; Alves, F A

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the effect of the low-level laser in the prevention and treatment of mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. A total of 70 patients with malignant neoplasms in the oral cavity or oropharynx were evaluated. The patients were randomized into two low-level laser therapy groups: Group 1 (660nm/15mW/3.8J/cm(2)/spot size 4mm(2)) or Group 2 (660nm/5mW/1.3J/cm(2)/spot size 4mm(2)) starting on the first day of radiotherapy. Oral mucositis was assessed daily and weekly using the NCI and WHO scales. Oral pain was scored daily with a visual analogue scale before laser application. The patients in Group 1 had a mean time of 13.5days (range 6-26days) to present mucositis grade II, while the patients in Group 2 had a mean time of 9.8days (range 4-14days) (both WHO and NCI p=0.005). In addition, Group 2 also presented a higher mucositis grade than Group 1 with significant differences found in weeks 2 (p=0.019), 3 (p=0.005) and 4 (p=0.003) for WHO scale and weeks 2 (p=0.009) and 4 (p=0.013) for NCI scale. The patients in Group 1 reported lower pain levels (p=0.004). Low-level laser therapy during radiotherapy was found to be effective in controlling the intensity of mucositis and pain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Preliminary results from the prototype synchrotron radiation detector on space shuttle mission STS-108

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderhub, H.; Bates, J.R.; Baetzner, D.; Baumgartner, S.; Biland, A. E-mail: biland@particle.phys.ethz.ch; Camps, C.; Capell, M.; Commichau, V.; Djambazov, L.; Fanchiang, Y.-J.; Fluegge, G.; Fritschi, M.; Grimm, O.; Hangarter, K.; Hofer, H.; Horisberger, U.; Kan, R.; Kaestli, W.; Kenney, G.P.; Kim, G.N.; Kim, K.S.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraeber, M.; Kuipers, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, M.W.; Lee, S.-C.; Lewis, R.; Lustermann, W.; Pauss, F.; Rauber, T.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.L.; Roeser, U.; Son, D.; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Tiwari, A.N.; Viertel, G.M.; Gunten, H. von; Wicki, S. Waldmeier; Wang, T.-S.; Yang, J.; Zimmermann, B

    2002-12-01

    A Synchrotron Radiation Detector measures synchrotron radiation emitted by high energetic particles in the earth magnetic field. This allows to identify cosmic ray electrons and positrons with energies in the TeV region. One possibility for such a detector outside the atmosphere uses YAP crystals to measure synchrotron photons with energies in the keV range. As such a detector can not distinguish between photons and electrons, the main problems are the diffuse cosmic ray gamma background and low energetic electrons in the vicinity of the earth. While the intensity of the diffuse gamma rays is known quite well, there exists limited knowledge about keV-electrons in low earth orbits. To measure these electrons a Prototype Synchrotron Radiation Detector (PSRD) was flown with Space Shuttle mission STS-108 (Dec.2001) and preliminary analysis of the data show very favorable results.

  3. Investigations of aircrews exposure to cosmic radiation - results, conclusions and suggestions

    CERN Document Server

    Bilski, P; Horwacik, T; Marczewska, B; Ochab, E; Olko, P

    2002-01-01

    In frame of a research project undertaken in collaboration with Polish airlines LOT, analysis of aircrews exposure to cosmic radiation has been performed. The applied methods included measurements of radiation doses with thermoluminescent detectors (MTS-N, MCP-N) and track detectors (CR-39) and also calculations of route doses with the CARI computer code. The obtained results indicate that aircrews of nearly all airplanes, with exception of these flying only on ATR aircraft, exceed regularly or may exceed in some conditions, effective doses of 1 mSv. In case of Boeing-767 aircrews such exceeding occurs always, independently of solar activity. Investigations revealed, that during these periods of the solar cycle, when intensity of cosmic radiation is high, exceeding of 6 mSv level is also possible. These results indicate, that according to Polish and European regulations it is necessary for airlines to provide regular estimations of radiation exposure of aircrews. Basing on the obtained results a system for pe...

  4. Mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Coskun, Mehmet; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2013-01-01

    . With the introduction of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors for the treatment of UC, it has become increasingly evident that the disease course is influenced by whether or not the patient achieves mucosal healing. Thus, patients with mucosal healing have fewer flare-ups, a decreased risk of colectomy......, and a lower probability of developing colorectal cancer. Understanding the mechanisms of mucosal wound formation and wound healing in UC, and how they are affected therapeutically is therefore of importance for obtaining efficient treatment strategies holding the potential of changing the disease course of UC....... This review is focused on the pathophysiological mechanism of mucosal wound formation in UC as well as the known mechanisms of intestinal wound healing. Regarding the latter topic, pathways of both wound healing intrinsic to epithelial cells and the wound-healing mechanisms involving interaction between...

  5. Starter Feeding Supplementation Alters Colonic Mucosal Bacterial Communities and Modulates Mucosal Immune Homeostasis in Newborn Lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junhua; Bian, Gaorui; Sun, Daming; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of starter feeding supplementation on colonic mucosal bacterial communities and on mucosal immune homeostasis in pre-weaned lambs. We selected eight pairs of 10-day-old lamb twins. One twin was fed breast milk (M, n = 8), while the other was fed breast milk plus starter (M+S, n = 8). The lambs were sacrificed at 56 days age. Colonic content was collected to determine the pH and the concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and lactate. The colonic mucosa was harvested to characterize the bacterial communities using Illumina MiSeq sequencing and to determine mRNA expression levels of cytokines and toll-like receptors (TLR) using quantitative real-time PCR. The results show that starter feeding decreased luminal pH and increased the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total VFA, and lactate in the colon. The principal coordinate analysis (PCA) and analysis of molecular variance show that starter feeding supplementation significantly affected the colonic mucosal bacterial communities with a higher relative abundance of the dominant taxa unclassified S24-7, Oscillibacter, Prevotella, Parabacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Ruminobacter, and Succinivibrio, and a lower proportion of unclassified Ruminococcaceae, RC9_gut_group, Blautia, Phocaeicola, Phascolarctobacterium, unclassified BS11_gut_group, unclassified family_XIII, and Campylobacter in lambs. Meanwhile, starter feeding decreased mRNA expression of TLR4 and cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ in colonic tissue. Furthermore, the changes in the colonic mucosal mRNA expression of TLR and cytokines were associated with changes in mucosal bacterial composition. These findings may provide new insights into colonic mucosal bacteria and immune homeostasis in developing lambs.

  6. Mucositis Grades and Yeast Species

    OpenAIRE

    Ognjenović, Marina; Milatić, Katja; Parat, Katica; KOVAČIĆ, IVAN; Ježina Bušelić, Marina A.; Božić, Joško

    2013-01-01

    Surgically treated patients with oral, head and neck cancer commonly develop mucositis during additional irradiation therapy. Oral mucosa inflammation other than irradiation is mostly caused by Candida albicans, yeast of Candida genus. This study evaluated possible connection between grades of oral mucositis and oral yeast profile in irradiated patients before, during and after irradiation. In 25 examined patients mucosits grades »0« to »2« before irradiation with 20% positive smears and o...

  7. Cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes are characterized by pain, burning sensation, numbness or paraesthesia of a particular part of the skin or mucosal surface without any visible signs. They are usually sensory disorders, sometimes with a great deal of psychologic overlay. In this article various conditions have been listed and are described. The possible causative mechanisms are discussed when they are applicable and the outline of their management is described.

  8. Observation of continuum radiations from the Cluster fleet: first results from direction finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. E. Décréau

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The Cluster fleet offers the first possibility of comparing non-thermal terrestrial continuum radiation from similarly equipped nearby observation points. A very rich data set has already been acquired on the Cluster polar orbit, between 4 and 19 Earth radii geocentric distances, and preliminary analysis has been carried out on these emissions. We focus in this paper on direction finding performed from all four spacecraft as a means to locate the position of the sources of this continuum radiation. Directions are derived from spin modulation properties, under the usual analysis assumptions of the wave vector of the radiation lying in the plane containing the spin axis and the antenna position at electric field minimum. All the spin axes of the four Cluster spacecraft are aligned perpendicular to the ecliptic, thus the aligned spacecraft antenna spin planes provide redundant 2-D views of the propagation path of the radiation and source location. Convincing 2-D triangulation results have been obtained in the vicinity of the source region. In addition, the out of spin plane component of the wave vector reveals itself to a certain extent through directivity characteristics compared at different distances of the spin plane to the ecliptic. The four case events studied (two of them taken near apogee, the other two near perigee have confirmed general properties derived from previous observations: trapping in the lower frequency range, radiation escaping into the magnetosheath region in the higher frequency range. All propagation directions are compatible with source positions in the plasmapause region, however, at a significant distance from the equator in one case. Our observations have also revealed new properties, like the importance of small-scale density irregularities in the local amplification of continuum radiation. We conclude that more detailed generation and propagation models are needed to fit the observations.

  9. Mucosal vaccines for biodefense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantis, N J; Morici, L A; Roy, C J

    2012-01-01

    Bioterrorism is the deliberate release of biological toxins, pathogenic viruses, bacteria, parasites, or other infectious agents into the public sphere with the objective of causing panic, illness, and/or death on a local, regional, or possibly national scale. The list of potential biological agents compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is long and diverse. However, a trait common to virtually all the potential bioterrorism agents is the fact that they are likely to be disseminated by either aerosol or in food/water supplies with the intention of targeting the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tracts, respectively. In some instances, inhalation or ingestion would mimic the natural route by which humans are exposed to these agents. In other instances, (e.g., the inhalation of a toxin is normally associated with food borne illness), it would represent an unnatural route of exposure. For most potential bioterrorism agents, the respiratory or gastrointestinal mucosa may simply serve as a route of entry by which they gain access to the systemic compartment where intoxication/replication occurs. For others, however, the respiratory or gastrointestinal mucosa is the primary tissue associated with pathogenesis, and therefore, the tissue for which countermeasures must be developed.

  10. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  11. [Results of the studies on radiation ecology and radiation biology at the Institute of Biology of Komi Science Center of Ural division of Russian Academy of Science (on 40th anniversary of the Department of Radiation Ecology)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskaev, A I; Kudiasheva, A G; Popova, O N; Materiĭ, L D; Shuktomova, I I; Frolova, N P; Kozubov, G M; Zaĭnullin, V G; Ermakova, O V; Rakin, A O; Bashlykova, L A

    2000-01-01

    Information about the foundation and history of the Radiation Ecology Department and results of the researches on the effect of increased background radiation level on plant and animal populations, migration of radionuclides in natural biocoenosies with increased radiation level are presented.

  12. Uterine cervical cancer: treatment with megavoltage radiation results and afterloading intracavitary techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurohara, S S; Di Saia, P; Kurohara, J; Grossman, I; George, F W; Morrow, C P

    1979-08-01

    Results were evaluated for 651 consecutive patients with invasive cancer of the intact uterine cervix. From 1963 through 1967 319 patients were treated primarily with the older Los Angeles County Hospital system of orthovoltage radiation and intracavitary radium therapy. Thereafter, 1968--1974, 332 patients were treated primarily with a newer modified M. D. Anderson Tumor Institute system of megavoltage radiation and afterloading intracavitary radium therapy. Age distribution and histology were similar for both groups, but clinical stage was slightly more advanced for patients treated earlier. Crude and net 5 year survival rates were 36% and 49% for the early group and 54% and 67% for the later group. Net 5 year survival rates for the earlier group by stage were: stage I, 74%; II, 62%; III, 23%; and IV, 6%. Survival rates for the later group were: I, 81%; II 76%; III, 50%; and IV, 15%. We believe this improvement can be attributed to more effective intracavitary radium therapy for handling local cancer and to delivery of cancericidal doses of radiation to regional nodes with the megavoltage radiation apparatus, as well as to the greater cooperative efforts put forth in the management of County Hospital patients.

  13. Routine management of locally advanced cervical cancer with concurrent radiation and cisplatin. Five-year results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candelaria Myrna

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, cervical cancer primarily affects socially disadvantaged women. Five randomized trials were the foundation for adopting cisplatin-based chemotherapy during radiation as the standard of care for high-risk patients after primary radical hysterectomy who require adjuvant radiation and for locally advanced patients treated with definitive radiation. These results were obtained in clinical trials performed in carefully prepared academic centers; hence, we sought to determine whether these results could be reproduced when patients were treated on an out-of-protocol basis. Methods We reviewed the files of 294 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who received radiation plus weekly cisplatin as routine management between 1999 to 2003, and analyzed treatment compliance, response rate, toxicity, and survival. Results A total of 294 patients who received radiation and cisplatin were analyzed. Mean age was 43.8 years (range, 26–68 years. The majority of cases were squamous cell carcinoma (87.8%, and distribution according to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO stage was as follows: IB2-IIA, 23%; IIB, 53.3%, and IIIB, 23%; there were only two IVA cases. Overall, 96% of patients completed external beam, and intracavitary therapy. The majority of patients (67% received the planned six courses of weekly cisplatin. Complete responses were achieved in 243 (83% patients, whereas 51 (17% had either persistent (32 patients, 10.8% or progressive (19 patients, 6.4% disease. At median follow-up (28 months; range, 2–68 months, 36 patients (12.2% have relapsed (locally 30.5, and systemically, 69.5%. The most common toxicities were hematologic and gastrointestinal, in the majority of cases considered mild-moderate. At median follow-up (28 months; range, 2–68 months, overall and progression-free survival are 76.5 and 67%, respectively. Conclusion Our results support use of chemoradiation with six weekly

  14. Recent advances in mucosal immunization using virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, Gaëlle; Kaeser, Matthias D; Moser, Christian; Gurny, Robert; Borchard, Gerrit

    2013-05-06

    Mucosal immunization offers the promises of eliciting a systemic and mucosal immune response, as well as enhanced patient compliance. Mucosal vaccination using defined antigens such as proteins and peptides requires delivery systems that combine good safety profiles with strong immunogenicity, which may be provided by virus-like particles (VLP). VLP are assembled from viral structural proteins and thus are devoid of any genetic material. They excel by mimicking natural pathogens, therefore providing antigen-protecting particulate nature, inherent immune-cell stimulatory mechanisms, and tissue-specific targeting depending on their parental virus. Nevertheless, despite of promising preclinical results, VLP remain rarely investigated in clinical studies. This review is intended to give an overview of obstacles and promises of VLP-based mucosal immunization as well as to identify strategies to further improve VLP while maintaining a good safety and tolerability profile.

  15. Does Less Invasive Spine Surgery Result in Increased Radiation Exposure? A Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-01-01

    .... The risks of radiation exposure include thyroid cancer, cataracts, and lymphoma. Although imaging techniques facilitate less invasive approaches and improve intraoperative accuracy, they may increase radiation...

  16. Long-term Results of Breast-conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy in Early Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Byun, Sang Jun [Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    To evaluate the long-term results after breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy in early breast cancer in terms of failure, survival, and cosmesis. One hundred fifty-four patients with stage I and II breast cancer were treated with conservative surgery plus radiotherapy between January 1992 and December 2002 at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. According to TNM stage, 93 patients were stage I, 50 were IIa, and 11 were IIb. The affected breasts were irradiated with 6 MV photons to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks with a boost irradiation dose of 10{approx}16 Gy to the excision site. Chemotherapy was administered in 75 patients and hormonal therapy in 92 patients with tamoxifen. Follow-up periods were 13{approx}179 months, with a median of 92.5 months. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 97.3% and 94.5%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year disease-free survival (5YDFS and 10YDFS, respectively) rates were 92.5% and 88.9%, respectively; the ultimate 5YDFS and 10YDFS rates after salvage treatment were 93.9% and 90.2%, respectively. Based on multivariate analysis, only the interval between surgery and radiation therapy ({<=}6 weeks vs. >6 weeks, p=0.017) was a statistically significant prognostic factor for DFS. The major type of treatment failure was distant failure (78.5%) and the most common distant metastatic site was the lungs. The cosmetic results were good-to-excellent in 96 patients (80.7%). Conservative surgery and radiation for early stage invasive breast cancer yielded excellent survival and cosmetic results. Radiation therapy should be started as soon as possible after breast-conserving surgery in patients with early breast cancer, ideally within 6 weeks.

  17. Results of radiation therapy in periarthritis humeroscapularis; Ergebnisse der Strahlentherapie bei Periarthropathia humeroscapularis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultze, J.; Schlichting, G.; Galalae, R.; Kimmig, B. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie), Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Koltze, H. [Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis, Celle (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Background: radiation therapy is applied in painful degenerative shoulder diseases. Aim of this work was to evaluate the contribution of radiation therapy to symptomatic improvement in periarthritis humeroscapularis. Methods: ninety-four patients with periarthritis humeroscapularis were treated in two institutions. Mean age was 68 years, sex distribution were 32 men and 62 women. In 58 cases the right side was affected, left in 36 cases. At single doses of 0,75 Gy once a week a total dose of 6 Gy was applied The treatment effect was evaluated by the standardized von Pannewitz-score at the end of the treatment up to 6 months thereafter. Results: the treatment results of all the 94 patients were documentated at the end of therapy. Seventy-one patients were followed at least for further 4 months. Radiogenic side-effects were not noticed. The symptoms of 54 patients (57.4%) were improved or vanished, in 40 cases the symptoms were not significantly affected (42.6%). Four months after therapy 42 of 71 patients were improved (59.2%), 29 unchanged (40.8%). The treatment effect occured typically up to 2 months after therapy, there were no age-related differences. Also in recurrent radiation therapies the symptoms improved, in 80 percent after one preceding therapy, however only in 31.2 percent after multiple prior radiotherapies. (orig.)

  18. Effect of substrate on the results of measuring coating thickness according to radiation scattered by substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedavnij, O.I.; Khripunov, L.Z. (Tomskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR). Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Ehlektronnoj Introskopii)

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a substrate on the results of measuring tantalum coating thickness in two-layer compositions according to gamma radiation scattered by the substrate is studied. It is shown that by means of an albedo-radiometer realizing the physical model absorber-scatterer one can determine the thickness (application uniformity) of tantalum coatings up to 150-300 ..mu..m depending on the substrate material (plexiglas, aluminium, iron, copper). In case of testing coatings on substrates of alloys and high-alloy steels in order to ensure high accuracy of measurement it is expedient with the above albedo-radiometer to determine the value of the backscattered radiation flux for the substrate before coating application.

  19. RD50 recent results: Development of radiation hard sensors for SLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Macchiolo, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The need for radiation hard semiconductor detectors for the tracker regions in high energy physics experiments at a future high luminosity hadron collider, like the proposed LHC upgrade, has led to the formation of the CERN RD50 collaboration. The R&D directions of RD50 follow two paths: the optimization of radiation hard bulk materials (Material Engineering) and the development of new detector designs (Device Engineering) as 3D sensors, thin sensors and n-in-p sensors. Some of the RD50 most recent results about silicon detectors are reported in this paper, with special reference to: (i) identification of defects responsible for long term annealing, (ii) charge collection efficiency of irradiated planar devices, in particular n-in-p microstrip detectors and epitaxial diodes, (iii) charge collection efficiency of double-type column 3D detectors, (iv) comparison of the performances of FZ and MCZ structures under mixed irradiation.

  20. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cannabidiol: an alternative therapeutic agent for oral mucositis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuba, L F; Salum, F G; Cherubini, K; Figueiredo, M A Z

    2017-06-01

    Chemo- and radiotherapy are therapeutic modalities often used in patients with malignant neoplasms. They kill tumour cells but act on healthy tissues as well, resulting in adverse effects. Oral mucositis is especially of concern, due to the morbidity that it causes. We reviewed the literature on the etiopathogenesis of oral mucositis and the activity of cannabidiol, to consider the possibility of its use for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis. We searched the PubMed database and selected complete articles published in English that met the inclusion criteria for the period 1998-2016. The search terms 'cannabinoids', 'cannabidiol', 'oxidative stress', 'antioxidants' and 'oral mucositis' were used. The control of oxidative stress may prevent and alleviate oral mucositis. Studies have demonstrated that cannabidiol is safe to use and possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. The literature on the use of cannabidiol in dentistry is still scarce. Studies investigating the use of cannabidiol in oral mucositis and other oxidative stress-mediated side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy on the oral mucosa should be encouraged. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Mucosal Vaccination for Prevention of HIV Infection and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldovini, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Most of HIV infections occur via the genital tract or the rectum and HIV replicates at high levels in lymphoid organs and intestinal mucosa, likely requiring a more diversified immunity than pathogens restricted to a single mucosal site, such as the gastrointestinal tract for Vibrio cholera, or the respiratory airways for the influenza virus. Numerous AIDS vaccine candidates are under development and a general observation obtained from preclinical trials in non-human primates that failed to provide sterilizing immunity is that some infection protection or delayed onset of disease is observed in the presence of anti-SIV immunity. Recent clinical trials support difficulties to reproduce in humans the results observed in simian models, but at least one of them indicated that some protection of infection can be achieved. However, given the limited efficacy observed in the RV144 trial and concerns voiced in its statistical interpretation, preclinical trials should explore more effective immunogens, whether new or as combinations of existing ones, and mucosal routes of vaccinations in addition to the systemic routes, with the goal to maximize vaccination-mediated protection. The rationale for generating both strong mucosal and systemic immunity comes from animal experiments, recent clinical trials, and other successful vaccines currently in use. Mucosal responses against SIV have been induced with a variety of SIV antigens and via different mucosal routes with a spectrum of effects on protection. This review covers the rational and the experimental data that support the validity to explore mucosal immunization for HIV infection and AIDS prevention.

  3. Differential Apoptosis in Mucosal and Dermal Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ariel; Francis, Marybeth; DiPietro, Luisa Ann

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Dermal and mucosal healing are mechanistically similar. However, scarring and closure rates are dramatically improved in mucosal healing, possibly due to differences in apoptosis. Apoptosis, nature's preprogrammed form of cell death, occurs via two major pathways, extrinsic and intrinsic, which intersect at caspase3 (Casp3) cleavage and activation. The purpose of this experiment was to identify the predominant pathways of apoptosis in mucosal and dermal wound healing. Approach: Wounds (1 mm biopsy punch) were made in the dorsal skin (n=3) or tongue (n=3) of female Balb/C mice aged 6 weeks. Wounds were harvested at 6 h, 24 h, day 3 (D3), D5, D7, and D10. RNA was isolated and analyzed using real time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Expression levels for genes in the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were compared in dermal and mucosal wounds. Results: Compared to mucosal healing, dermal wounds exhibited significantly higher expression of Casp3 (at D5; phealing compared to skin. Conclusion: Expression patterns of key regulators of apoptosis in wound healing indicate that apoptosis occurs predominantly through the intrinsic pathway in the healing mucosa, but predominantly through the extrinsic pathway in the healing skin. The identification of differences in the apoptotic pathways in skin and mucosal wounds may allow the development of therapeutics to improve skin healing. PMID:25493209

  4. Differential Apoptosis in Mucosal and Dermal Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ariel; Francis, Marybeth; DiPietro, Luisa Ann

    2014-12-01

    Objectives: Dermal and mucosal healing are mechanistically similar. However, scarring and closure rates are dramatically improved in mucosal healing, possibly due to differences in apoptosis. Apoptosis, nature's preprogrammed form of cell death, occurs via two major pathways, extrinsic and intrinsic, which intersect at caspase3 (Casp3) cleavage and activation. The purpose of this experiment was to identify the predominant pathways of apoptosis in mucosal and dermal wound healing. Approach: Wounds (1 mm biopsy punch) were made in the dorsal skin (n=3) or tongue (n=3) of female Balb/C mice aged 6 weeks. Wounds were harvested at 6 h, 24 h, day 3 (D3), D5, D7, and D10. RNA was isolated and analyzed using real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Expression levels for genes in the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were compared in dermal and mucosal wounds. Results: Compared to mucosal healing, dermal wounds exhibited significantly higher expression of Casp3 (at D5; pInnovation: Our observations indicate differential execution of apoptosis in oral wound healing compared to skin. Conclusion: Expression patterns of key regulators of apoptosis in wound healing indicate that apoptosis occurs predominantly through the intrinsic pathway in the healing mucosa, but predominantly through the extrinsic pathway in the healing skin. The identification of differences in the apoptotic pathways in skin and mucosal wounds may allow the development of therapeutics to improve skin healing.

  5. Selective fallopian tube catheterisation in female infertility: clinical results and absorbed radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 (Japan); Ishiguchi, T. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 (Japan); Maekoshi, H. [Department of Radiological Technology, Nagoya University College of Medical Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Ando, Y. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 (Japan); Tsuzaka, M. [Department of Radiological Technology, Nagoya University College of Medical Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Tamiya, T. [Department of Radiological Technology, Nagoya University College of Medical Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Suganuma, N. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Branch Hospital, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Ishigaki, T. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    Clinical results of fluoroscopic fallopian tube catheterisation and absorbed radiation doses during the procedure were evaluated in 30 infertility patients with unilateral or bilateral tubal obstruction documented on hysterosalpingography. The staged technique consisted of contrast injection through an intrauterine catheter with a vacuum cup device, ostial salpingography with the wedged catheter, and selective salpingography with a coaxial microcatheter. Of 45 fallopian tubes examined, 35 (78 %) were demonstrated by the procedure, and at least one tube was newly demonstrated in 26 patients (87 %). Six of these patients conceived spontaneously in the follow-up period of 1-11 months. Four pregnancies were intrauterine and 2 were ectopic. This technique provided accurate and detailed information in the diagnosis and treatment of tubal obstruction in infertility patients. The absorbed radiation dose to the ovary in the average standardised procedure was estimated to be 0.9 cGy. Further improvement in the X-ray equipment and technique is required to reduce the radiation dose. (orig.). With 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Origin of ΔN{sub eff} as a result of an interaction between dark radiation and dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjaelde, Ole Eggers [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Das, Subinoy [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Moss, Adam, E-mail: oeb@phys.au.dk, E-mail: subinoy@physik.rwth-aachen.de, E-mail: Adam.Moss@nottingham.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-01

    Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and recently from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) have indicated the possible existence of an extra radiation component in addition to the well known three neutrino species predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. In this paper, we explore the possibility of the apparent extra dark radiation being linked directly to the physics of cold dark matter (CDM). In particular, we consider a generic scenario where dark radiation, as a result of an interaction, is produced directly by a fraction of the dark matter density effectively decaying into dark radiation. At an early epoch when the dark matter density is negligible, as an obvious consequence, the density of dark radiation is also very small. As the Universe approaches matter radiation equality, the dark matter density starts to dominate thereby increasing the content of dark radiation and changing the expansion rate of the Universe. As this increase in dark radiation content happens naturally after Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), it can relax the possible tension with lower values of radiation degrees of freedom measured from light element abundances compared to that of the CMB. We numerically confront this scenario with WMAP+ACT and WMAP+SPT data and derive an upper limit on the allowed fraction of dark matter decaying into dark radiation.

  7. Mycoplasma pneumonia-associated mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Cyril; Sharain, Korosh; Skalski, Joseph; Ramar, Kannan

    2014-03-13

    We present a case of a young man with severe mucositis following an upper respiratory tract infection limited to the ophthalmic and oral mucosa while sparing the rest of the skin, genitalia and perianal regions. Investigations revealed that the mucositis was a rare extrapulmonary manifestation of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. He had progressive vision-threatening symptoms despite antibiotics and best supportive care and thus was treated with intravenous corticosteroids, immunoglobulins, temporary ocular amniotic membrane grafts and tarsorrhaphy. The patient made an almost complete recovery over 6 weeks.

  8. Recurrence of Esophageal Intestinal Metaplasia After Endoscopic Mucosal Resection and Radiofrequency Ablation of Barrett’s Esophagus: Results From a US Multicenter Consortium Recurrence of Barrett’s Esophagus after EMR and RFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Milli; Iyer, Prasad G.; Lutzke, Lori; Gorospe, Emmanuel C.; Abrams, Julian A.; Falk, Gary W.; Ginsberg, Gregory G.; Rustgi, Anil K.; Lightdale, Charles J.; Wang, Timothy C.; Fudman, David I.; Poneros, John M.; Wang, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an established treatment for dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus (BE). Although short-term endpoints of ablation have been ascertained, there have been concerns about recurrence of intestinal metaplasia (IM) after ablation. We aimed to estimate the incidence and identify factors that predicted the recurrence of IM after successful RFA. METHODS We analyzed data from 592 patients with BE treated with RFA from 2003 through 2011 at 3 tertiary referral centers. Complete remission of intestinal metaplasia (CRIM) was defined as eradication of IM (in esophageal and gastro esophageal junction biopsies), documented by 2 consecutive endoscopies. Recurrence was defined as presence of IM or dysplasia after CRIM in surveillance biopsies. Two experienced gastrointestinal pathologists confirmed pathology findings. RESULTS Based on histology analysis, before RFA, 71% of patients had high-grade dysplasia or esophageal adenocarcinoma, 15% had low-grade dysplasia, and 14% had non-dysplastic BE. Of patients treated, 448 (76%) were assessed following RFA. 55% of patients underwent endoscopic mucosal resection before RFA. The median time to CRIM was 22 months, with 56% of patients in CRIM by 24 months. Increasing age and length of BE segment were associated with a longer times to CRIM. Twenty-four months after CRIM, the incidence of recurrence was 33%; 22% of all recurrences observed were dysplastic BE. There were no demographic or endoscopic factors associated with recurrence. Complications developed in 6.5% of subjects treated with RFA; strictures were the most common complication. CONCLUSION Of patients with BE treated by RFA, 56% are in complete remission after 24 months. However, 33% of these patients have disease recurrence within the next 2 years. Most recurrences were non-dysplastic and endoscopically manageable, but continued surveillance after RFA is essential. PMID:23499759

  9. [High speed cinematographic analysis of subglottal mucosal vibration during experimentally induced phonation in excised larynges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, H

    1992-08-01

    Twenty-seven excised canine larynges and two excised human larynges fixed on a wall of a specially constructed glass box, were blown on and the subglottal mucosal vibrations were photographed using high speed cinematography from the tracheal side. Each film was repeatedly projected at normal speed and analyzed frame by frame. Mucosal upheaval appeared between the anterior commissure and the vocal process. The mucosal wave or "traveling wave" started from the mucosal upheaval and propagated medially and upward. The mucosal upheaval vibrated with a small amplitude and with an earlier phase than any other portion of the vocal fold. Increase of air flow resulted in increased amplitude of the free edge excursion. The mucosal upheaval seemed to shift more laterally after the increase of air flow. But judging from the positional relations between the mucosal upheaval and markers, the origin of the mucosal upheaval was the same despite the increase of air flow. After the increase of vocal fold tension by cricothyroid approximation, the mucosal wave occurred within the limited area near the vocal edge. The mucosal upheaval was located more medially as compared to the original position. The mucosal upheaval appeared on what was actually the superior portion of the vocal fold. Direct electrical stimulation of the thyroarytenoid muscle (TA) bulged the lower surface of the vocal fold medially, and narrowed the subglottic area surrounded by bilateral mucosal upheavals during vibration. The mucosal upheaval seemed to shift more medially after stimulation of TA, but combined with the movements of the marker, the mucosal upheaval appeared on a more inferior portion of the vocal fold compared to its position before the stimulation. Thus, a more dynamic mucosal wave appeared in the vertical direction. Histological examination revealed that the mucosal upheaval arose on the lower surface of the vocal fold, slightly above the area where the muscular layer came close to the epithelial

  10. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Villar, Rosangela Correa [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro, Gilberto de, E-mail: gilberto.castro@usp.br [Department of Clinical Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Antequera, Reynaldo [Divisao de Odontologia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might

  11. An Assessment of the Current US Radiation Oncology Workforce: Methodology and Global Results of the American Society for Radiation Oncology 2012 Workforce Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vichare, Anushree; Washington, Raynard; Patton, Caroline; Arnone, Anna [ASTRO, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, (United States); Fung, Claire Y. [Commonwealth Newburyport Cancer Center, Newburyport, Massachusetts (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Pohar, Surjeet, E-mail: spohar@netzero.net [Indiana University Health Cancer Center East, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the characteristics, needs, and concerns of the current radiation oncology workforce, evaluate best practices and opportunities for improving quality and safety, and assess what we can predict about the future workforce. Methods and Materials: An online survey was distributed to 35,204 respondents from all segments of the radiation oncology workforce, including radiation oncologists, residents, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, medical physicists, nurse practitioners, nurses, physician assistants, and practice managers/administrators. The survey was disseminated by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) together with specialty societies representing other workforce segments. An overview of the methods and global results is presented in this paper. Results: A total of 6765 completed surveys were received, a response rate of 19%, and the final analysis included 5257 respondents. Three-quarters of the radiation oncologists, residents, and physicists who responded were male, in contrast to the other segments in which two-thirds or more were female. The majority of respondents (58%) indicated they were hospital-based, whereas 40% practiced in a free-standing/satellite clinic and 2% in another setting. Among the practices represented in the survey, 21.5% were academic, 25.2% were hospital, and 53.3% were private. A perceived oversupply of professionals relative to demand was reported by the physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist segments. An undersupply was perceived by physician's assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses. The supply of radiation oncologists and residents was considered balanced. Conclusions: This survey was unique as it attempted to comprehensively assess the radiation oncology workforce by directly surveying each segment. The results suggest there is potential to improve the diversity of the workforce and optimize the supply of the workforce segments. The survey also provides a benchmark for

  12. Use of {sup 60}Co panoramic source in the induction of oral mucositis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Maira F.; Benetti, Carolina; Zezell, Denise M., E-mail: mairandrade@yahoo.com, E-mail: zezell@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Correa, Luciana, E-mail: lcorrea@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FO/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia

    2013-07-01

    Oral Mucositis is a well-known side effect of chemo-radiotherapy in cancer patients or transplant recipients that could induce hospitalization or impairs therapy in different levels of severity. This study is devoted to define the first steps in the research of low level laser treatments in oral mucositis, proposing a {sup 60}Co radiation to experimentally induce oral mucositis in rats using Panoramic gamma irradiator, simulating usual radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. Fifteen male Wistar rats, above 250g, were irradiated at Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes (IPEN - CNEN/SP) and divided in three experimental groups, with different single doses of radiation (30 Gy, 25 Gy and 20 Gy). The animals were observed for a 20 days period. Animals that received 30 Gy and 25 Gy developed greater severity of mucositis and premature euthanasia was performed in these groups on the 7th and 11th day after the irradiation, respectively. The 20 Gy group developed oral mucositis grading from moderated to severe between the days 7 and 11 after irradiation, with progressive body mass loss and decrease in the intake of food and water. These animals recovered from oral mucositis around the 18th day and clinical remission at the 20th day. The single dose of 20 Gy Gamma radiation proved to be efficient way for inducing oral mucositis in rats, allowing the establishment of an experimental model for oral mucositis in rats for future use on interventions of this serious aspect of radiation therapy, such as laser therapy using different wave lengths and power densities. (author)

  13. Mucosal vaccines: where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraehenbuhl, Jean-Pierre; Neutra, Marian R

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal vaccinology is a relatively young but rapidly expanding discipline. At present the vast majority of vaccines are administered by injection, including vaccines that protect against mucosally acquired pathogens such as influenza virus and human papilloma virus. However, mucosal immune responses are most efficiently induced by the administration of vaccines onto mucosal surfaces. The small number of currently licensed mucosal vaccines have reduced the burden of disease and mortality caused by enteric pathogens including rotavirus, V. cholerae and S. typhi, or those that spread to affect distal organs such as poliovirus. Expanding knowledge about the special features of the mucosal immune system promises to accelerate development of mucosal vaccines that could contribute significantly to protection against pathogens that colonize or invade via mucosal surfaces including HIV, Shigella, ETEC, Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori and many others.

  14. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  15. Immunology of gut mucosal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetti, Marcela F; Simon, Jakub K; Sztein, Marcelo B; Levine, Myron M

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Inside the mucosal immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry R McGhee

    Full Text Available An intricate network of innate and immune cells and their derived mediators function in unison to protect us from toxic elements and infectious microbial diseases that are encountered in our environment. This vast network operates efficiently by use of a single cell epithelium in, for example, the gastrointestinal (GI and upper respiratory (UR tracts, fortified by adjoining cells and lymphoid tissues that protect its integrity. Perturbations certainly occur, sometimes resulting in inflammatory diseases or infections that can be debilitating and life threatening. For example, allergies in the eyes, skin, nose, and the UR or digestive tracts are common. Likewise, genetic background and environmental microbial encounters can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs. This mucosal immune system (MIS in both health and disease is currently under intense investigation worldwide by scientists with diverse expertise and interests. Despite this activity, there are numerous questions remaining that will require detailed answers in order to use the MIS to our advantage. In this issue of PLOS Biology, a research article describes a multi-scale in vivo systems approach to determine precisely how the gut epithelium responds to an inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, given by the intravenous route. This article reveals a previously unknown pathway in which several cell types and their secreted mediators work in unison to prevent epithelial cell death in the mouse small intestine. The results of this interesting study illustrate how in vivo systems biology approaches can be used to unravel the complex mechanisms used to protect the host from its environment.

  17. Transoral Mucosal Excision Sutured Gastroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legner, Andras; Altorjay, Aron; Juhasz, Arpad; Stadlhuber, Rudolph; Reich, Viktor; Hunt, Brandon; Rothstein, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. An outpatient transoral endoscopic procedure for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and obesity would be appealing if safe, effective, and durable. We present the first in human experience with a new system. Methods. Eight patients with GERD (3) and obesity (5) were selected according to a preapproved study protocol. All GERD patients had preprocedure manometry and pH monitoring to document GERD as well as quality of life and symptom questionnaires. Obese patients (body mass index >35) underwent a psychological evaluation and tests for comorbidities. Under general anesthesia, a procedure was performed at the gastroesophageal junction including mucosal excision, suturing of the excision beds for apposition, and suture knotting. Results. One patient with micrognathia could not undergo the required preprocedural passage of a 60 F dilator and was excluded. The first 2 GERD patients had incomplete procedures due to instrument malfunction. The subsequent 5 subjects had a successfully completed procedure. Four patients were treated for obesity and had an average excess weight loss of 30.3% at 2-year follow-up. Of these patients, one had an 8-mm outlet at the end of the procedure recognized on video review—a correctable error—and another vomited multiple times postoperatively and loosened the gastroplasty sutures. The treated GERD patient had resolution of reflux-related symptoms and is off all antisecretory medications at 2-year follow-up. Her DeMeester score was 8.9 at 24 months. Conclusion. The initial human clinical experience showed promising results for effective and safe GERD and obesity therapy. PMID:24623807

  18. Radiative Forcing associated with Particulate Carbon Emissions resulting from the Use of Mercury Control Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, H.; Penner, J. E.; Lin, G.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury is a persistent, toxic metal that bio-accumulates within the food web and causes neurological damage and fetal defects in humans. The U.S. was the first country to regulate the leading anthropogenic source of mercury into the atmosphere: coal combustion for electric power generation. The U.S. EPA's 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) was replaced and further tightened in 2012 by the Mercury and Air Toxics Standard (MATS), which required existing coal-fired utilities to reduce their mercury emissions by approximately 90% by 2015. Outside the U.S., the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has passed the legally binding Minamata global mercury treaty that compels its signatory countries to prevent and reduce the emission and release of mercury. The most mature technology for controlling mercury emissions from coal combustion is the injection into the flue gas of powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbents having chemically treated surfaces designed to rapidly oxidize and adsorb mercury. However, such PAC is known to have electrical properties that make it difficult to remove from flue gas via electrostatic precipitation, by far the most common particulate control technology used in countries such as the U.S., India, and China which rely heavily on coal for power generation. As a result, PAC used to control mercury emissions can be emitted into the atmosphere, the sub-micron fraction of which may result in unintended radiative forcing similar to black carbon (BC). Here, we estimate the potential increases in secondary BC emissions, those not produced from combustion but arising instead from the use of injected PAC for mercury emission reduction. We also calculate the radiative forcing associated with these secondary BC emissions by using a global atmospheric chemical transport model coupled with a radiative transfer model.

  19. Radiation dose from multidetector CT studies in children: results from the first Italian nationwide survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, Claudio [IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Origgi, Daniela; Palorini, Federica [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Department of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Matranga, Domenica [University of Palermo, Department of Sciences for Health Promotion and Mother and Child Care ' ' G. D' Alessandro' ' , Palermo (Italy); Salerno, Sergio [University of Palermo, Department of Medical and Forensic Biopathology and Biotechnologies, Section of Radiology, Palermo (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) scanners have contributed to the widespread use of CT in paediatric imaging. However, concerns are raised for the associated radiation exposure. Very few surveys on radiation exposure from MDCT studies in children are available. The aim of this study was to outline the status of radiation exposure in children from MDCT practice in Italy. In this retrospective multicentre study we asked Italian radiology units with an MDCT scanner with at least 16 slices to provide dosimetric and acquisition parameters of CT examinations in three age groups (1-5, 6-10, 11-15 years) for studies of head, chest and abdomen. The dosimetric results were reported in terms of third-quartile volumetric CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) (mGy), size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) (mGy), dose length product (DLP) (mGy cm), and total DLP for multiphase studies. These results were compared with paediatric European and adult Italian published data. A multivariate analysis assessed the association of CTDI{sub vol} with patient characteristics and scanning modalities. We collected data from 993 MDCT examinations performed at 25 centres. For age groups 1-5 years, 6-10 years and 11-15 years, the CTDI{sub vol}, DLP and total DLP values were statistically significantly below the values observed in our analogous national survey in adults, although the difference decreased with increasing age. CTDI{sub vol} variability among centres was statistically significant (variance = 0.07; 95% confidence interval = 0.03-0.16; P < 0.001). This study reviewed practice in Italian centres performing paediatric imaging with MDCT scanners. The variability of doses among centres suggests that the use of standardised CT protocols should be encouraged. (orig.)

  20. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and ..gamma..-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome.

  1. Man-made radionuclides in the environment and resulting radiation exposures; Anthropogene Radionuklide in der Umwelt und daraus resultierende Strahlenexpositionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, R. [Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany). Zentrum fuer Strahlenschutz und Radiooekologie

    2009-07-01

    This contribution gives a survey about the sources of man-made environmental radioactivity and quantifies some of the resulting radiation exposures. The relevance of the different radionuclides with respect to the radiation exposures is discussed. Finally, the question of the effects of small doses is addressed. (orig.)

  2. Test-beam Results from a RICH Detector Prototype Using Aerogel Radiator and Pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aglieri-Rinella, G; Van Lysebetten, A; Piedigrossi, D; Wyllie, K; Bellunato, T F; Calvi, M; Matteuzzi, C; Musy, M; Perego, D L; Somerville, L P; Newby, C; Easo, S; Wotton, S

    2006-01-01

    A test-beam study was performed at CERN with a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) prototype using three pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors. Results on the photon yield and Cherenkov angle resolution are presented here, for the Aerogel radiator and also for reference runs taken with Nitrogen radiator.

  3. Dendritic cell-targeting DNA-based mucosal adjuvants for the development of mucosal vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish effective mucosal immunity against various mucosal pathogens, vaccines must be delivered via the mucosal route and contain effective adjuvant(s). Since mucosal adjuvants can simply mix with the antigen, it is relatively easy to adapt them for different types of vaccine development. Even in simple admixture vaccines, the adjuvant itself must be prepared without any complications. Thus, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or plasmids encoding certain cDNA(s) would be potent mucosal ...

  4. Preliminary Results from an Investigation into Nanostructured Nuclear Radiation Detectors for Non-Proliferation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the concept of embedding composite scintillators consisting of nanosized inorganic crystals in an organic matrix has been actively pursued. Nanocomposite detectors have the potential to meet many of the homeland security, non-proliferation, and border and cargo-screening needs of the nation and, by virtue of their superior nuclear identification capability over plastic, at roughly the same cost as plastic, have the potential to replace all plastic detectors. Nanocomposites clearly have the potential of being a gamma ray detection material that would be sensitive yet less expensive and easier to produce on a large scale than growing large, whole crystals of similar sensitivity. These detectors would have a broad energy range and a sufficient energy resolution to perform isotopic identification. The material can also be fabricated on an industrial scale, further reducing cost. This investigation focused on designing and fabricating prototype core/shell and quantum dot (QD) detectors. Fourteen core/shell and four QD detectors, all with the basic consistency of a mixture of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix with different densities of nanoparticles, were prepared. Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated, embedded in a polystyrene matrix, and the resultant scintillators’ radiation detector properties were characterized. This work also attempted to extend the gamma energy response on both low- and high-energy regimes by demonstrating the ability to detect low-energy and high-energy gamma rays. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with a significant response of these materials to nuclear radiation.

  5. 193-nm radiation durability study of MoSi binary mask and resulting lithographic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servin, Isabelle; Belledent, Jérôme; Pain, Laurent; Connolly, Brid; Sczyrba, Martin; Lamantia, Matt

    2011-05-01

    Dimensions on mask continue to shrink to keep up with the ITRS roadmap. This has implications on the material of choice for the blanks. For example, the new binary OMOG stack (Opaque MOSi on Glass) was successfully introduced to meet the mask specifications at the 32nm technology node. Obviously 193-nm optical lithography will be further used in production at even higher NA and lower k1 emphasizing, for example, the impact on wafer of any electromagnetic field migration effects. Indeed, long term radiation damage inducing CD growth and consequently, device yield loss, has already been reported [1, 2]. This mechanism, known as Electric Field induced Migration of chrome (EMF) often shortens the mask's lifetime. Here, a study was conducted to investigate the impact of intensive ArF scanner exposure both on final wafer and mask performances. The Si printed wafers measured with top-down CD-SEM were characterized with respect to CD uniformity, linearity, Sub Resolution Assist Feature (SRAF) printability through process window, MEEF, DOF, and OPC accuracy. The data was also correlated to advanced mask inspection results (e.g. AIMSTM) taken at the same location. More precisely, this work follows a preliminary study [1] which pointed out that OMOG is less sensitive to radiation than standard COG (Chrome On Glass). And, in this paper, we report on results obtained at higher energy to determine the ultimate lifetime of OMOG masks.

  6. Results of Simulated Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) on Spectra Restraint Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Benjamin; Hussain, Sarosh; Waller, Jess

    2017-01-01

    Spectra or similar Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fabric is the likely choice for future structural space suit restraint materials due to its high strength-to-weight ratio, abrasion resistance, and dimensional stability. During long duration space missions, space suits will be subjected to significant amounts of high-energy radiation from several different sources. To insure that pressure garment designs properly account for effects of radiation, it is important to characterize the mechanical changes to structural materials after they have been irradiated. White Sands Test Facility (WSFTF) collaborated with the Crew and Thermal Systems Division at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to irradiate and test various space suit materials by examining their tensile properties through blunt probe puncture testing and single fiber tensile testing after the materials had been dosed at various levels of simulated GCR and SPE Iron and Proton beams at Brookhaven National Laboratories. The dosages were chosen based on a simulation developed by the Structural Engineering Division at JSC for the expected radiation dosages seen by space suit softgoods seen on a Mars reference mission. Spectra fabric tested in the effort saw equivalent dosages at 2x, 10x, and 20x the predicted dose as well as a simulated 50 year exposure to examine the range of effects on the material and examine whether any degradation due to GCR would be present if the suit softgoods were stored in deep space for a long period of time. This paper presents the results of this work and outlines the impact on space suit pressure garment design for long duration deep space missions.

  7. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among chewing tobacco users: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha S Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square and Fisher′s exact tests were used to assess the statistical significance. Results: Of the 901 subjects with CT habits, 55.8% revealed no clinically detectable oral mucosal changes and 44.1% showed mucosal changes of which 63.8% were males and 36.1% were females. The most common finding was chewers mucositis (59.5% followed by submucous fibrosis (22.8%, leukoplakia (8%, lichenoid reaction (6.5%, oral cancer (2.7%, and lichen planus (0.5%. Conclusion: This study provides information about different CT habits and associated mucosal lesions among this population.

  8. Continuous electromagnetic radiation monitoring in the environment: analysis of the results in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manassas, Athanasios; Boursianis, Achilles; Samaras, Theodoros; Sahalos, John N

    2012-09-01

    Non-ionising radiation-monitoring networks were initiated as a result of the public concerns about the potential health effects from telecommunication emissions. In the present study, the data acquired from such networks in Greece are used to assess the changes in the outdoor electromagnetic environment with respect to location and time. The study shows that there is a statistically significant difference between the urban (median electric field: 1.1 V m(-1)) and the rural (median electric field: 0.3 V m(-1)) installations of monitoring units and also shows that there is a median diurnal variation (daily maximum to minimum) of 20.2 and 33.8 % for the broadcasting and mobile telecommunication emissions, respectively. Moreover, there is a difference in the electric field between daytime and night, but not between morning and afternoon. The results are in line with previously published data from spot measurements, monitoring networks and personal exposimeter studies performed in several European countries.

  9. Hawking Radiation from a (4+n)-dimensional Black Hole Exact Results for the Schwarzschild Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, C M; Harris, Chris M.; Kanti, Panagiota

    2003-01-01

    We start our analysis by deriving a master equation that describes the motion of a field with arbitrary spin $s$ on a 3-brane embedded in a non-rotating, uncharged (4+n)-dimensional black hole background. By numerical analysis, we derive exact results for the greybody factors and emission rates for scalars, fermions and gauge bosons emitted directly on the brane, for all energy regimes and for an arbitrary number $n$ of extra dimensions. The relative emissivities on the brane for different types of particles are computed and their dependence on the dimensionality of spacetime is demonstrated -- we therefore conclude that both the amount and the type of radiation emitted can be used for the determination of $n$ if the Hawking radiation from these black holes is observed. The emission of scalar modes in the bulk from the same black holes is also studied and the relative bulk-to-brane energy emissivity is accurately computed. We demonstrate that this quantity varies considerably with $n$ but always remains small...

  10. Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT Cost-Effectiveness Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash eBijlani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe and synthesize the current stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT cost-effectiveness research to date across several common SRS and SBRT applications. Methods: This review was limited to comparative economic evaluations of SRS, SBRT and alternative treatments (e.g., other radiotherapy techniques or surgery. Based on PubMed searches using the terms, stereotactic, stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, economic evaluation, quality adjusted life year (QALY, cost, cost effectiveness, cost utility and cost analysis, published studies of cost-effectiveness and health economics were obtained. Included were articles in peer-reviewed journals that presented a comparison of costs between treatment alternatives from January 1997 to November 2012. Papers were excluded if they did not present cost calculations, therapeutic cost comparisons, or health economic endpoints. Results: Clinical outcomes and costs of SRS and SBRT were compared to other therapies for treatment of cancer in the brain, spine, lung, prostate and pancreas. Treatment outcomes for SRS and SBRT are usually superior or comparable, and cost-effective, relative to alternative techniques. Conclusion: Based on the review of current SRS and SBRT clinical and health economic literature, from a patient perspective, SRS and SBRT provide patients a clinically-effective treatment option, while from the payer and provider perspective, SRS and SBRT demonstrate cost-savings.

  11. Effects of radiation on health-examination results of Japanese radiological technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Hisayoshi; Okumura, Yutaka (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan)); Sugahara, Tsutomu; Aoyama, Takashi; Hashimoto, Tetsuaki; Yamamoto, Yoichi

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effects of irradiation, smoking and drinking on health-examination results of Japanese male radiological technologists. We classified radiological technologists according to radiation exposure dose, smoking and drinking situation. We defined the reference group whose radiation doses were less than 30 cGy and who were nonsmokers and nondrinkers. We compared 27 items of serum biochemical examinations, blood pressure and 4 items of peripheral blood cell examinations between the reference group and the other groups after tested the normality of each investigated item after transformation and rejection of outliers. Inorganic phosphorus in the high-dose group was significantly higher than those of the reference group. The leukocyte counts in the high-dose group was significantly lower than those of the reference group. On LAP, ALP, albumin and beta-lipoprotein, the effects of irradiation were slight, but potentiated those of smoking and drinking. The rate of abnormal value on high-dose groups was higher than those of the reference group on albumin and ALP, but the same on LAP, beta-lipoprotein, inorganic phosphorus and the leukocyte counts. (author).

  12. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-08-12

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT(+) B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture.

  13. Results of the 2014 Survey of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Ashesh B; Marshall, David; Vapiwala, Neha; Davis, Sara Beth; Langer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) conducted an in-depth survey of program directors along several axes. We report the results of this survey and compare the major findings with those of the 2007 ADROP survey. The survey was written and approved by ADROP leadership in 2012, announced online through broadcasts throughout 2013 and early 2014, and closed in mid-2014. The results based on question groups related to (1) hours spent in activities, (2) budget and nonprogram resources, (3) physics/biology didactics, (4) mock exams/didactics/research, (5) electives, (6) students, and (7) resources/challenges were tabulated. Descriptive comparisons with the 2007 survey were performed. There was 26% participation (23/88 programs). Major areas of time commitment were faculty and site organization, maintenance, and corrections (70 hours/year) and didactics/conferences and rounds (200 hours/year). The median program director protected time was 23% (range 0%-50%). All responding programs (100%) had biology and physics courses and assigned directors, but only approximately 20% of respondents had a threshold grade in these courses for graduation. Major resources desired were templates of goals/objectives by disease site, competency evaluations by level, journal club repository, and software for contouring, oral examination preparation, grant writing, publication writing, oral presentation, and effective teaching. Major activity challenges were Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education external review and time commitment. Overall, the 2014 results are similar to those of the 2007 survey. The average time commitment remains considerably higher than the 10% minimum required in the current ACGME program requirements. The survey results may guide ADROP membership in centralizing some of the identified resources needed. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with the live-attenuated HSV-1 vaccine VC2 stimulates the proliferation of mucosal T cells and germinal center responses resulting in sustained production of highly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanfield, Brent A; Pahar, Bapi; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Veazey, Ronald; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2017-01-23

    We have shown that the live-attenuated HSV-1 VC2 vaccine strain with mutations in glycoprotein K (gK) and the membrane protein UL20 is unable to establish latency in vaccinated animals and produces a robust immune response capable of completely protecting mice against lethal vaginal HSV-1 or HSV-2 infections. To better understand the immune response generated by vaccination with VC2, we tested its ability to elicit immune responses in rhesus macaques. Vaccinated animals showed no signs of disease and developed increasing HSV-1 and HSV-2 reactive IgG 1 after two booster vaccinations, while IgG subtypes IgG 2 and IgG 3 remained at low to undetectable levels. All vaccinated animals produced high levels of cross protective neutralizing antibodies. Flow cytometry analysis of cells isolated from draining lymph nodes showed that VC2 vaccination stimulated significant increases in plasmablast (CD27 high CD38 high ) and mature memory (CD21 - IgM - ) B cells. T cell analysis on cells isolated from draining lymph node biopsies demonstrated a statistically significant increase in proliferating (Ki67 + ) follicular T helper cells and regulatory CXCR5 + CD8 + cytotoxic T cells. Analysis of plasma isolated two weeks post vaccination showed significant increases in circulating CXCL13 indicating increased germinal center activity. Cells isolated from vaginal biopsy samples collected over the course of the study exhibited vaccination-dependent increases in proliferating (Ki67 + ) CD4 + and CD8 + T cell populations. These results suggest that intramuscular vaccination with the live-attenuated HSV-1 VC2 vaccine strain can stimulate robust IgG 1 antibody responses that persist for >250days post vaccination. In addition, vaccination lead to the maturation of B cells into plasmablast and mature memory B cells, the expansion of follicular T helper cells, and affects in the mucosal immune responses. These data suggest that the HSV VC2 vaccine induces potent immune responses that could help

  15. New horizon of mucosal immunity and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ichiro; Nochi, Tomonori; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    Progress in the past quarter-century on understanding the molecular, cellular, and in vivo components of the mucosal immune system have allowed us to develop a practical strategy for a novel mucosal vaccine. The mucosal immune system can induce secretory IgA (SIgA) and serum IgG responses to provide two layers of defense against mucosal pathogens. For SIgA-mediated immunity in the gastrointestinal tract, the gut-associated lymphoid tissue contains both the tissue-dependent and tissue-independent IgA components. Harnessing the mucosal immune system for vaccine development may help prevent the global health problems caused by enteric infectious diseases. We have therefore combined mucosal immunology and plant biology to create a rice-based mucosal vaccine that requires neither needles and syringes nor refrigeration.

  16. Radio and chemioinduced oral mucositis treatment: comparison between conventional drug protocol and treatments with low intensity lasers; Tratamento da mucosite oral e quimioinduzida: comparacao entre protocolo medicamentoso convencional e tratamentos com lasers em baixa intensidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alencar, Anelise Ribeiro Peixoto

    2011-07-01

    In this clinical study verified the effects of low intensity laser in the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis radio and/or chemical induced. Thirty one patients with head and neck cancer were selected before being submitted to cancer exclusive radiotherapy or radio and associated chemotherapy. The patients were distributed into three randomly groups as follows: group 1- (control) conventional medicine treatment; group 2 - conventional medicine treatment and daily laser therapy as soon as grade two oral mucositis appeared; group 3 - conventional medicine treatment and daily laser therapy to be initiated immediately before radiotherapy sessions.The irradiation parameters were: wavelength of 660nm, potency of 100mW, continuous mode, punctual application, 2J energy on thirty pre-determined 30 points, with 20s of exposure per point. The control group received medical treatment which consisted in using a set of preventive and therapeutic approach for acute radiation-induced adverse effects. Results were evaluated observing occurrence and grade of oral mucositis, score of pain, loss of body mass, use of nasogastric sound line, internment and interruption of oncologic treatment due to oral mucositis. The results showed that the preventive protocol as used was the most effective in prevention and treatment of oral mucositis and that its daily application contributed in relieving the painful symptomatology so collaborating to maintain and/or bettering the life quality of oncologic patients. (author)

  17. Nonmucosal alphavirus vaccination stimulates a mucosal inductive environment in the peripheral draining lymph node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph M; Nicholson, Michael G; Whitmore, Alan C; Zamora, Melodie; West, Ande; Iwasaki, Akiko; Staats, Herman F; Johnston, Robert E

    2008-07-01

    The strongest mucosal immune responses are induced following mucosal Ag delivery and processing in the mucosal lymphoid tissues, and much is known regarding the immunological parameters which regulate immune induction via this pathway. Recently, experimental systems have been identified in which mucosal immune responses are induced following nonmucosal Ag delivery. One such system, footpad delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP), led to the local production of IgA Abs directed against both expressed and codelivered Ags at multiple mucosal surfaces in mice. In contrast to the mucosal delivery pathway, little is known regarding the lymphoid structures and immunological components that are responsible for mucosal immune induction following nonmucosal delivery. In this study, we have used footpad delivery of VRP to probe the constituents of this alternative pathway for mucosal immune induction. Following nonmucosal VRP delivery, J chain-containing, polymeric IgA Abs were detected in the peripheral draining lymph node (DLN), at a time before IgA detection at mucosal surfaces. Further analysis of the VRP DLN revealed up-regulated alpha4beta7 integrin expression on DLN B cells, expression of mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 on the DLN high endothelia venules, and production of IL-6 and CC chemokines, all characteristics of mucosal lymphoid tissues. Taken together, these results implicate the peripheral DLN as an integral component of an alternative pathway for mucosal immune induction. A further understanding of the critical immunological and viral components of this pathway may significantly improve both our knowledge of viral-induced immunity and the efficacy of viral-based vaccines.

  18. The quality of radiation care: the results of focus group interviews and concept mapping to explore the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, Jessica L; Sixma, Herman; van Triest, Baukelien; Keus, Ronald B; Hendriks, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we explore the quality aspects of radiation care from the patient's perspective in order to develop a draft Consumer Quality Index (CQI) Radiation Care instrument. Four focus group discussions with (former) cancer patients were held to explore the aspects determining the quality of radiation care. The list of aspects generated was categorised based on similarity and importance in a concept mapping procedure. Four focus group discussions revealed seven main themes related to the quality of radiation care: information provision, a patient-centred approach, professional competence, planning and waiting times, accessibility, cooperation and communication, and follow-up care. Results of concept mapping procedures revealed which items the patients considered to be most important. A radiation oncologist who is up to date about the patient's file is of paramount importance for cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. The quality aspects found through focus group discussions provided useful insight into how patients experience radiation care. Furthermore, concept mapping made these results more solid. To evaluate the quality of radiation care from the patient's perspective, these quality aspects will be guiding in the development of a CQI Radiation Care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation Therapy in Addition to Gross Total Resection of Retroperitoneal Sarcoma Results in Prolonged Survival: Results from a Single Institutional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M. Zagar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Typical treatment of retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPSs is surgery with or without radiation therapy for localized disease. With surgery alone, local failure rates are as high as 90%; this led to radiation therapy playing an important role in the treatment of RPSs. Methods. Thirty-one patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma treated with gross total resection and radiation therapy make up this retrospective analysis. Nineteen were treated preoperatively and 12 postoperatively (median dose, 59.4 Gy—sixteen also received intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT (median dose, 11 Gy. Patients were followed with stringent regimens, including frequent CT scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Results. With a median follow-up of 19 months (range 1–66 months, the 2-year overall survival (OS rate is 70% (median, 52 months. The 2-year locoregional control (LRC rate is 77% (median, 61.6 months. The 2-year distant disease free survival (DDFS rate is 70% (median not reached. There were no differences in radiation-related acute and late toxicities among patients treated pre- versus postoperatively, whether with or without IORT. Conclusions. Compared to surgery alone, neoadjuvant or adjuvant radiation therapy offers patients with RPS an excellent chance for long-term LRC, DDS, and OS. The integration of modern treatment planning for external beam radiation therapy and IORT allows for higher doses to be delivered with acceptable toxicities.

  20. Partial Breast Radiation Therapy With Proton Beam: 5-Year Results With Cosmetic Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, David A., E-mail: dbush@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Do, Sharon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Lum, Sharon; Garberoglio, Carlos [Department of Surgical Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Mirshahidi, Hamid [Department of Medical Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Patyal, Baldev; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: We updated our previous report of a phase 2 trial using proton beam radiation therapy to deliver partial breast irradiation (PBI) in patients with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had invasive nonlobular carcinoma with a maximal dimension of 3 cm. Patients underwent partial mastectomy with negative margins; axillary lymph nodes were negative on sampling. Subjects received postoperative proton beam radiation therapy to the surgical bed. The dose delivered was 40 Gy in 10 fractions, once daily over 2 weeks. Multiple fields were treated daily, and skin-sparing techniques were used. Following treatment, patients were evaluated with clinical assessments and annual mammograms to monitor toxicity, tumor recurrence, and cosmesis. Results: One hundred subjects were enrolled and treated. All patients completed the assigned treatment and were available for post-treatment analysis. The median follow-up was 60 months. Patients had a mean age of 63 years; 90% had ductal histology; the average tumor size was 1.3 cm. Actuarial data at 5 years included ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence-free survival of 97% (95% confidence interval: 100%-93%); disease-free survival of 94%; and overall survival of 95%. There were no cases of grade 3 or higher acute skin reactions, and late skin reactions included 7 cases of grade 1 telangiectasia. Patient- and physician-reported cosmesis was good to excellent in 90% of responses, was not changed from baseline measurements, and was well maintained throughout the entire 5-year follow-up period. Conclusions: Proton beam radiation therapy for PBI produced excellent ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival with minimal toxicity. The treatment proved to be adaptable to all breast sizes and lumpectomy cavity configurations. Cosmetic results appear to be excellent and unchanged from baseline out to 5 years following treatment. Cosmetic results may be improved over those reported with photon

  1. Dendritic cell-targeting DNA-based mucosal adjuvants for the development of mucosal vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish effective mucosal immunity against various mucosal pathogens, vaccines must be delivered via the mucosal route and contain effective adjuvant(s). Since mucosal adjuvants can simply mix with the antigen, it is relatively easy to adapt them for different types of vaccine development. Even in simple admixture vaccines, the adjuvant itself must be prepared without any complications. Thus, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or plasmids encoding certain cDNA(s) would be potent mucosal adjuvant candidates when compared with other substances that can be used as mucosal adjuvants. The strategy of a DNA-based mucosal adjuvant facilitates the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells, and thus is an effective and safe approach. It would also provide great flexibility for the development of effective vaccines for various mucosal pathogens. PMID:19722892

  2. Alterations of CNS structure & function by charged particle radiation & resultant oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory; Chang, Polly; Favre, Cecile; Fike, John; Komarova, Natalia; Limoli, Charles; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Obenaus, Andre; Raber, Jacob; Spigelman, Igor; Soltesz, Ivan; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Stampanoni, Marco; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Wodarz, Dominik

    were complex and suggested continuous remodeling of the brain for up to 6 months. Thus we demonstrated a suite of CNS structural and functional changes after proton and iron ion exposure in the low dose regime. Based on these findings we will now test whether oxidative stress mediates the reactions of CNS to radiation exposure and what role radiation quality and dose rate play in the responses. We will use cultured neural precursor cells (mouse human) to detect changes in oxidative status and differentiation as functions of charged particle charge and velocity. These results will inform the selection of particles for many in vivo measurements that will compare wild type mice to a transgenic strain that over-expresses a human catalase gene (which inactivates hydrogen peroxide) in the mitochondrial compartment. This will explicitly test the role of reactive oxygen species in mediating the mechanisms underlying the CNS endpoints that we will measure. We will extend the electrophysiological measurements on individual nerves in hippocampal slices to characterize both inhibitory and excitatory synapses. Further, multi-electrode arrays will be used to follow correlated electrical activity in different hippocampal regions in order to understand network-level function as well as synaptic efficacy and plasticity. Controlled oxidative stress on irradiated samples will explore whether response mechanisms are shared. To link alterations in neurogenesis to performance we will explore behavioral changes mediated by the hippocampus simultaneously with measures of expression of the Arc gene in newly-born neurons. This will test whether decrements in performance correlate with loss of new cells and whether behavior properly stimulates functional integration of the new cells; the behavioral paradigm will be contextual fear conditioning. We will develop mathematical frameworks for CNS responses to radiation in order to inform risk estimates. Finally, we will couple a high

  3. Radiation Therapy Results of Invasive Cervical Carcinoma Found After Inappropriate Hysterectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Doo Ho; Kim, Eun Seog; Nam, Kae Hyun; Huh, Seung Jae [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-15

    Purpose : Hysterectomy without lymph node dissection was considered an inadequate treatment method for invasive uterine cervix cancer. Usually the procedure was performed inadvertently on patients who were thought to have benign or premalignant conditions preoperatively. We analysed radiotherapy results of such patients to evaluate survival rates, failure patterns and prognostic factors according to various conditions. Methods and Materials : Sixty one patients undergoing hysterectomy in the presence of invasive cervical carcinoma were reviewed retrospectively. Preoperative diagnosis were carcioma in situ (38 cases), severe dysplasia(2), myoma(6), uterine bleeding (4), uterine prolapse (2), and early invasive cervix cancer (10) (One patient had myoma and carcinoma in situ coincidently). Patients received postoperative megavoltage radiotherapy form August 1985 to December 1993, and minimum follow-up period was 24 months. Eight patients reveived ICR only, 6 patients ICR and external radiation, and 47 patients received external radiation therapy only. Results : Overall 5-year survival rate and relapse-free survival rate were 83.8%, 86.9% respectively. For patients with retrospective stage IA, IB, IIB (gross residual after surgery), and vaginal cuff recurrence were 90.9%, 88.8%, 38.4%, and 100% respectively. There were 8 cases of treatment failure, most of them (5/8) were in patients with gross residual disease, other patients were full thickness involvement of cervix wall (2/8) except one. Patients with early vaginal cuff recurrence and microinvasive cervical cncer (stage IA) had no treatment related failure. Prognostic factors affecting survival by univariate analysis were status of residual disease, tumor histology and retrospective stage. Conclusion : Adjuvant radiotherapy appeared to be effective treatment method for patients with presumed stage IA, IB and early local recurrent disease after inadvertent hysterectomy. Survivals for patients with gross disease

  4. Practice patterns of radiation therapy technology in Australia: results of a national audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Pete; Dempsey, Shane; Giles, Eileen; Maresse, Sharon; McCorkell, Giulia; Opie, Craig; Wright, Caroline; Carmichael, Mary-Ann

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the results of a single-day census of radiation therapy (RT) treatment and technology use in Australia. The primary aim of the study was to ascertain patterns of RT practice and technology in use across Australia. These data were primarily collated to inform curriculum development of academic programs, thereby ensuring that training is matched to workforce patterns of practice. The study design was a census method with all 59 RT centres in Australia being invited to provide quantitative summary data relating to patient case mix and technology use on a randomly selected but common date. Anonymous and demographic-free data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Overall data were provided across all six Australian States by 29 centres of a possible 59, yielding a response rate of 49% and representing a total of 2743 patients. Findings from this study indicate the increasing use of emerging intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image fusion and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) technology in Australian RT planning and delivery phases. IMRT in particular was used for 37% of patients, indicating a high uptake of the technology in Australia when compared to other published data. The results also highlight the resource-intensive nature of benign tumour radiotherapy. In the absence of routine national data collection, the single-day census method offers a relatively convenient means of measuring and tracking RT resource utilisation. Wider use of this tool has the potential to not only track trends in technology implementation but also inform evidence-based guidelines for referral and resource planning.

  5. Interaction between the gut microbiome and mucosal immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Na; Li, Na; Duan, Xinwang; Niu, Haitao

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota, the largest symbiotic ecosystem with the host, has been shown to play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Dysbiosis of the gut microbiome is caused by the imbalance between the commensal and pathogenic microbiomes. The commensal microbiome regulates the maturation of the mucosal immune system, while the pathogenic microbiome causes immunity dysfunction, resulting in disease development. The gut mucosal immune system, which consists of lymph nodes, lamina propria and epithelial cells, constitutes a protective barrier for the integrity of the intestinal tract. The composition of the gut microbiota is under the surveillance of the normal mucosal immune system. Inflammation, which is caused by abnormal immune responses, influences the balance of the gut microbiome, resulting in intestinal diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the interaction between the gut microbiota and the immune system and provided a reference for future studies.

  6. [The development of mucosal vaccine using bacterial function for targeting mucosal tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidehiko; Kondoh, Masuo; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Most pathogens invade body through the mucosal epithelium, which is a primary target to prevent the infectious diseases. Mucosal vaccine has been considered to be an effective strategy to establish immunosurveillance against pathogens by the induction of antigen-specific immune responses at both mucosal and systemic immune compartments. The development of antigen delivery system and mucosal adjuvants are required for the sufficient induction of protective immunity in the development of mucosal vaccine. In this review, we shed light on the recent advances in the development of antigen delivery system using microbial functions for mucosal vaccines.

  7. Macroscopic Hematuria After Conventional or Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy: Results From a Prospective Phase 3 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Arcidiacono, Fabio; Landoni, Valeria; Saracino, Bianca Maria; Farneti, Alessia; Arcangeli, Stefano; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Gomellini, Sara; Strigari, Lidia; Arcangeli, Giorgio

    2016-10-01

    To assess the macroscopic hematuria rates within a single-institution randomized phase 3 trial comparing dose-escalated, conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (CFRT) and moderately hypofractionated radiation therapy (MHRT) for localized prostate cancer. Patients with intermediate- to high-risk localized prostate cancer were treated with conformal RT and short-course androgen deprivation. Both the prostate and the entire seminal vesicles were treated to 80 Gy in 40 fractions over 8 weeks (CFRT) or 62 Gy in 20 fractions over 5 weeks (MHRT). The endpoint of the present study was the development of any episode or grade of macroscopic hematuria. The median follow-up period was 93 months (range 6-143). Macroscopic hematuria was reported by 25 of 168 patients (14.9%). The actuarial estimate of hematuria at 8 years was 17.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.7%-23.3%). The number of patients with hematuria was 6 and 19 in the CFRT and MHRT arms, respectively, for an actuarial 8-year estimate of 9.7% and 24.3%, respectively (hazard ratio 3.468, 95% CI 1.385-8.684; P=.008). Overall, 8 of 25 patients were found to have biopsy-proven urothelial carcinoma (3 in the CFRT arm and 5 in the MHRT arm; P=.27). Thus, the 8-year actuarial incidence of macroscopic hematuria (after censoring urothelial cancer-related episodes) was 4.1% and 18.2% after CFRT and MHRT, respectively (hazard ratio 4.961, 95% CI 1.426-17.263; P=.012). The results were confirmed by multivariate analysis after accounting for several patient-, treatment-, and tumor-related covariates. MHRT was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of macroscopic hematuria compared with CFRT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation Hardening by Software Techniques on FPGAs: Flight Experiment Evaluation and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Andrew G.; Flatley, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We present our work on implementing Radiation Hardening by Software (RHBSW) techniques on the Xilinx Virtex5 FPGAs PowerPC 440 processors on the SpaceCube 2.0 platform. The techniques have been matured and tested through simulation modeling, fault emulation, laser fault injection and now in a flight experiment, as part of the Space Test Program- Houston 4-ISS SpaceCube Experiment 2.0 (STP-H4-ISE 2.0). This work leverages concepts such as heartbeat monitoring, control flow assertions, and checkpointing, commonly used in the High Performance Computing industry, and adapts them for use in remote sensing embedded systems. These techniques are extremely low overhead (typically radiation hardened processor. The recently concluded STP-H4 flight experiment was an opportunity to upgrade the RHBSW techniques for the Virtex5 FPGA and demonstrate them on-board the ISS to achieve TRL 7. This work details the implementation of the RHBSW techniques, that were previously developed for the Virtex4-based SpaceCube 1.0 platform, on the Virtex5-based SpaceCube 2.0 flight platform. The evaluation spans the development and integration with flight software, remotely uploading the new experiment to the ISS SpaceCube 2.0 platform, and conducting the experiment continuously for 16 days before the platform was decommissioned. The experiment was conducted on two PowerPCs embedded within the Virtex5 FPGA devices and the experiment collected 19,400 checkpoints, processed 253,482 status messages, and incurred 0 faults. These results are highly encouraging and future work is looking into longer duration testing as part of the STP-H5 flight experiment.

  9. Cloud forming properties of ambient aerosol in the Netherlands and resultant shortwave radiative forcing of climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khlystov, A.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis discusses properties of ambient aerosols in the Netherlands which are controlling the magnitude of the local aerosol radiative forcing. Anthropogenic aerosols influence climate by changing the radiative transfer through the atmosphere via two effects, one is direct and a second

  10. Mucosal Kaposi sarcoma, a Rare Cancer Network study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Miller

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS most often affect the skin but occasionally affect the mucosa of different anatomic sites. The management of mucosal KS is seldom described in the literature. Data from 15 eligible patients with mucosal KS treated between 1994 and 2008 in five institutions within three countries of the Rare Cancer Network group were collected. The inclusion criteria were as follows: age >16 years, confirmed pathological diagnosis, mucosal stages I and II, and a minimum of 6 months’ follow-up after treatment. Head and neck sites were the most common (66%. Eleven cases were HIV-positive. CD4 counts correlated with disease stage. Twelve patients had biopsy only while three patients underwent local resection. Radiotherapy (RT was delivered whatever their CD4 status was. Median total radiation dose was 16.2 Gy (0-45 delivered in median 17 days (0-40 with four patients receiving no RT. Six patients underwent chemotherapy and received from 1 to 11 cycles of various regimens namely vinblastin, caelyx, bleomycine, or interferon, whatever their CD4 counts was. Five-year disease free survival were 81.6% and 75.0% in patients undergoing RT or not, respectively. Median survival was 66.9 months. Radiation-induced toxicity was at worse grade 1-2 and was manageable whatever patients’ HIV status. This small series of mucosal KSs revealed that relatively low-dose RT is overall safe and efficient in HIV-positive and negative patients. Since there are distant relapses either in multicentric cutaneous or visceral forms in head and neck cases, the role of systemic treatments may be worth investigations in addition to RT of localized disease. Surgery may be used for symptomatic lesions, with caution given the risk of bleeding.

  11. Oral mucositis: recent perspectives on prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio da Silva Santos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis is a result of toxicity and one of the most common side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in cancer treatment and in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Clinically these changes are characterized by epithelial atrophy, edema, erythema and the appearance of ulcerations that can affect the entire oral mucosa, causing pain and discomfort, impairing speech, and swallowing food. In addition to the major symptoms, the ulcers increase the risk of local and systemic infection, compromising function and interfering with oral antineoplastic treatment and may lead to it being discontinued. The diagnosis, prevention and therapeutic strategies in providing support in cases of oral mucositis are the dentist’s responsibility. Through critical analysis of literature, the aim of this article is to present oral mucositis, its pathogenesis, clinical features and treatments offered today to address or control the condition, highlighting the importance of dentists’ role in its management.

  12. The oral mucosal surface and blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, Ella A; Dierkes, Tobias; Sprang, Jürgen; Arnold, Wolfgang H

    2013-03-12

    Detailed information about the size of the oral mucosa is scarce in the literature, and those studies that do exist do not take into account the size of the tongue or the enlargement of the surface by the papillae. Because of the various functions of the oral mucosa in the maintenance of oral health, knowledge of its true size may provide a better understanding of the physiology of the oral cavity and some oral diseases and direct future therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to determine the total size of the oral mucosa. Five human adult cadaver heads were cut in the median sagittal plane, and the total area of the oral surface was determined using silicon casts. The surface of the tongue was measured with quantitative profilometry. Photographs of oral blood vessels were taken in different areas of the oral mucosa of adult test subjects using intravital microscopy, and the pictures were compared with vessel casts of the oral mucosal capillaries of a maccaca fasciculrais monkey, which was studied using a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the dorsal side of the tongue comprises a large proportion of the total oral mucosal surface. The surface area of the epithelium increases moving from anterior to posterior on the tongue, and the number of underlying blood vessels increases proportionally. It can be concluded that the back of the tongue plays an important role in the oral resorption of drugs. The results may be of relevance for the delivery and development of oral drug application.

  13. Hypoxia and Mucosal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Sean P.; Campbell, Eric L.; Kominsky, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Sites of inflammation are defined by significant changes in metabolic activity. Recent studies have suggested that O2 metabolism and hypoxia play a prominent role in inflammation so-called “inflammatory hypoxia,” which results from a combination of recruited inflammatory cells (e.g., neutrophils and monocytes), the local proliferation of multiple cell types, and the activation of multiple O2-consuming enzymes during inflammation. These shifts in energy supply and demand result in localized regions of hypoxia and have revealed the important function off the transcription factor HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor) in the regulation of key target genes that promote inflammatory resolution. Analysis of these pathways has provided multiple opportunities for understanding basic mechanisms of inflammation and has defined new targets for intervention. Here, we review recent work addressing tissue hypoxia and metabolic control of inflammation and immunity. PMID:27193451

  14. Icing oral mucositis: Oral cryotherapy in multiple myeloma patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joey; Seabrook, Jamie; Fulford, Adrienne; Rajakumar, Irina

    2017-03-01

    Background Up to 70% of patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplant develop oral mucositis as a side effect of high-dose melphalan conditioning chemotherapy. Oral cryotherapy has been documented to be potentially effective in reducing oral mucositis. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the cryotherapy protocol implemented within the hematopoietic stem cell transplant program. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted of adult multiple myeloma patients who received high-dose melphalan conditioning therapy for autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Primary endpoints were incidence and severity of oral mucositis. Secondary endpoints included duration of oral mucositis, duration of hospital stay, parenteral narcotics use and total parenteral nutrition use. Results One hundred and forty patients were included in the study, 70 patients in both no cryotherapy and cryotherapy groups. Both oral mucositis incidence and severity were found to be significantly lower in the cryotherapy group. Fifty (71.4%) experienced mucositis post cryotherapy compared to 67 (95.7%) in the no cryotherapy group (p cryotherapy group (p = 0.03). Oral mucositis duration and use of parenteral narcotics were also significantly reduced. Duration of hospital stay and use of parenteral nutrition were similar between the two groups. Conclusion The cryotherapy protocol resulted in a significantly lower incidence and severity of oral mucositis. These results provide evidence for the continued use of oral cryotherapy, an inexpensive and generally well-tolerated practice.

  15. Advances and challenges in mucosal adjuvant technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsted, Daniel; Fallahi, Firouzeh; Golshani, Ashkan; Azizi, Ali

    2015-05-15

    Adjuvants play attractive roles in enhancement of immune response during vaccination; however, due to several challenges, only a limited number of adjuvants are licensed by health authorities. The lack of an effective mucosal adjuvant is even more significant as none of the licensed adjuvants revealed a strong enhancement in immune system after mucosal administration. Over the past two decades, several mucosal adjuvants have been developed to deliver antigens to the target cells in the mucosal immune system and increase specific immune responses. However, the safety and efficacy of these adjuvants for testing in human trials is still an important issue, requiring further study. In this article, we briefly review the challenges associated with most common mucosal adjuvants and discuss potential strategies for targeting the mucosal immune system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prejudice and Health Anxiety about Radiation Exposure from Second-Generation Atomic Bomb Survivors: Results from a Qualitative Interview Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Kamite

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of atomic bomb radiation exposure on the survivors and their children has been a worrisome problem since soon after the 1945 Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings. Researchers have examined physical and genetic effects; however, no research has focused on second-generation survivors’ (SGS psychological effects. Consequently, this study shed light on the SGS’ experience of discrimination and prejudice and their anxiety concerning the genetic effects of radiation exposure. This study utilized semi-structured interviews with 14 SGS (10 women, mean age = 56 ± 6.25 years, range = 46–68 years. Data were analyzed using a modified version of the grounded theory approach. Three categories were extracted: low awareness as an SGS, no health anxiety regarding the effect of radiation, and health anxiety regarding the effect of radiation. The results did not reveal that SGS who grew up in the bombed areas experienced discrimination or prejudice. They had little health anxiety from childhood to adolescence. In this study, some of the SGS developed health anxiety about their third-generation children, but only among female participants. Perhaps the transgenerational transmission of anxiety concerning the genetic effects of radiation exposure causes stress, particularly among women with children. However, a change was seen in adulthood health anxiety regarding the effects of radiation, suggesting the possibility that changes in the psychological experiences of SGS can be observed throughout their lifetimes and that their own health status, and that of their children, the third-generation survivors, affects their health anxiety regarding radiation.

  17. Cherenkov radiation imaging of beta emitters: in vitro and in vivo results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinelli, Antonello E., E-mail: spinelli.antonello@hsr.it [Medical Physics Department, S. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina N. 60, Milan (Italy); Boschi, Federico [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie N. 8, Verona (Italy); D' Ambrosio, Daniela [Medical Physics Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, via Massarenti N. 9, Bologna (Italy); Calderan, Laura [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie N. 8, Verona (Italy); Marengo, Mario [Medical Physics Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, via Massarenti N. 9, Bologna (Italy); Fenzi, Alberto [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie N. 8, Verona (Italy); Menegazzi, Marta [Department of Life and Reproduction Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie N. 8, Verona (Italy); Sbarbati, Andrea [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie N. 8, Verona (Italy); Del Vecchio, Antonella; Calandrino, Riccardo [Medical Physics Department, S. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina N. 60, Milan (Italy)

    2011-08-21

    The main purpose of this work was to investigate both in vitro and in vivo Cherenkov radiation (CR) emission coming from {sup 18}F and {sup 32}P. The main difference between {sup 18}F and {sup 32}P is mainly the number of the emitted light photons, more precisely the same activity of {sup 32}P emits more CR photons with respect to {sup 18}F. In vitro results obtained by comparing beta counter measurements with photons average radiance showed that Cherenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) allows quantitative tracer activity measurements. In order to investigate in vivo the CLI approach, we studied an experimental xenograft tumor model of mammary carcinoma (BB1 tumor cells). Cherenkov in vivo dynamic whole body images of tumor bearing mice were acquired and the tumor tissue time activity curves reflected the well-known physiological accumulation of {sup 18}F-FDG in malignant tissues with respect to normal tissues. The results presented here show that it is possible to use conventional optical imaging devices for in vitro or in vivo study of beta emitters.

  18. Results of radiation test of the cathode front-end board for CMS endcap muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Breedon, R; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Hauser, J; Holbrook, B; Kim, C L; Ling, T; Mey, M; Murray, P; Rush, C J; Santiard, Jean-Claude; Tripathi, M

    2001-01-01

    After a brief overview of the CMS EMU electronics system, results on radiation induced single event effects, total ionization dose and displacement effects will be reported. These results are obtained by irradiating the components on electronics boards with 63 MeV protons and 1 MeV neutrons. During the proton irradiation, the electronics board was fully under power, all components on the board were active and the data were read out in the same way as designed for CMS. No deterioration of analog performance for each of the three CMOS ASICs on the tested board was observed, up to a dose of 10 krad. Each of the tested FPGAs survived beyond the dose of 30 krad. No single event latch-up was detected for the CMOS ASICs up to a proton fluence of 2x10 sup 1 sup 2 cm sup - sup 2. Single Event Upsets (SEU) in FPGAs were detected and their cross-sections measured. SEU mitigation with triple module redundancy and voting was implemented and tested.

  19. Long-term visual results in eyes cured for retinoblastoma by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holbek, S.; Ehlers, N. (Department of Ophthalmology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-four eyes from 18 patients cured for retinoblastoma by radiation on an average 12 years previously, were re-examined with respect to visual performance. The macular functions, i.e. visual acuity, colour vision and contrast sensitivity demonstrated performances predictable from tumour localization and radiation dose to the macula. The rod functions, i.e. visual field and dark adaptation were found to be relatively resistant to the radiation treatment. A special problem encountered in two-eyed patients was the unavoidable amblyopia dut to unequal handicaps in the two eyes at the vulnerable age. (author).

  20. Efficient Mucosal Delivery of Vaccine Using the FcRn-Mediated IgG Transfer Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lilin; Zeng, Rongyu; Bai, Yu; Roopenian, Derry C.; Zhu, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Vaccine strategies to prevent invasive mucosal pathogens are being sought because 80–90% of infectious diseases are initiated at mucosal surfaces. However, our ability to deliver an intact vaccine antigen across a mucosal barrier for induction of effective immunity is limited. The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) mediates the transport of IgG across polarized epithelial cells lining mucosal surfaces. By mimicking IgG transfer at mucosal surfaces, intranasal immunization with a model antigen, herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein gD fused with an IgG Fc fragment, in combination with the adjuvant CpG, resulted in complete protection of wild type, but not FcRn knockout, mice that were intravaginally challenged with virulent HSV-2 186. This immunization strategy induced efficient mucosal and systemic antibody, B and T cell immune responses, including memory immune responses, which remained stable at least 6 months post-vaccination and conferred protection for a majority of animals. These results demonstrate that the FcRn-IgG transcellular transport pathway may represent a novel mucosal vaccine delivery route for a subunit vaccine against abundant mucosal pathogens. PMID:21240266

  1. The Development of an AIDS Mucosal Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Tang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that mucosal tissues contain the largest surface area of the human body and are the front line of natural host defense against various pathogens. In fact, more than 80% of infectious disease pathogens probably gain entry into the susceptible human hosts through open mucosal surfaces. Human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1, a mainly sexually transmitted virus, also primarily targets the vaginal and gastrointestinal mucosa as entry sites for viral transmission, seeding, replication and amplification. Since HIV-1 establishes its early replication in vaginal or rectal mucosal tissues, the induction of sufficient mucosal immunity at the initial site of HIV-1 transmission becomes essential for a protective vaccine. However, despite the fact that current conventional vaccine strategies have remained unsuccessful in preventing HIV-1 infection, sufficient financial support and resources have yet to be given to develop a vaccine able to elicit protective mucosal immunity against sexual transmissions. Interestingly, Chinese ancestors invented variolation through intranasal administration about one thousand years ago, which led to the discovery of a successful smallpox vaccine and the final eradication of the disease. It is the hope for all mankind that the development of a mucosal AIDS vaccine will ultimately help control the AIDS pandemic. In order to discover an effective mucosal AIDS vaccine, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of mucosal immunology and to test various mucosal vaccination strategies.

  2. Oral cryotherapy reduced oral mucositis in patients having cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivakovsky, Sylvia

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CANCERLIT, CINAHL, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment compared to usual care, no treatment or other interventions to prevent mucositis. The primary outcome was incidence of mucositis and its severity.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers carried out study assessment and data extraction independently. Treatment effect for continuous data was calculated using mean values and standard deviations and expressed as mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval. Risk ratio (RR) was calculated for dichotomous data. Meta-analysis was performed.ResultsFourteen studies with 1280 participants were included. Subgroup analysis was undertaken according to the main cancer treatment type. Cryotherapy reduced the risk of developing mucositis by 39% (RR = 0.61; 95%CI, 0.52 to 0.72) on patients treated with fluorouracil (5FU). For melphalan-based treatment the risk of developing mucositis was reduced by 41% (RR =0.59; 95%CI, 0.35 to 1.01). Oral cryotherapy was shown to be safe, with very low rates of minor adverse effects, such as headaches, chills, numbness/taste disturbance and tooth pain. This appears to contribute to the high rates of compliance seen in the included studies.ConclusionsThere is confidence that oral cryotherapy leads to a large reduction in oral mucositis in adults treated with 5FU. Although there is less certainty on the size of the reduction on patients treated with melphalan, it is certain there is reduction of severe mucositis.

  3. COSMIC: A Regimen of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Plus Dose-Escalated, Raster-Scanned Carbon Ion Boost for Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors: Results of the Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Alexandra D., E-mail: alexdjensen@gmx.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Nikoghosyan, Anna V.; Lossner, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas; Jäkel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Centre, Heidelberg (Germany); Münter, Marc W.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dose-escalated carbon ion (C12) therapy in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) and other malignant salivary gland tumors (MSGTs) of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: COSMIC (combined treatment of malignant salivary gland tumors with intensity modulated radiation therapy and carbon ions) is a prospective phase 2 trial of 24 Gy(RBE) C12 followed by 50 Gy IMRT in patients with pathologically confirmed MSGT. The primary endpoint is mucositis Common Terminology Criteria grade 3; the secondary endpoints are locoregional control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3; treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Results: Between July 2010 and August 2011, 54 patients were accrued, and 53 were available for evaluation. The median follow-up time was 42 months; patients with microscopically incomplete resections (R1, n=20), gross residual disease (R2, n=17), and inoperable disease (n=16) were included. Eighty-nine percent of patients had ACC, and 57% had T4 tumors. The most common primary sites were paranasal sinus (34%), submandibular gland, and palate. At the completion of radiation therapy, 26% of patients experienced grade 3 mucositis, and 20 patients reported adverse events of the ear (38%). The most common observed late effects were grade 1 xerostomia (49%), hearing impairment (25%, 2% ipsilateral hearing loss), and adverse events of the eye (20%), but no visual impairment or loss of vision. Grade 1 central nervous system necrosis occurred in 6%, and 1 grade 4 ICA hemorrhage without neurologic sequelae. The best response was 54% (complete response/partial remission). At 3 years, the LC, PFS, and OS were 81.9%, 57.9%, and 78.4%, respectively. No difference was found regarding resection status. The

  4. Late radiation responses in man: Current evaluation from results from Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schull, William J.

    Among the late effects of exposure to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, none looms larger than radiation related malignancies. Indeed, the late effects of A-bomb radiation on mortality appear to be limited to an increase in malignant tumors. At present, it can be shown that cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, lungs, stomach, thyroid, and urinary tract as well as leukemia and multiple myeloma increase in frequency with an increase in exposure. No significant relationship to radiation can as yet be established for malignant lymphoma, nor cancers of the rectum, pancreas or uterus. Radiation induced malignancies other than leukemia seem to develop proportionally to the natural cancer rate for the attained age. For specific age-at-death intervals, both relative and absolute risks tend to be higher for those of younger age at the time of bombing. Other late effects include radiation-related lenticular opacities, disturbances of growth among those survivors still growing at the time of exposure, and mental retardation and small head sizes among the in utero exposed. Chromosomal abnormalities too are more frequently encountered in the peripheral leucocytes of survivors, and this increase is functionally related to their exposure. Some uncertainty continues to surround both the quantity and quality of the radiation released by these two nuclear devices, particularly the Hiroshima bomb. A recent reassessment suggests that the gamma radiation estimates which have been used in the past may be too low at some distances and the neutron radiation estimates too high at all distances; moreover, the energies of the neutrons released now appear ``softer'' than previously conjectured. These uncertainties not sufficiently large, however, to compromise the reality of the increased frequency of malignancy, but make estimates of the dose response, particularly in terms of gamma and neutron exposures, tentative.

  5. GAMMA RADIATION INTERACTS WITH MELANIN TO ALTER ITS OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL AND RESULTS IN ELECTRIC CURRENT PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C.; Ekechukwu, A.; Milliken, C.

    2011-05-17

    The presence of melanin pigments in organisms is implicated in radioprotection and in some cases, enhanced growth in the presence of high levels of ionizing radiation. An understanding of this phenomenon will be useful in the design of radioprotective materials. However, the protective mechanism of microbial melanin in ionizing radiation fields has not yet been elucidated. Here we demonstrate through the electrochemical techniques of chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry that microbial melanin is continuously oxidized in the presence of gamma radiation. Our findings establish that ionizing radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential. Sustained oxidation resulted in electric current production and was most pronounced in the presence of a reductant, which extended the redox cycling capacity of melanin. This work is the first to establish that gamma radiation alters the oxidation-reduction behavior of melanin, resulting in electric current production. The significance of the work is that it provides the first step in understanding the initial interactions between melanin and ionizing radiation taking place and offers some insight for production of biomimetic radioprotective materials.

  6. Radiation dose limits and liver toxicities resulting from multiple yttrium-90 radioembolization treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Joseph Y; Rhee, Thomas K; Atassi, Bassel; Gates, Vanessa L; Kulik, Laura; Mulcahy, Mary F; Larson, Andrew C; Ryu, Robert K; Sato, Kent T; Lewandowski, Robert J; Omary, Reed A; Salem, Riad

    2007-11-01

    To assess the relationship between cumulative hepatic lobar radiation dose and liver toxicities in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with multiple sessions of yttrium-90 radioembolization. Forty-one patients with HCC (age range, 46-82 years) underwent radioembolization with 90Y. Patients were classified according to the Okuda scoring system. All patients received single liver lobar treatments on two or more occasions according to standard clinical 90Y embolization protocol. Cumulative radiation dose to each liver lobe was measured and patients were followed to assess liver toxicities. Statistical analysis was performed with the Student t test and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Patients with Okuda stage I disease received more treatments than those with Okuda stage II disease (mean, 2.65 vs 2.24; Por=1 toxicity; P<.005). No correlation between cumulative radiation dose and liver toxicities existed in patients with Okuda stage II disease. The maximum tolerated dose was between 222 and 390 Gy. Median survival times were 660 and 431 days for patients with Okuda stage I and stage II disease, respectively. Patients with HCC can tolerate high cumulative radiation doses with 90Y therapy. Compared with patients with Okuda stage II disease, patients with Okuda stage I disease tolerate a higher cumulative radiation dose without liver toxicity, but liver toxicities increase with increasing cumulative radiation doses.

  7. Consensus guidelines for postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases: results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Kristin J; Lo, Simon S; Soltys, Scott G; Yamada, Yoshiya; Barani, Igor J; Brown, Paul D; Chang, Eric L; Gerszten, Peter C; Chao, Samuel T; Amdur, Robert J; De Salles, Antonio A F; Guckenberger, Matthias; Teh, Bin S; Sheehan, Jason; Kersh, Charles R; Fehlings, Michael G; Sohn, Moon-Jun; Chang, Ung-Kyu; Ryu, Samuel; Gibbs, Iris C; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Although postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases is increasingly performed, few guidelines exist for this application. The purpose of this study is to develop consensus guidelines to promote safe and effective treatment for patients with spinal metastases. METHODS Fifteen radiation oncologists and 5 neurosurgeons, representing 19 centers in 4 countries and having a collective experience of more than 1300 postoperative spine SBRT cases, completed a 19-question survey about postoperative spine SBRT practice. Responses were defined as follows: 1) consensus: selected by ≥ 75% of respondents; 2) predominant: selected by 50% of respondents or more; and 3) controversial: no single response selected by a majority of respondents. RESULTS Consensus treatment indications included: radioresistant primary, 1-2 levels of adjacent disease, and previous radiation therapy. Contraindications included: involvement of more than 3 contiguous vertebral bodies, ASIA Grade A status (complete spinal cord injury without preservation of motor or sensory function), and postoperative Bilsky Grade 3 residual (cord compression without any CSF around the cord). For treatment planning, co-registration of the preoperative MRI and postoperative T1-weighted MRI (with or without gadolinium) and delineation of the cord on the T2-weighted MRI (and/or CT myelogram in cases of significant hardware artifact) were predominant. Consensus GTV (gross tumor volume) was the postoperative residual tumor based on MRI. Predominant CTV (clinical tumor volume) practice was to include the postoperative bed defined as the entire extent of preoperative tumor, the relevant anatomical compartment and any residual disease. Consensus was achieved with respect to not including the surgical hardware and incision in the CTV. PTV (planning tumor volume) expansion was controversial, ranging from 0 to 2 mm. The spinal cord avoidance structure was predominantly the true cord

  8. A Study on Oral Mucosal Lesions in 3500 Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oral manifestions with their respective dermatological disease was statistically analysed by. Pearson's correlation test.(P < 0.05 were considered as statistically significant) Results: The prevalence rate of oral mucosal lesions in the present study was 1.8% (65/3500). The most frequent lesions observed were psoriasis 32.3% ...

  9. Radiation protection in interventional radiology: survey results of attitudes and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynskey, G Emmett; Powell, Daniel K; Dixon, Robert G; Silberzweig, James E

    2013-10-01

    To assess attitudes of interventional radiologists toward personal radiation protection and the use of radiation protection devices. Invitations to an anonymous online survey that comprised eight questions focused on operator attitudes toward radiation protection devices were sent via e-mail to the active membership of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR): a total of 3,158 e-mail invitations. A single reminder e-mail was sent. There were 504 survey responders (16% response rate). Reported radiation safety device use included lead apron (99%), thyroid shield (94%), leaded eyeglasses (54%), ceiling-suspended leaded shield (44%), rolling leaded shields (12%), ceiling-suspended/rolling lead-equivalent apron (4%), radiation-attenuating sterile surgical gloves (1%), and sterile lead-equivalent patient-mounted drape (4%). Reasons commonly cited for not using certain devices were comfort (eyewear), ease of use (mounted shields), and lack of availability (rolling/hanging shields and patient-mounted shields). Interventionalists have an array of tools from which to choose for personal radiation protection; however, for a variety of reasons related to lack of availability or choice, these tools are not universally employed. Further study may be of value to clarify why comfort was cited most often as the primary barrier to the use of protective eyewear and difficulty of use was cited as the primary barrier to use of mounted shields (despite reporting that concern for radiation-induced injury to the eye is paramount). It may also be of interest to further study why certain devices with demonstrable protection effects are not readily available, such as rolling/hanging and patient-mounted shields. © SIR, 2013.

  10. Estimating the risks of cancer mortality and genetic defects resulting from exposures to low levels of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhl, T.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1984-05-01

    Estimators for calculating the risk of cancer and genetic disorders induced by exposure to ionizing radiation have been recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the International Committee on Radiological Protection. These groups have also considered the risks of somatic effects other than cancer. The US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has discussed risk estimate procedures for radiation-induced health effects. The recommendations of these national and international advisory committees are summarized and compared in this report. Based on this review, two procedures for risk estimation are presented for use in radiological assessments performed by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In the first procedure, age- and sex-averaged risk estimators calculated with US average demographic statistics would be used with estimates of radiation dose to calculate the projected risk of cancer and genetic disorders that would result from the operation being reviewed under NEPA. If more site-specific risk estimators are needed, and the demographic information is available, a second procedure is described that would involve direct calculation of the risk estimators using recommended risk-rate factors. The computer program REPCAL has been written to perform this calculation and is described in this report. 25 references, 16 tables.

  11. The AMSAT-OSCAR-40 High Elliptical Orbit Radiation Environment Monitoring Payload - First Flight Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeting, Martin, , Sir

    Over the last decade, Surrey's micro-satellites have provided continuous monitoring of the proton and heavy-ion environment encountered in low-Earth orbit (LEO), through the use of a series of silicon PIN-diode-based particle detectors, starting with the UK Defence Evaluation Research Agency's (DERA's) Cosmic-Radiation Environment and Dosimetry (CREDO) payload, flown on-board UoSAT-3 in 1990, followed in 1992 by the Cosmic-Ray Experiment (CRE), developed at the Surrey Space Centre under a micro-satellite Technology Transfer (TT) programme operated between Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL) and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), and flown on the resulting KITSAT-1 micro-satellite. The CRE was flown again in 1993 on-board the PoSAT- 1 micro-satellite, developed under a similar TT programme operated between SSTL and Portugal. The results from all of these instruments have given a great deal of information on the nature of the low-Earth orbit (LEO) ionising radiation environment, and in the case of the PoSAT-1 CRE, continue to do so. However, to obtain a more complete "picture" of the magnetosphere, it is necessary to orbit instruments much further out in space An opportunity to do this arose in 1994 when amateur radio satellite groups (AMSAT) proposed launching a small (600 kg) communications satellite into highly elliptical orbit. This satellite, called AMSAT-OSCAR-40 (AO-40), was launched by Ariane 5 rocket on 16th November 2000, initially into a geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). The satellite has subsequently been manoeuvred into a highly elliptical, 1070 km x 58,700 km, 6.8o inclination orbit, and thus it affords the opportunity to observe the proton and heavy-ion environment through a large cross-section of Earth's magnetosphere. AO-40 carries a version of the CRE, which has been slightly modified in terms of interfaces and packaging to fit that particular satellite bus. However the particle detecting element is essentially

  12. Radiation results in IL-8 mediated intercellular signaling that increases adhesion between monocytic cells and aortic endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucik, Dennis; Babitz, Stephen; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad

    Epidemiological evidence has established terrestrial radiation exposure as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. For example, a major side effect of therapeutic radiation, especially for breast and head-and-neck cancers, is atherosclerosis, which can result in stroke years after treatment. Similarly, atomic bomb survivors were significantly more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than their countrymen. Even radiation technologists, prior to 1950 (when regulations governing shielding and occupational exposure were less rigorous) had an increased risk of clinically significant atherosclerosis. We have recently shown that 600 MeV (56) Fe similarly exacerbates plaque formation in the apoE mouse atherosclerosis model at doses 4-7 fold lower than required for x-rays to produce a similar pro-atherogenic effect. This raises concern that exposure to cosmic radiation might pose a similar risk for astronauts. Because so little is known about the mechanism of pro-atherogenic radiation effects, however, the current strategy to minimize risk from terrestrial radiation sources is to limit exposure. For astronauts on deep space missions, exposure to a significant amount of radiation will be unavoidable. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanism of radiation-induced atherosclerosis will be essential in order to develop countermeasures. Radiation can cause increased adhesiveness of vascular endothelium, leading to inappropriate accumulation of monocytes and other white blood cells, which can initiate a self-perpetuating inflammatory response. This vascular inflammation is an early event in atherosclerosis that can eventually lead to clinically significant cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke. We showed earlier that x-rays, (56) Fe, and (28) Si all accelerate development of atherosclerosis in the apoE -/- mouse model. We also demonstrated that both x-rays and heavy ions increase adhesion of monocytic cells to vascular human aortic endothelial

  13. Animal Models of Chemotherapy-induced Mucositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangild, Per T; Shen, René Liang; Pontoppidan, Peter Erik Lotko

    2018-01-01

    mangement and treatments. The results obtained from specific animal models can be difficult to translate to the diverse range of CIM manifestations in patients that vary according to the antineoplastic drugs, dose, underlying (cancer) disease and patient characteristics (e.g. age, genetics, body......Chemotherapy for cancer patients induces damaging tissue reactions along the epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). This chemotherapy-induced mucositis (CIM) is a serious side effect of cytotoxic drugs and several animal models of CIM have been developed to help understand the progression...... of CIM, and how to prevent it. Animal models allow highly controlled experimental conditions, detailed organ (e.g. GIT) insights, standardized, clinically-relevant treatment regimens and discovery of new biomarkers. Still, surprisingly few results from animal models have been translated into clinical CIM...

  14. Results from the Project 8 phase-1 cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtari Esfahani, A.; Böser, S.; Claessens, C.; de Viveiros, L.; Doe, P. J.; Doeleman, S.; Fertl, M.; Finn, E. C.; Formaggio, J. A.; Guigue, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Jones, A. M.; Kazkaz, K.; LaRoque, B. H.; Machado, E.; Monreal, B.; Nikkel, J. A.; Oblath, N. S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Rybka, G.; Saldaña, L.; Slocum, P. L.; Tedeschi, J. R.; Thümmler, T.; Vandevender, B. A.; Wachtendonk, M.; Weintroub, J.; Young, A.; Zayas, E.

    2017-09-01

    The Project 8 collaboration seeks to measure the absolute neutrino mass scale by means of precision spectroscopy of the beta decay of tritium. Our technique, cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy, measures the frequency of the radiation emitted by electrons produced by decays in an ambient magnetic field. Because the cyclotron frequency is inversely proportional to the electron’s Lorentz factor, this is also a measurement of the electron’s energy. In order to demonstrate the viability of this technique, we have assembled and successfully operated a prototype system, which uses a rectangular waveguide to collect the cyclotron radiation from internal conversion electrons emitted from a gaseous 83m Kr source. Here we present the main design aspects of the first phase prototype, which was operated during parts of 2014 and 2015. We will also discuss the procedures used to analyze these data, along with the features which have been observed and the performance achieved to date.

  15. Radiation Protection in Pediatric Radiology: Results of a Survey Among Dutch Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijwaard, Harmen; Valk, Doreth; de Waard-Schalkx, Ischa

    2016-10-01

    A survey about radiation protection in pediatric radiology was conducted among 22 general and seven children's hospitals in the Netherlands. Questions concerned, for example, child protocols used for CT, fluoroscopy and x-ray imaging, number of images and scans made, radiation doses and measures taken to reduce these, special tools used for children, and quality assurance issues. The answers received from 27 hospitals indicate that radiation protection practices differ considerably between general and children's hospitals but also between the respective general and children's hospitals. It is recommended that hospitals consult each other to come up with more uniform best practices. Few hospitals were able to supply doses that can be compared to the national Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs). The ones that could be compared exceeded the DRLs in one in five cases, which is more than was expected beforehand.

  16. Bioadhesive delivery systems for mucosal vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudner, Barbara C; O'Hagan, Derek T

    2010-12-01

    Mucosal vaccine delivery potentially induces mucosal as well as systemic immune responses and may have advantages particularly for optimal protection against pathogens that infect the host through mucosal surfaces. However, the delivery of antigens through mucosal membranes remains a major challenge due to unfavorable physiological conditions (pH and enzymes) and significant biological barriers, which restrict the uptake of antigens. To improve mucosal vaccine delivery, the use of bioadhesive delivery systems offers numerous advantages, including protection from degradation, increasing concentration of antigen in the vicinity of mucosal tissue for better absorption, extending their residence time, and/or targeting them to sites of antigen uptake. Although some bioadhesives have direct immune stimulating properties, it appears most likely that successful mucosal vaccination will require the addition of vaccine adjuvants for optimal immune responses, particularly if they are to be used in an unprimed population. Thus, complex vaccine formulations and delivery strategies have to be carefully designed to appropriately stimulate immune response for the target pathogen. In addition, careful consideration is needed to define the "best" route for mucosal immunization for each individual pathogen.

  17. Nutrition and Gut Mucositis in Pediatric Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Peter Erik Lotko

    . Unfortunately, effective treatment strategies against mucositis are not in general available. The overall aim of the present PhD was to study interactions between mucositis, inflammation and nutrition. We hypothesized that toxic reactions in the alimentary tract, induced by chemotherapy, followed by release...

  18. Empowering patients for radiation therapy safety: Results of the EMPATHY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibault, J-E; Pernet, A; Mollo, V; Gourdon, L; Martin, O; Giraud, P

    2016-12-01

    With the increase of treatment complexity, enhancing safety is a key concern in radiation oncology. Beyond the involvement of the healthcare professional, patient involvement and empowerment could play a major role in that setting. We explored how patients perceived and fulfilled that role during their radiation treatment. A voluntary and anonymous questionnaire was administered to all patients treated in our department between November 2013 and May 2014. The following data were collected: sociodemographic profile; information received and initiatives to search for additional information; behavior when an unusual treatment event was perceived; active involvement in the safety of the treatment; nature and perception of their own involvement. A statistical analysis was performed to assess behavioral predictors. A total of 155 patients answered the survey. Most of them were treated for prostate (n=58, 37.4%), lung (n=27, 17.4%), head and neck (n=26, 16.8%) and breast (n=25, 16.1%). Only eight patients (5%) had previously received radiation therapy. Ninety-five percent of the patients estimated they had received enough information about their treatment, but 48% would have wanted more. When patients noticed an unusual event during their treatment session, most of them (61%) reported it to the radiation therapist. Patient participation to radiation therapy safety should be encouraged to ensure a cooperative risk management. Healthcare professionals need to inform the patients on the basic technical processes involved in their treatment. Patient empowerment should be added to the verifications made by the radiation therapists and physicians but should not replace them. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Results of a 5-Week Schedule of Modern Total Skin Electron Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Stephen Lloyd, E-mail: stephen.morris@gstt.nhs.uk [St Johns Institute of Dermatology, Guys and St Thomas Hospital, London (United Kingdom); McGovern, Mark; Bayne, Sally; Wain, Mary; Child, Fiona; Whittaker, Sean [St Johns Institute of Dermatology, Guys and St Thomas Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of a 5-week schedule of total skin electron beam radiation therapy (TSEB) for mycosis fungoides (MF). Methods: Over 5 years, 41 patients with confirmed MF were treated with a modern TSEB technique delivering 30 Gy in 20 fractions over 5 weeks to the whole skin surface. Data were collected prospectively and entered into the skin tumor unit research database. Skin modified skin weighted assessment tool score data were collected to determine response, duration of response, survival, and toxicity. The outcomes were analyzed according to the patient's stage before TSEB, prognostic factors, and adjuvant treatments. Results: Seventeen patients were stage 1B, 19 were stage IIB, 3 were stage III, and 2 were stage IV. The overall response rate was 95%, with a complete response rate of 51%. Seventy-six percent of patients had relapsed at median follow-up of 18 months. The median time to relapse was 12 months, to systemic therapy was 15 months, and to modified skin weighted assessment tool progression above baseline was 44 months. The complete response rate was 59% in stage IB and 47% in stage IIB patients. The median time to skin relapse was longer in stage IB compared with stage IIB, 18 months versus 9 months. The median time to systemic therapy was longer in stage IB compared with stage IIB, >56 months versus 8 months. The median overall survival was 35 months: >56 months for stage IB, 25 months for stage IIB, 46 months for stage III, and 23.5 months for stage IV. Fifteen patients received adjuvant psoralen + ultraviolet A treatment with no difference seen in the time to relapse. Conclusions: This 5-week schedule of TSEB for MF has a high response rate with comparable duration of response to other regimens. Future studies are needed to find adjuvant and combination treatments to improve the duration of response.

  20. Radiation control coatings installed on rough-surfaced built-up roofs -- Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.; Christian, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have tracked the solar reflectance and thermal performance of small samples of various radiation control coatings on smooth surfaces for several years on a roof test facility in East Tennessee. The focus is on white coatings because of their potential to weather, causing the solar reflectance to decrease as the coatings age. Support of the federal New Technology Demonstration Program allowed them to extend the study to more samples on smooth surfaces and entire rough-surfaced roofs at a federal facility in the Panhandle of Florida. Two rough-surfaced, moderately well-insulated, low solar reflectance built-up roofs (BURs) were spray-coated with a latex-based product with ceramic beads added to improve solar reflectance. In the first three months after installation, the fresh BUR coatings showed a significant decrease in both the outside-surface temperature and the heat flux through the roof insulation. Average sunlit values were generated to exclude nighttime data, data on cloudy days, and data when the uncoated patch on one roof was more strongly shaded in mid-afternoon on sunny days. The average power demand during occupied periods for the first month with the coating for the building with the thermally massive roof deck was 13% less than during the previous month without the coating. For the other buildings with a lightweight roof deck but high internal loads, there were no clear average power savings due to the coating. The authors are continuing to monitor electricity use in these all-electric buildings to calibrate a model for the peak power and annual energy use of the buildings. Modeling results to be given at the end of the two year project will address the effect of roof R-value, geographic location, and solar reflectance, including the effect of weathering, on the performance of coated roofs. The calibrated models should allow one to segregate site-specific effects such as shading and large thermal mass.

  1. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for T4 nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment results and locoregional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.L.Y.; Tsai, C.L.; Chen, W.Y.; Wang, C.W. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Div. of Radiation Oncology; Huang, Y.S.; Chen, Y.F. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Medical Imaging; Kuo, S.H. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Div. of Radiation Oncology; National Taiwan Univ. College of Medicine, Taipei (China). Graduate Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Hong, R.L. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Div. of Medical Oncology; Ko, J.Y.; Lou, P.J. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to examine outcomes in patients with T4 nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 154 patients with nonmetastatic T4 NPC were treated with IMRT to a total dose of 70 Gy in 33-35 fractions. In addition, 97 % of patients received concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. Results: The rates of 5-year actuarial locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, progression free-survival, and overall survival (OS) were 81.2, 72.2, 61.9, and 78.1 %, respectively. A total of 27 patients had locoregional recurrence: 85.2 % in-field failures, 11.1 % marginal failures, and 3.7 % out-of-field failures. Fourteen patients with locoregional recurrence received aggressive treatments, including nasopharyngectomy, neck dissection, or re-irradiation, and the 5-year OS rate tended to be better (61.9 %) compared to those receiving conservative treatment (32.0 %, p = 0.051). In patients treated with 1 course of radiotherapy, grade {>=} 3 toxicities of ototoxicity, neck fibrosis, xerostomia, epistaxis, and radiographic temporal lobe necrosis occurred in 18.2, 9.8, 6.3, 2.1, and 5.6 % of patients, respectively. Increased ototoxicity, osteonecrosis, severe nasal bleeding, and temporal necrosis were observed in patients treated by re-irradiation. Conclusion: IMRT offers good locoregional control in patients with T4 NPC. For patients with locoregional recurrence after definitive radiotherapy, aggressive local treatment may be considered for a better outcome. (orig.)

  2. Results of nimotuzumab and vinorelbine, radiation and re-irradiation for diffuse pontine glioma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimino, Maura; Biassoni, Veronica; Miceli, Rosalba; Schiavello, Elisabetta; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Modena, Piergiorgio; Casanova, Michela; Pecori, Emilia; Giangaspero, Felice; Antonelli, Manila; Buttarelli, Francesca Romana; Potepan, Paolo; Pollo, Bianca; Nunziata, Raffaele; Spreafico, Filippo; Podda, Marta; Anichini, Andrea; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Sardi, Iacopo; De Cecco, Loris; Bode, Udo; Bach, Ferdinand; Gandola, Lorenza

    2014-06-01

    Radiotherapy is the only treatment definitely indicated for diffuse pontine gliomas (DIPG). Findings on the role of EGFR signaling in the onset of childhood DIPG prompted the use of nimotuzumab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody. Assuming a potential synergy with both radiotherapy and vinorelbine, a pilot phase 2 protocol was launched that combined nimotuzumab with concomitant radiation and vinorelbine. An amendment in July 2011 introduced re-irradiation at relapse. The primary endpoint for first-line treatment was objective response rate (CR + PR + SD) according to the RECIST. This report concerns the outcome of this strategy as a whole. Vinorelbine 20 mg/m(2) was administered weekly, with nimotuzumab 150 mg/m(2) in the first 12 weeks of treatment; radiotherapy was delivered from weeks 3 to 9, for a total dose of 54 Gy. Vinorelbine 25 mg/m(2) and nimotuzumab were given every other week thereafter until the tumor progressed or for up to 2 years. Re-irradiation consisted of 19.8 Gy, fractionated over 11 days. Baseline and latest MRIs were assessed blindly by an outside neuroradiologist. Twenty five children (mean age 7.4 years) were enrolled as of August 2009 (median follow-up 29 months). A response was observed in 24/25 patients (96 %). The nimotuzumab/vinorelbine combination was very well tolerated, with no acute side-effects. Eleven of 16 locally-relapsing patients were re-irradiated. One-year PFS and OS rates were 30 ± 10 % and 76 ± 9 %, respectively; 2-year OS was 27 ± 9 %; the median PFS and OS were 8.5 and 15 months, respectively. This strategy generated interesting results and warrants further investigation.

  3. Mucosal vaccines: a paradigm shift in the development of mucosal adjuvants and delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Atul; Gowda, Devegowda Vishakante; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Shinde, Chetan G; Iyer, Meenakshi

    2015-04-01

    Mucosal immune responses are the first-line defensive mechanisms against a variety of infections. Therefore, immunizations of mucosal surfaces from which majority of infectious agents make their entry, helps to protect the body against infections. Hence, vaccinization of mucosal surfaces by using mucosal vaccines provides the basis for generating protective immunity both in the mucosal and systemic immune compartments. Mucosal vaccines offer several advantages over parenteral immunization. For example, (i) ease of administration; (ii) non-invasiveness; (iii) high-patient compliance; and (iv) suitability for mass vaccination. Despite these benefits, to date, only very few mucosal vaccines have been developed using whole microorganisms and approved for use in humans. This is due to various challenges associated with the development of an effective mucosal vaccine that can work against a variety of infections, and various problems concerned with the safe delivery of developed vaccine. For instance, protein antigen alone is not just sufficient enough for the optimal delivery of antigen(s) mucosally. Hence, efforts have been made to develop better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for improved mucosal Th1 and Th2 immune responses using an efficient and safe immunostimulatory molecule and novel delivery carriers. Therefore, in this review, we have made an attempt to cover the recent advancements in the development of adjuvants and delivery carriers for safe and effective mucosal vaccine production. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Mucosal vaccines: novel strategies and applications for the control of pathogens and tumors at mucosal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis Cs; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites.

  5. Global and Regional Climate Responses Solar Radiation Management: Results from a climateprediction.net Geoengineering Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricke, Katharine; Allen, Myles; Ingram, William; Keith, David; Granger Morgan, M.

    2010-05-01

    To date modeling studies suggest that, while significant hydrological anomalies could result from the artificial addition of reflecting aerosols in the stratosphere for the purpose of solar radiation management (SRM), even at the regional level such a geoengineered world would bear a much closer resemblance to a low CO2 world, than to an unmodified high CO2 world. These previous modeling studies have generally compared one or two SRM forcing scenarios to various business-as-usual controls. However, such approaches cannot provide much information about regional sensitivities to the levels of SRM that might realistically result. Should engaging in SRM every be seriously contemplated, such regional analysis of a range of realistic scenarios will be an essential input to any process of geopolitical decision-making. Here we present the results from a large-ensemble experiment that used the HadCM3L GCM, implemented through climateprediction.net. The analysis examines 135 globally-uniform stratospheric optical depth modification scenarios designed to stabilize global temperatures under SRES A1B. Scenarios were tested using ten-member subensembles which made small perturbations to initial conditions. All simulations use identical standard settings of model physics parameters and are initiated from historically-forced runs from 1920-2005. A total of 7,331 simulations of the years 2000-2080 were performed for this experiment using computing resources donated by the general public. Our analysis of regional temperature and precipitation anomalies, normalized to account for variability, shows that SRM compensations for anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing do generally return regional climates closer to their baseline climate states than the no-geoengineering, business-as-usual scenarios. However, we find that the magnitudes and sensitivities of regional responses to this type of activity, as modeled in HadCM3L, are highly variable. As the amount of SRM increases to compensate

  6. BISPHOSPHONATE - RELATED MUCOSITIS (BRM: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Stanimirov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates (BPs are the most widely used and effective antiresorptive agents for the treatment of diseases in which there is an increase in osteoclastic resorption, including post-menopausal osteoporosis, Paget’s disease, and tumor-associated osteolysis. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are well aware of the side effects of bisphosphonates and mainly with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ. Less known are the mucosal lesions associated with the use of these agents. In the scientific literature, there are only few reports of mucosal lesions due to the direct contact of the oral form of BPs with the mucosa (bisphosphonate-related mucositis. They are mostly related to improper use of bisphosphonate tablets that are chewed, sucked or allowed to melt in the mouth before swallowing. Lesions are atypical and need to be differentiated from other mucosal erosions. We present a case of bisphosphonate-related mucositis due to the improper use of alendronate.

  7. Hydrophobicity of mucosal surface and its relationship to gut barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaofa; Caputo, Francis J; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2008-03-01

    Loss of the gut barrier has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and, thus, understanding the intestinal barrier is of potential clinical importance. An important, but relatively neglected, component of the gut barrier is the unstirred mucus layer, which through its hydrophobic and other properties serves as an important barrier to bacterial and other factors within the gut lumen. Thus, the goal of this study was to establish a reproducible method of measuring mucosal hydrophobicity and test the hypothesis that conditions that decrease mucosal hydrophobicity are associated with increased gut permeability. Hydrophobicity was measured in various segments of normal gut by measuring the contact angle of an aqueous droplet placed on the mucosal surface using a commercial goniometer. Second, the effect of the mucolytic agent N-acetyl cysteine on mucosal hydrophobicity and gut permeability was measured, as was the effects of increasing periods of in vivo gut ischemia on these parameters. Gut ischemia was induced by superior mesenteric artery occlusion, and gut permeability was measured by the mucosal-to-serosal passage of fluoresceine isothiocyanate-dextran (4.3 kDa) (FD4) across the everted sacs of ileum. Intestinal mucosal hydrophobicity showed a gradual increase from the duodenum to the end of the ileum and remained at high level in the cecum, colon, and rectum. Both N-acetyl cysteine treatment and ischemia caused a dose-dependent decrease in mucosal hydrophobicity, which significantly correlated increased gut permeability. Mucosal hydrophobicity of the intestine can be reproducibly measured, and decreases in mucosal hydrophobicity closely correlate with increased gut permeability. These results suggest that mucosal hydrophobicity can be a reliable method of measuring the barrier function of the unstirred mucus layer and a useful parameter in evaluating the pathogenesis of gut barrier dysfunction.

  8. Predictive modelling for swallowing dysfunction after primary (chemo)radiation : Results of a prospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christianen, Miranda E M C; Schilstra, Cornelis; Beetz, Ivo; Muijs, C.T.; Chouvalova, Olga; Burlage, Fred R.; Doornaert, P.; Koken, P.W.; Leemans, C.R.; Rinkel, R.N.; de Bruijn, M.J.; de Bock, G.H.; Roodenburg, J.L.; van der Laan, B.F.; Slotman, B.J.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I.M.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Langendijk, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this large multicentre prospective cohort study was to identify which dose volume histogram parameters and pre-treatment factors are most important to predict physician-rated and patient-rated radiation-induced swallowing dysfunction (RISD) in order to develop

  9. Predictive modelling for swallowing dysfunction after primary (chemo)radiation: Results of a prospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christianen, M.E.M.C.; Schilstra, C.; Beetz, I.; Muijs, C.T.; Chouvalova, O.; Burlage, F.R.; Doornaert, P.A.H.; Koken, P.W.; Leemans, C.R.; Rinkel, R.N.P.M.; de Bruijn, M.J.; de Bock, G.H.; Roodenburg, J.L.N.; van Laan, B.F.A.M.; Slotman, B.J.; de Leeuw, I.M.; Bijl, H.P.; Langendijk, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this large multicentre prospective cohort study was to identify which dose volume histogram parameters and pre-treatment factors are most important to predict physician-rated and patient-rated radiation-induced swallowing dysfunction (RISD) in order to develop

  10. Higher Chest Wall Dose Results in Improved Locoregional Outcome in Patients Receiving Postmastectomy Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panoff, Joseph E.; Takita, Cristiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Hurley, Judith [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Reis, Isildinha M. [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health and Sylvester Division of Biostatistics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Sylvester Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Zhao, Wei [Sylvester Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Rodgers, Steven E. [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Gunaseelan, Vijayalakshmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Wright, Jean L., E-mail: Jwright3@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Randomized trials demonstrating decreased locoregional recurrence (LRR) and improved overall survival (OS) in women receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) used up to 50 Gy to the chest wall (CW), but in practice, many centers boost the CW dose to {>=}60 Gy, despite lack of data supporting this approach. We evaluated the relationship between CW dose and clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 582 consecutively treated patients who received PMRT between January 1999 and December 2009. We collected data on patient, disease, treatment characteristics, and outcomes of LRR, progression-free survival (PFS) and OS. Results: Median follow-up from the date of diagnosis was 44.7 months. The cumulative 5-year incidence of LRR as first site of failure was 6.2%. CW dose for 7% (43 patients) was {<=}50.4 Gy (range, 41.4-50.4 Gy) and 93% received >50.4 Gy (range, 52.4-74.4 Gy). A CW dose of >50.4 Gy vs. {<=}50.4 Gy was associated with lower incidence of LRR, a 60-month rate of 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-8.2) vs. 12.7% (95% CI, 4.5-25.3; p = 0.054). Multivariate hazard ratio (HR) for LRR controlling for race, receptor status, and stage was 2.62 (95% CI, 1.02-7.13; p = 0.042). All LRR in the low-dose group occurred in patients receiving 50 to 50.4 Gy. Lower CW dose was associated with worse PFS (multivariate HR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.64-4.56; p < 0.001) and OS (multivariate HR, 3.88; 95% CI, 2.16-6.99; p < 0.001). Conclusions: The addition of a CW boost above 50.4 Gy resulted in improved locoregional control and survival in this cohort patients treated with PMRT for stage II-III breast cancer. The addition of a CW boost to standard-dose PMRT is likely to benefit selected high-risk patients. The optimal technique, target volume, and patient selection criteria are unknown. The use of a CW boost should be studied prospectively, as has been done in the setting of breast conservation.

  11. Radical radiation therapy for oligometastatic breast cancer: Results of a prospective phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovo, Marco; Furlan, Carlo; Polesel, Jerry; Fiorica, Francesco; Arcangeli, Stefano; Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Alongi, Filippo; Del Conte, Alessandro; Militello, Loredana; Muraro, Elena; Martorelli, Debora; Spazzapan, Simon; Berretta, Massimiliano

    2017-09-21

    We conducted a prospective phase II multicentric trial to determine if radical radiation therapy to all metastatic sites might improve the progression-free survival (PFS) in oligometastatic breast cancer patients. Secondary endpoints were local control (LC), overall survival (OS) and toxicity. Inclusion criteria were the following: oligometastatic breast cancer with ≤5 metastatic sites, FDG-PET/CT staging, no brain metastases, primary tumor controlled. Radiotherapy could be delivered using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) technique or fractionated intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). SBRT consisted of 30-45Gy in 3 fractions, while IMRT was delivered to a total dose of 60Gy in 25 fractions. We hypothesized that radical radiation therapy could increase the PFS from 30% (according to the published literature) to 50% at two years. 54 Patients with 92 metastatic lesions were enrolled. Forty-four were treated with SBRT, and 10 with IMRT. Forty-eight (89%) patients received a form of systemic therapy concomitantly to radiation therapy. Sites of metastatic disease were the following: bones 60 lesions, lymph nodes 23 lesions, lung 4 lesions, liver 5 lesions. After a median follow-up of 30months (range, 6-55months), 1- and 2-year PFS was 75% and 53%, respectively. Two-year LC and OS were 97% and 95%, respectively. Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and no Grade ≥3 toxicity was documented. Grade 2 toxicity were pain and fatigue in 2 cases. Patients with oligometastatic breast cancer treated with radical radiotherapy to all metastatic sites may achieve long-term progression-free survival, without significant treatment-related toxicity. While waiting for data from randomized trials, the use of radical radiation therapy to all metastatic sites in patients with oligometastatic breast cancer should be considered a valuable option, and its recommendation should be individualized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of radiation for plant breeding in Japan: results and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, I. [National Institute of Agricultural Resource, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    In 1966, as the first breeds by radiation mutation in Japan, `Reimei`, a rice variety with increased lodging resistance by short culm mutation and Raiden`, an early variety by mutation of soybean obtained by extreme late variety with nematoda resistance were bred and registered in the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry. Since these characteristics of `short culm` and early maturing` have a comparatively high mutation rate and ease of selection, among seed propagation crops many kinds of those varieties improved to have either of these characteristics or both of them at the same time by mutation breeding are bred. In Japan, varieties bred by use of mutation breeding count 107 (as of April 1998). Among crops, that with the most varieties is chrysanthemum, which has 20 varieties and the next is rice with 15 varieties. The other 38 varieties of crops such as grains, beans, industrial crops, vegetables, flowering plants, flowering trees and fruit trees, mutation breeding varieties are widely bred. Among mutagens used, gamma ray holds 80%. The recent development in the research of DNA recombination is amazing and plant bodies which have introduced useful genes which other plants have are being obtained. Radiation mutation breeding, however, has the advantages of breeding new varieties by improving only one or two characteristics of excellent races. Radiation mutation breeding and DNA recombination technologies, therefore, may need to be utilized separately according to respective purposes. In the future, for radiation mutation breeding, mutants with quality characteristics which others do not have, corresponding to the diverse demand on agricultural products must come to be required. On the other hand, by the crops like banana for which ordinary breeding is almost impossible, the expectation for radiation mutation breeding will be more and more heightened. In addition, the accumulation of studies on controlling the direction of mutation which has been regarded

  13. Neutrophils as Components of Mucosal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Caroline H T; Campbell, Eric L; Colgan, Sean P

    2017-11-01

    Inflammatory responses in the intestinal mucosa inevitably result in the recruitment of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]). Epithelial cells that line the mucosa play an integral role in the recruitment, maintenance, and clearance of PMNs at sites of inflammation. The consequences of such PMN-epithelial interactions often determine tissue responses and, ultimately, organ function. For this reason, there is significant interest in understanding how PMNs function in the mucosa during inflammation. Recent studies have shown that PMNs play a more significant role in molding of the immune response than previously thought. Here, we review the recent literature regarding the contribution of PMNs to the development and resolution of inflammation, with an emphasis on the role of the tissue microenvironment and pathways for promoting epithelial restitution. These studies highlight the complex nature of inflammatory pathways and provide important insight into the difficulties of treating mucosal inflammation.

  14. Colorectal endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Pujan; Wallace, Michael B

    2017-08-01

    Colonoscopy has the benefit of detecting and treating precancerous adenomatous polyps and thus reduces mortality associated with CRC. Screening colonoscopy is the keystone for prevention of colorectal cancer. Over the last 20 years there has been increased in the management of large colorectal polyps from surgery to endoscopic removal techniques which is less invasive. Traditionally surgical resection was the treatment of choice for many years for larger polyps but colectomy poses significant morbidity of 14-46% and mortality of up to 7%. There are several advantages of endoscopic resection technique over surgery; it is less invasive, less expensive, has rapid recovery, and preserves the normal gut functions. In addition patient satisfaction and efficacy of EMR is higher with minor complications. Thus, this has facilitated the development of advanced resection technique for the treatment of large colorectal polyps called as endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. GPS-ABC radiated chamber testing overview and results : GPS-ABC Workshop VI : RTCA Washington, DC, March 30, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-30

    This presentation, which was given during the GPS-ABC Workshop VI in Washington, DC on March 30, 2017 details the authors' radiated testing protocols and results. GPS receiver testing was carried out April 25-29, 2016 at the Army : Research Laborator...

  16. The effects of ultraviolet radiation on the planktonic community of a shallow, eutrophic estuary: results of mesocosm experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forster, R.M.; Schubert, H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the results of pelagic mesocosm experiments designed to test the effects of enhanced and reduced ultraviolet radiation (UV) on the planktonic community of a Baltic Sea estuary. The Darss-Zingst estuary consists of a series of brackish lagoons with high concentrations of

  17. Milieurapportage 1993. IV. Monitoring of radiation in the atmosphere and a food chain. Results in the Netherlands in 1992

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aldenkamp FJ; Drost RMS; Koolwijk AC; Kwakman PJM; van Lunenburg APPA; Ockhuizen A; Tax RB; Tijsmans MH; de Vries LJ; van Westerlaak PJM; LSO

    1993-01-01

    This 1992 annual report presents the results of biosphere sample measurements by the Laboratory of Radiation Research (LSO) of the National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection (RIVM). The measurements are part of the National Measurement Programme (NMP) of the Coordinating

  18. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy after breast conserving surgery for invasive breast cancer: an intermediate result

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seok Ho; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jin Ho; Lee, Young Don; Park, Heoung Kyu; Kim, Hyun Young; Park, Se Hoon [Gachon Medical School, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) followed by chemotherapy (CT{sub x}.) and radiation therapy (RT) is widely performed for the treatment of early breast cancer. This retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate our interim results in terms of failure patterns, survival and relative risk factors. From January 1999 through December 2003, 129 patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and treated with BCS followed by RT were subject to retrospective review. The median age of the patients was 45 years (age distribution, 27 {approx} 76 years). The proportions of patients according to their tumor, nodes, and metastases (TNM) stage were 65 (50.4%) in stage I, 41 (31.7%) in stage IIa, 13 (10.1%) in stage IIb, 9 (7.0%) in stage III, and 1 patient (0.8%) in stage IIIc. For 32 patients (24.8%), axillary node metastasis was found after dissection, BCS consisted of quadrantectomy in 115 patients (89.1%) and lumpectomy in 14 patients (10.6%). Axillary node dissection at axillary level I and II was performed for 120 patients (93%). For 7 patients (5.4%), only sentinel node dissection was performed with BCS. For 2 patients (1.6%) axillary dissection of any type was not performed. Postoperative RT was given with 6 MV X-rays. A tumor dose of 50.4 Gy was delivered to the entire breast area using a tangential field with a wedge compensator. An additional dose of 9 {approx} 16 Gy was given to the primary tumor bed areas with electron beams. In 30 patients (23.3%), RT was delivered to the supraclavicular node. Most patients had adjuvant CT{sub x}. with 4 {approx} 6 cycles of CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) regimens. The median follow-up period was 50 months (range: 17 {approx} 93 months). The actuarial 5 year survival rate (5Y-OSR) was 96.9%, and the 5 year disease free survival rate (5Y-DFSR) was 93.7%. Local recurrences were noted in 2 patients (true: 2, regional node: 1) as the first sign of recurrence at a mean time of 29.3 months after surgery. Five

  19. CCL19 and CCL28 augment mucosal and systemic immune responses to HIV-1 gp140 by mobilizing responsive immunocytes into secondary lymph nodes and mucosal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kai; Luo, Sukun; Tong, Lina; Huang, Xin; Jin, Wei; Huang, Wenjie; Du, Tao; Yan, Yan; He, Siyi; Griffin, George E; Shattock, Robin J; Hu, Qinxue

    2013-08-15

    Induction of broad and potent neutralizing Abs at the mucosal portals of entry remains a primary goal for most vaccines against mucosally acquired viral infections. Selection of appropriate adjuvants capable of promoting both systemic and mucosal responses will be crucial for the development of effective immunization strategies. In this study, we investigated whether plasmid codelivery of cytokines APRIL, CCL19, or CCL28 can enhance Ag-induced immune responses to HIV-1 gp140. Our results demonstrated that pCCL19 and pCCL28, but not pAPRIL, significantly enhanced Ag-specific systemic and mucosal Ab responses. gp140-specific Abs in serum enhanced by pCCL19 or pCCL28 were broadly distributed across all four IgG subclasses, of which IgG1 was predominant. The enhanced systemic and mucosal Abs showed increased neutralizing activity against both homologous and heterologous HIV-1, and potency correlated with gp140-specific serum IgG and vaginal IgA levels. Measurement of gp140-specific cytokines produced by splenocytes demonstrated that pCCL19 and pCCL28 augmented balanced Th1/Th2 responses. pCCL19 and pCCL28 also increased IgA(+) cells in colorectal mucosal tissue. pCCL19 codelivery resulted in an increase of CCR7(+) CD11c(+) cells in mesenteric lymph nodes and both CCR7(+) CD11c(+) cells and CCR7(+) CD3e(+) cells in spleen, whereas pCCL28 codelivery resulted in an augment of CCR10(+) CD19(+) cells in both spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. Together, our data indicate that pCCL19 and pCCL28 can enhance HIV-1 envelope-specific systemic and mucosal Ab responses, as well as T cell responses. Such enhancements appear to be associated with mobilization of responsive immunocytes into secondary lymphoid organs and mucosal tissues through interactions with corresponding receptors.

  20. The Radiation Response of Sarcomas by Histologic Subtypes: A Review With Special Emphasis Given to Results Achieved With Razoxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Relatively few results are available in the literature about the radiation response of unresectable sarcomas in relation to their histology. Therefore, an attempt was made to summarize the present situation. Materials and methods. This report is based on a review of the literature and the author's own experience. Adult-type soft tissue sarcomas, chondrosarcomas, and chordomas were analyzed. Radioresponse was mainly associated with the degree of tumor shrinkage, that is, objective responses. Histopathologic responses, that is, the degree of necrosis, are only discussed in relation to radiation treatment reports of soft tissue sarcomas as a group. Results. Radiation therapy alone leads to major responses in about 50% of lipo-, fibro-, leiomyo-, or chondrosarcomas. The response rate is less than 50% in malignant fibrous histiocytomas, synovial, neurogenic, and other rare soft tissue sarcomas. The response rates may increase up to 75% through the addition of radiosensitizers such as halogenated pyrimidines or razoxane, or by the use of high-LET irradiation. Angiosarcomas become clearly more responsive if biologicals, angiomodulating, and/or tubulin affinic substances are given together with radiation therapy. Razoxane is able to increase the duration and quality of responses even in difficult-to-treat tumors like chondrosarcomas or chordomas. Conclusions. The available data demonstrate that the radioresponsiveness of sarcomas is very variable and dependent on histology, kind of radiation, and various concomitantly given drugs. The rate of complete sustained remissions by radiation therapy alone or in combination with drugs is still far from satisfactory although progress has been made through the use of sensitizing agents.

  1. Host model uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcing estimates: results from the AeroCom Prescribed intercomparison study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stier

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Simulated multi-model "diversity" in aerosol direct radiative forcing estimates is often perceived as a measure of aerosol uncertainty. However, current models used for aerosol radiative forcing calculations vary considerably in model components relevant for forcing calculations and the associated "host-model uncertainties" are generally convoluted with the actual aerosol uncertainty. In this AeroCom Prescribed intercomparison study we systematically isolate and quantify host model uncertainties on aerosol forcing experiments through prescription of identical aerosol radiative properties in twelve participating models. Even with prescribed aerosol radiative properties, simulated clear-sky and all-sky aerosol radiative forcings show significant diversity. For a purely scattering case with globally constant optical depth of 0.2, the global-mean all-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing is −4.47 Wm−2 and the inter-model standard deviation is 0.55 Wm−2, corresponding to a relative standard deviation of 12%. For a case with partially absorbing aerosol with an aerosol optical depth of 0.2 and single scattering albedo of 0.8, the forcing changes to 1.04 Wm−2, and the standard deviation increases to 1.01 W−2, corresponding to a significant relative standard deviation of 97%. However, the top-of-atmosphere forcing variability owing to absorption (subtracting the scattering case from the case with scattering and absorption is low, with absolute (relative standard deviations of 0.45 Wm−2 (8% clear-sky and 0.62 Wm−2 (11% all-sky. Scaling the forcing standard deviation for a purely scattering case to match the sulfate radiative forcing in the AeroCom Direct Effect experiment demonstrates that host model uncertainties could explain about 36% of the overall sulfate forcing diversity of 0.11 Wm−2 in the AeroCom Direct Radiative Effect experiment. Host model errors in aerosol radiative forcing are largest in regions of uncertain host model

  2. Radiation therapy for wet type age-related macular degeneration. Long term follow-up results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasai, Keisuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mandai, Michiyo; Takahashi, Masayo; Honda, Yoshihito [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-12-01

    Between April, 1994 and July, 1995, 33 patients with occult type choroidal neovascularization (CNV) with or without the classical type CNV of the wet type age-related macular degeneration ARMD were treated with radiation therapy (10 Gy/5 fx/1 week or 20 Gy/10 fx/2 weeks). This phase I/II study showed that radiation therapy seems to be useful for CNV during the first 12 months. Some eyes which initially showed good response to irradiation began to lose their visual acuity. However, the dose of 20 Gy in 10 fractions seemed useful to maintain the visual acuity better than 0.1 in this long term follow-up study (24 months). (author)

  3. Some New Results in Astrophysical Problems of Nonlinear Theory of Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikichyan, H. V.

    2017-07-01

    In the interpretation of the observed astrophysical spectra, a decisive role is related to nonlinear problems of radiative transfer, because the processes of multiple interactions of matter of cosmic medium with the exciting intense radiation ubiquitously occur in astrophysical objects, and in their vicinities. Whereas, the intensity of the exciting radiation changes the physical properties of the original medium, and itself was modified, simultaneously, in a self-consistent manner under its influence. In the present report, we show that the consistent application of the principle of invariance in the nonlinear problem of bilateral external illumination of a scattering/absorbing one-dimensional anisotropic medium of finite geometrical thickness allows for simplifications that were previously considered as a prerogative only of linear problems. The nonlinear problem is analyzed through the three methods of the principle of invariance: (i) an adding of layers, (ii) its limiting form, described by differential equations of invariant imbedding, and (iii) a transition to the, so-called, functional equations of the "Ambartsumyan's complete invariance". Thereby, as an alternative to the Boltzmann equation, a new type of equations, so-called "kinetic equations of equivalence", are obtained. By the introduction of new functions - the so-called "linear images" of solution of nonlinear problem of radiative transfer, the linear structure of the solution of the nonlinear problem under study is further revealed. Linear images allow to convert naturally the statistical characteristics of random walk of a "single quantum" or their "beam of unit intensity", as well as widely known "probabilistic interpretation of phenomena of transfer", to the field of nonlinear problems. The structure of the equations obtained for determination of linear images is typical of linear problems.

  4. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography of testicular disorders in dogs: preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    FELICIANO, M. A. R.; Maronezi,M.C.; Simões,A.P.R.; G.S. Maciel; Pavan, L; B. Gasser; Silva, P.; Uscategui,R.R.; CARVALHO, C.F.; J. C. Canola; Vicente, W. R. R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the use of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in the evaluation of testicular disorders in dogs. Eighteen dogs with testicular disorders (thirty-six testicles) were assessed. Echotexture, size, contours and margins of testes were analysed by ultrasonography. Deformities and tissue stiffness (greyscale and homogenous or heterogeneous) were evaluated by qualitative elastography and shear velocity was determined quantitatively. Subsequent t...

  5. Acute Exposure to High Dose γ-Radiation Results in Transient Activation of Bone Lining Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Wong, Carmen P.; Lindenmaier, Laurence B.; Wagner, Lindsay A.; Branscum, Adam J.; Menn, Scott A.; Taylor, James; Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu; Sibonga, Jean D.

    2014-01-01

    The present studies investigated the cellular mechanisms for the detrimental effects of high dose whole body γ-irradiation on bone. In addition, radioadaptation and bone marrow transplantation were assessed as interventions to mitigate the skeletal complications of irradiation. Increased trabecular thickness and separation and reduced fractional cancellous bone volume, connectivity density, and trabecular number were detected in proximal tibia and lumbar vertebra 14 days following γ-irradiation with 6 Gy. To establish the cellular mechanism for the architectural changes, vertebrae were analyzed by histomorphometry 1, 3, and 14 days following irradiation. Marrow cell density decreased within 1 day (67% reduction, pbone perimeter was increased by 290% (1 day, p=0.04), 1230% (3 days, pmarrow cell death and activation of bone lining cells to express the osteoblast phenotype (Pearson correlation −0.85, pbone perimeter was also detected with irradiation. A priming dose of γ-radiation (0.5 mGy), previously shown to reduce mortality, had minimal effect on the cellular responses to radiation and did not prevent detrimental changes in bone architecture. Bone marrow transplantation normalized marrow cell density, bone turnover, and most indices of bone architecture following irradiation. In summary, radiation-induced death of marrow cells is associated with 1) a transient increase in bone formation due, at least in part, to activation of bone lining cells, and 2) an increase in bone resorption due to increased osteoclast perimeter. Bone marrow transplantation is effective in mitigating the detrimental effects of acute exposure to high dose whole body γ-radiation on bone turnover. PMID:23954507

  6. Paradoxical reaction in tubercular meningitis resulting in involvement of optic radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monga Parveen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old woman was diagnosed to have tubercular meningitis (TBM with a right parietal infarct. She responded well to four-drug anti-tubercular treatment (ATT, systemic steroids and pyridoxine. Steroids were tapered off in one and a half months; she was put on two-drug ATT after two months. Six months after initial diagnosis she presented with sudden, bilateral visual loss. Vision was 3/200 with afferent pupillary defect and un-recordable field in the right eye; vision was 20/60 in the left eye, pupillary reaction was sluggish and the field showed a temporal hemianopia. On reintroduction of systemic corticosteroids vision improved (20/120 in right eye and 20/30 in left eye within three days; the field defects improved sequentially to a left homonymous hemianopia, then a left homonymous inferior quadrantonopia. A diagnosis of TBM, on treatment, with bilateral optic neuritis, and right optic radiation involvement was made. Since the patient had been off ethambutol for four months, the optic neuritis and optic radiation lesion were attributed to a paradoxical reaction to tubercular allergen, corroborated by prompt recovery in response to corticosteroids. This is the first report of optic radiation involvement in a paradoxical reaction in neuro-tuberculosis in a young adult.

  7. Long-term results and complications of preoperative radiation in the treatment of rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, W.P.; Garb, J.L.; Park, W.C.; Stark, A.J.; Chabot, J.R.; Friedmann, P.

    1988-02-01

    A retrospective study of 149 patients with rectal cancer diagnosed between 1972 and 1979 was undertaken to compare survival, disease-free survival, recurrence sites, and long-term complications of 40 patients who received 4000 to 4500 rads of preoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (radiation group) with those of 109 patients treated by resection alone (control group). After a mean follow-up of 84 months and 99 months, respectively, survival of the irradiated patients was significantly better than that of controls (68% versus 52%, p less than 0.05). Disease-free survival of those patients rendered free of disease by treatment was also superior for the irradiated group (84% versus 57%, p less than 0.005). Local recurrence without signs of distant metastases developed only one-third as often in irradiated patients (6% versus 18%). Distant metastases, alone or in combination with local recurrence, were also less common after radiation (12% versus 27%). Second primary tumors developed in 15% and 10% of the respective groups, a difference that was not statistically significant. When we consider the survival benefit of preoperative radiation therapy, long-term complications were relatively mild. Delayed healing of the perineum was noted in two irradiated patients. Persistent diarrhea was severe enough to warrant treatment in only one case, and one patient required a colostomy for intestinal obstruction from pelvic fibrosis.

  8. Ozone database in support of CMIP5 simulations: results and corresponding radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cionni

    2011-11-01

    total column ozone is overestimated in the southern polar latitudes during spring and tropospheric column ozone is slightly underestimated. Vertical profiles of tropospheric ozone are broadly consistent with ozonesondes and in-situ measurements, with some deviations in regions of biomass burning. The tropospheric ozone radiative forcing (RF from the 1850s to the 2000s is 0.23 W m−2, lower than previous results. The lower value is mainly due to (i a smaller increase in biomass burning emissions; (ii a larger influence of stratospheric ozone depletion on upper tropospheric ozone at high southern latitudes; and possibly (iii a larger influence of clouds (which act to reduce the net forcing compared to previous radiative forcing calculations. Over the same period, decreases in stratospheric ozone, mainly at high latitudes, produce a RF of −0.08 W m−2, which is more negative than the central Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4 value of −0.05 W m−2, but which is within the stated range of −0.15 to +0.05 W m−2. The more negative value is explained by the fact that the regression model simulates significant ozone depletion prior to 1979, in line with the increase in EESC and as confirmed by CCMs, while the AR4 assumed no change in stratospheric RF prior to 1979. A negative RF of similar magnitude persists into the future, although its location shifts from high latitudes to the tropics. This shift is due to increases in polar stratospheric ozone, but decreases in tropical lower stratospheric ozone, related to a strengthening of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, particularly through the latter half of the 21st century. Differences in trends in tropospheric ozone among the four RCPs are mainly driven by different methane concentrations, resulting in a range of tropospheric ozone RFs between 0.4 and 0.1 W m−2 by 2100. The ozone dataset described here has been released for

  9. Mucosal Vaccine Development Based on Liposome Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Valentina; Norling, Karin; Bally, Marta; Höök, Fredrik; Lycke, Nils Y

    2016-01-01

    Immune protection against infectious diseases is most effective if located at the portal of entry of the pathogen. Hence, there is an increasing demand for vaccine formulations that can induce strong protective immunity following oral, respiratory, or genital tract administration. At present, only few mucosal vaccines are found on the market, but recent technological advancements and a better understanding of the principles that govern priming of mucosal immune responses have contributed to a more optimistic view on the future of mucosal vaccines. Compared to live attenuated vaccines, subcomponent vaccines, most often protein-based, are considered safer, more stable, and less complicated to manufacture, but they require the addition of nontoxic and clinically safe adjuvants to be effective. In addition, another limiting factor is the large antigen dose that usually is required for mucosal vaccines. Therefore, the combination of mucosal adjuvants with the recent progress in nanoparticle technology provides an attractive solution to these problems. In particular, the liposome technology is ideal for combining protein antigen and adjuvant into an effective mucosal vaccine. Here, we describe and discuss recent progress in nanoparticle formulations using various types of liposomes that convey strong promise for the successful development of the next generation of mucosal vaccines.

  10. Radiated Immunity Testing of a Device with an External Wire: Repeatibility of Reverberation Chamber Results and Correlation with Anechoic Chamber Results

    OpenAIRE

    Canavero, Flavio

    2003-01-01

    We present the experimental radiated immunity results of an electronic device with an external wire obtained in reverberation and anechoic chambers. Repeatability and reproducibility of reverberation chamber measurements are investigated by repeating the test in three reverberation chambers with different characteristics. We show how the current state of the art allows a statistical control of RC measurement repeatability within an industrial installation, and that a statistical correlation w...

  11. Effect of banana powder (Musa sapientum var. paradisiaca) on gastric mucosal shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyaya, K; Bhattacharya, D; Chakraborty, A; Goel, R K; Sanyal, A K

    1987-01-01

    Banana pulp powder (Musa sapientum Linn. var. paradisiaca) was studied for its effects on gastric mucosal resistance. Banana-treated (0.5 g/kg orally, twice daily for 3 days) rats of either sex showed: (i) a significant increase in the [3H]thymidine incorporation into mucosal cell DNA; (ii) a significant increase in the total carbohydrate (sum of total hexoses, hexosamine, fucose and sialic acid) content of gastric mucosa; (iii) a significant decrease in gastric juice DNA and protein; (iv) a significant increase in the total carbohydrates and carbohydrate/protein ratio of gastric juice. Aspirin treatment to rats caused similar effects as banana on the [3H]thymidine incorporation into mucosal cell DNA but showed opposite effects on the other parameters. These results suggest that banana treatment increased and aspirin decreased the gastric mucosal resistance as evidenced by a respective decrease and increase in gastric juice DNA, the latter serving as an index of the rate of mucosal shedding. Increased cellular mucus may be the factor for increased mucosal resistance. The results of the present study tend to confirm that plantain banana powder strengthens mucosal resistance and promotes the healing of ulcers.

  12. Clinical Evaluation of a New Bilayer Artificial Dermis for Repair of Oral Mucosal Defects: Report of two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ming Chen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Free mucosal grafts or split-thickness skin grafts have been used in patients undergoing repair procedures for oral mucosal defects. Conventional methods require the creation of second surgical wounds for use as donor sites. We applied two bilayers of artificial dermis to repair a buccal mucosal defect in one case and vestibular extension in another case. After removal of the sutures, no infection, pain, or hemorrhage developed in these patients. The results of granulation and epithelialization were good. Satisfactory appearance and function were achieved in both cases. Therefore, bilayer artificial dermis may be recommended for the repair of oral mucosal defects.

  13. Is Dental Implantation Indicated in Patients with Oral Mucosal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalogirou Eleni-Marina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Dental implants are a reliable treatment choice for rehabilitation of healthy patients as well as subjects with several systemic conditions. Patients with oral mucosal diseases often exhibit oral mucosal fragility and dryness, erosions, blisters, ulcers or microstomia that complicate the use of removable dentures and emphasize the need for dental implants. The aim of the current study is to review the pertinent literature regarding the dental implantation prospects for patients with oral mucosal diseases. Material and Method: The English literature was searched through PubMed and Google Scholar electronic databases with key words: dental implants, oral mucosal diseases, oral lichen planus (OLP, epidermolysis bullosa (EB, Sjögren’s syndrome (SS, cicatricial pemphigoid, bullous pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, scleroderma/systemic sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, leukoplakia, oral potentially malignant disorders, oral premalignant lesions, oral cancer and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Results: Literature review revealed dental implantation in patients with OLP (14 articles, EB (11 articles, pemphigus vulgaris (1 article, SS (14 articles, systemic sclerosis (11 articles, systemic lupus erythematosus (3 articles and oral SCC development associated with leukoplakia (5 articles. No articles regarding dental implants in patients with pemphigoid or leukoplakia without SCC development were identified. Most articles were case-reports, while only a few retrospective, prospective or observational studies were identified. Conclusions: Dental implants represent an acceptable treatment option with a high success rate in patients with chronic mucocutaneous and autoimmune diseases with oral manifestations, such as OLP, SS, EB and systemic sclerosis. Patients with oral possibly malignant disorders should be closely monitored to rule out the development of periimplant malignancy. Further studies with long follow-up, clinical and radiographic

  14. Sensitivity of clear-sky direct radiative effect of the aerosol to micro-physical properties by using 6SV radiative transfer model: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani, Cristiana; Tirelli, Cecilia; Manzo, Ciro; Pietrodangelo, Adriana; Curci, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    The aerosol micro-physical properties are crucial to analyze their radiative impact on the Earth's radiation budget [IPCC, 2007]. The 6SV model, last generation of the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code [Kotchenova et al., 2007; Vermote et al., 1997] has been used to perform physically-based atmospheric correction of hyperspectral airborne and aircraft remote sensing data [Vermote et al., 2009; Bassani et al. 2010; Tirelli et al., 2014]. The atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data has been shown to be sensitive to the aerosol micro-physical properties, as reported in Bassani et al., 2012. The role of the aerosol micro-physical properties on the accuracy of the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data acquired over water and land targets is investigated within the framework of CLAM-PHYM (Coasts and Lake Assessment and Monitoring by PRISMA HYperspectral Mission) and PRIMES (Synergistic use of PRISMA products with high resolution meteo-chemical simulations and their validation on ground and from satellite) projects, both funded by Italian Space Agency (ASI). In this work, the results of the radiative field of the Earth/Atmosphere coupled system simulated by using 6SV during the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data are presented. The analysis of the clear-sky direct radiative effect is performed considering the aerosol micro-physical properties used to define the aerosol model during the atmospheric correction process. In particular, the AERONET [Holben et al., 1998] and FLEXAOD [Curci et al., 2014] micro-physical properties are used for each image to evaluate the contribution of the size distribution and refractive index of the aerosol type on the surface reflectance and on the direct radiative forcing. The results highlight the potential of the hyperspectral remote sensing data for atmospheric studies as well as for environmental studies. Currently, the future hyperspectral missions, such as the

  15. Modern mucosal vaccines, adjuvants and microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranage, Martin P; Manoussaka, Maria

    2009-02-01

    Preventing infection at the pathogen portal of entry through induction of mucosal immunity and the use of microbicides has always been an exciting prospect. Moreover, the promise of needle-free prophylaxis is attractive for many reasons. This meeting report highlights some of the critical issues that were discussed concerning recent advances in the field. New routes of vaccination and modalities of delivery are still being discovered, and important advances are occurring in the development of safe mucosal adjuvants. Protection of mucosal surfaces is likely to be particularly crucial to prevent infections with pathogens, such as HIV, that can be sequestered rapidly.

  16. Mismatch in breast and detector size during screening and diagnostic mammography results in increased patient radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Catherine L; Slanetz, Priscilla J; Rosen, Max P

    2014-01-01

    When using mammographic detectors of different sizes, it can be difficult to match patient breast size to optimal detector size. We studied whether a mismatch between breast size and optimal detector size resulted in increased radiation exposure. All screening and diagnostic (Dx) mammography patients during a 6-week period in November-December 2009 (864 patients) were evaluated (institutional review board exemption for quality assurance studies). Data gathered included breast size (large or small), detector size used, number of views obtained, mean glandular dose (MGD) per breast, and patient waiting time. Average MGD and average waiting time was calculated for imaging performed on appropriately matched or mismatched breast size-detector size pairs. Screening mammography patients with large breasts imaged on a small detector received a significantly higher radiation dose (4.9 vs. 3.3 mGy, P imaged on a small detector received a higher radiation dose (8.2 vs. 6.7 mGy, P imaged on a small detector. Pressure to minimize patient waiting time may inadvertently result in increased radiation dose. Detector size should be matched to breast size whenever possible, but particularly for patients with larger breast sizes. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Management of chemo- and radiotherapy induced oral mucositis with low-energy laser: initial results of A.C. Camargo Hospital Manejo da mucosite oral induzida por quimioterapia e radioterapia com laser de baixa potência: resultados iniciais do Hospital A.C. Camargo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renata Lazari Sandoval; Daniel Henrique Koga; Lígia Schmitd Buloto; Ricardo Suzuki; Luciano Lauria Dib

    2003-01-01

    Background. Oral mucositis is a common complication of some malignancies treatment, causing therapeutic modifications due to patient's debilitation, which often interferes with the prognosis of the disease...

  18. Mucosal Vaccination Overcomes the Barrier to Recombinant Vaccinia Immunization Caused by Preexisting Poxvirus Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyakov, Igor M.; Moss, Bernard; Strober, Warren; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    1999-04-01

    Overcoming preexisting immunity to vaccinia virus in the adult population is a key requirement for development of otherwise potent recombinant vaccinia vaccines. Based on our observation that s.c. immunization with vaccinia induces cellular and antibody immunity to vaccinia only in systemic lymphoid tissue and not in mucosal sites, we hypothesized that the mucosal immune system remains naive to vaccinia and therefore amenable to immunization with recombinant vaccinia vectors despite earlier vaccinia exposure. We show that mucosal immunization of vaccinia-immune BALB/c mice with recombinant vaccinia expressing HIV gp160 induced specific serum antibody and strong HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. These responses occurred not only in mucosal but also in systemic lymphoid tissue, whereas systemic immunization was ineffective under these circumstances. In this context, intrarectal immunization was more effective than intranasal immunization. Boosting with a second dose of recombinant vaccinia was also more effective via the mucosal route. The systemic HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response was enhanced by coadministration of IL-12 at the mucosal site. These results also demonstrate the independent compartmentalization of the mucosal versus systemic immune systems and the asymmetric trafficking of lymphocytes between them. This approach to circumvent previous vaccinia immunity may be useful for induction of protective immunity against infectious diseases and cancer in the sizable populations with preexisting immunity to vaccinia from smallpox vaccination.

  19. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy for intracranial benign tumor : preliminary results of clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Huh, Seung Jae [Samsung Medical Center, Syungkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    1998-06-01

    With the development of stereotactic immobilization systems capable of reliable serial repositioning, fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy(FSRT) offers the potential for an improved treatment outcome by excellent dose delivery, and dose distribution characteristics with the favorable radio-biological properties of fractionated irradiation. We describe our initial experience using FSRT for the treatment of intracranial benign tumor. Between August 1995 and December 1996, 15 patients(7 males and 8 females aged 6-70 years) were treated with FSRT. The patients had the following diagnosis : pituitary adenoma(10) including one patient who previously had received radiotherapy, craniopharyngioma(2), acoustic neurinoma(1), meningioma(2). Using the Gill-Thomas-Cos-man relocatable head frame and multiple non-coplanar therapy, the daily dose of 2Gy was irradiated at 90% to 100% isodose surface of the isocenter. The collimator sizes ranged from 26mm to 70mm. In all patients except one follow-up lost, disease was well-controlled. Acute complication was negligible and no patient experienced cranial nerve neuropathies and radiation necrosis. In overall patient setup with scalp measurements, reproducibility was found to have mean of 1.1{+-}0.6mm from the baseline reading. Relocatable stereotactic system for FSRT is highly reproducible and comfortable. Although the follow-up period was relatively short, FSRT is considered to be a safe an effective radiation technique as the treatment of intracranial tumor. But the fractionation schedule(fraction size, overall treatment time and total dose) still remains to be solved by further clinical trials.

  20. Latest Results on Jupiter's Atmosphere and Radiation Belts from the Juno Microwave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, M.

    2017-09-01

    The Juno Microwave Radiometer (MWR) was designed to investigate Jupiter's atmosphere and radiation belts as one of a suite of instruments that form the core of the Juno mission. The traces of absolute nadir brightness temperature for the first six perijove pass has been used to infer a striking variation in the distribution of NH3, which traces a previously unexpected deep circulation. The accumulation of data from all perijove passes obtained to date demonstrate the longitudinal, temporal, and depth dependencies of observed structures. Partial 3D maps show the structure and depths of specific features on Jupiter, notably the polar regions and the Great Red Spot.

  1. Radiative forcing associated with particulate carbon emissions resulting from the use of mercury control technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guangxing; Penner, Joyce E; Clack, Herek L

    2014-09-02

    Injection of powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbents into the flue gas of coal fired power plants with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) is the most mature technology to control mercury emissions for coal combustion. However, the PAC itself can penetrate ESPs to emit into the atmosphere. These emitted PACs have similar size and optical properties to submicron black carbon (BC) and thus could increase BC radiative forcing unintentionally. The present paper estimates, for the first time, the potential emission of PAC together with their climate forcing. The global average maximum potential emissions of PAC is 98.4 Gg/yr for the year 2030, arising from the assumed adoption of the maximum potential PAC injection technology, the minimum collection efficiency, and the maximum PAC injection rate. These emissions cause a global warming of 2.10 mW m(-2) at the top of atmosphere and a cooling of -2.96 mW m(-2) at the surface. This warming represents about 2% of the warming that is caused by BC from direct fossil fuel burning and 0.86% of the warming associated with CO2 emissions from coal burning in power plants. Its warming is 8 times more efficient than the emitted CO2 as measured by the 20-year-integrated radiative forcing per unit of carbon input (the 20-year Global Warming Potential).

  2. Beam test results of CMS RPCs at high eta region under high-radiation environment

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S; Bahk, S Y; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Kang, D H; Kang, T I; Kim, T J; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, H W; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Lim, J K; Moon, D H; Nam, S K; Oh, J K; Park, W J; Rhee, J T; Ryu, M S; Shim, H H; Sim, K S

    2004-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) forward resistivity plate chambers (RPCs) at the high eta region must be operated in presence of a radiation-induced rate as high as 1 kHz/cm**2. It is still unknown if the RPCs coated with linseed oil can be operated under such a high- radiation environment over the lifetime of CMS. Non-oiled RPCs may be one of the options since phenolic or melamine-coated bakelite is chemically stabler than linseed oil. We have constructed oiled and non-oiled RPCs at the high eta region of CMS using phenolic bakelite and tested them in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. While both RPCs show the same characteristics in the efficiency and the strip multiplicity, the non-oiled RPC generates an intrinsic noise rate of 50 Hz/cm**2, compared to only 5 Hz/cm**2 for the oiled RPC, both at 10.0kV which is about 100 V above the 95% knee of the efficiency curve.

  3. Oral Symptoms and Mucosal Lesions in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicmil Ana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Good glycoregulation at patients with diabetes mellitus is essential for prevention of many complications, including those in oral cavity. Results of numerous studies indicate that xerostomia and neurosensory oral disorders are present in type 2 diabetics. A review of the literature shows contradictory results about prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in diabetics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of xerostomia, neurosensory disorders and mucosal lesions in oral cavity of type 2 diabetics.

  4. Current State and Problems of Radiation Risk Communication: Based on the Results of a 2012 Whole Village Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yujiro

    2017-02-24

    The entire village of Iitate was contaminated by radioactive material from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant; even today, the residents remain evacuated. For the villagers, risk communication is an important element of recovery and maintaining health. This analysis focuses on the problem of radiation, presents results from a questionnaire of villagers, and examines methods for future risk communication activities. In May 2012, anonymous surveys were sent to 2914 heads of households whose addresses were registered in Iitate. Their understanding of radiation and information needs were extracted from the answers. There were 1755 valid responses (61.4%). In relation to understanding, the most frequent answer was "There are numerous opinions and I do not know which one is true" (72.2%), followed by "I definitely want opportunities to learn more about how radiation is created" (41.6%). Residents felt that they could not determine which of the available information was reliable. The 60s+ age group responded more than younger age groups that "I do not have much information and do not know much about it," "I do not know much about it, so I want to learn more," and "I definitely want opportunities to learn more about how radiation is created." Among information needs, "publications" (50.2%) and "community associations" (45.9%) received many responses; residents want study groups to be held at places and through media that give them regular opportunities to connect with each other. Residents in their 20s and 30s preferred "publications," while those in their 40s, 50s, and 60s+ were more likely to request "community associations" and "resident meetings." In addition, we found gender differences in both understanding and information needs. These results indicate that radiation and health risk communication should be addressed in a way that aligns with residents' needs by age and gender.

  5. Novel developments in endoscopic mucosal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sommen, F; Curvers, W L; Nagengast, W B

    2018-01-01

    Endoscopic techniques such as High-definition and optical-chromoendoscopy have had enormous impact on endoscopy practice. Since these techniques allow assessment of most subtle morphological mucosal abnormalities, further improvements in endoscopic practice lay in increasing the detection efficacy

  6. Microneedle and mucosal delivery of influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang-Moo; Song, Jae-Min; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2017-01-01

    In recent years with the threat of pandemic influenza and other public health needs, alternative vaccination methods other than intramuscular immunization have received great attention. The skin and mucosal surfaces are attractive sites probably because of both non-invasive access to the vaccine delivery and unique immunological responses. Intradermal vaccines using a microinjection system (BD Soluvia) and intranasal vaccines (FluMist) are licensed. As a new vaccination method, solid microneedles have been developed using a simple device that may be suitable for self-administration. Because coated micorneedle influenza vaccines are administered in the solid state, developing formulations maintaining the stability of influenza vaccines is an important issue to be considered. Marketable microneedle devices and clinical trials remain to be developed. Other alternative mucosal routes such as oral and intranasal delivery systems are also attractive for inducing cross protective mucosal immunity but effective non-live mucosal vaccines remain to be developed. PMID:22697052

  7. Microbiota and Mucosal Immunity in Amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Bruno M.; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  8. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colombo, Bruno M; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    ...) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  9. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M Colombo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last twenty years we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacterias, archeas and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: i the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and ii the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  10. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Bruno M; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  11. Transgenic Killer Commensal Bacteria as Mucosal Protectants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Polonelli

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available As first line of defense against the majority of infections and primary site for their transmission, mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity and genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts represent the most suitable sites to deliver protective agents for the prevention of infectious diseases. Mucosal protection is important not only for life threatening diseases but also for opportunistic infections which currently represent a serious burden in terms of morbidity, mortality, and cost of cures. Candida albicans is among the most prevalent causes of mucosal infections not only in immuno- compromised patients, such as HIV-infected subjects who are frequently affected by oral and esophageal candidiasis, but also in otherwise healthy individuals, as in the case of acute vaginitis. Unfortunately, current strategies for mucosal protection against candidiasis are severely limited by the lack of effective vaccines and the relative paucity and toxicity of commercially available antifungal drugs. An additional option has been reported in a recent

  12. Ultraviolet radiation affects emission of ozone-depleting substances by marine macroalgae: results from a laboratory incubation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laturnus, Frank; Svensson, Teresia; Wiencke, Christian; Oberg, Gunilla

    2004-12-15

    The depletion of stratospheric ozone due to the effects of ozone-depleting substances, such as volatile organohalogens, emitted into the atmosphere from industrial and natural sources has increased the amount of ultraviolet radiation reaching the earth's surface. Especially in the subpolar and polar regions, where stratospheric ozone destruction is the highest, individual organisms and whole ecosystems can be affected. In a laboratory study, several species of marine macroalgae occurring in the polar and northern temperate regions were exposed to elevated levels of ultraviolet radiation. Most of the macroalgae released significantly more chloroform, bromoform, dibromomethane, and methyl iodide-all volatile organohalogens. Calculating on the basis of the release of total chlorine, bromine, and iodine revealed that, except for two macroalgae emitting chlorine and one alga emitting iodine, exposure to ultraviolet radiation caused macroalgae to emit significantly more total chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Increasing levels of ultraviolet radiation due to possible further destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer as a result of ongoing global atmospheric warming may thus increase the future importance of marine macroalgae as a source for the global occurrence of reactive halogen-containing compounds.

  13. A practical method for clinical diagnosis of oral mucosal melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Azañero, Wilson A; Mosqueda Taylor, Adalberto

    2003-01-01

    To present a practical and technically simple method for clinical diagnosis of oral melanomas that allows to differentiate this neoplasm from other pigmented lesions. Thirteen oral pigmented lesions with suspected diagnosis of mucosal melanomas were submitted to a test named "rubbing with a gauze" the surface of the lesion. The test was considered positive when the gauze stained dark brown or black due to the presence of melanin-laden cells on the epithelial surface. In all cases definite diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy. Positive results were obtained in 11 out of 13 cases (84.6%). Our results establish that the test "rubbing with gauze" the surface of oral pigmented lesions demonstrates a high sensitivity to anticipate clinically the diagnosis of mucosal melanomas. However, a negative result does not exclude this neoplasm, since there are some cases in which malignant cells have not invaded the superficial epithelial layers. In every case the final diagnosis must be established by histopathologic or immunohistochemical analysis.

  14. Efficacy of Infliximab Biosimilar CT-P13 Induction Therapy on Mucosal Healing in Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Klaudia; Rutka, Mariann; Golovics, Petra A; Végh, Zsuzsanna; Lovász, Barbara D; Nyári, Tibor; Gecse, Krisztina B; Kolar, Martin; Bortlik, Martin; Duricova, Dana; Machkova, Nadezda; Hruba, Veronika; Lukas, Martin; Mitrova, Katarina; Malickova, Karin; Bálint, Anita; Nagy, Ferenc; Bor, Renáta; Milassin, Ágnes; Szepes, Zoltán; Palatka, Károly; Lakatos, Péter L; Lukas, Milan; Molnár, Tamás

    2016-11-01

    CT-P13 is the first biosimilar to infliximab that has been approved for the same indications as its originator infliximab. No data are available on the effect of infliximab biosimilar on mucosal healing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of CT-P13 induction therapy on mucosal healing in patients with ulcerative colitis [UC]. UC patients, who received CT-P13 therapy from its local introduction at three Hungarian and one Czech inflammatory bowel disease centres, were prospectively enrolled. Sigmoidoscopy was performed after the end of the induction therapy at week 14. Mucosal healing was defined as Mayo endoscopic subscore 0 or 1. Complete mucosal healing was defined as Mayo endoscopic subscore 0. Trough level of CT-P13 was measured at week 14. Sixty-three UC patients who underwent CT-P13 induction therapy were enrolled in the study. Indication for the therapy was acute, severe flare up and chronic, refractory activity in 24 and 39 patients, respectively. Cumulative clinical response and steroid-free remission at week 14 were achieved in 82.5% and 47.6% of the patients, respectively. Sigmoidoscopy revealed steroid-free mucosal healing in 47.6% of the patients, and complete mucosal healing was present in 27%. Mayo endoscopic subscore decreased significantly at week 14 compared to baseline. Trough levels of infliximab correlated with mucosal healing. This is, to our knowledge, the first study examining the efficacy of CT-P13 induction therapy on mucosal healing in UC. The results indicate that mucosal healing is achieved in two-thirds of UC patients by the end of the induction treatment with CT-P13. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. ٍEvaluating Baremoom Mouthwash Efficacy in Treatment of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Akhavan Karbasi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis is regarded as a painful and discomforting chemotherapy complication , affecting patient’s quality of life and endurance to continue the treatment. Hence, treatment of mucositis is of great significance. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of Baremoom mouthwash in treatment of chemotherapy-induced mucositis . Methods: This interventional double-blinded randomized clinical trial study was performed on 40 adult patients under chemotherapy in blood and oncology department of Shahid Sadouqhi hospital. The total of 40 patients were randomly divided into two groups: an experimental baremoom group and a control placebo group each containing 20 subjects. Baremoom mouthwash (30% extract, Soren Tektoos, Mashhad and placebo mouthwash ( Sterile water with allowable additives ,Soren Tektoos, Mashhad with same apparent properties were given to the patients (3 times a day for 7 days after mucositis detection. The patients were evaluated in regard with mucositis grade (0-4 WHO and wounds extension on 1th , 3th and 7th days after the study begining. In order to statistically analyze the collected data, Freidman, Mann–Whitney, and wilcoxon W tests were applied utilizing SPSS software (ver, 17. Results: On 3rd  and 7th  days, mean degree of wound extension and mucositis were demonstrated to be significantly different between the two groups. According to Friedman test, both experimental and control groups revealed a significant difference in regard with wound extension and mucositis grade within the three time periods. Conclusion: The study findings indicated that Baremoom mouthwash was more effective in chemotherapy- induced mucositis than placebo. Hence, this agent can be recommended as an appropriate medicine in order to eliminate mucositis symtoms and decrease oral ulcers.

  16. Modeling laser irradiation conditions for mucosal tissues in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Astaf'eva, L. G.; Plavskii, V. Yu.

    2012-05-01

    We use computer modeling to analzye empirically selected conditions for antimicrobial photodynamic therapy of mucosal tissues. We calculate the optical and thermal fields for experimental conditions for low-intensity (cold) laser irradiation used in treatment of lesions in mucosal tissues stained by methylene blue: λ = 670 nm, power density 150-300 mW/cm2, doses 9-18 J/cm2; λ = 632.8 nm, 15 mW/cm2, dose 4.5 J/cm2. For numerical estimates, we used the optical characteristics of methylene blue and three layers of mucosal tissues at the laser radiation wavelengths, and also the thermal characteristics of the tissues. The experimental conditions were optimized using the ratio of the tissue penetration depth for the absorbed optical energy and the penetration depth of methylene blue into the lesion, while maintaining safe tissue heating temperatures.

  17. Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated with Precision-Oriented Radiation Therapy Techniques Including Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Shan Liu

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports preliminary results with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Between August 2000 and May 2001, we treated 19 patients with NPC using IMRT. Twelve patients had stage I-II disease and seven had stage III-IV disease. Six patients received 9.0-19.8 Gy three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT before IMRT and 18 patients received a brachytherapy boost after IMRT. The mean follow-up time was 13.0 months. All patients with stage II-IV disease except one received two cycles of chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU during radiotherapy, followed by two to four cycles of chemotherapy after radiotherapy. Tumor response was assessed using clinical examination and computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The mean doses administered to the gross tumor volume and clinical tumor volume were 70.9 Gy and 63.2 Gy, respectively. The mean doses administered to the right and left parotid glands were 38.1 Gy and 38.6 Gy, respectively. All 19 patients had a complete response of primary and lymph node disease. Grade III mucositis developed during chemoradiotherapy in 15 patients (79%. In addition, clinical grade I xerostomia was recorded in nine patients, grade II in nine, and grade III in one. This study demonstrated that 3D-CRT, IMRT, intracavitary brachytherapy, and chemotherapy are effective and safe methods to treat NPC. Although IMRT treatment spared parotid gland function, its efficacy may be significantly influenced by disease stage and location of the neck lymph nodes. More cases and a longer follow-up to assess survival and complications are planned.

  18. Late Side Effects After Image Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From 2 Prospective Cohorts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortel, Ruud C.; Incrocci, Luca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pos, Floris J.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Lebesque, Joos V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aluwini, Shafak [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Witte, Marnix G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heemsbergen, Wilma D., E-mail: w.heemsbergen@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: Technical developments in the field of external beam radiation therapy (RT) enabled the clinical introduction of image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT), which improved target conformity and allowed reduction of safety margins. Whether this had an impact on late toxicity levels compared to previously applied three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) is currently unknown. We analyzed late side effects after treatment with IG-IMRT or 3D-CRT, evaluating 2 prospective cohorts of men treated for localized prostate cancer to investigate the hypothesized reductions in toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with 3D-CRT (n=189) or IG-IMRT (n=242) to 78 Gy in 39 fractions were recruited from 2 Dutch randomized trials with identical toxicity scoring protocols. Late toxicity (>90 days after treatment) was derived from self-assessment questionnaires and case report forms, according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG-EORTC) scoring criteria. Grade ≥2 endpoints included gastrointestinal (GI) rectal bleeding, increased stool frequency, discomfort, rectal incontinence, proctitis, and genitourinary (GU) obstruction, increased urinary frequency, nocturia, urinary incontinence, and dysuria. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to compare grade ≥2 toxicities between both techniques, adjusting for other modifying factors. Results: The 5-year cumulative incidence of grade ≥2 GI toxicity was 24.9% for IG-IMRT and 37.6% following 3D-CRT (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.59, P=.005), with significant reductions in proctitis (HR: 0.37, P=.047) and increased stool frequency (HR: 0.23, P<.001). GU grade ≥2 toxicity levels at 5 years were comparable with 46.2% and 36.4% following IG-IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively (adjusted HR: 1.19, P=.33). Other strong predictors (P<.01) of grade ≥2 late toxicity were baseline complaints, acute toxicity, and age

  19. RADIATION-HYGIENIC AND MEDICAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE СHERNOBYL ACCIDENT: RESULTS AND PROGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Onischenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An article is devoted to the analysis of the radiation situation in the dynamics during the years since the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986. Data on the scope of activities fulfilled for the assessment of the territories radioactive contamination levels and foodstuffs contamination levels, on the values of the exposure doses for the population living on the contaminated territories, on the medical and socio-psychological consequences of the Chernobyl accident is presented. Basic norms and principles, used during the protective measures development and introduction, are considered, their effectiveness is demonstrated. Mistakes emerged during protective measures implementation are analyzed, the prognosis of the population exposure dose values for the 70-year period since the accident and main directions of activities for the contaminated territories remediation and normal life conditions restoration for the population at these territories are presented.

  20. Aerosol and Cloud Radiative Forcing in China: Preliminary Results from the EAST-AIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Cribb, M.; Xia, X.; Chen, H.; Wang, P.

    2005-12-01

    East Asia, and China in particular, is a region that can provide crucial and unique information concerning natural and anthropogenic aerosols and their impact on fundamental climate issues. Until very recently, few observational studies were conducted in this region of heavy aerosol loading and unique properties. The East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE) is an attempt to more fully characterize the physical, optical and chemical properties of these aerosols in different parts of China. Currently, three ground observation stations have been established under the aegis of this experiment. They include Xianghe (70 km southeast of Beijing), Liaozhong (50 km west of Shenyang), and Tai Lake (central to three mega-cities Shanghai, Hangzhou and Nanjing). Measurements have been taken continuously over different periods of time. The measurements include radiative quantities (for example, longwave and shortwave broadband and narrowband irradiances, etc.), the sky condition from a total sky imager, and aerosol quantities such as optical depth and single-scattering albedo. A preliminary analysis of the data with regards to the aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface will be presented. Critical to this analysis is the identification of clear skies, which is problematic in this region due to the ubiquitous presence of aerosol in the atmosphere. Another challenge is the discrimination between haze and cloud. The synergy of multiple data sources from the ground and from satellite is shown to help in identifying sky condition so that aerosol and cloud forcing can be determined.

  1. Preliminary results of radiation monitoring near uranium mines in Namibia EJOLT Project (DRAFT version)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chareyron, Bruno

    2012-04-05

    As a part of the EJOLT (Environmental Justice Organizations Liability and Trade) project, EARTHLIFE Namibia and CRIIRAD (Commission for Independent Research and Information about Radiation) have organised visits in areas located in the vicinity of uranium mines in Namibia In the course of an on site mission carried out between September 22 and October 2 2011, scientists from the CRIIRAD laboratory took radiation measurements in situ, and collected 14 samples of top soil, 13 samples of surface sediments of the Swakop, Gawib and Khan rivers, 11 underground water samples in the alluvium of Swakop, and Khan rivers and tap water from Arandis city, and one sample of asparagus. Solid samples have been analysed at the CRIIRAD laboratory in France (measurements performed by HpGe gamma spectrometry) and water samples have been monitored for main chemicals by LDA 26 laboratory in France and for radium 226 and radon 222 at the CRIIRAD laboratory. Some of the preliminary findings are summarised in this report: 1 - The dose rate measured by CRIIRAD on the parking of Roessing mine is about 6 times above natural background value (0.9 {mu}Sv/h compared to 0.15 {mu}Sv/h); 2 - The management of waste rock dumps needs to be improved: Some waste rocks are dumped on the banks of Khan river (at the intersection with Dome Gorge) without fencing and confinement. The radiological impact of this activity has to be studied in detail but preliminary measurements show various impacts on the environment; 3 - The finest fraction of the radioactive tailings dumped on Roessing tailings dam is blown away by the wind and contaminates the surrounding environment; 4 - The high uranium concentration in underground water collected downstream Roessing uranium mine in the Khan river and Swakop river alluvium raises the question of the origin of this uranium

  2. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Generation of magnetic fields as a result of interaction of pairs of radiation pulses with solid barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, N. S.; Shaĭnoga, I. S.; Shentsev, N. I.

    1989-02-01

    An analysis is made of the problem of generation of magnetic fields in a laser plasma jet formed as a result of the interaction of two consecutive radiation pulses of moderate intensity with a dielectric barrier. It is assumed that the source of an emf is the thermo-emf of the inhomogeneous plasma. The structure of gasdynamic streams and the parameters of magnetic fields in the plasma jet are found by numerical solution of a known system of equations considered in a two-dimensional cylindrical configuration. The profiles of the plasma parameters and the temporal and spatial distributions of the magnetic fields are presented. It is shown that the results of numerical calculations can be useful, for example, in the diagnostics of laser jets.

  3. Professional oral health care reduces oral mucositis pain in patients treated by superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Kosei; Kobayashi, Wataru; Sakaki, Hirotaka; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Kon, Takao; Mimura, Mayu; Ito, Ryohei; Furudate, Ken; Kimura, Hiroto

    2015-11-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a painful complication of radiation therapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. OM can compromise nutrition, require opioid analgesics and hospitalization for pain control, and lead to interruption of treatment. Severe oral mucositis appears inevitable in superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy (SSIACRT), requiring management of OM for the patient. The objective of this study was to assess the utility of professional oral health care (POHC) for the management of OM in patients undergoing SSIACRT. Thirty-three patients were enrolled in this study. The first 17 patients underwent SSIACRT before we created an oral management team, and thus did not receive POHC. The remaining 16 patients received POHC. Fever duration, duration of oral feeding difficulty, opioid usage, duration of opioid administration, duration of hospitalization, and number of hospital days from the end of irradiation to discharge were compared between these two groups. Median total dose of morphine during SSIACRT, median number of hospital days from end of irradiation to discharge, and duration of hospitalization all differed significantly between groups (P opioid administration, fever duration, and duration of oral feeding difficulty did not differ significantly between groups. These findings indicate that POHC may reduce opioid use and shorten the hospital stay. Such results might be obtained through infection control by POHC. This report appears to be the first study to evaluate the efficiency of POHC in SSIACRT for oral cancer from the perspective of mucositis pain and opioid use.

  4. Phenylbutyrate Mouthwash Mitigates Oral Mucositis During Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, Sang-Hue; Wang, Ling-Wei [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Yang Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yi-Hsien [Division of Radiotherapy, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jen, Yee-Min, E-mail: yeeminjen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Yih-Lin, E-mail: ylchung@kfsyscc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Yang Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Deleterious oral mucositis (OM) develops during radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients. There are currently no effective cytoprotective treatments for OM without a potential risk of tumor protection. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study aimed to determine the therapeutic safety and efficacy of phenylbutyrate (an antitumor histone deacetylase inhibitor and chemical chaperone) 5% mouthwash for treating OM caused by cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2005 and June 2006, 36 HNC patients were randomized to standard oral care plus 5 mL of either phenylbutyrate 5% mouthwash (n = 17) or placebo (mouthwash vehicle, n = 19) taken four times daily (swish and spit). Treatment began when mild mucositis (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1) occurred, and ended 4 weeks after RT completion. Safety and efficacy were based on adverse events, physical examination, laboratory determinations, vital signs, Oral Mucosa Assessment Scale (OMAS) and World Health Organization scores, the ability to eat, body weight change, local control, and survival. Results: We found no severe drug-related side effect. At RT doses of 5500-7500 cGy, phenylbutyrate significantly mitigated the severity of mucositis compared with placebo, based on both the WHO score (severity {>=} 3; p = 0.0262) and the OMAS scale (ulceration score {>=} 2; p = 0.0049). The Kaplan-Meier estimates for 2- and 3-year local control, and overall survival were 100% and 80.8%, and 78.6% and 64.3%, respectively, in the phenylbutyrate group and 74.2% and 74.2%, and 57.4% and 50.2%, respectively, in the placebo group. Conclusions: This pilot trial suggested that phenylbutyrate mouthwash significantly decreased the impact of OM in HNC patients receiving RT or chemoradiotherapy and did not confront the tumor control. Larger Phase II randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

  5. Jaw mobility changes in patients with upper aerodigestive tract cancer undergoing radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragante, Karoline; Wienandts, Patrícia; Mozzini, Carolina; Pinto, Rosélie; da Motta, Neiro; Jotz, Geraldo

    2015-11-01

    Radiation therapy is a therapeutic modality widely used for treatment of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) neoplasms. However, its action is not restricted to tumor cells, and it may cause a variety of adverse reactions, including reduced jaw mobility. A prospective cohort study was conducted to assess changes in jaw mobility in patients with UADT cancer undergoing radiation therapy. Fifty-six patients completed the study. The results showed a significant reduction in mouth opening (pcancer experience reduced jaw mobility after radiation therapy, which is strongly correlated with mucositis and reduced functional ability.

  6. Alteration of the redox state with reactive oxygen species for 5-fluorouracil-induced oral mucositis in hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiko Yoshino

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral mucositis using an in vivo L-band electron spin resonance (ESR technique. An oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with 10% acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch was used. Lipid peroxidation was measured as the level of malondialdehyde determined by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. The rate constants of the signal decay of nitroxyl compounds using in vivo L-band ESR were calculated from the signal decay curves. Firstly, we established the oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch. An increased level of lipid peroxidation in oral mucositis was found by measuring malondialdehyde using isolated hamster cheek pouch ulcer. In addition, as a result of in vivo L-band ESR measurements using our model animals, the decay rate constants of carbamoyl-PROXYL, which is a reagent for detecting the redox balance in tissue, were decreased. These results suggest that a redox imbalance might occur by excessive generation of ROS at an early stage of oral mucositis and the consumption of large quantities of antioxidants including glutathione in the locality of oral mucositis. These findings support the presence of ROS involved in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis with anti-cancer therapy, and is useful for the development of novel therapies drugs for oral mucositis.

  7. Standing on the Shoulders of Giants: Results From the Radiation Oncology Academic Development and Mentorship Assessment Project (ROADMAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, Emma B. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Oregon Health Science Center Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Fuller, Clifton D., E-mail: cdfuller@mdanderson.org [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Oregon Health Science Center Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze survey information regarding mentorship practices and cross-correlate the results with objective metrics of academic productivity among academic radiation oncologists at US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited residency training programs. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved survey for the Radiation Oncology Academic Development and Mentorship Assessment Project (ROADMAP) was sent to 1031 radiation oncologists employed at an ACGME-accredited residency training program and administered using an international secure web application designed exclusively to support data capture for research studies. Data collected included demographics, presence of mentorship, and the nature of specific mentoring activities. Productivity metrics, including number of publications, number of citations, h-index, and date of first publication, were collected for each survey respondent from a commercially available online database, and m-index was calculated. Results: A total of 158 academic radiation oncologists completed the survey, 96 of whom reported having an academic/scientific mentor. Faculty with a mentor had higher numbers of publications, citations, and h- and m-indices. Differences in gender and race/ethnicity were not associated with significant differences in mentorship rates, but those with a mentor were more likely to have a PhD degree and were more likely to have more time protected for research. Bivariate fit regression modeling showed a positive correlation between a mentor's h-index and their mentee's h-index (R{sup 2} = 0.16; P<.001). Linear regression also showed significant correlates of higher h-index, in addition to having a mentor (P=.001), included a longer career duration (P<.001) and fewer patients in treatment (P=.02). Conclusions: Mentorship is widely believed to be important to career development and academic productivity. These results emphasize the importance of

  8. Clinical Effectiveness of Aloe Vera in the Management of Oral Mucosal Diseases- A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Gopakumar Ramachandran; Naidu, Giridhar Seetharam; Jain, Supreet; Makkad, Ramanpal Singh; Jha, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aloe vera is well known for its medicinal properties which lead to its application in treating various diseases. Its use in treating oral lesions has not been much documented in literature. Aim Although, systematic reviews on aloe vera and its extracts have been done earlier, but in relation to oral diseases this is the first systematic review. The aim of the present systematic review was to compile evidence based studies on the effectiveness of Aloe vera in treatment of various oral diseases. Materials and Methods Computerized literature searches were performed to identify all published articles in the subject. The following databases were used: PUBMED [MEDLINE], SCOPUS, COCHRANE DATABASE, EMBASE and SCIENCE DIRECT using specific keywords. The search was limited to articles published in English or with an English Abstract. All articles (or abstracts if available as abstracts) were read in full. Data were extracted in a predefined fashion. Assessment was done using Jadad score. Results Fifteen studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. Population of sample study ranged from 20 patients to 110 patients with clinically diagnosed oral mucosal lesions. Out of 15 studies, five were on patients with oral lichen planus, two on patients with oral submucous fibrosis, other studies were carried on patients with burning mouth syndrome, radiation induced mucositis, candida associated denture stomatitis, xerostomic patients and four were on minor recurrent apthous stomatitis. Most studies showed statistically significant result demonstrating the effectiveness of Aloe vera in treatment of oral diseases. Conclusion Although there are promising results but in future, more controlled clinical trials are required to prove the effectiveness of Aloe vera for management of oral diseases. PMID:27656587

  9. Mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity in provoked vestibulodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witzeman K

    2015-08-01

    highest level of pain.Results: The lower vestibule’s mucosa 5.81 (standard deviation =2.83 was significantly more sensitive than the upper vestibule 2.52 (standard deviation =2.6 (P<0.01 on exam. However, mucosal sensitivity was not associated with intercourse pain, while muscle sensitivity was moderately associated with both average and highest intensity of intercourse pain (r=-0.46, P=0.01 and r=-0.42, P=0.02, respectively.Conclusion: This preliminary study suggests that mucosal measures alone may not sufficiently capture the spectrum of clinical pain report in women with PVD, which is consistent with the empirical success of physical therapy in this population.Keywords: vulvodynia, provoked vestibulodynia, pain sensitivity, pelvic floor muscle pain, vulvar pain, pressure pain threshold, dyspareunia

  10. Oral Candida as an aggravating factor of mucositis Induced by radiotherapy; Candida Oral como fator agravante da mucosite radioinduzida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoes, Cristiane Araujo; Castro, Jurema Freire Lisboa de; Cazal, Claudia [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de odontologia

    2011-07-01

    Antineoplastic treatment induces some undesirable consequences in head and neck cancer patients. Often, the emergence of major clinical manifestations, such as oral mucositis, results in temporary interruption of the treatment, decreasing the patients' quality of life, and increasing hospital costs. Radio-induced or chemo-induced oral mucositis is possibly aggravated by opportunist fungal infections, which turn the mucositis more resistant to the conventional treatments. Objective: this study aims to identify the presence of Candida sp. as a possible aggravating factor of oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer under antineoplastic treatment. Method: all patients with radio- or chemo-induced oral mucositis from the Cancer Hospital of Pernambuco, treated between October 2008 and April 2009, were selected for the study. The prevalence of Candida sp was measured through the cytological analysis of oral mucosa in patients with oral mucositis. The fungal presence was correlated with the mucositis severity. Results: the results showed a positive association between fungal colonization and more several lesions (degrees III and IV of mucositis). Conclusion: The outcomes shown may contribute to a solution for unconventional mucosites, which do not respond to the usual treatment. (author)

  11. Chemotherapy Induces Oral Mucositis in Mice Without Additional Noxious Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bertolini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis (OM is a serious side effect of cancer chemotherapy. The pathobiology of oral mucositis remains incompletely understood due to lack of appropriate models which recapitulate the human condition. Existing rodent models are intraperitoneal and require radiation, chemical or mechanical injury to the chemotherapy protocol to induce oral lesions. We aimed to develop an OM mouse model that is induced solely by chemotherapy and reproduces macroscopic, histopathologic and inflammatory characteristics of the human condition. Female C57BL/6 mice were given intravenous 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU injections every 48 hours, for 2 weeks. A high daily dose of intraperitoneal administration was tested for comparison. Mice were monitored daily for weight loss. Epithelial histomorphometric analyses in tongue, esophageal and intestinal tissues were conducted coupled with assessment of apoptosis, cell proliferation, neutrophilic infiltration and the integrity of adherens junctions by immunohistochemistry. Neutropenia was assessed in peripheral blood and bone marrow. Tissues were analyzed for pro-inflammatory cytokines at the protein and mRNA levels. Daily intraperitoneal administration of 5-FU led to rapid weight loss and intestinal mucositis, but no oral inflammatory changes. Intravenous administration triggered atrophy of the oral and esophageal epithelium accompanied by reduction in cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Coincidental with these changes were up-regulation of NF-κB, TNFα, IL-1β, GM-CSF, IL-6 and KC. Despite neutropenia, increased oral neutrophilic infiltration and reduced E-cadherin was observed in oroesophageal mucosae. We developed a novel experimental tool for future mechanistic studies on the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced OM.

  12. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI elastography of testicular disorders in dogs: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.R. Feliciano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the use of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI elastography in the evaluation of testicular disorders in dogs. Eighteen dogs with testicular disorders (thirty-six testicles were assessed. Echotexture, size, contours and margins of testes were analysed by ultrasonography. Deformities and tissue stiffness (greyscale and homogenous or heterogeneous were evaluated by qualitative elastography and shear velocity was determined quantitatively. Subsequent to orchiectomy, testicular samples were collected for histopathology analysis and thirty-six disorders were identified. Qualitative elastography revealed that normal healthy testicular tissues were homogenous and not pliable while the affected testicles had alterations in tissue stiffness and homogeneity. The values obtained for quantitative elastography of the testicular tissues were: normal/healthy - 1.30±0.12 m/s; degenerated - 0.97±0.08 m/s; atrophied - 2.00±0.35 m/s; hypoplastic - 0.82±0.2 m/s; cystic - 1.32±0.18 m/s; orchitis - 2.68±0.42 m/s; interstitial cell tumours - 3.32±0.65 m/s; sertolioma - 2.99±0.07 m/s and leydigoma - 2.73±0.37. ARFI elastography of abnormal testes proved to be an applicable and complementary technique in the diagnosis of testicular disease in dogs.

  13. State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1981-11-01

    Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

  14. Evaluation of long-term cosmetic results and complications following breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujishiro, Satsuki; Mitsumori, Michihide; Kokubo, Masaki; Nagata, Yasushi; Sasai, Keisuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Hospital; Kodama, Hiroshi

    1999-12-01

    Long-term cosmetic outcomes and complications were evaluated in 109 patients with breast cancer who had been treated by breast conservation therapy. Patients received radiation therapy at Kyoto University Hospital following quadrantectomy and level II or III axillary node dissection. Factors that might influence long-term cosmetic results were also analyzed. Irradiation to the breast was administered in 2 Gy fractions, 5 times a week for a total of 50 Gy in all patients. Cobalt-60 {gamma}-rays were used in 108 patients with the exception of 1 patient who received 6 Mev X-ray. Some patients with positive or close margins received boost irradiation of 10 Gy using electron beams to the primary tumor bed. Cosmetic outcome was assessed by both a scoring method and breast retraction assessment (BRA). Forty-seven percent of patients were assessed as excellent to good before radiation therapy. The percent of excellent to good decreased shortly after termination of radiation therapy, but gradually improved and stabilized by 3 years. Seventy percent of patients showed a score of excellent to good 5 years after treatment. The average BRA of the 109 patients was 3.0 cm. This did not change between 3 and 5 years after treatment. A significant correlation between cosmetic score and BRA was shown at all follow-up times. Factors such as age over 50 years (p=0.008), tumor location in the outer quadrant (p=0.02) and boost irradiation (p=0.03) significantly affected the cosmetic score. Arm edema and restriction of shoulder movement were observed in 22% and 49% at the start of radiation therapy, these improved within approximately 3 years and 1 year after treatment, respectively. Mild skin change was observed in 60% of patients even 5 years after treatment. The results indicate that cosmetic outcome after breast conservation therapy is clinically acceptable, and the complication rate is low. (author)

  15. Bladder Function Preservation With Brachytherapy, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Limited Surger in Bladder Cancer Patients: Long-Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluwini, Shafak, E-mail: s.aluwini@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institution, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rooij, Peter H.E. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institution, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kirkels, Wim J.; Boormans, Joost L. [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institution, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karina K.; Wijnmaalen, Arendjan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institution, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of a bladder preservation strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) using external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy/interstitial radiation therapy (IRT). Methods and Materials: Between May 1989 and October 2011, 192 selected patients with MIBC were treated with a combined regimen of preoperative external beam radiation therapy and subsequent surgical exploration with or without partial cystectomy and insertion of source carrier tubes for afterloading IRT using low dose rate and pulsed dose rate. Data for oncologic and functional outcomes were prospectively collected. The primary endpoints were local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), bladder function preservation survival, and salvage cystectomy-free survival. The endpoints were constructed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The mean follow-up period was 105.5 months. The LRFS rate was 80% and 73% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Salvage cystectomy-free survival at 5 and 10 years was 93% and 85%. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 65% and 46%, whereas cancer-specific survival at 5 and 10 years was 75% and 67%. The distant metastases-free survival rate was 76% and 69% at 5 and 10 years. Multivariate analysis revealed no independent predictors of LRFS. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥3 late bladder and rectum toxicity were recorded in 11 patients (5.7%) and 2 patients (1%), respectively. Conclusions: A multimodality bladder-sparing regimen using IRT offers excellent long-term oncologic outcome in selected patients with MIBC. The late toxicity rate is low, and the majority of patients preserve their functional bladder.

  16. Clinical Effectiveness of Aloe Vera in the Management of Oral Mucosal Diseases- A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Gopakumar Ramachandran; Naidu, Giridhar Seetharam; Jain, Supreet; Nagi, Ravleen; Makkad, Ramanpal Singh; Jha, Abhishek

    2016-08-01

    Aloe vera is well known for its medicinal properties which lead to its application in treating various diseases. Its use in treating oral lesions has not been much documented in literature. Although, systematic reviews on aloe vera and its extracts have been done earlier, but in relation to oral diseases this is the first systematic review. The aim of the present systematic review was to compile evidence based studies on the effectiveness of Aloe vera in treatment of various oral diseases. Computerized literature searches were performed to identify all published articles in the subject. The following databases were used: PUBMED [MEDLINE], SCOPUS, COCHRANE DATABASE, EMBASE and SCIENCE DIRECT using specific keywords. The search was limited to articles published in English or with an English Abstract. All articles (or abstracts if available as abstracts) were read in full. Data were extracted in a predefined fashion. Assessment was done using Jadad score. Fifteen studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. Population of sample study ranged from 20 patients to 110 patients with clinically diagnosed oral mucosal lesions. Out of 15 studies, five were on patients with oral lichen planus, two on patients with oral submucous fibrosis, other studies were carried on patients with burning mouth syndrome, radiation induced mucositis, candida associated denture stomatitis, xerostomic patients and four were on minor recurrent apthous stomatitis. Most studies showed statistically significant result demonstrating the effectiveness of Aloe vera in treatment of oral diseases. Although there are promising results but in future, more controlled clinical trials are required to prove the effectiveness of Aloe vera for management of oral diseases.

  17. Strategies for preventing mucosal cell-associated HIV transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Kevin J; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2014-12-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be transmitted through either cell-free virions or leukocytes harboring intracellular HIV in bodily fluids. In recent years, the early initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy leading to virological suppression has resulted in decreased HIV transmission to uninfected partners. Additionally, the efficacy of primary chemoprophylaxis with oral or topical antiretroviral regimens containing tenofovir (with or without emtricitabine) has been demonstrated. However, the efficacy of these approaches may be compromised by suboptimal adherence, decreased drug concentrations in mucosal compartments in women, and genital inflammation. Furthermore, in vitro studies on the effects of tenofovir on cell-associated HIV transmission have produced conflicting results. Preclinical studies suggest that combination preventive approaches may be most effective in stopping the transmission of HIV after mucosal exposure. Since the development of antibodies were found to correlate with protection in the only effective HIV vaccine trial, the administration of preformed mucosal and systemic antibodies may inform the development of safe and effective antibody-based oral, topical, and/or systemic preexposure prophylaxis agents and provide guidance in the development of HIV vaccines that effectively block cell-associated HIV transmission. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Cystic fibrosis: a mucosal immunodeficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Taylor Sitarik; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a channel that regulates the transport of ions and the movement of water across the epithelial barrier. Mutations in CFTR, which form the basis for the clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis, affect the epithelial innate immune function in the lung, resulting in exaggerated and ineffective airway inflammation that fails to eradicate pulmonary pathogens. Compounding the effects of excessive neutrophil recruitment, the mutant CFTR channel does not transport antioxidants to counteract neutrophil-associated oxidative stress. Whereas mutant CFTR expression in leukocytes outside of the lung does not markedly impair their function, the expected regulation of inflammation in the airways is clearly deficient in cystic fibrosis. The resulting bacterial infections, which are caused by organisms that have substantial genetic and metabolic flexibility, can resist multiple classes of antibiotics and evade phagocytic clearance. The development of animal models that approximate the human pulmonary phenotypes—airway inflammation and spontaneous infection—may provide the much-needed tools to establish how CFTR regulates mucosal immunity and to test directly the effect of pharmacologic potentiation and correction of mutant CFTR function on bacterial clearance. PMID:22481418

  19. Low level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients: systematic review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sabbagh, Rula Fawzi; Selting, Wayne J.

    2016-03-01

    Oral mucositis is a debilitating and dose limiting side effect of oncotherapy in cancer patients. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is a promising new intervention for the treatment of oral mucositis. Aims and objectives: 1. Perform a systematic review of available literature on the therapeutic effect of LLLT on established oral mucositis. 2. Formulate recommendations for future studies based on results of review. Methods: Electronic search oflow level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis was conducted and eligible studies reviewed. Results: Four studies met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. A total of 109 patients were included, 59 of which received LLLT as a therapeutic measure. An overall success rate of 81.4% success rate was reported in regard to OM. Conclusion: The review demonstrated the positive therapeutic effect of LLLT on oral mucositis. However, the need for future studies with standardized reporting of parameters and methods is needed to increase the level of evidence of this intervention.

  20. Radiation techniques used in patients with breast cancer: Results of a survey in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algara, Manuel; Arenas, Meritxell; De Las Peñas Eloisa Bayo, Dolores; Muñoz, Julia; Carceller, José Antonio; Salinas, Juan; Moreno, Ferran; Martínez, Francisco; González, Ezequiel; Montero, Angel

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the resources and techniques used in the irradiation of patients with breast cancer after lumpectomy or mastectomy and the status of implementation of new techniques and therapeutic schedules in our country. The demand for cancer care has increased among the Spanish population, as long as cancer treatment innovations have proliferated. Radiation therapy in breast cancer has evolved exponentially in recent years with the implementation of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, image guided radiotherapy and hypofractionation. An original survey questionnaire was sent to institutions participating in the SEOR-Mama group (GEORM). In total, the standards of practice in 969 patients with breast cancer after surgery were evaluated. The response rate was 70% (28/40 centers). In 98.5% of cases 3D conformal treatment was used. All the institutions employed CT-based planning treatment. Boost was performed in 56.4% of patients: electrons in 59.8%, photons in 23.7% and HDR brachytherapy in 8.8%. Fractionation was standard in 93.1% of patients. Supine position was the most frequent. Only 3 centers used prone position. The common organs of risk delimited were: homolateral lung (80.8%) and heart (80.8%). In 84% histograms were used. An 80.8% of the centers used isocentric technique. In 62.5% asymmetric fields were employed. CTV was delimited in 46.2%, PTV in 65% and both in 38.5%. A 65% of the centers checked with portal films. IMRT and hypofractionation were used in 1% and in 5.5% respectively. In most of centers, 3D conformal treatment and CT-based planning treatment were used. IMRT and hypofractionation are currently poorly implemented in Spain.

  1. Radiation therapy for oligorecurrence in prostate cancer. Preliminary results of our centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Ruiz de León, C; Ramírez Backhaus, M; Sobrón Bustamante, M; Casaña, J; Arribas, L; Rubio-Briones, J

    2017-07-21

    There is growing interest in the use of more aggressive therapeutic modalities for treating metastatic prostate cancer. In this study, we examine the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for patients with oligorecurrent prostate cancer. We analysed the biochemical response and toxicity of patients who underwent this therapy at our centre. We selected patients who experienced oligorecurrence between January 2015 to December 2016 and were administered SBRT. The association of androgen deprivation (AD) was left in each case to the decision of the tumour committee. We describe the clinical situation at diagnosis of oligorecurrence, the treatment administered and the biochemical response. We considered a biochemical response to be a 50% reduction in the absolute prostate-specific antigen (PSA) readings. SBRT was administered to 11 patients with bone (82%) and/or lymph node oligometastasis (18%). The treatment regimen for bone oligometastasis was 27Gy divided into 3 sessions, while the treatment for lymph node oligometastasis reached 70Gy. Seven patients had no treatment at the time of diagnosis, 2 were in the castration-resistant phase, 1 patient was in the off phase of intermittent AD, and 1 patient had adjuvant AD for pN1. Seven patients presented a biochemical response with a PSA reduction of 75-100%. The response was not assessable in 4 patients due to the continuing adjuvant AD. With a mean follow-up of 10.5 months, only 2 patients had progressed. Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity was detected in only 1 patient. Our data suggest that the use of SBRT in carefully selected patients with metastatic oligorecurrence of prostate cancer can achieve biochemical response and potentially delay progression and the use of systemic treatments. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of primary and secondary mucosal immunity using avian infectious bronchitis virus as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xueshui; Rosa, Artur J M; Chen, Ding-Geng; Wang, Xiuqing

    2008-02-15

    Although mucosal immune responses are critical for protection of hosts from clinical illness and even mortality caused by mucosal pathogens, the molecular mechanism of mucosal immunity, which is independent of systemic immunity, remains elusive. To explore the mechanistic basis of mucosal protective immunity, gene transcriptional profiling in mucosal tissues was evaluated after the primary and secondary immunization of animals with an attenuated avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), a prototype of Coronavirus and a well-characterized mucosal pathogen. Results showed that a number of innate immune factors including toll-like receptors (TLRs), retinoic-acid-inducible gene-1 (RIG-1), type I interferons (IFNs), complements, and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) were activated locally after the primary immunization. This was accompanied or immediately followed by a potent Th1 adaptive immunity as evidenced by the activation of T-cell signaling molecules, surface markers, and effector molecules. A strong humoral immune response as supported by the significantly up-regulated immunoglobulin (Ig) gamma chain was observed in the absence of innate, Th1 adaptive immunity, or IgA up-regulation after the secondary immunization, indicating that the local memory response is dominated by IgG. Overall, the results provided the first detailed kinetics on the molecular basis underlying the development of primary and secondary mucosal immunity. The key molecular signatures identified may provide new opportunities for improved prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to combat mucosal infections.

  3. Lateral expansion and carbon exchange of a boreal peatland in Finland resulting in 7000 years of positive radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathijssen, Paul J. H.; Kähkölä, Noora; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Lohila, Annalea; Minkkinen, Kari; Laurila, Tuomas; Väliranta, Minna

    2017-03-01

    Data on past peatland growth patterns, vegetation development, and carbon (C) dynamics during the various Holocene climate phases may help us to understand possible future climate-peatland feedback mechanisms. In this study, we analyzed and radiocarbon dated several peat cores from Kalevansuo, a drained bog in southern Finland. We investigated peatland succession and C dynamics throughout the Holocene. These data were used to reconstruct the long-term atmospheric radiative forcing, i.e., climate impact of the peatland since initiation. Kalevansuo peat records revealed a general development from fen to bog, typical for the southern boreal zone, but the timing of ombrotrophication varied in different parts of the peatland. Peat accumulation patterns and lateral expansion through paludification were influenced by fires and climate conditions. Long-term C accumulation rates were overall lower than the average values found from literature. We suggest the low accumulation rates are due to repeated burning of the peat surface. Drainage for forestry resulted in a nearly complete replacement of typical bog mosses by forest species within 40 years after drainage. The radiative forcing reconstruction suggested positive values (warming) for the first 7000 years following initiation. The change from positive to negative forcing was triggered by an expansion of bog vegetation cover and later by drainage. The strong relationship between peatland area and peat type with radiative forcing suggests a possible feedback for future changing climate, as high-latitude peatlands may experience prominent regime shifts, such as fen to bog transitions.

  4. First Global Consensus for Evidence-Based Management of the Hematopoietic Syndrome Resulting From Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Gent, Robert Nicolas; Carr, Zhanat; Schneider, Rita; Bader, Judith; Buglova, Elena; Chao, Nelson; Norman Coleman, C.; Ganser, Arnold; Gorin, Claude; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Andrew Huff, L.; Lillis-Hearne, Patricia; Maekawa, Kazuhiko; Nemhauser, Jeffrey; Powles, Ray; Schünemann, Holger; Shapiro, Alla; Stenke, Leif; Valverde, Nelson; Weinstock, David; White, Douglas; Albanese, Joseph; Meineke, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hematopoietic syndrome (HS) is a clinical diagnosis assigned to people who present with ≥1 new-onset cytopenias in the setting of acute radiation exposure. The World Health Organization convened a panel of experts to evaluate the evidence and develop recommendations for medical countermeasures for the management of HS in a hypothetical scenario involving the hospitalization of 100 to 200 individuals exposed to radiation. The objective of this consultancy was to develop recommendations for treatment of the HS based upon the quality of evidence. Methods English-language articles were identified in MEDLINE and PubMed. Reference lists of retrieved articles were distributed to panel members before the meeting and updated during the meeting. Published case series and case reports of individuals with HS, published randomized controlled trials of relevant interventions used to treat nonirradiated individuals, reports of studies in irradiated animals, and prior recommendations of subject matter experts were selected. Studies were extracted using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. In cases in which data were limited or incomplete, a narrative review of the observations was made. No randomized controlled trials of medical countermeasures have been completed for individuals with radiation-associated HS. The use of GRADE analysis of countermeasures for injury to hematopoietic tissue was restricted by the lack of comparator groups in humans. Reliance on data generated in nonirradiated humans and experimental animals was necessary. Results Based upon GRADE analysis and narrative review, a strong recommendation was made for the administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and a weak recommendation was made for the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conclusions Assessment of therapeutic interventions for HS in

  5. Results of the 2013-2015 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabavizadeh, Nima, E-mail: nabaviza@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Burt, Lindsay M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Mancini, Brandon R. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Morris, Zachary S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Walker, Amanda J. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Miller, Seth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Bhavsar, Shripal [Department of Radiation Oncology, Integris Cancer Institute, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Mohindra, Pranshu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kim, Miranda B. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kharofa, Jordan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to survey radiation oncology chief residents to define their residency experience and readiness for independent practice. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2013 to 2014 and 2014 to 2015, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted an electronic survey of post-graduate year-5 radiation oncology residents in the United States during the final 3 months of training. Descriptive statistics are reported. Results: Sixty-six chief residents completed the survey in 2013 to 2014 (53% response rate), and 69 completed the survey in 2014 to 2015 (64% response rate). Forty to 85% percent of residents reported inadequate exposure to high-dose rate and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Nearly all residents in both years (>90%) reported adequate clinical experience for the following disease sites: breast, central nervous system, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, head and neck, and lung. However, as few as 56% reported adequate experience in lymphoma or pediatric malignancies. More than 90% of residents had participated in retrospective research projects, with 20% conducting resident-led prospective clinical trials and 50% conducting basic science or translational projects. Most chief residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week in the clinical/hospital setting and performing fewer than 15 hours per week tasks that were considered to have little or no educational value. There was more than 80% compliance with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) work hour limits. Fifty-five percent of graduating residents intended to join an established private practice group, compared to 25% who headed for academia. Residents perceive the job market to be more competitive than previous years. Conclusions: This first update of the ARRO chief resident survey since the 2007 to 2008 academic year documents US radiation oncology residents' experiences and conditions over a 2-year period

  6. Neutrophils negatively regulate induction of mucosal IgA responses after sublingual immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, J; Bonnegarde-Bernard, A; Duverger, A; Iwakura, Y; Cormet-Boyaka, E; Martin, T L; Steiner, H E; Bachman, R C; Boyaka, P N

    2015-07-01

    Induction of mucosal immunoglobulin-A (IgA) capable of providing a first line of defense against bacterial and viral pathogens remains a major goal of needle-free vaccines given via mucosal routes. Innate immune cells are known to play a central role in induction of IgA responses by mucosal vaccines, but the relative contribution of myeloid cell subsets to these responses has not firmly been established. Using an in vivo model of sublingual vaccination with Bacillus anthracis edema toxin (EdTx) as adjuvant, we examined the role of myeloid cell subsets for mucosal secretory IgA responses. Sublingual immunization of wild-type mice resulted in a transient increase of neutrophils in sublingual tissues and cervical lymph nodes. These mice later developed Ag-specific serum IgG responses, but not serum or mucosal IgA. Interestingly, EdTx failed to increase neutrophils in sublingual tissues and cervical lymph nodes of IKKβ(ΔMye) mice, and these mice developed IgA responses. Partial depletion of neutrophils before immunization of wild-type mice allowed the development of both mucosal and serum IgA responses. Finally, co-culture of B cells with neutrophils from either wild-type or IKKβ(ΔMye) mice suppressed secretion of IgA, but not IgM or IgG. These results identify a new role for neutrophils as negative regulators of IgA responses.

  7. Mucositis in irradiated cancer patients: effects of an antiseptic mouthrinse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzós, Isabel; Herrera, David; Santos, Sagrario; O'Connor, Ana; Peña, Carmen; Lanzós, Eduardo; Sanz, Mariano

    2010-09-01

    To assess the effects of an antiseptic, non-alcohol based mouth-rinse containing chlorhexidine and cetylpyridinium chloride, in preventing the oral complications associated to radiation therapy in head-and-neck cancer patients. This was a parallel, double blind, prospective, randomized clinical trial. Cancer patients were randomly assigned to one of the two treatments (test mouth-rinse or a placebo). Three visits were scheduled (baseline, 14 and 28 days). Different outcome variables were evaluated: mucositis, plaque and gingival indices, stimulated saliva and salivary pH. 70 patients were screened and 36 were included. The presence and the degree of mucositis significantly increased in both groups and no significant differences were detected between groups, although the median increase in the placebo group (1.81) at 2 weeks was higher than in the test group (1.20). Within the limitations of the small sample size, this study suggests that the use of the tested mouth-rinse may lead to some improvements in clinical parameters in patients irradiated for head-and-neck cancer.

  8. [Treatment and prevention of cancer treatment related oral mucositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Esquide, Gonzalo; Nervi, Bruno; Vargas, Alex; Maíz, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    One of the most common and troublesome complications of modern intensive anticancer treatments is oral mucositis. The purpose of this review is to summarize current evidence and clinical guidelines regarding its prevention and therapy. The use of keratinocyte growth factor-1, supplementary glutamine and other recently developed treatment modalities are discussed. The injury of the oral mucosa caused by antineoplastic agents promotes the local expression of multiple pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic molecules and eventually leads to the development of ulcers. Such lesions predispose patients to several infectious and nutritional complications. Also, they lead to modification of treatment schedules, potentially affecting overall prognosis. Local cryotherapy with ice chips and phototherapy with low energy laser may be useful as preventive measures. Mouthwashes with allopurinol and phototherapy with low energy laser can be used as treatment. In radiotherapy, special radiation administration techniques should be used to minimize mucosal injury. Pain control should always be optimized, with the use of patient controlled analgesia and topical use of morphine. Supplemental glutamine should not be used outside of research protocols. Lastly, thorough attention should be paid to general care and hygiene measures.

  9. Spatial variations in immediate greenhouse gases and aerosol emissions and resulting radiative forcing from wildfires in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengli; Liu, Heping; Dahal, Devendra; Jin, Suming; Li, Shuang; Liu, Shu-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Boreal fires can cool the climate; however, this conclusion came from individual fires and may not represent the whole story. We hypothesize that the climatic impact of boreal fires depends on local landscape heterogeneity such as burn severity, prefire vegetation type, and soil properties. To test this hypothesis, spatially explicit emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosols and their resulting radiative forcing are required as an important and necessary component towards a full assessment. In this study, we integrated remote sensing (Landsat and MODIS) and models (carbon consumption model, emission factors model, and radiative forcing model) to calculate the carbon consumption, GHGs and aerosol emissions, and their radiative forcing of 2001–2010 fires at 30 m resolution in the Yukon River Basin of Alaska. Total carbon consumption showed significant spatial variation, with a mean of 2,615 g C m−2 and a standard deviation of 2,589 g C m−2. The carbon consumption led to different amounts of GHGs and aerosol emissions, ranging from 593.26 Tg (CO2) to 0.16 Tg (N2O). When converted to equivalent CO2 based on global warming potential metric, the maximum 20 years equivalent CO2 was black carbon (713.77 Tg), and the lowest 20 years equivalent CO2 was organic carbon (−583.13 Tg). The resulting radiative forcing also showed significant spatial variation: CO2, CH4, and N2O can cause a 20-year mean radiative forcing of 7.41 W m−2 with a standard deviation of 2.87 W m−2. This emission forcing heterogeneity indicates that different boreal fires have different climatic impacts. When considering the spatial variation of other forcings, such as surface shortwave forcing, we may conclude that some boreal fires, especially boreal deciduous fires, can warm the climate.

  10. Respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic motion monitoring during stereotactic liver radiation therapy: First results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Worm, Esben Schjødt; Hansen, Rune; Larsen, Lars Peter; Grau, Cai; Høyer, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Intrafraction motion may compromise the target dose in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of tumors in the liver. Respiratory gating can improve the treatment delivery, but gating based on an external surrogate signal may be inaccurate. This is the first paper reporting on respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic monitoring during liver SBRT. Two patients with solitary liver metastases were treated with respiratory-gated SBRT guided by three implanted electromagnetic transponders. The treatment was delivered in end-exhale with beam-on when the centroid of the three transponders deviated less than 3 mm [left-right (LR) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions] and 4mm [cranio-caudal (CC)] from the planned position. For each treatment fraction, log files were used to determine the transponder motion during beam-on in the actual gated treatments and in simulated treatments without gating. The motion was used to reconstruct the dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) with and without gating. The reduction in D95 (minimum dose to 95% of the CTV) relative to the plan was calculated for both treatment courses. With gating the maximum course mean (standard deviation) geometrical error in any direction was 1.2 mm (1.8 mm). Without gating the course mean error would mainly increase for Patient 1 [to -2.8 mm (1.6 mm) (LR), 7.1 mm (5.8 mm) (CC), -2.6 mm (2.8mm) (AP)] due to a large systematic cranial baseline drift at each fraction. The errors without gating increased only slightly for Patient 2. The reduction in CTV D95 was 0.5% (gating) and 12.1% (non-gating) for Patient 1 and 0.3% (gating) and 1.7% (non-gating) for Patient 2. The mean duty cycle was 55%. Respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic motion monitoring was performed for two liver SBRT patients. The gating added robustness to the dose delivery and ensured a high CTV dose even in the presence of large intrafraction motion.

  11. Recent progress in mucosal vaccine development: potential and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycke, Nils

    2012-07-25

    Most pathogens access the body through the mucosal membranes. Therefore, effective vaccines that protect at these sites are much needed. However, despite early success with the live attenuated oral polio vaccine over 50 years ago, only a few new mucosal vaccines have been subsequently launched. This is partly due to problems with developing safe and effective mucosal adjuvants. In the past decade, however, the successful development of live attenuated mucosal vaccines against influenza virus and rotavirus infections has boosted interest in this field, and great expectations for new mucosal vaccines lie ahead. Here, I discuss the expanding knowledge and strategies used in the development of mucosal vaccines.

  12. Mucosal disease series. Number IV. Erythema multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farthing, P; Bagan, J-V; Scully, C

    2005-09-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is an acute mucocutaneous hypersensitivity reaction characterised by a skin eruption, with or without oral or other mucous membrane lesions. Occasionally EM may involve the mouth alone. EM has been classified into a number of different variants based on the degree of mucosal involvement and the nature and distribution of the skin lesions. EM minor typically affects no more than one mucosa, is the most common form and may be associated with symmetrical target lesions on the extremities. EM major is more severe, typically involving two or more mucous membranes with more variable skin involvement - which is used to distinguish it from Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), where there is extensive skin involvement and significant morbidity and a mortality rate of 5-15%. Both EM major and SJS can involve internal organs and typically are associated with systemic symptoms. Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) may be a severe manifestation of EM, but some experts regard it as a discrete disease. EM can be triggered by a number of factors, but the best documented is preceding infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV), the lesions resulting from a cell mediated immune reaction triggered by HSV-DNA. SJS and TEN are usually initiated by drugs, and the tissue damage is mediated by soluble factors including Fas and FasL.

  13. Highly Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Exposed Seronegative Men Have Lower Mucosal Innate Immune Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Jennifer A; Romas, Laura; Hoffman, Jennifer C; Elliott, Julie; Saunders, Terry; Burgener, Adam D; Anton, Peter A; Yang, Otto O

    2017-08-01

    Risk of HIV acquisition varies, and some individuals are highly HIV-1-exposed, yet, persistently seronegative (HESN). The immunologic mechanisms contributing to this phenomenon are an area of intense interest. As immune activation and inflammation facilitate disease progression in HIV-1-infected persons and gastrointestinal-associated lymphoid tissue is a highly susceptible site for transmission, we hypothesized that reduced gut mucosal immune reactivity may contribute to reduced HIV-1 susceptibility in HESN men with a history of numerous rectal sexual exposures. To test this, we used ex vivo mucosal explants from freshly acquired colorectal biopsies from healthy control and HESN subjects who were stimulated with specific innate immune ligands and inactivated whole pathogens. Immune reactivity was then assessed via cytokine arrays and proteomic analysis. Mucosal immune cell compositions were quantified via immunohistochemistry. We found that explants from HESN subjects produced less proinflammatory cytokines compared with controls following innate immune stimulation; while noninflammatory cytokines were similar between groups. Proteomic analysis identified several immune response proteins to be differentially expressed between HIV-1-stimulated HESN and control explants. Immunohistochemical examination of colorectal mucosa showed similar amounts of T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells between groups. The results of this pilot study suggest that mucosal innate immune reactivity is dampened in HESN versus control groups, despite presence of similar densities of immune cells in the colorectal mucosa. This observed modulation of the rectal mucosal immune response may contribute to lower risk of mucosal HIV-1 transmission in these individuals.

  14. Mucosal adjuvants for vaccines to control upper respiratory infections in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihashi, Kohtaro; Sato, Shintaro; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Influenza virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae are two major pathogens that lead to significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Since both pathogens enter the host via the mucosa, especially the upper respiratory tract (URT), it is essential to elicit pathogen-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody (Ab) responses at mucosal surfaces for defense of the elderly. However, as aging occurs, alterations in the mucosal immune system of older individuals result in a failure to induce SIgA Abs for protection from these infections. To overcome mucosal immunosenescence, we have developed a mucosal dendritic cell targeting, novel double adjuvant system which we show to be an attractive and effective immunological modulator. This system induces a more balanced Th1- and Th2-type cytokine response which supports both mucosal SIgA and systemic IgG1 and IgG2a Ab responses. Thus, adaptation of this adjuvant system to nasal vaccines for influenza virus and S. pneumoniae could successfully provide protection by supporting pathogen-specific SIgA Ab responses in the URT in the mouse model of aging. In summary, a double adjuvant system is considered to be an attractive and potentially important strategy for the future development of mucosal vaccines for the elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Respuesta inmune mucosal inducida por proteoliposoma y cocleato derivados de N. meningitidis serogrupo B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith del Campo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal vaccination offers attractive advantages to conventional systemic vaccination. Most pathogens enter or establish infection at mucosal surfaces. This represents an enormous challenge for vaccine development. Nevertheless, the availability of safe and effective adjuvants that function mucosally is the major limitation. Therefore, we investigated the impact of mucosal immunization with the Neisseria meningitidis B proteoliposome (AFPL1, Adjuvant Finlay Proteoliposome 1 and its-derived cochleate (Co, AFCo1. They contain multiple PAMPs as immunopotentiators and have delivery system ability as well as Th1 polarization activity. Groups of female mice were immunized by nasal, oral, intravaginal, or intramuscular routes with three doses with AFPL1/AFCo1 alone or containing ovalbumin or glycoprotein (g D2 from Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2. High levels of specific IgG antibodies were detected in sera of mice vaccinated with either route. However, specific IgA antibodies were produced in saliva and vaginal wash only following mucosal delivering. The polarization to a Th1 pattern was confirmed by testing the induction of IgG2a/IgG2c antibody, positive delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, and gIFN production. Additionally, AFCo1gD2 showed practically no vaginal HSV-2 replication and 100% protection against lethal vaginal HSV-2 challenge. In conclusion, the results support the use of AFCo1 as potent Th1 adjuvant for mucosal vaccines, particularly for nasal route.

  16. Dietary L-arginine supplementation reduces Methotrexate-induced intestinal mucosal injury in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koppelmann Tal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginine (ARG and nitric oxide maintain the mucosal integrity of the intestine in various intestinal disorders. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of oral ARG supplementation on intestinal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis following methotrexate (MTX-induced intestinal damage in a rat. Methods Male rats were divided into four experimental groups: Control rats, CONTR-ARG rats, were treated with oral ARG given in drinking water 72 hours before and 72 hours following vehicle injection, MTX rats were treated with a single dose of methotrexate, and MTX-ARG rats were treated with oral ARG following injection of MTX. Intestinal mucosal damage, mucosal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and enterocyte apoptosis were determined 72 hours following MTX injection. RT-PCR was used to determine bax and bcl-2 mRNA expression. Results MTX-ARG rats demonstrated greater jejunal and ileal bowel weight, greater ileal mucosal weight, greater ileal mucosal DNA and protein levels, greater villus height in jejunum and ileum and crypt depth in ileum, compared to MTX animals. A significant decrease in enterocyte apoptosis in the ileum of MTX-ARG rats (vs MTX was accompanied by decreased bax mRNA and protein expression and increased bcl-2 protein levels. Conclusions Treatment with oral ARG prevents mucosal injury and improves intestinal recovery following MTX- injury in the rat.

  17. Mucosal Mast Cells Response in the Jejunum of Ascaridia galli-Infected Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmawi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal defense mechanism against helminthes parasitic nematode to be associated with mucosal mast cells reaction. The aim of this research was to examine the effect of infection by Ascaridia galli parasite to trigger mucosal defense based on mucosal mast cells response in laying hens. Amount of ten head laying hens 12-wk old were divided into two groups containing five chickens of each. The first group, chickens were left as un-infected controls. The second group, chickens were infected orally with 1,000 embryonated eggs of A. galli. Mucosal mast cell responses were assayed by in situ jejunal mast cell counts in stained serial histological sections with Alcian blue (pH 0.3 and Safranin-O (pH 0.1 of the jejunum. Mucosal mast cells response were observed and counted on days 14 post infection. The result showed that A. galli infection was able to increase significantly (P<0.05 mast cells response. This research concluded that the A. galli infection can trigger the involment of mucosal mast cells response in jejunal defense of laying hens against parasitic diseases caused by A. galli.

  18. Mucosal vaccines against respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kejian; Varga, Steven M

    2014-06-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of severe respiratory disease in infants, young children, immune-compromised and elderly populations worldwide. Natural RSV infection in young children does not elicit long-lasting immunity and individuals remain susceptible to repeated RSV infections throughout life. Because RSV infection is restricted to the respiratory tract, an RSV vaccine should elicit mucosal immunity at upper and lower respiratory tracts in order to most effectively prevent RSV reinfection. Although there is no safe and effective RSV vaccine available, significant progress has been recently made in basic RSV research and vaccine development. This review will discuss recent advances in the identification of a new neutralizing antigenic site within the RSV fusion (F) protein, understanding the importance of mucosal immune responses against RSV infection, and the development of novel mucosal vaccination strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mucosal Immunity and Candida albicans Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Moyes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between mucosal surfaces and microbial microbiota are key to host defense, health, and disease. These surfaces are exposed to high numbers of microbes and must be capable of distinguishing between those that are beneficial or avirulent and those that will invade and cause disease. Our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these discriminatory processes has recently begun to expand as new studies bring to light the importance of epithelial cells and novel immune cell subsets such as Th17 T cells in these processes. Elucidating how these mechanisms function will improve our understanding of many diverse diseases and improve our ability to treat patients suffering from these conditions. In our voyage to discover these mechanisms, mucosal interactions with opportunistic commensal organisms such as the fungus Candida albicans provide insights that are invaluable. Here, we review current knowledge of the interactions between C. albicans and epithelial surfaces and how this may shape our understanding of microbial-mucosal interactions.

  20. Low Temperature (30 K) TID Test Results of a Radiation Hardened 128 Channel Serial-to-Parallel Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stephen; Buchner, Stephen; Moseley, Harvey; Ray, Knute; Tuttle, Jim; Quinn, Ed; Buchanan, Ernie; Bloom, Dave; Hait, Tom; Pearce, Mike; hide

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the low temperature, Total Ionizing Dose (TID) tests of radiation hardened serial to parallel converter to be used on the James Webb Space Telescope. The test results show that the original HV583 level shifter - a COTS part -was not suitable for JWST because the supply currents exceeded specs after 20 krad( Si) .The HV584 - functionally similar to the HV583 -was designed using RHBD approach that reduced the leakage currents to within acceptable levels and had only a small effect on the level-shifted output voltage.

  1. Novel vaccine development strategies for inducing mucosal immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujkuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kosuke; Gilbert, Rebekah S; McGhee, Jerry R; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-01-01

    To develop protective immune responses against mucosal pathogens, the delivery route and adjuvants for vaccination are important. The host, however, strives to maintain mucosal homeostasis by responding to mucosal antigens with tolerance, instead of immune activation. Thus, induction of mucosal immunity through vaccination is a rather difficult task, and potent mucosal adjuvants, vectors or other special delivery systems are often used, especially in the elderly. By taking advantage of the common mucosal immune system, the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells and microfold epithelial cells may facilitate the induction of effective mucosal immunity. Thus, novel routes of immunization and antigen delivery systems also show great potential for the development of effective and safe mucosal vaccines against various pathogens. The purpose of this review is to introduce several recent approaches to induce mucosal immunity to vaccines, with an emphasis on mucosal tissue targeting, new immunization routes and delivery systems. Defining the mechanisms of mucosal vaccines is as important as their efficacy and safety, and in this article, examples of recent approaches, which will likely accelerate progress in mucosal vaccine development, are discussed. PMID:22380827

  2. Monitoring of radiation in the environment in the Netherlands. Results in 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knetsch, G.J. (ed.)

    2002-07-01

    This report presents the results of radioactivity measurements in the Dutch environment in 2001. The measurements were carried out by RIVM, RIZA, RIKZ and Inspectorate for Health Protection and Veterinary Public Health. Radioactivity measurements were carried out on airborne particles, deposition, surface water, seawater, drinking water and food (honey, powdered milk, game, poultry, blueberry and chanterelle). Results for ambient dose equivalent rates were obtained from the National Radioactivity Monitoring Network. The levels of radioactivity in the Dutch environment were not elevated in 2001.

  3. Monitoring of radiation in the environment in the Netherlands. Results in 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Knetsch, G J

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of radioactivity measurements in the Dutch environment in 2001. The measurements were carried out by RIVM, RIZA, RIKZ and Inspectorate for Health Protection and Veterinary Public Health. Radioactivity measurements were carried out on airborne particles, deposition, surface water, seawater, drinking water and food (honey, powdered milk, game, poultry, blueberry and chanterelle). Results for ambient dose equivalent rates were obtained from the National Radioactivity Monitoring Network. The levels of radioactivity in the Dutch environment were not elevated in 2001

  4. Environmental radiation dosimetry at Argentine Antarctic Marambio Base (64° 13' S, 56° 43' W): preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, Alba; Ciancio, Vicente; Laurenza, Monica; Storini, Marisa; Esposito, Adolfo; Terrazas, Juan Carlos; Morfino, Paolo; Liberatore, Alessandro; Di Giovan, Gustavo

    2017-09-01

    The preliminary results obtained in the first environmental radiation dosimetry campaign performed in the Antarctic region are presented. This experiment is carried out in the framework of CORA (COsmic Rays in Antarctica) Project, a collaboration between Argentine and Italian institutions. After a feasibility study performed in the Antarctic summer 2013, a new campaign has been carried out, started in March 2015, to measure various components of cosmic ray induced secondary atmospheric radiation at the Argentine Marambio Base (Antarctica; 196 m a.s.l., 64°13' S, 56°43' W). Due to a very few dosimetric data available in literature at high southern latitudes, accurate measurements are performed by using a set of different active and passive detectors. Special attention is dedicated to measure the neutron ambient dose equivalent in different energy ranges, by using an active detector, the Atomtex Rem Counter, for neutron energy between 0.025 eV-14 MeV and a set of passive bubble dosimeters, sensitive to thermal neutrons and neutrons in the energy range 100 keV-20 MeV. The results obtained in the first six months of measurements for X and γ radiation and for low and intermediate energy neutrons (En ≤ 20 MeV) are presented in this paper and show that at high latitude, also at sea level and at distance from the South Magnetic Pole, the ambient dose equivalent is significant, in particular for the high contribution of neutron component. This involves that at higher altitude (i.e. Antarctic Plateau, over 3000 m a.s.l.) the yearly ambient dose equivalent could be higher than the limit of 1 mSv recommended for general public by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Monitoring of radiation in the environment in the Netherlands. Results in 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knetsch, G.J. (ed.)

    2002-07-01

    This report presents the results of radioactivity measurements in the environment in the Netherlands carried out by RIVM, RIZA, RIKZ and Inspectorate for Health Protection and Veterinary Public Health in 2000. Measurements of radioactivity have been carried out in airborne particulates, deposition, surface water, seawater, drinking water and food (honey, game, blueberry and mushrooms). Results for ambient dose equivalent rates have been obtained from the National Radioactivity Monitoring Network. No measurements were done in milk. In 2000 no elevated levels of radioactivity were found in the Dutch environment.

  6. Monitoring of radiation in the environment in the Netherlands. Results in 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Knetsch, G J

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of radioactivity measurements in the environment in the Netherlands carried out by RIVM, RIZA, RIKZ and Inspectorate for Health Protection and Veterinary Public Health in 2000. Measurements of radioactivity have been carried out in airborne particulates, deposition, surface water, seawater, drinking water and food (honey, game, blueberry and mushrooms). Results for ambient dose equivalent rates have been obtained from the National Radioactivity Monitoring Network. No measurements were done in milk. In 2000 no elevated levels of radioactivity were found in the Dutch environment

  7. [Efficacy of sucralfate in the prophylaxis of diarrhea secondary to acute radiation-induced enteritis. Preliminary results of a double-blind randomized trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls, A; Algara, M; Domènech, M; Lladó, A; Ferrer, E; Marín, S

    1991-03-30

    Pelvic radiation therapy is usually associated with intestinal symptoms, especially diarrhea. Sucralfate has been demonstrated to be effective in peptic ulcers, and seems to provide some benefits in chemotherapy induced mucositis and radiogenic rectitis and enteritis. Thirty-four patients between 20-80 years of age, without diarrea and with a Karnofsky index greater than 60%, undergoing whole pelvic irradiation (46 Gy total dose, 2 Gy/day, 5 days/week) have been randomized to receive: sucralfate (1g/6h) (18 patients) or placebo (16 patients) during the treatment period and 3 weeks later. The statistical analysis of the clinical records show that patients receiving sucralfate do better during the whole treatment period (p = 0.03), and they need other complementary measures against diarrhea, as diet (p = 0.03) or pharmacologic support (p = 0.002), later in the course of the radiotherapy. Nevertheless, the incidence and severity of diarrea and other associated simptoms show no differences between both groups. Sucralfate increases the enteric tolerance during pelvic irradiation in cancer patients.

  8. The Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Mission Description and Early Results

    CERN Document Server

    Rottman, G; George, V

    2005-01-01

    This book describes the state-of-the art instruments for measuring the solar irradiance from soft x-ray to the near infrared and the total solar irradiance. Furthermore, the SORCE mission and early results on solar variability are presented along with papers that provide an overview of solar influences on Earth.

  9. Monitoring of radiation in the environment in the Netherlands. Results in 2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knetsch GJ; RIZA; RIKZ; LSO

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the results of radioactivity measurements in the Dutch environment in 2001. The measurements were carried out by RIVM, RIZA, RIKZ and Inspectorate for Health Protection and Veterinary Public Health. Radioactivity measurements were carried out on airborne particles, deposition,

  10. Monitoring of radiation in the environment in the Netherlands. Results in 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knetsch GJ; RIZA; RIKZ; KvW; LSO; IMD

    2004-01-01

    The Dutch government is compelled to measure radioactivity in the environment under terms of the Euratom Treaty of 1957. This report presents the results of radioactivity measurements in the Dutch environment in 2002. The measurements were carried out by RIVM, RIZA, RIKZ and Inspectorate for Health

  11. Monitoring of radiation in the environment in the Netherlands. Results in 2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knetsch GJ; LSO; RIZA; RIKZ; Keuringsdienst van Waren

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of radioactivity measurements in the environment in the Netherlands carried out by RIVM, RIZA, RIKZ and Inspectorate for Health Protection and Veterinary Public Health in 2000. Measurements of radioactivity have been carried out in airborne particulates, deposition,

  12. Monitoring of Radiation in the Environment. Results in the Netherlands in 1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs JEM; RIZA; RIKZ; Keuringsdienst van Waren; LSO

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of radioactivity measurements in the environment in the Netherlands carried out by four organisations in 1998. The yearly averaged gross alfa- and gross beta-activity concentrations in air dust in Bilthoven were 0.0812 and 0.398 mBq4m-3, respectively. The yearly

  13. Mucosal vaccines: recent progress in understanding the natural barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Olga; Lebre, Filipa; Bento, Dulce; Borchard, Gerrit; Junginger, Hans E

    2010-02-01

    It has long been known that protection against pathogens invading the organism via mucosal surfaces correlates better with the presence of specific antibodies in local secretions than with serum antibodies. The most effective way to induce mucosal immunity is to administer antigens directly to the mucosal surface. The development of vaccines for mucosal application requires antigen delivery systems and immunopotentiators that efficiently facilitate the presentation of the antigen to the mucosal immune system. This review provides an overview of the events within mucosal tissues that lead to protective mucosal immune responses. The understanding of those biological mechanisms, together with knowledge of the technology of vaccines and adjuvants, provides guidance on important technical aspects of mucosal vaccine design. Not being exhaustive, this review also provides information related to modern adjuvants, including polymeric delivery systems and immunopotentiators.

  14. A Radiation-Hydrodynamics Code Comparison for Laser-Produced Plasmas: FLASH versus HYDRA and the Results of Validation Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Orban, Chris; Chawla, Sugreev; Wilks, Scott C; Lamb, Donald Q

    2013-01-01

    The potential for laser-produced plasmas to yield fundamental insights into high energy density physics (HEDP) and deliver other useful applications can sometimes be frustrated by uncertainties in modeling the properties and expansion of these plasmas using radiation-hydrodynamics codes. In an effort to overcome this and to corroborate the accuracy of the HEDP capabilities recently added to the publicly available FLASH radiation-hydrodynamics code, we present detailed comparisons of FLASH results to new and previously published results from the HYDRA code used extensively at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We focus on two very different problems of interest: (1) an Aluminum slab irradiated by 15.3 and 76.7 mJ of "pre-pulse" laser energy and (2) a mm-long triangular groove cut in an Aluminum target irradiated by a rectangular laser beam. Because this latter problem bears a resemblance to astrophysical jets, Grava et al., Phys. Rev. E, 78, (2008) performed this experiment and compared detailed x-ray int...

  15. Radiometric gains of satellite sensors of reflected solar radiation - Results from NASA ER-2 aircraft measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Peter; Galimore, Reginald; Cooper, John

    1992-01-01

    A method for using congruent aircraft-satellite observations to calibrate a satellite sensor is presented. A calibrated spectroradiometer at an altitude of 19 km above White Sands, NM, is oriented to view White Sands at the satellite overpass time along the same view vector as the satellite sensor. Collected data are transformed into corresponding estimates of sensor band radiance at the satellite (derived from the aircraft measurements), and average count (from the sensor measurements). These are both averaged across the footprint of the spectroradiometer. Results are presented for the evolution of NOAA-11 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) (Bands 1 and 2) gain between November 1988 and October 1990, and for GOES-6 and GOES-7 VISSR/VAS visible bands during the same period. Estimates of uncertainty in the results are presented, as well as ideas for their reduction in future flights.

  16. Radiation Test Results for Common CubeSat Microcontrollers and Microprocessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, Steven M.; Amrbar, Mehran; Vartanian, Sergeh

    2015-01-01

    SEL, SEU, and TID results are presented for microcontrollers and microprocessors of interest for small satellite systems such as the TI MSP430F1611, MSP430F1612 and MSP430FR5739, Microchip PIC24F256GA110 and dsPIC33FJ256GP710, Atmel AT91SAM9G20, and Intel Atom E620T, and the Qualcomm Snapdragon APQ8064.

  17. Radiation resistance of elastomeric O-rings in mixed neutron and gamma fields: Testing methodology and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenoni, A.; Bignotti, F.; Donzella, A.; Donzella, G.; Ferrari, M.; Pandini, S.; Andrighetto, A.; Ballan, M.; Corradetti, S.; Manzolaro, M.; Monetti, A.; Rossignoli, M.; Scarpa, D.; Alloni, D.; Prata, M.; Salvini, A.; Zelaschi, F.

    2017-11-01

    Materials and components employed in the presence of intense neutron and gamma fields are expected to absorb high dose levels that may induce deep modifications of their physical and mechanical properties, possibly causing loss of their function. A protocol for irradiating elastomeric materials in reactor mixed neutron and gamma fields and for testing the evolution of their main mechanical and physical properties with absorbed dose has been developed. Four elastomeric compounds used for vacuum O-rings, one fluoroelastomer polymer (FPM) based and three ethylene propylene diene monomer rubber (EPDM) based, presently available on the market have been selected for the test. One EPDM is rated as radiation resistant in gamma fields, while the other elastomers are general purpose products. Particular care has been devoted to dosimetry calculations, since absorbed dose in neutron fields, unlike pure gamma fields, is strongly dependent on the material composition and, in particular, on the hydrogen content. The products have been tested up to about 2 MGy absorbed dose. The FPM based elastomer, in spite of its lower dose absorption in fast neutron fields, features the largest variations of properties, with a dramatic increase in stiffness and brittleness. Out of the three EPDM based compounds, one shows large and rapid changes in the main mechanical properties, whereas the other two feature more stable behaviors. The performance of the EPDM rated as radiation resistant in pure gamma fields does not appear significantly better than that of the standard product. The predictive capability of the accelerated irradiation tests performed as well as the applicable concepts of threshold of radiation damage is discussed in view of the use of the examined products in the selective production of exotic species facility, now under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. It results that a careful account of dose rate effects

  18. Forecasting the Earth’s radiation belts and modelling solar energetic particle events: Recent results from SPACECAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poedts Stefaan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available High-energy charged particles in the van Allen radiation belts and in solar energetic particle events can damage satellites on orbit leading to malfunctions and loss of satellite service. Here we describe some recent results from the SPACECAST project on modelling and forecasting the radiation belts, and modelling solar energetic particle events. We describe the SPACECAST forecasting system that uses physical models that include wave-particle interactions to forecast the electron radiation belts up to 3 h ahead. We show that the forecasts were able to reproduce the >2 MeV electron flux at GOES 13 during the moderate storm of 7–8 October 2012, and the period following a fast solar wind stream on 25–26 October 2012 to within a factor of 5 or so. At lower energies of 10 – a few 100 keV we show that the electron flux at geostationary orbit depends sensitively on the high-energy tail of the source distribution near 10 RE on the nightside of the Earth, and that the source is best represented by a kappa distribution. We present a new model of whistler mode chorus determined from multiple satellite measurements which shows that the effects of wave-particle interactions beyond geostationary orbit are likely to be very significant. We also present radial diffusion coefficients calculated from satellite data at geostationary orbit which vary with Kp by over four orders of magnitude. We describe a new automated method to determine the position at the shock that is magnetically connected to the Earth for modelling solar energetic particle events and which takes into account entropy, and predict the form of the mean free path in the foreshock, and particle injection efficiency at the shock from analytical theory which can be tested in simulations.

  19. New generation of oral mucosal vaccines targeting dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Owen, Jennifer L.; Sahay, Bikash; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-01-01

    As most infectious organisms gain entry at mucosal surfaces, there is a great deal of interest in developing vaccines that elicit effective mucosal immune responses against pathogen challenge. Targeted vaccination is one of the most effective methods available to prevent and control infectious diseases. Mucosal vaccines can offer lower costs, better accessibility, needle free delivery, and a higher capacity for mass immunizations during pandemics. Both local mucosal immunity and robust system...

  20. Determination of radiative widths of scalar mesons from experimental results on γ γ ->π π

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boglione, M.; Pennington, M. R.

    1999-06-01

    The scalar mesons in the 1 GeV region constitute the Higgs sector of the strong interactions. They are responsible for the masses of all light flavour hadrons. However, the composition of these scalar states is far from clear, despite decades of experimental effort. The two photon couplings of the f0's are a guide to their structure. Two photon results from Mark II, Crystal Ball and CELLO prompt a new Amplitude Analysis of γγtoπ^+π^-, π^0π^0 cross-sections. Despite their currently limited angular coverage and lack of polarized photons, we use a methodology that provides the nearest one can presently achieve to a model-independent partial wave separation. We find two distinct classes of solutions. Both have very similar two photon couplings for the f_0(980) and f_0(400-1200). Hopefully these definitive results will be a spur to dynamical calculations that will bring us a better understanding of these important states.

  1. Biological image construction by using Raman radiation and Pca: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez E, J. C. [IPN, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingenieria, Campus Guanajuato, Av. Mineral de Valenciana 200, Col. Fracc. Industrial Puerto Interior, 36275 Silao, Guanajuato (Mexico); Cordova F, T. [Universidad de Guanajuato, DIC, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, Loma del Bosque No. 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Hugo R, V., E-mail: jcmartineze@ipn.mx [Universidad de Guadalajara, Centro Universitario de Tonala, Morelos No. 180, 69584 Tonala, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In the last years, the Raman spectroscopy (Rs) technique has had some applications in the study and analysis of biological samples, due to it is able to detect concentrations or presence of certain organic and inorganic compounds of medical interest. In this work, raw data were obtained through measurements in selected points on a square regions in order to detect specific organic / inorganic compounds on biological samples. Gold nano stars samples were prepared and coated with membrane markers (CD 10+ and CD 19+) and diluted in leukemic B lymphocytes. Each data block was evaluated independently by the method of principal component analysis (Pca) in order to find representative dimensionless values (Cp) for each Raman spectrum in a specific coordinate. Each Cp was normalized in a range of 0-255 in order to generate a representative image of 8 bits of the region under study. Data acquisition was performed with Raman microscopy system Renishaw in Via in the range of 550 to 1700 cm-1 with a 785 nm laser source, with a power of 17 m W and 15 s of exposure time were used for each spectrum. In preliminary results could detect the presence of molecular markers CD 10+ and CD 19+ with gold nano stars and discrimination between both markers. The results suggest conducting studies with specific concentrations organic and inorganic materials. (Author)

  2. Protecting LHC IP1/IP5 Components Against Radiation Resulting from Colliding Beam Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N V; Kerby, J S; Strait, J B

    2003-01-01

    Beam-induced energy deposition in the LHC high luminosity interaction region (IR) components due to both pp collisions and beam loss in the IR vicinity is a significant challenge for the design of the high luminosity insertions. It was shown in our previous studies that a set of absorbers would reduce both the peak power density and total heat load to tolerable levels. In this paper the results of further optimization and comprehensive MARS calculations are summarized for the LHC lattice, version 6.4, for the updated IP1 and IP5 layouts and a baseline pp-collision source term. Power density, power dissipation, particle fluxes and spectra, accumulated dose and residual dose rates are studied in the components of the inner triplets including their TAS absorbers, the TAN neutral beam absorbers, separation dipoles, and quadrupoles of the outer triplets and possible collimators there. Results are given for the nominal luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1. The current design is proved to provide the best safety margin under...

  3. Radioactivity in drinking water: regulations, monitoring results and radiation protection issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Nuccetelli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Drinking waters usually contain several natural radionuclides: tritium, radon, radium, uranium isotopes, etc. Their concentrations vary widely since they depend on the nature of the aquifer, namely, the prevailing lithology and whether there is air in it or not. AIMS: In this work a broad overview of the radioactivity in drinking water is presented: national and international regulations, for limiting the presence of radioactivity in waters intended for human consumption; results of extensive campaigns for monitoring radioactivity in drinking waters, including mineral bottled waters, carried out throughout the world in recent years; a draft of guidelines for the planning of campaigns to measure radioactivity in drinking water proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (ARPA of Lombardia.

  4. Protecting LHC Components Against Radiation Resulting From an Unsynchronized Beam Abort

    CERN Document Server

    Drozhdin, A I; Mokhov, N V; Rakhno, I L; Weisse, E

    2001-01-01

    The effect of possible accidental beam loss in the LHC on the IP5 and IP6 insertion elements is studied via realistic Monte Carlo simulations. The scenario studied is beam loss due to unsynchronized abort at an accidental prefire of one of the abort kicker modules. Simulations show that this beam loss would result in severe heating of the IP5 and IP6 superconducting (SC) quadrupoles. Contrary to the previous considerations with a stationary set of collimators in IP5, collimators in IP6 close to the cause are proposed: a movable collimator upstream of the Q4 quadrupole and a stationary one upstream of the extraction septum MSD. The calculated temperature rise in the optimal set of collimators is quite acceptable. All SC magnets are protected by these collimators against damage.

  5. Radiation induced peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids: recent results on formation of hydroperoxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauville, C.; Remita, S. [Lab. de Chimie Physique, Univ. Rene Descartes, Paris (France); Therond, P. [Lab. de Biochimie, Hopital de Bicetre, Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Jore, D.; Gardes-Albert, M. [Lab. de Chimie Physique, Univ. Rene Descartes, Paris (France)

    2001-02-01

    Aqueous solutions of linoleic acid were irradiated in air with {gamma}-rays of {sup 137}Cs. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was been used to separate and measure the production of hydroperoxides. The results obtained after reverse phase chromatography, associated with a microperoxydase for hydroperoxide detection, indicate the presence of two different hydroperoxides. One type of hydroperoxide was the major product obtained when the initial linoleic concentrations were below the critical micellar concentration (2 mM), and the second type was produced when the concentrations were above 2 mM. A further separation carried out on the second hydroperoxide by direct phase HPLC showed that it contains three compounds, mainly HPODE 9 and 13. (author)

  6. Radiative and Dynamical Feedbacks Over the Equatorial Cold-Tongue: Results from Seven Atmospheric GCMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, D; Zhang, T; Covey, C; Klein, S; Collins, W; Kiehl, J; Meehl, J; Held, I; Suarez, M

    2005-01-04

    The equatorial Pacific is a region with strong negative feedbacks. Yet coupled GCMs have exhibited a propensity to develop a significant SST bias in that region, suggesting an unrealistic sensitivity in the coupled models to small energy flux errors that inevitably occur in the individual model components. Could this 'hypersensitivity' exhibited in a coupled model be due to an underestimate of the strength of the negative feedbacks in this region? With this suspicion, the feedbacks in the equatorial Pacific in seven atmospheric GCMs (AGCMs) have been quantified using the interannual variations in that region and compared with the corresponding calculations from the observations. The seven AGCMs are: the NCAR CAM1, the NCAR CAM2,the NCAR CAM3, the NASA/NSIPP Atmospheric Model, the Hadley Center Model, the GFDL AM2p10, and the GFDL AM2p12. All the corresponding coupled runs of these seven AGCMs have an excessive cold-tongue in the equatorial Pacific. The net atmospheric feedback over the equatorial Pacific in the two GFDL models is found to be comparable to the observed value. All other models are found to have a weaker negative net feedback from the atmosphere--a weaker regulating effect on the underlying SST than the real atmosphere. A weaker negative feedback from the cloud albedo and a weaker negative feedback from the atmospheric transport are the two leading contributors to the weaker regulating effect from the model atmosphere. All models overestimate somewhat the positive feedback from water vapor. These results confirm the suspicion that an underestimate of negative feedbacks from the atmosphere over the equatorial Pacific region is a prevalent problem. The results also suggest, however, that a weaker regulatory effect from the atmosphere is unlikely solely responsible for the 'hypersensitivity' in all models. The need to validate the feedbacks from the ocean transport is therefore highlighted.

  7. Meta-analysis of beta radiation augmentation for trabeculectomy - results in distinct ethnic groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Issa de Fendi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis on the efficacy of trabeculectomy (TREC followed by beta irradiation (BRT/TREC compared to TREC alone for glaucoma in terms of intraocular pressure (IOP control and adverse effects of treatment in different ethnic groups. METHODS: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT was performed comparing adjunct BRT treatment for glaucoma with standard TREC after 12 months. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and Cochrane Library databases, Trial registers, bibliographic databases and recent studies of relevant journals were searched. Two reviewers independently reviewed relevant reports and the references from these reports were searched for additional trials, using guidelines set by QUOROM statement criteria. RESULTS: Of a total of 1,350 citations, eight studies (five cohorts, three randomized were identified and only 3 RCT were included in this meta-analysis. Higher IOP reductions were verified in the BRT arm compared to the control arm (mean difference=1.68 mmHg, 95% CI= 0.61-2.68, P=0.002. Uncontrolled postoperative IOP (>21 mmHg was less frequent when BRT was used (BRT/ TREC arm compared to the control arm (38/218=17.4% versus 9/239=3.8%; OR=6.7; 95% CI 3.2-14.3, P<0.0001. Although better IOP control was observed in all patients treated with adjuvant BRT, only Black patients displayed a significant difference (P=0.005. There were no significant differences between the BRT and control arms regarding loss of visual acuity, postoperative complications and necessity of cataract surgery. CONCLUSION: Adjunct BRT increases the success rate of TREC, with better results in non Caucasian patients, and does not influence the occurrence of postoperative complications.

  8. Mucosal Vaccination and Therapy with Genetically Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vehicles that overcome the problem of delivering functional proteins to the mucosal tissues. By the intranasal route, both live and killed LAB vaccine strains have been shown to elicit mucosal and systemic immune responses that

  9. Adaptive immune responses at mucosal surfaces of teleost fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Yang, G.; Kiron, V.

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the extant knowledge on the teleostean mucosal adaptive immune mechanisms, which is relevant for the development of oral or mucosal vaccines. In the last decade, a number of studies have shed light on the presence of new key components of mucosal immunity: a distinct

  10. Concomitant early mucosal and cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Viviane S; Cafe, Virginia; Costa, Jackson; Oliveira, Fabiano; Bafica, Andre; Rosato, Andrea; de Freitas, Luiz A R; Brodskyn, Claudia; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina

    2006-08-01

    Mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) is often clinically silent until reaching a highly advanced state. In this prospective study, 6 of 220 patients with early cutaneous leishmaniasis were diagnosed with mucosal involvement by otorhinolaryngological examination (a rate similar to the reported rate of late ML). Detection of early ML may represent an important strategy in preventing severe mucosal destruction in human leishmaniasis.

  11. Oral Mucositis: understanding the pathology and management

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiou, M; Patapatiou, G; Domoxoudis, S.; Pistevou-Gompaki, K; Papanikolaou, A

    2012-01-01

    Oral Mucositis is a common complication of cancer therapy which may limit the completion of treatment and affect the quality of life of the patient. As we have come to understand its pathogenesis new developments in its management and prevention have allowed us minimize this side effect.

  12. Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Accorona, Remo; Botti, Gerardo; Farina, Davide; Fossati, Piero; Gatta, Gemma; Gogas, Helen; Lombardi, Davide; Maroldi, Roberto; Nicolai, Piero; Ravanelli, Marco; Vanella, Vito

    2017-04-01

    Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck is a very rare and aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. The nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and oral cavity are the most common locations. One-, 3- and 5-year survival rates between 2000 and 2007 were 63%, 30% and 20%, respectively. Cigarette smoking seems to be a risk factor even though the evidence for this is very low. Clinical signs and symptoms are usually nonspecific. While surgery is considered the mainstay of treatment for most mucosal melanomas of the head and neck region, radiotherapy has a role in local control of the disease after surgery. Many new treatment options in the last years, in particular targeted therapies (i.e. inhibitors of c-KIT, NRAS/MEK or BRAF) and immunotherapies (anti CTLA-4 and anti PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies), have changed the history of cutaneous melanoma. Despite the different biology, mucosal melanoma is currently treated in the same way as cutaneous melanoma; however, patients with mucosal melanoma were excluded from the majority of recent clinical trials. Recent molecular findings offer new hope for the development of more effective systemic therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Plant-derived antigens as mucosal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, H S; Herbst-Kralovetz, M M

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, researchers have developed robust systems for recombinant subunit vaccine production in plants. Stably and transiently transformed plants have particular advantages that enable immunization of humans and animals via mucosal delivery. The initial goal to immunize orally by ingestion of plant-derived antigens has proven difficult to attain, although many studies have demonstrated antibody production in both humans and animals, and in a few cases, protection against pathogen challenge. Substantial hurdles for this strategy are low-antigen content in crudely processed plant material and limited antigen stability in the gut. An alternative is intranasal delivery of purified plant-derived antigens expressed with robust viral vectors, especially virus-like particles. The use of pattern recognition receptor agonists as adjuvants for mucosal delivery of plant-derived antigens can substantially enhance serum and mucosal antibody responses. In this chapter, we briefly review the methods for recombinant protein expression in plants, and describe progress with human and animal vaccines that use mucosal delivery routes. We do not attempt to compile a comprehensive list, but focus on studies that progressed to clinical trials or those that showed strong indications of efficacy in animals. Finally, we discuss some regulatory concerns regarding plant-based vaccines.

  14. Results of a Direct Search Using Synchrotron Radiation for the Low-Energy (229)Th Nuclear Isomeric Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeet, Justin; Schneider, Christian; Sullivan, Scott T; Rellergert, Wade G; Mirzadeh, Saed; Cassanho, A; Jenssen, H P; Tkalya, Eugene V; Hudson, Eric R

    2015-06-26

    We report the results of a direct search for the (229)Th (I(π)=3/2(+)←5/2(+)) nuclear isomeric transition, performed by exposing (229)Th-doped LiSrAlF(6) crystals to tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and observing any resulting fluorescence. We also use existing nuclear physics data to establish a range of possible transition strengths for the isomeric transition. We find no evidence for the thorium nuclear transition between 7.3 eV and 8.8 eV with transition lifetime (1-2) s≲τ≲(2000-5600)  s. This measurement excludes roughly half of the favored transition search area and can be used to direct future searches.

  15. Coupling External Radiation Transport Code Results to the GADRAS Detector Response Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection; Thoreson, Gregory G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection; Horne, Steven M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection

    2014-01-01

    Simulating gamma spectra is useful for analyzing special nuclear materials. Gamma spectra are influenced not only by the source and the detector, but also by the external, and potentially complex, scattering environment. The scattering environment can make accurate representations of gamma spectra difficult to obtain. By coupling the Monte Carlo Nuclear Particle (MCNP) code with the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) detector response function, gamma spectrum simulations can be computed with a high degree of fidelity even in the presence of a complex scattering environment. Traditionally, GADRAS represents the external scattering environment with empirically derived scattering parameters. By modeling the external scattering environment in MCNP and using the results as input for the GADRAS detector response function, gamma spectra can be obtained with a high degree of fidelity. This method was verified with experimental data obtained in an environment with a significant amount of scattering material. The experiment used both gamma-emitting sources and moderated and bare neutron-emitting sources. The sources were modeled using GADRAS and MCNP in the presence of the external scattering environment, producing accurate representations of the experimental data.

  16. Gamma radiation measurement in select sand samples from Camburi beach - Vitoria, Espirito Santo, Brazil: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Livia F.; Pecequilo, Brigitte R.S.; Aquino, Reginaldo R., E-mail: lfbarros@ipen.b, E-mail: brigitte@ipen.b, E-mail: raquino@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The variation of natural radioactivity along the surface of the beach sands of Camburi, located in Vitoria, capital of Espirito Santo, southeastern Brazil, was determined from the contents of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K. Eleven collecting points was selected along all the 6 km extension of the Camburi beach. Sand samples collected from all established points on January 2011 were dried and sealed in standard 100 mL polyethylene flasks and measured by high resolution gamma spectrometry after a 4 weeks ingrowth period, in order to allow the secular equilibrium in the {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series. The {sup 226}Ra concentration was determined from the weighted average concentrations of {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi. The {sup 232}Th concentration was determined from the weighted average concentrations of {sup 228}Ac, {sup 212}Pb and {sup 212}Bi and the {sup 40}K from its single gamma transition. Preliminary results show activity concentrations varying from 5 Bq.kg{sup -1} to {sup 222} Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra and from 14 Bq.kg{sup -1} to 1074 Bq.kg{sup -'}1 for {sup 232}Th, both with the highest values for Camburi South and Central. For {sup 40}K, the activity concentrations ranged from 14 Bq.kg{sup -1} to 179 Bq.kg{sup -1} and the highest values were obtained for Camburi South. (author)

  17. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, J.; Pálfalvi, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  18. Seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air and resulting radiation dose to human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.A. Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of radiation hazard of indoor radon is largely due to the radon progenies, which are inhaled and deposited in the human respiratory tract. It is essential to evaluate aerodynamic characteristics of the radon progenies, which are either attached or unattached to aerosol particles, because the dose is strongly dependent on the location of deposition in respiratory tract and hence on the aerodynamic characteristics of the aerosol particles. This paper presents the seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air under domestic conditions at Nagoya University, Japan. A low pressure cascade impactor as an instrument for classifying aerosol sizes and imaging plate as a radiation detector have been employed to characterize the activity size distribution of short-lived radon decay products. In parallel, radon and its progenies concentrations were measured. Taking into account the progeny characteristics, the inhalation dose in the different seasons was also estimated based on a lung dose model with the structure that is related to the ICRP66 respiratory tract model. The result evident that, the highest dose 0.22 mSvy−1 was observed during the winter where the highest value of equilibrium equivalent concentration of radon (EEC and lowest value of the activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD were found in this season; whereas, the dose in spring appeared to be lowest 0.02 mSvy−1.

  19. Effect of Estimated Daily Global Solar Radiation Data on the Results of Crop Growth Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Formayer

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The results of previous studies have suggested that estimated daily globalradiation (RG values contain an error that could compromise the precision of subsequentcrop model applications. The following study presents a detailed site and spatial analysis ofthe RG error propagation in CERES and WOFOST crop growth models in Central Europeanclimate conditions. The research was conducted i at the eight individual sites in Austria andthe Czech Republic where measured daily RG values were available as a reference, withseven methods for RG estimation being tested, and ii for the agricultural areas of the CzechRepublic using daily data from 52 weather stations, with five RG estimation methods. In thelatter case the RG values estimated from the hours of sunshine using the ångström-Prescottformula were used as the standard method because of the lack of measured RG data. At thesite level we found that even the use of methods based on hours of sunshine, which showedthe lowest bias in RG estimates, led to a significant distortion of the key crop model outputs.When the ångström-Prescott method was used to estimate RG, for example, deviationsgreater than ±10 per cent in winter wheat and spring barley yields were noted in 5 to 6 percent of cases. The precision of the yield estimates and other crop model outputs was lowerwhen RG estimates based on the diurnal temperature range and cloud cover were used (mean bias error 2.0 to 4.1 per cent. The methods for estimating RG from the diurnal temperature range produced a wheat yield bias of more than 25 per cent in 12 to 16 per cent of the seasons. Such uncertainty in the crop model outputs makes the reliability of any seasonal yield forecasts or climate change impact assessments questionable if they are based on this type of data. The spatial assessment of the RG data uncertainty propagation over the winter wheat yields also revealed significant differences within the study area. We

  20. High-risk extracranial chondrosarcoma: long-term results of surgery and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Jayant Sastri; Ferguson, Peter C; O'Sullivan, Brian; Catton, Charles N; Griffin, Anthony M; Wunder, Jay S; Bell, Robert S; Kandel, Rita A; Chung, Peter W

    2011-06-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate results of surgery and radiotherapy (RT) for high-risk extracranial chondrosarcomas. Between 1986 and 2006, 60 patients underwent surgery and RT for extracranial high-risk chondrosarcoma. Preoperative RT (median, 50 gray [Gy]) and postoperative RT (median, 60 Gy) were used in 40% and 60% patients, respectively. Sites included pelvis/lower extremity (48%), chest wall (22%), spine/paraspinal (17%), and head and neck (13%). Overall, median tumor size was 7 cm (range, 1-22 cm), and tumor grade was I, II, and III in 22%, 64%, and 14% of cases, respectively. Pathologically clear surgical margins (R0) were present in 50%, microscopic positive margins (R1) in 28%, and gross positive margins (R2) in 13%, half of whom had clinically detectable residual disease; surgical margin was unknown in 8%. Median follow-up was 75 months (range, 5-230 months). The crude local control rate was 90%. Patients with R0, R1, and R2 resections had local control of 100%, 94%, and 42%, respectively. Of the 8 cases that had R2 resection, 3 experienced uncontrolled progression, but 5 patients had stable disease with long-term follow-up. The 10-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and cause-specific survival were 86%, 80.5%, and 89.4%, respectively. Younger age and grade III tumors were associated with worse progression-free survival (P = .03 and .0003, respectively). Although surgery with complete resection is paramount in management of chondrosarcoma, RT is a useful adjuvant treatment and appears to offer excellent and durable local control where wide surgical resection is difficult to accomplish. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  1. Evaluation of mucosal and systemic immune responses elicited by GPI-0100- adjuvanted influenza vaccine delivered by different immunization strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Liu

    Full Text Available Vaccines for protection against respiratory infections should optimally induce a mucosal immune response in the respiratory tract in addition to a systemic immune response. However, current parenteral immunization modalities generally fail to induce mucosal immunity, while mucosal vaccine delivery often results in poor systemic immunity. In order to find an immunization strategy which satisfies the need for induction of both mucosal and systemic immunity, we compared local and systemic immune responses elicited by two mucosal immunizations, given either by the intranasal (IN or the intrapulmonary (IPL route, with responses elicited by a mucosal prime followed by a systemic boost immunization. The study was conducted in BALB/c mice and the vaccine formulation was an influenza subunit vaccine supplemented with GPI-0100, a saponin-derived adjuvant. While optimal mucosal antibody titers were obtained after two intrapulmonary vaccinations, optimal systemic antibody responses were achieved by intranasal prime followed by intramuscular boost. The latter strategy also resulted in the best T cell response, yet, it was ineffective in inducing nose or lung IgA. Successful induction of secretory IgA, IgG and T cell responses was only achieved with prime-boost strategies involving intrapulmonary immunization and was optimal when both immunizations were given via the intrapulmonary route. Our results underline that immunization via the lungs is particularly effective for priming as well as boosting of local and systemic immune responses.

  2. Mucosal immunity and HIV-1 infection: applications for mucosal AIDS vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyakov, Igor M; Ahlers, Jeffrey D

    2012-01-01

    Natural transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) occurs through gastrointestinal and vaginal mucosa. These mucosal tissues are major reservoirs for initial HIV replication and amplification, and the sites of rapid CD4(+) T cell depletion. In both HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected macaques, massive loss of CD4(+) CCR5(+) memory T cells occurs in the gut and vaginal mucosa within the first 10-14 days of infection. Induction of local HIV-specific immune responses by vaccines may facilitate effective control of HIV or SIV replication at these sites. Vaccines that induce mucosal responses, in particular CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), have controlled viral replication at mucosal sites and curtailed systemic dissemination. Thus, there is strong justification for development of next generation vaccines that induce mucosal immune effectors against HIV-1 including CD8(+) CTL, CD4(+) T helper cells and secretory IgA. In addition, further understanding of local innate mechanisms that impact early viral replication will greatly inform future vaccine development. In this review, we examine the current knowledge concerning mucosal AIDS vaccine development. Moreover, we propose immunization strategies that may be able to elicit an effective immune response that can protect against AIDS as well as other mucosal infections.

  3. Effective treatment of chronic radiation proctitis using radiofrequency ablation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chao Zhou; Adler, Desmond C; Becker, Laren; Yu Chen; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Figueiredo, Marisa; Schmitt, Joseph M; Fujimoto, James G; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    .... Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been successful for mucosal ablation in the esophagus. Here we report the efficacy of RFA with the BarRx Halo90 system in three patients with bleeding from chronic radiation proctitis...

  4. Continued Benefit to Rectal Separation for Prostate Radiation Therapy: Final Results of a Phase III Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: Daniel.Hamstra@gmail.com [Texas Oncology, Texas Center for Proton Therapy, Irving, Texas (United States); Mariados, Neil [Associated Medical Professionals of NY, PLLC, Syracuse, New York (United States); Sylvester, John [21st Century Oncology, Inc, Lakewood Ranch, East Bradenton, Florida (United States); Shah, Dhiren [Western New York Urology Associates, LLC, Doing Business as Cancer Care of WNY, Cheektowaga, New York (United States); Karsh, Lawrence [The Urology Center of Colorado, Denver, Colorado (United States); Hudes, Richard [Chesapeake Urology Associates, Doing Business as Chesapeake Urology Research Associates (The Prostate Center), Owings Mills, Maryland (United States); Beyer, David [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Kurtzman, Steven [Urological Surgeons of Northern California Inc, Campbell, California (United States); Bogart, Jeffrey [The Research Foundation of State University of New York/State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York (United States); Hsi, R. Alex [Peninsula Cancer Center, Poulsbo, Washington (United States); Kos, Michael [Urology Nevada, Reno, Nevada (United States); Ellis, Rodney [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Logsdon, Mark [Sutter Health Sacramento Sierra Region, Doing Business as Sutter Institute for Medical Research, Sacramento, California (United States); Zimberg, Shawn [Advanced Radiation Centers of New York, Lake Success, New York (United States); Forsythe, Kevin [Oregon Urology Institute, Springfield, Oregon (United States); Zhang, Hong [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Soffen, Edward [CentraState Medical Center, Freehold, New Jersey (United States); Francke, Patrick [Carolina Regional Cancer Center, LLC, 21st Century Oncology, Inc, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina (United States); Mantz, Constantine [21st Century Oncology, Inc, Fort Meyers, Florida (United States); and others

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: SpaceOAR, a Food and Drug Administration–approved hydrogel intended to create a rectal–prostate space, was evaluated in a single-blind phase III trial of image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy. A total of 222 men were randomized 2:1 to the spacer or control group and received 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to the prostate with or without the seminal vesicles. The present study reports the final results with a median follow-up period of 3 years. Methods and Materials: Cumulative (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0) toxicity was evaluated using the log-rank test. Quality of life (QOL) was examined using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the mean changes from baseline in the EPIC domains were tested using repeated measures models. The proportions of men with minimally important differences (MIDs) in each domain were tested using repeated measures logistic models with prespecified thresholds. Results: The 3-year incidence of grade ≥1 (9.2% vs 2.0%; P=.028) and grade ≥2 (5.7% vs 0%; P=.012) rectal toxicity favored the spacer arm. Grade ≥1 urinary incontinence was also lower in the spacer arm (15% vs 4%; P=.046), with no difference in grade ≥2 urinary toxicity (7% vs 7%; P=0.7). From 6 months onward, bowel QOL consistently favored the spacer group (P=.002), with the difference at 3 years (5.8 points; P<.05) meeting the threshold for a MID. The control group had a 3.9-point greater decline in urinary QOL compared with the spacer group at 3 years (P<.05), but the difference did not meet the MID threshold. At 3 years, more men in the control group than in the spacer group had experienced a MID decline in bowel QOL (41% vs 14%; P=.002) and urinary QOL (30% vs 17%; P=.04). Furthermore, the control group were also more likely to have experienced large declines (twice the MID) in bowel QOL (21% vs 5%; P=.02) and urinary QOL (23% vs 8%; P=.02). Conclusions: The benefit of a hydrogel spacer in

  5. Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Proton Beam Radiation Therapy with Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Results of an Interim Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, David A., E-mail: dbush@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Smith, Jason C. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Slater, Jerry D. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Volk, Michael L. [Transplantation Institute and Liver Center, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Reeves, Mark E. [VA Loma Linda Health Care System, Loma Linda, California (United States); Cheng, Jason [Transplantation Institute and Liver Center, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Grove, Roger [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Vera, Michael E. de [Transplantation Institute and Liver Center, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To describe results of a planned interim analysis of a prospective, randomized clinical trial developed to compare treatment outcomes among patients with newly diagnosed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had either clinical or pathologic diagnosis of HCC and met either Milan or San Francisco transplant criteria. Patients were randomly assigned to transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or to proton beam radiation therapy. Patients randomized to TACE received at least 1 TACE with additional TACE for persistent disease. Proton beam radiation therapy was delivered to all areas of gross disease to a total dose of 70.2 Gy in 15 daily fractions over 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival, with secondary endpoints of overall survival, local tumor control, and treatment-related toxicities as represented by posttreatment days of hospitalization. Results: At the time of this analysis 69 subjects were available for analysis. Of these, 36 were randomized to TACE and 33 to proton. Total days of hospitalization within 30 days of TACE/proton was 166 and 24 days, respectively (P<.001). Ten TACE and 12 proton patients underwent liver transplantation after treatment. Viable tumor identified in the explanted livers after TACE/proton averaged 2.4 and 0.9 cm, respectively. Pathologic complete response after TACE/proton was 10%/25% (P=.38). The 2-year overall survival for all patients was 59%, with no difference between treatment groups. Median survival time was 30 months (95% confidence interval 20.7-39.3 months). There was a trend toward improved 2-year local tumor control (88% vs 45%, P=.06) and progression-free survival (48% vs 31%, P=.06) favoring the proton beam treatment group. Conclusions: This interim analysis indicates similar overall survival rates for proton beam radiation therapy and TACE. There is a trend toward improved local tumor control and progression-free survival with proton beam. There are

  6. An Autonomous System for Experimental Evolution of Microbial Cultures: Test Results Using Ultraviolet-C Radiation and Escherichia Coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouandji, Cynthia; Wang, Jonathan; Arismendi, Dillon; Lee, Alonzo; Blaich, Justin; Gentry, Diana

    2017-01-01

    At its core, the field of microbial experimental evolution seeks to elucidate the natural laws governing the history of microbial life by understanding its underlying driving mechanisms. However, observing evolution in nature is complex, as environmental conditions are difficult to control. Laboratory-based experiments for observing population evolution provide more control, but manually culturing and studying multiple generations of microorganisms can be time consuming, labor intensive, and prone to inconsistency. We have constructed a prototype, closed system device that automates the process of directed evolution experiments in microorganisms. It is compatible with any liquid microbial culture, including polycultures and field samples, provides flow control and adjustable agitation, continuously monitors optical density (OD), and can dynamically control environmental pressures such as ultraviolet-C (UV-C) radiation and temperature. Here, the results of the prototype are compared to iterative exposure and survival assays conducted using a traditional hood, UV-C lamp, and shutter system.

  7. The etiological structure, biological properties of causative agents of peri-implant mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Faustova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to examine the peri-implant mucositis microflora and sensitivity of dominant pathogens to antibiotics and antiseptics. Materials and methods. The study involved 43 patients with peri-implant mucositis. During the study 162 clinical strains of microorganisms were isolated and identified. Cultivation of clinical isolates was performed by the standard method, final identification was carried out with using bacteriological automatic analyzer Vitec – 2compact bioMérieux (France. Determination of sensitivity to antibiotics of pathogens was carried with disc-diffusion method; the study of sensitivity to antiseptics was carried by means of double serial dilutions method by the standard procedure approved by the Order № 167 of the Ministry of Public Health of Ukraine on “On Approval of Training Guidance “Assessment of the sensitivity of microorganisms to antibiotics”, dated by April, 5, 2007. Results. It is The microflora of peri-implant area of patients with mucositis was revealed to consist of opportunistic species. Representatives of Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were dominating among them, although Kocuria spp., Enterobacter spp. and yeast-like fungi Candida spp. were detected quite common. Investigated clinical strains of microorganisms had different sensitivity to antibiotics. All cultures were sensitive to fluoroquinolones, but very significant number of them showed resistance to penicillins, macrolides and lincosamides. In turn, horosten, dekasan and chlorhexidine had powerful antimicrobial effect on dominant pathogens of periimplant mucositis in patients. Moreover, the effect of decametoxine-based antiseptics on some of them significantly exceeded the activity of chlorhexidine. Conclusions. Microflora from peri-implant area of patients with peri-implant mucositis consists mainly of aerobic and facultative anaerobic microorganisms, belonging to normal oral microflora. Most of pathogens of mucositis obtaine

  8. Multi-scale finite element modeling of Eustachian tube function: influence of mucosal adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, J E; Swarts, J D; Ghadiali, S N

    2016-12-01

    The inability to open the collapsible Eustachian tube (ET) leads to the development of chronic Otitis Media (OM). Although mucosal inflammation during OM leads to increased mucin gene expression and elevated adhesion forces within the ET lumen, it is not known how changes in mucosal adhesion alter the biomechanical mechanisms of ET function. In this study, we developed a novel multi-scale finite element model of ET function in adults that utilizes adhesion spring elements to simulate changes in mucosal adhesion. Models were created for six adult subjects, and dynamic patterns in muscle contraction were used to simulate the wave-like opening of the ET that occurs during swallowing. Results indicate that ET opening is highly sensitive to the level of mucosal adhesion and that exceeding a critical value of adhesion leads to rapid ET dysfunction. Parameter variation studies and sensitivity analysis indicate that increased mucosal adhesion alters the relative importance of several tissue biomechanical properties. For example, increases in mucosal adhesion reduced the sensitivity of ET function to tensor veli palatini muscle forces but did not alter the insensitivity of ET function to levator veli palatini muscle forces. Interestingly, although changes in cartilage stiffness did not significantly influence ET opening under low adhesion conditions, ET opening was highly sensitive to changes in cartilage stiffness under high adhesion conditions. Therefore, our multi-scale computational models indicate that changes in mucosal adhesion as would occur during inflammatory OM alter the biomechanical mechanisms of ET function. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Isolation of HIV-1-neutralizing mucosal monoclonal antibodies from human colostrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Friedman

    Full Text Available Generation of potent anti-HIV antibody responses in mucosal compartments is a potential requirement of a transmission-blocking HIV vaccine. HIV-specific, functional antibody responses are present in breast milk, and these mucosal antibody responses may play a role in protection of the majority of HIV-exposed, breastfeeding infants. Therefore, characterization of HIV-specific antibodies produced by B cells in milk could guide the development of vaccines that elicit protective mucosal antibody responses.We isolated B cells from colostrum of an HIV-infected lactating woman with a detectable neutralization response in milk and recombinantly produced and characterized the resulting HIV-1 Envelope (Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs.The identified HIV-1 Env-specific colostrum mAbs, CH07 and CH08, represent two of the first mucosally-derived anti-HIV antibodies yet to be reported. Colostrum mAb CH07 is a highly-autoreactive, weakly-neutralizing gp140-specific mAb that binds to linear epitopes in the gp120 C5 region and gp41 fusion domain. In contrast, colostrum mAb CH08 is a nonpolyreactive CD4-inducible (CD4i gp120-specific mAb with moderate breadth of neutralization.These novel HIV-neutralizing mAbs isolated from a mucosal compartment provide insight into the ability of mucosal B cell populations to produce functional anti-HIV antibodies that may contribute to protection against virus acquisition at mucosal surfaces.

  10. Stimulation of intestinal mucosal growth with intracolonic infusion of short-chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripke, S A; Fox, A D; Berman, J M; Settle, R G; Rombeau, J L

    1989-01-01

    Dietary fiber, which stimulates intestinal mucosal growth, is fermented by anaerobic bacteria in the rat hindgut to the short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) acetate, propionate, and butyrate. Butyrate is the preferred oxidative fuel of the colonocyte in vitro, and the provision of preferred intestinal fuels has been shown to stimulate mucosal proliferation in vivo. This study determined whether chronic colonic infusion of butyrate or a combination of SCFA would stimulate intestinal mucosal growth in an animal deprived of its normal source of SCFA, fiber fermentation in the cecum. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a fat- and fiber-free elemental liquid diet and underwent cecectomy, ileocolic anastomosis, and insertion of a proximal colonic infusion catheter. Rats were then assigned to receive either a continuous infusion of butyrate (20 mM, 40 mM, or 150 mM), SCFA (70 mM acetate + 35 mM propionate + 20 mM butyrate), or saline, or to receive no infusion. A seventh group underwent proximal colonic transection and reanastomosis. After 7 days, jejunal, ileal, and proximal colonic segments were analyzed for mucosal weight, protein, RNA, and DNA. In the colon, the 40-mM butyrate infusion resulted in significant elevations in all mucosal parameters relative to all three control groups, saline infusion, no infusion, and transection. Both the 20-mM butyrate and the SCFA groups showed increased colonic mucosal DNA compared to controls. In the jejunum and ileum, mucosal DNA content was significantly greater in the SCFA group than in the control groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Healing action of topical chamomile on 5-fluoracil induced oral mucositis in hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Vanessa C S; Lopez, Talita C C; Martins, Marco A T; Sant'Ana Filho, Manoel; Bussadori, Sandra K; Fernandes, Kristianne P S; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel A; Martins, Manoela D

    2011-05-01

    Oral mucositis is a common complication in the treatment of cancer. Its management and prevention are seen as high priority in cancer patient care. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of topical chamomile in the treatment of oral mucositis induced by 5-fluoracil (5-FU) in hamsters. One hundred five hamsters were randomly separated into three groups (35 animals each): group I--without treatment (control); group II--treatment with chamomile (Ad-Muc®); and group III--treatment with corticoid (betamethasone elixir--Celestone®). The animals received an intraperitoneal injection of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. On days 3 and 4, the buccal mucosa was scratched and therapy was initiated on day 5. Three animals were sacrificed on days 0, 2, 5, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16, weighed, and the buccal mucosa removed for clinical and histopathological analysis. The animals that developed mucositis and were treated with chamomile or the corticoid agent weighed significantly less than those in the control group. The group treated with the corticoid agent exhibited a more severe clinical condition, whereas the group treated with chamomile exhibited mild mucositis throughout the experiment. The group treated with chamomile had a 12-fold greater chance of scoring zero (absence of mucositis) than the control group. Analysis of the histopathological results demonstrated that the group treated with chamomile exhibited a lesser degree of mucositis throughout the evaluation period in comparison to the control and corticoid groups. Chamomile proved effective in the treatment of oral mucositis in a hamster model. However, well-designed clinical studies are needed to confirm the clinical efficacy of this medicine in humans.

  12. New generation of oral mucosal vaccines targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jennifer L; Sahay, Bikash; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-12-01

    As most infectious organisms gain entry at mucosal surfaces, there is a great deal of interest in developing vaccines that elicit effective mucosal immune responses against pathogen challenge. Targeted vaccination is one of the most effective methods available to prevent and control infectious diseases. Mucosal vaccines can offer lower costs, better accessibility, needle free delivery, and a higher capacity for mass immunizations during pandemics. Both local mucosal immunity and robust systemic responses can be achieved through mucosal vaccination. Recent progress in understanding the molecular and cellular components of the mucosal immune system have allowed for the development of a novel mucosal vaccine platform utilizing specific dendritic cell-targeting peptides and orally administered lactobacilli to elicit efficient antigen specific immune responses against infections, including Bacillus anthracis in experimental models of disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) Practice Patterns and IGRT's Impact on Workflow and Treatment Planning: Results From a National Survey of American Society for Radiation Oncology Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavizadeh, Nima; Elliott, David A; Chen, Yiyi; Kusano, Aaron S; Mitin, Timur; Thomas, Charles R; Holland, John M

    2016-03-15

    To survey image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) practice patterns, as well as IGRT's impact on clinical workflow and planning treatment volumes (PTVs). A sample of 5979 treatment site-specific surveys was e-mailed to the membership of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), with questions pertaining to IGRT modality/frequency, PTV expansions, method of image verification, and perceived utility/value of IGRT. On-line image verification was defined as images obtained and reviewed by the physician before treatment. Off-line image verification was defined as images obtained before treatment and then reviewed by the physician before the next treatment. Of 601 evaluable responses, 95% reported IGRT capabilities other than portal imaging. The majority (92%) used volumetric imaging (cone-beam CT [CBCT] or megavoltage CT), with volumetric imaging being the most commonly used modality for all sites except breast. The majority of respondents obtained daily CBCTs for head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), lung 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or IMRT, anus or pelvis IMRT, prostate IMRT, and prostatic fossa IMRT. For all sites, on-line image verification was most frequently performed during the first few fractions only. No association was seen between IGRT frequency or CBCT utilization and clinical treatment volume to PTV expansions. Of the 208 academic radiation oncologists who reported working with residents, only 41% reported trainee involvement in IGRT verification processes. Consensus guidelines, further evidence-based approaches for PTV margin selection, and greater resident involvement are needed for standardized use of IGRT practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thalidomide induces mucosal healing in postoperative Crohn disease endoscopic recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huiqin; Wang, Xinying; Liu, Side

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Thalidomide has been successful use in patients with refractory Crohn disease (CD) in recent years. Methods: We collected the data of a postoperative CD patient who was prescribed thalidomide to induce remission and reviewed the relevant literatures. Results: A 51-year-old female was diagnosed as CD after an urgent terminal intestinal resection and presented endoscopic recurrence despite the prophylactic treatment with azathioprine (AZA). Fortunately, she achieved mucosal healing (MH) at a low dose of thalidomide for 15 months. Conclusion: Thalidomide is effective to induce MH in the postoperative CD endoscopic recurrence. PMID:27603389

  15. Oral mucosal precancer and cancer: A helpful discriminating clinical tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Crispian; Sciubba, James J; Bagan, Jose V

    2015-09-01

    The authors have collaborated with many colleagues in several countries in formulating a useful and practical clinical tool for evaluating oral mucosal findings on routine examination. Consideration of several factors including history, evolution of positive findings and clinical information allows placement of examination results into one of three categories which are graded by a color scheme along a spectrum of concerns (green to red, or no concern to serious concern). Afforded to the clinician is a straightforward grading system as a starting point for office end clinic use for all patients.

  16. Enhancement of Mucosal Immunogenicity of Viral Vectored Vaccines by the NKT Cell Agonist Alpha-Galactosylceramide as Adjuvant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailbala Singh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene-based vaccination strategies, specifically viral vectors encoding vaccine immunogens are effective at priming strong immune responses. Mucosal routes offer practical advantages for vaccination by ease of needle-free administration, and immunogen delivery at readily accessible oral/nasal sites to efficiently induce immunity at distant gut and genital tissues. However, since mucosal tissues are inherently tolerant for induction of immune responses, incorporation of adjuvants for optimal mucosal vaccination strategies is important. We report here the effectiveness of alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, a synthetic glycolipid agonist of natural killer T (NKT cells, as an adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of vaccine antigens delivered using viral vectors by mucosal routes in murine and nonhuman primate models. Significant improvement in adaptive immune responses in systemic and mucosal tissues was observed by including α-GalCer adjuvant for intranasal immunization of mice with vesicular stomatitis virus vector encoding the model antigen ovalbumin and adenoviral vectors expressing HIV env and Gag antigens. Activation of NKT cells in systemic and mucosal tissues along with significant increases in adaptive immune responses were observed in rhesus macaques immunized by intranasal and sublingual routes with protein or adenovirus vectored antigens when combined with α-GalCer adjuvant. These results support the utility of α-GalCer adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of mucosal vaccines delivered using viral vectors.

  17. HIV enteropathy and aging: gastrointestinal immunity, mucosal epithelial barrier, and microbial translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyin; Kotler, Donald P

    2014-07-01

    Despite decreases in morbidity and mortality as a result of antiretroviral therapy, gastrointestinal dysfunction remains common in HIV infection. Treated patients are at risk for complications of 'premature' aging, such as cardiovascular disease, osteopenia, neurocognitive decline, malignancies, and frailty. This review summarizes recent observations in this field. Mucosal CD4 lymphocytes, especially Th17 cells, are depleted in acute HIV and simian immune deficiency virus (SIV) infections, although other cell types also are affected. Reconstitution during therapy often is incomplete, especially in mucosa. Mucosal barrier function is affected by both HIV infection and aging and includes paracellular transport via tight junctions and uptake through areas of apoptosis; other factors may affect systemic antigen exposure. The resultant microbial translocation is associated with systemic immune activation in HIV and SIV infections. There is evidence of immune activation and microbial translocation in the elderly. The immune phenotypes of immunosenescence in HIV infection and aging appear similar. There are several targets for intervention; blockage of residual mucosal virus replication, preventing antigen uptake, modulating the microbiome, improving T cell recovery, combining therapies aimed at mucosal integrity, augmenting mucosal immunity, and managing traditional risk factors for premature aging in the general population. Aging may interact with HIV enteropathy to enhance microbial translocation and immune activation.

  18. Chemotherapy-induced mucositis pursuant to different phase of chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlette Suzy Puspa Pertiwi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia is the most common Leukemia seen in children. This disease has a manifestation in the oral mucosa, which is caused by either the disease itself or its treatment by chemotherapy, such as mucositis. Oral mucositis is one of a common, debilitating complication of cancer chemotherapy. Mucosal toxicity depends on Several factors; one of them is the duration of the therapy. The aim of this study is to evaluate chemotherapy-induced mucositis pursuant to a different phase of chemotherapy in children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Twenty children diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia who received induction, consolidation, and maintenance chemotherapy of Hasan Sadikin Hospital were included in this study. The criteria used for assessing mucositis was based on general mucositis scale from WHO. Data were collected and presented in the form of tables and percentages. The results showed that every child had developed mucositis during the course of chemotherapy in the induction and consolidation phase, except one child in the maintenance group did not the. at the induction phase 14,3% had developed mucositis at scale 2 and 86,7 at scale 3, consolidation phase 50% at scale 2 and 50% at scale 1, and in maintenance phase 14,3% in scale 28,6% in scale 1, and 57,1 in scale 2. Generally, it was concluded that mucositis develops in every phase of chemotherapy but the scale is slighter as the course of chemotherapy enters the advanced phases.

  19. Feasibility of Endovascular Radiation Therapy Using Holmium-166 Filled Balloon Catheter in a Swine Hemodialysis Fistula Model: Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Yun; Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myoung Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Byung Chul [Dept. of Radiology, Internal Medicine, EwhaWoman' s University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Jung [Dept. of Internal Medicine, EwhaWoman' s University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    To describe how to make a swine hemodialysis fistula model and report our initial experience to test the feasibility of endovascular radiation therapy with Holmium-166 filled balloon catheters. The surgical formation of arterio-venous fistula (AVF) was performed by end-to-side anastomosis of the bilateral jugular vein and carotid artery of 6 pigs. After 4 weeks, angiograms were taken and endovascular radiation was delivered to the venous side of AVF with Holmium-166 filled balloon catheters. Pigs were sacrificed 4 weeks after the radiation and AVFs were harvested for histological examination. All animals survived without any morbidity during the experimental periods. The formation of fistula on the sides of necks was successful in 11 of the 12 pigs (92%). One AVF failed from the small jugular vein. On angiograms, 4 of the 11 AVFs showed total occlusion or significant stenosis and therefore, endovascular radiation could not be performed. Of 7 eligible AVFs, five underwent successful endovascular radiation and two AVFs did not undergo radiation for the control. Upon histologic analysis, one non-radiated AVF showed total occlusion and others showed intimal thickening from the neointimal hyperplasia. Formation of the swine carotid artery-jugular vein hemodialysis fistula model was successful. Endovascular radiation using a Holmium-166 filled balloon catheter was safe and feasible.

  20. The quality of radiation care: the results of focus group interviews and concept mapping to explore the patient's perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, J.L.; Sixma, H.; Triest, B. van; Keus, R.B.; Hendriks, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: In this study, we explore the quality aspects of radiation care from the patient’s perspective in order to develop a draft Consumer Quality Index (CQI) Radiation Care instrument. Materials and methods: Four focus group discussions with (former) cancer patients were held to

  1. Tissue-engineered oral mucosa to study radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, Helen E; Eves, Paula C; Pinnock, Abigail; Thornhill, Martin H; Murdoch, Craig

    2013-11-01

    Oral mucositis is a severe and often dose-limiting side-effect of cancer therapy that occurs in patients receiving radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. Although radiation-induced effects on keratinocytes have been studied, little is known about its effect on fibroblasts or endothelial cells or, more importantly, when all these cells are combined in an engineered oral mucosal model. Monolayer cultures of normal oral keratinocytes, normal oral fibroblasts, human dermal microvascular endothelial cells or tissue-engineered oral mucosa (TEOM) were exposed to 20 Gy irradiation. Cell damage and cytokine release was measured for 72 h for monolayer cultures and for up to 21 d for TEOM. Compared to non-irradiated cells, the viability of all monolayer and co-cultures was significantly reduced 72 h post-irradiation while levels of secreted interleukin IL-6 and CXCL8 were increased. The viability of irradiated TEOM models was significantly reduced compared to controls at all time-points. Histologically, irradiated TEOM displayed thinner epithelium, increased apoptosis and more extensive damage than non-irradiated models. IL-6, CXCL8 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor release was reduced whereas IL-1α levels were increased in irradiated TEOM models compared to controls. TEOM models comprising of mixed cell populations may prove useful in examining the pathobiology of