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Sample records for radiation induced removal

  1. Radiation Induced Removal of Stacking Faults in Quenched Aluminium

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    Bergenlid, U.

    1965-12-15

    The effect of neutron irradiation on specimens of quenched aluminium containing Frank sessile dislocation loops has been studied by means of electron microscopy. The Frank loops were found to trans. form into perfect loops at doses less than 10{sup 17} nvt. A possible reason for the removal of the stacking faults is the displacement of a number of atoms at the faults, leading to the passage of a Shockley partial. Unfaulting induced by stress fields from dislocations, released during the irradiation, can also be important.

  2. Removing Noises Induced by Gamma Radiation in Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging Using a Temporal Median Filter

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    Xu Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI can provide information of medical radionuclides used in nuclear imaging based on Cerenkov radiation, which makes it possible for optical means to image clinical radionuclide labeled probes. However, the exceptionally weak Cerenkov luminescence (CL from Cerenkov radiation is susceptible to lots of impulse noises introduced by high energy gamma rays generating from the decays of radionuclides. In this work, a temporal median filter is proposed to remove this kind of impulse noises. Unlike traditional CLI collecting a single CL image with long exposure time and smoothing it using median filter, the proposed method captures a temporal sequence of CL images with shorter exposure time and employs a temporal median filter to smooth a temporal sequence of pixels. Results of in vivo experiments demonstrated that the proposed temporal median method can effectively remove random pulse noises induced by gamma radiation and achieve a robust CLI image.

  3. Pilot-scale study of the radiation-induced silica removal from underground brackish water in Saudi Arabia

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    Aljohani, Mohammed S. [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Nuclear Engineering Dept.

    2017-08-01

    Silica scaling deposition in industrial water systems is one of the biggest challenges facing the water treatment industry due the low solubility of the scalants in the feed waters. In this preliminary work, we investigated the effectiveness of the ionizing radiation induced removal of silica in water sample from the Salbukh, Saudi Arabia, water treatment plant by using metallic iron as the source of ferric hydroxide to co-precipitate the silica. The influence of several reaction parameters, i.e. iron powder dosage, radiation dose, initial pH and equilibrium pH effect were investigated. In the optimum conditions, up to 75% of silica was removed. This preliminary study showed that this environmentally friendly process is effective in silica removal from underground water.

  4. Removal of acidic indigo carmine textile dye from aqueous solutions using radiation induced cationic hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Müfrettin Murat

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the removal of acidic indigo carmine dyes from aqueous solutions using cationic hydrogels. Irradiated hydrogels were investigated as a new sorbent for dye removal from aqueous solution. Poly(N,N-Diethylamino ethyl methacrylate) [poly(DEAEMA)] hydrogels were prepared by radiation polymerisation of N,N-diethylamino ethyl methacrylate [DEAEMA] monomer in the presence of cross-linking agent, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate [EGDMA], and used for the removal of acidic indigo carmine textile dye. The adsorption of dyes was examined using a batch sorption technique. The effects of pH, time and initial dye concentration on the adsorption capacity of hydrogels were investigated. Maximum gelation ratio was 98.2% at irradiation dose of 5.3 kGy. Maximum equilibrium volume swelling, V/V(0), value was 21.3 at pH 2.8. Maximum amount of adsorbed indigo carmine onto hydrogels was 96.7 mg dye/g gel at pH 2.8, 21 h of adsorption time and 120 mg/L initial dye solution. Swelling and adsorption capacity increased with decreasing of pH. Compared with Congo red, amounts of adsorbed indigo carmine are much higher than those of Congo red. Langmuir isotherm model was the best fit for these poly(DEAEMA) hydrogels-indigo carmine systems.

  5. Development of a water purifier for radioactive cesium removal from contaminated natural water by radiation-induced graft polymerization

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    Seko, Noriaki; Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Kasai, Noboru; Shibata, Takuya; Saiki, Seiichi; Ueki, Yuji

    2018-02-01

    Six years after the Fukushima-nuclear accident, the dissolved radioactive cesium (Cs) is now hardly detected in environmental natural waters. These natural waters are directly used as source of drinking and domestic waters in disaster-stricken areas in Fukushima. However, the possibility that some radioactive Cs adsorbed on soil or leaves will contaminate these natural waters during heavy rains or typhoon is always present. In order for the returning residents to live with peace of mind, it is important to demonstrate the safety of the domestic waters that they will use for their daily life. For this purpose, we have synthesized a material for selective removal of radioactive Cs by introducing ammonium 12-molybdophosphate (AMP) onto polyethylene nonwoven fabric through radiation-induced emulsion graft polymerization technique. Water purifiers filled with the grafted Cs adsorbent were installed in selected houses in Fukushima. The capability of the grafted adsorbent to remove Cs from domestic waters was evaluated for a whole year. The results showed that the tap water filtered through the developed water purifier contained no radioactive Cs, signifying the very effective adsorption performance of the developed grafted adsorbent. From several demonstrations, we have commercialized the water purifier named "KranCsair®". Furthermore, we have also developed a method for the mass production of the grafted nonwoven fabric. Using a 30 L grafting reactor, it was possible to produce the grafted nonwoven fabric with a suitable range of degree of grafting. When an irradiated roll of nonwoven trunk fabric with a length of 10 m and a width of 30 cm was set in the reactor filled with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), AMP, Tween 80 monomer emulsion solution at 40 °C for 1 h, the difference of Dgs in the length and the width on roll of fabrics was negligible.

  6. The synthesis of a new type adsorbent for the removal of toxic gas by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Jiro; Sugo, Takanobu; Fujiwara, Kunio; Sekiguchi, Hideaki

    A new type of adsorbent containing sulfulic acid group for the removal of ammonia gas was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of styrene onto fibrous and nonwoven type polypropylene followed by sulufonation with chlorosulfonic acid. The rate of the adsorption of ammonia gas by H-type adsorbent is independent of the ion-exchange capacity. The amount of ammonia gas adsorbed by the chemical adsorption was dependent on the ion-exchange capacity of H-type fibrous adsorbent and was kept constant value in spite of the equilibrium pressure of ammonia gas. Cu(II)- and Ni(II)-types fibrous adsorbent were prepared by the ion exchange reaction of Na-type fibrous adsorbent with metal nitrate solutions. Although, the rate of adsorption of ammonia gas by metal-type fibrous adsorbent is lower than that of H-type adsorbent, the amount of ammonia gas adsorbed increase compared to H-type adsorbent with the same ion exchange capacity. It was related to the highest coordination number of metal ion. The ratio of the number of ammonia molecules adsorbed chemically and the number of metal ion adsorbed in fibrous adsorbent was 4 for Cu-type and 6 for Ni-type fibrous adsorbent, respectivelly.

  7. Radiation induced oral mucositis

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    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  8. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

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    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants.

  9. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

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    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  10. Radiation induced microbial pesticide

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    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Sang Jae

    2000-01-01

    To control plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria (K1, K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 13 kinds of fungi. Mutants of K1 and YS1 strains were induced by gamma-ray radiation and showed promising antifungal activities. These wild type and mutants showed resistant against more than 27 kinds of commercial pesticides among 30 kinds of commercial pesticides test particularly, YS1-1006 mutant strain showed resistant against hydrogen oxide. And mutants had increased antifungal activity against Botryoshaeria dothidea. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful method for the induction of functional mutants. (author)

  11. Removal of ammonia nitrogen in wastewater by microwave radiation.

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    Lin, Li; Yuan, Songhu; Chen, Jing; Xu, Zuqun; Lu, Xiaohua

    2009-01-30

    Ammonia nitrogen contaminated wastewater has posed great threat on the safety of water resources. In this study, a novel process, microwave (MW) radiation, was developed for the removal of ammonia nitrogen from wastewater. The effects of pH, radiation time, aeration and initial ammonia concentration on the removal were investigated. pH and radiation time showed significant influence on the removal of ammonia nitrogen. The largest removal was obtained at pH 11 in 3 min. Initial ammonia concentration and aeration had minute influence. The mechanism of ammonia removal was proposed as the formation of molecular ammonia (NH(3)) and the subsequent evaporation of NH(3) by MW radiation. Compared with conventional heating (CH) mode, MW radiation led to higher ammonia removal. Both thermal and non-thermal effects were responsible for the removal, but the contribution of thermal effect was more significant. In the end, coke-plant wastewater containing high concentration of ammonia nitrogen was treated by MW radiation. With the initial ammonia concentration of 5000 mg/L at pH 11, ammonia was reduced to 350 mg/L at 750 W by 10 min MW radiation. It could be proposed that MW radiation was an effective method for the removal of ammonia nitrogen from wastewater.

  12. Radiation induced glioblastoma. A case report

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    Kato, Naoki; Kayama, Takamasa; Sakurada, Kaori; Saino, Makoto; Kuroki, Akira [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-05-01

    We report a surgical case of a 54-year-old woman with a radiation induced glioblastoma. At the age of 34, the patient was diagnosed to have a non-functioning pituitary adenoma. It was partially removed followed by 50 Gy focal irradiation with a 5 x 5 cm lateral opposed field. Twenty years later, she suffered from rapidly increasing symptoms such as aphasia and right hemiparesis. MRI showed a large mass lesion in the left temporal lobe as well as small mass lesions in the brain stem and the right medial temporal lobe. These lesions situated within the irradiated field. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed relatively high lactate signal and decreased N-acetyl aspartate, choline, creatine and phosphocreatine signals. Increased lactate signal meant anaerobic metabolism that suggested the existence of a rapidly growing malignant tumor. Thus, we planned surgical removal of the left temporal lesion with the diagnosis of a radiation induced malignant glioma. The histological examination revealed a glioblastoma with radiation necrosis. MIB-1 staining index was 65%. Postoperatively, her symptoms improved, but she died from pneumonia 1 month after the surgery. A autopsy was obtained. The lesion of the left temporal lobe was found to have continuity to the lesion in the midbrain, the pons and the right temporal lobe as well. High MIB-1 staining index suggested that a radiation induced glioblastoma had high proliferative potential comparing with a de novo and secondary glioblastoma. (author)

  13. Removal of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hospital air using microwave radiation

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    firouz valipour

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: Microwave radiation with high functionality can be used to remove bacterial air pollutions. They can help to control biological agents in hospitals and medical centers with good efficiency.

  14. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

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    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  15. Radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

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    Alesawi, Anwar M; El-Hakim, Assaad; Zorn, Kevin C; Saad, Fred

    2014-09-01

    To better understand the mechanism of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis and the advantages and disadvantages of available treatment options for bladder hemorrhage as well as preventive measures. There have been several attempts recently to manage hemorrhagic cystitis with hyperbaric oxygen therapy, transurethral coagulation using Greenlight potassium-titanyl-phosphate laser and other different treatment modalities, but we still need more investigation on larger cohort studies. Hemorrhagic cystitis is an uncommon urological problem. It is most often caused by radiation therapy and cyclophosphamide, but can be associated with other contributing factors. Technological advances in radiation therapy have resulted in greater treatment efficacy, with significant reduction in side-effects such as hemorrhagic cystitis. Higher dose radiation treatment, however, is more often associated with problematic hemorrhagic cystitis. Treatment of hemorrhagic cystitis is multifactorial and can range from simple bladder irrigation to cystectomy with urinary diversion.

  16. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

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    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  17. Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis

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    Osama Muhammad Maria

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT, which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  18. Radiation-induced leiomyosarcoma of the oropharynx

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    Maier Wolfgang

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leiomyosarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor originating from smooth muscle cells, which most frequently develops in the myometrium and in the gastro-intestinal tract. Reviewing the international literature, radiation-induced sarcoma arise in 0.035 to 0.2 % of all irradiated patients. Especially in the head and neck region, radiation-induced leiomyosarcoma is an extremely rare lesion. The authors report a case of a radiation-induced leiomyosarcoma of the tonsillar region of the oropharynx in a 51-year-old male patient, who had undergone radiation therapy of this region 38 years before. The lesion was treated by radical surgery. Diagnostic steps, histological presentation and therapy are described in detail and the literature concerning radiation induced malignancies in general as well as radiation induced leiomyosarcoma in particular is reviewed. The highlights of this case are an extremely uncommon location and a rare pathological entity of radiation induced malignancies.

  19. Antihistamines block radiation-induced taste aversions.

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    Levy, C J; Carroll, M E; Smith, J C; Hofer, K G

    1974-12-13

    When rats are treated with an antihistamine prior to being given sublethal doses of ionizing radiation, the formation of a conditioned saccharin aversion is completely inhibited. A profound aversion could be conditioned with histamine diphosphate as the aversive stimulus. The increase in histamine production after radiation exposure represents the physiological basis of radiation-induced taste aversions.

  20. Radiation-induced leukemias in ankylosing spondylitis

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    Toolis, F. (Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, UK); Potter, B.; Allan, N.C.; Langlands, A.O.

    1981-10-01

    Three cases of leukemia occurred in patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated by radiotherapy. In each case, the leukemic process exhibited bizarre features suggesting that radiation is likely to induce atypical forms of leukemia possessing unusual attributes not shared by spontaneously developing leukemia. The likely distinctive aspects of radiation-induced leukemia are discussed.

  1. Nintedanib Compared With Placebo in Treating Against Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Are Undergoing Chemoradiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-08

    Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  2. Radiation Induced Bystander Effect in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Yunfei; Hei K. Tom

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of biological effects in cells that are not directly traversed by radiation, but merely in the presence of cells that are. Although radiation induced bystander effects have been well defined in a variety of in vitro models using a range of endpoints including clonogenic survival, mutations, neoplastic transformation, apoptosis, micronucleus, chromosomal aberrations and DNA double strand breaks, the mechanism(s) as well as the pres...

  3. Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0531 TITLE: Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William H. McBride CONTRACTING...FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radiation-Induced Vaccination to...determine abscopal responses that are hypothesized to be due to RT- induced vaccination . RT was started 10 days after the first and 3rd dose of

  4. Radiation induced decomposition of a refractory cefathiamidine intermediate.

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    Bao, Qiburi; Chen, Lujun; Wang, Jianlong

    2014-12-01

    Diisopropylthiourea (DPT), an intermediate of a widely used cephalosporin, has been found to be one of the most refractory components in cephalosporin synthesis wastewater. This compound cannot be completely removed by conventional biological processes due to its antimicrobial property. Ionizing radiation has been applied in the decomposition of refractory pollutants in recent years and has proved effective. Therefore, the decomposition of DPT by γ-irradiation was studied. The compound was irradiated at the dose of 150-2000 Gy before a change of concentration and UV absorption of the solutions was detected. Furthermore, the decomposition kinetics and radiation yield (G-value) of DPT was investigated. The results of radiation experiments on DPT-containing aqueous showed that the DPT can be effectively degraded by γ-radiation. DPT concentration decreased with increasing absorbed doses. G-values of radiolytic decomposition for DPT (20 mg/L) were 1.04 and 0.47 for absorbed doses of 150 and 2000 Gy, respectively. The initial concentration and pH of the solutions affected the degradation. As the concentration of substrate increased, the decomposition was reduced. The decrease of removal rate and radiation efficacy under alkaline condition suggested that lower pH values benefit the γ-induced degradation. UV absorption from 190 to 250 nm decreased after radiation while that from 250 to 300 nm increased, indicating the formation of by-products. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Carcinogenesis induced by low-dose radiation

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    Piotrowski Igor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the effects of high dose radiation on human cells and tissues are relatively well defined, there is no consensus regarding the effects of low and very low radiation doses on the organism. Ionizing radiation has been shown to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations which are known to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. The induction of secondary cancers is a challenging long-term side effect in oncologic patients treated with radiation. Medical sources of radiation like intensity modulated radiotherapy used in cancer treatment and computed tomography used in diagnostics, deliver very low doses of radiation to large volumes of healthy tissue, which might contribute to increased cancer rates in long surviving patients and in the general population. Research shows that because of the phenomena characteristic for low dose radiation the risk of cancer induction from exposure of healthy tissues to low dose radiation can be greater than the risk calculated from linear no-threshold model. Epidemiological data collected from radiation workers and atomic bomb survivors confirms that exposure to low dose radiation can contribute to increased cancer risk and also that the risk might correlate with the age at exposure.

  6. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

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    Michael eRobbins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (> 6 months to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses > 30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses > 60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain

  7. Study on radiation-inducible genes

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    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-15

    Transcription of previously identified radiation-inducible genes, uscA and cyoA, was examined responding to radiation. The putative promoter regions of both genes were cloned into pRS415 vector containing lacZ, and the core promoter region necessary for radiation response were determined through promoter deletion method. To investigate the role of uscA, which is assumed to be small RNA related with radiation response, a deletion mutant strain of uscA was constructed. However, uscA deletion did not affect bacterial survival against radiation exposure. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the N-terminal 140 amino acid of SspH1 was found to function as a secretion signal peptide. To create an attenuated tumor-targeting bacteria, Salmonella ptsI mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. Finally, the tumor-targeting ability of ptsI mutant was verified by the use of in-vivo imaging analysis.

  8. Study on radiation-inducible genes

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    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Park, Hae Jun; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-15

    Radiation-inducible genes of E. coli, which is a model strain for bacterial study, and Salmonella, which is a typical strain for pathogenic bacteria were compared through omic analysis. Heat shock response genes and prophage genes were induced by radiation in Salmonella, not in E. coli. Among prophage genes tested, STM2628 showed the highest activation by radiation, and approximately 1 kb promoter region was turned out to be necessary for radiation response. To screen an artificial promoter showing activation by 2 Gy, the high-throughput screening method using fluorescent MUG substrate was established. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. To do this, a tumor-targeting hfq Salmonella mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the signal peptide of SspH1 was determined and the signal peptide was proven to be able to secrete an anticancer protein. Tumor xenograft mouse model was secured, which can be used for efficiency evaluation of bacterial tumor therapy.

  9. Interference Phenomena in Medium Induced Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    We consider the interference pattern for the medium-induced gluon radiation produced by a color singlet quark-antiquark antenna embedded in a QCD medium with size $L$ and `jet quenching' parameter $\\hat q$. Within the BDMPS-Z regime, we demonstrate that, for a dipole opening angle $\\theta_{q\\bar q} \\gg\\theta_c\\equiv {2}/{\\sqrt{\\hat q L^3}}$, the interference between the medium--induced gluon emissions by the quark and the antiquark is suppressed with respect to the direct emissions. This is so since direct emissions are delocalized throughout the medium and thus yield contributions proportional to $L$ while interference occurs only between emissions at early times, when both sources remain coherent. Thus, for $\\tqq \\gg\\theta_c$, the medium-induced radiation is the sum of the two spectra individually produced by the quark and the antiquark, without coherence effects like angular ordering. For $\\tqq \\ll\\theta_c$, the medium--induced radiation vanishes.

  10. Radiation-induced gene expression in human subcutaneous fibroblasts is predictive of radiation-induced fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødningen, Olaug Kristin; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Alsner, Jan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Breast cancer patients show a large variation in normal tissue reactions after ionizing radiation (IR) therapy. One of the most common long-term adverse effects of ionizing radiotherapy is radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF), and several attempts have been made over the last...... years to develop predictive assays for RIF. Our aim was to identify basal and radiation-induced transcriptional profiles in fibroblasts from breast cancer patients that might be related to the individual risk of RIF in these patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fibroblast cell lines from 31 individuals......-treated fibroblasts. Transcriptional differences in basal and radiation-induced gene expression profiles were investigated using 15K cDNA microarrays, and results analyzed by both SAM and PAM. RESULTS: Sixty differentially expressed genes were identified by applying SAM on 10 patients with the highest risk of RIF...

  11. Radiation induced fracture of the scapula

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    Riggs, J.H. III; Schultz, G.D.; Hanes, S.A. (Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, Whittier, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    A case of radiation induced osteonecrosis resulting in a fracture of the scapula in a 76-yr-old female patient with a history of breast carcinoma is presented. Diagnostic imaging, laboratory recommendations and clinical findings are discussed along with an algorithm for the safe management of patients with a history of cancer and musculoskeletal complaints. This case demonstrates the necessity of a thorough investigation of musculoskeletal complaints in patients with previous bone-seeking carcinomas.

  12. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

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    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  13. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  14. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  15. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sarah Baker, Alysa Fairchild Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. Keywords: non–small cell lung cancer, acute, late, toxicity, stricture

  16. ACE inhibition attenuates radiation-induced cardiopulmonary damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Sonja J.; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; de Boer, Rudolf A; Faber, Hette; Cannon, Megan V; Nagle, Peter W; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A; van Luijk, Peter; Coppes, Robert P

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In thoracic irradiation, the maximum radiation dose is restricted by the risk of radiation-induced cardiopulmonary damage and dysfunction limiting tumor control. We showed that radiation-induced sub-clinical cardiac damage and lung damage in rats mutually interact and that

  17. Radiation induced erosion of autoelectron emitter surface

    CERN Document Server

    Mazilova, T I; Ksenofontov, V A

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of erosion of the needle-shaped autoemitter surface under the effect of the helium ions bombardment are studied. The analysis of the radiation-induced formation of the surface atomic roughness testifies to the nondynamic character of shifting the surface atoms by the ions energies below the threshold of the Frenkel stable pairs formation and cathode sputtering. The quasistatic mechanism of the surface erosion due to the atoms shift into the low-coordination positions by releasing the energy of the helium internodal atoms formation is discussed

  18. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sarah; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. PMID:28210168

  19. Radar detection of radiation-induced ionization in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Heifetz, Alexander; Chien, Hual-Te; Liao, Shaolin; Koehl, Eugene R.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2015-07-21

    A millimeter wave measurement system has been developed for remote detection of airborne nuclear radiation, based on electromagnetic scattering from radiation-induced ionization in air. Specifically, methods of monitoring radiation-induced ionization of air have been investigated, and the ionized air has been identified as a source of millimeter wave radar reflection, which can be utilized to determine the size and strength of a radiation source.

  20. Operative treatment of radiation-induced fistulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balslev, I.; Harling, H.

    1987-01-01

    Out of 136 patients with radiation-induced intestinal complications, 45 had fistulae. Twenty-eight patients had rectovaginal fistulae while the remainder had a total of 13 different types of fistulae. Thirty-seven patients were treated operatively and eight were treated conservatively. Thirty-three patients were submitted to operation for rectal fistulae. Of these, 28 were treated by defunctioning colostomy, three were treated by Hartmann's method and resection and primary anastomosis was carried out in two patients. In the course of the period of observation, 35% of the patients developed new radiation damage. The frequency in the basic material without fistulae was 21% (0.05

  1. A case of radiation induced cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchikawa, Kohzo; Sato, Akira; Kato, Joji (Nippon Dental Univ., Niigata (Japan). School of Dentistry at Niigata)

    1994-06-01

    A case of carcinoma on the right buccal mucosa is presented. The case was suspected to have been induced by irradiation therapy for a carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa. An external radiotherapy, 6-MeV Linac, had been done for the carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa in a 55-year-old female, with single lateral direction from the left to the right in 1977. In 1985, a papillary lesion on the right buccal mucosa was detected, and histological examination revealed a papilloma without atypism. In 1991, as an ulcer on the right upper buccal fold as well as three papillary lesions in the central portion of the right buccal mucosa were found, the patient was referred to our clinic. Microscopical findings were consistent with the early invasive carcinomas. A surgical excision of these whole lesions and skin graft were completed. The criteria of this case for the suspicion of radiation-induced carcinoma were as follows. There was a long latent period of 14 years. The previous dose of irradiation, 60 Gy, was sufficient. The right buccal mucosa was involved in the radiation field. A severe scar on the left cheek resulted from the previous irradiation. Anatomically, there is no evidence of the secondary carcinoma on the right buccal mucosa with the primary carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa. No evidence for recurrence of the tumors on both sides of buccal mucosa has been detected so far. Further observations will be necessary to detect other tumors in the irradiated field later on. (author).

  2. Harnessing a radiation inducible promoter of Deinococcus radiodurans for enhanced precipitation of uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2014-11-10

    Bioremediation is an attractive option for the treatment of radioactive waste. We provide a proof of principle for augmentation of uranium bioprecipitation using the radiation inducible promoter, Pssb from Deinococcus radiodurans. Recombinant cells of D. radiodurans carrying acid phosphatase gene, phoN under the regulation of Pssb when exposed to 7 kGy gamma radiation at two different dose rates of 56.8 Gy/min and 4 Gy/min, showed 8-9 fold increase in acid phosphatase activity. Highest whole cell PhoN activity was obtained after 2h in post irradiation recovery following 8 kGy of high dose rate radiation. Such cells showed faster removal of high concentrations of uranium than recombinant cells expressing PhoN under a radiation non-inducible deinococcal promoter, PgroESL and could precipitate uranium even after continuous exposure to 0.6 Gy/min gamma radiation for 10 days. Radiation induced recombinant D. radiodurans cells when lyophilized retained high levels of PhoN activity and precipitated uranium efficiently. These results highlight the importance of using a suitable promoter for removal of radionuclides from solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation-Induced Alopecia after Endovascular Embolization under Fluoroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipawee Ounsakul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced alopecia after fluoroscopically guided procedures is becoming more common due to an increasing use of endovascular procedures. It is characterized by geometric shapes of nonscarring alopecia related to the area of radiation. We report a case of a 46-year-old man presenting with asymptomatic, sharply demarcated rectangular, nonscarring alopecic patch on the occipital scalp following cerebral angiography with fistula embolization under fluoroscopy. His presentations were compatible with radiation-induced alopecia. Herein, we also report a novel scalp dermoscopic finding of blue-grey dots in a target pattern around yellow dots and follicles, which we detected in the lesion of radiation-induced alopecia.

  4. Radiation-induced xerostomia in a patient with nasopharyngeal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: This study reports a case of radiation-induced xerstomia in a patient with nasopharyngeal cancer, to emphasize the need for prompt oral care to prevent untoward effects of xerostomia and to improve patients' quality of life. CASE REPORT: A 60 year old man diagnosed of radiation-induced xerostomia, after 6 ...

  5. Moisture removal characteristics of thin layer rough rice under sequenced infrared radiation heating and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice drying with infrared (IR) radiation has been investigated during recent years and showed promising potential with improved quality and energy efficiency. The objective of this study was to further investigate the moisture removal characteristics of thin layer rough rice heated by IR and cooled ...

  6. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  7. Treatment of radiation-induced cystitis with hyperbaric oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, J.P.; Boland, F.P.; Mori, H.; Gallagher, M.; Brereton, H.; Preate, D.L.; Neville, E.C.

    1985-08-01

    The effects of hyperbaric oxygen on radiation cystitis have been documented in 3 patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. Cessation of gross hematuria and reversal of cystoscopic bladder changes were seen in response to a series of hyperbaric oxygen treatments of 2 atmosphere absolute pressure for 2 hours. To our knowledge this is the first report of cystoscopically documented healing of radiation-induced bladder injury.

  8. In field arsenic removal from natural water by zero-valent iron assisted by solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo, Lorena [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7-D, Arica (Chile); Laboratorio de Investigaciones Medioambientales de Zonas Aridas, LIMZA, Centro de Investigaciones del Hombre en el Desierto, CIHDE, Arica (Chile)], E-mail: lorenacp@uta.cl; Lienqueo, Hugo; Arenas, Maria [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7-D, Arica (Chile); Acarapi, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7-D, Arica (Chile); Laboratorio de Investigaciones Medioambientales de Zonas Aridas, LIMZA, Centro de Investigaciones del Hombre en el Desierto, CIHDE, Arica (Chile); Contreras, David; Yanez, Jorge; Mansilla, Hector D. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2008-12-15

    An in situ arsenic removal method applicable to highly contaminated water is presented. The method is based in the use of steel wool, lemon juice and solar radiation. The method was evaluated using water from the Camarones River, Atacama Desert in northern Chile, in which the arsenic concentration ranges between 1000 and 1300 {mu}g L{sup -1}. Response surface method analysis was used to optimize the amount of zero-valent iron (steel wool) and the citrate concentration (lemon juice) to be used. The optimal conditions when using solar radiation to remove arsenic from natural water from the Camarones river are: 1.3 g L{sup -1} of steel wool and one drop (ca. 0.04 mL) of lemon juice. Under these conditions, removal percentages are higher than 99.5% and the final arsenic concentration is below 10 {mu}g L{sup -1}. This highly effective arsenic removal method is easy to use and inexpensive to implement. - An in situ arsenic removal method applicable to highly contaminated waters by using zero-valent iron, citrate and solar radiation was developed.

  9. Radiation-induced degradation of DNA bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douki, T.; Delatour, T.; Martini, R.; Cadet, J.

    1999-01-01

    Radio-induced degradation of DNA involves radical processes. A series of lesions among the major bases degradation products has been measured in isolated DNA exposed to gamma radiation in aerated aqueous solution. Degradation can be accounted for by the formation of hydroxyl radicals upon radiolysis of water (indirect effect). The four bases are degraded in high yield. Direct effect has been mimicked by photo-induced electron abstraction from the bases producing their radical cation. Quantification of the modified bases showed that guanine is the preferential target. This can be explained by its lower oxidation potential and charge transfer phenomena. La décomposition radio-induite de l'ADN fait intervenir des processus radicalaires. Une série de lésions choisies parmi les produits majeurs de dégradation des bases a été mesurée dans de l'ADN isolé exposé au rayonnement en solution aqueuse aérée. Les modifications sont alors dues aux radicaux hydroxyles produits par la radiolyse de l'eau (effet indirect) et les quatre bases sont efficacement dégradées. L'arrachement d'électrons aux bases par photosensibilisation pour produire leur radical cation, a été utilisé comme modèle de l'effet direct. La quantification des bases modifiées montre que la guanine est préférentiellement dégradée. Cette observation peut s'expliquer par le plus faible potentiel d'oxydation de cette base ainsi que par les phénomènes de transfert de charge vers les guanines.

  10. Decrease in radiation-induced biological effects due to prior radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken; Ohnishi, Takeo [Nara Medical Univ., Nara (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    We are constantly exposed to environmental radiation. ICRP recommends annual limitations of radiation exposure of 1 and 50 mSv for the general public and for radiation workers, respectively. Initially, there were doubts about different limitations between the two groups based on radiation sensitivity. Regarding the dose/effect relationship, two discrepant hypotheses are the linear no-threshold theory and non-linear with threshold theory, which form the basis of the current radiation protection programs. The radioadaptive response fully occurs near the range of natural radiation and radiation-related working area. This response is a biological defense mechanism in which low dose and low dose-rate irradiation elicits cellular resistance to the genotoxic effects of subsequent irradiation. However, its molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. This article reviews the trends in research and our recent findings on decreases in radiation-induced biological effects due to prior radiation exposure.

  11. Radiation-Induced Amorphization of Crystalline Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fama, M.; Loeffler, M. J.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    We study radiation-induced amorphization of crystalline ice, ana lyzing the resu lts of three decades of experiments with a variety of projectiles, irradiation energy, and ice temperature, finding a similar trend of increasing resistance of amorphization with temperature and inconsistencies in results from different laboratories. We discuss the temperature dependence of amorphization in terms of the 'thermal spike' model. We then discuss the common use of the 1.65 micrometer infrared absorption band of water as a measure of degree of crystallinity, an increasingly common procedure to analyze remote sensing data of astronomical icy bodies. The discussion is based on new, high quality near-infrared refl ectance absorption spectra measured between 1.4 and 2.2 micrometers for amorphous and crystalline ices irradiated with 225 keV protons at 80 K. We found that, after irradiation with 10(exp 15) protons per square centimeter, crystalline ice films thinner than the ion range become fully amorphous, and that the infrared absorption spectra show no significant changes upon further irradiation. The complete amorphization suggests that crystalline ice observed in the outer Solar System, including trans-neptunian objects, may results from heat from internal sources or from the impact of icy meteorites or comets.

  12. Coherent Cherenkov radiation from cosmic-ray-induced air showers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, K D; van den Berg, A M; Scholten, O; Werner, K

    2011-08-05

    Very energetic cosmic rays entering the atmosphere of Earth will create a plasma cloud moving with almost the speed of light. The magnetic field of Earth induces an electric current in this cloud which is responsible for the emission of coherent electromagnetic radiation. We propose to search for a new effect: Because of the index of refraction of air, this radiation is collimated in a Cherenkov cone. To express the difference from usual Cherenkov radiation, i.e., the emission from a fast-moving electric charge, we call this magnetically induced Cherenkov radiation. We indicate its signature and possible experimental verification.

  13. Radiation-Induced Second Cancer Risk Estimates From Radionuclide Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Besemer, Abigail

    2017-09-01

    The use of radionuclide therapy in the clinical setting is expected to increase significantly over the next decade. There is an important need to understand the radiation-induced second cancer risk associated with these procedures. In this study the radiation-induced cancer risk in five radionuclide therapy patients was investigated. These patients underwent serial SPECT imaging scans following injection as part of a clinical trial testing the efficacy of a 131Iodine-labeled radiopharmaceutical. Using these datasets the committed absorbed doses to multiple sensitive structures were calculated using RAPID, which is a novel Monte Carlo-based 3D dosimetry platform developed for personalized dosimetry. The excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation-induced cancer in these structures was then derived from these dose estimates following the recommendations set forth in the BEIR VII report. The radiation-induced leukemia ERR was highest among all sites considered reaching a maximum value of approximately 4.5. The radiation-induced cancer risk in the kidneys, liver and spleen ranged between 0.3 and 1.3. The lifetime attributable risks (LARs) were also calculated, which ranged from 30 to 1700 cancers per 100,000 persons and were highest for leukemia and the liver for both males and females followed by radiation-induced spleen and kidney cancer. The risks associated with radionuclide therapy are similar to the risk associated with external beam radiation therapy.

  14. Simulating Space Radiation-Induced Breast Tumor Incidence Using Automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuskin, A C; Osseiran, A I; Tang, J; Costes, S V

    2016-07-01

    Estimating cancer risk from space radiation has been an ongoing challenge for decades primarily because most of the reported epidemiological data on radiation-induced risks are derived from studies of atomic bomb survivors who were exposed to an acute dose of gamma rays instead of chronic high-LET cosmic radiation. In this study, we introduce a formalism using cellular automata to model the long-term effects of ionizing radiation in human breast for different radiation qualities. We first validated and tuned parameters for an automata-based two-stage clonal expansion model simulating the age dependence of spontaneous breast cancer incidence in an unexposed U.S. We then tested the impact of radiation perturbation in the model by modifying parameters to reflect both targeted and nontargeted radiation effects. Targeted effects (TE) reflect the immediate impact of radiation on a cell's DNA with classic end points being gene mutations and cell death. They are well known and are directly derived from experimental data. In contrast, nontargeted effects (NTE) are persistent and affect both damaged and undamaged cells, are nonlinear with dose and are not well characterized in the literature. In this study, we introduced TE in our model and compared predictions against epidemiologic data of the atomic bomb survivor cohort. TE alone are not sufficient for inducing enough cancer. NTE independent of dose and lasting ∼100 days postirradiation need to be added to accurately predict dose dependence of breast cancer induced by gamma rays. Finally, by integrating experimental relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for TE and keeping NTE (i.e., radiation-induced genomic instability) constant with dose and LET, the model predicts that RBE for breast cancer induced by cosmic radiation would be maximum at 220 keV/μm. This approach lays the groundwork for further investigation into the impact of chronic low-dose exposure, inter-individual variation and more complex space radiation

  15. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  16. Seven cases of radiation-induced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugita, Kazunari; Yamamoto, Osamu; Suenaga, Yoshinori [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-09-01

    We report 7 cases of radiation-induced skin cancer. The diagnosis was based on the history of radiotherapy for benign skin diseases (5 cases) and of occupational exposures to medical doctors (2 cases). All cases were squamous cell carcinomas which arose from chronic radiodermatitis. The estimated latent period of these tumors ranged from 6 to 64 years, with an average of 29.9 years. After surgical treatments of the lesions, no local recurrences were observed in all cases. Benign skin diseases had sometimes been treated with low-energy radiation before the 1960s. Considering the estimated latent period, the peak time point of developing risk of radiation-induced skin cancer by such treatment has been already passed, however, the danger of it should not be ignored in future. In association with multiplicity of radiation usage, occupational exposure of radiation may develop the risk of occurrence of skin cancer in future. Therefore, we should recognize that radiation-induced skin cancer is not in the past. In the cases of chronic skin diseases showing warty keratotic growth, erosion and ulcer, we should include chronic radio-dermatitis in the differential diagnosis. It is necessary to recall all patients about the history of radiotherapy or radiation exposure. Rapid histopathological examination is mandatory because of the suspicion of radiation-induced skin cancer. (author)

  17. Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Rana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation.

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen: Primary treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, J.P.; Neville, E.C.

    1989-07-01

    Of 8 patients with symptoms of advanced cystitis due to pelvic radiation treated with hyperbaric oxygen 7 are persistently improved during followup. All 6 patients treated for gross hematuria requiring hospitalization have been free of symptoms for an average of 24 months (range 6 to 43 months). One patient treated for stress incontinence currently is dry despite little change in bladder capacity, implying salutary effect from hyperbaric oxygen on the sphincter mechanism. One patient with radiation-induced prostatitis failed to respond. This experience suggests that hyperbaric oxygen should be considered the primary treatment for patients with symptomatic radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

  19. Radiation-induced leiomyosarcoma of the posterior neck region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Gorjón, Pablo; Gil Melcón, María; Muñoz Herrera, Angel M; Franco Calvo, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Leiomyosarcomas are mesenchymal malignant tumours that appear in smooth muscle cells. Their most frequent locations are the uterus and gastrointestinal tract. Their occurrence in head and neck is considered exceptional. We present a patient with a posterior neck region leiomyosarcoma who had received radiation for a nasopharyngeal carcinoma 20 years earlier. The incidence ratio of these tumours in radiated patients (therefore considered radiation-induced) ranges from 0,035 to 0,2%. Radiation-induced sarcomas are difficult to diagnose due to the induration and fibrosis in the radiated area and the non-specific symptoms that they present. Their prognosis is very poor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Removal of ammonia nitrogen in wastewater by microwave radiation: a pilot-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Chen, Jing; Xu, Zuqun; Yuan, Songhu; Cao, Menghua; Liu, Huangcheng; Lu, Xiaohua

    2009-09-15

    A large removal of ammonia nitrogen in wastewater has been achieved by microwave (MW) radiation in our previous bench-scale study. This study developed a continuous pilot-scale MW system to remove ammonia nitrogen in real wastewater. A typical high concentration of ammonia nitrogen contaminated wastewater, the coke-plant wastewater from a Coke company, was treated. The output power of the microwave reactor was 4.8 kW and the handling capacity of the reactor was about 5m(3) per day. The ammonia removal efficiencies under four operating conditions, including ambient temperature, wastewater flow rate, aeration conditions and initial concentration were evaluated in the pilot-scale experiments. The ammonia removal could reach about 80% for the real coke-plant wastewater with ammonia nitrogen concentrations of 2400-11000 mg/L. The running cost of the MW technique was a little lower than the conventional steam-stripping method. The continuous microwave system showed the potential as an effective method for ammonia nitrogen removal in coke-plant water treatment. It is proposed that this process is suitable for the treatment of toxic wastewater containing high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen.

  1. Construction of radiation - induced metastasis model in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kuk; Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Sung Wook; Kim, Jae Sung; Hwang, Sang Gu; Kang, Joo Hyun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    In treatment of cancer, distant metastases are important limiting factor because an estimated 50% of all cancer patients will develop metastases, and the metastases are major causing of cancer treatment failure. Recently a few reports indicated {gamma}-radiation induced an increase of invasiveness of several cancer cells. In this study, we had tried to show the possibility that radiation could also induce metastasis in vivo system. To prove our hypothesis, we constructed primary tumor by using C6-TL transfectant cell line expressing HSV1-tk and firefly luciferase (fLuc), and then {gamma}-radiation was treated to xenografts locally. Treatment of {gamma}-radiation to primary C6-TL xenografts of mice reduced size of xenografts and elongated survival of mice than those of mock control mice. But we also show that {gamma}-radiation treatment was followed by the growth of dormant metastases in various organs including lung and intestine after 2-4 weeks of {gamma}-radiation treatment. When bioluminescence imaging indicated growth of tumor in organs in mice, we sacrificed the mice and repeat acquired bioluminescence imaging after repeatedly. These images presented tumor growth locations exactly in organs. Because metastatic tumor candidates have morphology of foci, biopsies were performed for histological analysis or PCR analysis to confirm metastases. In most foci, histological analysis indicated several features of typical cancer tissue and PCR analysis showed present of fLuc gene in metastases. Detection of fLuc gene in metastases indicated these foci were originated from primary C6-TL xenografts, and the results suggest that {gamma}-radiation could promote metastasis in vivo as well as in vitro system. Although we need to understand changes of intracellular signaling or physiological phenomena of the radiation-induced metastasis yet, these results also imply that {gamma}-radiation treatment only to cancer patients need to pay attention carefully, and development of new

  2. Radiation-Induced Heart Disease: Pathologic Abnormalities and Putative Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil K Taunk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a common diagnosis in women. Breast radiation has become a critical in managing patients who receive breast conserving surgery, or have certain high-risk features after mastectomy. Most patients have an excellent prognosis, therefore understanding the late effects of radiation to the chest is important. Radiation induced heart disease (RIHD comprises a spectrum of cardiac pathology including myocardial fibrosis and cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, valvular disease, pericardial disease, and arrhythmias. Tissue fibrosis is a common mediator in RIHD. Multiple pathways converge with both acute and chronic cellular, molecular, and genetic changes to result in fibrosis. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of cardiac disease related to radiation therapy to the chest. Our understanding of these mechanisms has improved substantially, but much work remains to further refine radiation delivery techniques and develop therapeutics to battle late effects of radiation.

  3. Optical imaging of radiation-induced metabolic changes in radiation-sensitive and resistant cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhallak, Kinan; Jenkins, Samir V.; Lee, David E.; Greene, Nicholas P.; Quinn, Kyle P.; Griffin, Robert J.; Dings, Ruud P. M.; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2017-06-01

    Radiation resistance remains a significant problem for cancer patients, especially due to the time required to definitively determine treatment outcome. For fractionated radiation therapy, nearly 7 to 8 weeks can elapse before a tumor is deemed to be radiation-resistant. We used the optical redox ratio of FAD/(FAD+NADH) to identify early metabolic changes in radiation-resistant lung cancer cells. These radiation-resistant human A549 lung cancer cells were developed by exposing the parental A549 cells to repeated doses of radiation (2 Gy). Although there were no significant differences in the optical redox ratio between the parental and resistant cell lines prior to radiation, there was a significant decrease in the optical redox ratio of the radiation-resistant cells 24 h after a single radiation exposure (p=0.01). This change in the redox ratio was indicative of increased catabolism of glucose in the resistant cells after radiation and was associated with significantly greater protein content of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α), a key promoter of glycolytic metabolism. Our results demonstrate that the optical redox ratio could provide a rapid method of determining radiation resistance status based on early metabolic changes in cancer cells.

  4. Radiation recall dermatitis induced by trastuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Kaynak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation recall phenomenon is an acute, egzematous reaction that develops throughout a previously irradiated area, precipitated by the administration of docetaxel, doxorubicin, gemcitabine and paclitaxel. We report a 52-year-old woman with breast cancer who received locoregional radiotherapy followed by trastuzumab monotherapy. Three day after the first cycle of trastuzumab monotherapy, dermatitis developed in the previously irradiated skin.

  5. RADIATION INDUCED VULCANIZATION OF RUBBER LATEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesrobian, R.B.; Ballantine, D.S.; Metz, D.J.

    1964-04-28

    A method of vulcanizing rubber latex by exposing a mixture containing rubber latex and from about 15 to about 21.3 wt% of 2,5-dichlorostyrene to about 1.1 megarads of gamma radiation while maintaining the temperature of the mixture at a temperature ranging between from about 56 to about 59 deg C is described. (AEC)

  6. Prevention Of Radiation Induced Hematological Alterations By ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The modulatory influence of Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) leaves extract was investigated in Swiss albino mice at a dose of 3 Gy gamma radiation. For this purpose, adult Swiss albino mice were irradiated with 3 Gy gamma rays in the presence (experimental) or absence (control) of rosemary (1000 mg/kg body wt.).

  7. Revisiting scaling properties of medium-induced gluon radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Arleo, Francois; Sami, Taklit

    2011-01-01

    Discussing the general case of a hard partonic production process, we show that the notion of parton energy loss is not always sufficient to fully address medium-induced gluon radiation. The broader notion of gluon radiation associated to a hard process has to be used, in particular when initial and final state radiation amplitudes interfere, making the medium-induced radiated energy different from the energy loss of any well-identified parton. Our arguments are first presented in an abelian QED model, and then applied to large-xF quarkonium hadroproduction. In this case, we show that the medium-induced radiated energy is qualitatively similar (but not identical) to the radiative energy loss of an "asymptotic massive parton" undergoing transverse momentum broadening when travelling through the nucleus. In particular, it scales as the incoming parton energy, which suggests to reconsider gluon radiation as a possible explanation of large-xF quarkonium suppression in p-A collisions. We expect a similar effect in...

  8. Spinacia oleracea Modulates Radiation-Induced Biochemical Changes in Mice Testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisodia, Rashmi; Yadav, Ritu K; Sharma, K V; Bhatia, A L

    2008-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to investigate the radioprotective efficacy of spinach against radiation induced oxidative stress, since its leaves are rich in antioxidants like carotenoids (beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin) and high content of proteins, minerals, vitamin C. For the experimental study, healthy Swiss mice were selected from an inbred colony and divided into four groups. Group I (normal) it did not receive any treatment. Group II (drug treated) was orally supplemented with extract of spinach extract once daily at the dose of 1100 mg/kg for fifteen consecutive days. Group III (control) received distilled water orally equivalent to spinach extract for fifteen days than exposed to 5 Gy of gamma radiation. Group IV (experimental) was also administered orally with spinach extract for 15 consecutive days once daily. Thereafter, exposed to single dose of 5Gy of gamma radiation. After the exposure mice were than sacrificed at different autopsy intervals viz. 1, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days. Testis was removed for various biochemical estimations viz. LPO, protein, cholesterol and glycogen. Radiation induced augmentation in lipid peroxidation, glycogen and cholesterol values were significantly ameliorated by supplementation of SE extract, whereas radiation induced deficit in protein content could be elevated. This indicates that spinach extract pre - treatment renders protection against various biochemical changes in the mice testis to some extent if taken continuously which might be due to synergistic effect of antioxidant constituents present in the spinach.

  9. Novel Radiomitigator for Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, A-S; Shirazi-fard, Y.; Terada, M.; Alwood, J. S.; Steczina, S.; Medina, C.; Tahimic, C. G. T.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced bone loss can occur with radiotherapy patients, accidental radiation exposure and during long-term spaceflight. Bone loss due to radiation is due to an early increase in oxidative stress, inflammation and bone resorption, resulting in an imbalance in bone remodeling. Furthermore, exposure to high-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation will impair the bone forming progenitors and reduce bone formation. Radiation can be classified as high-LET or low-LET based on the amount of energy released. Dried Plum (DP) diet prevents bone loss in mice exposed to total body irradiation with both low-LET and high-LET radiation. DP prevents the early radiation-induced bone resorption, but furthermore, we show that DP protects the bone forming osteoblast progenitors from high-LET radiation. These results provide insight that DP re-balances the bone remodeling by preventing resorption and protecting the bone formation capacity. This data is important considering that most of the current osteoporosis treatments only block the bone resorption but do not protect bone formation. In addition, DP seems to act on both the oxidative stress and inflammation pathways. Finally, we have preliminary data showing the potential of DP to be radio-protective at a systemic effect and could possible protect other tissues at risk of total body-irradiation such as skin, brain and heart.

  10. Retinal Damage Induced by Internal Limiting Membrane Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Gelman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The internal limiting membrane (ILM, the basement membrane of the Müller cells, serves as the interface between the vitreous body and the retinal nerve fiber layer. It has a fundamental role in the development, structure, and function of the retina, although it also is a pathologic component in the various vitreoretinal disorders, most notably in macular holes. It was not until understanding of the evolution of idiopathic macular holes and the advent of idiopathic macular hole surgery that the idea of adjuvant ILM peeling in the treatment of tractional maculopathies was explored. Today intentional ILM peeling is a commonly applied surgical technique among vitreoretinal surgeons as it has been found to increase the rate of successful macular hole closure and improve surgical outcomes in other vitreoretinal diseases. Though ILM peeling has refined surgery for tractional maculopathies, like all surgical procedures it is not immune to perioperative risk. The essential role of the ILM to the integrity of the retina and risk of trauma to retinal tissue spurs suspicion with regard to its routine removal. Several authors have investigated the retinal damage induced by ILM peeling and these complications have been manifested across many different diagnostic studies.

  11. Radiation-induced pseudotumor following therapy for soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Lacey F.; Kransdorf, Mark J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Buskirk, Steven J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); O' Connor, Mary I. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Menke, David M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Pathology, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and imaging appearance of radiation induced pseudotumors in patients following radiation therapy for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. We retrospectively reviewed the serial magnetic resonance (MR) images of 24 patients following radiation therapy for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. A total of 208 exams were reviewed (mean, 8.7 exams per patient) and included all available studies following the start of radiation therapy. Exams were analyzed for the identification of focal signal abnormalities within the surgical bed suggesting local tumor recurrence. Histopathologic correlation was available in nine patients suspected of having local tumor recurrence. Additional information recorded included patient demographics, tumor type and location, radiation type, and dose. The study group consisted of 12 men and 12 women, having an average age of 63 years (range, 39-88 years). Primary tumors were malignant fibrous histiocytoma (n = 13), leiomyosarcoma (n = 6), liposarcoma (n = 3), synovial sarcoma (n = 1), and extraskeletal chondrosarcoma (n = 1). All lesions were high-grade sarcomas, except for two myxoid liposarcomas. Average patient radiation dose was 5,658 cGy (range, 4,500-8,040 cGy). Average follow-up time was 63 months (range, 3-204 months). Focal signal abnormalities suggesting local recurrence were seen in nine (38%) patients. Three of the nine patients with these signal abnormalities were surgically proven to have radiation-induced pseudotumor. The pseudotumors developed between 11 and 61 months following the initiation of radiation therapy (mean, 38 months), with an average radiation dose of 5,527 cGy (range, 5,040-6,500 cGy). MR imaging demonstrated a relatively ill-defined ovoid focus of abnormal signal and intense heterogeneous enhancement with little or no associated mass effect. MR imaging of radiation-induced pseudotumor typically demonstrates a relatively ill-defined ovoid mass-like focus of intense

  12. Radiation recall dermatitis induced by trastuzumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Dochang; Koo, Ja Seung; Suh, Chang-Ok; Yoon, Chang Yun; Bae, Jaehyun; Lee, Soohyeon

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of radiation recall dermatitis caused by trastuzumab. A 55-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer received palliative first-line trastuzumab/paclitaxel and a salvage partial mastectomy with lymph node dissection was subsequently performed. In spite of the palliative setting, the pathology report indicated that no residual carcinoma was present, and then she underwent locoregional radiotherapy to ensure a definitive response. After radiotherapy, she has maintained trastuzumab monotherapy. Nine days after the fifth cycle of trastuzumab monotherapy, dermatitis in previously irradiated skin developed, with fever. Radiation recall dermatitis triggered by trastuzumab is extremely rare. A high fever developed abruptly with a skin rash. This may be the first case of this sort to be reported.

  13. Radiation-induced malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomi, Takafumi; Watanabe, Masato; Kaneko, Tadayoshi; Matsubayashi, Jun; Nagao, Toshitaka; Chiba, Hiroshige

    2011-07-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) originates from primitive mesenchymal cells and has the capacity for dual histiocytic and fibroblastic differentiation. We report on an MFH of the left maxilla that developed in a 79-year old woman 20 years after surgery and radiation for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Postoperative radiotherapy with 70 Gy was administered for a primary neoplasm of SCC of the left maxilla to a localized field through two lateral ports. This secondary neoplasm arose at the site of tumor resection (partial maxillectomy) within the irradiated field, and was resected. The development of sarcomas is a recognized complication of radiation therapy. The final diagnosis after the operation was MFH. The patient died of tumor recurrence at the skull base and within the cranium, 19 months after the operation. Radiation-induced sarcoma is well known, but radiation-induced MFH is relatively rare in the head and neck region. The details of this case are presented with a review of literature.

  14. Radiation-induced edge effects in deep submicron CMOS transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Faccio, F

    2005-01-01

    The study of the TID response of transistors and isolation test structures in a 130 nm commercial CMOS technology has demonstrated its increased radiation tolerance with respect to older technology nodes. While the thin gate oxide of the transistors is extremely tolerant to dose, charge trapping at the edge of the transistor still leads to leakage currents and, for the narrow channel transistors, to significant threshold voltage shift-an effect that we call Radiation Induced Narrow Channel Effect (RINCE).

  15. Radiation-induced apoptosis in microvascular endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Langley, R. E.; Bump, E A; Quartuccio, S. G.; Medeiros, D; Braunhut, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    The response of the microvasculature to ionizing radiation is thought to be an important factor in the overall response of both normal tissues and tumours. It has recently been reported that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a potent mitogen for endothelial cells, protects large vessel endothelial cells from radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro. Microvessel cells are phenotypically distinct from large vessel cells. We studied the apoptotic response of confluent monolayers of capillary en...

  16. Intravesical ozone therapy for progressive radiation-induced hematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavo, Bernardino; Gutiérrez, Dominga; Martín, Dionisio; Suárez, Gerardo; Hernández, María A; Robaina, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    Progressive radiation-induced cystitis can become a serious clinical problem the therapeutic solution of which is limited and almost invariably aggressive. Ozone therapy is a nonconventional therapy that has been reported to offer benefits in late-onset wound healing and ischemic disorders. This report describes a patient with progressive radiation-induced hematuria from standard conservative treatment that was further treated with ozone therapy. Ozone therapy was achieved by intravesical instillation of ozonized bi-distilled water over a period of 30 minutes, three sessions per week during the first weeks. Later, ozone therapy sessions were decreased and involved ozonized water or direct intravesicular instillation of ozone at 20-25 microg/mL. Hematuria was successfully controlled by intravesical application of ozone therapy. The successes achieved with this technique suggest that intravesicular instillation of ozonized bi-distilled water or ozone merits further investigation with a view to its application to counter this radiation-induced side-effect.

  17. Chronic radiation-induced dermatitis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spałek M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mateusz Spałek Department of Radiotherapy I, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland Abstract: Chronic radiation dermatitis is a late side effect of skin irradiation, which may deteriorate patients’ quality of life. There is a lack of precise data about its incidence; however, several risk factors may predispose to the development of this condition. It includes radiotherapy dose, fractionation, technique, concurrent systemic therapy, comorbidities, and personal and genetic factors. Chronic radiation dermatitis is mostly caused by the imbalance of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines. Clinical manifestation includes changes in skin appearance, wounds, ulcerations, necrosis, fibrosis, and secondary cancers. The most severe complication of irradiation is extensive radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF. RIF can manifest in many ways, such as skin induration and retraction, lymphedema or restriction of joint motion. Diagnosis of chronic radiation dermatitis is usually made by clinical examination. In case of unclear clinical manifestation, a biopsy and histopathological examination are recommended to exclude secondary malignancy. The most effective prophylaxis of chronic radiation dermatitis is the use of proper radiation therapy techniques to avoid unnecessary irradiation of healthy skin. Treatment of chronic radiation dermatitis is demanding. The majority of the interventions are based only on clinical practice. Telangiectasia may be treated with pulse dye laser therapy. Chronic postirradiation wounds need special dressings. In case of necrosis or severe ulceration, surgical intervention may be considered. Management of RIF should be complex. Available methods are rehabilitative care, pharmacotherapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and laser therapy. Future challenges include the assessment of late skin toxicity in modern irradiation techniques. Special attention should be paid on genomics and

  18. Radiation-Induced Esophagitis is Mitigated by Soy Isoflavones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Fountain

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy present with acute esophagitis and chronic fibrosis, as a result of radiation injury to esophageal tissues. We have shown that soy isoflavones alleviate pneumonitis and fibrosis caused by radiation toxicity to normal lung. The effect of soy isoflavones on esophagitis histopathological changes induced by radiation was investigated. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 Gy or 25 Gy single thoracic irradiation and soy isoflavones for up to 16 weeks. Damage to esophageal tissues was assessed by H&E, Masson’s Trichrome and Ki-67 staining at 1, 4, 10, 16 weeks after radiation. The effects on smooth muscle cells and leukocyte infiltration were determined by immunohistochemistry using anti-αSMA and anti-CD45 respectively. Results: Radiation caused thickening of esophageal tissue layers that was significantly reduced by soy isoflavones. Major radiation alterations included hypertrophy of basal cells in mucosal epithelium and damage to smooth muscle cells in muscularis mucosae as well as disruption of collagen fibers in lamina propria connective tissue with leukocyte infiltration. These effects were observed as early as one week after radiation and were more pronounced with a higher dose of 25 Gy. Soy isoflavones limited the extent of tissue damage induced by radiation both at 10 and 25 Gy.Conclusions: Soy isoflavones have a radioprotective effect on the esophagus, mitigating the early and late effects of radiation injury in several esophagus tissue layers. Soy could be administered with radiotherapy to decrease the incidence and severity of esophagitis in lung cancer patients receiving thoracic radiation therapy.

  19. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  20. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis: improvement after removal of amalgam in dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsunuma, T; Iikura, Y; Nagakura, T; Saitoh, H; Akimoto, K; Akasawa, A; Kindaichi, S

    1990-05-01

    We present a case of exercise-induced anaphylaxis with improvement following the removal of dental amalgam. Although her symptoms were unresponsive to various kinds of therapy until removal of the amalgam, her symptoms related to exercise improved remarkably after the removal. The increase in plasma histamine levels for exercise provocation test also improved. This suggests that sensitivity to metals might cause exercise-induced asthma in some patients.

  1. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  2. H- - H Collision Induced Radiative Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadonova, A. V.; Devdariani, A. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Exchange interaction leads to the formation of gerade and ungerade states of temporary molecules (quasimolecules) formed during the H- +H slow collisions. The work deals with the radiation produced by optical transitions between those states. The main characteristics involved in the description of optical transitions in quasimolecules, i.e., energy terms, an optical dipole transition moments, have been calculated in the frame of zero-range potentials model. The main feature of calculations is that the results can be expressed analytically in closed forms via the Lambert W function.

  3. Case report of radiation-induced rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaki, Y.; Nagase, T.; Hokari, I.; Hasegawa, A.; Tazawa, K. (Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1982-09-01

    A 70-year-old woman who had been treated by irradiation of unknown dose for cervical carcinoma of uterus 27 years before, was admitted in our hospital. Barium enema and romanoscope with rectal biopsy revealed rectal carcinoma with narrow recto-sigmoidal segment and procto-ilela fistula. Sections from resected specimen showed mucinous adenocarcinoma of the rectum with severe disorganization around the cancer lesion such as fibrosis, ulcer and vascular degeneration as a possible effect of previous irradiation. Radiation-induced carcinomas of the large intestine previously reported in the literatures were reviewed and the problems of the criteria of so-called radiation induced malignancy were discussed.

  4. Radiation-induced endometriosis in Macaca mulatta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanton, J.W.; Golden, J.G. (USAF School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks AFB, TX (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Female rhesus monkeys received whole-body doses of ionizing radiation in the form of single-energy protons, mixed-energy protons, X rays, and electrons. Endometriosis developed in 53% of the monkeys during a 17-year period after exposure. Incidence rates for endometriosis related to radiation type were: single-energy protons, 54%; mixed-energy protons, 73%; X rays, 71%; and electrons, 57%. The incidence of endometriosis in nonirradiated control monkeys was 26%. Monkeys exposed to single-energy protons, mixed-energy protons, and X rays developed endometriosis at a significantly higher rate than control monkeys (chi 2, P less than 0.05). Severity of endometriosis was staged as massive, moderate, and minimal. The incidence of these stages were 65, 16, and 19%, respectively. Observations of clinical disease included weight loss in 43% of the monkeys, anorexia in 35%, space-occupying masses detected by abdominal palpation in 55%, abnormal ovarian/uterine anatomy on rectal examination in 89%, and radiographic evidence of abdominal masses in 38%. Pathological lesions were endometrial cyst formation in 69% of the monkeys, adhesions of the colon in 66%, urinary bladder in 50%, ovaries in 86%, and ureters in 44%, focal nodules of endometrial tissue throughout the omentum in 59%, and metastasis in 9%. Clinical management of endometriosis consisted of debulking surgery and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy combined in some cases with total abdominal hysterectomy. Postoperative survival rates at 1 and 5 years for monkeys recovering from surgery were 48 and 36%, respectively.

  5. A case showing effective radiotherapy for a radiation-induced glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Kimiko; Inamura, Takanori; Nakamizo, Akira; Ikezaki, Kiyonobu; Inoha, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kazumasa; Matsuzaki, Akinobu; Fukui, Masashi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences

    2001-07-01

    Radiation-induced glioblastoma is usually resistant to all treatments. We report a case with radiation-induced glioblastoma, in which radiotherapy was remarkably effective. A 14-year-old female with a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the age of 7, underwent 15 Gy of radiotherapy to the whole brain. She was admitted to our department due to the development of headache and nausea. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an irregularly enhanced mass in the left frontal lobe. Partial removal of the mass was performed and histological examination showed it to be glioblastoma with a high MIB-1 index. The patient underwent 40 Gy of local radiotherapy and chemotherapy with ACNU and Interferon-{beta} for 2 years. The residual tumor disappeared after the radiotherapy, and her status is still ''complete remission'', 29 months after the onset. (author)

  6. Possible Radiation Sensitisation by Trastuzumab Leading to Radiation-Induced Myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Alastair B; Evans, Tamasin; Hayward, Richard L; Higgins, Geoffrey S; Murray, Katherine L; Summers, David; Kunkler, Ian H

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY: BACKGROUND: Trastuzumab is used as adjuvant treatment in patients with HER2-positive breast cancers and has been shown to reduce the chance of recurrence by up to 50%. However, experience with it given with radiotherapy is limited and there is in vitro evidence of a radiosensiti-sation effect. We describe the first case of trastuzumab-associated radiation-induced myelitis. CASE REPORT: This patient received a calculated dose of 28 Gy to the spinal cord when receiving adjuvant radiotherapy to the chest wall and supraclavicular and axillary lymph nodes. This is well below the accepted radiation tolerance of the spinal cord (50-60 Gy) but she developed radiation-induced myelitis of her spinal cord with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging changes. We postulate that trastuzu-mab given concurrently with radiation may have acted as a radiosensitiser and that normal repair mechanisms in the acute stage were affected by trastuzumab blockage of epidermal growth factor receptors, resulting in demy-elination at a lower dose of radiation than normally seen. CONCLUSIONS: Concomitant radiotherapy and adjuvant trastuzumab treatment should be given with caution and consideration made of delaying trastuzumab until after radiotherapy has been completed. As longer-term data become available for patients who received trastuzumab and radiation, it will become clearer whether there is a significant interaction on organs such as the heart and spinal cord in the radiation field.

  7. The applicability of the Sedov - Taylor scaling during material removal of metals and oxide layers with pulsed ? and excimer laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aden, M.; Kreutz, E. W.; Schlüter, H.; Wissenbach, K.

    1997-03-01

    For the removal of material with pulsed laser radiation the distance travelled by the shock or blast wave and the amount of energy released in the plasma state due to the absorption of laser radiation are determined experimentally and theoretically. The distance travelled by the blast wave is detected by schlieren photography, the released energy by monitoring the transmitted laser radiation during the removal process. The theoretical evaluation is performed by numerical simulation using a model incorporating the laser-induced vaporization process and the dynamics of the plasma state. The results obtained from the experiments and the model are compared with that of the Sedov - Taylor scaling. The removal of the oxide layer from austenitic steel is investigated with 0022-3727/30/6/011/img8 laser radiation produced by a TEA and a high-power 0022-3727/30/6/011/img8 laser device. For the TEA laser with fluences of 5 and 10 J 0022-3727/30/6/011/img10 50 - 80% of the pulse energy is released into the plasma state and the Sedov - Taylor scaling describes the distance travelled by the blast wave in agreement with data from the experiments and the simulation. For the high-power 0022-3727/30/6/011/img8 laser with a fluence of 50 J 0022-3727/30/6/011/img10, 6% of the pulse energy is released into the plasma state and the Sedov - Taylor scaling does not describe the data of the simulation. The process of removal of copper and aluminium material is simulated for excimer laser radiation with fluences of 15 and 30 J 0022-3727/30/6/011/img10. For copper 15 - 30% of the pulse energy is released into the plasma state and the Sedov - Taylor scaling is applicable. For aluminium, less than 2% of the pulse energy is released into the plasma state and the Sedov - Taylor scaling is only applicable for the higher fluence.

  8. Radiation-induced cancers of the head and neck, (3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umatani, Katsunori; Satoh, Takeo; Yoshino, Kunitoshi; Takagi, Tadashi; Fujii, Takashi; Hatta, Chihiro; Maetani, Chikahide; Lu, Bo (Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan))

    1989-08-01

    This paper discusses twenty patients with radiation-induced cancers of the head and neck treated in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, the Center for Adult Diseases, Osaka, from January 1979 to December 1985. The most common site of radiation-induced cancers was the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus (70%). We found synchronous double cancers in 2 out of the 20 patients (10%). One patient had hypopharyngeal cancer and thyroid cancer, and the other had oropharyngeal cancer and thyroid cancer. All of the laryngeal cancers were in the supraglottic area. Cancer of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus occurred more frequently in females (1:3.7 males-females ratio). Half of the patients (10/20) had received irradiation for tuberculous cervical adenitis and 8 patients had been irradiated for malignant tumors. The averaged latent period in the patients who had irradiated for benign conditions was 37.4 years, and that for malignant diseases was 16.0 years. Therefore the latent period of the former was 2.3 times as long as that of the latter. The incidence of radiation-induced cancers in all the patients who had the cancer of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus was 9% and that of the laryngeal cancer was 0.7%. The incidence of radiation-induced cancers in the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus remarkably differed from that in the larynx. However, it was suggested that the larynx was as resistant to radiation induction as the hypopharynx. Six of the 20 patients (30%) had radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Among them, the incidence of cancers was 33%. (author).

  9. Radiation-induced degassing of cryopumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, W.G.; Ruby, L.

    1978-06-01

    The pressure-gauge response of the system to the TRIGA pulses is shown. With an unloaded cryopump, an apparent pressure pulse is produced which is only slightly longer than the reactor pulse itself. In separate experiments, it was found that a similarly appearing pulse is produced by a completely sealed-off vacuum gauge. With a deuterium-loaded cryopump, a very much larger pressure pulse was produced, which had a long exponential tail, characteristic of a re-pumpdown of the system. The pumping speed, as computed from the exponential, is about half that observed previously when the cryopump was subjected to D/sub 2/-gas pulses, in the absense of radiation. Additional experiments were run with the core of the reactor retracted somewhat into the pool, in order to change the mix of gamma rays, thermal neutrons, and fast neutrons so as to preferentially depress the latter.

  10. Radiation-induced camptocormia and dropped head syndrome. Review and case report of radiation-induced movement disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Clemens; Kuhnt, Thomas; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Hering, Kathrin [Leipzig University, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, camptocormia and dropped head syndrome (DHS) have gained attention as particular forms of movement disorders. Camptocormia presents with involuntary forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine that typically increases during walking or standing and may severely impede walking ability. DHS is characterized by weakness of the neck extensors and a consecutive inability to extend the neck; in severe cases the head is fixed in a ''chin to chest position.'' Many diseases may underlie these conditions, and there have been some reports about radiation-induced camptocormia and DHS. A PubMed search with the keywords ''camptocormia,'' ''dropped head syndrome,'' ''radiation-induced myopathy,'' ''radiation-induced neuropathy,'' and ''radiation-induced movement disorder'' was carried out to better characterize radiation-induced movement disorders and the radiation techniques involved. In addition, the case of a patient developing camptocormia 23 years after radiation therapy of a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the abdomen is described. In total, nine case series of radiation-induced DHS (n = 45 patients) and - including our case - three case reports (n = 3 patients) about radiogenic camptocormia were retrieved. Most cases (40/45 patients) occurred less than 15 years after radiotherapy involving extended fields for Hodgkin's disease. The use of wide radiation fields including many spinal segments with paraspinal muscles may lead to radiation-induced movement disorders. If paraspinal muscles and the thoracolumbar spine are involved, the clinical presentation can be that of camptocormia. DHS may result if there is involvement of the cervical spine. To prevent these disorders, sparing of the spine and paraspinal muscles is desirable. (orig.) [German] In den letzten Jahren haben Bewegungsstoerungen von Wirbelsaeule und paraspinaler Muskulatur in

  11. Ion-Induced Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlathölter, Thomas

    The interaction of keV ions with building blocks of DNA and proteins is of fundamental interest to proton and heavy ion therapy. During the last decade, ion-induced ionization and fragmentation was studied for isolated biomolecules, biomolecular clusters, nanosolvated isolated biomolecules and solid thin biomolecular films. This article gives a brief overview over the research on biomolecular mechanisms underlying ion-induced radiation damage with a focus on the different target systems.

  12. Radiation Induced Immune Response in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    dependent cell- mediated phagocytosis ( ADCP ). This research will allow us to characterize antigens and antibodies intended for clinical trials in patients...Moreover, TIP1 is inducible in nearly all mouse models of cancer resulting in opsonization and activation of ADCC and ADCP . Antibodies that we...antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis ( ADCP ). ScFv antibodies Overall Project Summary Subtask 1.1 Binding of antibodies to irradiated

  13. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  14. Radiation Induced Hypoplasia of the Mandible and Retarded Tooth Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Tuteja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Few cases of radiation-induced damage to the teeth and jaws, have been reported in the literature. Radiation therapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients affected with head and neck cancer. In spite of its recognized benefits in the treatment of malignant tumors, radiation therapy has several side-effects in the head and neck region. This paper highlights a case report where hypoplasia of the mandible, trismus and stunted permanent teeth roots were observed in an 18-year-old patient who was diagnosed with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma—embryonal type group III at the age of 5 years. He had received radiation therapy of 50 Gy to the nasopharynx for about 1 year and was reviewed for a period of 11 years. Full mouth periapical radiographs and panoramic radiograph revealed hypoplasia of the mandible and generalized hypoplasia of the roots of the permanent teeth.

  15. Blackbody-induced radiative dissociation of cationic SF 6 clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toker, Jonathan; Rahinov, I.; Schwalm, D.

    2012-01-01

    The stability of cationic SF5+(SF6)n−1 clusters was investigated by measuring their blackbody-induced radiative dissociation (BIRD) rates. The clusters were produced in a supersonic expansion ion source and stored in an electrostatic ion-beam trap at room temperature, where their abundances...... and stability of SF6-based clusters....

  16. Radiation-induced femoral head necrosis | Abdulkareem | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are very few cases of radiation-induced femoral head necrosis described in the literature, therefore, this case will add new knowledge and highlights important aspects in the diagnosis and management of this uncommon condition. Our patient was 74 years old and presented with left hip and groin pain for 8 months, ...

  17. Coherent Cherenkov Radiation from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, K. D.; van den Berg, A. M.; Scholten, O.; Werner, K.

    2011-01-01

    Very energetic cosmic rays entering the atmosphere of Earth will create a plasma cloud moving with almost the speed of light. The magnetic field of Earth induces an electric current in this cloud which is responsible for the emission of coherent electromagnetic radiation. We propose to search for a

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for refractory radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro de Oliveira, Tiago M; Carmelo Romão, António J; Gamito Guerreiro, Francisco M; Matos Lopes, Tomé M

    2015-10-01

    To analyze the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen for the treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis and to identify factors associated with successful treatment. Clinical records from 176 patients with refractory radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis treated at the Portuguese Navy Center for Underwater and Hyperbaric Medicine, during a 15-year period, were retrospectively analyzed. Evolution of macroscopic hematuria was used to analyze treatment efficacy and correlated with other external variables. From a total of 176 treated patients, 23.9% evidenced other radiation-induced soft tissue lesions. After an average on 37 sessions, 89.8% of patients showed resolution of hematuria, with only 1.7% of adverse events. In our sample, hematuria resolution after treatment with hyperbaric oxygen was statistically associated to the need for transfusion therapy (P = 0.026) and the number of sessions of hyperbaric oxygen (P = 0.042). No relationship was found with the remaining variables. Refractory radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis can be successfully and safely treated with hyperbaric oxygen. Treatment effectiveness seems to be correlated with the need for transfusion therapy and the number of sessions performed. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  19. Radiation-induced vascular lesions of the skin: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flucke, U.E.; Requena, L.; Mentzel, T.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced cutaneous vascular neoplasms occur infrequently and comprise benign, so-called atypical vascular lesions (AVL) and angiosarcomas (AS), often being high-grade malignant tumors. Both arise most frequently within previously irradiated skin in breast-conserving-treated mammary cancer

  20. Poor outcome in radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karram, T.; Rinkevitch, D.; Markiewicz, W. (Technion Medical School, Haifa (Israel))

    1993-01-15

    The purpose was to compare the outcome of patients with radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis versus patients with constiction due to another etiology. Twenty patients with constrictive pericarditis were seen during 1975-1986 at a single medical center. Six had radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis (Group A). The etiology was idiopathic in ten subjects and secondary to carcinomatous encasement, chronic renal failure, purulent infection and tuberculosis in one patient each (Group B, N = 14). Meang age was 53.4 [+-] 15.5 years. Extensive pericardiectomy was performed in 3/6 Group A and 13/14 Group B patients. All Group A patients died, 4 weeks - 11 years post-diagnosis (median = 10 months). Two Group A patients died suddenly, one died post-operatively of respiratory failure, another of pneumonia and two of recurrent carcinoma. Thirteen Group B patients are alive (median follow-up = 72 months). The only death in this group was due to metastatic cancer. The poor outcome with radiation-induced constriction is probably multi-factorial. Poor surgical outcome is to be expected in patients with evidence of recurrent tumor, high-dose irradiation, pulmonary fibrosis or associated radiation-induced myocardinal, valvular or coronary damage.

  1. Radiation induced changes in the airway - anaesthetic implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiation induces a variety of changes in the airway that can potentially lead to difficult intubation. Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible, a severe consequence of radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies can cause a reduction of the 'mandibular space' and alteration of the morphometric measurements, viz.

  2. Radiation induced oxidative damage modification by cholesterol in liposomal membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, B. N.; Mishra, K. P.

    1999-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induced structural and chemical alterations in egg lecithin liposomal membrane have been studied by measurements of lipid peroxides, conjugated diene and fluorescence polarization. Predominantly unilamellar phospholipid vesicles prepared by sonication procedure were subjected to radiation doses of γ-rays from Co-60 in aerated, buffered aqueous suspensions. The oxidative damage in irradiated lipid molecules of liposomes has been determined spectrophotometrically by diene conjugate formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive (TBAR) method as a function of radiation dose. A correlation was found between the radiation dose applied (0.1-1 kGy) and the consequent lipid oxidation. The damage produced in irradiated liposomal membrane was measured by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence decay and polarization. The observed decrease in DPH fluorescence and increase in polarization was found dependent on the radiation dose suggesting alterations in rigidity or organizational order in phospholipid bilayer after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated liposome vesicles composed of cholesterol showed marked reduction in observed radiation mediated peroxide formation and significantly affected the DPH fluorescence parameters. The magnitude of these modifying effects were found dependent on the mole fraction of cholesterol. It is concluded that modulation of structural order in unilamellar vesicle membrane by variations in basic molecular components controlled the magnitude of lipid peroxidation and diene conjugate formation. These observations contribute to our understanding of mechanism of radical reaction mediated damage caused by ionizing radiation in phospholipid membrane.

  3. Radiation induced oxidative damage modification by cholesterol in liposomal membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B.N. [Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Mishra, K.P. [Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    1999-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induced structural and chemical alterations in egg lecithin liposomal membrane have been studied by measurements of lipid peroxides, conjugated diene and fluorescence polarization. Predominantly unilamellar phospholipid vesicles prepared by sonication procedure were subjected to radiation doses of {gamma}-rays from Co-60 in aerated, buffered aqueous suspensions. The oxidative damage in irradiated lipid molecules of liposomes has been determined spectrophotometrically by diene conjugate formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive (TBAR) method as a function of radiation dose. A correlation was found between the radiation dose applied (0.1-1 kGy) and the consequent lipid oxidation. The damage produced in irradiated liposomal membrane was measured by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence decay and polarization. The observed decrease in DPH fluorescence and increase in polarization was found dependent on the radiation dose suggesting alterations in rigidity or organizational order in phospholipid bilayer after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated liposome vesicles composed of cholesterol showed marked reduction in observed radiation mediated peroxide formation and significantly affected the DPH fluorescence parameters. The magnitude of these modifying effects were found dependent on the mole fraction of cholesterol. It is concluded that modulation of structural order in unilamellar vesicle membrane by variations in basic molecular components controlled the magnitude of lipid peroxidation and diene conjugate formation. These observations contribute to our understanding of mechanism of radical reaction mediated damage caused by ionizing radiation in phospholipid membrane.

  4. Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.

    1996-10-01

    In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5` region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3` region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process.

  5. A study of radiation-induced cerebral vascular injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Ye

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate radiation-induced carotid and cerebral vascular injury and its relationship with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifty eight NPC patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis (TLN were recruited in the study. Duplex ultrasonography was used to scan bilateral carotid arterials to evaluate the intima-media thickness (IMT and occurrence of plaque formation. Flow velocities of bilateral middle cerebral arteries (MCAs, internal carotid arteries (ICAs and basal artery (BA were estimated through Transcranial Color Doppler (TCD. The results were compared with data from 33 patients who were free from radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis after radiotherapy and 29 healthy individuals. RESULTS: Significant differences in IMT, occurrence of plaques of ICAs and flow velocities of both MCAs and ICAs were found between patients after radiotherapy and healthy individuals (p<0.05. IMT had positive correlation with post radiation interval (p = 0.049. Compared with results from patients without radiation-induced TLN, the mean IMT was significantly thicker in patients with TLN (p<0.001. Plaques were more common in patients with TLN than patients without TLN (p = 0.038. In addition, flow velocities of MCAs and ICAs in patients with TLN were much faster (p<0.001, p<0.001. Among patients with unilateral TLN, flow velocity of MCAs was significantly different between ipsilateral and contralateral sides to the lesion (p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: Thickening of IMT, occurrence of plaque formation and hemodynamic abnormality are more common in patients after radiotherapy, especially in those with TLN, compared with healthy individuals.

  6. Caffeine ameliorates radiation-induced skin reactions in mice but does not influence tumour radiation response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebbar, S.A.; Mitra, A.K.; George, K.C.; Verma, N.C. [Radiation Biology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)]. E-mail: ncverma@apsara.barc.ernet.in

    2002-03-01

    Intramuscular administration of caffeine at a dose of 80 mg kg{sup -1} body weight to the gastrocnemius muscles of Swiss mice 5 min prior to local irradiation (35 Gy) of the leg delayed the progression of radiation-induced skin reactions in such animals. While 90% epilation with reddening of the skin was noted in animals treated with radiation alone, animals pretreated with caffeine suffered only partial hair loss with slight reddening of the skin on the 16th and 20th days post-irradiation. Beyond the 28th day, damage scores in irradiated feet for both the groups were similar (score 3) and remained unchanged until the 32nd day and then decreased and disappeared completely in both treatment groups by the 40th day after irradiation. In addition, the effect of caffeine on the radiation response of a mouse fibrosarcoma was investigated. Results showed that intratumoral administration of caffeine at a dose of 80 mg kg{sup -1} body weight 5 min prior to local exposure of tumours to 10 Gy of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays did not influence the response of tumours to radiation. The present study thus showed that although caffeine ameliorated radiation-induced skin reactions in the mouse leg, it did not affect the tumour radiation response, indicating its potential application in cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  7. The role of ultraviolet radiation during ultralow k films curing: Strengthening mechanisms and sacrificial porogen removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenasni, Aziz; Jousseaume, Vincent; Holliger, Philippe; Favennec, Laurent; Gourhant, Olivier; Maury, Patrick; Gerbaud, Guillaume

    2007-11-01

    This work proposes a fundamental understanding of structural transformation occurring during porogen extraction from as-deposited ultralow k (ULK) materials when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation during thermal curing. Specific explanations are provided for as deposited films at high temperature (T >250 °C). This temperature range is sufficient to assess thin-film stability. Two distinguished regimes were identified in the curing process. During the first stage, the film shrinks strongly in similar proportion to SiCH3 break. Preferential impact of UV radiation on hydrocarbon porogen bonds leads also to a break of SiCH3 structures. In this work, 5 min of curing is enough to remove the porogen and create the max of porosity (33%). After the porogen removal step, the porous film shrinks under UV radiation leading to an increase of SiOSi bond concentration. A structural rearrangement of the bulk is initiated since the porogen is totally evacuated from the film. The increase of normalized infrared SiOSi peak during UV curing (related in literature to an improvement of mechanical properties) is mainly due to film densification (a few SiOSi bonds creation). The origin of shrinkage is explained by the breaking of SiCH3 which could turn into a SiH bond leading to a free volume reduction within the film. In this case, a correlation is found between shrinkage and elastic modulus. The resulting SiOSi structure densification drives, at first order, the improvement of the mechanical properties. UV radiation exposure shows no effect in silanol condensation and acts mainly on the porogen decomposition and bulk densification. Si-CH2-Si structure formation, pointed out in the literature as a possible reaction way to enhance film crosslinking, is identified in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) broadband spectrum of the ULK film. However, resulted NMR and infrared peaks intensities suggest its formation as a minor. This study gives a full understanding of UV curing impact on

  8. Design Methodologies and to Combat Radiation Induced Corruption in FPGAs and SoCs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Traditional radiation hardened by process (RHBP) and radiation hardened by design (RHBD) techniques have seen success in mitigating the effects of radiation induced...

  9. [Induced astigmatism after corneal suture removal after cataract surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loriaut, P; Kaswin, G; Rousseau, A; Meziani, L; M'nafek, N; Pogorzalek, N; Labetoulle, M

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the time until astigmatic stabilization after corneal suture removal after cataract surgery. A prospective study was performed on 13 patients who had undergone cataract surgery by phacoemulsification with 2.4mm incision, for whom it was felt necessary to remove a corneal suture. A specular corneal topography was performed by OPD Scan before removal, immediately after, then 10, 20, 30 minutes and 15 days later. For each acquisition, the keratometric readings at the steepest (Kmax) and the flattest (Kmin) meridians (central at 1.15 mm from corneal center, intermediate at 2.30 mm and peripheral at 3.30 mm) and the amount of corneal astigmatism were measured. Corneal topography of 13 patients was acquired. Mean age was 70 ± 12 years. Mean time after cataract surgery was 23 ± 14 days. The greatest change in Kmax occurred within the first minutes following suture removal for the central and intermediate cornea (mean variation of -4.38% and -4.59% of initial Kmax respectively, i.e. -2.04 D ± 3.14 D et -2.15 D ± 3.11 D) whereas it was observed between 0 and 10 minutes for the peripheral area (mean 1.57% of Kmax after suture removal i.e. 0.96 D ± 1.85 D). Mean change in corneal astigmatism between 30 minutes and day 15 was 0.08 D ± 0.31 D (3.6% of baseline). When suture removal was performed between 7 and 10 days postoperatively, mean change was 0.16 D ± 0.24 D, whereas it was 0.03 D ± 0.34 D when performed after four weeks. Keratometric readings vary only slightly beyond the first 30 minutes after suture removal. These results suggest that the refraction could be accurately measured the same day as suture removal, with no additional follow-up absolutely necessary in order to prescribe the final spectacles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R., E-mail: akennedy@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials: Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results: The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD{sub 50}) of the ferrets was established at ∼1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions: Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD{sub 50} in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals.

  11. Radiation-induced erectile dysfunction: Recent advances and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Mahmood, PhD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men in the United States. A large number of patients undergo radiation therapy (RT as a standard care of treatment; however, RT causes erectile dysfunction (radiation-induced erectile dysfunction; RiED because of late side effects after RT that significantly affects quality of life of prostate cancer patients. Within 5 years of RT, approximately 50% of patients could develop RiED. Based on the past and current research findings and number of publications from our group, the precise mechanism of RiED is under exploration in detail. Recent investigations have shown prostate RT induces significant morphologic arterial damage with aberrant alterations in internal pudendal arterial tone. Prostatic RT also reduces motor function in the cavernous nerve which may attribute to axonal degeneration may contributing to RiED. Furthermore, the advances in radiogenomics such as radiation induced somatic mutation identification, copy number variation and genome-wide association studies has significantly facilitated identification of biomarkers that could be used to monitoring radiation-induced late toxicity and damage to the nerves; thus, genomic- and proteomic-based biomarkers could greatly improve treatment and minimize arterial tissue and nerve damage. Further, advanced technologies such as proton beam therapy that precisely target tumor and significantly reduce off-target damage to vital organs and healthy tissues. In this review, we summarize recent advances in RiED research and novel treatment modalities for RiED. We also discuss the possible molecular mechanism involved in the development of RiED in prostate cancer patients. Further, we discuss various readily available methods as well as novel strategies such as stem cell therapies, shockwave therapy, nerve grafting with tissue engineering, and nutritional supplementations might be used to

  12. Radiation-induced desulfurization of Arabian crude oil and straight-run diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basfar, A.A., E-mail: abasfar@kacst.edu.sa [Radiation Technology Center, Atomic Energy Research Institute, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Mohamed, K.A. [Radiation Technology Center, Atomic Energy Research Institute, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-11-15

    Radiation-induced desulfurization of four types of Arabian crude oils (heavy, medium, light and extra light) and straight-run diesel (SRD) was investigated over the range of 10-200 kGy. Results show that gamma radiation processing at absorbed doses up to 200 kGy without further treatment is not sufficient for desulfurization. However, the combination of gamma-irradiation with other physical/chemical processes (i.e. L/L extraction, adsorption and oxidation) may be capable of removing considerable levels of sulfur compounds in the investigated products. Currently, this approach of combined radiation/physical/chemical processes is under investigation. The findings of these attempts will be reported in the future. - Highlights: > Irradiation effect on desulfurization in Arabian crude oils and straight-run diesel was investigated. > No noticeable changes in sulfur content after irradiation up to 200 kGy were observed. > Stricter regulations on sulfur levels in fuels motivate search for improved desulfurization processes. > Limited investigations on radiation-induced desulfurization of oil products are conducted.

  13. Challenges and Opportunities in Radiation-induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaans, Bernadette M.M.; Nicolai, Heinz G.; Chancellor, Michael B.; Lamb, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    As diagnosis and treatment of cancer is improving, medical and social issues related to cancer survivorship are becoming more prevalent. Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC), a rare but serious disease that may affect patients after pelvic radiation or systemic chemotherapy, has significant unmet medical needs. Although no definitive treatment is currently available, various interventions are employed for HC. Effects of nonsurgical treatments for HC are of modest success and studies aiming to control radiation-induced bladder symptoms are lacking. In this review, we present current and advanced therapeutic strategies for HC to help cancer survivors deal with long-term urologic health issues. PMID:27601964

  14. Planck's Radiation Law: Thermal Excitations of Vacuum Induced Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogiba F.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The second Planck’s radiation law is derived considering that “resonators” induced by the vacuum absorb thermal excitations as additional fluctuations. The maximum energy transfer, as required by the maximum entropy equilibrium, occurs when the frequencies of these two kind of vibrations are equal. The motion resembles that of the coherent states of the quantum oscillator, as originally pointed by Schrödinger [1]. The resulting variance, due to random phases, coincides with that used by Einstein to reproduce the first Planck’s radiation law from his thermal fluctuation equation [2].

  15. Radiation induced changes in alpha toxin of Staphylococcus aureus 3750

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherekar, S.V.; Bhushan, B.; Gore, M.S. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Biochemistry and Food Technology Div.)

    1981-06-01

    Influence of ..gamma..-radiation and heat on haemolytic activity of purified alpha toxin from staphylococcus aureus 3750 cells was studied. Heat treatment at 60deg C for 1 min resulted in 99% inactivation of alpha toxin, while exposure to ..gamma..-radiation caused linear decline in activity, 40 krad causing 50% inactivation. Urea treatment reversed the heat induced inactivation but did not reactivate the irradiated toxin. However, the irradiated toxin retained its antigenicity, thus indicating its potential for the preparation of toxoid against alpha toxin.

  16. Radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbon production in platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radha, E.; Vaishnav, Y.N.; Kumar, K.S.; Weiss, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Generation of volatile hydrocarbons (ethane, pentane) as a measure of lipid peroxidation was followed in preparations from platelet-rich plasma irradiated in vitro. The hydrocarbons in the headspace of sealed vials containing irradiated and nonirradiated washed platelets, platelet-rich plasma, or platelet-poor plasma increased with time. The major hydrocarbon, pentane, increased linearly and significantly with increasing log radiation dose, suggesting that reactive oxygen species induced by ionizing radiation result in lipid peroxidation. Measurements of lipid peroxidation products may give an indication of suboptimal quality of stored and/or irradiated platelets.

  17. Radiation-induced inhibition of RNA synthesis in Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, S G; Rustad, R C; Oleinick, N L

    1975-07-01

    Radiation-induced disturbances in RNA synthesis were investigated in exponentially growing Tetrahymena. Sub-lethal doses of gamma-radiation lead to a transient, dose-dependent decrease in the rate of total RNA synthesis measured by 3H-uridine incorporation, without an alteration of 3H-uridine uptake by the cells. The rate of 3H-uridine incorporation decreases exponentially with dose. In contrast, the duration of inhibition of RNA synthesis is linearly dependent on dose. Target-theory calculations suggest that the sensitive molecule has a molecular weight of about 2 X 10(7) Daltons.

  18. Possibility of increasing the efficiency of laser-induced tattoo removal by optical skin clearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genina, E. A.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Tuchin, V. V.; Altshuler, G. B.; Yaroslavskii, I. V.

    2008-06-01

    The possibility of selective laser photothermolysis improvement for the removal of tattoo pigments due to the optical clearing of human skin is investigated. It is shown experimentally that the optical skin clearing increases the tattoo image contrast. Computer Monte Carlo simulations show that by decreasing the laser beam scattering in upper skin layers, it is possible to reduce the radiation power required for tattoo removal by 30%—40% and, therefore, to increase the the photothermolysis efficiency.

  19. Heat radiation vs air drying to remove interfacial water from self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathews Irene

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinician′s quest for time-saving and technique-insensitive technology has led to the development of simplified self-etch adhesives that are predominantly water or solvent based. Several studies have shown that conventional air-drying procedures are incapable of eliminating all the residual water in the adhesive and that it may even cause collapse of the underlying collagen matrix. We hypothesized that heat from a light source may be effective in removing water from these adhesives. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the effectiveness of heat vs conventional air drying in eliminating water droplets from self-etch adhesive. A self-etch adhesive was applied to bur-cut dentin surfaces, which were then allotted to one of two treatment procedures for eliminating residual water from the adhesive: conventional air drying or the experimental heat application. Specimens were then prepared and analyzed using SEM. Specimens in the experimental group showed no evidence of water treeing within the adhesive layer. Thus, it was concluded that heat radiation was an effective method to remove residual water from simplified adhesives.

  20. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  1. Radiation-Induced Prompt Photocurrents in Microelectronics Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Dodd, P E; Buller, D L; Doyle, B L; Vizkelethy, G; Walsh, D S

    2003-01-01

    The effects of photocurrents in nuclear weapons induced by proximal nuclear detonations are well known and remain a serious hostile environment threat for the US stockpile. This report describes the final results of an LDRD study of the physical phenomena underlying prompt photocurrents in microelectronic devices and circuits. The goals of this project were to obtain an improved understanding of these phenomena, and to incorporate improved models of photocurrent effects into simulation codes to assist designers in meeting hostile radiation requirements with minimum build and test cycles. We have also developed a new capability on the ion microbeam accelerator in Sandia's Ion Beam Materials Research Laboratory (the Transient Radiation Microscope, or TRM) to supply ionizing radiation in selected micro-regions of a device. The dose rates achieved in this new facility approach those possible with conventional large-scale dose-rate sources at Sandia such as HERMES III and Saturn. It is now possible to test the phy...

  2. Radiation-induced grafting of dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate onto PE/PP nonwoven fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaklı, Pınar Akkaş; Kavaklı, Cengiz; Seko, Noriaki; Tamada, Masao; Güven, Olgun

    2007-12-01

    A new adsorbent was prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization of dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate (DMAEMA) onto polyethylene/polypropylene (PE/PP) nonwoven fabric. The trunk polymer was irradiated by electron beam at a voltage of 2 MeV and a current of 3 mA in nitrogen atmosphere at dry-ice temperature to different doses. The degree of grafting was determined as a function of irradiation dose, monomer concentration, temperature and reaction time. Grafting conditions were optimized and about 150% grafted samples were used for further experiments. DMAEMA grafted polymer was later protonated in acid solution to prepare specialty adsorbent for the removal of phosphate. Adsorption experiments were performed in column mode for removal of phosphate. It was shown that 2000 bed volumes of phosphate-free water can be produced from 100 ppb phosphate (as P) solution at high space velocity.

  3. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Erkang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-04-01

    In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy α-particle irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensitive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose α-particle radiation-induced damage in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  4. Radiation-Induced Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    or the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines and related molecules by DCs. To overcome this radiation-induced immunosuppression, we plan to...effects on the tumor microenvironment, such as up- regulating the expression of inflammatory mediators (e.g. COX2 and PGE2), heat shock proteins ...Economou. 1997. Genetic immunization for the melanoma antigen MART- 1/ Melan -A using recombinant adenovirus-transduced murine dendritic cells. Cancer Res

  5. Radiation-Induced Cardiovascular Disease: A Clinical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Wamique Yusuf

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer survival has improved dramatically, and this has led to the manifestation of late side effects of multimodality therapy. Radiation (RT to the thoracic malignancies results in unintentional irradiation of the cardiac chambers. RT-induced microvascular ischemia leads to disruption of capillary endothelial framework, and injury to differentiated myocytes results in deposition of collagen and fibrosis. Coexistence of risk factors of metabolic syndrome and preexisting atherosclerosis in addition to RT exposure results in accelerated occurrence of major coronary events. Hence, it becomes pertinent to understand the underlying pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of RT-induced cardiovascular disease to devise optimal preventive and surveillance strategies.

  6. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazato, Tomonori; Yusa, Toshiko; Onaga, Tomohiro; Sugaya, Kimio; Koyama, Yuzo; Hatano, Tadashi; Ogawa, Yoshihide [Ryukyus Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-05-01

    Radiation therapy has widely been used for cancers in the pelvis. Radiation cystitis, one of the late complications, presents often as hemorrhagic cystitis, which is refractory to the conventional therapy and may threaten the patient`s life. We used hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with radiation cystitis to test its potential benefit. Ten patients aged from 46 to 81 years with a mean of 62 years underwent one or more courses of hyperbaric oxygen therapy according to their symptoms, consisting of 20 sessions (3 to 5 sessions a week) at the Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, the University of the Ryukyus Hospital in the 9-year period from 1985 to 1994. They included 8 patients having a history of cervical cancer, one with external genital cancer and one with vaginal cancer. During the 75 min hyperbaric oxygen therapy patients received 100% oxygen at 2 absolute atmosphere pressure in the Multiplace Hyperbaric Chamber. Hematuria subsided and subjective symptoms including urinary frequency improved in seven patients. Cystoscopic findings including mucosal edema, redness, and capillary dilation were partially improved. The procedure subjectively and objectively palliated the 10 patients in a favorable manner. To date we have not armed any active procedure to control radiation-induced refractory hemorrhagic cystitis in terms of efficacy, invasiveness, and adverse effects. Therefore, in consideration of our clinical results, hyperbaric oxygen therapy appears to be useful for radiation cystitis. (author)

  7. Radiation-induced bystander effect: The important part of ionizing radiation response. Potential clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wideł

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available It has long been a central radiobiological dogma that the damaging effects of ionizing radiation, such as cell death, cytogenetic changes, apoptosis, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis, are the results of the direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or indirect damage via water radiolysis products. However, several years ago attention turned to a third mechanism of radiation, termed the “bystander effect” or “radiation-induced bystander effect” (RIBE. This is induced by agents and signals emitted by directly irradiated cells and manifests as a lowering of survival, cytogenetic damage, apoptosis enhancement, and biochemical changes in neighboring non-irradiated cells. The bystander effect is mainly observed in in vitro experiments using very low doses of alpha particles (range; mGy, cGy, but also after conventional irradiation (X-rays, gamma rays at low as well as conventional doses. The mechanisms responsible for the bystander effect are complex and still poorly understood. It is believed that molecular signals released from irradiated cells induce different signaling ways in non-irradiated neighboring cells, leading to the observed events. The molecular signals may be transmitted through gap junction intercellular communication and through a medium transfer mechanism. The nature of these transmitted factors are diverse, and still not defi nitely established. It seems that RIBE may have important clinical implications for health risk associated with radiation exposure. Potentially, this effectmay have important implications in the creation of whole-body or localized side effects in tissues beyond the irradiation fi eld and also in low-dose radiological and radioisotope diagnostics. Factors emitted by irradiated cells may result in the risk of genetic instability, mutations, and second primary cancer induction. They might also have their own part in inducing and extending post-radiation side effects in normal tissue. The

  8. Ultraviolet radiation-induced murine tumors produced in the absence of ultraviolet radiation-induced systemic tumor immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, S W; Greenoak, G E; Reeve, V E; Gallagher, C H

    1991-06-01

    Using micro-UV-irradiation versus whole-dorsal irradiation for inducing cutaneous carcinomas in Skh:HRI mice and an assay for UV radiation (UVR)-induced systemic tumor immunosuppression, the dependence upon systemic immunosuppression for the growth of UVR-induced carcinomas was examined. Squamous cell carcinomas were produced by repeated microirradiation of 0.8-cm2 middorsal skin with xenon are solar-simulated UVR. These tumors were excised from tumor-bearing animals who 7 days later were inoculated ventrally with a cloned UVR-induced squamous cell carcinoma cell line, the T51/6. This cell line only grows in UVR-induced immunosuppressed Skh:HRI mice. In two separate experiments T51/6 inocula failed to grow significantly in the previously tumor-bearing animals (1 of 13) and in unirradiated mice (0 of 19), whereas it grew in 100% (15 of 15) of animals given a whole-dorsal subcarcinogenic UVR dose from a filtered fluorescent tube solar simulator. No sinecomitant immune response to the T51/6 was found in previously UVR-induced tumor-bearing animals. In contrast to whole-dorsal UVR-induced tumors, microirradiation-induced squamous cell carcinomas, whose original growth environment lacked UVR-induced systemic tumor immunosuppression, did not grow preferentially in mice given an immunosuppressive dose of UVR. However both the whole-dorsal and microirradiation-induced tumors were shown to be poorly antigenic, since they lacked preferential growth in athymic nude mice. These observations provide evidence that UVR-induced systemic tumor immunosuppression is not necessary for the production of UVR-induced tumors. However, it does cause a positive selection pressure during tumor formation, independent of the carcinogenic effect of UVR, which affects the transplantation biology of a tumor.

  9. Radiation-induced adaptive response in fish cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lorna A; Seymour, Colin B; O'Neill-Mehlenbacher, Alicia; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2008-04-01

    There is considerable interest at present in low-dose radiation effects in non-human species. In this study gamma radiation-induced adaptive response, a low-dose radiation effect, was examined in three fish cell lines, (CHSE-214 (Chinook salmon), RTG-2 (rainbow trout) and ZEB-2J (zebrafish)). Cell survival after exposure to direct radiation with or without a 0.1 Gy priming dose, was determined using the colony forming assay for each cell line. Additionally, the occurrence of a bystander effect was examined by measuring the effect of irradiated cell culture medium from the fish cell lines on unexposed reporter cells. A non-linear dose response was observed for all cell lines. ZEB-2J cells were very sensitive to low doses and a hyper-radiosensitive (HRS) response was observed for doses fish cell lines tested. Rather, it was found that pre-exposure of these cells to 0.1 Gy radiation sensitized the cells to subsequent high doses. In CHSE-214 cells, increased sensitivity to subsequent high doses of radiation was observed when the priming and challenge doses were separated by 4 h; however, this sensitizing effect was no longer present when the interval between doses was greater than 8 h. Additionally, a "protective" bystander response was observed in these cell lines; exposure to irradiated medium from fish cells caused increased cloning efficiency in unirradiated reporter cells. The data confirm previous conclusions for mammalian cells that the adaptive response and bystander effect are inversely correlated and contrary to expectations probably have different underlying mechanisms.

  10. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Eftekhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right–sided cancer. Methods: To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. Results: A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46. In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03 and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049 walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%, while in five of the controls (13.9%,(Odds ratio=1.3. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusion: The risk of radiation induced myocardial

  11. Determination of carbamate and organophosphorus pesticides in vegetable samples and the efficiency of gamma-radiation in their removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Muhammed Alamgir Zaman; Jahan, Iffat; Karim, Nurul; Alam, Mohammad Khorshed; Abdur Rahman, Mohammad; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Gan, Siew Hua; Fakhruddin, Abu Naieum Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the residual pesticide levels were determined in eggplants (Solanum melongena) (n = 16), purchased from four different markets in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The carbamate and organophosphorus pesticide residual levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the efficiency of gamma radiation on pesticide removal in three different types of vegetables was also studied. Many (50%) of the samples contained pesticides, and three samples had residual levels above the maximum residue levels determined by the World Health Organisation. Three carbamates (carbaryl, carbofuran, and pirimicarb) and six organophosphates (phenthoate, diazinon, parathion, dimethoate, phosphamidon, and pirimiphos-methyl) were detected in eggplant samples; the highest carbofuran level detected was 1.86 mg/kg, while phenthoate was detected at 0.311 mg/kg. Gamma radiation decreased pesticide levels proportionately with increasing radiation doses. Diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and phosphamidon were reduced by 40-48%, 35-43%, and 30-45%, respectively, when a radiation strength of 0.5 kGy was utilized. However, when the radiation dose was increased to 1.0 kGy, the levels of the pesticides were reduced to 85-90%, 80-91%, and 90-95%, respectively. In summary, our study revealed that pesticide residues are present at high amounts in vegetable samples and that gamma radiation at 1.0 kGy can remove 80-95% of some pesticides.

  12. Determination of Carbamate and Organophosphorus Pesticides in Vegetable Samples and the Efficiency of Gamma-Radiation in Their Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Alamgir Zaman Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the residual pesticide levels were determined in eggplants (Solanum melongena (n=16, purchased from four different markets in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The carbamate and organophosphorus pesticide residual levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, and the efficiency of gamma radiation on pesticide removal in three different types of vegetables was also studied. Many (50% of the samples contained pesticides, and three samples had residual levels above the maximum residue levels determined by the World Health Organisation. Three carbamates (carbaryl, carbofuran, and pirimicarb and six organophosphates (phenthoate, diazinon, parathion, dimethoate, phosphamidon, and pirimiphos-methyl were detected in eggplant samples; the highest carbofuran level detected was 1.86 mg/kg, while phenthoate was detected at 0.311 mg/kg. Gamma radiation decreased pesticide levels proportionately with increasing radiation doses. Diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and phosphamidon were reduced by 40–48%, 35–43%, and 30–45%, respectively, when a radiation strength of 0.5 kGy was utilized. However, when the radiation dose was increased to 1.0 kGy, the levels of the pesticides were reduced to 85–90%, 80–91%, and 90–95%, respectively. In summary, our study revealed that pesticide residues are present at high amounts in vegetable samples and that gamma radiation at 1.0 kGy can remove 80–95% of some pesticides.

  13. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotrim, Ana P. [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yoshikawa, Masanobu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baum, Bruce J., E-mail: bbaum@dir.nidcr.nih.gov [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  14. Radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbon production in platelets. Scientific report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radha, E.; Vaishnav, Y.N.; Kumar, K.S.; Weiss, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia plays an important role in the development of the post-irradiation hemorrhagic syndrome. Although destruction of platelet precursors in bone marrow is a major effect of high-dose radiation exposure, the effects of radiation on preformed platelets are unclear. The latter is also of concern with respect to blood-banking practices since platelets are often irradiated at doses in the range of 20-50 Gy before transfusions to prevent graft-versus-host disease. With increasing emphasis on allogenic and autologous bone-marrow transplantation, transfusions of irradiated platelets are likely to rise. Generation of volatile hydrocarbons (ethane, pentane) as a measure of lipid peroxidation was followed in preparations from platelet-rich plasma irradiated in vitro. The hydrocarbons in the headspace of sealed vials containing irradiated and nonirradiated washed platelets, platelet-rich plasma, or platelet-poor plasma increased with time. The major hydrocarbon, pentane, increased linearly and significantly with increasing log radiation dose, suggesting that reactive oxygen species induced by ionizing radiation result in lipid peroxidation. Measurements of lipid peroxidation products may give an indication of suboptimal quality of stored and/or irradiated platelets.

  15. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousada, Cláudio M; Soroka, Inna L; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-18

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  16. A case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma and skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Yuki; Yano, Kenji [Kure National Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma, and skin cancer in a 69-year-old woman who had undergone local irradiation and application of radium directly to the skin for actinomycosis of the face at the age of twenty. Some forty to fifty years later, a skin ulcer in the preauricular area in the center of the radiodermatitis, cerebral meningioma in the right sphenoid ridge, and a keratotic skin tumor in the right auricle all developed within the previously irradiated region. The cerebral meningioma was extirpated. The skin ulcer was excised and covered with a forearm flap. After the skin tumor was excised and the subcutaneous tumor in the postauricular area was excised, the postoperative histopathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. It was considered that the squamous cell carcinoma was derived from irradiated keratosis. Four months later, right neck lymph node dissection was performed. Both the meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma satisfied Cahan's criteria for radiation-induced tumors. So we diagnosed these as radiation-induced cerebral meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma. We haven't detected any recurrence of the squamous cell carcinoma for two years. We learned from this case that chronic radiation disturbances cause an irreversible reaction and various radiolesions, including malignancies, can occur after a long period of latency. It is important to never underestimate a small lesion in the irradiated area, to plan early preventive surgical treatment to remove skin that may have been over-subjected to irradiation, and to continue long-term follow-up for patients with chronic radiodermatitis. (author)

  17. Ultraviolet A radiation (320-400 nm) protects hairless mice from immunosuppression induced by ultraviolet B radiation (280-320 nm) or cis-urocanic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, V E; Bosnic, M; Boehm-Wilcox, C; Nishimura, N; Ley, R D

    1998-04-01

    T cell-mediated immune function, here measured as the contact hypersensitivity reaction, is readily suppressed by moderate exposure of mice to ultraviolet B (UVB) or solar-simulated radiation (SSUV), or by topical application of cis-urocanic acid. The effect of ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation on immune function has been unclear. Here we have demonstrated that when UVA radiation from a fluorescent tube source was rigorously filtered to remove contaminating UVB radiation, it was immunologically innocuous at physiologically relevant doses. Furthermore, we have found that mice exposed to UVA radiation, either immediately after, or up to 24 h before, immunosuppressive treatment with either UVB radiation, SSUV or cis-urocanic acid, became refractory to the immunosuppression and retained more normal contact hypersensitivity. A greater UVA exposure reversed the immunosuppression more effectively. The results suggest that there are immunologically significant interactions between UV wavebands, and that UVA exposure may induce a relatively long-lived immunoprotective photoproduct, as yet unidentified, that can inhibit the activity of epidermal cis-urocanic acid and thus provide protection from photoimmunosuppression.

  18. Radiation-induced cerebral meningioma: a recognizable entity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Shalit, M.N.; Cohen, M.L.; Zandbank, U.; Reichenthal, E.

    1984-11-01

    The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical and histopathological findings in 201 patients with intracranial meningiomas operated on in the period 1978 to 1982. Forty-three of the patients (21.4%) had at some previous time received radiation treatment to their scalp, the majority for tinea capitis. The findings in these 43 irradiated patients were compared with those in the 158 non-irradiated patients. Several distinctive clinical and histological features were identified in the irradiated group, which suggest that radiation-induced meningiomas can be defined as a separate nosological subgroup. The use of irradiation in large numbers of children with tinea capitis in the era prior to the availability of griseofulvin may be responsible for a significantly increased incidence of intracranial meningiomas.

  19. Treatment of radiation- and chemotherapy-induced stomatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnel, S.B.; Blakeslee, D.B.; Oswald, S.G.; Barnes, M. (Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, Aurora, CO (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Severe stomatitis is a common problem encountered during either radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Most therapeutic regimens are empirical, with no scientific basis. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of various topical solutions in the treatment of radiation- or chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. Eighteen patients were entered into a prospective double-blinded study to test several topical solutions: (1) viscous lidocaine with 1% cocaine; (2) dyclonine hydrochloride 1.0% (Dyclone); (3) kaolin-pectin solution, diphenhydramine plus saline (KBS); and (4) a placebo solution. Degree of pain relief, duration of relief, side effects, and palatability were evaluated. The results showed that Dyclone provided the most pain relief. Dyclone and viscous lidocaine with 1% cocaine provided the longest pain relief, which averaged 50 minutes This study provides objective data and defines useful guidelines for treatment of stomatitis.

  20. Acupuncture treatment of patients with radiation-induced xerostomia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, M.; Dawidson, I.; Johnson, G.; Angmar-Maansson, B. [Karolinska Inst., Huddinge (Sweden). Dept. of Cardiology; Fernberg, J.-O. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of General Oncology

    1996-05-01

    Xerostomia is a common and usually irreversible side effect in patients receiving radiation therapy (>50 Gy) for head and neck cancer. Of 38 patients with radiation-induced xerostomia, 20 in the experimental group were treated with classical acupuncture and 18 patients in the control group received superficial acupuncture as placebo. Within both groups the patients showed significantly increased salivary flow rates after the acupuncture treatment. In the experimental group 68% and in the control group 50% of the patients had increased salivary flow rates at the end of the observation period. Among those patients who had had all their salivary glands irradiated, 50% in both groups showed increased salivary flow rates (>20%) by the end of the observation period of 1 year. The study indicates that among the patients who had increased salivary flow rates already after the first 12 acupuncture sessions, the majority had high probability of continual improvement after the completion of acupuncture treatment. (Author).

  1. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    used an array of countermeasures (Antioxidant diets and injections) to prevent the radiation-induced bone loss, although these did not prevent bone loss, analysis is ongoing to determine if these countermeasure protected radiation-induced damage to other tissues.

  2. Simvastatin attenuates radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Liping Xu,* Xi Yang,* Jiayan Chen, Xiaolin Ge, Qin Qin, Hongcheng Zhu, Chi Zhang, Xinchen Sun Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Statins are widely used lipid-lowering drugs, which have pleiotropic effects, such as anti-inflammation, and vascular protection. In our study, we investigated the radioprotective potential of simvastatin (SIM in a murine model of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. Design: Ninety-six Institute of Cancer Research mice were randomly divided into four groups: solvent + sham irradiation (IR (Group I, SIM + sham IR (Group II, IR + solvent (Group III, and IR + SIM (Group IV. SIM (10 mg/kg body weight, three times per week was administered intraperitoneally 1 week prior to IR through to the end of the experiment. Saliva and submandibular gland tissues were obtained for biochemical, morphological (hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson’s trichrome, and Western blot analysis at 8 hours, 24 hours, and 4 weeks after head and neck IR. Results: IR caused a significant reduction of salivary secretion and amylase activity but elevation of malondialdehyde. SIM remitted the reduction of saliva secretion and restored salivary amylase activity. The protective benefits of SIM may be attributed to scavenging malondialdehyde, remitting collagen deposition, and reducing and delaying the elevation of transforming growth factor β1 expression induced by radiation. Conclusion: SIM may be clinically useful to alleviate side effects of radiotherapy on salivary gland. Keywords: simvastatin, radiation protection, submandibular gland, transforming growth factor-β1, mice

  3. Interference effects in medium-induced gluon radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    As a step towards understanding the in-medium evolution of a hard jet, we consider the interference pattern for the medium induced gluon radiation produced by a color singlet quark-antiquark antenna embedded in a QCD medium with size L. We focus on the typical kinematics for medium-induced gluon radiation in the BDMPS-Z regime, that is, short formation times \\tau_f >\\theta_c = 2/\\sqrt{\\hat q L^3}, with \\hat q the `jet quenching' parameter. We demonstrate that, for a dipole opening angle \\theta_{q\\bar q} larger than \\theta_c, the interference between the medium-induced gluon emissions by the quark and the antiquark is parametrically suppressed with respect to the corresponding direct emissions. Physically, this is so since the direct emissions can be delocalized anywhere throughout the medium and thus yield contributions proportional to L. On the contrary, the interference occurs only between gluons emitted at very early times, within the characteristic time scales for quantum and color coherence between the t...

  4. Studies on chemical protectors against radiation, 33; Protective mechanisms of various compounds against skin injury induced by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yushi; Kumazawa, Noriko; Suzuki, Makoto; Wang Cheng-Ming; Ohta, Setsuko; Shinoda, Masato (Hoshi Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    The radiation protective mechanisms on skin injury induced by soft X-irradiation were investigated by use of various radiation protective agents such as sulfur compounds (MEA, MEG, thiourea), nucleic acid constitutional compounds (adenosine, inosine), antioxidative compounds (sesamol, ferulic acid, ascorbic acid), crude drugs (Rosae Fructus, Anemarrhenae Rhizoma, Trapae Fructus, Forsythiae Fructus, Aloe arborescens). Scavenge action of activated oxygen, inhibitory effect of lipid peroxidation, induction of antioxidative protein and protective effect against damage of deoxyribonucleic acid and superoxide dismutase by X-irradiation were evaluated as the radiation protective mechanisms, and relationship between these results and protective effect of skin injury induced by radiation was studied. (author).

  5. Galactic cosmic ray-induced radiation dose on terrestrial exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atri, Dimitra; Hariharan, B; Grießmeier, Jean-Mathias

    2013-10-01

    This past decade has seen tremendous advancements in the study of extrasolar planets. Observations are now made with increasing sophistication from both ground- and space-based instruments, and exoplanets are characterized with increasing precision. There is a class of particularly interesting exoplanets that reside in the habitable zone, which is defined as the area around a star where the planet is capable of supporting liquid water on its surface. Planetary systems around M dwarfs are considered to be prime candidates to search for life beyond the Solar System. Such planets are likely to be tidally locked and have close-in habitable zones. Theoretical calculations also suggest that close-in exoplanets are more likely to have weaker planetary magnetic fields, especially in the case of super-Earths. Such exoplanets are subjected to a high flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) due to their weak magnetic moments. GCRs are energetic particles of astrophysical origin that strike the planetary atmosphere and produce secondary particles, including muons, which are highly penetrating. Some of these particles reach the planetary surface and contribute to the radiation dose. Along with the magnetic field, another factor governing the radiation dose is the depth of the planetary atmosphere. The higher the depth of the planetary atmosphere, the lower the flux of secondary particles will be on the surface. If the secondary particles are energetic enough, and their flux is sufficiently high, the radiation from muons can also impact the subsurface regions, such as in the case of Mars. If the radiation dose is too high, the chances of sustaining a long-term biosphere on the planet are very low. We have examined the dependence of the GCR-induced radiation dose on the strength of the planetary magnetic field and its atmospheric depth, and found that the latter is the decisive factor for the protection of a planetary biosphere.

  6. Removal of phosphate using copper-loaded polymeric ligand exchanger prepared by radiation grafting of polypropylene/polyethylene (PP/PE) nonwoven fabric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsbay, Murat, E-mail: mbarsbay@hacettepe.edu.t [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, 06800 Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Kavakli, Pinar Akkas, E-mail: pinar@hacettepe.edu.t [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, 06800 Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Gueven, Olgun, E-mail: guven@hacettepe.edu.t [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, 06800 Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-03-15

    A novel polymeric ligand exchanger (PLE) was prepared for the removal of phosphate ions from water. 2,2'-dipyridylamine (DPA), a bidentate ligand forming compound with high coordination capacity with a variety of metal ions was bound to glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) grafted polypropylene/polyethylene (PP/PE) nonwoven fabric synthesized by radiation-induced grafting technique. DPA attachment on epoxy ring of GMA units was tested in different solvents, i.e. methanol, ethanol, dioxane and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The highest amount of modification was achieved in dioxane. In order to prepare the corresponding PLE for the removal of phosphate, DPA-immobilized fabric was loaded with Cu(II) ions. Phosphate adsorption experiments were performed in batch mode at different pH (5-9) and phosphate concentrations. The fabric was found to be effective for the removal of phosphate ions. At every stage of preparation and use, the nonwoven fabric was characterized by thermal (i.e. DSC and TGA) and spectroscopic (FTIR) methods. Competitive adsorption experiments were also carried out using two solutions with different concentration levels at pH 7 to see the effect of competing ions. Phosphate adsorption was found to be effective and selective from solutions having trace amounts of competitive anions. It is expected that the novel PLE synthesized can be used for the removal of phosphate ions in low concentrations over a large range of pH.

  7. Removal of phosphate using copper-loaded polymeric ligand exchanger prepared by radiation grafting of polypropylene/polyethylene (PP/PE) nonwoven fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsbay, Murat; Kavaklı, Pınar Akkaş; Güven, Olgun

    2010-03-01

    A novel polymeric ligand exchanger (PLE) was prepared for the removal of phosphate ions from water. 2,2'-dipyridylamine (DPA), a bidentate ligand forming compound with high coordination capacity with a variety of metal ions was bound to glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) grafted polypropylene/polyethylene (PP/PE) nonwoven fabric synthesized by radiation-induced grafting technique. DPA attachment on epoxy ring of GMA units was tested in different solvents, i.e. methanol, ethanol, dioxane and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The highest amount of modification was achieved in dioxane. In order to prepare the corresponding PLE for the removal of phosphate, DPA-immobilized fabric was loaded with Cu(II) ions. Phosphate adsorption experiments were performed in batch mode at different pH (5-9) and phosphate concentrations. The fabric was found to be effective for the removal of phosphate ions. At every stage of preparation and use, the nonwoven fabric was characterized by thermal (i.e. DSC and TGA) and spectroscopic (FTIR) methods. Competitive adsorption experiments were also carried out using two solutions with different concentration levels at pH 7 to see the effect of competing ions. Phosphate adsorption was found to be effective and selective from solutions having trace amounts of competitive anions. It is expected that the novel PLE synthesized can be used for the removal of phosphate ions in low concentrations over a large range of pH.

  8. Modern cataract surgery for radiation-induced cataracts in retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Ihab M; Abouzeid, Hana; Balmer, Aubin; Gaillard, Marie-Claire; Othenin-Girard, Philippe; Pica, Alessia; Moeckli, Raphaël; Schorderet, Daniel F; Munier, Francis L

    2011-02-01

    Surgery of radiation-induced cataracts in children with retinoblastoma (RB) is a challenge as early intervention is weighted against the need to delay surgery until complete tumour control is obtained. This study analyses the safety and functional results of such surgery. In a retrospective, non-comparative, consecutive case series, we reviewed medical records of RB patients ≤ 14 y of age who underwent either external beam radiotherapy or plaque treatment and were operated for radiation-induced cataract between 1985 and 2008. In total, 21 eyes of 20 RB patients were included and 18 out of the 21 eyes had Reese-Ellsworth stage V or ABC classification group D/E RB. Median interval between last treatment for RB and cataract surgery was 21.5 months, range 3-164 months. Phacoaspiration was performed in 13 eyes (61%), extra-capsular cataract extraction in 8 (39%) and intraocular lens implantation in 19 eyes (90%). The majority of cases, 11/21 (52%), underwent posterior capsulorhexis or capsulotomy and 6/21 (28%) an anterior vitrectomy. Postoperative visual acuity was ≥ 20/200 in 13 eyes and < 20/200 in 5 eyes. Intraocular tumour recurrence was noted in three eyes. Mean postoperative follow up was 90 months ± 69 months. Modern cataract surgery, including clear cornea approach, lens aspiration with posterior capsulotomy, anterior vitrectomy and IOL implantation is a safe procedure for radiation-induced cataract as long as RB is controlled. The visual prognosis is limited by initial tumour involvement of the macula and by corneal complications of radiotherapy. We recommend a minimal interval of 9 months between completion of treatment of retinoblastoma and cataract surgery.

  9. Erythrocyte Stiffness during Morphological Remodeling Induced by Carbon Ion Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baoping; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Jizeng

    2014-01-01

    The adverse effect induced by carbon ion radiation (CIR) is still an unavoidable hazard to the treatment object. Thus, evaluation of its adverse effects on the body is a critical problem with respect to radiation therapy. We aimed to investigate the change between the configuration and mechanical properties of erythrocytes induced by radiation and found differences in both the configuration and the mechanical properties with involving in morphological remodeling process. Syrian hamsters were subjected to whole-body irradiation with carbon ion beams (1, 2, 4, and 6 Gy) or X-rays (2, 4, 6, and 12 Gy) for 3, 14 and 28 days. Erythrocytes in peripheral blood and bone marrow were collected for cytomorphological analysis. The mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were determined using atomic force microscopy, and the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was analyzed via western blotting. The results showed that dynamic changes were evident in erythrocytes exposed to different doses of carbon ion beams compared with X-rays and the control (0 Gy). The magnitude of impairment of the cell number and cellular morphology manifested the subtle variation according to the irradiation dose. In particular, the differences in the size, shape and mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were well exhibited. Furthermore, immunoblot data showed that the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was changed after irradiation, and there was a common pattern among its substantive characteristics in the irradiated group. Based on these findings, the present study concluded that CIR could induce a change in mechanical properties during morphological remodeling of erythrocytes. According to the unique characteristics of the biomechanical categories, we deduce that changes in cytomorphology and mechanical properties can be measured to evaluate the adverse effects generated by tumor radiotherapy. Additionally, for the first time, the current study provides a new

  10. A model of radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Takaaki

    2017-07-01

    We discuss a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the rst and second generation introducing extra U(1) gauge symmetry, discrete Z 2 symmetry, vector-like fermions and exotic scalar elds. Then we analyze the allowed parameter regions which simultaneously satisfy the constraints of FCNCs for the quark sector and of LFVs including μ - e conversion, observed quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. In addition, the typical value for the (g - 2) μ in our model is presented. We also show extension of the model in which Majorana type neutrino masses are generated at the two loop level.

  11. Antioxidant Responses Induced by UVB Radiation in Deschampsia antarctica Desv.

    OpenAIRE

    K?hler, Hans; Contreras, Rodrigo A.; Pizarro, Marisol; Cort?s-Ant?quera, Rodrigo; Z??iga, Gustavo E.

    2017-01-01

    Deschampsia antarctica Desv. is one of two vascular plants that live in the Maritime Antarctic Territory and is exposed to high levels of ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation. In this work, antioxidant physiology of D. antarctica was studied in response to UVB induced oxidative changes. Samples were collected from Antarctica and maintained in vitro culture during 2 years. Plants were sub-cultured in a hydroponic system and exposed to 21.4 kJ m-2 day-1, emulating summer Antarctic conditions. Results ...

  12. Nicotinamide prevents ultraviolet radiation-induced cellular energy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joohong; Halliday, Gary M; Surjana, Devita; Damian, Diona L

    2010-01-01

    UV radiation is carcinogenic by causing mutations in the skin and also by suppressing cutaneous antitumor immunity. We previously found nicotinamide (vitamin B3) to be highly effective at reducing UV-induced immunosuppression in human volunteers, with microarray studies on in vivo irradiated human skin suggesting that nicotinamide normalizes subsets of apoptosis, immune function and energy metabolism-related genes that are downregulated by UV exposure. Using human adult low calcium temperature keratinocytes, we further investigated nicotinamide's effects on cellular energy metabolism. We found that nicotinamide prevented UV-induced cellular ATP loss and protected against UV-induced glycolytic blockade. To determine whether nicotinamide alters the effects of UV-induced oxidative stress posttranslationally, we also measured UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nicotinamide had no effect on ROS formation, and at the low UV doses used in these studies, equivalent to ambient daily sun exposure, there was no evidence of apoptosis. Hence, nicotinamide appears to exert its UV protective effects on the skin via its role in cellular energy pathways.

  13. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  14. UVB radiation induced effects on cells studied by FTIR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Di Giambattista, Lucia; Gaudenzi, S; Pozzi, D; Grandi, M; Morrone, S; Silvestri, I; Castellano, A Congiu; 10.1007/s00249-009-0446-9

    2010-01-01

    We have made a preliminary analysis of the results about the eVects on tumoral cell line (lymphoid T cell line Jurkat) induced by UVB radiation (dose of 310 mJ/cm^2) with and without a vegetable mixture. In the present study, we have used two techniques: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and flow cytometry. FTIR spectroscopy has the potential to provide the identiWcation of the vibrational modes of some of the major compounds (lipid, proteins and nucleic acids) without being invasive in the biomaterials. The second technique has allowed us to perform measurements of cytotoxicity and to assess the percentage of apoptosis. We already studied the induction of apoptotic process in the same cell line by UVB radiation; in particular, we looked for correspondences and correlations between FTIR spetroscopy and flow cytometry data finding three highly probable spectroscopic markers of apoptosis (Pozzi et al. in Radiat Res 168:698-705, 2007). In the present work, the results have shown significant changes ...

  15. Mitochondrial mutagenesis induced by tumor-specific radiation bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The radiation bystander effect is a cellular process whereby cells not directly exposed to radiation display cellular alterations similar to directly irradiated cells. Cellular targets including mitochondria have been postulated to play a significant role in this process. In this study, we utilized the Random Mutation Capture assay to quantify the levels of random mutations and deletions in the mitochondrial genome of bystander cells. A significant increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial mutations was found at 24 h in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from irradiated tumor explants (p = 0.018). CG:TA mutations were the most abundant lesion induced. A transient increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial deletions was also detected in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from tumor but not normal tissue at 24 h (p = 0.028). The increase in both point mutations and deletions was transient and not detected at 72 h. To further investigate mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were assessed in these bystander cells. There was a significant reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and this was positively associated with the frequency of random point mutation and deletions in bystander cells treated with conditioned media from tumor tissue (r = 0.71, p = 0.02). This study has shown that mitochondrial genome alterations are an acute consequence of the radiation bystander effect secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction and suggests that this cannot be solely attributable to changes in ROS levels alone.

  16. Investigation of mutations induced by radiation and restriction endonucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Kim E.

    The effects of gamma radiation and restriction endonuclease (RE) induced DNA double strand breaks (dsb) upon the mutation frequency and the surviving fraction of three Chinese hamster cell lines V79-4, CHO-K1 and an X-ray sensitive dsb repair deficient cell line xrs-5 were studied. The X-ray sensitive xrs-5 cell line was shown to be more sensitive to both the lethal and the mutagenic effects of gamma radiation having a substantially lower surviving fraction and a higher thymidine kinase (tk) mutation frequency per unit dose than the parental CHO-K1 cells. The frequency of induced hprt- mutations in the V79-4 cell line was comparable to the induced frequency of tk mutations in the CHO-K1 cells. The effect of blunt- and cohesive- ended dsb upon the surviving fraction and the induced mutation frequency was studied by porating different Chinese hamster cell lines (CHO-K1, V79-4 and xrs-5) with RE using Streptolysin O (SLO). The surviving fraction of the different cell lines was reduced with increasing concentrations of Pvu II. Increases in the concentration of Pvu II produced increases in the frequency of hypoxyanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) mutations in the V79-4 cells and tk mutations in the CHO-K1 and xrs-5 cells. However, the xrs-5 cells were shown to be hypomutable to Pvu II compared with the parental CHO-K1 cells. EcoR1 was ineffective at inducing tk mutations in the CHO-Kl cells but was as effective as Pvu II at inducing hprt mutations in the V79-4 cells. None of the spontaneously induced V79-4 hprt- mutant cells were shown to have observable molecular deletions when analysed by PCR deletion screening. One third of the radiation induced hprt - mutants were shown to be deletions. However, too few mutant cells were analysed for any non-random distribution of deletions to be observed. Half of the hprt- mutants induced by SLO poration alone were shown to be due to deletions of oi\\e or more exons. The distribution of the DNA deletions in SLO hprt

  17. Radiation-induced bystander effects in cultured human stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykyta V Sokolov

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The radiation-induced "bystander effect" (RIBE was shown to occur in a number of experimental systems both in vitro and in vivo as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation (IR. RIBE manifests itself by intercellular communication from irradiated cells to non-irradiated cells which may cause DNA damage and eventual death in these bystander cells. It is known that human stem cells (hSC are ultimately involved in numerous crucial biological processes such as embryologic development; maintenance of normal homeostasis; aging; and aging-related pathologies such as cancerogenesis and other diseases. However, very little is known about radiation-induced bystander effect in hSC. To mechanistically interrogate RIBE responses and to gain novel insights into RIBE specifically in hSC compartment, both medium transfer and cell co-culture bystander protocols were employed.Human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC and embryonic stem cells (hESC were irradiated with doses 0.2 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy of X-rays, allowed to recover either for 1 hr or 24 hr. Then conditioned medium was collected and transferred to non-irradiated hSC for time course studies. In addition, irradiated hMSC were labeled with a vital CMRA dye and co-cultured with non-irradiated bystander hMSC. The medium transfer data showed no evidence for RIBE either in hMSC and hESC by the criteria of induction of DNA damage and for apoptotic cell death compared to non-irradiated cells (p>0.05. A lack of robust RIBE was also demonstrated in hMSC co-cultured with irradiated cells (p>0.05.These data indicate that hSC might not be susceptible to damaging effects of RIBE signaling compared to differentiated adult human somatic cells as shown previously. This finding could have profound implications in a field of radiation biology/oncology, in evaluating radiation risk of IR exposures, and for the safety and efficacy of hSC regenerative-based therapies.

  18. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in Cultured Human Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Mykyta V.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The radiation-induced “bystander effect” (RIBE) was shown to occur in a number of experimental systems both in vitro and in vivo as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). RIBE manifests itself by intercellular communication from irradiated cells to non-irradiated cells which may cause DNA damage and eventual death in these bystander cells. It is known that human stem cells (hSC) are ultimately involved in numerous crucial biological processes such as embryologic development; maintenance of normal homeostasis; aging; and aging-related pathologies such as cancerogenesis and other diseases. However, very little is known about radiation-induced bystander effect in hSC. To mechanistically interrogate RIBE responses and to gain novel insights into RIBE specifically in hSC compartment, both medium transfer and cell co-culture bystander protocols were employed. Methodology/Principal Findings Human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and embryonic stem cells (hESC) were irradiated with doses 0.2 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy of X-rays, allowed to recover either for 1 hr or 24 hr. Then conditioned medium was collected and transferred to non-irradiated hSC for time course studies. In addition, irradiated hMSC were labeled with a vital CMRA dye and co-cultured with non-irradiated bystander hMSC. The medium transfer data showed no evidence for RIBE either in hMSC and hESC by the criteria of induction of DNA damage and for apoptotic cell death compared to non-irradiated cells (p>0.05). A lack of robust RIBE was also demonstrated in hMSC co-cultured with irradiated cells (p>0.05). Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that hSC might not be susceptible to damaging effects of RIBE signaling compared to differentiated adult human somatic cells as shown previously. This finding could have profound implications in a field of radiation biology/oncology, in evaluating radiation risk of IR exposures, and for the safety and efficacy of hSC regenerative

  19. Space-radiation-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas; Lee, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    We report on the results of a study of the photon luminescence of the Moon induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and space radiation from the Sun, using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) above 1 keV in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence albedo produced by the Moon's surface when there is no sunlight and Earthshine. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior of the Moon. From the photon fluence we derive the spectrum which can be utilized to examine existing lunar spectral data and to design orbiting instrumentation for measuring various components of the space-radiation-induced photon luminescence present on the Moon.

  20. Estimating radiation risk induced by CT screening for Korean population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Won Seok; Yang, Hye Jeong; Min, Byung In

    2017-02-01

    The purposes of this study are to estimate the radiation risks induced by chest/abdomen computed tomography (CT) screening for healthcare and to determine the cancer risk level of the Korean population compared to other populations. We used an ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator to compute the organ effective dose induced by CT screening (chest, low-dose chest, abdomen/pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis CT). A risk model was applied using principles based on the BEIR VII Report in order to estimate the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) using the Korean Life Table 2010. In addition, several countries including Hong Kong, the United States (U.S.), and the United Kingdom, were selected for comparison. Herein, each population exposed radiation dose of 100 mSv was classified according to country, gender and age. For each CT screening the total organ effective dose calculated by ImPACT was 6.2, 1.5, 5.2 and 11.4 mSv, respectively. In the case of Korean female LAR, it was similar to Hong Kong female but lower than those of U.S. and U.K. females, except for those in their twenties. The LAR of Korean males was the highest for all types of CT screening. However, the difference of the risk level was negligible because of the quite low value.

  1. Sestrin2 protects the myocardium against radiation-induced damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yue-Can; Chi, Feng; Xing, Rui; Gao, Song; Chen, Jia-Jia; Duan, Qiong-Yu; Sun, Yu-Nan; Niu, Nan; Tang, Mei-Yue; Wu, Rong [Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center, Shenyang (China); Zeng, Jing [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); Wang, Hong-Mei [Nanfang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Sestrin2 in response to radiation-induced injury to the heart and on the cardiomyopathy development in the mouse. Mice with genetic deletion of the Sestrin2 (Sestrin2 knockout mice [Sestrin2 KO]) and treatment with irradiation (22 or 15 Gy) were used as independent approaches to determine the role of Sestrin2. Echocardiography (before and after isoproterenol challenge) and left ventricular (LV) catheterization were performed to evaluate changes in LV dimensions and function. Masson's trichrome was used to assess myocardial fibrosis. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect the capillary density. After 22 or 15 Gy irradiation, the LV ejection fraction (EF) was impaired in wt mice at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation when compared with sham irradiation. Compared to wt mice, Sestrin2 KO mice had significant reduction in reduced LVEF at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation. A significant increase in LV end-diastolic pressure and myocardial fibrosis and a significant decrease in capillary density were observed in irradiation-wt mice, as well as in irradiation-Sestrin2 KO mice. Sestrin2 involved in the regulation of cardiomyopathy (such as myocardial fibrosis) after irradiation. Overexpression of Sestrin2 might be useful in limiting radiation-induced myocardial injury. (orig.)

  2. Radiation-Induced Correlation between Molecules Nearby Metallic Antenna Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Osaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically investigate optical absorption of molecules embedded nearby metallic antennas by using discrete dipole approximation method. It is found that the spectral peak of the absorption is shifted due to the radiation-induced correlation between the molecules. The most distinguishing feature of our work is to show that the shift is largely enhanced even when the individual molecules couple with localized surface plasmons near the different antennas. Specifically, we first consider the case that two sets of dimeric gold blocks with a spacing of a few nanometers are arranged and reveal that the intensity and spectral peak of the optical absorption strongly depend on the position of the molecules. In addition, when the dimeric blocks and the molecules are periodically arranged, the peak shift is found to increase up to ~1.2 meV (300 GHz. Because the radiation-induced correlation is essential for collective photon emission, our result implies the possibility of plasmon-assisted superfluorescence in designed antenna-molecule complex systems.

  3. Radiation-induced thyroid cancer after radiotherapy for childhood cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiravova, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, Faculty Hospital Motol, Uk, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-01

    Full text of the publication follows: The thyroid gland in children is among the most sensitive organs to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation, and very young children are at especially high risk. Due to extreme sensitivity of the thyroid gland in children, there is a risk of radiation - induced thyroid cancer even when the thyroid gland is outside the irradiated field. Increased incidence of thyroid cancer has been noted following radiotherapy not only for childhood Hodgkin disease (majority of observed patients), but also for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, Wilms tumor, acute lymphocytic leukemia and tumors of the central nervous system also. Radiation-induced tumors begin to appear 5-10 years after irradiation and excess risk persists for decades, perhaps for the remainder of life. The incidence of thyroid cancer is two- to threefold higher among females than males. Most of the thyroid cancers that occur in association with irradiation are of the papillary type, for which the cure rate is high if tumors are detected early. Our Department in co-operation with Department of Children Hematology and Oncology Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and Faculty Hospital Motol monitors patients after therapy for cancer in childhood for the long term period. The monitoring is focused on detection of thyroid disorders that occur as last consequences of oncology therapy, especially early detection of nodular changes in thyroid gland and thyroid carcinogenesis. The survey presents two patients observed in our department that were diagnosed with the papillary thyroid carcinoma which occurred 15 and more years after radiotherapy for childhood cancer. After total thyroidectomy they underwent therapy with radioiodine. After radiotherapy it is necessary to pursue a long-term following and assure interdisciplinary co-operation which enables early detection of last consequences of radiotherapy, especially the most serious ones as secondary carcinogenesis

  4. Upcycling of polypropylene waste by surface modification using radiation-induced grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad Inaam ul; Taimur, Shaista; Yasin, Tariq

    2017-11-01

    In this work, upcycling of polypropylene waste into amidoxime functionalized polypropylene adsorbent was studied using radiation-induced grafting technique. Polypropylene waste (PPw) was resulted from accelerated thermal ageing of polypropylene (PP). Bulk grafting of acrylonitrile (AN) onto PPw was achieved by simultaneous radiation grafting method using gamma rays. Degree of grafting of AN on PPw is affected by absorbed dose and dose rate. The acrylonitrile groups of grafted PPw were chemically converted into amidoxime functionality. Both the acrylonitrile-grafted PP waste and its amidoxime product were investigated by FTIR, XRD, SEM-EDX and TGA techniques. The prepared amidoxime adsorbent with amidoxime group density of 8.06 mmol/g was used for removal of copper ions from aqueous solutions. The effects of various physicochemical conditions such as: solution pH, adsorbent content, initial metal ion concentration and time on adsorption were studied to maximize adsorption of metal ion. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion models were applied to study the kinetics of adsorption. Maximum Langmuir adsorption capacity of 208.3 mg/g at pH 5.0 with optimum contact time of 120 min was observed. Utilization of PP waste and its comparable adsorption capacity with existing radiation grafted polymer-based adsorbents provide a new, cheap and cost effective system.

  5. Radiation-induced vulvar angiokeratoma along with other late radiation toxicities after carcinoma cervix: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Bhandari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiokeratoma including vulvar angiokeratoma is a very rare complication of radiation. Exact incidence is still unknown, we report a case that developed radiation-induced angiokeratoma of skin in the vulvar region along with other late radiation sequelae in the form of bone fracture, new bone formation, bone marrow widening, muscle hypertrophy, and subcutaneous fibrosis, 18 years after radiotherapy to the pelvic region for the treatment of carcinoma cervix. All these late radiation sequel are rare to be seen in a single patient, and none of the case reports could be found in the world literature.

  6. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stephanie; Paris, Francois [Inserm UMR U892, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie Nantes-Angers CRCNA, Institut de Recherche Therapeutique IRT-UN, Universite de Nantes, 8 Quai Moncousu, BP 70721, F-44007 (France); Corre, Isabelle, E-mail: icorre@nantes.inserm.fr [Inserm UMR U892, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie Nantes-Angers CRCNA, Institut de Recherche Therapeutique IRT-UN, Universite de Nantes, 8 Quai Moncousu, BP 70721, F-44007 (France)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial

  7. Clinical and experimental studies on effects of chemotherapeutic agents on radiation-induced pulmonary damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadasaki, Kouichi

    1988-12-01

    Clinical and experimental studies were undertaken to evaluate the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on radiation-induced pulmonary damage. In a clinical study, one hundred patients with lung cancer were retrospectively reviewed in terms of the development of radiation pneumonitis. In the patients treated with radiation and chemotherapy except for cisplatinum, radiation pneumonitis occurred more frequently and severely than patients with radiation alone. In an experimental study, male SD rats received 15 Gy radiation to the right lungs with or without injection of chemotherapeutic agents including cisplatinum, adriamycin or peplomycin. Histological changes and hydroxyproline contents of the lungs were evaluated at 2 or 5 months after treatment. Pulmonary damage was severer in rats with radiation and drugs than those with radiation alone. However, rats with cisplatinum had less damage than those with other drugs. In conclusion, radiation-induced pulmonary damage was enhanced by administration of several chemotherapeutic agents. However, cisplatinum seemed to enhance pulmonary damage less than other drugs. (author) 77 refs.

  8. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to {phi}{sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E{sub C}-0.460 eV and E205a at E{sub C}-0.395 eV where E{sub C} is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V{sub 3}) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V{sub 3} defect

  9. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Department of Plastic Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sang Ho [Department of Dermatology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sil [College of Pharmacy & Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewah Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun-Jung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaeho, E-mail: jjhmd@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-08

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. - Highlights: • The effects of radiation on skin thickness in mice. • Next generation sequencing revealed that radiation inhibited pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression. • PDK2 inhibited irradiation-induced cytokine gene expression. • Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness.

  10. Ionizing radiation induced cataract; Katarakt-Induktion durch ionisierende Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.U. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Strahlenbiologie

    2013-07-01

    Until recently it was believed that the cataract (opacity of the eye lens) is a deterministic effect with a dose threshold of several Gray in dependence on the exposure conditions. Studies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in the vicinity of Chernobyl, of American radiologic technologists, astronauts, and patients after having received several computer tomographies of the head region, however, have shown that this assumption is not correct. It had been overlooked in the past that with decreasing dose the latency period is increasing. Therefore, the originally available studies were terminated too early. The more recent studies show that, in the case of a threshold existing at all, it is definitely below 0.8 Gy independently of an acute or a chronic exposure. All studies, however, include 0 Gy in the confidence interval, so that the absence of a dose threshold cannot be excluded. The German Commission on Radiological Protection (Strahlenschutzkommission, SSK) suggested therefore among others: targeted recording of the lens dose during activities which are known to be associated with possible significant lens exposure, examination of the lens should be included as appropriate in the medical monitoring of people occupationally exposed to radiation, if there is potentially high lens exposure, adoption of research strategies to develop a basic understanding of the mechanisms underlying radiation induced cataracts. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) actually assumes a threshold dose of 0.5 Gy and, based on this assumption, has recommended in 2011 to reduce the dose limit for the eye lens from 150 mSv in a year to 20 mSv in a year for people occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. (orig.)

  11. Radiation induced defects and thermoluminescence mechanism in aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Awata, T. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, M. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Nakagawa, M. [Kagawa Univ., Faculty of Education, Takamatsu, Kagawa (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    The thermoluminescence of the irradiated aluminum oxides were measured to study the radiation induced defects and their behaviors. Neutron and {gamma}-ray irradiation were performed for a shingle crystal of the high purity aluminum oxide. The thermoluminescence glow curve and its activation energy were measured. The spectroscopy measurement on the thermoluminescence and the absorption are also carried out. The observed 430 and 340 nm peaks are discussed relating to the F{sup +} and F centers, respectively. Activation state of the F center transits to 3P state through 1P state by emitting phonons. Trapped electron on 3P state emits phonon of 2.9 eV (430 nm) during transition to the ground state. The above reaction can be written by the equation. F{sup +} + e {yields} (F){sup *} {yields} F + h{nu}(2.9 eV, 470 nm). (Katsuta, H.)

  12. Invertase immobilization onto radiation-induced graft copolymerized polyethylene pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Alvaro Antonio Alencar; Vitolo, Michele; de Oliveira, Rômulo Cesar; Higa, Olga Zazuco

    1996-06-01

    The graft copolymer poly(ethylene-g-acrylic acid) (LDPE-g-AA) was prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylic acid onto low density polyethylene (LDPE) pellets, and characterized by infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The presence of the grafted poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was established. Invertase was immobilized onto the graft polymer and the thermodynamic parameters of the soluble and immobilized enzyme were determined. The Michaelis constant, Km, and the maximum reaction velocity, Vmax, were determined for the free and the immobilized invertase. The Michaelis constant, Km was larger for the immobilized invertase than for the free enzyme, whereas Vmax was smaller for the immobilized invertase. The thermal stability of the immobilized invertase was higher than that of the free enzyme.

  13. Radiation-induced polymerization for the immobilization of penicillin acylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccu, E.; Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Veronese, F.M.

    1987-06-01

    The immobilization of Escherichia coli penicillin acylase was investigated by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperature. A leak-proof composite that does not swell in water was obtained by adding the cross-linking agent trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate to the monomer-aqueous enzyme mixture. Penicillin acylase, which was immobilized with greater than 70% yield, possessed a higher Km value toward the substrate 6-nitro-3-phenylacetamidobenzoic acid than the free enzyme form (Km = 1.7 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-5) M, respectively). The structural stability of immobilized penicillin acylase, as assessed by heat, guanidinium chloride, and pH denaturation profiles, was very similar to that of the free-enzyme form, thus suggesting that penicillin acylase was entrapped in its native state into aqueous free spaces of the polymer matrix.

  14. Radiation induced effects on mechanical properties of nanoporous gold foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, M., E-mail: magda@lanl.gov, E-mail: efu@pku.edu.cn; Fu, E. G., E-mail: magda@lanl.gov, E-mail: efu@pku.edu.cn; Wang, Y. Q.; Martinez, E.; Caro, A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Mook, W. M.; Sheehan, C.; Baldwin, J. K. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnology, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-06-09

    It has recently been shown that due to a high surface-to-volume ratio, nanoporous materials display radiation tolerance. The abundance of surfaces, which are perfect sinks for defects, and the relation between ligament size, defect diffusion, and time combine to define a window of radiation resistance [Fu et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 191607 (2012)]. Outside this window, the dominant defect created by irradiation in Au nanofoams are stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). Molecular dynamics computer simulations of nanopillars, taken as the elemental constituent of foams, predict that SFTs act as dislocation sources inducing softening, in contrast to the usual behavior in bulk materials, where defects are obstacles to dislocation motion, producing hardening. In this work we test that prediction and answer the question whether irradiation actually hardens or softens a nanofam. Ne ion irradiations of gold nanofoams were performed at room temperature for a total dose up to 4 dpa, and their mechanical behavior was measured by nanoindentation. We find that hardness increases after irradiation, a result that we analyze in terms of the role of SFTs on the deformation mode of foams.

  15. ARE EPIGENETIC MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN RADIATION-INDUCED BYSTANDER EFFECTS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmel eMothersill

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation including bystander effects and genomic instability are unique in that no classic mutagenic event occurs in the cell showing the effect. In the case of bystander effects, cells which were not in the field affected by the radiation show high levels of mutations, chromosome aberrations and membrane signaling changes leading to what is termed horizontal transmission of mutations and information which may be damaging while in the case of genomic instability, generations of cells derived from an irradiated progenitor appear normal but then lethal and non-lethal mutations appear in distant progeny. This is known as vertical transmission. In both situations high yields of non-clonal mutations leading to distant occurrence of mutation events both in space and time. This precludes a mutator phenotype or other conventional explanation and appear to indicate a generalized form of stress induced mutatgenesis which is well documented in bacteria. This review will discuss the phenomenology of what we term non-targeted effects, and will consider to what extent they challenge conventional ideas in genetics and epigenetics.

  16. Antioxidant Responses Induced by UVB Radiation in Deschampsia antarctica Desv.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Köhler

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Deschampsia antarctica Desv. is one of two vascular plants that live in the Maritime Antarctic Territory and is exposed to high levels of ultraviolet-B (UVB radiation. In this work, antioxidant physiology of D. antarctica was studied in response to UVB induced oxidative changes. Samples were collected from Antarctica and maintained in vitro culture during 2 years. Plants were sub-cultured in a hydroponic system and exposed to 21.4 kJ m-2 day-1, emulating summer Antarctic conditions. Results showed rapid and significant increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS at 3 h, which rapidly decreased. No dramatic changes were observed in photosynthetic efficiency, chlorophyll content, and level of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (MDA. The enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, SOD and total peroxidases, POD and non-enzymatic antioxidant activity (total phenolic increased significantly in response to UVB treatment. These findings suggest that tolerance of D. antarctica to UVB radiation could be attributed to its ability to activate both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems.

  17. Chromatin Structure and Radiation-Induced Intrachromosome Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangala; Zhang, Ye; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    We have recently investigated the location of breaks involved in intrachromosomal type exchange events, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique for human chromosome 3. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, intrachromosome exchanges were found to occur preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions were on the same arm of the chromosome. To explore the relationships between intrachromosome exchanges and chromatin structure, we used probes that hybridize the three regions of 3p21, 3q11 and 3q26, and measured the distance between two of the three regions in interphase cells. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation-induced intrachromosome aberrations depends upon both the location of fragile sites and the folding of chromatins

  18. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  19. Radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Mondrup, K.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology R)

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and latency period of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients by a neurological follow-up examination at least 60 months (range 67-130 months) after the primary treatment. All patients were treated primarily with simple mastectomy, axillary nodal sampling and radiotherapy (RT). Postoperatively, pre- and postmenopausal patients were randomly allocated chemotherapy for antiestrogen treatment. All patients were recurrence-free at time of examination. Clinically, 35% (25-47%) of the patients had RBP; 19% (11-29%) had definite RBP, i.e. were physically disabled, and 16% (9-26%) had probable RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-35%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%) of cases assessment of a definite level was not possible. RBP was more common after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (42%) than after radiotherapy alone (26%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The incidence of definite RBP was significantly higher in the younger age group (p = 0.02). This could be due to more extensive axillary surgery but also to the fact that chemotherapy was given to most premenopausal patients. In most patients with RBP the symptoms began during or immediately after radiotherapy, and were thus without significant latency. Chemotherapy might enhance the radiation-induced effect on nerve tissue, thus diminishing the latency period. Lymphedema was present in 22% (14-32%), especially in the older patients, and not associated with the development of RBP. In conclusion, the damaging effect of RT on peripheral nerve tissue was documented. Since no successful treatment is available, restricted use of RT to the brachial plexus is warranted, especially when administered concomitantly with cytotoxic therapy. (orig.).

  20. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Radiation-Induced Cystitis and Proctitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliai, Caspian; Fisher, Brandon; Jani, Ashish; Wong, Michael; Poli, Jaganmohan; Brady, Luther W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Komarnicky, Lydia T., E-mail: lydia.komarnicky-kocher@drexelmed.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To provide a retrospective analysis of the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for treating hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) and proctitis secondary to pelvic- and prostate-only radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients were treated with HBOT for radiation-induced HC and proctitis. The median age at treatment was 66 years (range, 15-84 years). The range of external-beam radiation delivered was 50.0-75.6 Gy. Bleeding must have been refractory to other therapies. Patients received 100% oxygen at 2.0 atmospheres absolute pressure for 90-120 min per treatment in a monoplace chamber. Symptoms were retrospectively scored according to the Late Effects of Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management, Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scale to evaluate short-term efficacy. Recurrence of hematuria/hematochezia was used to assess long-term efficacy. Results: Four of the 19 patients were lost to follow-up. Fifteen patients were evaluated and received a mean of 29.8 dives: 11 developed HC and 4 proctitis. All patients experienced a reduction in their LENT-SOMA score. After completion of HBOT, the mean LENT-SOMA score was reduced from 0.78 to 0.20 in patients with HC and from 0.66 to 0.26 in patients with proctitis. Median follow-up was 39 months (range, 7-70 months). No cases of hematuria were refractory to HBOT. Complete resolution of hematuria was seen in 81% (n = 9) and partial response in 18% (n = 2). Recurrence of hematuria occurred in 36% (n = 4) after a median of 10 months. Complete resolution of hematochezia was seen in 50% (n = 2), partial response in 25% (n = 1), and refractory bleeding in 25% (n = 1). Conclusions: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is appropriate for radiation-induced HC once less time-consuming therapies have failed to resolve the bleeding. In these conditions, HBOT is efficacious in the short and long term, with minimal side effects.

  1. Radiation Induced Electrical Current and Voltage in Dielectric Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-22

    1968) Biophysik 4:302. The radiation shielding commninity has-’ext ve dose depth data for homo- geneous materials, and the radiation therapy field has...Bernard, M. (1968) Biophysik 4:302. The radiation shielding community has extensiv’e dose depth data for homo- geneous materials, and the radiation

  2. Prevention of ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression by sunscreen in Candida albicans-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Quan; LI, RUNXIANG; Zhao, Xiaoxia; LIANG, BIHUA; MA, SHAOYIN; Li, Zhenjie; ZHU, HUILAN

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced immunosuppression leading to skin cancer has received increased attention in previous years. The present study aimed to investigate the immunoprotection offered by Anthelios sunscreen in a mouse model of Candida albicans-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity. Anthelios sunscreen was applied to the skin on the dorsal skin of BALB/c mice treated with a sub-erythema dose of solar-simulated radiation. Delayed-type hypersensitivity was induced by immunization wit...

  3. Pretreatment of low dose radiation reduces radiation-induced apoptosis in mouse lymphoma (EL4) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Hyun, S J; Yoon, M Y; Ji, Y H; Cho, C K; Yoo, S Y

    1997-06-01

    Induction of an adaptive response to ionizing radiation in mouse lymphoma (EL4) cells was studied by using cell survival fraction and apoptotic nucleosomal DNA fragmentation as biological end points. Cells in early log phase were pre-exposed to low dose of gamma-rays (0.01 Gy) 4 or 20 hrs prior to high dose gamma-ray (4, 8 and 12 Gy for cell survival fraction analysis; 8 Gy for DNA fragmentation analysis) irradiation. Then cell survival fractions and the extent of DNA fragmentation were measured. Significant adaptive response, increase in cell survival fraction and decrease in the extent of DNA fragmentation were induced when low and high dose gamma-ray irradiation time interval was 4 hr. Addition of protein or RNA synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide or 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRFB), respectively during adaptation period, the period from low dose gamma-ray irradiation to high dose gamma-ray irradiation, was able to inhibit the induction of adaptive response, which is the reduction of the extent DNA fragmentation in irradiated EL4 cells. These data suggest that the induction of adaptive response to ionizing radiation in EL4 cells required both protein and RNA synthesis.

  4. A Rare Case of Radiation-Induced Osteosarcoma of the Ethmoid Sinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaed Alzahrani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy has been recognized as a useful modality of treatment in head and neck malignant tumors. However, radiation over 10 Gy may predispose to secondary tumors. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the ethmoid sinus is unusual. These tumors may present long after radiation with epistaxis. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and biopsy are the modalities of diagnosis. We report a case of radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the ethmoid sinus 9 years after initial exposure. We describe the clinical presentation, the radiological findings, and the management.

  5. Radiation-induced catalytic degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in the presence of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Shaoqing; Hu Jun [Laboratory of Environmental Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Jianlong, E-mail: wangjl@tsinghua.edu.c [Laboratory of Environmental Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-10-15

    The gamma radiation induced catalytic degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in the presence of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles in aqueous solution was investigated. The initial concentration of PNP solution was 50 mg/L, and the additional TiO{sub 2} doses were 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/L. The experimental results indicated that the PNP decomposition kinetics conformed to the modified pseudo-first order reaction equation under all applied conditions. When the TiO{sub 2} dose was in the range of 0-2.0 g/L, the effect of additional TiO{sub 2} on PNP decomposition rate was not obvious because PNP could be removed quite well by irradiation even in the absence of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles; however, the removal of total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) was significantly accelerated in the presence of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, the TOC removal efficiency increased from about 16% to 42%, and therefore the mineralization of PNP could be enhanced by TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. The inorganic nitrogen products were quantitatively measured to estimate the decomposition degree of PNP. The major aromatic intermediates, as well as carboxylic acids were identified by LCMS and IC. Possible reactions involved in radiation induced catalytic decomposition of PNP in aqueous solutions were proposed.

  6. Radiation-induced catalytic degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in the presence of TiO 2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaoqing, Yu; Jun, Hu; Jianlong, Wang

    2010-10-01

    The gamma radiation induced catalytic degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in the presence of titanium dioxide (TiO 2) nanoparticles in aqueous solution was investigated. The initial concentration of PNP solution was 50 mg/L, and the additional TiO 2 doses were 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/L. The experimental results indicated that the PNP decomposition kinetics conformed to the modified pseudo-first order reaction equation under all applied conditions. When the TiO 2 dose was in the range of 0-2.0 g/L, the effect of additional TiO 2 on PNP decomposition rate was not obvious because PNP could be removed quite well by irradiation even in the absence of TiO 2 nanoparticles; however, the removal of total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) was significantly accelerated in the presence of TiO 2 nanoparticles, the TOC removal efficiency increased from about 16% to 42%, and therefore the mineralization of PNP could be enhanced by TiO 2 nanoparticles. The inorganic nitrogen products were quantitatively measured to estimate the decomposition degree of PNP. The major aromatic intermediates, as well as carboxylic acids were identified by LCMS and IC. Possible reactions involved in radiation induced catalytic decomposition of PNP in aqueous solutions were proposed.

  7. Apoptosis is signalled early by low doses of ionising radiation in a radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlong, Hayley, E-mail: hayley.furlong@dit.ie [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Mothersill, Carmel [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Nuclear Research Building, 1280 Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Lyng, Fiona M. [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Howe, Orla [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Molecular mechanisms involved in the production of a radiation induced bystander effect are not well known. ► We investigate gene expression changes in apoptotic genes in both direct and bystander responses. ► We demonstrate initiation of the apoptotic cascade in a bystander response. ► Lower doses reveal a specific but differential response related to apoptosis compared to higher doses. - Abstract: It is known that ionising radiation (IR) induces a complex signalling apoptotic cascade post-exposure to low doses ultimately to remove damaged cells from a population, specifically via the intrinsic pathway. Therefore, it was hypothesised that bystander reporter cells may initiate a similar apoptotic response if exposed to low doses of IR (0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy) and compared to directly irradiated cells. Key apoptotic genes were selected according to their role in the apoptotic cascade; tumour suppressor gene TP53, pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl2, pro-apoptotic JNK and anti-apoptotic ERK, initiator caspase 2 and 9 and effector caspase 3, 6 and 7. The data generated consolidated the role of apoptosis following direct IR exposure for all doses and time points as pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and JNK as well as initiator caspase 7 and effector caspase 3 and 9 were up-regulated. However, the gene expression profile for the bystander response was quite different and more complex in comparison to the direct response. The 0.05 Gy dose point had a more significant apoptosis gene expression profile compared to the 0.5 Gy dose point and genes were not always expressed within 1 h but were sometimes expressed 24 h later. The bystander data clearly demonstrates initiation of the apoptotic cascade by the up-regulation of TP53, Bax, Bcl-2, initiator caspase 2 and effector caspase 6. The effector caspases 3 and 7 of the bystander samples demonstrated down-regulation in their gene expression levels at 0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy at both time points therefore not

  8. Effect of the background gas pressure on the effectiveness of laser-induced material removal from deep cavities in irradiated targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palya, Austin; Ranjbar, Omid A.; Lin, Zhibin; Volkov, Alexey N.

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimensional expansion of a plume, induced by short-pulse laser irradiation of a bottom of a cylindrical cavity in a copper target, into argon background gas at pressure ranging from 0 to 1 bar is studied numerically based on a hybrid computational model that includes a heat conduction equation for the irradiated target and a kinetic model of the gas mixture flow. It is found that an increasing pressure of non-reactive background gas can induce an order-of-magnitude increase in the effectiveness of removal of the laser ablation products from the cavity as compared to ablation under vacuum conditions. The effectiveness of the material removal, measured as the ratio of the mass of the ablated products leaving the cavity to the evaporated mass, is determined by the interplay between the confinement and focusing effects of the background gas, which decelerate the plume expansion and concentrate the ablation products far from the cavity wall, correspondingly. At small background gas pressure, the plume expansion is dominated by the focusing effect, which enhances the efficiency of the material removal. At large pressure, the confinement effect dominates and suppresses the material removal. As a result, there is an optimum background gas pressure that maximizes the efficiency of the material removal from the cavity. This optimum background gas pressure depends on the characteristic pressure in the plume and strongly increases with an increase in the absorbed intensity of laser radiation.

  9. The effect of radiation dose on the onset and progression of radiation-induced brain necrosis in the rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Brad A; Ma, Htet S W; Hansen, Katherine S; Perks, Julian; Kent, Michael S; Fragoso, Ruben C; Marcu, Laura

    2017-07-01

    To provide a comprehensive understanding of how the selection of radiation dose affects the temporal and spatial progression of radiation-induced necrosis in the rat model. Necrosis was induced with a single fraction of radiation exposure, at doses ranging between 20 and 60 Gy, to the right hemisphere of 8-week-old Fischer rats from a linear accelerator. The development and progression of necrosis in the rats was monitored and quantified every other week with T1- and T2-weighted gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI studies. The time to onset of necrosis was found to be dose-dependent, but after the initial onset, the necrosis progression rate and total volume generated was constant across different doses ranging between 30 and 60 Gy. Radiation doses less than 30 Gy did not develop necrosis within 33 weeks after treatment, indicating a dose threshold existing between 20 and 30 Gy. The highest dose used in this study led to the shortest time to onset of radiation-induced necrosis, while producing comparable disease progression dynamics after the onset. Therefore, for the radiation-induced necrosis rat model using a linear accelerator, the most optimum results were generated from a dose of 60 Gy.

  10. Radiation-Hardened, Substrate-Removed, Metamorphic InGaAs Detector Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High-performance radiation-hardened metamorphic InGaAs imaging arrays sensitive from the ultraviolet (UV) through the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) will be...

  11. A novel radiation-induced p53 mutation is not implicated in radiation resistance via a dominant-negative effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunguang Sun

    Full Text Available Understanding the mutations that confer radiation resistance is crucial to developing mechanisms to subvert this resistance. Here we describe the creation of a radiation resistant cell line and characterization of a novel p53 mutation. Treatment with 20 Gy radiation was used to induce mutations in the H460 lung cancer cell line; radiation resistance was confirmed by clonogenic assay. Limited sequencing was performed on the resistant cells created and compared to the parent cell line, leading to the identification of a novel mutation (del at the end of the DNA binding domain of p53. Levels of p53, phospho-p53, p21, total caspase 3 and cleaved caspase 3 in radiation resistant cells and the radiation susceptible (parent line were compared, all of which were found to be similar. These patterns held true after analysis of p53 overexpression in H460 cells; however, H1299 cells transfected with mutant p53 did not express p21, whereas those given WT p53 produced a significant amount, as expected. A luciferase assay demonstrated the inability of mutant p53 to bind its consensus elements. An MTS assay using H460 and H1299 cells transfected with WT or mutant p53 showed that the novel mutation did not improve cell survival. In summary, functional characterization of a radiation-induced p53 mutation in the H460 lung cancer cell line does not implicate it in the development of radiation resistance.

  12. Studies on the radiation induced apoptosis by morphological and biochemical analysis in A431 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Keun Hee [Dong Shin College, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Bom, Hee Seung; Kim, Ji Yeul [College of Medicine, Chonnam National Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    We performed this study to evaluate the process of radiation induced apoptosis in A431 skin epithelial cancer cell line. Low to high dose radiation (0, 2, 5, 10, 25 Gy) was given to A431 cells by Cs-137 cell irradiator. Apoptosis was evaluated by cell morphology, dye exclusion test, and DNA laddering. Cell viability decreased as the radiation dose increased. Number of apoptotic bodies increased as radiation dose increased. It increased most significantly at 12 hours after irradiation. Lactate dehydrogenase activity in culture medium increased according to radiation dose and time after irradiation. DNA ladders could be identified in irradiated cells, but, it had no correlation with radiation dose or time after irradiation. Radiation-induced apoptosis which was the main course of cell death in A431 cells could be analyzed quantitatively by counting apoptotic bodies under microscope. Apoptosis increased as radiation dose increased.

  13. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  14. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  15. Radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening a modeling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.L. Miglioretti (Diana); J. Lange (Jane); J.J. Van Den Broek (Jeroen J.); C.I. Lee (Christoph I.); N.T. van Ravesteyn (Nicolien); D. Ritley (Dominique); K. Kerlikowske (Karla); J.J. Fenton (Joshua J.); J. Melnikow (Joy); H.J. de Koning (Harry); R.A. Hubbard (Rebecca)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Estimates of risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from mammography screening have not considered variation in dose exposure or diagnostic work-up after abnormal screening results. Objective: To estimate distributions of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and

  16. Atorvastatin mitigates testicular injuries induced by ionizing radiation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Ramezan Ali; Talebpour Amiri, Fereshteh; Khalatbary, Ali Reza; Ghasemi, Arash; Zargari, Mehryar; Ghesemi, Maryam; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2017-09-01

    Radiotherapy in patients with pelvis malignancy causes testes irradiation and resulted in testicular damages. Atorvastatin (ATV) in the low-dose is considered as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This experimental study was investigated protective effects of ATV on irradiation-induced testicular injury. Sixty male balb/c mice were randomly divided into 6 groups: 1: control, 2: irradiated (IR), 3, 4 and 5: IR plus ATV (10, 20 and 50mg/kg), 6: only ATV (50mg/kg). The ATV treated groups were received ATV for 7days via oral gavage before IR. Irradiated groups exposed to 2Gy whole body X-ray on day 8. Biochemical, histological and immunohistological parameters were evaluated for radioprotective effect of ATV. In the ATV pretreatment in irradiated mice, MDA levels were significantly decreased compared with the IR group. The effect of all three doses of ATV caused reduced MDA level, but ATV to dose of 50mg/kg had more effect than other doses of ATV. Significant decrease in the concentration of testosterone was observed in only irradiated mice compared with the ATV plus irradiated. In addition, the histological examination showed Johnsen Score in the IR group was lower compared to ATV pretreated groups. ATV significantly reduced caspase-3 immunoreactivity induced by irradiation. The results from this study suggest that ATV at low dose has a protective effect against irradiation-induced testicular damage. This result provides a new indication of ATV for protection of testis during radiation therapy in treatment of cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation and criticality safety analyses for the highly-enriched uranium core removal from a research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Haile; Grant, Charles; Preston, John

    2017-11-01

    Analysis was performed to estimate radiation levels during removal and packaging of the highly-enriched uranium core of the JM-1 SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor. Due to severe limitations of space in and around the reactor pool, the core could not be removed in the conventional manner as was done for previous SLOWPOKE defuelling operations. A transfer shield, with a balance between shielding efficacy, volume and weight was designed. Fuel depletion, Monte Carlo shielding and criticality calculations were performed. Comparisons of measured and calculated dose rates as well as results of the criticality safety assessment are presented. The designed transfer shield reduced the calculated unshielded dose rate from 29Sv/h to 8mSv/h. The maximum calculated effective neutron multiplication factor of approximately 0.89 was below the 0.91 upper subricital limit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy on the acquisition of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, W.A.; Rabin, B.M.; Lee, J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy on the acquisition of a radiation-induced taste aversion was examined to assess the importance of the vagus nerve in transmitting information on the peripheral toxicity of radiation to the brain. Vagotomy had no effect on taste aversion learning, consistent with reports using other toxins. The data support the involvement of a blood-borne factor in the acquisition of taste aversion induced by ionizing radiation.

  19. Apoptosis induced by ultraviolet radiation is enhanced by amplitude modulated radiofrequency radiation in mutant yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markkanen, Ari; Penttinen, Piia; Naarala, Jonne; Pelkonen, Jukka; Sihvonen, Ari-Pekka; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure affects cell death processes of yeast cells. Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells of the strains KFy417 (wild-type) and KFy437 (cdc48-mutant) were exposed to 900 or 872 MHz RF fields, with or without exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and incubated simultaneously with elevated temperature (+37 degrees C) to induce apoptosis in the cdc48-mutated strain. The RF exposure was carried out in a special waveguide exposure chamber where the temperature of the cell cultures can be precisely controlled. Apoptosis was analyzed using the annexin V-FITC method utilizing flow cytometry. Amplitude modulated (217 pulses per second) RF exposure significantly enhanced UV induced apoptosis in cdc48-mutated cells, but no effect was observed in cells exposed to unmodulated fields at identical time-average specfic absorption rates (SAR, 0.4 or 3.0 W/kg). The findings suggest that amplitude modulated RF fields, together with known damaging agents, can affect the cell death process in mutated yeast cells. Bioelectromagnetics 25:127-133, 2004. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Radiation-Induced Topological Disorder in Irradiated Network Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, Linn W.

    2002-12-21

    This report summarizes results of a research program investigating the fundamental principles underlying the phenomenon of topological disordering in a radiation environment. This phenomenon is known popularly as amorphization, but is more formally described as a process of radiation-induced structural arrangement that leads in crystals to loss of long-range translational and orientational correlations and in glasses to analogous alteration of connectivity topologies. The program focus has been on a set compound ceramic solids with directed bonding exhibiting structures that can be described as networks. Such solids include SiO2, Si3N4, SiC, which are of interest to applications in fusion energy production, nuclear waste storage, and device manufacture involving ion implantation or use in radiation fields. The principal investigative tools comprise a combination of experimental diffraction-based techniques, topological modeling, and molecular-dynamics simulations that have proven a rich source of information in the preceding support period. The results from the present support period fall into three task areas. The first comprises enumeration of the rigidity constraints applying to (1) more complex ceramic structures (such as rutile, corundum, spinel and olivine structures) that exhibit multiply polytopic coordination units or multiple modes of connecting such units, (2) elemental solids (such as graphite, silicon and diamond) for which a correct choice of polytope is necessary to achieve correct representation of the constraints, and (3) compounds (such as spinel and silicon carbide) that exhibit chemical disorder on one or several sublattices. With correct identification of the topological constraints, a unique correlation is shown to exist between constraint and amorphizability which demonstrates that amorphization occurs at a critical constraint loss. The second task involves the application of molecular dynamics (MD) methods to topologically-generated models

  1. Nutrient removal by Chlorella vulgaris F1068 under cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide induced hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiongzhi; Li, Feng; Ge, Fei; Liu, Na; Kuang, Yangduo

    2016-10-01

    Toxicants are generally harmful to biotechnology in wastewater treatment. However, trace toxicant can induce microbial hormesis, but to date, it is still unknown how this phenomenon affects nutrient removal during municipal wastewater treatment process. Therefore, this study focused on the effects of hormesis induced by cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), a representative quaternary ammonium cationic surfactant, on nutrient removal by Chlorella vulgaris F1068. Results showed that when the concentration of CTAB was less than 10 ng/L, the cellular components chlorophyll a, proteins, polysaccharides, and total lipids increased by 10.11, 58.17, 38.78, and 11.87 %, respectively, and some enzymes in nutrient metabolism of algal cells, such as glutamine synthetase (GS), acid phosphatase (ACP), H(+)-ATPase, and esterase, were also enhanced. As a result, the removal efficiencies of ammonia nitrogen (NH4 (+)) and total phosphorus (TP) increased by 14.66 and 8.51 %, respectively, compared to the control during a 7-day test period. The underlying mechanism was mainly due to an enhanced photosynthetic activity of C. vulgaris F1068 indicated by the increase in chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (the value of Fv/Fm, ΦII, Fv/Fo, and rETR increased by 12.99, 7.56, 25.59, and 8.11 %, respectively) and adenylate energy charge (AEC) (from 0.68 to 0.72). These results suggest that hormesis induced by trace toxicants could enhance the nutrient removal, which would be further considered in the design of municipal wastewater treatment processes. Graphical abstract The schematic mechanism of C. vulgaris F1068 under CTAB induced hormesis. Green arrows ( ) represent the increase and the red arrow ( ) represents the decrease.

  2. Shear-induced hydrodynamic cavitation as a tool for pharmaceutical micropollutants removal from urban wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanc, Mojca; Kosjek, Tina; Petkovšek, Martin; Dular, Matevž; Kompare, Boris; Širok, Brane; Stražar, Marjeta; Heath, Ester

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the removal of clofibric acid, ibuprofen, naproxen, ketoprofen, carbamazepine and diclofenac residues from wastewater, using a novel shear-induced cavitation generator has been systematically studied. The effects of temperature, cavitation time and H2O2 dose on removal efficiency were investigated. Optimisation (50°C; 15 min; 340 mg L(-1) of added H2O2) resulted in removal efficiencies of 47-86% in spiked deionised water samples. Treatment of actual wastewater effluents revealed that although matrix composition reduces removal efficiency, this effect can be compensated for by increasing H2O2 dose (3.4 g L(-1)) and prolonging cavitation time (30 min). Hydrodynamic cavitation has also been investigated as either a pre- or a post-treatment step to biological treatment. The results revealed a higher overall removal efficiency of recalcitrant diclofenac and carbamazepine, when hydrodynamic cavitation was used prior to as compared to post biological treatment i.e., 54% and 67% as compared to 39% and 56%, respectively. This is an important finding since diclofenac is considered as a priority substance to be included in the EU Water Framework Directive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cadmium induced-oxidative stress in pituitary gland is reversed by removing the contamination source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miler, Eliana A; Nudler, Silvana I; Quinteros, Fernanda A; Cabilla, Jimena P; Ronchetti, Sonia A; Duvilanski, Beatriz H

    2010-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd(2+)) is one of the most important environmental contaminants and acts as an endocrine disruptor. Previously, we have demonstrated that the simultaneous administration of Cd(2+) and melatonin (Mel) in drinking water impaired metal-induced oxidative stress in rat anterior pituitary gland. The aim of this study was to investigate if a treatment started after the toxic manifestations of Cd( 2+) became evident could reverse the effects of the metal. Animals exposed to Cd(2+) (5 parts per million [ppm], 30 days) were treated with Mel or without the metal during the next 1 or 2 months. Cd(2+) exposure increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a biomarker of oxidative stress, and an a posteriori Mel treatment reversed oxidative stress induced by Cd(2+). This effect was also observed 1 month after metal removal. The Cd(2+)-induced increase in metallothionein-1 (MT-1) and nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) expression were also reversed by metal removal. In addition, serum prolactin and luteinizing hormone levels affected by Cd( 2+) exposure were normalized. Considering that the manifestations of Cd(2+) intoxication become evident only after a certain period of metal accumulation, these results show that metal removal is enough to reverse Cd(2+) effects in anterior pituitary gland and bring to light the relevance of moving away the individual from the contamination source.

  4. Radiation induced base excision repair (BER): a mechanistic mathematical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanian, Shirin; Taleei, Reza; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a mechanistic model of base excision repair (BER) pathway for the repair of single-stand breaks (SSBs) and oxidized base lesions produced by ionizing radiation (IR). The model is based on law of mass action kinetics to translate the biochemical processes involved, step-by-step, in the BER pathway to translate into mathematical equations. The BER is divided into two subpathways, short-patch repair (SPR) and long-patch repair (LPR). SPR involves in replacement of single nucleotide via Pol β and ligation of the ends via XRCC1 and Ligase III, while LPR involves in replacement of multiple nucleotides via PCNA, Pol δ/ɛ and FEN 1, and ligation via Ligase I. A hallmark of IR is the production of closely spaced lesions within a turn of DNA helix (named complex lesions), which have been attributed to a slower repair process. The model presented considers fast and slow component of BER kinetics by assigning SPR for simple lesions and LPR for complex lesions. In the absence of in vivo reaction rate constants for the BER proteins, we have deduced a set of rate constants based on different published experimental measurements including accumulation kinetics obtained from UVA irradiation, overall SSB repair kinetic experiments, and overall BER kinetics from live-cell imaging experiments. The model was further used to calculate the repair kinetics of complex base lesions via the LPR subpathway and compared to foci kinetic experiments for cells irradiated with γ rays, Si, and Fe ions. The model calculation show good agreement with experimental measurements for both overall repair and repair of complex lesions. Furthermore, using the model we explored different mechanisms responsible for inhibition of repair when higher LET and HZE particles are used and concluded that increasing the damage complexity can inhibit initiation of LPR after the AP site removal step in BER. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Chronic radiation-induced esophagitis after treatment of oropharyngolaryngeal cancer: a little-known anatomo-clinical entity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morichau-Beauchant, M; Touchard, G; Battandier, D; Maire, P; Fontanel, J P; Daban, A; Babin, P; Matuchansky, C

    1983-11-01

    Chronic esophagitis induced by radiation therapy (CRE) for carcinoma of the oropharynx and larynx, and involving an initially normal esophagus, is poorly known, and often confused with a locally recurrent malignancy. By reporting 8 consecutive cases, the aim of this study is to contribute to proving that cervical CRE does indeed exist. Eight men, aged 58 to 76 years, developed complete aphagia (7 cases) or severe dysphagia (1 case), 2 to 56 months (median 8.5 months) after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the laryngopharyngeal area. In 5 patients, the primary tumour and/or chains of cervical lymph nodes were removed before radiation therapy; in the 8 patients, the esophagus was endoscopically free of disease. The total dose of radiation exceeded 60 grays in 6 patients. Although they were initially considered as suffering from a locally recurrent malignancy on a clinical basis, none of the 8 patients had patent signs (either endoscopic or histologic) of recurrence. In each case a severe lesion of the cervical esophagus was documented (stenosis 7 cases, giant ulceration 1 case): the diagnosis of CRE was based on endoscopic, histological, and evolutive criteria. Six patients were treated by prolonged nutritional support (via enteral route, 5 cases; parenteral route, 1 case); endoscopic dilatations were used as a single treatment or in association with nutritional support in 4 cases. Three patients died of CRE-induced regional complications; post mortem examination, performed in 2 cases, confirmed CRE without evidence of locally recurrent malignancy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Effect of epicatechin against radiation-induced oral mucositis: in vitro and in vivo study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Seob Shin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Radiation-induced oral mucositis limits the delivery of high-dose radiation to head and neck cancer. This study investigated the effectiveness of epicatechin (EC, a component of green tea extracts, on radiation-induced oral mucositis in vitro and in vivo. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The effect of EC on radiation-induced cytotoxicity was analyzed in the human keratinocyte line HaCaT. Radiation-induced apoptosis, change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and changes in the signaling pathway were investigated. In vivo therapeutic effects of EC for oral mucositis were explored in a rat model. Rats were monitored by daily inspections of the oral cavity, amount of oral intake, weight change and survival rate. For histopathologic evaluation, hematoxylin-eosin staining and TUNEL staining were performed. RESULTS: EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis, change of MMP, and intracellular ROS generation in HaCaT cells. EC treatment markedly attenuated the expression of p-JNK, p-38, and cleaved caspase-3 after irradiation in the HaCaT cells. Rats with radiation-induced oral mucositis showed decreased oral intake, weight and survival rate, but oral administration of EC significantly restored all three parameters. Histopathologic changes were significantly decreased in the EC-treated irradiated rats. TUNEL staining of rat oral mucosa revealed that EC treatment significantly decreased radiation-induced apoptotic cells. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in keratinocytes and rat oral mucosa and may be a safe and effective candidate treatment for the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis.

  7. Silibinin attenuates radiation-induced intestinal fibrosis and reverses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joong Sun; Han, Na-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Hae-June

    2017-09-19

    Radiotherapy is a common treatment for cancer patients, but its use is often restricted by the tolerance of normal tissue. As cancer patients live longer, delayed radiation effects on normal tissue have become a concern. Radiation-induced enteropathy, including inflammatory bowel disease and fibrosis, are major issues for long-term cancer survivors. To investigate whether silibinin attenuates delayed radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice, we focused on intestinal fibrotic changes. Silibinin improved delayed radiation injuries in mice in association with decreased collagen deposition within the intestines and deceased transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 levels in the intestine and plasma. Treating mice bearing CT26 mouse colon cancer tumors with both silibinin and radiation stimulated tumor regression more than radiation alone. We also investigated the effect of silibinin on the radiation-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the primary mechanism of fibrosis. We assessed changes in E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and α-smooth muscle actin expression, and demonstrated that silibinin attenuates radiation-induced EMT. Irradiating intestinal epithelial cells increased TGF-β1 levels, but silibinin suppressed TGF-β1 expression by inhibiting Smad2/3 phosphorylation. These results suggest silibinin has the potential to serve as a useful therapeutic agent in patients with radiation-induced intestinal fibrosis.

  8. Hybrid model of the radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Viviane V.B.; Faria, Fernando Pereira de; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: vitoriabraga06@gmail.com, E-mail: fernandopereirabh@gmail.com, E-mail: seg@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) refer to biological alterations in non-irradiated cells that occupy the same medium (culture or tissue) of irradiated cells. The biochemical mechanisms of the RIBE are not completely elucidated. However, several experiments indicate its existence. The objective of this work is to quantify the effect via stochastic and deterministic approaches. The hypotheses of the model are: a) one non-irradiated healthy cell interacts with signals that propagate through the medium. These signals are released by irradiated cells. At the time of interaction cell-signal, the cell can become damaged and signaling or damage and not signaling; b) Both types of damage cells repair with certain rate becoming health cells; c) The diffusion of signals obey the discrete diffusion equation with decay in two dimensions. d) The signal concentration released by irradiated cells depends on the dose in the low dose range (< 0.3 Gy) and saturates for higher dose values. As expected, the temporal analysis of the model as a function of the repair rate shows that the survival fraction decreases as the repair rate is reduced. The analysis of the extent of damage triggered by a signal concentration released by a single irradiated cell at time zero show that the damage grows with the maximum simulation time. The results show good agreement with the experimental data. The stochastic and deterministic methods used are in qualitative agreement, as expected. (author)

  9. Structural investigation of radiation-induced aggregates of ribonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajos, Gy.; Delincee, H. (Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Ernaehrung, Karlsruhe (Germany, F.R.))

    1983-10-01

    Following irradiation of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease in aqueous solution with /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays protein aggregates are formed. The nature of the bonds linking these radiation-induced aggregates together has been investigated by chromatographic and electrophoretic methods. Thin-layer gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, both in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate, demonstrated the existence of covalent crosslinks between the aggregates. Non-covalent crosslinking also plays a role in the radiolysis of ribonuclease. Thin-layer gel filtration with and without 6 M urea and 2 per cent ..beta..-mercaptoethanol added to the gel, revealed that only part of the covalent bonds between the aggregates consisted of disulphide linkages. By separation of the reduced aggregates by thin-layer gel filtration and electrophoresis, both with SDS, this finding was substantiated. Densitometric measurements indicated for example that the percentage of covalently linked dimers held together by disulphide bridges amounted to about 40-45 per cent, whereas the remaining 55-60 per cent of the dimers must be linked by other covalent bonds. The existence of covalent crosslinks other than disulphide bonds was also confirmed by isoelectric focusing, definite differences being established between the proteolytic hydrolysates of the reduced aggregates and the reduced monomer of ..gamma..-irradiated ribonuclease.

  10. MRI findings in radiation-induced hepatic injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suto, Yuji; Kato, Takashi; Yoshida, Kotaro; Sugihara, Shuji; Kamba, Masayuki; Ohta, Yoshio [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    To evaluate radiation-induced hepatic injuries (RIHI), magnetic resonance image (MRI) was conducted on 12 patients, to 6 months after radiotherapy on regions including the liver. T1-weighted and T2-weighted image (T1WI, T2WI), and gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced T1WI well obtained. Within 1 week, these MRI studies were repeated after chondroitin sulphate iron colloid (CSIC) administration. MRI findings and total irradiation doses were compared. Abnormalities were seen on one or more types of MRI in 7 patients. The total dose of irradiation was 40 or more Gy in these patients, and 40 or less Gy in those who showed no abnormal MR findings. Plain T2WI of the 7 cases showing MRI abnormalities demonstrated a slightly higher signal intensity (SI) in the irradiated areas in 2, an iso SI in 2, a slightly lower or lower SI in 3 cases. The irradiated and nonirradiated areas were clearly demarcated on Gd-DTPA-enhanced T1WI in 4 cases. Following CSIC administration, the irradiated areas became more marked in 3 cases. A clear demarcation between the 2 areas was obtained with double contrast MRI in the 7 cases. The present study indicates that MRI may be a useful noninvasive means of evaluating RIHI. (author)

  11. Radiation Sialadenitis Induced by High-dose Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Jaetae [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Radioactive iodine ({sup 131}I) is accumulated in the thyroid tissue and plays an important role in the treatment of differentiated papillary and follicular cancers after thyroidectomy. Simultaneously, {sup 131}I is concentrated in the salivary glands and secreted into the saliva. Dose-related damage to the salivary parenchyma results from the {sup 131}I irradiation. Salivary gland swelling and pain, usually involving the parotid, can be seen. The symptoms may develop immediately after a therapeutic dose of {sup 131}I and/or months later and progress in intensity with time. In conjunction with the radiation sialadenitis, secondary complications reported include xerostomia, taste alterations, infection, increases in caries, facial nerve involvement, candidiasis, and neoplasia. Prevention of {sup 131}I sialadenitis may involve the use of sialogogic agents to hasten the transit time of the radioactive iodine through the salivary glands. However, studies are not available to delineate the efficacy of this approach. Treatment of the varied complications that may develop encompass numerous approaches and include gland massage, sialogogic agents, duct probing, antibiotics, mouthwashes, good oral hygiene, and adequate hydration. Recently interventional sialoendoscopy has been introduced an effective tool for the management of patients with {sup 131}I-induced sialadenitis that is unresponsive to medical treatment.

  12. Radiation-induced gene expression in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Jones, Tamako A.; Chesnut, Aaron; Smith, Anna L.

    2002-01-01

    We used the nematode C. elegans to characterize the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in a simple animal model emphasizing the unique effects of charged particle radiation. Here we demonstrate by RT-PCR differential display and whole genome microarray hybridization experiments that gamma rays, accelerated protons and iron ions at the same physical dose lead to unique transcription profiles. 599 of 17871 genes analyzed (3.4%) showed differential expression 3 hrs after exposure to 3 Gy of radiation. 193 were up-regulated, 406 were down-regulated and 90% were affected only by a single species of radiation. A novel statistical clustering technique identified the regulatory relationships between the radiation-modulated genes and showed that genes affected by each radiation species were associated with unique regulatory clusters. This suggests that independent homeostatic mechanisms are activated in response to radiation exposure as a function of track structure or ionization density.

  13. Radiation grafting of acrylamide and maleic acid on chitosan and effective application for removal of Co(II) from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Alaaeldine Sh.; Ibrahim, Ahmed G.; Elsharma, Emad M.; Metwally, Essam; Siyam, Tharwat

    2018-03-01

    The graft copolymerization has been proven as a superior polymerization technique because it combines the functional advantages of the grafted and base polymers. In this work, the radiation-induced grafting of acrylamide (AAm) and maleic acid (MA) onto chitosan (CTS) was developed and optimized by determining the grafting percentage and efficiency as a function of grafting conditions such as AAm, MA, and CTS concentrations, and absorbed dose. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis (FTIR) confirmed the graft copolymerization. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) further characterized the grafted copolymers and showed their high thermal stability. Using batch sorption experiments and 60Co as a radiotracer, poly(CTS-AAm) and poly(CTS-MA) were evaluated for Co(II) removal from aqueous solutions. The Co(II) removal increases with increasing time, pH, polymer, and Co(II) concentrations. Experimentally, P(CTS-AAm) and P(CTS-MA) show high sorption capacities of Co(II), i.e. 150 mg g-1 and 421 mg g-1, respectively, which makes them potential sorbents of Co(II) for water and wastewater treatment. Finally, the Co(II) sorption was examined using sorption isotherm and kinetic models. The sorption was best fitted to Langmuir model which suggests the sorption is of chemisorption type. On the other hand, the sorption kinetics was best represented by Elovich model which also indicates the chemical nature of Co(II) sorption on P(CTS-AAm) and P(CTS-MA).

  14. Removal of solar radiation effect based on nonlinear data processing technique for Seismo-Ionospheric Anomaly before few earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunvar Shardaprasad Yadav

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of ionospheric precursorsof earthquakehas gained interest among many researchers, specially the precursor obtained in terms of anomalous variation in total electron content (TEC. If earthquake occurs during a period of moderate to high solar activity, the TEC derived using global positioning system (GPS measurements requires the elimination of solar effect so as to identify the precursory signature. This paperincludes multi-resolution time series technique to remove the nonlinear effect from solar radiation on GPS-based TEC. The technique is based on wavelet transform applicable to RINEX TEC data. This technique is used to remove nonlinear background solar effect from TEC prior to four different earthquakes (M 6.0. Further in order to evaluate the extracted TEC, we obtain the correlation between the decomposed TEC A6 and measured solar index (F10.7 and extreme ultraviolet (EUV. A good correlation is obtained between decomposed TEC A6 and EUV for all the cases. This suggests that this technique is useful in removal of background solar effect for identifying earthquake precursor in TEC.

  15. [Lithium carbonate-induced hyperparathyroidism in a patient after removal of a parathyroid adenoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Lithium compounds are widely used and effective drugs in the treatment of mood disorders. However, despite their efficacy, the use of lithium salts is limited by their narrow therapeutic window. Treatment with lithium salts may be associated with the risk of development of numerous adverse effects. Endocrine complications include: thyroid dysfunction, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and hyperparathyroidism. Because symptoms of lithium-induced hyperparathyroidism may resemble those of the underlying disorder, hyperparathyroidism sometimes remains undetected. The pathogenic mechanism for parathyroid dysfunction in lithium-treated patients is still unclear. We report a patient who had undergone removal of a parathyroid adenoma and later developed lithium-induced hyperparathyroidism. Cessation of lithium treatment normalised parathyroid function. The described case suggests that patients with pre-existing parathyroid disorders may be particularly susceptible to the development of lithium-induced hyperparathyroidism.

  16. Harmonic Tracking of Acoustic Radiation Force Induced Displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Joshua R.; Dahl, Jeremy J.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods rely upon accurate estimates of tissue deformation to characterize the mechanical properties of soft tissues. These methods are corrupted by clutter, which can bias and/or increase variance in displacement estimates. Harmonic imaging methods are routinely used for clutter suppression and improved image quality in conventional B-mode ultrasound, but have not been utilized in ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods. We introduce a novel, fully-sampled pulse inversion harmonic method for tracking tissue displacements that corrects the loss in temporal sampling frequency associated with conventional pulse inversion techniques. The method is implemented with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging to monitor the displacements induced by an impulsive acoustic radiation force excitation. Custom pulse sequences were implemented on a diagnostic ultrasound scanner to collect spatially-matched fundamental and harmonic information within a single acquisition. B-mode and ARFI images created from fundamental data collected at 4 MHz and 8 MHz are compared with 8 MHz harmonic images created using a bandpass filter approach and the fully sampled pulse inversion method. In homogeneous, tissue-mimicking phantoms, where no visible clutter was observed, there was little difference in the axial displacements, estimated jitter, and normalized cross-correlation among the fundamental and harmonic tracking methods. The similarity of the lower and higher frequency methods suggests that any improvement due to the increased frequency of the harmonic components is negligible. The harmonic tracking methods demonstrated a marked improvement in B-mode and ARFI image quality of in vivo carotid arteries. Improved feature detection and decreased variance in estimated displacements were observed in the arterial walls of harmonic ARFI images, especially in the pulse inversion harmonic ARFI images. Within the lumen, the harmonic tracking methods

  17. Harmonic tracking of acoustic radiation force-induced displacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Joshua R; Dahl, Jeremy J; Trahey, Gregg E

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods rely upon accurate estimates of tissue deformation to characterize the mechanical properties of soft tissues. These methods are corrupted by clutter, which can bias and/or increase variance in displacement estimates. Harmonic imaging methods are routinely used for clutter suppression and improved image quality in conventional B-mode ultrasound, but have not been utilized in ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods. We introduce a novel, fully-sampled pulse-inversion harmonic method for tracking tissue displacements that corrects the loss in temporal sampling frequency associated with conventional pulse-inversion techniques. The method is implemented with acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging to monitor the displacements induced by an impulsive acoustic radiation force excitation. Custom pulse sequences were implemented on a diagnostic ultrasound scanner to collect spatially-matched fundamental and harmonic information within a single acquisition. B-mode and ARFI images created from fundamental data collected at 4 MHz and 8 MHz are compared with 8-MHz harmonic images created using a band-pass filter approach and the fully sampled pulse-inversion method. In homogeneous, tissue-mimicking phantoms, where no visible clutter was observed, there was little difference in the axial displacements, estimated jitter, and normalized cross-correlation among the fundamental and harmonic tracking methods. The similarity of the lower- and higher-frequency methods suggests that any improvement resulting from the increased frequency of the harmonic components is negligible. The harmonic tracking methods demonstrated a marked improvement in B-mode and ARFI image quality of in vivo carotid arteries. Improved feature detection and decreased variance in estimated displacements were observed in the arterial walls of harmonic ARFI images, especially in the pulse-inversion harmonic ARFI images. Within the lumen, the harmonic tracking

  18. Radiation induced membrane effects at the apoptotic cell death; Strahleninduzierte Membraneffekte beim apoptotischen Zelltod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, H.A. [Inst. fuer Experimentelle Physik, Abt. Biophysik, Bremen Univ. (Germany); Ojeda, F. [Inst. de Fisica, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile)

    1996-12-31

    Lymphocytes are rather sensitive towards radiation induced apoptosis. The hypothesis can be tried that the cellular membrane (or intracellular membranes) be the primary target for the radiation induced apoptosis. Chemically induced and radiation induced apoptosis follow, at least partially, common mechanistic patterns. It involves a fluidisation of the cellular membrane. Rigidisation of the membrane by incorporation of cholesterol interferes with the radiation induced apoptosis. (orig.) [Deutsch] Lymphozyten sind sehr empfindlich gegen die strahleninduzierte Apoptosis. Die Hypothese wird aufgestellt, dass die Zellmembran (oder intrazellulaere Membranen) Primaertarget der Strahlung zur Induktion der Apoptose ist. Die chemisch induzierte und die strahleninduzierte Apoptose haben, zumindest partiell, gemeinsame Mechanismenstraenge. Sie geht einher mit einer Fludisierung der Zellmembran. Rigidisierung der Zellmembran durch Einbau von Cholesterin interferiert mit der strahleninduzierten Apoptose. (orig.)

  19. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  20. Spinal Cord Glioblastoma Induced by Radiation Therapy of Nasopharyngeal Rhabdomyosarcoma with MRI Findings: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Se Jin; Kim, In One [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Radiation-induced spinal cord gliomas are extremely rare. Since the first case was reported in 1980, only six additional cases have been reported.; The radiation-induced gliomas were related to the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma, thyroid cancer, and medullomyoblastoma, and to multiple chest fluoroscopic examinations in pulmonary tuberculosis patient. We report a case of radiation-induced spinal cord glioblastoma developed in a 17-year-old girl after a 13-year latency period following radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma. MRI findings of our case are described.

  1. Radiation Recall Reaction Induced by Adjuvant Trastuzumab (Herceptin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Chung

    2009-01-01

    trastuzumab (Herceptin administration, there has been no published case of radiation recall reaction associated with trastuzumab. This case describes a clinical presentation consistent with a radiation recall reaction following administration of adjuvant trastuzumab after neoadjuvant FEC-D chemotherapy and locoregional radiotherapy for HER2-positive, locally advanced breast cancer in a premenopausal woman. Although the mechanism and etiology of radiation recall dermatitis remain unclear, this case raises further hypotheses regarding a possible drug dose-dependence and possible predisposing risk factor for the development of radiation recall reactions.

  2. Vacuum radiation induced by time dependent electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bo, E-mail: zhangbolfrc@caep.cn [Department of High Energy Density Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Laboratory of Science and Technology on Plasma Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Zhang, Zhi-meng; Hong, Wei; He, Shu-Kai; Teng, Jian [Department of High Energy Density Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Laboratory of Science and Technology on Plasma Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Gu, Yu-qiu, E-mail: yqgu@caep.cn [Department of High Energy Density Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Laboratory of Science and Technology on Plasma Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China)

    2017-04-10

    Many predictions of new phenomena given by strong field quantum electrodynamics (SFQED) will be tested on next generation multi-petawatt laser facilities in the near future. These new phenomena are basis to understand physics in extremely strong electromagnetic fields therefore have attracted wide research interest. Here we discuss a new SFQED phenomenon that is named as vacuum radiation. In vacuum radiation, a virtual electron loop obtain energy from time dependent external electric field and radiate an entangled photon pair. Features of vacuum radiation in a locally time dependent electric field including spectrum, characteristic temperature, production rate and power are given.

  3. Vacuum radiation induced by time dependent electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Many predictions of new phenomena given by strong field quantum electrodynamics (SFQED will be tested on next generation multi-petawatt laser facilities in the near future. These new phenomena are basis to understand physics in extremely strong electromagnetic fields therefore have attracted wide research interest. Here we discuss a new SFQED phenomenon that is named as vacuum radiation. In vacuum radiation, a virtual electron loop obtain energy from time dependent external electric field and radiate an entangled photon pair. Features of vacuum radiation in a locally time dependent electric field including spectrum, characteristic temperature, production rate and power are given.

  4. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, Max, E-mail: max.seidensticker@med.ovgu.de [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin (Germany); Burak, Miroslaw [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology (Poland); Kalinski, Thomas [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Institut für Pathologie (Germany); Garlipp, Benjamin [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Gefäßchirurgie (Germany); Koelble, Konrad [Philipps Universität Marburg, Fachbereich Medizin der, Abteilung für Neuropathologie (Germany); Wust, Peter [Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Klinik für Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie (Germany); Antweiler, Kai [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Institut für Biometrie und Medizinische Informatik (Germany); Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  5. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    and increase in scientific use can be maintained for the synchrotron x-ray source. A short summary of the present state of the synchrotron radiation-induced x-ray emission (SRIXE) method is presented here. Basically, SRIXE experiments can include any that depend on the detection. of characteristic x-rays produced by the incident x-ray beam born the synchrotron source as they interact with a sample. Thus, experiments done to measure elemental composition, chemical state, crystal, structure, and other sample parameters can be considered in a discussion of SRIXE. It is also clear that the experimentalist may well wish to use a variety of complementary techniques for study of a given sample. For this reason, discussion of computed microtomography (CMT) and x-ray diffraction is included here. It is hoped that this present discussion will serve as a succinct introduction to the basic ideas of SRIXE for those not working in the field and possibly help to stimulate new types of work by those starting in the field as well as by experienced practitioners of the art. The topics covered include short descriptions of (1) the properties of synchrotron radiation, (2) a description of facilities used for its production, (3) collimated microprobe, (4) focused microprobes, (5) continuum and monoenergetic excitation, (6) detection limits, (7) quantitation, (8) applications of SRIXE, (9) computed microtomography (CMT), and (10)chemical speciation using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). An effort has been made to cite a wide variety of work from different laboratories to show the vital nature of the field.

  6. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: I. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A long-standing dogma in the radiation sciences is that energy from radiation must be deposited in the cell nucleus to elicit a biological effect. A number of non-targeted, delayed effects of ionizing radiation have been described that challenge this dogma and pose new challenges to evaluating potential hazards associated with radiation exposure. These effects include induced genomic instability and non-targeted bystander effects. The in vitro evidence for non-targeted effects in radiation biology will be reviewed, but the question as to how one extrapolates from these in vitro observations to the risk of radiation-induced adverse health effects such as cancer remains open.

  7. MRI of radiation-induced tumors of the head and neck in post-radiation nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrigo, Jill M.; King, Ann D.; Wong, Jeffrey K.T.; Ahuja, Anil T. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong S.A.R. (China); Leung, Sing Fai [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong S.A.R. (China); Vlantis, Alexander C.; Tong, Michael C.F. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong S.A.R. (China); Tse, Gary M.K. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Anatomical and Cellular Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong S.A.R. (China)

    2009-05-15

    The aim of this study was to document the sites and MRI features of radiation-induced tumors (RITs) in the head and neck following treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The MRI examinations and clinical records of 20 patients with 21 RITs were reviewed retrospectively. RITs developed 3-30 years after radiotherapy and included eleven squamous cell carcinomas, six sarcomas, two neuroendocrine carcinomas, one mucoepidermoid carcinoma and one meningioma. RITs arose in the maxillary region (9), oro/hypopharynx and oral cavity (5), external auditory canal (4), nasopharynx and sphenoid sinus (2) and brain (1). Radiation-induced carcinoma and sarcoma had MRI features that were useful to distinguish them from recurrent NPC. To improve early detection of RITs, the check areas on an MRI of a patient with previous NPC treated by radiation should always include the maxillary region, tongue, and external auditory canal/temporal bone. (orig.)

  8. Radiation-induced unrepairable DSBs: their role in the late effects of radiation and possible applications to biodosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Asao

    2017-12-21

    Although the vast majority of DNA damage induced by radiation exposure disappears rapidly, some lesions remain in the cell nucleus in very small quantities for days to months. These lesions may cause a considerable threat to an organism and include certain types of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) called 'unrepairable DSBs'. Unrepairable DSBs are thought to cause persistent malfunctioning of cells and tissues or cause late effects of radiation, especially the induction of delayed cell death, mutation, senescence, or carcinogenesis. Moreover, the measurement of unrepairable DSBs could potentially be used for retrospective biodosimetry or for identifying individuals at greater risk for developing the adverse effects associated with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. This review summarizes the concept of unrepairable DSBs in the context of persistent repair foci formed at DSBs. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  9. Rosiglitazone attenuates pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced intestinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangoni, M.; Gerini, C.; Sottili, M.; Cassani, S.; Stefania, G.; Biti, G. [Radiotherapy Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Castiglione, F. [Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E.; Bottoncetti, A.; Pupi, A. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.-The aim of the study was to evaluate radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on a murine model of late pulmonary damage and of acute intestinal damage. Methods.- Lung fibrosis: C57 mice were treated with the radiomimetic agent bleomycin, with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). To obtain an independent qualitative and quantitative measure for lung fibrosis we used high resolution CT, performed twice a week during the entire observation period. Hounsfield Units (HU) of section slides from the upper and lower lung region were determined. On day 31 lungs were collected for histological analysis. Acute intestinal damage: mice underwent 12 Gy total body irradiation with or without rosiglitazone. Mice were sacrificed 24 or 72 h after total body irradiation and ileum and colon were collected. Results.- Lung fibrosis: after bleomycin treatment, mice showed typical CT features of lung fibrosis, including irregular septal thickening and patchy peripheral reticular abnormalities. Accordingly, HU lung density was dramatically increased. Rosiglitazone markedly attenuated the radiological signs of fibrosis and strongly inhibited HU lung density increase (60% inhibition at the end of the observation period). Histological analysis revealed that in bleomycin-treated mice, fibrosis involved 50-55% of pulmonary parenchyma and caused an alteration of the alveolar structures in 10% of parenchyma, while in rosiglitazone-treated mice, fibrosis involved only 20-25% of pulmonary parenchyma, without alterations of the alveolar structures. Acute intestinal damage: 24 h after 12 Gy of total body irradiation intestinal mucosa showed villi shortening, mucosal thickness and crypt necrotic changes. Rosiglitazone showed a histological improvement of tissue structure, with villi and crypts normalization and oedema reduction. Conclusion.- These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced

  10. A comparative review of radiation-induced cancer risk models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hee; Kim, Ju Youl [FNC Technology Co., Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seok Jung [Risk and Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    With the need for a domestic level 3 probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), it is essential to develop a Korea-specific code. Health effect assessments study radiation-induced impacts; in particular, long-term health effects are evaluated in terms of cancer risk. The objective of this study was to analyze the latest cancer risk models developed by foreign organizations and to compare the methodology of how they were developed. This paper also provides suggestions regarding the development of Korean cancer risk models. A review of cancer risk models was carried out targeting the latest models: the NUREG model (1993), the BEIR VII model (2006), the UNSCEAR model (2006), the ICRP 103 model (2007), and the U.S. EPA model (2011). The methodology of how each model was developed is explained, and the cancer sites, dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) and mathematical models are also described in the sections presenting differences among the models. The NUREG model was developed by assuming that the risk was proportional to the risk coefficient and dose, while the BEIR VII, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and U.S. EPA models were derived from epidemiological data, principally from Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The risk coefficient does not consider individual characteristics, as the values were calculated in terms of population-averaged cancer risk per unit dose. However, the models derived by epidemiological data are a function of sex, exposure age, and attained age of the exposed individual. Moreover, the methodologies can be used to apply the latest epidemiological data. Therefore, methodologies using epidemiological data should be considered first for developing a Korean cancer risk model, and the cancer sites and DDREF should also be determined based on Korea-specific studies. This review can be used as a basis for developing a Korean cancer risk model in the future.

  11. Radiation-induced morphological changes in the vagina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, K.; Fidarova, E.; Schmid, M.P.; Sturdza, A.; Kranz, A.; Poetter, R. [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Nout, R.A. [University Medical Center Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Clinical Oncology; Wiebe, E. [Alberta Univ., Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Polterauer, S. [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of General Gynecology and Gynecologic Oncology; Doerr, W. [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology

    2012-11-15

    Background and purpose: Treatment-induced chronic vaginal changes after definitive radio(chemo)therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer patients are reported as one of the most distressing consequences of treatment, with major impact on quality of life. Although these vaginal changes are regularly documented during gynecological follow-up examinations, the classic radiation morbidity grading scales are not concise in their reporting. The aim of the study was therefore to identify and qualitatively describe, on the basis of vaginoscopies, morphological changes in the vagina after definitive radio(chemo)therapy and to establish a classification system for their detailed and reproducible documentation. Patients and methods: Vaginoscopy with photodocumentation was performed prospectively in 22 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer after definitive radio(chemo)therapy at 3-24 months after end of treatment. All patients were in complete remission and without severe grade 3/4 morbidity outside the vagina. Results: Five morphological parameters, which occurred consistently after treatment, were identified: mucosal pallor, telangiectasia, fragility of the vaginal wall, ulceration, and adhesions/occlusion. The symptoms in general were observed at different time points in individual patients; their quality was independent of the time of assessment. Based on the morphological findings, a comprehensive descriptive and semiquantitative scoring system was developed, which allows for classification of vaginal changes. A photographic atlas to illustrate the morphology of the alterations is presented. Conclusion: Vaginoscopy is an easily applicable, informative, and well-tolerated procedure for the objective assessment of morphological vaginal changes after radio(chemo)therapy and provides comprehensive and detailed information. This allows for precise classification of the severity of individual changes. (orig.)

  12. Radiation-induced morphological changes in the vagina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchheiner, K; Fidarova, E; Nout, R A; Schmid, M P; Sturdza, A; Wiebe, E; Kranz, A; Polterauer, S; Pötter, R; Dörr, W

    2012-11-01

    Treatment-induced chronic vaginal changes after definitive radio(chemo)therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer patients are reported as one of the most distressing consequences of treatment, with major impact on quality of life. Although these vaginal changes are regularly documented during gynecological follow-up examinations, the classic radiation morbidity grading scales are not concise in their reporting. The aim of the study was therefore to identify and qualitatively describe, on the basis of vaginoscopies, morphological changes in the vagina after definitive radio(chemo)therapy and to establish a classification system for their detailed and reproducible documentation. Vaginoscopy with photodocumentation was performed prospectively in 22 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer after definitive radio(chemo)therapy at 3-24 months after end of treatment. All patients were in complete remission and without severe grade 3/4 morbidity outside the vagina. Five morphological parameters, which occurred consistently after treatment, were identified: mucosal pallor, telangiectasia, fragility of the vaginal wall, ulceration, and adhesions/occlusion. The symptoms in general were observed at different time points in individual patients; their quality was independent of the time of assessment. Based on the morphological findings, a comprehensive descriptive and semiquantitative scoring system was developed, which allows for classification of vaginal changes. A photographic atlas to illustrate the morphology of the alterations is presented. Vaginoscopy is an easily applicable, informative, and well-tolerated procedure for the objective assessment of morphological vaginal changes after radio(chemo)therapy and provides comprehensive and detailed information. This allows for precise classification of the severity of individual changes.

  13. Gamma radiation induced effects in floppy and rigid Ge-containing chalcogenide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ailavajhala, Mahesh S.; Mitkova, Maria [Department of Electrical Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr. Boise, Idaho 83725-2075 (United States); Gonzalez-Velo, Yago; Barnaby, Hugh; Kozicki, Michael N.; Holbert, Keith [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-9309 (United States); Poweleit, Christian [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States); Butt, Darryl P. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr. Boise, Idaho 83725-2090 (United States)

    2014-01-28

    We explore the radiation induced effects in thin films from the Ge-Se to Ge-Te systems accompanied with silver radiation induced diffusion within these films, emphasizing two distinctive compositional representatives from both systems containing a high concentration of chalcogen or high concentration of Ge. The studies are conducted on blanket chalcogenide films or on device structures containing also a silver source. Data about the electrical conductivity as a function of the radiation dose were collected and discussed based on material characterization analysis. Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction Spectroscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy provided us with data about the structure, structural changes occurring as a result of radiation, molecular formations after Ag diffusion into the chalcogenide films, Ag lateral diffusion as a function of radiation and the level of oxidation of the studied films. Analysis of the electrical testing suggests application possibilities of the studied devices for radiation sensing for various conditions.

  14. Radiation-induced chondrosarcomas: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy has become an important component of various cancer treatments. The development of second malignancy as a result of radiation therapy is a well-known sinister complication. However, radiation-induced sarcomas (RIS are rare complications of radiation therapy. The timescale between completion of the radiotherapy and the development of a second malignancy, known as the latent period, can vary widely from as little as 5 years to 50 years later. Radiation-induced sarcomas per se are very rare and those with histomorphology of chondrosarcomas are even rarer. We report a rare case of RIS of left iliac bone in a 62-year-old lady after combined chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma (stage IIb. This case is being reported for its extreme rarity, vivid histology and clinical presentation.

  15. Crustal deformation induced by mantle dynamics: insights from models of gravitational lithosphere removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huilin; Currie, Claire A.

    2017-08-01

    Mantle-based stresses have been proposed to explain the occurrence of deformation in the interior regions of continental plates, far from the effects of plate boundary processes. We examine how the gravitational removal of a dense mantle lithosphere root may induce deformation of the overlying crust. Simplified numerical models and a theoretical analysis are used to investigate the physical mechanisms for deformation and assess the surface expression of removal. Three behaviours are identified: (1) where the entire crust is strong, stresses from the downwelling mantle are efficiently transferred through the crust. There is little crustal deformation and removal is accompanied by surface subsidence and a negative free-air gravity anomaly. Surface uplift and increased free-air gravity occur after the dense root detaches. (2) If the mid-crust is weak, the dense root creates a lateral pressure gradient in the crust that drives Poiseuille flow in the weak layer. This induces crustal thickening, surface uplift and a minor free-air gravity anomaly above the root. (3) If the lower crust is weak, deformation occurs through pressure-driven Poiseuille flow and Couette flow due to basal shear. This can overthicken the crust, producing a topographic high and a negative free-air gravity anomaly above the root. In the latter two cases, surface uplift occurs prior to the removal of the mantle stress. The modeling results predict that syn-removal uplift will occur if the crustal viscosity is less than ∼1021 Pa s, corresponding to temperatures greater than ∼400-500 °C for a dry and felsic or wet and mafic composition, and ∼900 °C for a dry and mafic composition. If crustal temperatures are lower than this, lithosphere removal is marked by the formation of a basin. These results can explain the variety of surface expressions observed above areas of downwelling mantle. In addition, observations of the surface deflection may provide a way to constrain the vertical rheological

  16. Near-field photochemical and radiation-induced chemical fabrication of nanopatterns of a self-assembled silane monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich C. Fischer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A general concept for parallel near-field photochemical and radiation-induced chemical processes for the fabrication of nanopatterns of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM of (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES is explored with three different processes: 1 a near-field photochemical process by photochemical bleaching of a monomolecular layer of dye molecules chemically bound to an APTES SAM, 2 a chemical process induced by oxygen plasma etching as well as 3 a combined near-field UV-photochemical and ozone-induced chemical process, which is applied directly to an APTES SAM. All approaches employ a sandwich configuration of the surface-supported SAM, and a lithographic mask in form of gold nanostructures fabricated through colloidal sphere lithography (CL, which is either exposed to visible light, oxygen plasma or an UV–ozone atmosphere. The gold mask has the function to inhibit the photochemical reactions by highly localized near-field interactions between metal mask and SAM and to inhibit the radiation-induced chemical reactions by casting a highly localized shadow. The removal of the gold mask reveals the SAM nanopattern.

  17. Mechanisms of Radiation Induced Effects in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    understanding the fundamental radiation response of nanocarbon materials (CNTs and graphene ) and the nanoscale electronic devices comprising them. The...earmarked to replace conventional semiconductor devices in the near future. At the onset of the current program, carbon nanotube technology was...research agenda was highly impactful on understanding the fundamental radiation response of nanocarbon materials (CNTs and graphene ) and the nanoscale

  18. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Zhen [Central Laboratory, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Gan, Ye-Hua, E-mail: kqyehuagan@bjmu.edu.cn [Central Laboratory, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  19. Radiation-induced mechanical property changes in filled rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, A; Weisgraber, T H; Gee, R H; Small, W; Alviso, C T; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

    2011-06-01

    In a recent paper we exposed a filled elastomer to controlled radiation dosages and explored changes in its cross-link density and molecular weight distribution between network junctions [A. Maiti et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 031802 (2011)]. Here we report mechanical response measurements when the material is exposed to radiation while being under finite nonzero strain. We observe interesting hysteretic behavior and material softening representative of the Mullins effect, and materials hardening due to radiation. The net magnitude of the elastic modulus depends upon the radiation dosage, strain level, and strain-cycling history of the material. Using the framework of Tobolsky's two-stage independent network theory we develop a model that can quantitatively interpret the observed elastic modulus and its radiation and strain dependence.

  20. Should regional ventilation function be considered during radiation treatment planning to prevent radiation-induced complications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Fujun; Jeudy, Jean; Senan, Suresh; van Sornsen de Koste, J R; D'Souza, Warren; Tseng, Huan-Hsin; Zhou, Jinghao; Zhang, Hao

    2016-09-01

    -subvolume metrics were significant (P values ≤ 0.02) in predicting volume airway dilation. Likelihood ratio test showed that when combining dose-function and/or dose-subvolume metrics with dose-volume metrics, the achieved improvements of prediction accuracy on volume loss and airway dilation were significant (P values ≤ 0.04). The authors' results demonstrated that the inclusion of regional ventilation function improved accuracy in predicting RF. In particular, dose-subvolume metrics provided a promising method for preventing radiation-induced pulmonary complications.

  1. Reductions in Calcium Uptake Induced in Rat Brain Synaptosomes by Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    located in the brain and heart using nimodipine and Reductions in Calcium Uptake Induced in Rat Brain Synapto- nifedipine (I1-13). Nimodipine binding...was also reduced by radiation exposure. Nimodipine binding to dihydropyridine (DHP) L-type calcium uptake after irradiation in wh31e-brain, cortical...resistant to the direct effects of MATERIALS AND METHODS ionizing radiation, exposure to ionizing radiation can have Materials. Bay K 8644 and nimodipine

  2. Protein deposition on field-emitter tips and its removal by UV radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitz, J. A.; Giaever, I.

    1980-07-01

    Protein deposition on field-emitter tips has been examined using Transmission Electron Microscopy to view the protein coated tip profile. A single layer of adsorbed protein is barely if at all detectable, but double and triple layers produced by the immunologic reaction can be directly observed. As a result, the thickness and morphology of antigen-antibody layers has been directly observed for the first time. Tips exposed first to Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and then to anti-BSA rabbit serum are covered with a reasonably uniform, double protein layer ≈130 Å thick. This layer can be built-up to a triple layer ≈275 Å thick by additional exposure to anti-rabbit IgG goat serum. Surface tension forces during the drying process which follows protein deposition appear to affect the thickness and morphology of the protein layers. The oxidation and subsequent change in the morphology of a protein layer exposed to ultraviolet radiation has also been observed using TEM. The destruction of a triple protein layer at a rate of ≈0.5 Å/s is observed for tungsten tips exposed to ≈6 W of UV radiation from a high-pressure mercury arc in laboratory ambient. These results are compared to those obtained from a simple, visual test for protein layer adsorption in which submonolayer coverages of protein can be detected with the unaided eye.

  3. TU-CD-303-02: Beyond Radiation Induced Double Strand Breaks - a New Horizon for Radiation Therapy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S. [UNC School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Recent advances in cancer research have shed new light on the complex processes of how therapeutic radiation initiates changes at cellular, tissue, and system levels that may lead to clinical effects. These new advances may transform the way we use radiation to combat certain types of cancers. For the past two decades many technological advancements in radiation therapy have been largely based on the hypothesis that direct radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks cause cell death and thus tumor control and normal tissue damage. However, new insights have elucidated that in addition to causing cellular DNA damage, localized therapeutic radiation also initiates cascades of complex downstream biological responses in tissue that extend far beyond where therapeutic radiation dose is directly deposited. For instance, studies show that irradiated dying tumor cells release tumor antigens that can lead the immune system to a systemic anti-cancer attack throughout the body of cancer patient; targeted irradiation to solid tumor also increases the migration of tumor cells already in bloodstream, the seeds of potential metastasis. Some of the new insights may explain the long ago discovered but still unexplained non-localized radiation effects (bystander effect and abscopal effect) and the efficacy of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy) where many “hot” and “cold” spots are intentionally created throughout the treatment volume. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind the non-localized radiation effects creates tremendous opportunities to develop new and integrated cancer treatment strategies that are based on radiotherapy, immunology, and chemotherapy. However, in the multidisciplinary effort to advance new radiobiology, there are also tremendous challenges including a lack of multidisciplinary researchers and imaging technologies for the microscopic radiation-induced responses. A better grasp of the essence of

  4. ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenstein, Barry

    2003-01-01

    ... of this project are to (1) screen 50 breast cancer patients for a ATM mutations who developed radiation-induced grade 3/4 late subcutaneous tissue morbidity as defined by the RTOG/EORTC scoring scheme, (2...

  5. Radiation-Induced Processing of Hydrocarbons in Environments Relevant to Pluto

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallagher, Robert

    2001-01-01

    An understanding of the formation of the larger molecules in the outer solar system, by radiation induced processing of more primitive constituents, has implications relating to the evolution of the solar system...

  6. The protective effects of trace elements against side effects induced by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jaial [Dept. of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Trace elements play crucial role in the maintenance of genome stability in the cells. Many endogenous defense enzymes are containing trace elements such as superoxide dismutase and metalloproteins. These enzymes are contributing in the detoxification of reactive oxidative species (ROS) induced by ionizing radiation in the cells. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium are main trace elements that have protective roles against radiation-induced DNA damages. Trace elements in the free salt forms have protective effect against cell toxicity induced by oxidative stress, metal-complex are more active in the attenuation of ROS particularly through superoxide dismutase mimetic activity. Manganese-complexes in protection of normal cell against radiation without any protective effect on cancer cells are more interesting compounds in this topic. The aim of this paper to review the role of trace elements in protection cells against genotoxicity and side effects induced by ionizing radiation.

  7. Radiation induced cell loss in rat submandibular gland and its relation to gland function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeilstra, LJW; Vissink, A; Konings, AWT; Coppes, RP

    Purpose: To understand early and late radiation-induced loss of function of the submandibular gland, changes in cell number were documented and correlated with data on gland function. Modulation of the radiation effect by sialogogues was used to investigate possible mechanisms of action. Materials

  8. Short and long term radiation induced cardiovascular disease in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Nielsen, Hanne Melgaard

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced cardiovascular disease is well described as a late effect in cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Advancements in surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have led to an increasing number of cancer survivors with resultant long-term side effects related to their cancer...

  9. Comparison of three rat strains for development of radiation-induced lung injury after hemithoracic irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerde, MR; Kampinga, HH; Szabo, BG; Vujaskovic, Z

    The purpose of this study is to define differences in radiation sensitivity among rat strains using breathing frequency and lung perfusion as end points of radiation-induced lung injury. The results have confirmed previous findings in mice showing that-under stringently controlled iso-dose/volume

  10. A Prospective Cohort Study on Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism : Development of an NTCP Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Christianen, Miranda E. M. C.; Beetz, Ivo; Chouvalova, Olga; Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level of 105 patients treated with (chemo-) radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer was prospectively

  11. Evaluation of laser-induced thin-layer removal by using shadowgraphy and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabasović, M. S.; Šević, D.; Lukač, N.; Jezeršek, M.; Možina, J.; Gregorčič, P.

    2016-03-01

    Shadow photography and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are studied as methods for monitoring the selective removal of thin (i.e., under 100 μm) layers by laser ablation. We used a laser pulse of 5 ns and 16 mJ at 1064 nm to ablate an 18-μm-thin copper layer from the fiberglass substrate. On the basis of shadowgraphs of the laser-induced shock waves, we measured the optodynamic energy-conversion efficiency, defined as the ratio between the mechanical energy of the shock wave and the excitation-pulse energy. Our results show that this efficiency is significantly higher for the laser pulse-copper interaction than for the interaction between the excitation pulse and the substrate. LIBS was simultaneously employed in our experimental setup. The optical emission from the plasma plume was collected by using a spectrograph and recorded with a streak camera. We show that advancing of laser ablation through the copper layer and reaching of the substrate can be estimated by tracking the spectral region between 370 and 500 nm. Therefore, the presented results confirm that LIBS method enables an on-line monitoring needed for selective removal of thin layers by laser.

  12. Epigenetic Analysis of Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Bystander Effects in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Cui, Changna; Xue, Bei

    Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect was defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic and proteomics plays significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were exposed head-only to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of (12) C heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. Directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that heavy-ion irradiated mouse head could induce genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate was highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. The results illustrated that genomic methylation changes of heavy ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of

  13. Identification of novel senescence-associated genes in ionizing radiation-induced senescent carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Bong Cho; Han, Na Kyung; Hong, Mi Na; Park, Su Min; Yoo, Hee Jung [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chu, In Sun [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Hee [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Cellular senescence is considered as a defense mechanism to prevent tumorigenesis. Ionizing radiation (IR) induces stress-induced premature senescence as well as apoptosis in various cancer cells. Senescent cells undergo functional and morphological changes including large and flattened cell shape, senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}Gal) activity, and altered gene expressions. Even with the recent findings of several gene expression profiles and supporting functional data, it is obscure that mechanism of IR-induced premature senescence in cancer cells. We performed microarray analysis to identify the common regulated genes in ionizing radiation-induced prematurely senescent human carcinoma cell lines.

  14. Radiation-induced dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma with orbital invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Brett W; Prescott, Christina R; Said, Sherif A; Campana, John; Attié-Castro, Flávia A; Velasco E Cruz, Antonio Augusto; Durairaj, Vikram D

    2014-01-01

    To report 2 interventional cases of dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma with orbital involvement after radiotherapy performed in childhood and to review the literature on chondrosarcoma in the orbit following radiation treatment. Retrospective analysis of medical records of 2 patients with chondrosarcoma of the orbits with review of the literature. The first patient developed chondrosarcoma of the orbital and maxillary sinus 36 years after external beam radiation therapy to the OS to treat retinoblastoma. The second patient developed a large orbital chondrosarcoma 35 years after external beam radiation therapy in the treatment of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia. These cases highlight the risk of secondary chondrosarcoma in patients following radiotherapy and the importance of lifetime monitoring.

  15. Bystander effects in UV-induced genomic instability: Antioxidants inhibit delayed mutagenesis induced by ultraviolet A and B radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahle Jostein

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic instability is characteristic of many types of human cancer. Recently, we reported that ultraviolet radiation induced elevated mutation rates and chromosomal instability for many cell generations after ultraviolet irradiation. The increased mutation rates of unstable cells may allow them to accumulate aberrations that subsequently lead to cancer. Ultraviolet A radiation, which primarily acts by oxidative stress, and ultraviolet B radiation, which initially acts by absorption in DNA and direct damage to DNA, both produced genomically unstable cell clones. In this study, we have determined the effect of antioxidants on induction of delayed mutations by ultraviolet radiation. Delayed mutations are indicative of genomic instability. Methods Delayed mutations in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt gene were detected by incubating the cells in medium selectively killing hprt mutants for 8 days after irradiation, followed by a 5 day period in normal medium before determining mutation frequencies. Results The UVB-induced delayed hprt mutations were strongly inhibited by the antioxidants catalase, reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase, while only reduced glutathione had a significant effect on UVA-induced delayed mutations. Treatment with antioxidants had only minor effects on early mutation frequenies, except that reduced glutathione decreased the UVB-induced early mutation frequency by 24 %. Incubation with reduced glutathione was shown to significantly increase the intracellular amount of reduced glutathione. Conclusion The strong effects of these antioxidants indicate that genomic instability, which is induced by the fundamentally different ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B radiation, is mediated by reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide and downstream products. However, cells take up neither catalase nor SOD, while incubation with glutathione resulted in increased intracellular levels of

  16. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated With the Severity of Radiation-Induced Proctitis in Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbanzadeh-Moghaddam, Amir [Medical Student' s Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholamrezaei, Ali, E-mail: Gholamrezaei@med.mui.ac.ir [Medical Student' s Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Poursina Hakim Research Institution, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hemati, Simin [Department of Radiotherapy Oncology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced injury to normal tissues is a common complication of radiation therapy in cancer patients. Considering the role of vitamin D in mucosal barrier hemostasis and inflammatory responses, we investigated whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with the severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis in cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This prospective observational study was conducted in cancer patients referred for pelvic radiation therapy. Serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured before radiation therapy. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations of <35 nmol/L and <40 nmol/L in male and female patients, respectively, based on available normative data. Acute proctitis was assessed after 5 weeks of radiation therapy (total received radiation dose of 50 Gy) and graded from 0 to 4 using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Results: Ninety-eight patients (57.1% male) with a mean age of 62.8 ± 9.1 years were studied. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 57 patients (58.1%). Symptoms of acute proctitis occurred in 72 patients (73.4%) after radiation therapy. RTOG grade was significantly higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency than in normal cases (median [interquartile range] of 2 [0.5-3] vs 1 [0-2], P=.037). Vitamin D deficiency was associated with RTOG grade of ≥2, independent of possible confounding factors; odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 3.07 (1.27-7.50), P=.013. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis. Investigating the underlying mechanisms of this association and evaluating the effectiveness of vitamin D therapy in preventing radiation-induced acute proctitis is warranted.

  17. Radiation-Induced Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McBride, William H

    2006-01-01

    ... into the generation of tumor-specific immunity so as to achieve the best therapeutic outcome from radiation therapy. From the conventional point of view radiotherapy is usually related to cell killing...

  18. Low dose ionizing radiation induced acoustic neuroma: A putative link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin A Borkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although exposure to high dose ionizing radiation (following therapeutic radiotherapy has been incriminated in the pathogenesis of many brain tumors, exposure to chronic low dose ionizing radiation has not yet been shown to be associated with tumorigenesis. The authors report a case of a 50-year-old atomic reactor scientist who received a cumulative dose of 78.9 mSv over a 10-year period and was detected to have an acoustic neuroma another 15 years later. Although there is no proof that exposure to ionizing radiation was the cause for the development of the acoustic neuroma, this case highlights the need for extended follow-up periods following exposure to low dose ionizing radiation.

  19. [A case of prednisolone therapy for radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Masato; Nishimura, Taiji; Kurita, Susumu; Lee, Chorsu; Kondo, Yukihiro; Yamazaki, Keiichi

    2011-05-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis resulting from radiation to pelvic visceral malignant lesions often might be incurable and there have been no established definitive treatment. We experienced a case with severe radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. The treatment with oral administration of prednisolone was performed and obtained a successful result. Gross hematuria disappeared in 2 weeks in this case. This experience suggested that oral administration of prednisolone could be considered the treatment for patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis when usual treatments including transurethral electro-coagulation are unsuccessful.

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the successful treatment of two cases of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Akihito; Ohkubo, Yuhei; Takashima, Rikiya; Furugen, Nobuaki; Tochimoto, Masato; Tsuchiya, Akira (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan). Kasumigaura Hospital)

    1994-08-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis resulting from radiation to pelvic visceral malignant lesions often might be incurable and there have been established no definitive treatment. We experienced 2 cases of radiation-induced severe hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. The treatment with hyperbaric oxygen to control hematuria was performed and obtained successful results. Gross hematuria was disappeared and cystoscopic figure was remarkably improved. No remarkable side-effect was observed in both patients. This experience suggested that hyperbaric oxygen could be considered as the primary treatment for patient with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis instead of usual treatment. (author).

  1. Low-Dose Bevacizumab Is Effective in Radiation-Induced Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Alessandretti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radiation-induced necrosis is a complication of brain irradiation. Treatment options are limited. Methods: The response to treatment with low-dose bevacizumab in 2 patients with radiation-induced necrosis was reported. Results: Both patients with metastatic melanoma, aged 48 and 51 years, had significant symptomatic and radiological improvement with low-dose bevacizumab treatment. Doses as low as 5 mg/kg every 6 weeks and 7.5 mg/kg i.v. every 4 weeks were used and were highly effective. Conclusions: Low-dose bevacizumab is a solid option in the management of edema associated with radiation necrosis.

  2. Viimsi water treatment plant for Ra removal: NORM residue/waste generation, radiation safety issues, and regulatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiisk, M.; Suursoo, S.; Realo, E.; Jantsikene, A.; Lumiste, L.; Vaeaer, K.; Isakar, K.; Koch, R. [University of Tartu (Estonia)

    2014-07-01

    In early 2012, the first large-scale water treatment plant, specifically designed to remove Ra-isotopes from groundwater, was commissioned in Viimsi parish, North-Estonia. The plant serves approximately 15 000 consumers with maximum production capacity of 6000 m{sup 3}/d. The chosen water treatment technology is chemical free and is based on co-precipitation and adsorption with Fe(OH){sub 3} and MnO{sub 2} flocks, and adsorption of residual Ra onto zeolite sand. The chosen technology is a complex approach and is designed to reduce high Fe and Mn concentrations as well as dissolved gases along with Ra isotopes. It is proved to be well adapted with hydro-chemical conditions of the groundwater feeding the plant. As the novel technology has been applied for the first time on a large scale, the plant was taken under long-term investigation when commissioned. The latter focuses on three areas: Ra removal efficiency and its dynamics, build-up of radioactive waste, and radiation safety. The average Ra-226 and Ra-228 activity concentrations in raw water feeding the plant are approximately 0.5 Bq/L and 0.6 Bq/L, respectively, resulting in total indicative dose of 0.4 mSv/y. Operating conditions of the plant are restricted by the established indicative value of 0.1 mSv/y for drinking water, i.e. a minimum 75% removal efficiency for Ra is required. Results of the studies show that the plant operates at Ra-removal efficiency of 98% or higher without the need of regeneration or replacement of filtering materials within the first two years. Measurements confirm that ∼90% of Ra accumulates in the solid filter media, 8-9% is washed out by backwash system as liquid effluent and 1-2% is fed on to the consumer distribution network. It has been calculated that at the level of current production capacity (below 3000 m{sup 3}/d) the yearly accumulation rate in the plant is approximately 300 and 400 MBq/y for Ra-226 and Ra-228, respectively. These values strongly exceed the exemption

  3. Removal of Penicillin G and Erythromycin with Ionizing Radiation Followed by Biological Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Issam; Mezni, Mohamed; Boulila, Abdennacer; Hamdi, Mokhtar; Saidi, Mouldi

    2016-10-01

    The decomposition of penicillin G and erythromycin antibiotics at concentration of 0.2 mg ml(-1) by gamma irradiation at 50 kGy followed by biological treatment with Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 was evaluated. Degradation of penicillin G and erythromycin was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance analysis (NMR), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and chemical oxygen demand (COD). The exposure to the absorbed dose of 50 kGy caused degradation of penicillin G and erythromycin in the aqueous solution. The complete disappearance of NMR and FTIR peaks following irradiation confirmed the breakage of the β-lactam ring in penicillin G, and the decarboxylation and cleavage of the thiazolidine ring and for erythromycin, the complete destruction of the three aromatic rings. Irradiation alone removed 52.8 and 65.5 % of penicillin G and erythromycin, respectively. Further reduction to 12.6 and 14 % of the original penicillin G and erythromycin COD, respectively, was achieved using treatment of the irradiation products with C. metallidurans.

  4. Advances in dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Y

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yang Yu,1 Hui Guan,1 Yuanli Dong,1 Ligang Xing,2 Xiaolin Li2 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, University of Jinan, Jinan, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Objective: To summarize the research progress about the dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis.Methods: We performed a systematic literature review addressing radiation esophagitis in the treatment of lung cancer published between January 2009 and May 2015 in the PubMed full-text database index systems.Results: Twenty-eight eligible documents were included in the final analysis. Many clinical factors were related to the risk of radiation esophagitis, such as elder patients, concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the intense radiotherapy regimen (hyperfractionated radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiotherapy. The parameters including Dmax, Dmean, V20, V30, V50, and V55 may be valuable in predicting the occurrence of radiation esophagitis in patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Genetic variants in inflammation-related genes are also associated with radiation-induced toxicity.Conclusion: Dosimetry and biological factors of radiation-induced esophagitis provide clinical information to decrease its occurrence and grade during radiotherapy. More prospective studies are warranted to confirm their prediction efficacy. Keywords: lung cancer, esophagitis, radiation injuries, predictors

  5. High-LET radiation-induce malignant and benign tumors in rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J. [Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Zhao, P.; Hiz, Z.; Chen, S.; Roy, N.

    1999-03-01

    In the multistage theory of carcinogenesis, cells progress to cancer through a series of mutations in cancer-relevant genes, and sometimes the intermediate stages become benign neoplastic lesions. Although cancer induction by low LET radiation is subject to repair or recovery in the sense that multiple exposures produce fewer cancers than the same single dose, this recovery is not seen following exposure to high LET radiation. Data are presented on squamous and basal cell carcinoma and fibroma induction in rat skin exposed to: 1. an electron beam (LET=0.34 kV/{mu}), 2. a neon ion beam (LET=30 kV/{mu} ) and 3. an argon ion beam (LET=125 kV/{mu}). Cancer yields were fitted by a LET-dependent quadratic equation, and equation parameters were estimated by regression analysis for each type of radiation. The results are consistent with the interpretation that carcinoma induction can be explained by a pathway involving 2 radiation-induced events, 1 radiation-induced mutation and 1 spontaneous mutation, while benign fibromas can be explained by a pathway involving 1 radiation-induced event and 1 radiation-induced mutation. (author)

  6. Bystander Effect Induced by UV Radiation; why should we be interested? 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Widel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The bystander effect, whose essence is an interaction of cells directly subjected to radiation with adjacent non-subjected cells, via molecular signals, is an important component of ionizing radiation action. However, knowledge of the bystander effect in the case of ultraviolet (UV radiation is quite limited. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by UV in exposed cells induce bystander effects in non-exposed cells, such as reduction in clonogenic cell survival and delayed cell death, oxidative DNA damage and gene mutations, induction of micronuclei, lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. Although the bystander effect after UV radiation has been recognized in cell culture systems, its occurrence in vivo has not been studied. However, solar UV radiation, which is the main source of UV in the environment, may induce in human dermal tissue an inflammatory response and immune suppression, events which can be considered as bystander effects of UV radiation. The oxidative damage to DNA, genomic instability and the inflammatory response may lead to carcinogenesis. UV radiation is considered one of the important etiologic factors for skin cancers, basal- and squamous-cell carcinomas and malignant melanoma. Based on the mechanisms of actions it seems that the UV-induced bystander effect can have some impact on skin damage (carcinogenesis?, and probably on cells of other tissues. The paper reviews the existing data about the UV-induced bystander effect and discusses a possible implication of this phenomenon for health risk. 

  7. Bystander effect induced by UV radiation; why should we be interested?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, Maria

    2012-11-14

    The bystander effect, whose essence is an interaction of cells directly subjected to radiation with adjacent non-subjected cells, via molecular signals, is an important component of ionizing radiation action. However, knowledge of the bystander effect in the case of ultraviolet (UV) radiation is quite limited. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by UV in exposed cells induce bystander effects in non-exposed cells, such as reduction in clonogenic cell survival and delayed cell death, oxidative DNA damage and gene mutations, induction of micronuclei, lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. Although the bystander effect after UV radiation has been recognized in cell culture systems, its occurrence in vivo has not been studied. However, solar UV radiation, which is the main source of UV in the environment, may induce in human dermal tissue an inflammatory response and immune suppression, events which can be considered as bystander effects of UV radiation. The oxidative damage to DNA, genomic instability and the inflammatory response may lead to carcinogenesis. UV radiation is considered one of the important etiologic factors for skin cancers, basal- and squamous-cell carcinomas and malignant melanoma. Based on the mechanisms of actions it seems that the UV-induced bystander effect can have some impact on skin damage (carcinogenesis?), and probably on cells of other tissues. The paper reviews the existing data about the UV-induced bystander effect and discusses a possible implication of this phenomenon for health risk. 

  8. Challenges in Clinical Management of Radiation-Induced Illnesses in Exploration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Rebecca; Chancellor, Jeffery; Suresh, Rahul; Carnell, Lisa; Reyes, David; Nowadly, Craig; Antonsen, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Historical solar particle events (SPEs) provide context for some understanding of acute radiation exposure risk to astronauts traveling outside of low Earth orbit. Modeling of potential doses delivered to exploration crewmembers anticipates limited radiation-induced health impacts, including prodromal symptoms of nausea, emesis, and fatigue, but suggests that more severe clinical manifestations are unlikely. Recent large animal-model research in space-analogs closely mimicking SPEs has identified coagulopathic events independent of the hematopoietic sequelae of higher radiation doses, similar in manifestation to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We explored the challenges of clinical management of radiation-related clinical manifestations, using currently accepted modeling techniques and anticipated physiological sequelae, to identify medical capabilities needed to successfully manage SPE-induced radiation illnesses during exploration spaceflight.

  9. Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W; Muenzer, Jared T; Chang, Kathy C; Davis, Chris G; McDunn, Jonathan E; Coopersmith, Craig M; Hilliard, Carolyn A; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Grigsby, Perry W; Hunt, Clayton R

    2007-04-06

    The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues.

  10. Effective formalin treatment of two cases of radiation-induced hemorrhagic colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ietsugu, Kenichi; Kosugi, Mitsuyo; Nakashima, Hisayuki; Sakatoku, Mitsuaki; Bando, Hiroyuki; Sunohara, Tetsuyuki [Tonami General Hospital, Toyama (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    Radiation colitis sometimes shows uncontrollable bleeding. The treatment by 4 percent formalin solution was effective for two cases of radiation-induced hemorrhagic colitis. Case 1 was an 80-year-old female who had cloacogenic carcinoma, poorly-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma type. This was complicated by hemorrhagic proctitis 16 months after radiation therapy. Bleeding could not be controlled by steroid enema and endoscopic laser therapy. Formalin treatment was very effective for hemostasis. Case 2 was 47-year-old female who had breast cancer with multiple bone metastases. This was complicated by hemorrhagic colitis 15 months after radiation therapy of bone metastases of the lumbar spine and the sacrum. Three formalin treatments were needed for hemostasis, however, they were effective. The formalin treatment is a simple, effective and minimally invasive therapy for radiation-induced hemorrhagic colitis of the lower sigmoid colon and the rectum. (author)

  11. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leadon, S.A. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)); Copper, P.K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-11-15

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribe genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, the authors examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. They found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. The results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions.

  12. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadon, S A; Cooper, P K

    1993-11-15

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribed genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, we examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. We found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. Our results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions.

  13. Amelioration of ionizing radiation induced lipid peroxidation in mouse liver by Moringa oleifera Lam. leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh Kr; Datta, Sanjukta; Ghosh, Santinath; Dey, Sanjit

    2012-03-01

    Protective effect of Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MoLE) against radiation-induced lipid peroxidation has been investigated. Swiss albino mice, selected from an inbred colony, were administered with MoLE (300 mg/kg body wt) for 15 days before exposing to a single dose of 5 Gy 60Co-gamma radiation. After treatments, animals were necropsied at different post irradiation intervals (days 1, 7 and 15) and hepatic lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents were estimated to observe the relative changes due to irradiation and its possible amelioration by MoLE. It was observed that, MoLE treatment restored GSH in liver and prevented radiation induced augmentation in hepatic lipid peroxidation. Phytochemical analysis showed that MoLE possess various phytochemicals such as ascorbic acid, phenolics (catechin, epicatechin, ferulic acid, ellagic acid, myricetin) etc., which may play the key role in prevention of hepatic lipid peroxidation by scavenging radiation induced free radicals.

  14. Management of late radiation-induced rectal injury after treatment of carcinoma of the uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen-Mersh, T.G.; Wilson, E.J.; Hope-Stone, H.F.; Mann, C.V.

    1987-06-01

    Sixty-one of 1418 (4.3 per cent) patients treated with radiation for carcinoma of the uterus from 1963 to 1983 had significant radiation-induced complications of the intestine develop which required a surgical opinion considering further management. Ninety-three per cent of these complications involved the rectum. Florid proctitis resolved within two years of onset in 33 per cent of the patients who were managed conservatively while 22 per cent of the patients died of disseminated disease within the same time period. Surgical treatment was eventually necessary in 39 per cent of the patients who were initially treated conservatively for radiation induced proctitis. Rectal excision with coloanal sleeve anastomosis produced a satisfactory result in eight of 11 patients with severe radiation injury involving the rectum. The incidence of radiation-induced and malignant rectovaginal fistula were similar (1 per cent), but disease-induced symptoms tended to occur earlier after primary treatment (a median of eight months) compared with radiation-induced symptoms (a median of 16 months).

  15. Radiation-induced synthesis of poly(acrylic acid) nanogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak, Malgorzata; Kadlubowski, Slawomir; Ulanski, Piotr

    2018-01-01

    Nanogel is a two-component system of a diameter in the range of tens of nanometers, consisting of an intramolecularly crosslinked polymer chain and solvent, typically water, filling the space between segments of the macromolecule. Microgels are bigger than nanogels and their size range is between 100 nm to 100 μm. One of the methods used for synthesizing nanogels is linking the segments of a single macromolecule with the use of ionizing radiation, by intramolecular recombination of radiation-generated polymer radicals. The main advantage of this technique is absence of monomers, catalysts, surfactants or crosslinking agents. This method is an interesting alternative way of synthesizing polymeric carriers for biomedical applications. The aim of the study was radiation synthesis and characterization of poly(acrylic acid) - PAA - nanogels and microgels. The physico-chemical properties were described by determination of weight-average molecular weight and dimensions (radius of gyration, hydrodynamic radius) of the nanogels and microgels. Influence of polymer concentration and dose on these parameters was analyzed. Adjusting the PAA concentration and absorbed dose, one can control the molecular weight and dimensions of nanogels. The solutions of PAA were irradiated with two sources of ionizing radiation: γ-source and electron accelerator. The former method yields mainly microgels due to prevailing intermolecular crosslinking, while the latter promotes intramolecular recombination of PAA-derived radicals and in consequence formation of nanogels. In the future radiation-synthesized PAA nanogels, after functionalization, will be tested as carriers for delivering radionuclides to the tumor cells.

  16. Adenosine kinase inhibition protects against cranial radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munjal M Acharya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical radiation therapy for the treatment of CNS cancers leads to unintended and debilitating impairments in cognition. Radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction is long lasting, however, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are still not well established. Since ionizing radiation causes microglial and astroglial activation, we hypothesized that maladaptive changes in astrocyte function might be implicated in radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. Among other gliotransmitters, astrocytes control the availability of adenosine, an endogenous neuroprotectant and modulator of cognition, via metabolic clearance through adenosine kinase (ADK. Adult rats exposed to cranial irradiation (10 Gy showed significant declines in performance of hippocampal-dependent cognitive function tasks (novel place recognition, novel object recognition, and contextual fear conditioning 1 month after exposure to ionizing radiation using a clinically relevant regimen. Irradiated rats spent less time exploring a novel place or object. Cranial irradiation also led to reduction in freezing behavior compared to controls in the fear conditioning task. Importantly, immunohistochemical analyses of irradiated brains showed significant elevation of ADK immunoreactivity in the hippocampus that was related to astrogliosis and increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Conversely, rats treated with the ADK inhibitor 5-iodotubercidin (5-ITU, 3.1 mg/kg, i.p., for 6 days prior to cranial irradiation showed significantly improved behavioral performance in all cognitive tasks 1 month post exposure. Treatment with 5-ITU attenuated radiation-induced astrogliosis and elevated ADK immunoreactivity in the hippocampus. These results confirm an astrocyte-mediated mechanism where preservation of extracellular adenosine can exert neuroprotection also against radiation-induced pathology. These innovative findings link radiation-induced changes in cognition and CNS

  17. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  18. Effect of mobile phone radiation on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Kouchaki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Scientific interest in potential mobile phone impact on human brain and performance has significantly increased in recent years. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of mobile phone radiation on seizure threshold in mice. Materials and methods:BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, acute, and chronic mobile phone radiation for 30, 60, and 90 min with frequency 900 to 950 MHz and pulse of 217 Hz. The chronic group received 30 days of radiation, while the acute group received only once. The intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole (5 mg/ml was used to induce seizure signs. Results:  Although acute mobile radiation did not change seizure threshold, chronic radiation decreased the clonic and tonic seizure thresholds significantly. Conclusion: Our data suggests that thecontinued and prolonged contact with the mobile phone radiation might increase the risk of seizure attacks and should be limited.

  19. The effects of polaprezinc on radiation-induced taste alterations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa; Togao, Osamu [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences; Shikama, Naoto (and others)

    2001-06-01

    The effects of polaprezinc (an insoluble zinc complex of L-carnosine) on taste abnormalities were investigated in 22 patients receiving radiation therapy to head and neck malignancies. The total doses to the tongue were 25.5-46.0 Gy (mean, 37.9 Gy). All patients received 75 mg of polaprezinc two times a day with an interval of 0-1,561 days (mean, 305.3 days) after the completion of radiation therapy. The duration of the drug administration was 25-353 days (mean, 96.9 days). Twenty patients (90.9%) were aware of an improvement of a partial or complete loss of taste. Polaprezinc is effective in improving loss of taste after radiation therapy. (author)

  20. Validation of genetic predictors of late radiation-induced morbidity in prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack, Line M H; Petersen, Stine E; Nielsen, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    in 96 patients (rs2788612, rs1800629, rs264663, rs2682585, rs2268363, rs1801516, rs13035033, rs7120482 and rs17779457). A validated gene expression profile predictive of resistance to radiation-induced skin fibrosis was tested in 42 patients. An RT-induced anorectal dysfunction score (RT-ARD) served...

  1. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkal, B.H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Gultekin, F.A. [Department of General Surgery, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Guven, B. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Turkcu, U.O. [Mugla School of Health Sciences, Mugla Sitki Kocman University, Mugla (Turkey); Bektas, S. [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Can, M. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2013-09-27

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  2. Growth hormone used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Xia, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Zheng-Sen; Lu, Xin-Liang

    2015-08-21

    Intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis is rare. We describe a 69-year-old man with intractable hemorrhagic gastritis induced by postoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. Although anti-secretory therapy with or without octreotide was initiated for hemostasis over three months, melena still occurred off and on, and the patient required blood transfusions to maintain stable hemoglobin. Finally growth hormone was used in the treatment of hemorrhage for two weeks, and hemostasis was successfully achieved. This is the first report that growth hormone has been used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

  3. Superior vena cava obstruction caused by radiation induced venous fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Putten, JWG; Schlosser, NJJ; Vujaskovic, Z; Van der Leest, AHD; Groen, HJM

    Superior vena cava syndrome is most often caused by lung carcinoma. Two cases are described in whom venous obstruction in the superior mediastinum was caused by local vascular fibrosis due to radiotherapy five and seven years earlier. The development of radiation injury to greater vessels is

  4. Wheat Germ Oil Attenuates Gamma Radiation-Induced Skeletal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muscular strength is important in sport as well as in daily activities. Exposure to ionizing radiation is thought to increase oxidative stress and damage muscle tissue. Wheat germ oil is a natural unrefined vegetable oil. It is an excellent source of vitamin E, octacosanol, linoleic and linolenic essential fatty acids, which may be ...

  5. Modeling of chronic radiation-induced cystitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette M.M. Zwaans, PhD

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: We developed an RC model that mimics the human pathology and functional changes. Furthermore, radiation exposure attenuates the urothelial integrity long-term, allowing for potential continuous irritability of the bladder wall from exposure to urine. Future studies will focus on the underlying molecular changes associated with this condition and investigate novel treatment strategies.

  6. Ion induced radiation damage on the molecular level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarado Chacon, Fresia

    2007-01-01

    Throughout our lives we are exposed to ionizing radiation from cosmic and environmental sources or from medical diagnostics and treatments. In conventional therapy of malignant tumors, photons or electrons are used. Nowadays we witness the introduction of proton and heavy ion beams which have a

  7. Radiation induced changes in the airway - anaesthetic implications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Loss of teeth. • _ mobility of tongue. • micrognathia/mandibu- lar recession. • Extraoral/intraoral fistu- lae. • Altered consistency of neck tissue presents as firm or woody mass. • Skin tethering. • Snoring. • Hoarseness of voice. • Irritant cough. Table 1: Airway changes following radiation. Anaesthetic implications. • Difficult mask ...

  8. Gamma radiation-induced synthesis and characterization of Polyvinylpyrrolidone nanogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ges, A. A.; Viltres, H.; Borja, R.; Rapado, M.; Aguilera, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the importance of bioactive peptides, proteins and drug for pharmaceutical purpose, there is a growing interest for suitable delivery systems, able to increase their bioavailability and to target them to the desired location. Some of the most studied delivery systems involve encapsulation or entrapment of drugs into biocompatible polymeric devices. A multitude of techniques have been described for the synthesis of nanomaterials from polymers, however, the use of ionizing radiation (γ, e-), to obtain nano- and microgels polymer is characterized by the possibility of obtaining products with a high degree of purity. Although, in the world, electronic radiation is used for this purpose, gamma radiation has not been utilized for these purposes. In this paper is developed the formulation the formulation of Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanogels synthesized by gamma radiation techniques, for their evaluation as potential system of drug delivery. Experiments were performed in absence of oxygen using aqueous solutions of PVP (0.05% -1%). Crosslinking reactions were carried out at 25° C in a gamma irradiation chamber with a 60Co source (MPX-γ 30). The Viscosimetry, Light Scattering, X-Ray Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), were used as characterization techniques.

  9. Radioprotective Effect of Thymol Against Salivary Glands Dysfunction Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Yarmand, Fateme; Motallebnejad, Mina; Seyedmajidi, Maryam; Moslemi, Dariush; Bijani, Ali; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of thymol as a natural product against salivary glands dysfunction induced by ionizing radiation in rats. The rats were treated with thymol at dose of 50 mg/Kg before exposure to ionizing radiation at dose 15 Gy. Salivary gland function was evaluated with radioisotope scintigraphy and then salivary gland to background counts ratio was calculated. Ionizing radiation caused significant salivary glands dysfunction at the 3th and the 70th days with reduction in radioactivity uptake in salivary glands. Ratios of salivary gland to background radioactivities were 2.0 ± 0.05, 1.58 ± 0.62 and 1.99 ± 0.07 at 3th days for control, radiation, and thymol plus radiation groups, respectively. Thymol significantly protected acute and chronic salivary gland dysfunction induced by ionizing radiation in the rats.This finding may have been a promising application of thymol for the protection of salivary glands dysfunction induced by ionizing irradiation in patients exposed to radiation in head and neck cancer therapy.

  10. Vitamin E protects salivary glands dysfunction induced by ionizing radiation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Yarmand, Fateme; Motallebnejad, Mina; Seyedmajidi, Maryam; Moslemi, Dariush; Ashrafpour, Manouchehr; Bijani, Ali; Moghadamnia, Aliakbar; Mardanshahi, Alireza; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the radioprotective effect of vitamin E as a natural product. Vitamin E protects the salivary glands dysfunction that is induced by ionizing radiation. It was analysed with radioisotope scintigraphy and then salivary gland to background counts ratio was calculated. Histopathological evaluation was performed. The rats were treated with vitamin E at dose of 400IU/kg 48, 24, and 1h before 15Gy gamma rays irradiation. The rats were evaluated for the salivary gland function through nuclear medicine protocol. Radiation causes significant salivary glands dysfunction at the 3rd and the 70th days with a reduction in radioactivity uptake in the salivary glands. Ratios of salivary gland to background radioactivities were 1.99±0.11, 1.58±0.08 and 1.92±0.04 for control, radiation, and vitamin E plus radiation groups, respectively. Vitamin E significantly improved salivary gland dysfunction induced by ionizing radiation in the rats. In conclusion, our results indicate protective effects of vitamin E against salivary gland dysfunction induced by gamma radiation. Thus, vitamin E is a promising radioprotective agent for patients who receive radiation in head and neck cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of radiation-induced transmission degradation of borosilicate crown optical glass from four different manufacturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusarov, Andrei; Doyle, Dominic; Glebov, Leonid; Berghmans, Francis

    2005-09-01

    Space-born optical systems must be tolerant to radiation to guarantee that the required system performance is maintained during prolonged mission times. The radiation-induced absorption in optical glasses is often related with the presence of impurities, which are, intentionally or not, introduced during the manufacturing process. Glass manufacturers use proprietary fabrication processes and one can expect that the radiation sensitivity of nominally identical optical glasses from different manufacturers is different. We studied the gamma-radiation induced absorption of several crown glasses with nd ≈ 1.516 and vd ≈ 64, i.e. NBK7 (Schott), S-BSL7 (Ohara), BSC 517642 (Pilkington) and K8 (Russia). NBK7 recently replaced the well-known BK7. We therefore also compared the radiation response of NBK7 and BK7 glass. Our results show that whereas the glasses are optically similar before irradiation, they show a different induced absorption after irradiation and also different post-radiation recovery kinetics. Taking these differences into account can help to improve the radiation tolerance of optical systems for space applications.

  12. Impact of p53 status on heavy-ion radiation-induced micronuclei in circulating erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P. Y.; Torous, D.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R.

    2000-01-01

    Transgenic mice that differed in their p53 genetic status were exposed to an acute dose of highly charged and energetic (HZE) iron particle radiation. Micronuclei (MN) in two distinct populations of circulating peripheral blood erythrocytes, the immature reticulocytes (RETs) and the mature normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs), were measured using a simple and efficient flow cytometric procedure. Our results show significant elevation in the frequency of micronucleated RETs (%MN-RETs) at 2 and 3 days post-radiation. At 3 days post-irradiation, the magnitude of the radiation-induced MN-RET was 2.3-fold higher in the irradiated p53 wild-type animals compared to the unirradiated controls, 2.5-fold higher in the p53 hemizygotes and 4.3-fold higher in the p53 nullizygotes. The persistence of this radiation-induced elevation of MN-RETs is dependent on the p53 genetic background of the animal. In the p53 wild-type and p53 hemizygotes, %MN-RETs returned to control levels by 9 days post-radiation. However, elevated levels of %MN-RETs in p53 nullizygous mice persisted beyond 56 days post-radiation. We also observed elevated MN-NCEs in the peripheral circulation after radiation, but the changes in radiation-induced levels of MN-NCEs appear dampened compared to those of the MN-RETs for all three strains of animals. These results suggest that the lack of p53 gene function may play a role in the iron particle radiation-induced genomic instability in stem cell populations in the hematopoietic system.

  13. γ-radiation induced corrosion of copper in bentonite-water systems under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin Norrfors, K.; Björkbacka, Åsa; Kessler, Amanda; Wold, Susanna; Jonsson, Mats

    2018-03-01

    In this work we have experimentally studied the impact of bentonite clay on the process of radiation-induced copper corrosion in anoxic water. The motivation for this is to further develop our understanding of radiation-driven processes occurring in deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel where copper canisters containing the spent nuclear fuel will be embedded in compacted bentonite. Experiments on radiation-induced corrosion in the presence and absence of bentonite were performed along with experiments elucidating the impact irradiation on the Cu2+ adsorption capacity of bentonite. The experiments presented in this work show that the presence of bentonite clay has no or very little effect on the magnitude of radiation-induced corrosion of copper in anoxic aqueous systems. The absence of a protective effect similar to that observed for radiation-induced dissolution of UO2 is attributed to differences in the corrosion mechanism. This provides further support for the previously proposed mechanism where the hydroxyl radical is the key radiolytic oxidant responsible for the corrosion of copper. The radiation effect on the bentonite sorption capacity of Cu2+ (reduced capacity) is in line with what has previously been reported for other cations. The reduced cation sorption capacity is partly attributed to a loss of Al-OH sites upon irradiation.

  14. A Prospective Cohort Study on Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism: Development of an NTCP Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Christianen, Miranda E.M.C.; Beetz, Ivo; Chouvalova, Olga; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R. [Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Oosting, Sjoukje F. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schilstra, Cornelis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A., E-mail: j.a.langendijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level of 105 patients treated with (chemo-) radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer was prospectively measured during a median follow-up of 2.5 years. Hypothyroidism was defined as elevated serum TSH with decreased or normal free thyroxin (T4). A multivariate logistic regression model with bootstrapping was used to determine the most important prognostic variables for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Results: Thirty-five patients (33%) developed primary hypothyroidism within 2 years after radiation therapy. An NTCP model based on 2 variables, including the mean thyroid gland dose and the thyroid gland volume, was most predictive for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. NTCP values increased with higher mean thyroid gland dose (odds ratio [OR]: 1.064/Gy) and decreased with higher thyroid gland volume (OR: 0.826/cm{sup 3}). Model performance was good with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85. Conclusions: This is the first prospective study resulting in an NTCP model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. The probability of hypothyroidism rises with increasing dose to the thyroid gland, whereas it reduces with increasing thyroid gland volume.

  15. Radiation induced oral mucositis: a review of current literature on prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Rath, G K

    2016-09-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a major limiting acute side effect of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. The spectrum of problems associated with mucositis includes oral pain, odynophagia, reduced oral intake, and secondary infections. Incidence of mucositis is increased with addition of concurrent chemotherapy as well as altered fractionation schedules. This leads to treatment interruption and suboptimal disease control. Hence, prevention as well as timely management of OM is necessary for optimum tumor control. We reviewed the English literature with key words "Radiation induced mucositis, Mucositis, Oral Mucositis" to find relevant articles describing incidence, pathophysiology, prophylaxis, and treatment of oral mucositis. Prevention and treatment of OM is an active area of research. Maintenance of oral hygiene is an important part in prevention of OM. A battery of agents including normal saline and alkali (soda bicarbonate) mouth washes, low level laser therapy, and benzydamine (non-steroidal analgesic and anti-inflammatory) have effectiveness in the prevention and treatment of radiation induced oral mucositis. Chlorhexidine mouth gargles are recommended for prevention of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis but is not recommended for radiotherapy associated mucositis. Treatment of co-existing infection is also important and both topical (povidone iodine) and systemic anti fungals should be used judiciously. Radiation induced oral mucositis is a common problem limiting the efficacy of radiation by increasing treatment breaks. Adequate prophylaxis and treatment may limit the severity of radiation mucositis and improve compliance to radiation which may translate in better disease control and survival.

  16. Chromatin Folding, Fragile Sites, and Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Low- and High- LET Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Cox, Bradley; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J.; Wu, Honglu

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated non-random distributions of breaks involved in chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high-LET radiation. To investigate the factors contributing to the break point distribution in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations, human epithelial cells were fixed in G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome in separate colors. After the images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multimega base pair scale. Specific locations of the chromosome, in interphase, were also analyzed with bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes. Both mBAND and BAC studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested association of interphase chromatin folding to the radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. We further investigated the distribution of genes, as well as the distribution of breaks found in tumor cells. Comparisons of these distributions to the radiation hotspots showed that some of the radiation hotspots coincide with the frequent breaks found in solid tumors and with the fragile sites for other environmental toxins. Our results suggest that multiple factors, including the chromatin structure and the gene distribution, can contribute to radiation-induced chromosome aberrations.

  17. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: II. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vivo, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the evidence for non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo. Currently, human health risks associated with radiation exposures are based primarily on the assumption that the detrimental effects of radiation occur in irradiated cells. Over the years a number of non-targeted effects of radiation exposure in vivo have been described that challenge this concept. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects, clastogenic factors produced in plasma from irradiated individuals that can cause chromosomal damage when cultured with nonirradiated cells, and transgenerational effects of parental irradiation that can manifest in the progeny. These effects pose new challenges to evaluating the risk(s) associated with radiation exposure and understanding radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  18. Gamma radiation induced effects on slaughterhouse wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Rita; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Branco, Joaquim; Botelho, M. Luisa

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary study using gamma radiation on slaughterhouse wastewater samples was carried out. Chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids (TSS) results were obtained at a dose rate of 0.9 kGy h -1. A decrease of COD, BOD and colour was observed after irradiation at high absorbed doses. The microbiological results, following irradiation in the same conditions, correlated with the BOD results. The results obtained highlight the potential of this technology for wastewater treatment.

  19. Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Conditioned Taste Aversion Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    impairment of the synthesis of these cells, especially those in In addition to emesis. exposure to lower doses of ionizing bone marrow. However. since...sions can be produced. using saccharin or sucrose solutions. to ionizing radiation at doses of 15-500 rad significantly re- after injection of a wide...conditioning day attenuated the with the activation of the pituitary/adrenal system. Manipu- acquisition of a CTA to saccharin . However, they adminis

  20. Radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks in radiology; Strahleninduzierte DNA-Doppelstrangbrueche in der Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuefner, M.A. [Dornbirn Hospital (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Brand, M.; Engert, C.; Uder, M. [Erlangen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Schwab, S.A. [Radiologis, Oberasbach (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Shortly after the discovery of X-rays, their damaging effect on biological tissues was observed. The determination of radiation exposure in diagnostic and interventional radiology is usually based on physical measurements or mathematical algorithms with standardized dose simulations. γ-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy is a reliable and sensitive method for the quantification of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in blood lymphocytes. The detectable amount of these DNA damages correlates well with the dose received. However, the biological radiation damage depends not only on dose but also on other individual factors like radiation sensitivity and DNA repair capacity. Iodinated contrast agents can enhance the x-ray induced DNA damage level. After their induction DSB are quickly repaired. A protective effect of antioxidants has been postulated in experimental studies. This review explains the principle of the γ-H2AX technique and provides an overview on studies evaluating DSB in radiologic examinations.

  1. Transurethral coagulation for radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis using Greenlight™ potassium-titanyl-phosphate laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin; Xue, Boxin; Shan, Yuxi; Yang, Dongrong; Zang, Yachen

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to to demonstrate the initial treatment outcomes of Greenlight™ potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP) laser on radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. Hemorrhagic cystitis is a common complication of radiation therapy for pelvic tumors. From September 2004 to February 2011, 10 patients with radiation-induced intractable hemorrhagic cystitis underwent transurethral Greenlight KTP laser coagulation of the bladder. The power setting was limited to 20-30 W. Bleeding stopped in all cases after one session of laser treatment. Mean follow-up time was 17 months (6-36 months). All patients underwent cystoscopy 3 months postoperatively, and no bleeding or significant scar was found. Recurrence of significant bleeding was seen in one case 7 months post-operation, and was again cured by KTP laser. There were no complications from the procedures. Our experience suggests that transurethral coagulation using KTP laser is a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of hemorrhagic radiation cystitis.

  2. Phenytoin Induced Erythema Multiforme after Cranial Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanci, Atilla; Tekkök, İsmail Hakkı

    2015-08-01

    The prophylactic use of phenytoin during and after brain surgery and cranial irradiation is a common measure in brain tumor therapy. Phenytoin has been associated with variety of adverse skin reactions including urticaria, erythroderma, erythema multiforme (EM), Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. EM associated with phenytoin and cranial radiation therapy (EMPACT) is a rare specific entity among patients with brain tumors receiving radiation therapy while on prophylactic anti-convulsive therapy. Herein we report a 41-year-old female patient with left temporal glial tumor who underwent surgery and then received whole brain radiation therapy and chemotherapy. After 24 days of continous prophylactic phenytoin therapy the patient developed minor skin reactions and 2 days later the patient returned with generalized erythamatous and itchy maculopapuler rash involving neck, chest, face, trunk, extremities. There was significant periorbital and perioral edema. Painful mucosal lesions consisting of oral and platal erosions also occurred and prevented oral intake significantly. Phenytoin was discontinued gradually. Systemic admistration of corticosteroids combined with topical usage of steroids for oral lesions resulted in complete resolution of eruptions in 3 weeks. All cutaneous lesions in patients with phenytoin usage with the radiotherapy must be evoluated with suspicion for EM.

  3. Radiation induced degradation of xanthan gum in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayrabolulu, Hande; Demeter, Maria; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Güven, Olgun; Şen, Murat

    2018-03-01

    In our previous study, we have investigated the effect of gamma rays on xanthan gum in the solid state and it was determined that dose rate was an important factor effecting the radiation degradation of xanthan gum. In the present study, in order to provide a better understanding of how ionizing radiation effect xanthan gum, we have investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on aqueous solutions of xanthan at various concentrations (0.5-4%). Xanthan solutions were irradiated with gamma rays in air, at ambient temperature, at different dose rates (0.1-3.3-7.0 kGy/h) and doses (2.5-50 kGy). Change in their molecular weights was followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Chain scission yield (G(S)), and degradation rate constants (k) were calculated. It was determined that, solution concentration was a factor effecting the degradation chemical yield and degradation rate of xanthan gum. Chain scission reactions were more effective for lower solution concentrations.

  4. Electric field deformation in diamond sensors induced by radiation defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de; Boegelspacher, Felix; Dierlamm, Alexander; Mueller, Thomas; Steck, Pia [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (IEKP), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) (Germany); Dabrowski, Anne; Guthoff, Moritz [CERN (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    The BCML system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC. As detectors 32 poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors are positioned in a ring around the beam pipe at a distance of ±1.8 m and ±14.4 m from the interaction point. The radiation hardness of the diamond sensors in terms of measured signal during operation was significantly lower than expected from laboratory measurements. At high particle rates, such as those occurring during the operation of the LHC, a significant fraction of the defects act as traps for charge carriers. This space charge modifies the electrical field in the sensor bulk leading to a reduction of the charge collection efficiency (CCE). A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the Transient Current Technique, the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model the rate dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software ''SILVACO TCAD''. This talk compares the experimental measurement results with the simulations.

  5. Effect of radiation-induced modification in fluoroelastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zen, Heloisa Augusto; Lugao, Ademar Benevolo, E-mail: helozen@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Polymers exposed to ionizing irradiation, even at low doses, often undergo structural changes accompanied by molecular crosslinking and chain scission (degradation) reactions. The general effect of the radiation on polymers is determined by the ratio of crosslinking to chain scission events. This ratio depends on parameters such as chemical structure, physical state, radicals stability and mobility, irradiation rate and irradiation atmosphere. The radiation process is a large used technique to promote modification in their structures to apply them in different areas and is well known for its merits and potential in modifying the chemical and the physical properties of polymeric materials without cause drastic changes in their inherent properties, depend on the dose irradiated. In this study was used fluoroelastomer with 70% - fluor that having excellent thermal, chemical and mechanical properties. Vulcanized and non-vulcanized samples of this material were submitted to gamma radiation under air atmosphere in order to observe the effect of atmosphere in the polymer matrix. The irradiated doses were 5, 10 and 20kGy, at room temperature. The characterization was made by scanning electron microscope (SEM), infrared spectroscopy using attenuate reflectance (ATR-IR) and X-ray diffraction. The results demonstrated which was expected, the degradation reactions were observed. (author)

  6. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects: Evidence for an Adaptive Response to Low Dose Exposures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the induction of bystander effects by low dose, low-LET ionizing radiation and discusses how they may be related to observed adaptive responses or other protective effects of low dose exposures. Bystander effects appear to be the result of a generalized stress response in tissues or cells. The signals may be produced by all exposed cells, but the response appears to require a quorum in order to be expressed. The major response involving low LET radiation exposure discussed in the existing literature is a death response. This has many characteristics of apoptosis but is p53 independent. While a death response might appear to be adverse, the position is argued in this paper that it is in fact protective and removes damaged cells from the population. Since many cell populations carry damaged cells without being exposed to radiation, so called “background damage”, it is possible that low doses exposures cause removal of cells damaged by agents other than the test dose of radiation. This mechanism would lead to the production of “U-shaped” dose response curves. In this scenario, the level of “adaptive” or beneficial response will be related to the background damage carried by the cell population. This model may be important when attempting to predict the consequences of mixed exposures involving radiation and other environmental stressors. PMID:18648593

  7. Radiation Induced Crosslinking of Polyethylene in the Presence of Bifunctional Vinyl Monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, M. S.; Singer, Klaus Albert Julius; Silverman, J.

    1977-01-01

    Several reports have been published showing that the radiation induced grafting of bifunctional vinyl monomers to low density polyethylene results in a product with an unusually high density of crosslinks. The same grafting reactions are shown to reduce the incipient gel dose by more than a factor...... of fifty. This paper is concerned with the apparent crosslinking produced by the radiation grafting of two monomers to polyethylene: acrylic acid and acrylonitrile....

  8. Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Bone Loss and Effects on Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    skeletal sites. Indeed, within five years of radiation treatment at the pelvic region ( cervical , rectal or anal cancer), the risk of hip fracture ...radiation-induced effects at skeletal sites, including bone loss and increased fracture risk at the hip [2-4]. Indeed, the risk of hip fracture within...general population [5-7]. Hip fracture causes considerable morbidity and mortality to cancer patients during the course of treatment and poses a

  9. C/EBPδ deficiency sensitizes mice to ionizing radiation-induced hematopoietic and intestinal injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehalata A Pawar

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the mechanisms involved in the radiation response is critical for developing interventions to mitigate radiation-induced injury to normal tissues. Exposure to radiation leads to increased oxidative stress, DNA-damage, genomic instability and inflammation. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein delta (Cebpd; C/EBPδ is implicated in regulation of these same processes, but its role in radiation response is not known. We investigated the role of C/EBPδ in radiation-induced hematopoietic and intestinal injury using a Cebpd knockout mouse model. Cebpd-/- mice showed increased lethality at 7.4 and 8.5 Gy total-body irradiation (TBI, compared to Cebpd+/+ mice. Two weeks after a 6 Gy dose of TBI, Cebpd-/- mice showed decreased recovery of white blood cells, neutrophils, platelets, myeloid cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells, decreased colony-forming ability of bone marrow progenitor cells, and increased apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells compared to Cebpd+/+ controls. Cebpd-/- mice exhibited a significant dose-dependent decrease in intestinal crypt survival and in plasma citrulline levels compared to Cebpd+/+ mice after exposure to radiation. This was accompanied by significantly decreased expression of γ-H2AX in Cebpd-/- intestinal crypts and villi at 1 h post-TBI, increased mitotic index at 24 h post-TBI, and increase in apoptosis in intestinal crypts and stromal cells of Cebpd-/- compared to Cebpd+/+ mice at 4 h post-irradiation. This study uncovers a novel biological function for C/EBPδ in promoting the response to radiation-induced DNA-damage and in protecting hematopoietic and intestinal tissues from radiation-induced injury.

  10. Hesperidin as radioprotector against radiation-induced lung damage in rat: A histopathological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hassan Haddadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are generated by ionizing radiation, and one of the organs commonly affected by ROS is the lung. Radiation-induced lung injury including pneumonia and lung fibrosis is a dose-limiting factor in radiotherapy (RT of patients with thorax irradiation. Administration of antioxidants has been proved to protect against ROS. The present study was aimed to assess the protective effect of hesperidin (HES against radiation-induced lung injury of male rats. Fifty rats were divided into three groups. G1: Received no HES and radiation (sham. G2: Underwent γ-irradiation to the thorax. G3: Received HES and underwent γ-irradiation. The rats were exposed to a single dose of 18 Gy using cobalt-60 unit and were administered HES (100 mg/kg for 7 days before irradiation. Histopathological analysis was performed 24 h and 8 weeks after RT. Histopathological results in 24 h showed radiation-induced inflammation and presence of more inflammatory cells as compared to G1 (P < 0.05. Administration of HES significantly decreased such an effect when compared to G2 (P < 0.05. Histopathological evaluation in 8 weeks showed a significant increase in mast cells, inflammation, inflammatory cells, alveolar thickness, vascular thickness, pulmonary edema, and fibrosis in G2 when compared to G1 (P < 0.05. HES significantly decreased inflammatory response, fibrosis, and mast cells when compared to G2 (P < 0.05. Administration of HES resulted in decreased radiation pneumonitis and radiation fibrosis in the lung tissue. Thus, the present study showed HES to be an efficient radioprotector against radiation-induced damage in the lung of tissue rats.

  11. Diet-induced obesity modulates epigenetic responses to ionizing radiation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Vares

    Full Text Available Both exposure to ionizing radiation and obesity have been associated with various pathologies including cancer. There is a crucial need in better understanding the interactions between ionizing radiation effects (especially at low doses and other risk factors, such as obesity. In order to evaluate radiation responses in obese animals, C3H and C57BL/6J mice fed a control normal fat or a high fat (HF diet were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy ×4. Bone marrow micronucleus assays did not suggest a modulation of radiation-induced genotoxicity by HF diet. Using MSP, we observed that the promoters of p16 and Dapk genes were methylated in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a HF diet (irradiated and non-irradiated; Mgmt promoter was methylated in irradiated and/or HF diet-fed mice. In addition, methylation PCR arrays identified Ep300 and Socs1 (whose promoters exhibited higher methylation levels in non-irradiated HF diet-fed mice as potential targets for further studies. We then compared microRNA regulations after radiation exposure in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a normal or an HF diet, using microRNA arrays. Interestingly, radiation-triggered microRNA regulations observed in normal mice were not observed in obese mice. miR-466e was upregulated in non-irradiated obese mice. In vitro free fatty acid (palmitic acid, oleic acid administration sensitized AML12 mouse liver cells to ionizing radiation, but the inhibition of miR-466e counteracted this radio-sensitization, suggesting that the modulation of radiation responses by diet-induced obesity might involve miR-466e expression. All together, our results suggested the existence of dietary effects on radiation responses (especially epigenetic regulations in mice, possibly in relationship with obesity-induced chronic oxidative stress.

  12. Diet-induced obesity modulates epigenetic responses to ionizing radiation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Ishii-Ohba, Hiroko; Nenoi, Mitsuru; Nakajima, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Both exposure to ionizing radiation and obesity have been associated with various pathologies including cancer. There is a crucial need in better understanding the interactions between ionizing radiation effects (especially at low doses) and other risk factors, such as obesity. In order to evaluate radiation responses in obese animals, C3H and C57BL/6J mice fed a control normal fat or a high fat (HF) diet were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy ×4). Bone marrow micronucleus assays did not suggest a modulation of radiation-induced genotoxicity by HF diet. Using MSP, we observed that the promoters of p16 and Dapk genes were methylated in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a HF diet (irradiated and non-irradiated); Mgmt promoter was methylated in irradiated and/or HF diet-fed mice. In addition, methylation PCR arrays identified Ep300 and Socs1 (whose promoters exhibited higher methylation levels in non-irradiated HF diet-fed mice) as potential targets for further studies. We then compared microRNA regulations after radiation exposure in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a normal or an HF diet, using microRNA arrays. Interestingly, radiation-triggered microRNA regulations observed in normal mice were not observed in obese mice. miR-466e was upregulated in non-irradiated obese mice. In vitro free fatty acid (palmitic acid, oleic acid) administration sensitized AML12 mouse liver cells to ionizing radiation, but the inhibition of miR-466e counteracted this radio-sensitization, suggesting that the modulation of radiation responses by diet-induced obesity might involve miR-466e expression. All together, our results suggested the existence of dietary effects on radiation responses (especially epigenetic regulations) in mice, possibly in relationship with obesity-induced chronic oxidative stress.

  13. The Effect of Pentoxifylline on Radiation-Induced Cardiac Injury in ICR Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hyun Suk; Yang, Kwang Mo; Kang, Seung Hee; Kang, Yun Kyung [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-15

    Purpose : Chest irradiation leads to a significant cardiac injury in a number of patients. To prevent, or to reduce the risk of radiation-induced cardiac injury, pentoxifylline(PTX), a haemorrheologic agent that improves the blood flow through small blood capillaries has been employed. Materials and Methods : One hundred and eighty ICR mice were divided into three study groups : control, radiation alone, and radiation-pentoxifylline. Each group was subdivided into 12 subgroups: 1,3,6 and 10 days and 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks observation period after irradiation. The total 15 Gy of radiation was delivered in a single fraction through anterior mediastinal port. Pentoxifylline was injected subcutaneously daily 50mg/k to the back of the mice from the first day of irradiation throughout the observation period. The mice of each group after a certain observation period were sacrificed and sectioned for histopathologic examination of the heart. Results : The findings of acute radiation-induced carditis i.e., heterohpilic infiltration and vacuolization and ballooning of endothelial cells were on served upto weeks and reduced sharply afterwards. The late radiation effects including pericarditis with mononuclear cell infiltration, pericardial fibrosis, endothelial cell changes, myocardial degeneration and fibrosis present from 4 weeks onwards after irradiation but with various degree of severity. The overall process of pathologic changes of radiation-pentoxify-acute stage was relatively short and the severity of late cardiac toxicity was much lesser compared with those of radiation alone group. Conclusion : Pentoxifyllline can effectively reduce the late radiation-induced cardiac injury and resolve the acute effects relatively rapidly.

  14. Gamma-radiation-induced corrosion of aluminum alloy: low dose effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjana, K.; Ampornrat, P.; Channuie, J.

    2017-06-01

    Gamma-radiation-induced corrosion of aluminium alloy 6061 (AA6061) immersed in demineralized water was studied at radiation dose up to 206 kGy using a Co-60 gamma radiation source. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the oxide produced on the post-irradiated samples were investigated using SEM-EDS. The electrochemical corrosion potentials (Ecorr ) of the post-irradiated samples were measured. The corrosion behavior of AA6061 appeared to be dose dependent under the experimental conditions. A dramatic change in surface morphology was observed in the samples exposed to gamma radiation at 206 kGy. At this radiation dose the aluminium oxide scale developed can be clearly seen. The results from electrochemical corrosion tests have shown that the corrosion potentials (Ecorr ) can be undoubtedly decreased by gamma irradiation, giving corrosion rate of 7 × 10-4 mm/yr.

  15. Solar ultraviolet radiation induced variations in the stratosphere and mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, L. L.

    1987-01-01

    The detectability and interpretation of short-term solar UV induced responses of middle atmospheric ozone, temperature, and dynamics are reviewed. The detectability of solar UV induced perturbations in the middle atmosphere is studied in terms of seasonal and endogenic dynamical variations. The interpretation of low-latitude ozone and possible temperature responses on the solar rotation time scale is examined. The use of these data to constrain or test photochemical model predictions is discussed.

  16. Low temperature diffusion of hydrogenic species in oxide crystals: Radiation induced diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Gonzalez, R. [Universidad `Carlos III` de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria

    1993-10-01

    Normally stable configurations of substitutional protons or deuterons in oxide crystal become highly unstable during ionizing radiation at room temperature, resulting in the displacements of these species. The cross section for radiation-induced-displacements of protons is exceedingly large and is a strong function of temperature. The displacement cross section of protons from cation sites is twice that of deuterons. Diffusion of these species can be induced at temperatures not otherwise possible by thermal means. For example, using electron irradiation near room temperature the O-H bond is readily broken and the hydrogenic species can be channeled along the c-axis in TiO{sub 2} by an applied electric field. Radiation induced displacements of protons from anion sites (hydride ions) at room temperature are also discussed.

  17. Cinnamon extract ameliorates ionizing radiation-induced cellular injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Khaled Sh; Mostafa, Abdel-Halem A; Ali, Ehab M M; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed A S

    2011-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective role of cinnamon extract against inflammatory and oxidative injuries in gamma irradiated rats. Rats were subjected to fractionated doses of gamma radiation. Cinnamon extract were daily administrated before starting irradiation and continued after radiation exposure. The results obtained revealed that the administration of cinnamon extract to irradiated rats significantly ameliorated the changes induced in liver antioxidant system; catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities as well as reduced glutathione concentration. The liver's lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation indices were significantly decreased when compared with their equivalent values in irradiated rats. Furthermore, the changes induces in xanthine oxidoreductase system were significantly diminished. In addition, the changes in liver nitric oxide contents, serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and C-reactive protein levels were markedly improved. In conclusion, the administration of cinnamon extract might provide substantial protection against radiation-induced oxidative and inflammatory damages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic gastritis with prednisolone: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan; Xie, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Hong; Chen, Yi; Ren, Zheng-Gang

    2012-12-28

    Radiation-induced gastritis is an infrequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. It is a serious complication arising from radiation therapy, and the standard treatment method has not been established. The initial injury is characteristically acute inflammation of gastric mucosa. We presented a 46-year-old male patient with hemorrhagic gastritis induced by external radiotherapy for metastatic retroperitoneal lymph node of hepatocellular carcinoma. The endoscopic examination showed diffuse edematous hyperemicmucosa with telangiectasias in the whole muscosa of the stomach and duodenal bulb. Multiple hemorrhagic patches with active oozing were found over the antrum. Anti-secretary therapy was initiated for hemostasis, but melena still occurred off and on. Finally, he was successfully treated by prednisolone therapy. We therefore strongly argue in favor of perdnisolone therapy to effectively treat patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic gastritis.

  19. Changes in peroxidases associated with radiation-induced sprout inhibition in garlic (Allium sativum L. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, C.A.; Curvetto, N.R.; Orioli, G.A. (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina)); Arguello, J.A. (Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina). Dept. de Biologia Aplicada)

    1991-02-01

    The effects of an acute dose of {gamma}-rays (10 Gy) to post-dormant garlic cloves on inner sprout growth and changes in peroxidases and soluble proteins were evaluated up to 100 days of storage in darkness at 19+-1{sup 0}C and 42+-2% relative humidity. Radiation-induced inhibition of sprout growth became evident after 25 days of treatment and was synchronous with a marked increase in peroxidase activity. Thin-layer isoelectric focusing revealed that radiation induced an increase in the number of anodic peroxidase isoenzymes at 100 days, suggesting modifications in the vascularization process. Neither the soluble protein content nor the protein pattern were affected by irradiation. These results are discussed in terms of a possible mediating effect of peroxidase on radiation-induced sprout inhibition in garlic. (author).

  20. The Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in cranial irradiated Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Xue, Bei; Wang, Xinwen; Wang, Jiawen

    2016-07-01

    Heavy-ion radiation could lead to bystander effect in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. The exact mechanisms of radiation-induced bystander effect in distant organ remain obscure, yet accumulating evidence points to the role of DNA methylation changes in bystander effect. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were cranial exposed to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of carbon heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. The γH2AX foci as the DNA damage biomarker in directly irradiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 0, 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplifcation polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that cranial irradiated mice could induce the γH2AX foci and genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly irradiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate were highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation in ear. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. We also found that the numbers of γH2AX foci and the genomic methylation changes of heavy-ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo. Keywords: Heavy-ion radiation; Bystander effect; DNA methylation; γH2

  1. Characterization of a novel epigenetic effect of ionizing radiation: the death-inducing effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Shruti; Smith, Leslie E.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The detrimental effects associated with exposure to ionizing radiation have long been thought to result from the direct targeting of the nucleus leading to DNA damage; however, the emergence of concepts such as radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects have challenged this dogma. After cellular exposure to ionizing radiation, we have isolated a number of clones of Chinese hamster-human hybrid GM10115 cells that demonstrate genomic instability as measured by chromosomal destabilization. These clones show dynamic and persistent generation of chromosomal rearrangements multiple generations after the original insult. We hypothesize that these unstable clones maintain this delayed instability phenotype by secreting factors into the culture medium. To test this hypothesis we transferred filtered medium from unstable cells to unirradiated GM10115 cells. No GM10115 cells were able to survive this medium. This phenomenon by which GM10115 cells die when cultured in medium from chromosomally unstable GM10115 clones is the death-inducing effect. Medium transfer experiments indicate that a factor or factors is/are secreted by unstable cells within 8 h of growth in fresh medium and result in cell killing within 24 h. These factors are stable at ambient temperature but do not survive heating or freezing, and are biologically active when diluted with fresh medium. We present the initial description and characterization of the death-inducing effect. This novel epigenetic effect of radiation has implications for radiation risk assessment and for health risks associated with radiation exposure.

  2. Overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12) correlates with radiation-induced lung fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Myung Gu; Jeong, Ye Ji; Lee, Haejune [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sujae [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    MMPs are classified into five subgroups: collagenases (MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-13), gelatinases (MMP-2, MMP-9), stromelysins (MMP-3, MMP-10, MMP-11), as well as metalloelastase (MMP-12), the membrane-type MMPs (MMP14, MMP15), and other MMPS (e. g., MMP-19, and MMP20). MMP-12 (matrix metalloproteinase12), also known as macrophage metalloelastase, was first identified as an elastolytic metalloproteinase secreted by inflammatory macrophages 30 years ago. MMP-12 degrades extracellular matrix (ECM) components to facilitate tissue remodeling. It can degrade elastin and other substrates, such as type IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, gelatin, vitronectin, entactin, heparin, and chondroitin sulfates. In the lung, MMP-12 is identified in alveolar macrophages of cigarette smokers as an elastolytic MMP. Inactivation of the MMP-12 gene in knockout mice demonstrates a critical role of MMP-12 in smoking-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of MMP-12 by radiation in lung, so we evaluate that MMP-12 expression pattern in normal lung tissue and cancer cell following radiation. Radiation induced lung injury most commonly occurs as a result of radiation therapy administered to treat cancer. The present study demonstrates that MMP-12 was highly increased in the lung damaged by radiation Thus, MMP-12 might be of potential relevance as a clinically diagnostic tool and sensitive biomarker for radiation induced lung injury and fibrosis.

  3. The protective effects of vitamin C on hepatotoxicity induced by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Ki Jung; Park, Sung Kwang; Cho, Heung Lae [Pusan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ki Mun; Chai, Gyu Young; Chung, Duck Wha [Gyungsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jin Soon [Jinju International University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    This study was carried out to determine the protective effects of vitamin C on the hepatotoxicity induced by radiation. The Spraque Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups; the control group, the radiation exposed group, and the radiation and vitamin C-treated group. SOD activity catalase, malondialdehyde and liver enzymes were analyzed to assess the antioxidant effects of vitamin C. The increased level of malondialdehyde and the decreased catalase activity that were induced by radiation were improved after vitamin C but were was no statistical significance among three groups. The superoxide dismutase activity of the liver was increased by vitamin C, but there were no statistically significant differences between the vitamin C-treated group and the non vitamin C-treated group. The level of liver enzymes in sera such as glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, lactate dehyrogenase and alkaline phosphatase were remarkably elevated by radiation. The levels of those enzymes were decreased in the vitamin C-treated group and statistical significance was noted for the GPT level ({rho} < 0.01). On the electromicrographic findings, the hepatic cell destruction was considerably decreased in the vitamin C-treated group. Vitamin C is thought to be an effective antioxidant against the hepatotoxicity induced by radiation.

  4. Radiation-induced damage to mitochondrial D-. beta. -hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and lipid peroxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, O.; Nakazawa, T. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)); Miyahara, M.; Shiraishi, N. (Kochi Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Medical Biology)

    1985-07-01

    Radiation-induced damage to the reconstituted system of membrane-bound enzyme, D-..beta.. hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase obtained from rat liver mitochondria, was investigated in relation to the lipid peroxidation of membranes. The D-..beta.. hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase in fresh mitochondria was very low in general and not affected by irradiation because of little incorporation of substrates into mitochondria. Enzyme activity in one-day-aged mitochondria or submitochondrial particles was five times higher than that of fresh mitochondria and decreased with increasing radiation dose accompanying the increase in peroxidation of membrane lipids. D-..beta..-hydroxyl-butyrate dehydrogenase activity in the reconstituted system of the purified enzyme with irradiated liver microsomes or irradiated liposomes was decreased considerably in comparison with either unirradiated control or irradiated enzyme. Radiation-induced decrease in the enzyme activity was thought to be caused mainly by peroxidation of membrane lipids and not due to direct damage by radiation to the enzyme molecule itself. Irradiation of microsomes caused decreases in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine content and an increase in lysophosphatidylcholine content. Arachidonic acid contents in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine were also markedly decreased with increasing radiation dose. These results are discussed in terms of a mechanism involving radiation-induced damage to membrane function and structures.

  5. Radiation-Induced Cataractogenesis: A Critical Literature Review for the Interventional Radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seals, Kevin F., E-mail: KSeals@mednet.ucla.edu; Lee, Edward W., E-mail: EdwardLee@mednet.ucla.edu [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, UCLA Medical Center (United States); Cagnon, Christopher H., E-mail: CCagnon@mednet.ucla.edu [University of California at Los Angeles, Department of Radiology (United States); Al-Hakim, Ramsey A., E-mail: RAlhakim@mednet.ucla.edu; Kee, Stephen T., E-mail: SKee@mednet.ucla.edu [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, UCLA Medical Center (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Extensive research supports an association between radiation exposure and cataractogenesis. New data suggests that radiation-induced cataracts may form stochastically, without a threshold and at low radiation doses. We first review data linking cataractogenesis with interventional work. We then analyze the lens dose typical of various procedures, factors modulating dose, and predicted annual dosages. We conclude by critically evaluating the literature describing techniques for lens protection, finding that leaded eyeglasses may offer inadequate protection and exploring the available data on alternative strategies for cataract prevention.

  6. Measurements of Ionizing Radiation Doses Induced by High Irradiance Laser on Targets in LCLS MEC Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Liu, J. C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Prinz, A. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rokni, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tran, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Woods, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Xia, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Galter, e. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lee, H. -J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Milathianaki, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nagler, B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Comprehensive measurements for photon and neutron radiation doses generated from laser-plasma interaction at SLAC’s MEC laser facility have been conducted. The goals of the measurements were to; determine the radiation dose per laser shot as a function of laser, optic and target parameters that are relevant to the MEC laser operations; validate the RPD-developed analytic model for photon dose calculations; and evaluate the performance of various types of passive and active detectors in the laser-induced radiation fields.

  7. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeluts, A A; Esaulkov, M N; Kosareva, O G; Solyankin, P M; Shkurinov, A P [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gapeyev, A B; Pashovkin, T N [Institute of Cell Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Matyunin, S N [Section of Applied Problems at the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nazarov, M M [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Cherkasova, O P [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-28

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 – 200 μW cm{sup -2} within the frequency range of 0.1 – 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes. (biophotonics)

  8. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeluts, A. A.; Gapeyev, A. B.; Esaulkov, M. N.; Kosareva, O. G.; Matyunin, S. N.; Nazarov, M. M.; Pashovkin, T. N.; Solyankin, P. M.; Cherkasova, O. P.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 - 200 μW cm-2 within the frequency range of 0.1 - 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes.

  9. Development of radiation biological dosimetry and treatment of radiation-induced damaged tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil [and others

    2000-04-01

    Util now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline(triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the apoptotic fragment assay, PCC, comet assay, and micronucleus assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiated dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with chromosome dosimetry and micronucleus assay.

  10. Radiation related basic cancer research : research for radiation induced tumor cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Hong, Seok Il; Cho, Kyung Ja; Kim, Byung Gi; Lee, Kee Ho; Nam, Myung Jin

    1999-04-01

    The radioresistant clones was established from human U251 glioblastoma cell line through intermittently exposed to 3 Gy gamma-radiation for six months. Treatment of SNU-16 cells with various doses of radiation, TNF alpha and PMA resulted in a decrease in cell viability. The results prove that cell death of SNU16 is a apoptosis mediated by caspase-3. We have examined the expression of bcl-2 and c-myc in cervical cancer specimens and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to determine the role of coexpression of bcl-3 and c-myc during progression into cervical cancer. The frequent alterations in FHIT expression in many cervical carcinomas and their cell lines suggest that FHIT gene alterations are pla a role in cervical tumorigenesis. According to these correlation between the viability and apoptosis of RD cells, the proper range of the dosage for the investigation of differentiation potency in RD cells was assessed as 1 to 3Gy.

  11. Radiation enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  12. Extracellular Vesicles Mediate Radiation-Induced Systemic Bystander Signals in the Bone Marrow and Spleen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmári, Tünde; Kis, Dávid; Bogdándi, Enikő Noémi; Benedek, Anett; Bright, Scott; Bowler, Deborah; Persa, Eszter; Kis, Enikő; Balogh, Andrea; Naszályi, Lívia N.; Kadhim, Munira; Sáfrány, Géza; Lumniczky, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects refer to the induction of biological changes in cells not directly hit by radiation implying that the number of cells affected by radiation is larger than the actual number of irradiated cells. Recent in vitro studies suggest the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in mediating radiation-induced bystander signals, but in vivo investigations are still lacking. Here, we report an in vivo study investigating the role of EVs in mediating radiation effects. C57BL/6 mice were total-body irradiated with X-rays (0.1, 0.25, 2 Gy), and 24 h later, EVs were isolated from the bone marrow (BM) and were intravenously injected into unirradiated (so-called bystander) animals. EV-induced systemic effects were compared to radiation effects in the directly irradiated animals. Similar to direct radiation, EVs from irradiated mice induced complex DNA damage in EV-recipient animals, manifested in an increased level of chromosomal aberrations and the activation of the DNA damage response. However, while DNA damage after direct irradiation increased with the dose, EV-induced effects peaked at lower doses. A significantly reduced hematopoietic stem cell pool in the BM as well as CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte pool in the spleen was detected in mice injected with EVs isolated from animals irradiated with 2 Gy. These EV-induced alterations were comparable to changes present in the directly irradiated mice. The pool of TLR4-expressing dendritic cells was different in the directly irradiated mice, where it increased after 2 Gy and in the EV-recipient animals, where it strongly decreased in a dose-independent manner. A panel of eight differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNA) was identified in the EVs originating from both low- and high-dose-irradiated mice, with a predicted involvement in pathways related to DNA damage repair, hematopoietic, and immune system regulation, suggesting a direct involvement of these pathways in mediating radiation-induced

  13. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balentova, Sona; Adamkov, Marian

    2015-11-24

    Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors.

  14. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Balentova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors.

  15. Gamma radiation induced effects on slaughterhouse wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Rita [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)], E-mail: ritamelo@itn.pt; Cabo Verde, Sandra [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Branco, Joaquim [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Botelho, M. Luisa [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2008-01-15

    A preliminary study using gamma radiation on slaughterhouse wastewater samples was carried out. Chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids (TSS) results were obtained at a dose rate of 0.9 kGy h{sup -1}. A decrease of COD, BOD and colour was observed after irradiation at high absorbed doses. The microbiological results, following irradiation in the same conditions, correlated with the BOD results. The results obtained highlight the potential of this technology for wastewater treatment.

  16. Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Alteration of Martian Surface Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    The nature and origin of martian surface materials cannot be fully characterized without addressing the unusual reactivity of the soil and the effects of exposure to the unique martian environment. Our laboratory experiments show that ultraviolet radiation at the martian surface can result in the oxidation of metal atoms and the creation of reactive oxygen species on grain surfaces. This process is important in understanding the nature and evolution of martian soils. It can explain the reactivity discovered by the Viking Landers and possibly the origin of the ferric component of the soil.

  17. Radiation induced luminescence processes in c-BN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkler, L.; Berzina, B.; Benabdesselam, M.

    2004-01-01

    Spectral properties of cubic boron nitride have been studied using methods of photoluminescence (PL), X-ray excited luminescence (XL), thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence. It is found that emission of cubic boron nitride is presented by 4 subbands, their relative yield...... is determined by the excitation type: blue, green (dominant) and red bands are observed in PL, ultraviolet, blue (dominant), green and red bands-in XL. Three thermal peaks are found in TL curves in the 0-700degreesC temperature range, their presence and intensity depend on radiation type used. A tentative...

  18. Multiscale physics of ion-induced radiation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, A V

    2014-01-01

    This is a review of a multiscale approach to the physics of ion-beam cancer therapy, an approach suggested in order to understand the interplay of a large number of phenomena involved in the radiation damage scenario occurring on a range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. We describe different effects that take place on different scales and play major roles in the scenario of interaction of ions with tissue. The understanding of these effects allows an assessment of relative biological effectiveness that relates the physical quantities, such as dose, to the biological values, such as the probability of cell survival. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hard tooth tissue removal by short and long Er:YAG or Er,Cr:YSGG mid-infrared laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínková, H.; Dostálová, T.; Remeš, M.; Šulc, J.; Němec, M.; Fibrich, M.

    2017-02-01

    Hard dental tissue removal by laser radiation is an alternative treatment to conventional dental-drilling procedures. The advantages of this therapy are fast and localized treatment of hard dental tissue and painlessness. The most effective systems for those purposes are Er-lasers generating radiation at wavelengths of around 3 μm. The aim of this study was qualitative and quantitative examination of human dentin and ivory tissue removal by pulsed free-running (FR) and Q-switched (QSW) Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser radiations. From the obtained results it follows that generally Er:YAG laser has lower threshold for the tissue removal in both FR and QSW regimes. Furthermore, the FR Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG radiation can be effective for both dentin and ivory ablation and can prepare smooth cavities without side effects. The QSW regime is useful preferably for precise ablation of a starting tooth defect and for the part of the tooth very close to the gum. This regime is excellent for micro-preparation or for tooth treatment of children.

  20. Estimating the excess lifetime risk of radiation induced secondary malignancy (SMN) in pediatric patients treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI): Conventional radiation therapy versus helical intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jordan A; Chera, Bhishamjit S; Brenner, David J; Shuryak, Igor; Wilson, Adam K; Lehman-Davis, Misty; Fried, David V; Somasundaram, Vivek; Lian, Jun; Cullip, Tim; Marks, Lawrence B

    To quantify the risk of radiation-induced second malignancies (SMN) in pediatric patients receiving craniospinal irradiation (CSI) either with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (Conv CSI) or tomotherapy helical intensity modulated radiation therapy (Tomo CSI). A novel predictive model that accounts for short- and long-term carcinogenesis was incorporated into our institutional treatment planning system to quantify the lifetime risk of SMN in incidentally irradiated organs. Five pediatric patients previously treated with CSI were studied. For each case, Conv CSI and Tomo CSI plans were computed. The excess absolute number of SMN was computed for each plan for each patient. For female patients, age was varied to assess its impact. Tomo CSI has a much higher risk than Conv CSI for breast cancer. Tomo has a slightly increased risk for the lung, and conventional has a slightly higher risk for the thyroid. Both techniques have intermediate risks to the pancreas and stomach, and lesser risks to the bladder and rectum. For the breast, the magnitude of the absolute risks varied with age: 14.2% versus 7.4% (Tomo vs Conv) age 5; 16.9% versus 7.6% age 10, and 18.6% versus 8.0% age 15. Tomo has a higher risk for inducing breast and lung second cancers, and when using Tomo-based intensity modulated radiation therapy, care should be taken to avoid incidental radiation to the breast. When planning CSI, one needs to balance these cancer risks against other normal tissue effects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Radiation induced myxoma of superior vena cava origin presenting as a right atrial mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzi, F; Faraji, R

    2014-01-01

    Myxomas are the most common benign cardiac tumors. Myxomas are more common in the left heart chamber than the right side chamber. An extracardiac origin presenting as a right atrial mass is very rare. Right-sided tumors are considerably less common than left-sided tumors, and however myxoma of great vessels origin presenting as right atrial masses are rare but radiation induced villous myxoma in superior vena cava (SVC) is exceedingly rare tumor. A case of radiation induced myxoma originating in a previously undescribed location and presenting as a right atrial mass is reported.

  2. Terahertz Photovoltaic Detection of Cyclotron Resonance in the Regime of Radiation-Induced Magnetoresistance Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    these radiation-induced oscillations do overlap the more-rapidly- varying-with-B Shubnikov–de Haas ( SdH ) oscillations; see also Refs. 17, 21, and 22. A... SdH Oscillations RIMRO FIG. 2. (Color online) Microwave (f < 300 GHz) and terahertz (f 300 GHz) radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in...Shubnikov–de Haas ( SdH ) oscillations. A subset of oscillations of each type are marked on the figure. The solid vertical lines below 0.1 T marks the

  3. Antimicrobial fabric adsorbed iodine produced by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Shoji; Fujiwara, Kunio; Sugo, Takanobu; Suzuki, Koichi

    2013-03-01

    Antimicrobial fabric was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of N-vinyl pyrrolidone onto polyolefine nonwoven fabric and subsequent adsorption of iodine. In response of the huge request for the antimicrobial material applied to face masks for swine flu in 2009, operation procedure of continuous radiation-induced graft polymerization apparatus was improved. The improved grafting production per week increased 3.8 times compared to the production by former operation procedure. Shipped antimicrobial fabric had reached 130,000 m2 from June until December, 2009.

  4. Effect of acoustic, deformation on radiation-induced luminescence of pyrolytic boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Kardashev, B K; Plaksin, O A; Stepanov, V A; Stepanov, P A; Chernov, V M

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the ultrasound oscillations with the frequency of approximately 100 kHz on the radiation-induced luminescence on the pyrolytic boron nitride, originating by the protons irradiation (the energy of 8 MeV, the flux of 1.6 x 10 sup 1 sup 2 p/cm s), is studied. The impact of the ultrasound oscillations manifests itself by high deformation amplitudes (approximately 10 sup - sup 4), when the nonlinear, amplitude-dependent ultrasound absorption is observed. The obtained data are explained by the change in the kinetics of recrystallization, induced by irradiation, whereby the disappearance (radiation annealing) of the small angle boundaries occurs

  5. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Induced Radiation Sensitization Effects on Human Cancer Cells after Photon and Hadron Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariungerel Gerelchuluun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA is a histone deacetylase inhibitor, which has been widely utilized throughout the cancer research field. SAHA-induced radiosensitization in normal human fibroblasts AG1522 and lung carcinoma cells A549 were evaluated with a combination of γ-rays, proton, and carbon ion exposure. Growth delay was observed in both cell lines during SAHA treatment; 2 μM SAHA treatment decreased clonogenicity and induced cell cycle block in G1 phase but 0.2 μM SAHA treatment did not show either of them. Low LET (Linear Energy Transfer irradiated A549 cells showed radiosensitization effects on cell killing in cycling and G1 phase with 0.2 or 2 μM SAHA pretreatment. In contrast, minimal sensitization was observed in normal human cells after low and high LET radiation exposure. The potentially lethal damage repair was not affected by SAHA treatment. SAHA treatment reduced the rate of γ-H2AX foci disappearance and suppressed RAD51 and RPA (Replication Protein A focus formation. Suppression of DNA double strand break repair by SAHA did not result in the differences of SAHA-induced radiosensitization between human cancer cells and normal cells. In conclusion, our results suggest SAHA treatment will sensitize cancer cells to low and high LET radiation with minimum effects to normal cells.

  6. [Radiation arteritis- and radiodermitis-induced leg ulcer: surgical revascularization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branellec, A; Bureau, J M; Gigou, F; Matichard, E; Debure, C

    2006-02-01

    A forty-four-year old man was hospitalized for diagnosis and treatment of a left leg ulcer which did not heal despite good compliance with a three-month medical regimen. Twenty years before he had undergone surgical curettage and radiotherapy (81 gy) for an osteosarcoma of the upper third of the left tibia. He was considered completely cured with regular findings. On examination he had a 5 X 7 cm deep ulcer with raised margins and no signs of infection, localized on the radiodermatitis on the medial aspect of his left leg. Arterial examination confirmed the left arteriopathy with absence of distal pulses; the Ankle Brachial Pressure Index was 0.69 and the foot TcPO2 27 mmHg. Arteriography confirmed the localized left lesions with three distal popliteal and proximal arterial occlusions, all other arteries being strictly normal. Arterial and dermatological radiation leg ulcer was retained as the etiological diagnosis. As the ulcer was very painful, extensive and limited walking distance, surgical revascularisation was undertaken because endoluminal revascularization was impossible. A femoroperoneal saphenous bypass was performed with surgical incisions beyond the radiodermatitis area. Two months after a split skin graft, the ulcer was considered healed and the patency of the by-pass confirmed on duplex examination. This is the first case report of a successful distal by-pass performed for radiation arteritis and ulcer healing. Long-term follow up should be reported.

  7. [NLRP3 inflammasome induces pyroptosis in lung tissues of radiation-induced lung injury in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rong; Wu, Dongming; Deng, Shihua; Liu, Teng; Zhang, Ting; Xu, Ying

    2017-09-01

    Objective To establish a radiation-induced lung injury model and investigate the role of caspase-1-dependent programmed cell death (pyroptosis) in the pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis. Methods BALB/c mice were sacrificed after receiving 5-day 15 Gy X-ray irradiation at chest cavity. The pathological changes of pulmonary tissues were observed by HE staining. The apoptosis of lung tissues cells after irradiation was detected by TUNEL assay. The expressions of γ-H2AX, ki67, NLR family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3), caspase-1, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC/TMS-1) were detected by Western blot analysis. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to check mRNA levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), NLRP3, caspase-1, IL-1β and IL-18. Immunohistochemical staining was used to determine the expressions of NLRP3, caspase-1 and TMS1 in lung tissues. The activity of caspase-1 was evaluated by caspase-1 assay kit, and the serum levels of IL-1β and IL-18 were detected by ELISA. Results After irradiation, the capillaries of the alveolar wall of the mice were dilated and congested, inflammatory cells infiltrated, the alveolar wall thickened. Positive rate of lung tissue cells was raised in TUNEL staining. The expressions of γ-H2AX and ki67 were elevated, indicating that DNA damage and cell proliferation activity decreased in lung tissues. The mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and MCP-1 in lung cells increased; the serum levels of IL-1β and IL-18 increased; the expressions of IL-1β, IL-18, NLRP3, caspase-1 and ASC/TMS-1 in lung tissues were enhanced; and caspase-1 activity increased. Conclusion After irradiation, the pyroptosis caused by the activation of NLRP3 inflammatory body occurred in the lung tissue of mice.

  8. Assessing caries removal by undergraduate dental students using quantitative light-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Adejumoke A; Jarad, Fadi D; Komarov, Gleb N; Pender, Neil; Higham, Susan M

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare detection of enamel and dentinal caries by dental students' and faculty members' visual inspection and by quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). The overall aim was to determine whether QLF is an appropriate technique for use in clinical skills laboratories as a teaching aid for dental undergraduates to detect and assess the removal of enamel and dentinal caries. Sixty students who had no clinical experience with dental caries were asked to select . suitably decayed teeth and mount them in plaster. After recording baseline QLF images, students removed caries according to instructions given by the clinical tutor. On completion of the exercise, the teeth were visually determined to be caries-free by the student, then confirmed by the clinical tutor. A fluorescein in alcohol solution was injected into the cavity for two minutes, rinsed, and dried before QLF images were captured. The images were visually analyzed by two examiners for the presence or absence of caries. From seventy-four images recorded, seventeen were excluded due to exposure of the pulp chamber. The remaining fifty-seven teeth, which by clinical visual examination were judged to be caries-free, were examined using QLF. Fifty-three percent were found to be caries-free, while 47 percent were carious. In this sample of fifty-seven teeth judged to be caries-free by both dental students and faculty members, QLF thus detected caries in almost half of these teeth. These findings suggest that QLF is a useful, noninvasive, nondestructive technique for the detection of caries and can serve as an adjunct to chair-side diagnosis and management of dental caries, which is typically accomplished by visual inspection. QLF may be useful and appropriate as an objective clinical teaching aid for the assessment of dental caries.

  9. Heavy-ion radiation induced Photosynthesis changes in Oryza sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Xishan; Meng, Qingmei

    The abnormal development of rice was observed frequently after the seed was exposed to heavy-ion radiation. The heavy-ion radiation could change the chloroplast structure in mesophyll cell by decreasing chloroplast grana and loosing the thylakoid lamellas. To study the mechanism of heavy-ion radiation induced photosynthesis changes, rice seed was exposed to 0-20 Gy dose of (12) C radiation. By measuring the changes of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, the content of chlorophyll as well as the expression of CP24 in the leaves of rice at the three-leaf stage, we analyzed the influence mechanism of heavy-ion radiation on photosynthesis in rice. The results indicated that chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm and content of chlorophyll (including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll) changed significantly in different doses. Both the relative expression of CP24 and its encoding gene lhcb6 altered after exposed to different dose of radiation. By using Pearson correlation analysis, we found that the 1 Gy was the bound of low-dose radiation. The possible molecular mechanisms and biological consequences of the observed changes are discussed. Key Words: Heavy-ion Radiation; Rice; Photosynthesis; Fv/Fm; CP24.

  10. Space-type radiation induces multimodal responses in the mouse gut microbiome and metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casero, David; Gill, Kirandeep; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Nelson, Gregory; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan; Braun, Jonathan; Cheema, Amrita K

    2017-08-18

    Space travel is associated with continuous low dose rate exposure to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Pathophysiological manifestations after low dose radiation exposure are strongly influenced by non-cytocidal radiation effects, including changes in the microbiome and host gene expression. Although the importance of the gut microbiome in the maintenance of human health is well established, little is known about the role of radiation in altering the microbiome during deep-space travel. Using a mouse model for exposure to high LET radiation, we observed substantial changes in the composition and functional potential of the gut microbiome. These were accompanied by changes in the abundance of multiple metabolites, which were related to the enzymatic activity of the predicted metagenome by means of metabolic network modeling. There was a complex dynamic in microbial and metabolic composition at different radiation doses, suggestive of transient, dose-dependent interactions between microbial ecology and signals from the host's cellular damage repair processes. The observed radiation-induced changes in microbiota diversity and composition were analyzed at the functional level. A constitutive change in activity was found for several pathways dominated by microbiome-specific enzymatic reactions like carbohydrate digestion and absorption and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, while the activity in other radiation-responsive pathways like phosphatidylinositol signaling could be linked to dose-dependent changes in the abundance of specific taxa. The implication of microbiome-mediated pathophysiology after low dose ionizing radiation may be an unappreciated biologic hazard of space travel and deserves experimental validation. This study provides a conceptual and analytical basis of further investigations to increase our understanding of the chronic effects of space radiation on human health, and points to potential new targets for intervention in adverse radiation

  11. Carbon Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Biological effects on Oryza sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Xishan; Gong, Ning; Meng, Qingmei; Liu, Jiawei; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Large number of researches on rice after spaceflights indicated that rice was a favorable model organism to study biological effects induced by space radiation. The stimulative effect could often be found on rice seedlings after irradiation by low-dose energetic heavy-ion radiation. Spaceflight also could induce stimulative effect on kinds of seeds. To further understand the mechanism of low-dose radiation biological effects and the dose range, the germinated rice seeds which were irradiated by different doses of carbon heavy-ion (0, 0.02, 0.1, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20Gy, LET=27.3keV/µm) were used as materials to study. By investigating the variation of rice phenotype under different doses, we found that 2Gy radiation dose was a dividing point of the phenotypic variation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the variation of mitochondria, chloroplast, endoplasmic reticulum, ribosome and nucleus in mesophyll cell of rice apical meristem at 24 hours after radiation with different doses. The cells were not apparently physiologically damaged when the dose of radiation was less than 2Gy. The number of chloroplast did not change significantly, but the number of mitochondria was significantly increased, and gathered around in the chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum; the obvious lesion of chloroplast and mitochondria were found at the mesophyll cells when radiation dose was higher than 2Gy. The mitochondria were swelling and appearing blurred crest. The chloroplast and mitochondrial mutation rate increased significantly (pradiation mainly occurred at three-leaf stage along with the increasing activity of antioxidase system and damages of lipid peroxidation. We also found that the relative expression of genes sdhb and aox1a which encode the key proteins in mitochondria changed differently after exposed to different doses of radiation, and the lower dose of the radiation could cause longer effect. The chlorophyll was an important organ of photosynthesis

  12. Low Dose Radiation Overcomes Diabetes-induced Suppression of Hippocampal Neuronal Cell Proliferation in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Ki; Hong, Seong-Eon; Lee, Taeck-Hyun; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of low dose radiation on diabetes induced suppression of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat. After 0.01 Gy, 0.1 Gy, 1 Gy and 10 Gy radiation was delivered, the dentate gyrus of hippocampus of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats were evaluated using immunohistochemistry for 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU), caspase-3, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining. The number of BrdU positive cells in the non-diabetic rats, diabetic rats without radiation, diabetic rats with 0.01 Gy radiation, diabetic rats with 0.1 Gy radiation, diabetic rats with 1 Gy radiation and diabetic rats with 10 Gy radiation were 55.4±8.5/mm2, 33.3±6.4/mm2, 67.7±10.5/mm2, 66.6±10.0/mm2, 23.5±6.3/mm2and 14.3±7.2/mm2, respectively. The number of caspase-3 positive cells was 132.6±37.4/mm2, 378.6±99.1/mm2, 15.0±2.8/mm2, 57.1±16.9/mm2, 191.8±44.8/mm2and 450.4±58.3/mm2, respectively. The number of TUNEL-positive cells was 24.5±2.0/mm2, 21.7±4.0/mm2, 20.4±2.0/mm2, 18.96±2.1/mm2, 58.3±7.9/mm2, and 106.0±9.8/mm2, respectively. These results suggest low doses of radiation paradoxically improved diabetes induced neuronal cell suppression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat. PMID:16778397

  13. The different radiation response and radiation-induced bystander effects in colorectal carcinoma cells differing in p53 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, Maria; Lalik, Anna; Krzywon, Aleksandra; Poleszczuk, Jan; Fujarewicz, Krzysztof; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2015-08-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect, appearing as different biological changes in cells that are not directly exposed to ionizing radiation but are under the influence of molecular signals secreted by irradiated neighbors, have recently attracted considerable interest due to their possible implication for radiotherapy. However, various cells present diverse radiosensitivity and bystander responses that depend, inter alia, on genetic status including TP53, the gene controlling the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. Here we compared the ionizing radiation and bystander responses of human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells with wild type or knockout TP53 using a transwell co-culture system. The viability of exposed to X-rays (0-8 Gy) and bystander cells of both lines showed a roughly comparable decline with increasing dose. The frequency of micronuclei was also comparable at lower doses but at higher increased considerably, especially in bystander TP53-/- cells. Moreover, the TP53-/- cells showed a significantly elevated frequency of apoptosis, while TP53+/+ counterparts expressed high level of senescence. The cross-matched experiments where irradiated cells of one line were co-cultured with non-irradiated cells of opposite line show that both cell lines were also able to induce bystander effects in their counterparts, however different endpoints revealed with different strength. Potential mediators of bystander effects, IL-6 and IL-8, were also generated differently in both lines. The knockout cells secreted IL-6 at lower doses whereas wild type cells only at higher doses. Secretion of IL-8 by TP53-/- control cells was many times lower than that by TP53+/+ but increased significantly after irradiation. Transcription of the NFκBIA was induced in irradiated TP53+/+ mainly, but in bystanders a higher level was observed in TP53-/- cells, suggesting that TP53 is required for induction of NFκB pathway after irradiation but another mechanism of activation must operate in

  14. Chronic Intake of Japanese Sake Mediates Radiation-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Mouse Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Nakajima

    Full Text Available Sake is a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage that is gaining popularity worldwide. Although sake is reported to have beneficial health effects, it is not known whether chronic sake consumption modulates health risks due to radiation exposure or other factors. Here, the effects of chronic administration of sake on radiation-induced metabolic alterations in the livers of mice were evaluated. Sake (junmai-shu was administered daily to female mice (C3H/He for one month, and the mice were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy/day for the last four days of the sake administration period. For comparative analysis, a group of mice were administered 15% (v/v ethanol in water instead of sake. Metabolites in the liver were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry one day following the last exposure to radiation. The metabolite profiles of mice chronically administered sake in combination with radiation showed marked changes in purine, pyrimidine, and glutathione (GSH metabolism, which were only partially altered by radiation or sake administration alone. Notably, the changes in GSH metabolism were not observed in mice treated with radiation following chronic administration of 15% ethanol in water. Changes in several metabolites, including methionine and valine, were induced by radiation alone, but were not detected in the livers of mice who received chronic administration of sake. In addition, the chronic administration of sake increased the level of serum triglycerides, although radiation exposure suppressed this increase. Taken together, the present findings suggest that chronic sake consumption promotes GSH metabolism and anti-oxidative activities in the liver, and thereby may contribute to minimizing the adverse effects associated with radiation.

  15. Ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress alters miRNA expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Simone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, highly conserved, non-coding RNA that alter protein expression and regulate multiple intracellular processes, including those involved in the response to cellular stress. Alterations in miRNA expression may occur following exposure to several stress-inducing anticancer agents including ionizing radiation, etoposide, and hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Normal human fibroblasts were exposed to radiation, H(2O(2, or etoposide at doses determined by clonogenic cell survival curves. Total RNA was extracted and miRNA expression was determined by microarray. Time course and radiation dose responses were determined using RT-PCR for individual miRNA species. Changes in miRNA expression were observed for 17 miRNA species following exposure to radiation, 23 after H(2O(2 treatment, and 45 after etoposide treatment. Substantial overlap between the miRNA expression changes between agents was observed suggesting a signature miRNA response to cell stress. Changes in the expression of selected miRNA species varied in response to radiation dose and time. Finally, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS increased with increasing doses of radiation and pre-treatment with the thiol antioxidant cysteine decreased both ROS production and the miRNA response to radiation. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate a common miRNA expression signature in response to exogenous genotoxic agents including radiation, H(2O(2, and etoposide. Additionally, pre-treatment with cysteine prevented radiation-induced alterations in miRNA expression which suggests that miRNAs are responsive to oxidative stress. Taken together, these results imply that miRNAs play a role in cellular defense against exogenous stress and are involved in the generalized cellular response to genotoxic oxidative stress.

  16. Chronic Intake of Japanese Sake Mediates Radiation-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Mouse Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Sake is a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage that is gaining popularity worldwide. Although sake is reported to have beneficial health effects, it is not known whether chronic sake consumption modulates health risks due to radiation exposure or other factors. Here, the effects of chronic administration of sake on radiation-induced metabolic alterations in the livers of mice were evaluated. Sake (junmai-shu) was administered daily to female mice (C3H/He) for one month, and the mice were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy/day) for the last four days of the sake administration period. For comparative analysis, a group of mice were administered 15% (v/v) ethanol in water instead of sake. Metabolites in the liver were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry one day following the last exposure to radiation. The metabolite profiles of mice chronically administered sake in combination with radiation showed marked changes in purine, pyrimidine, and glutathione (GSH) metabolism, which were only partially altered by radiation or sake administration alone. Notably, the changes in GSH metabolism were not observed in mice treated with radiation following chronic administration of 15% ethanol in water. Changes in several metabolites, including methionine and valine, were induced by radiation alone, but were not detected in the livers of mice who received chronic administration of sake. In addition, the chronic administration of sake increased the level of serum triglycerides, although radiation exposure suppressed this increase. Taken together, the present findings suggest that chronic sake consumption promotes GSH metabolism and anti-oxidative activities in the liver, and thereby may contribute to minimizing the adverse effects associated with radiation.

  17. Predictive factors of radiation-induced skin toxicity in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Chia-Hsuan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the factors affecting the incidence of radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant 3 D conformal radiotherapy by the analysis of dosimetry and topical treatments. Methods Between September 2002 and July 2009, 158 breast cancer patients were treated with adjuvant 3 D conformal radiotherapy after undergoing surgery. Before November 2006, 90 patients were subjected to therapeutic skin care group and topical corticosteroid therapy was used for acute radiation dermatitis. Thereafter, 68 patients received prophylactic topical therapy from the beginning of radiotherapy. The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinical and treatment factors. Furthermore, the possible mechanisms responsible for the effects of topical treatment on radiation-induced dermatitis were investigated in vivo. Results The incidence of radiation-induced moist desquamation was 23% across 158 patients. Higher volume receiving 107% of prescribed dose within PTV (PTV-V107%; >28.6% and volume receiving 110% of prescribed dose within treated volume (TV-V110%; > 5.13%, and no prophylactic topical therapy for irradiated skin, were associated with higher incidence of acute radiation dermatitis. The protective effect of prophylactic topical treatment was more pronounced in patients with TV-V110% > 5.13%. Furthermore, using irradiated mice, we demonstrated that topical steroid cream significantly attenuated irradiation-induced inflammation, causing a decrease in expression of inflammatory cytokines and TGF-beta 1. Conclusion TV-V110% > 5.13% may be an important predictor for radiation induced dermatitis. Prophylactic topical treatment for irradiated skin can significantly improve the tolerance of skin to adjuvant radiotherapy, especially for patients with higher TV-V110%.

  18. Perspectives on Gravity-Induced Radiative Processes in Astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Papini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Single-vertex Feynman diagrams represent the dominant contribution to physical processes, but are frequently forbidden kinematically. This is changed when the particles involved propagate in a gravitational background and acquire an effective mass. Procedures are introduced that allow the calculation of lowest order diagrams, their corresponding transition probabilities, emission powers and spectra to all orders in the metric deviation, for particles of any spin propagating in gravitational fields described by any metric. Physical properties of the “space-time medium” are also discussed. It is shown in particular that a small dissipation term in the particle wave equations can trigger a strong back-reaction that introduces resonances in the radiative process and affects the resulting gravitational background.

  19. Defects induced in bioglass by gamma radiation for dosimetric purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Costa, Z.M.; Giehl, J.M.; Ludwig, V.; Pontuschka, W.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Melo, Adeilson P.; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-03-15

    Some dosimetric properties of the glass system 50P{sub 2}O{sub 5}.30-40CaO.20-10Na{sub 2}O mol% were studied applying the thermoluminescence technique. The glass samples were powdered, and were pressed with Teflon trademark in the proportion 1:2 to produce pellets. The glow curves of the pellets presented three peaks at 130 C, 215 C and 270 C, respectively. The TL response reproducibility presented a maximum coefficient of variation lower than 10%. The calibration curve is linear between 1.0 Gy and 1 kGy. Minimum detection limits were also determined. The gamma radiation dose response and the thermal stability of the materials were studied with the purpose to establish the best conditions of the present bioglass system for use in gamma ray TL dosimetry. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Clinical observation of taste disturbance induced by radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Yuzuru; Sera, Koshi; Nagasawa, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Noriyuki; Yajin, Koji; Harada, Yasuo (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-02-01

    Qualitative gustometry (filter paper disc method) was performed in six patients who underwent radiation therapy. Following results were obtained. 1) Subjective taste disturbance appeared when irradiation dosage amounted to 1000-2000 rad. Whereas, it disappeared in 1 to 3 months after the termination of irradiation. 2) The longer the period of irradiation, the more slowly taste disturbance recovered. 3) Disgeusia was noticed in 44.3% of S, 66.7% of N, 70% of T and 36.2% of Q tests. 4) Taste thresholds in the apical tongue region improved almost parallel to subjective recovery of the taste. Occasionally taste disturbance was prolonged over a month. This is possibly due to delayed regeneration of the gustatory buds. Furthermore, conditions of the oral cavity, such as infection, or mechanical stimulation, may well influence degree of taste disturbance and the process of regeneration.

  1. Radiation-induced valence changes in Eu-doped phosphors

    CERN Document Server

    Upadeo, S V

    1997-01-01

    Europium impurities can be incorporated in two forms: divalent and trivalent. Phosphors activated by Eu sup 2 sup + or Eu sup 3 sup + find important applications. Exposure to ionizing radiations is known to cause Eu sup 3 sup +->Eu sup 2 sup + conversion. This conversion is important in understanding thermoluminescence and radiophotoluminescence applications. However, there have been no systematic studies on Eu sup 3 sup +reversible Eu sup 2 sup + conversion. Data on Eu sup 3 sup +reversible Eu sup 2 sup + conversion in a large number of europium-doped phosphors are presented in this paper. It is concluded that efficient Eu sup 2 sup + phosphors are suitable hosts for studying Eu sup 3 sup +reversible Eu sup 2 sup + conversion. (author)

  2. Electrostatic Discharge Induced in Packaging by Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Nguyen, Tien T.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation belts around Planets have sufficient high energy electron flux to penetrate spacecraft skins and statically charge insulators inside the electronic boxes. For example, geosynchronous-orbit Earth spacecraft require 100 mils aluminum shielding to sufficiently attenuate the fast electron flux. Electrons are stopped and accumulate slowly in the insulated materials to produce strong electric fields. Typically the field strength achieves a threshold for occasional spontaneous discharge in the insulating material. The field strength remains high yet pulsing is infrequent. Charge can leak off if the insulator is sufficiently leaky. The conductivity of insulators is usually controlled by mobile ions such as H and OH in ground service. In space the mobile ions are eventually out-gassed. The resistivity of several insulators is known to increase over three decades after exposure to vacuum for several months. Insulators in space were seen to pulse more frequently as they aged.

  3. The response of kidney to ionizing radiation combined with hyperthermia induced by ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.G.; Sager, H.T.; Elkon, D.; Constable, W.; Rinehart, L.; Wills, M.; Savory, J.; Lacher, D.

    1982-11-01

    Mouse kidneys were made hyperthermic (42.5 degrees C for 30 min) one hour before, during, or one hour after local irradiation to determine the effect of hyperthermia on radiation damage. An ultrasound beam was used to induce hyperthermia. The urinary concentrations of total protein and albumin were used as criteria of kidney injury. Hyperthermia alone did not induce proteinuria. Radiation alone produced proteinuria that was not correlated with dose. Hyperthermia induced during or after irradiation resulted in a thermal enhancement factor of 1.29 +/- .33. Hyperthermia induced one hour before irradiation resulted in a thermal enhancement factor of 0.88 +/- .05, indicating a radioprotective effect. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time such an effect has been shown.

  4. The response of kidney to ionizing radiation combined with hyperthermia induced by ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.G.; Sager, H.T.; Elkon, D.; Constable, W.; Rinehart, L.; Wills, M.; Savory, J.; Lacher, D.

    1982-11-01

    Mouse kidneys were made hyperthermic (42.5/sup 0/C for 30 min) one hour before, during, or one hour after local irradiation to determine the effect of hyperthermia on radiation damage. An ultrasound beam was used to induce hyperthermia. The urinary concentrations of total protein and albumin were used as criteria of kidney injury. Hyperthermia alone did not induce proteinuria. Radiation alone produced proteinuria that was not correlated with dose. Hyperthermia induced during or after irradiation resulted in a thermal enhancement factor of 1.29+/-.33. Hyperthermia induced one hour before irradiation resulted in a thermal enhancement factor of 0.88+/-.05, indicating a radioprotective effect. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time such an effect has been shown.

  5. Protection of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system, small intestine and salivary glands in rats by JNJ7777120 compound, a histamine H4 ligand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J Martinel Lamas

    Full Text Available Based on previous data on the histamine radioprotective effect on highly radiosensitive tissues, in the present work we aimed at investigating the radioprotective potential of the H4R ligand, JNJ7777120, on ionizing radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage in small intestine, salivary glands and hematopoietic tissue. For that purpose, rats were divided into 4 groups. JNJ7777120 and JNJ7777120-irradiated groups received a daily subcutaneous JNJ7777120 injection (10 mg/kg starting 24 h before irradiation. Irradiated groups received a single dose of 5 Gy on whole-body using Cesium-137 source and were sacrificed 3 or 30 days after irradiation. Tissues were removed, fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin or PAS staining and histological characteristics were evaluated. Proliferative and apoptotic markers were studied by immunohistochemistry, while micronucleus assay was performed to evaluate DNA damage. Submandibular gland (SMG function was evaluated by methacholine-induced salivation. Results indicate that JNJ7777120 treatment diminished mucosal atrophy and preserved villi and the number of crypts after radiation exposure (240±8 vs. 165±10, P<0.01. This effect was associated to a reduced apoptosis and DNA damage in intestinal crypts. JNJ7777120 reduced radiation-induced aplasia, preserving medullar components and reducing formation of micronucleus and also it accelerated bone marrow repopulation. Furthermore, it reduced micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood (27±8 vs. 149±22, in 1,000 erythrocytes, P<0.01. JNJ7777120 completely reversed radiation-induced reduced salivation, conserving glandular mass with normal histological appearance and reducing apoptosis and atrophy of SMG. JNJ7777120 exhibits radioprotective effects against radiation-induced cytotoxic and genotoxic damages in small intestine, SMG and hematopoietic tissues and, thus, could be of clinical value for patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  6. Ionizing radiation induces tumor cell lysyl oxidase secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Colette J; Sharma, Ashish; Vuong, Dinh-Van

    2014-01-01

    metalloproteinases, among others, to promote tumor progression. Lysyl oxidase is known to play an important role in hypoxia-dependent cancer cell dissemination and metastasis. Here, we investigated the effects of IR on the expression and secretion of lysyl oxidase (LOX) from tumor cells. METHODS: LOX-secretion along...... with enzymatic activity was investigated in multiple tumor cell lines in response to irradiation. Transwell migration assays were performed to evaluate invasive capacity of naive tumor cells in response to IR-induced LOX. In vivo studies for confirming IR-enhanced LOX were performed employing...... immunohistochemistry of tumor tissues and ex vivo analysis of murine blood serum derived from locally irradiated A549-derived tumor xenografts. RESULTS: LOX was secreted in a dose dependent way from several tumor cell lines in response to irradiation. IR did not increase LOX-transcription but induced LOX...

  7. Reduction in radiation-induced brain injury by use of pentobarbital or lidocaine protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldfield, E.H.; Friedman, R.; Kinsella, T.; Moquin, R.; Olson, J.J.; Orr, K.; DeLuca, A.M. (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    To determine if barbiturates would protect brain at high doses of radiation, survival rates in rats that received whole-brain x-irradiation during pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia were compared with those of control animals that received no medication and of animals anesthetized with ketamine. The animals were shielded so that respiratory and digestive tissues would not be damaged by the radiation. Survival rates in rats that received whole-brain irradiation as a single 7500-rad dose under pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia was increased from between from 0% and 20% to between 45% and 69% over the 40 days of observation compared with the other two groups (p less than 0.007). Ketamine anesthesia provided no protection. There were no notable differential effects upon non-neural tissues, suggesting that pentobarbital afforded protection through modulation of ambient neural activity during radiation exposure. Neural suppression during high-dose cranial irradiation protects brain from acute and early delayed radiation injury. Further development and application of this knowledge may reduce the incidence of radiation toxicity of the central nervous system (CNS) and may permit the safe use of otherwise unsafe doses of radiation in patients with CNS neoplasms.

  8. Gamma radiation induced micronuclei and erythrocyte cellular abnormalities in the fish Catla catla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbumani, S. [Biodosimetry Laboratory, Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India); Mohankumar, Mary N., E-mail: marynmk@rediffmail.com [Biodosimetry Laboratory, Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

    2012-10-15

    Ionizing radiation induced DNA damage in fishes is a scarcely studied topic and very few studies are available in fishes exposed to ionizing radiation using the erythrocyte micronucleus assay under laboratory conditions. Since radionuclides released accidentally or during a nuclear disaster can contaminate inland water bodies, biomonitoring methods are required for assessing the impacts of high and low levels of radiation that may ultimately result in ionizing radiation exposure to both humans and non-human biota. Fresh water fish, Catla catla were subjected to protracted (0.002 Gy/min) and acute (3.2 Gy/min) gamma radiation to a total dose of 5 Gy. Peripheral blood samples were collected at different intervals (days 3, 6, 12, 18, 30, 45, 90, 135, 202) and analyzed by the erythrocyte micronucleus assay. Nuclear anomalies observed were micronuclei (MN), deformed nuclei (DN), nuclear bud (NBu), nuclear bridge (NBr), vacuolated nucleus (VN), binucleated cell (BNC), apoptotic cells (AC) while cytoplasmic abnormalities detected were vacuolated cytoplasm (VC), anisochromasia (AN), echinocytes (EC) and enucleus (EN). Both exposures caused a statistically significant increase in nuclear and cytoplasmic abnormalities that correlated with micronucleus and other nuclear anomalies. However, the extent of damage is higher after an acute exposure lasting for a longer period leading to apoptosis. Nuclear and cytoplasmic abnormalities are the resultants of gamma radiation induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity.

  9. Medium-induced gluon radiation and colour decoherence beyond the soft approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apolinário, Liliana [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE,Universidade de Santiago de Compostela,15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); CENTRA, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Armesto, Néstor [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE,Universidade de Santiago de Compostela,15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Milhano, José Guilherme [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE,Universidade de Santiago de Compostela,15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); CENTRA, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN,CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland); Salgado, Carlos A. [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE,Universidade de Santiago de Compostela,15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain)

    2015-02-18

    We derive the in-medium gluon radiation spectrum off a quark within the path integral formalism at finite energies, including all next-to-eikonal corrections in the propagators of quarks and gluons. Results are computed for finite formation times, including interference with vacuum amplitudes. By rewriting the medium averages in a convenient manner we present the spectrum in terms of dipole cross sections and a colour decoherence parameter with the same physical origin as that found in previous studies of the antenna radiation. This factorisation allows us to present a simple physical picture of the medium-induced radiation for any value of the formation time, that is of interest for a probabilistic implementation of the modified parton shower. Known results are recovered for the particular cases of soft radiation and eikonal quark and for the case of a very long medium, with length much larger than the average formation times for medium-induced radiation. Technical details of the computation of the relevant n-point functions in colour space and of the required path integrals in transverse space are provided. The final result completes the calculation of all finite energy corrections for the radiation off a quark in a QCD medium that exist in the small angle approximation and for a recoilless medium.

  10. Radiation-Induced Changes in Serum Lipidome of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Jelonek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer radiotherapy (RT induces response of the whole patient’s body that could be detected at the blood level. We aimed to identify changes induced in serum lipidome during RT and characterize their association with doses and volumes of irradiated tissue. Sixty-six patients treated with conformal RT because of head and neck cancer were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were collected before, during and about one month after the end of RT. Lipid extracts were analyzed using MALDI-oa-ToF mass spectrometry in positive ionization mode. The major changes were observed when pre-treatment and within-treatment samples were compared. Levels of several identified phosphatidylcholines, including (PC34, (PC36 and (PC38 variants, and lysophosphatidylcholines, including (LPC16 and (LPC18 variants, were first significantly decreased and then increased in post-treatment samples. Intensities of changes were correlated with doses of radiation received by patients. Of note, such correlations were more frequent when low-to-medium doses of radiation delivered during conformal RT to large volumes of normal tissues were analyzed. Additionally, some radiation-induced changes in serum lipidome were associated with toxicity of the treatment. Obtained results indicated the involvement of choline-related signaling and potential biological importance of exposure to clinically low/medium doses of radiation in patient’s body response to radiation.

  11. Antioxidant activity of capsaicin on radiation-induced oxidation of murine hepatic mitochondrial membrane preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangabhagirathi R

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramachandran Gangabhagirathi,1 Ravi Joshi,2 1Bioorganic Division, 2Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai, India Abstract: Capsaicin is the major capsaicinoid in chili peppers and is widely used as a spice. It is also used for topical applications in cases of peripheral neuropathy. The present study deals with its role in modulation of gamma radiation-induced damages of the biochemical constituents of rat liver mitochondrial membrane (RLM preparation. The extent of lipid hydroperoxide formation, depletion in protein thiols, and formation of protein carbonyls have been biochemically assessed in the presence of varying concentrations of capsaicin in RLM. Decrease in the activities of the important antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, which is involved in the scavenging of free radicals, and the mitochondrial marker enzyme succinate dehydrogenase have been also looked into. Capsaicin has been found to efficiently inhibit radiation-induced biochemical alterations, namely lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. It also significantly prevented radiation-induced loss in the activity of antioxidant enzyme and the important endogenous antioxidant glutathione. The study suggests that capsaicin can act as an antioxidant and radioprotector in physiological systems. Keywords: capsaicin, gamma radiation, radioprotection, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, enzyme activity

  12. Systematic review of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borab, Zachary; Mirmanesh, Michael D; Gantz, Madeleine; Cusano, Alessandro; Pu, Lee L Q

    2017-04-01

    Every year, 1.2 million cancer patients receive radiation therapy in the United States. Late radiation tissue injury occurs in an estimated 5-15% of these patients. Tissue injury can include skin necrosis, which can lead to chronic nonhealing wounds. Despite many treatments available to help heal skin necrosis such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, no clinical guidelines exist and evidence is lacking. The purpose of this review is to identify and comprehensively summarize studies published to date to evaluate the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis. Adhering to PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review of currently published articles was performed, evaluating the use of hyperbaric oxygen to treat skin necrosis. Eight articles were identified, including one observational cohort, five case series, and two case reports. The articles describe changes in symptoms and alteration in wound healing of radiation-induced skin necrosis after treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a safe intervention with promising outcomes; however, additional evidence is needed to endorse its application as a relevant therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Early administration of IL-6RA does not prevent radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoue Takehiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation pneumonia and subsequent radiation lung fibrosis are major dose-limiting complications for patients undergoing thoracic radiotherapy. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine and plays important roles in the regulation of immune response and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether anti-IL-6 monoclonal receptor antibody (IL-6RA could ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury in mice. Methods BALB/cAnNCrj mice having received thoracic irradiation of 21 Gy were injected intraperitoneally with IL-6RA (MR16-1 or control rat IgG twice, immediately and seven days after irradiation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to examine the plasma level of IL-6 and serum amyloid A (SAA. Lung injury was assessed by histological staining with haematoxylin and eosin or Azan, measuring lung weight, and hydroxyproline. Results The mice treated with IL-6RA did not survive significantly longer than the rat IgG control. We observed marked up-regulation of IL-6 in mice treated with IL-6RA 150 days after irradiation, whereas IL-6RA temporarily suppressed early radiation-induced increase in the IL-6 release level. Histopathologic assessment showed no differences in lung section or lung weight between mice treated with IL-6RA and control. Conclusions Our findings suggest that early treatment with IL-6RA after irradiation alone does not protect against radiation-induced lung injury.

  14. Dapsone hydroxylamine induces premature removal of human erythrocytes by membrane reorganization and antibody binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Luciana; Fiore, Cristina; Zen, Francesco; Coleman, Michael D; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Clari, Giulio

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE N-hydroxylation of dapsone leads to the formation of the toxic hydroxylamines responsible for the clinical methaemoglobinaemia associated with dapsone therapy. Dapsone has been associated with decreased lifespan of erythrocytes, with consequences such as anaemia and morbidity in patients treated with dapsone for malaria. Here, we investigated how dapsone and/or its hydroxylamine derivative (DDS-NHOH) induced erythrocyte membrane alterations that could lead to premature cell removal. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Erythrocytes from healthy donors were subjected to incubation with dapsone and DDS-NHOH for varying times and the band 3 protein tyrosine-phosphorylation process, band 3 aggregation, membrane alteration and IgG binding were all examined and compared with erythrocytes from two patients receiving dapsone therapy. KEY RESULTS The hydroxylamine derivative, but not dapsone (the parent sulphone) altered membrane protein interactions, leading both to aggregation of band 3 protein and to circulating autologous antibody binding, shown in erythrocytes from patients receiving dapsone therapy. The band 3 tyrosine-phosphorylation process can be used as a diagnostic system to monitor membrane alterations both in vitro, assessing concentration and time-dependent effects of DDS-NHOH treatment, and in vivo, evaluating erythrocytes from dapsone-treated patients, in resting or oxidatively stimulated conditions. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS DDS-NHOH-induced alterations of human erythrocytes can be directly monitored in vitro by tyrosine-phosphorylation level and formation of band 3 protein aggregates. The latter, together with antibody-mediated labelling of erythrocytes, also observed after clinical use of dapsone, may lead to shortening of erythrocyte lifespan. PMID:20662842

  15. Thioredoxin mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic stem cell injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupathi Sundaramoorthy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation exposure poses a significant threat to public health. Hematopoietic injury is one of the major manifestations of acute radiation sickness. Protection and/or mitigation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from radiation injury is an important goal in the development of medical countermeasure agents (MCM. We recently identified thioredoxin (TXN as a novel molecule that has marked protective and proliferative effects on HSCs. In the current study, we investigated the effectiveness of TXN in rescuing mice from a lethal dose of total body radiation (TBI and in enhancing hematopoietic reconstitution following a lethal dose of irradiation. Methods We used in-vivo and in-vitro methods to understand the biological and molecular mechanisms of TXN on radiation mitigation. BABL/c mice were used for the survival study and a flow cytometer was used to quantify the HSC population and cell senescence. A hematology analyzer was used for the peripheral blood cell count, including white blood cells (WBCs, red blood cells (RBCs, hemoglobin, and platelets. Colony forming unit (CFU assay was used to study the colongenic function of HSCs. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to determine the bone marrow cellularity. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase assay was used for cell senescence. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the DNA damage and senescence protein expression. Immunofluorescence staining was used to measure the expression of γ-H2AX foci for DNA damage. Results We found that administration of TXN 24 h following irradiation significantly mitigates BALB/c mice from TBI-induced death: 70% of TXN-treated mice survived, whereas only 25% of saline-treated mice survived. TXN administration led to enhanced recovery of peripheral blood cell counts, bone marrow cellularity, and HSC population as measured by c-Kit+Sca-1+Lin– (KSL cells, SLAM + KSL cells and CFUs. TXN treatment reduced cell senescence and radiation-induced

  16. Measurement of 60CO gamma radiation induced attenuation in multimode step-index POF at 530 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Milan S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As optical fibres are used ever more extensively in space applications, nuclear industry, medicine and high-energy physics experiments, it has become essential to investigate the influence of ionizing radiation on their characteristics. In this work, the radiation-induced attenuation at 530 nm is investigated experimentally in step-index multimode polymethyl-methacrylate plastic optical fibres exposed to low dose-rate gamma radiation. Cumulative doses ranged from 50 Gy to 500 Gy. The radiation induced attenuation has been empirically found to obey the power law RIA= aDb, where D is the total radiation dose and a and b are the constants determined by fitting.

  17. Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of {gamma} radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G{sub 2}/M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Protective role of hesperidin against γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in rat testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Nadia Z; Ahmed Zahran, Ahmed M; El-Rashidy, Fatma H; Abdo Kodous, Ahmad S

    2017-12-01

    Gamma (γ) ray, an electromagnetic radiation, is occasionally accompanying the emission of an alpha or beta particle. Exposure to such radiation can cause cellular changes such as mutations, chromosome aberration and cellular damage which depend upon the total amount of energy, duration of exposure and the dose. Ionizing radiation can impair spermatogenesis and can cause mutations in germ cells. In general, type B spermatogonia are sensitive to this type of radiation. The current study was carried out to evaluate the protective role of hesperidin (H), as a polyphenolic compound, on rat testis injury induced by γ-radiation. Rats were divided into groups including C group (control rats), R (irradiated) group (rats irradiated with γ-radiation), Vehicle (V) group (rats administered with dimethylsulfoxide "DMSO"), H group (rats administered with H only), HR and RH groups (rats treated with H before and after exposure to γ-radiation, respectively). Malondialdehyde (MDA: the end product of lipid peroxidation "LPO") and xanthine oxidase (XO: it generates reactive oxygen species "ROS") in testes homogenate as well as nitric oxide (NO: as ROS) in mitochondrial matrix were determined. The apoptotic markers including DNA-fragmentation (DNAF) in testes homogenate and calcium ions (Ca(2+)) in mitochondrial matrix were determined. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in testes homogenate, while reduced glutathione "GSH" in nuclear matrix were determined. Also histopathological examination for testes tissues through electron microscope was studied. Exposure of rats to γ-radiation (R group) increased the levels of MDA, NO, DNAF, Ca(2+) and XO activity, while it decreased GSH level, SOD and CAT activities as compared to the C groups; γ-radiation increased oxidative stress (OS), LPO, apoptosis and induced testes injuries. These results are in agreement with the histopathological examination. In contrast, treatment with H before or after exposure to γ-radiation

  19. Indirect effects of radiation induce apoptosis and neuroinflammation in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Yasmeen; Xie, Bingjie; Xu, Jin; Wang, Hailong; Hassan, Murtaza; Wang, Rui; Hong, Ma; Hong, Qing; Deng, Yulin

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have evaluated the role of direct radiation exposure in neurodegenerative disorders; however, association among indirect effects of radiation and neurodegenerative diseases remains rarely discussed. The objective of this study was to estimate the relative risk of neurodegeneration due to direct and indirect effects of radiation. (60)Co gamma ray was used as source of direct radiation whereas irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) was used to mimic the indirect effect of radiation. To determine the potency of ICCM to inhibit neuronal cells survival colony forming assay was performed. The role of ICCM to induce apoptosis in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells was estimated by TUNEL assay and Annexin V/PI assay. Level of oxidative stress and the concentration of inflammatory cytokines after exposing to direct radiation and ICCM were evaluated by ELISA method. Expression of key apoptotic protein following direct and indirect radiation exposure was investigated by western blot technique. Experimental data manifest that ICCM account loss of cell survival and increase apoptotic induction in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells that was dependent on time and dose. Moreover, ICCM stimulate significant release of inflammatory cytokines i.e., tumor necrosis factor TNF-alpha (P < 0.01), Interleukin-1 (IL-1, P < 0.001), and Interleukin-6 (IL-6, P < 0.001) in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells and elevate the level of oxidative stress (MDA, P < 0.01). Up-regulation of key apoptotic protein expression i.e., Bax, Bid, cytochrome C, caspase-8 and caspase-3 confirms the toxicity of ICCM to neuronal cells. This study provides the evidence that indirect effect of radiation can be as much damaging to neuronal cells as direct radiation exposure can be. Hence, more focused research on estimation risks of indirect effect of radiation to CNS at molecular level may help to reduce the uncertainty about cure and cause of several neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Mechanisms of thermal induced gallium removal (TIGR) from plutonium dioxide. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMuth, S.F.

    1998-08-07

    This study was initiated in order to determine the advantages of using a mixed-bed rather than a fixed-bed reactor (i.e. furnace) for separation of gallium from PuO{sub 2} by the Thermal Induced Gallium Removal (TIGR) process. The TIGR process is based upon vaporization of gallium suboxide (Ga{sub 2}O). from essentially nonvolatile PuO{sub 2}. The gallium suboxide is formed by passing a reducing gas (i.e. hydrogen) over the PuO{sub 2} particles. Several mechanisms are involved in the reduction and convective vaporization of the gallium suboxide. If the mass transfer of the gallium suboxide across the solid to gas interface significantly affects the processing time, it may be advantageous to use a mixed-bed reactor rather than a fixed-bed reactor. However, due to the difficulty of handling PuO{sub 2} powder, a mixed-bed reactor should be used only if significant advantages can be demonstrated. Based on available data, the results of this study provide strong evidence that a mixed-bed reactor (i.e. furnace) would provide little advantage over a fixed-bed reactor. This is due to the conclusion that the mechanism of internal gallium diffusion within the particle has the predominant affect on the processing time. This is an important conclusion since the use of a mixed-bed would require development of more complex hardware than for a fixed-bed.

  1. A kinetic-based model of radiation-induced intercellular signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J McMahon

    Full Text Available It is now widely accepted that intercellular communication can cause significant variations in cellular responses to genotoxic stress. The radiation-induced bystander effect is a prime example of this effect, where cells shielded from radiation exposure see a significant reduction in survival when cultured with irradiated cells. However, there is a lack of robust, quantitative models of this effect which are widely applicable. In this work, we present a novel mathematical model of radiation-induced intercellular signalling which incorporates signal production and response kinetics together with the effects of direct irradiation, and test it against published data sets, including modulated field exposures. This model suggests that these so-called "bystander" effects play a significant role in determining cellular survival, even in directly irradiated populations, meaning that the inclusion of intercellular communication may be essential to produce robust models of radio-biological outcomes in clinically relevant in vivo situations.

  2. Levofloxacin-induced radiation recall dermatitis: a case report and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernicke, A Gabriella; Swistel, Alexander J; Parashar, Bhupesh; Myskowski, Patricia L

    2010-10-01

    Radiation recall dermatitis (RRD) is a rare phenomenon. There are a few reports in the literature reporting RRD triggered by quinolones administration after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). We present an unusual case of RRD induced by levofloxacin 7 months after completion of EBRT. A 56-year-old Caucasian female was treated with EBRT for stage I carcinoma of the right breast with whole breast irradiation followed by the boost to the tumor bed to a total dose of 6080 cGy. Seven months post completion of EBRT, levofloxacin was administered for an upper respiratory tract infection. On day 8 of levofloxacin, the patient developed a blistering RRD in the skin overlying the area of previous radiation portals. Discontinuation of the RRD-inducing antibiotic and appropriate therapy led to the resolution of the condition. We review literature emphasizing this quinolone antibiotic as a causative of RRD.

  3. Radiation-induced crosslinking of polyvinyltrimethylsilane in the presence of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and allyl methacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliev, Roustam; Burillo, Guillermina [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Starannikova, Ludmila; Teplyakov, Vladimir [A.V. Topchiev Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-11-01

    Radiation-induced crosslinking of homogeneous glassy polyvinyltrimethylsilane was carried out either by the {gamma}-irradiation of the polymeric films containing 3-20 wt% of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate or by the radiation-induced grafting of allyl methacrylate from vapour phase onto films made of pure polymer. The dependence of grafting value on the absorbed {gamma}-irradiation dose and film thickness was investigated. The modified films were analyzed for the sol/gel content and the dependence of gel fraction yield of crosslinked polymer on absorbed dose, concentration of the crosslinking agents and film thickness. The radiation-chemical yields of crosslinking and degradation as well as gelation doses were calculated. The permeability of oxygen and nitrogen through the crosslinked films was determined.

  4. Radiation-induced crosslinking of polyvinyltrimethylsilane in the presence of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and allyl methacrylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Roustam; Starannikova, Ludmila; Teplyakov, Vladimir; Burillo, Guillermina

    1998-11-01

    Radiation-induced crosslinking of homogeneous glassy polyvinyltrimethylsilane was carried out either by the γ-irradiation of the polymeric films containing 3-20 wt% of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate or by the radiation-induced grafting of allyl methacrylate from vapour phase onto films made of pure polymer. The dependence of grafting value on the absorbed γ-irradiation dose and film thickness was investigated. The modified films were analyzed for the sol/gel content and the dependence of gel fraction yield of crosslinked polymer on absorbed dose, concentration of the crosslinking agents and film thickness. The radiation-chemical yields of crosslinking and degradation as well as gelation doses were calculated. The permeability of oxygen and nitrogen through the crosslinked films was determined.

  5. Effect of radiation induced deep level traps on Si detector performance

    CERN Document Server

    Eremin, V; Li, Z

    2002-01-01

    The main factor, which leads to semiconductor detector degradation in high-energy physics experiments, is the introduction of lattice defects in the detector material produced by radiation. Based on the spectrum of radiation induced defects in the silicon bulk, the overview of effects and mechanisms responsible for the changes in the main detector parameters such as effective concentration of the space charge in the depleted region, space charge sign inversion, charge collection efficiency, and detector breakdown voltage are considered. Special attention is paid to the electric field distortion related with high concentration of radiation induced deep traps, which is the key question for the design of detectors operating at cryogenic temperature. In particular, the charge collection recovery at low temperature, often refereed as the Lazarus effect, and the limitation for the detection rate related to the polarization effect are considered.

  6. Radiation Induced Grafting of Acrylate onto Waste Rubber: The Effect of Monomer Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirajuddin Siti Salwa M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of three different acrylate group monomers, namely n-butyl acrylate, methacrylic acid and tripropylene glycol diacrylate of radiation induced grafting onto waste rubber was studied. The electron beam accelerator operated at voltage of 2MeV was used to irradiate the waste rubber at 10 kGy and 100 kGy absorbed radiation dose, respectively. The formation of grafting was observed from the increase in the grafting yield and confirmed by Transformed Infra-Red Spectroscopy results. According to the result obtained, only tripropylene glycol diacrylate was selected to graft onto waste rubber. The carbonyl bond from acrylate groups was seen at 1726 cm-1 band which confirmed the presence of TPGDA in the polymer matrix. This indicates the successful preparation of the TPGDA-grafted waste rubber via radiation induced grafting techniques.

  7. Inhibition of autophagy induced by TSA sensitizes colon cancer cell to radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gang; Wang, Yan; Pang, Xueli; Zhang, Bo

    2014-02-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main treatments for clinical cancer therapy. However, its application was limited due to lack of radiosensitivity in some cancers. Trichostatin A (TSA) is a classic histone deacetylases inhibitor (HDACi) that specifically inhibits the biochemical functions of HDAC and is demonstrated to be an active anticancer drug. However, whether it could sensitize colon cancer to radiation is not clear. Our results showed that TSA enhanced the radiosensitivity of colon cancer cells as determined by CCK-8 and clonogenic survival assay. Moreover, apoptotic cell death induced by radiation was enhanced by TSA treatment. Additionally, TSA also induced autophagic response in colon cancer cells, while autophagy inhibition led to cell apoptosis and enhanced the radiosensitivity of colon cancer cells. Our data suggested that inhibition of cytoprotective autophagy sensitizes cancer cell to radiation, which might be further investigated for clinical cancer radiotherapy.

  8. Electromagnetic induction and radiation-induced abnormality of wave propagation in excitable media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Wu, Fuqiang; Hayat, Tasawar; Zhou, Ping; Tang, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Continuous wave emitting from sinus node of the heart plays an important role in wave propagating among cardiac tissue, while the heart beating can be terminated when the target wave is broken into turbulent states by electromagnetic radiation. In this investigation, local periodical forcing is applied on the media to induce continuous target wave in the improved cardiac model, which the effect of electromagnetic induction is considered by using magnetic flux, then external electromagnetic radiation is imposed on the media. It is found that target wave propagation can be blocked to stand in a local area and the excitability of media is suppressed to approach quiescent but homogeneous state when electromagnetic radiation is imposed on the media. The sampled time series for membrane potentials decrease to quiescent state due to the electromagnetic radiation. It could accounts for the mechanism of abnormality in heart failure exposed to continuous electromagnetic field.

  9. Fluctuation of a Piston in Vacuum Induced by Thermal Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Norio

    2017-10-01

    We consider the displacement of a piston dividing a vacuum cavity at a finite temperature T induced by fluctuations in the thermal radiation pressure. The correlation function of the thermal radiation pressure is calculated using the theoretical framework developed by Barton, which was first applied to the fluctuation of the Casimir force at absolute zero. We show that the variance of the radiation pressure at a fixed point is proportional to T8 and evaluate the mean square displacement for a piston with a small cross section in a characteristic correlation timescale ħ/(kBT). At room temperature, the contribution of the thermal radiation to the fluctuation is larger than that of the vacuum fluctuation.

  10. Transient optical transmission changes induced by pulsed electron radiation in commercial crown silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchek, A. O.; Lisitsyn, V. M.; Gusarov, A. I.; Yakovlev, V. Yu.; Arbuzov, V. I.

    2003-09-01

    We report on results of time-resolved induced optical absorption measurements in commercial crown silicate glass K8 (similar to Schott BK7 glass) and its radiation-resistant counterpart K108 under 0.25-MeV pulsed electron radiation. The spectra have been obtained in a wavelength range 280-1100 nm on a time interval 10 ns-1 s after the end of a 20-ns pulse. In contrast to behavior of stable defects, the efficiency of non-stationary color centers' generation in the long-wavelength spectrum range is similar for both standard and radiation-resistant glasses. The characteristic time for transmission recovery in the visible range at room temperature was found to be about 100 μs. Based on the Kramers-Krönig relations we have estimated transient refractive index changes. For the same radiation dose such changes can be two orders of magnitude higher than those observed in stationary conditions.

  11. A Case of Radiation-Induced Multifocal Laryngeal Angiosarcoma Presenting as a Diagnostic Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme R. Dowdall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck sarcomas are relatively rare tumors, with angiosarcomas representing a small subset. Angiosarcoma is a malignant endothelial neoplasm characterized by atypical, multilayered, or solid endothelial proliferation with vasoformative architecture. The global incidence of irradiation-associated sarcoma is estimated as between 0.03% and 0.08%. Here we reported the case of an elderly woman previously treated with radiation more than 20 years ago for an unknown primary of head and neck. This interesting case presented as a diagnostic challenge, and multiple biopsies were required to eventually establish the diagnosis of laryngeal angiosarcoma. We additionally have confirmation from our prior radiation records that the patient did, in fact, receive a substantial dose of radiation to the site previously. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of a documented radiation-induced multifocal laryngeal angiosarcoma.

  12. Preclinical Research into Basic Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boerma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD is a potentially severe side effect of radiotherapy of thoracic and chest wall tumors if all or part of the heart was included in the radiation field. RIHD presents clinically several years after irradiation and manifestations include accelerated atherosclerosis, pericardial and myocardial fibrosis, conduction abnormalities, and injury to cardiac valves. There is no method to prevent or reverse these injuries when the heart is exposed to ionizing radiation. This paper presents an overview of recent studies that address the role of microvascular injury, endothelial dysfunction, mast cells, and the renin angiotensin system in animal models of cardiac radiation injury. These insights into the basic mechanisms of RIHD may lead to the identification of targets for intervention in this late radiotherapy side effect.

  13. A cases of radiation-induced insufficiency fracture of the sacrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasahara, Toshiyuki; Kawase, Tomoko; Okabe, Harumi; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Endo, Siho; Nakata, Mihoko [Kyoto First Red-Cross Hospital (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    We presented a case of radiation-induced insufficiency fracture of the sacrum, clinically confused with metastasis. Bone scintigraphy showed characteristic H-shaped uptake, CT showed multiple fractures and sclerotic changes, and T1 weighted MR imaging provided diffuse decreased signal intensity in the sacrum. Bone scintigraphy, CT and MR imaging are useful technique for detecting insufficiency fracture. (author)

  14. Medium-induced gluon radiation in hard forward parton scattering in the saturation formalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munier, Stéphane; Peigné, Stéphane; Petreska, Elena

    2017-01-01

    We derive the medium-induced, coherent gluon radiation spectrum associated with the hard forward scattering of an energetic parton off a nucleus, in the saturation formalism and within the Gaussian approximation for the relevant correlators of Wilson lines. The calculation reproduces the simple

  15. Beam-induced radiation in the compact muon solenoid tracker at the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The silicon trackers are crucial for the physics at the LHC experiments, and the inner layers, being situated only a few centimeters from the interaction point, are most vulnerable to beam-induced radiation. We have recently carried out extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies using MARS program to estimate particle fluxes ...

  16. Inactivation of kupffer cells by gadolinium chloride protects murine liver from radiation-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shi-Suo; Qiang, Min; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Ke, Ai-Wu; Ji, Yuan; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Zeng, Hai-Ying; Liu, Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Stem Cell Therapy to Reduce Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, Rob P.; van der Goot, Annemieke; Lombaert, Isabelle M. A.

    Normal tissue damage after radiotherapy is still a major problem in cancer treatment. Stem cell therapy may provide a means to reduce radiation-induced side effects and improve the quality of life of patients. This review discusses the current status in stem cell research with respect to their

  18. Stem cells and the repair of radiation-induced salivary gland damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, R. P.; Stokman, M. A.

    Hyposalivation underlying xerostomia after radiotherapy is still a major problem in the treatment of head and neck cancer. Stem cell therapy may provide a means to reduce radiation-induced hyposalivation and improve the quality of life of patients. This review discusses the current status in

  19. The role of pilocarpine in the reduction of radiation induced damage to the salivary glands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burlage, Fred Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Regarding late morbidity, hyposalivation is one of the most frequently reported radiation-induced side effects which has a negative impact on health-related quality of life [1;2]. Besides the subjective sensation of a dry mouth (xerostomia), saliva also plays a major role in speech, taste

  20. Radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head and neck cancer patients : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    Purpose: To review literature on the relationship between the dose distribution in the thyroid gland and the incidence of radiation-induced hypothyroidism in adults. Material and Methods: Articles were identified through a search in MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Approximately 2449

  1. Modification of radiation-induced division delay by caffeine analogues and dibutyryl cyclic AMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimler, B.F.; Leeper, D.B.; Snyder, M.H.; Rowley, R.; Schneiderman, M.H. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). Hospital)

    1982-01-01

    The mitotic selection procedure for cell cycle analysis was utilized to investigate the concentration-dependent modification of x-radiation-induced division delay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by methyl xanthines (caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine) and by dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The methyl xanthines (concentrations from 0.5 to 1000 ..mu..g/ml) all reduced radiation-induced division delay with the effect being linear between approximately 100 and 1000 ..mu..g/ml. After doses of 100-300 rad, delay was reduced by 75, 94 or 83 per cent at 1000 ..mu..g/ml for each drug, respectively. However, the addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP had an opposite effect: radiation-induced delay was increased by the concentration range of 0.3 to 300 ..mu..g/ml. These results indicate that in mammalian cells the control of cell cycle progression and the modification of radiation-induced division delay are not simply related to intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Rather, there appear to be at least two competing mechanisms which are differentially affected by caffeine analogues or by direct addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The direct effect of caffeine and the methyl xanthines on membrane calcium permeability is considered.

  2. THE ROLE OF SECRETORY GRANULES IN RADIATION-INDUCED DYSFUNCTION OF RAT SALIVARY-GLANDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PETER, B; VANWAARDE, MAWH; VISSINK, A; SGRAVENMADE, EJ; KONINGS, AWT

    To investigate the possible role of secretory granules in radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction, rats were pretreated with isoproterenol (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally) to degranulate salivary gland acini, At maximal depletion, salivary glands were locally irradiated with a single dose of 15 Gy

  3. MiR-21 is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Ding, Nan; Pei, Hailong; Hu, Wentao; Wei, Wenjun; Zhang, Xurui; Zhou, Guangming; Wang, Jufang

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are well-established phenomena, in which DNA damage responses are induced not only in the directly irradiated cells but also in the non-irradiated bystander cells through intercellular signal transmission. Recent studies hint that bystander effects are possibly mediated via small non-coding RNAs, especially microRNAs. Thus, more details about the roles of microRNA in bystander effects are urgently needed to be elucidated. Here we demonstrated that bystander effects were induced in human fetal lung MRC-5 fibroblasts through medium-mediated way by different types of radiation. We identified a set of differentially expressed microRNAs in the cell culture medium after irradiation, among which the up-regulation of miR-21 was further verified with qRT-PCR. In addition, we found significant upregulation of miR-21 in both directly irradiated cells and bystander cells, which was confirmed by the expression of miR-21 precursor and its target genes. Transfection of miR-21 mimics into non-irradiated MRC-5 cells caused bystander-like effects. Taken together, our data reveals that miR-21 is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects. Elucidation of such a miRNA-mediated bystander effect is of utmost importance in understanding the biological processes related to ionizing radiation and cell-to-cell communication. PMID:25483031

  4. The role of protein kinase C alpha translocation in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zihui; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun; Hei, Tom K; Hong, Mei

    2016-05-11

    Ionizing radiation is a well known human carcinogen. Evidence accumulated over the past decade suggested that extranuclear/extracellular targets and events may also play a critical role in modulating biological responses to ionizing radiation. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of radiation-induced bystander effect is still unclear. In the current study, AL cells were irradiated with alpha particles and responses of bystander cells were investigated. We found out that in bystander AL cells, protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) translocated from cytosol to membrane fraction. Pre-treatment of cells with PKC translocation inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed the induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) activity and the increased cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression as well as the mutagenic effect in bystander cells. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was elevated in directly irradiated but not bystander cells; while TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1) increased in the membrane fraction of bystander cells. Further analysis revealed that PKC activation caused accelerated internalization and recycling of TNFR1. Our data suggested that PKCα translocation may occur as an early event in radiation-induced bystander responses and mediate TNFα-induced signaling pathways that lead to the activation of ERK and up-regulation of COX-2.

  5. Radiation-induced sterility for pupal and adult stages of the malaria moquito Anopheles arabiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helinski, M.E.H.; Parker, A.G.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background - In the context of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), radiation-induced sterility in the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis Patton (Diptera: Culicidae) was studied. Male mosquitoes were exposed to gamma rays in the pupal or adult stage and dose-sterility curves were determined.

  6. AN IMAGE-ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTION OF RADIATION-INDUCED DNA FRAGMENTATION AFTER CHEF ELECTROPHORESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROSEMANN, M; KANON, B; KONINGS, AWT; KAMPINGA, HH

    CHEF-electrophoresis was used as a technique to detect radiation-induced DNA breakage with special emphasis to biological relevant X-ray doses (0-10 Gy). Fluorescence detection of DNA-fragments using a sensitive image analysis system was directly compared with conventional scintillation counting of

  7. Gossypetin ameliorates ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice liver--a molecular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amitava; Manna, Krishnendu; Das, Dipesh Kr; Kesh, Swaraj Bandhu; Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Ujjal; Biswas, Sushobhan; Sengupta, Aaveri; Sikder, Kunal; Datta, Sanjukta; Ghosh, Mahua; Chakrabarty, Anindita; Banerji, Asoke; Dey, Sanjit

    2015-10-01

    Radioprotective action of gossypetin (GTIN) against gamma (γ)-radiation-induced oxidative stress in liver was explored in the present article. Our main aim was to evaluate the protective efficacy of GTIN against radiation-induced alteration of liver in murine system. To evaluate the effect of GTIN, it was orally administered to mice at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight for three consecutive days prior to γ-radiation at a dose of 5 Gy. Radioprotective efficacy of GTIN were evaluated at physiological, cellular, and molecular level using biochemical analysis, comet assay, flow cytometry, histopathology, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting techniques. Ionizing radiation was responsible for augmentation of hepatic oxidative stress in terms of lipid peroxidation and depletion of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence studies showed that irradiation enhanced the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) level, which leads to hepatic inflammation. To investigate further, we found that radiation induced the activation of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK)-mediated apoptotic pathway and deactivation of the NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated redox signaling pathway, whereas GTIN pretreatment ameliorated these radiation-mediated effects. This is the novel report where GTIN rationally validated the molecular mechanism in terms of the modulation of cellular signaling system' instead of ' This is the novel report where GTIN is rationally validated in molecular terms to establish it as promising radioprotective agents. This might be fruitful especially for nuclear workers and defense personnel assuming the possibility of radiation exposure.

  8. Nicaraven attenuates radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Kawakatsu

    Full Text Available Nicaraven, a chemically synthesized hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger, has been demonstrated to protect against ischemia-reperfusion injury in various organs. We investigated whether nicaraven can attenuate radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which is the conmen complication of radiotherapy and one of the major causes of death in sub-acute phase after accidental exposure to high dose radiation. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 1 Gy γ-ray radiation daily for 5 days in succession (a total of 5 Gy, and given nicaraven or a placebo after each exposure. The mice were sacrificed 2 days after the last radiation treatment, and the protective effects and relevant mechanisms of nicaraven in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with radiation-induced damage were investigated by ex vivo examination. We found that post-radiation administration of nicaraven significantly increased the number, improved the colony-forming capacity, and decreased the DNA damage of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. The urinary levels of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, a marker of DNA oxidation, were significantly lower in mice that were given nicaraven compared with those that received a placebo treatment, although the levels of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in the bone marrow cells did not differ significantly between the two groups. Interestingly, compared with the placebo treatment, the administration of nicaraven significantly decreased the levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α in the plasma of mice. Our data suggest that nicaraven effectively diminished the effects of radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which is likely associated with the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of this compound.

  9. The different radiation response and radiation-induced bystander effects in colorectal carcinoma cells differing in p53 status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widel, Maria, E-mail: maria.widel@polsl.pl [Biosystems Group, Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Lalik, Anna; Krzywon, Aleksandra [Biosystems Group, Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Poleszczuk, Jan [College of Inter-faculty Individual Studies in Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Warsaw, 93 Zwirki i Wigury Street, 02-089 Warsaw (Poland); Department of Integrated Mathematical Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Fujarewicz, Krzysztof; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna [Biosystems Group, Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We tested radiation response and bystander effect on HCT116p53+/+ and p53−/− cells. • The p53+/+ cells developed premature senescence in exposed and bystander neighbors. • Directly exposed and bystander p53−/− cells died profoundly through apoptosis. • Interleukins 6 and 8 were differently generated by both cell lines. • NFκB path was activated mainly in p53+/+ hit cells, in p53 −/− in bystanders only. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect, appearing as different biological changes in cells that are not directly exposed to ionizing radiation but are under the influence of molecular signals secreted by irradiated neighbors, have recently attracted considerable interest due to their possible implication for radiotherapy. However, various cells present diverse radiosensitivity and bystander responses that depend, inter alia, on genetic status including TP53, the gene controlling the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. Here we compared the ionizing radiation and bystander responses of human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells with wild type or knockout TP53 using a transwell co-culture system. The viability of exposed to X-rays (0–8 Gy) and bystander cells of both lines showed a roughly comparable decline with increasing dose. The frequency of micronuclei was also comparable at lower doses but at higher increased considerably, especially in bystander TP53-/- cells. Moreover, the TP53-/- cells showed a significantly elevated frequency of apoptosis, while TP53+/+ counterparts expressed high level of senescence. The cross-matched experiments where irradiated cells of one line were co-cultured with non-irradiated cells of opposite line show that both cell lines were also able to induce bystander effects in their counterparts, however different endpoints revealed with different strength. Potential mediators of bystander effects, IL-6 and IL-8, were also generated differently in both lines. The knockout cells secreted IL-6 at

  10. Protective Effect of Anthocyanins from Lingonberry on Radiation-induced Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang-Qi Tian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing concern about the serious harm of radioactive materials, which are widely used in energy production, scientific research, medicine, industry and other areas. In recent years, owing to the great side effects of anti-radiation drugs, research on the radiation protectants has gradually expanded from the previous chemicals to the use of natural anti-radiation drugs and functional foods. Some reports have confirmed that anthocyanins are good antioxidants, which can effectively eliminate free radicals, but studies on the immunoregulatory and anti-radiation effects of anthocyanins from lingonberry (ALB are less reported. In this experiment, mice were given orally once daily for 14 consecutive days before exposure to 6 Gy of gamma-radiation and were sacrificed on the 7th day post-irradiation. The results showed that the selected dose of extract did not lead to acute toxicity in mice; while groups given anthocyanins orally were significantly better than radiation control group according to blood analysis; pretreatment of anthocyanins significantly (p < 0.05 enhanced the thymus and spleen indices and spleen cell survival compared to the irradiation control group. Pretreatment with anthocyanins before irradiation significantly reduced the numbers of micronuclei (MN in bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs. These findings indicate that anthocyanins have immunostimulatory potential against immunosuppression induced by the radiation.

  11. Radiation-induced disorder in compressed lanthanide zirconates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sulgiye; Tracy, Cameron L; Zhang, Fuxiang; Park, Changyong; Trautmann, Christina; Tkachev, Sergey N; Lang, Maik; Mao, Wendy L; Ewing, Rodney C

    2018-02-28

    The effects of swift heavy ion irradiation-induced disordering on the behavior of lanthanide zirconate compounds (Ln 2 Zr 2 O 7 where Ln = Sm, Er, or Nd) at high pressures are investigated. After irradiation with 2.2 GeV 197 Au ions, the initial ordered pyrochlore structure (Fd3[combining macron]m) transformed to a defect-fluorite structure (Fm3[combining macron]m) in Sm 2 Zr 2 O 7 and Nd 2 Zr 2 O 7 . For irradiated Er 2 Zr 2 O 7 , which has a defect-fluorite structure, ion irradiation induces local disordering by introducing Frenkel defects despite retention of the initial structure. When subjected to high pressures (>29 GPa) in the absence of irradiation, all of these compounds transform to a cotunnite-like (Pnma) phase, followed by sluggish amorphization with further compression. However, if these compounds are irradiated prior to compression, the high pressure cotunnite-like phase is not formed. Rather, they transform directly from their post-irradiation defect-fluorite structure to an amorphous structure upon compression (>25 GPa). Defects and disordering induced by swift heavy ion irradiation alter the transformation pathways by raising the energetic barriers for the transformation to the high pressure cotunnite-like phase, rendering it inaccessible. As a result, the high pressure stability field of the amorphous phase is expanded to lower pressures when irradiation is coupled with compression. The responses of materials in the lanthanide zirconate system to irradiation and compression, both individually and in tandem, are strongly influenced by the specific lanthanide composition, which governs the defect energetics at extreme conditions.

  12. Study on the bias-dependent effects of proton-induced damage in CdZnTe radiation detectors using ion beam induced charge microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yaxu; Jie, Wanqi; Rong, Caicai; Xu, Lingyan; Xu, Yadong; Lv, Haoyan; Shen, Hao; Du, Guanghua; Guo, Na; Guo, Rongrong; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Tao; Xi, Shouzhi

    2016-09-01

    The influence of damage induced by 2MeV protons on CdZnTe radiation detectors is investigated using ion beam induced charge (IBIC) microscopy. Charge collection efficiency (CCE) in irradiated region is found to be degraded above a fluence of 3.3×10(11)p/cm(2) and the energy spectrum is severely deteriorated with increasing fluence. Moreover, CCE maps obtained under the applied biases from 50V to 400V suggests that local radiation damage results in significant degradation of CCE uniformity, especially under low bias, i. e., 50V and 100V. The CCE nonuniformity induced by local radiation damage, however, can be greatly improved by increasing the detector applied bias. This bias-dependent effect of 2MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe detectors is attributed to the interaction of electron cloud and radiation-induced displacement defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinicopathological evaluation of radiation induced basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meibodi Naser

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of skin neoplasms is one of the most important chronic complications of radiation therapy. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most frequent carcinoma occurring at the region of the body to which radiotherapy was delivered. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and histological aspects of basal cell carcinoma in patients with a history of radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Medical records and microscopic slides of 80 patients with basal cell carcinoma who had received radiotherapy (1996-2006 were reviewed in pathology department of Imam Reza hospital of Mashhad, Iran. Collected data were analyzed statistically using descriptive test. Results: 60 men and 20 women were included, majority of them in their sixties. Plaque was the most common clinical pattern of basal cell carcinoma. Fifty one percent of the patients had pigmented and 42.5% had multiple lesions. Scalp was the most common site of involvement. Histologically, macronodular and pigmented carcinoma were the most predominant forms of basal cell carcinoma. Discussion: Majority of patients had scalp involvement and multiple lesions. Nodular and pigmented forms were the most common histological findings. We suggest the need for close supervision in patients with a history of radio therapy in the past.

  14. War Induced Aerosol Optical, Microphysical and Radiative Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Pavel; Tiwari, Shubhansh

    2017-01-01

    The effect of war on air pollution and climate is assessed in this communication. War today in respect of civil wars and armed conflict in the Middle East area is taken into consideration. Impacts of war are not only in loss of human life and property, but also in the environment. It is well known that war effects air pollution and in the long run contribute to anthropogenic climate change, but general studies on this subject are few because of the difficulties of observations involved. In the current scenario of the ongoing conflict in the Middle East regions, deductions in parameters of atmosphere are discussed. Aerosol Optical Depth, Aerosol loads, Black Carbon, Ozone,Dust, regional haze and many more are analyzed using various satellite data. Multi-model analysis is also studied to verify the analysis. Type segregation of aerosols, in-depth constraints to atmospheric chemistry, biological effects and particularly atmospheric physics in terms of radiative forcing, etc. are discussed. Undergraduate in Earth Sciences.

  15. Radiation-induced defects in magnesium lactate as ESR dosimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Hassan, G M; Takaki, S

    1999-01-01

    Magnesium lactate (Mg-lactate: (CH sub 3 CH(OH)COO) sub 2 Mg), magnesium lactate doped with lithium lactate (Mg(Li)-lactate) and nominal pure lithium lactate (CH sub 3 CH(OH)COOLi) doped with Mg-lactate (Li(Mg)-lactate) were irradiated by gamma-rays to study radicals for materials of radiation dosimeter with electron spin resonance (ESR). Quartet spectra were ascribed to lactate radicals in Mg-lactate and Li(Mg)-lactate with the spectroscopic splitting factors (g-factor) of 2.0032+-0.004 and 2.0029+-0.004 and the intensity ratio of 1:3:3:1 due to the hyperfine coupling constants of (A/g beta) of 1.92+-0.06 and 1.82+-0.06 mT, respectively. The response to gamma-ray dose and the thermal stability as well as the effect of UV-illumination have been studied to establish this material as an ESR dosimeter. The number of free radicals per 100 eV (G-value) was obtained to be 1.15+-0.32, 1.35+-0.35, 0.46+-0.14 and 0.78+-0.24 for Mg-lactate, Mg(Li)-lactate, Li-lactate and Lie(Mg)-lactate, respectively. Thermoluminescenc...

  16. Radiation damage induced by neutrons in CMS silicon sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Forton, Eric

    Les expériences conduites auprès du futur accélérateur LHC au CERN nécessitent la construction des détecteurs les plus grands et les plus complexes jamais conçus. En particulier, le trajectographe de la collaboration CMS utilisera uniquement des détecteurs micropiste silicium et ce, en très grandes quantités. Ce dernier dépend donc de manière capitale de la qualité de toute la production des senseurs et la collaboration CMS a ainsi décidé de mettre en place un vaste programme de contrôle de cette qualité. Cette thèse présente une partie des travaux réalisés à l'UCL dans ce cadre. La discussion porte en particulier sur résistance aux radiations des senseurs en silicium, testée de manière routinière à Louvain-la-Neuve. Le texte débute par une présentation du détecteur CMS et des dégâts radiatifs subits par les détecteurs micropiste silicium. Les dispositifs expérimentaux mis en place auprès des cyclotrons et dans le laboratoire de l'institut de Physique nucléaire sont ensuite...

  17. Medium-induced gluon radiation beyond the eikonal approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apolinário, Liliana, E-mail: lilianamarisa.cunha@usc.es [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); CENTRA, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Armesto, Néstor [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Milhano, Guilherme [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); CENTRA, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland); Salgado, Carlos A. [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    In this work we improve existing calculations of radiative energy loss by computing corrections that implement energy–momentum conservation, previously only implemented a posteriori, in a rigorous way. Using the path-integral formalism, we compute in-medium splittings allowing transverse motion of all particles in the emission process, thus relaxing the assumption that only the softest particle is permitted such movement. This work constitutes the extension of the computation carried out for x→1 in L. Apolinario et al. (2012) [5], to all values of x, the momentum fraction of the energy of the parent parton carried by the emitted gluon. In order to accomplish a general description of the whole in-medium showering process, in this work we allow for arbitrary formation times for the emitted gluon (the limit of small formation times was previously employed in J.-P. Blaizot et al., 2013 [6], for the g→gg splitting). We provide general expressions and their realisation in the path integral formalism within the harmonic oscillator approximation.

  18. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress T-Cell Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-06-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcomes compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of preinvasive foci. We investigated the effects of radiation therapy in p48(Cre);LSL-Kras(G12D) (KC) and p48(Cre);LSLKras(G12D);LSL-Trp53(R172H) (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from radiation treated invasive and preinvasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8(+) T cells than controls, and greater numbers of CD4(+) T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. A neutralizing antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Radiation treatment causes macrophages

  19. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is a novel therapeutic agent for focal radiation-induced osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Abhishek; Wang, Luqiang; Young, Tiffany; Zhong, Leilei; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Levine, Michael A; Cengel, Keith; Liu, X Sherry; Zhang, Yejia; Pignolo, Robert J; Qin, Ling

    2018-01-01

    Bone atrophy and its related fragility fractures are frequent, late side effects of radiotherapy in cancer survivors and have a detrimental impact on their quality of life. In another study, we showed that parathyroid hormone 1-34 and anti-sclerostin antibody attenuates radiation-induced bone damage by accelerating DNA repair in osteoblasts. DNA damage responses are partially regulated by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. In the current study, we examined whether proteasome inhibitors have similar bone-protective effects against radiation damage. MG132 treatment greatly reduced radiation-induced apoptosis in cultured osteoblastic cells. This survival effect was owing to accelerated DNA repair as revealed by γH2AX foci and comet assays and to the up-regulation of Ku70 and DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit, essential DNA repair proteins in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Administration of bortezomib (Bzb) reversed the loss of trabecular bone structure and strength in mice at 4 wk after focal radiation. Histomorphometry revealed that Bzb significantly increased the number of osteoblasts and activity in the irradiated area and suppressed the number and activity of osteoclasts, regardless of irradiation. Two weeks of Bzb treatment accelerated DNA repair in bone-lining osteoblasts and thus promoted their survival. Meanwhile, it also inhibited bone marrow adiposity. Taken together, we demonstrate a novel role of proteasome inhibitors in treating radiation-induced osteoporosis.-Chandra, A., Wang, L., Young, T., Zhong, L., Tseng, W.-J., Levine, M. A., Cengel, K., Liu, X. S., Zhang, Y., Pignolo, R. J., Qin, L. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is a novel therapeutic agent for focal radiation-induced osteoporosis. © FASEB.

  20. Bone marrow stromal cell transplantation mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhrajit Saha

    Full Text Available Nuclear accidents and terrorism presents a serious threat for mass casualty. While bone-marrow transplantation might mitigate hematopoietic syndrome, currently there are no approved medical countermeasures to alleviate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS, resulting from direct cytocidal effects on intestinal stem cells (ISC and crypt stromal cells. We examined whether bone marrow-derived adherent stromal cell transplantation (BMSCT could restitute irradiated intestinal stem cells niche and mitigate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.Autologous bone marrow was cultured in mesenchymal basal medium and adherent cells were harvested for transplantation to C57Bl6 mice, 24 and 72 hours after lethal whole body irradiation (10.4 Gy or abdominal irradiation (16-20 Gy in a single fraction. Mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid population were characterized by flow cytometry. Intestinal crypt regeneration and absorptive function was assessed by histopathology and xylose absorption assay, respectively. In contrast to 100% mortality in irradiated controls, BMSCT mitigated RIGS and rescued mice from radiation lethality after 18 Gy of abdominal irradiation or 10.4 Gy whole body irradiation with 100% survival (p<0.0007 and p<0.0009 respectively beyond 25 days. Transplantation of enriched myeloid and non-myeloid fractions failed to improve survival. BMASCT induced ISC regeneration, restitution of the ISC niche and xylose absorption. Serum levels of intestinal radioprotective factors, such as, R-Spondin1, KGF, PDGF and FGF2, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were elevated, while inflammatory cytokines were down regulated.Mitigation of lethal intestinal injury, following high doses of irradiation, can be achieved by intravenous transplantation of marrow-derived stromal cells, including mesenchymal, endothelial and macrophage cell population. BMASCT increases blood levels of intestinal growth factors and induces regeneration of the irradiated

  1. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION-AND CHEMICALLY-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapid, sensitive and simple assays for radiation- and chemically-induced DNA damage can be of significant benefit to a number of fields including radiation biology, clinical research, and environmental monitoring. Although temperature-induced DNA strand separation has been use...

  2. The role of ER stress response on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sang; Kim, Kwang Seok; Woo, Sang Keun; Lee, Yong Jin; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Kang, Seong Man; Lim, Young Bin [Laboratory of Radiation Effect, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathologic factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury. However, mechanism involved in ionizing radiation (IR)-induced apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is triggered by perturbation of the ER functions, leading to the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive signaling cascade aimed at restoring ER homeostasis by facilitating the degradation of misfolded proteins and expanding the protein folding capacity of the cell. Recently, IR has also been shown to induce ER stress, thereby activating the UPR signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we report the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhance IR-induced caspase3 activation. Knockdown of xbp1 or atf6 with siRNA leads to inhibition of IR-induced caspase3 activation. Taken together, our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our findings could contribute to the development of new strategies based on modulating ER stress responses to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  3. Radiation-induced cell transformation: transformation efficiencies of different types of ionizing radiation and molecular changes in radiation transformants and tumor cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Hieber, L.; Trutschler, K; Smida, J.; Wachsmann, M; Ponsel, G.; Kellerer, Albrecht M.

    1990-01-01

    This study aims to compare the efficiencies of 5.4 keV soft X-rays, alpha-particles, and gamma-rays in transforming C3H 10T1/2 cells and to assess the sequence of cellular and molecular changes during the process of radiation-induced transformation of Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. The somewhat more densely ionizing soft X-rays are more effective than gamma-rays both for cell inactivation and cell transformation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) appears to be independent of dos...

  4. Electrode Induced Removal and Recovery of Uranium (VI) from Acidic Subsurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, Kelvin [Carnegie Mellon University

    2013-08-12

    The overarching objective of this research is to provide an improved understanding of how aqueous geochemical conditions impact the removal of U and Tc from groundwater and how engineering design may be utilized to optimize removal of these radionuclides. Experiments were designed to address the unique conditions in Area 3 of ORNL while also providing broader insight into the geochemical effectors of the removal rates and extent for U and Tc. The specific tasks of this work were to: 1) quantify the impact of common aqueous geochemical and operational conditions on the rate and extent of U removal and recovery from water, 2) investigate the removal of Tc with polarized graphite electrode, and determine the influence of geochemical and operational conditions on Tc removal and recovery, 3) determine whether U and Tc may be treated simultaneous from Area 3 groundwater, and examine the bench-scale performance of electrode-based treatment, and 4) determine the capacity of graphite electrodes for U(VI) removal and develop a mathematical, kinetic model for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Overall the body of work suggests that an electrode-based approach for the remediation of acidic subsurface environments, such as those observed in Area 3 of ORNL may be successful for the removal for both U(VI) and Tc. Carbonaceous (graphite) electrode materials are likely to be the least costly means to maximize removal rates and efficiency by maximizing the electrode surface area.

  5. Radiation-induced abnormal cortical thickness in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiabao; Lv, Xiaofei; Niu, Meiqi; Liu, Lizhi; Chen, Jun; Xie, Fei; Zhong, Miao; Qiu, Shijun; Li, Li; Huang, Ruiwang

    2017-01-01

    Conventional MRI studies showed that radiation-induced brain necrosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in years after radiotherapy (RT) could involve brain gray matter (GM) and impair brain function. However, it is still unclear the radiation-induced brain morphological changes in NPC patients with normal-appearing GM in the early period after RT. In this study, we acquired high-resolution brain structural MRI data from three groups of patients, 22 before radiotherapy (pre-RT) NPC patients with newly diagnosed but not yet medically treated, 22 NPC patients in the early-delayed stage after radiotherapy (post-RT-ED), and 20 NPC patients in the late-delayed stage after radiotherapy (post-RT-LD), and then analyzed the radiation-induced cortical thickness alteration in NPC patients after RT. Using a vertex-wise surface-based morphometry (SBM) approach, we detected significantly decreased cortical thickness in the precentral gyrus (PreCG) in the post-RT-ED group compared to the pre-RT group. And the post-RT-LD group showed significantly increased cortical thickness in widespread brain regions, including the bilateral inferior parietal, left isthmus of the cingulate, left bank of the superior temporal sulcus and left lateral occipital regions, compared to the pre-RT group, and in the bilateral PreCG compared to the post-RT-ED group. Similar analysis with ROI-wise SBM method also found the consistent results. These results indicated that radiation-induced brain injury mainly occurred in the post-RT-LD group and the cortical thickness alterations after RT were dynamic in different periods. Our findings may reflect the pathogenesis of radiation-induced brain injury in NPC patients with normal-appearing GM and an early intervention is necessary for protecting GM during RT.

  6. Protection against radiation-induced hematopoietic damage in bone marrow by hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingfang; Sun, Huiyan; Xiao, Fengjun; Wang, Xiaojie; Yang, Yuefeng; Liu, Yingxia; Zhang, Qunwei; Wu, Chutse; Wang, Hua; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene could prevent radiation-induced hematopoietic damage. Thirty C57BL/6 mice were randomized into three groups, in which phosphate buffer saline (PBS), mock adenovirus vector (Ad-null) or adenovirus vector containing HGF (Ad-HGF) were injected into the tail vein of each group, respectively. After 48 hours, the mice received a single irradiation dose of 6.5 Gy (60)Co gamma rays. Blood samples were extracted via the tail vein at day 0, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, 24 and 30 after irradiation, for red blood cell (RBC) and white blood cell (WBC) and cluster of differentiation4 (CD4)/cluster of differentiation8 (CD8) ratio assessment. At weekly intervals following irradiation, serum erythropoietin (EPO), Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). On post-irradiation day 30, the mice were autopsied and erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) were evaluated. Adenovirus-mediated HGF gene transfer could increase human HGF level in serum and have a significant elevation in RBC and WBC count. Ad-HGF increased EPO and IL-6 levels and prompted BFU-E formation. Ad-HGF decreased radiation- induced micronucleus frequency in the mouse bone marrow (BM). Most evidence of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage was observed morphologically in bone marrow specimen four weeks after irradiation. Ad-HGF protected against radiation-induced BM failure and increased survival. Finally, Ad-HGF increased the thymic index and enhanced immune function in the irradiated C57BL/6 mice. This is the first report to date that demonstrates the potential of HGF gene transfer to prevent radiation-induced hematopoietic damage.

  7. Permeability of Brain Tumor Vessels Induced by Uniform or Spatially Microfractionated Synchrotron Radiation Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, Audrey; Potez, Marine; Coquery, Nicolas; Rome, Claire; Lemasson, Benjamin; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Rémy, Chantal; Laissue, Jean; Barbier, Emmanuel L; Djonov, Valentin; Serduc, Raphael

    2017-08-01

    To compare the blood-brain barrier permeability changes induced by synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT, which relies on spatial fractionation of the incident x-ray beam into parallel micron-wide beams) with changes induced by a spatially uniform synchrotron x-ray radiation therapy. Male rats bearing malignant intracranial F98 gliomas were randomized into 3 groups: untreated, exposed to MRT (peak and valley dose: 241 and 10.5 Gy, respectively), or exposed to broad beam irradiation (BB) delivered at comparable doses (ie, equivalent to MRT valley dose); both applied by 2 arrays, intersecting orthogonally the tumor region. Vessel permeability was monitored in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging 1 day before (T-1) and 1, 2, 7, and 14 days after treatment start. To determine whether physiologic parameters influence vascular permeability, we evaluated vessel integrity in the tumor area with different values for cerebral blood flow, blood volume, edema, and tissue oxygenation. Microbeam radiation therapy does not modify the vascular permeability of normal brain tissue. Microbeam radiation therapy-induced increase of tumor vascular permeability was detectable from T2 with a maximum at T7 after exposure, whereas BB enhanced vessel permeability only at T7. At this stage MRT was more efficient at increasing tumor vessel permeability (BB vs untreated: +19.1%; P=.0467; MRT vs untreated: +44.8%; Ptumor than BB. Microbeam radiation therapy-induced increased tumor vascular permeability is: (1) significantly greater; (2) earlier and more prolonged than that induced by BB irradiation, especially in highly proliferative tumor areas; and (3) targets all tumor areas discriminated by physiologic characteristics, including those not damaged by homogeneous irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Case of radiation induced aneurysm of extracranial carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashiro, Takashi; Ikota, Toshio; Yamashita, Kousuke; Kodama, Takao

    1988-08-01

    An unusual case of post-irradiation aneurysm of extracranial internal carotid artery is presented. A 70-year-old man, complaining of left cervical throbbing mass with focal pain, was admitted on February 8, 1985. It was noted, from his past history, that he had had surgery of the removal of cervical lymphnodes and that unknown dosage of irradiation had been added to the cervical region 30 years before. Left carotid angiography (on admission) demonstrated a giant aneurysm in the cervical portion of internal carotid artery. Right carotid angiography with compression of left carotid artery revealed good cross filling through anterior communicating artery. Computed tomography with contrast media showed a ring like enhanced mass, which was thought to suggest that a large part of the aneurysm was filled with intraluminal thrombosis. During 30 days of evaluation, the aneurysm grew larger and his cervical pain became untolerable. Operation, the resection of the aneurysm and the reconstruction (of circulation) with vein graft, was challenged on March 12. It was so difficult with meticulous work that the ligation of left common carotid artery was performed after all. Seven days after the operation, he suffered from the gastrointestinal bleeding, which was enough to lead him to hypovolemic shock. Thereafter, right hemiparesis and aphasia were brought about. Two months later, he died of pneumonia. On histological examination, it was demonstrated that the aneurysm communicated with the necrotic tissue and that the normal structure of the blood vessel was not observed in the aneurysmal wall and consisted of the collagenous fiber and granulated tissue. The aneurysm was interpreted as a false one.

  9. Dietary Supplement Attenuates Radiation-Induced Osteoclastogenic and Oxidative Stress-Related Responses and Protects Adult Mice from Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Ruth; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Tahimic, Candice; Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Alwood, Joshua; Shahnazari, Mohammed; Halloran, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Our central hypothesis is that oxidative stress plays a key role in cell dysfunction and progressive bone loss caused by radiation exposure during spaceflight. In animal studies, excess free radical formation is associated with pathological changes in bone structure, enhanced bone resorption, reduced bone formation and decreased bone mineral density, which can lead to skeletal fragility. We previously reported that exposure to low or high-LET radiation rapidly increases expression levels of pro-osteoclastogenic and oxidative stress-related genes in bone and marrow, followed by pathological changes in skeletal structure. To screen various antioxidants for radioprotective effects on bone, 4 month old, male C57Bl6/J mice were treated with a dietary antioxidant cocktail, injectable alpha-lipoic acid, or a dried plum-enriched diet (DP). Mice were then exposed to 2Gy 137Cs total body radiation and one day later marrow cells were collected and the relevant genes analyzed for expression levels. Of the candidates tested, DP was most effective in reducing bone resorption-related gene expression. Microcomputed tomography revealed that DP also prevented the radiation-induced deterioration of skeletal microarchitecture, as indicated by percent bone volume, trabecular spacing and trabecular number. DP had similar protective effects on skeletal structure after sequential exposure to protons (0.5 Gy, 150MeV/n) and 56Fe 0.5Gy, 600 MeV/n). When cultured ex vivo under osteogenic conditions, bone marrow-derived cells from DP-fed animals exhibited increased colony numbers compared to control diet-fed animals. These findings suggest that DP exerted pro-osteogenic effects apart from previously identified anti-resorptive actions, which may contribute to radioprotection of skeletal tissue. In conclusion, a diet enriched in certain types of antioxidants and polyphenols such as DP may be useful as an intervention to protect tissues from degenerative effects of ionizing radiation.

  10. Bystander effect induced by UVC radiation in Chinese hamster V79 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengwen; Jin, Cuihong; Lu, Xiaobo; Yang, Jinghua; Liu, Qiufang; Qi, Ming; Lu, Shuai; Zhang, Lifeng; Cai, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    In past decades, researches on radiation-induced bystander effect mainly focused on ionizing radiation such as α-particle, β-particle, X-ray and γ-ray. But few researches have been conducted on the ability of ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced bystander effect, and knowledge of UVC-induced bystander effect is far limited. Here, we adopted medium transfer experiment to detect whether UVC could cause bystander effect in Chinese hamster V79 cells. We determined the cell viability, apoptosis rate, chromosome aberration and ultrastructure changes, respectively. Our results showed that: (1) the viability of UVC-irradiated V79 cells declined significantly with the dosage of UVC; (2) similar to the irradiated cells, the main death type of bystander cells cultured in irradiation conditioned medium (ICMs) was also apoptosis; (3) soluble factors secreted by UVC-irradiated cells could induce bystander effect in V79 cells; (4) cells treated with 4 h ICM collected from 90 mJ cm(-2) UVC-irradiated cells displayed the strongest response. Our data revealed that UVC could cause bystander effect through the medium soluble factors excreted from irradiated cells and this bystander effect was a novel quantitative and kinetic response. These findings might provide a foundation to further explore the exact soluble bystander factors and detailed mechanism underlying UVC-induced bystander effect. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  11. Modification of radiation-induced acute oral mucositis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, M; Ross, G A

    2004-02-01

    A new non-toxic drug (compound A) consisting of curcumin, alpha-tocopherol and sunflower oil was developed and its efficacy tested in the treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis in the rat. Mature (12 weeks old, 200-225 g) female Sprague-Dawley rats were used. While under general anaesthesia, the tongues of the animals were slightly extended outside and a region of the underside of the tongue was irradiated in-situ with single doses of 2.27 MeV beta-rays from a 5-mm diameter 90Sr/90Y plaque. The dose-rate of the source was about 10 Gy min(-1) at the surface of the mucus membrane. Irradiations and subsequent assessment of the lesion were carried out under general anaesthesia maintained by a 1.5% halothane/oxygen mixture. Six groups of animals were irradiated with single doses of 13.5, 15.0, 16.5 or 18Gy. One subgroup (radiation only) received no further treatment, while the other five groups received 0.5 ml day(-1) of either compound A, sunflower oil, alpha-tocopherol, curcumin or water containing 10% ethanol by oral gavage until the end of experiments. Mucosal ulceration (erosion of mucosal epithelium) was considered as an end-point. From the day after irradiation until any acute radiation-induced oral mucosal lesion had healed, the tongues of the animals were assessed daily for the presence of radiation-induced mucositis (mucosal ulceration). Quantal data for the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis were analysed using logit analysis and a dose-modification factor was obtained. There was a modest increase in ED50, the dose expected to cause mucositis in 50% of the animals after both alpha-tocopherol and sunflower oil were administered. This resulted in dose-modification factors of 1.05. While curcumin treatment resulted in a dose-modification factor of 1.09. Compound A significantly reduced the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis with a statistically significant dose-modification factor of 1.2 +/- 0.1. Curcumin and other components of compound A

  12. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress Immune Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Ly, Nancy Ngoc Giao; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R.; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcome, compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of pre-invasive foci. Methods We investigated the effects of radiation in p48Cre;LSL-KrasG12D (KC) and p48Cre;LSLKrasG12D;LSL-Trp53R172H (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2–12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from invasive and pre-invasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype, compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8+ T cells than controls and greater numbers of CD4+ T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. An antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Conclusions Radiation exposure causes macrophages in PDAs

  13. [Surgical treatment of radiation-induced lesions of the hip in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duparc, J; Massin, P

    1996-11-01

    The authors report their experience in the surgical management of lesions of the adult hip following radiotherapy. The diagnosis of a hip problem occurring after pelvic radiotherapy for malignant tumors is made by clinical and radiological examination. The problems include femoral head necrosis, necrosis and/or fracture of the acetabulum, or involvement of the entire hip joint (radiation coxopathy). Fractures of the femoral neck have been described in the literature, but are now very rare following the routine use of external shields as protection during irradiation. Post-irradiation lesions are often bilateral 21%. They appear after a variable latency period of two to twenty years and they progress remorselessly. A diagnosis of simple radio necrosis can only be made after using radio isotope bone scanning, MRI or CT to exclude malignant disease as acetabular metastasis, and radio-induced sarcomas. Hemiarthroplasty is often followed by collapse of the acetabulum and should no longer be used. The treatment generally practised nowadays is a Total Hip Replacement (THR). We report a retrospective study of 71 hips in 56 patients treated, between 1970 and 1982, by the use of conventional cemented components. In 49 hips this was followed by a 52% incidence of acetabular loosening resulting from the poor quality of the irradiated bone which had become necrotic and porotic. Between 1983 and 1990, we modified the technique by regularly using reinforcing the acetabulum with a metallic ring fixed by long screws, (as used in revision surgery for THR). Bone grafts were also used in 9 cases. We had a 12% incidence of loosening in 22 hips with a mean follow-up of 40 months. There were also two post-operative infection which need removal of the prostheses. This emphasizes the risk of infection in this type of surgery and is probably increased by the associated lesions of the soft tissues (lymphoedema, radiodermitis). The authors wish to stress the poor prognosis of radiation

  14. Radiation-Induced Testicular Injury and Its Amelioration by Tinospora cordifolia (An Indian Medicinal Plant Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this investigation is to determine the deleterious effects of sub lethal gamma radiation on testes and their possible inhibition by Tinospora cordifolia extract (TCE. For this purpose, one group of male Swiss albino mice was exposed to 7.5 Gy gamma radiation to serve as the irradiated control, while the other group received TCE (75 mg/kg b. wt./day orally for 5 consecutive days half an hr before irradiation to serve as experimental. Exposure of animals to 7.5 Gy gamma radiation resulted into significant decrease in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter up to 15 days of irradiation. Cent percent mortality was recorded by day 17th in irradiated control, whereas all animals survived in experimental group. TCE pretreatment rendered significant increase in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter at various intervals as compared to irradiated group. Radiation induced histological lesions in testicular architecture were observed more severe in irradiated control then the experimental. TCE administration before irradiation significantly ameliorated radiation induced elevation in lipid peroxidation and decline in glutathione concentration in testes. These observations indicate the radio- protective potential of Tinospora cordifolia root extract in testicular constituents against gamma irradiation in mice.

  15. Radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction: An experimental model in the old rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamproglou, I. [Laboratoire de Biophysique, Paris (France); Chen, Q.M.; Poisson, M. [Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    To develop a model of radiation-induced behavioral dysfunction. A course of whole brain radiation therapy (30 Gy/10 fractions/12 days) was administered to 26 Wistar rats ages 16-27 months, while 26 control rats received sham irradiation. Sequential behavioral studies including one-way avoidance, two-way avoidance, and a standard operant conditioning method (press-lever avoidance) were undertaken. In addition, rats were studied in a water maze 7 months postradiation therapy. Prior to radiation therapy, both groups were similar. No difference was found 1 and 3 months postradiation therapy. At 6-7 months postradiation therapy, irradiated rats had a much lower percentage of avoidance than controls for one-way avoidance (23% vs. 55%, p {le} 0.001) and two-way avoidance (18% vs. 40%, p {le} 0.01). Seven months postradiation therapy the reaction time was increased (press-lever avoidance, 11.20 s vs. 8.43 s, p {le} 0.05) and the percentage of correct response was lower (water maze, 53% vs. 82%) in irradiated rats compared with controls. Pathological examination did not demonstrate abnormalities of the irradiated brains at the light microscopic level. Behavioral dysfunction affecting mainly memory can be demonstrated following conventional radiation therapy in old rats. This model can be used to study the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive changes. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: This review examines the evidence for the hypothesis that epigenetics are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Conclusion: In addition to the extensively studied targeted effects of radiation, it is now apparent that non-targeted delayed effects such as RIGI are also important post-irradiation outcomes. In RIGI, unirradiated progeny cells display phenotypic changes at delayed times after radiation of the parental cell. RIGI is thought to be important in the process of carcinogenesis, however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. In the genomically unstable clones developed by Morgan and colleagues, radiation-induced mutations, double-strand breaks, or changes in mRNA levels alone could not account for the initiation or perpetuation of RIGI. Since changes in the DNA sequence could not fully explain the mechanism of RIGI, inherited epigenetic changes may be involved. Epigenetics are known to play an important role in many cellular processes and epigenetic aberrations can lead to carcinogenesis. Recent studies in the field of radiation biology suggest that the changes in methylation patterns may be involved in RIGI. Together these clues have led us to hypothesize that epigenetics may be the missing link in understanding the mechanism behind RIGI.

  17. Ionizing radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis and adaptation: Quantitative and temporal aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Junqing; Baldwin, Joseph; Held, Kathryn D; Prise, Kevin M; Redmond, Robert W.; Liber, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    This work explores several quantitative aspects of radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in WTK1 human lymphoblast cells. Gamma-irradiation of cells was used to generate conditioned medium containing bystander signals, and that medium was transferred onto naïve recipient cells. Kinetic studies revealed that it required up to one hour to generate sufficient signal to induce the maximal level of mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in the bystander cells receiving the conditioned medium. Furthermore, it required at least one hour of exposure to the signal in the bystander cells to induce mutations. Bystander signal was fairly stable in the medium, requiring 12–24 hours to diminish. Medium that contained bystander signal was rendered ineffective by a 4-fold dilution; in contrast a greater than 20-fold decrease in the cell number irradiated to generate a bystander signal was needed to eliminate bystander-induced mutagenesis. This suggested some sort of feedback inhibition by bystander signal that prevented the signaling cells from releasing more signal. Finally, an ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response was shown to be effective in reducing bystander mutagenesis; in addition, low levels of exposure to bystander signal in the transferred medium induced adaptation that was effective in reducing mutations induced by subsequent γ-ray exposures. PMID:19695271

  18. Ionizing radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis and adaptation: Quantitative and temporal aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ying; Zhou Junqing; Baldwin, Joseph [Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Held, Kathryn D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Redmond, Robert W. [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Liber, Howard L., E-mail: howard.liber@colostate.edu [Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, Denver, CO (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This work explores several quantitative aspects of radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in WTK1 human lymphoblast cells. Gamma-irradiation of cells was used to generate conditioned medium containing bystander signals, and that medium was transferred onto naive recipient cells. Kinetic studies revealed that it required up to 1 h to generate sufficient signal to induce the maximal level of mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in the bystander cells receiving the conditioned medium. Furthermore, it required at least 1 h of exposure to the signal in the bystander cells to induce mutations. Bystander signal was fairly stable in the medium, requiring 12-24 h to diminish. Medium that contained bystander signal was rendered ineffective by a 4-fold dilution; in contrast a greater than 20-fold decrease in the cell number irradiated to generate a bystander signal was needed to eliminate bystander-induced mutagenesis. This suggested some sort of feedback inhibition by bystander signal that prevented the signaling cells from releasing more signal. Finally, an ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response was shown to be effective in reducing bystander mutagenesis; in addition, low levels of exposure to bystander signal in the transferred medium induced adaptation that was effective in reducing mutations induced by subsequent {gamma}-ray exposures.

  19. Radiation induced current in the RF coils of integrated linac-MR systems: the effect of buildup and magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Ben; Ghila, Andrei; Fallone, B G; Rathee, Satyapal

    2012-08-01

    In integrated linac-MRI systems, a measurable radiation induced current (RIC) is caused in RF coils by pulsed irradiation. This work (1) tests a buildup method of RIC removal in planar conductors; (2) validates a Monte Carlo method of RIC calculation in metal conductors; and (3) uses the Monte Carlo method to examine the effects of magnetic fields on both planar conductor and practical cylindrical coil geometries. The RIC was measured in copper and aluminum plates, taken as the RF coil conductor surrogates, as a function of increasing thickness of buildup materials (teflon and copper). Based on the Penelope Monte Carlo code, a method of RIC calculation was implemented and validated against measurements. This method was then used to calculate the RIC in cylindrical coil geometries with various air gaps between the coil conductor and the enclosed water phantom. Magnetic fields, both parallel and perpendicular to the radiation beam direction, were then included in the simulation program. The effect of magnetic fields on the effectiveness of RIC removal with the application of buildup material was examined in both the planar and the cylindrical geometries. Buildup reduced RIC in metal plate conductors. For copper detector∕copper buildup case, the RIC amplitude was reduced to zero value with 0.15 cm copper buildup. However, when the copper is replaced with teflon as buildup atop the copper conductor, the RIC was only reduced to 80% of its value at zero buildup since the true electronic equilibrium cannot be obtained in this case. For the aluminum detector∕teflon buildup case, the initial amplitude of the RIC was reduced by 90% and 92% in planar aluminum conductor and a surface coil, respectively. In case of cylindrical coils made of aluminum, teflon buildup around the coil's outer surface was generally effective but failed to remove RIC when there was an air gap between the coil and the phantom. Stronger magnetic fields (>0.5 T) perpendicular to the beam direction

  20. P53 status in radiation-induced soft-tissue sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubert, H.; Meye, A.; Hinze, R.; Holzhausen, H.J.; Schmidt, H.; Rath, F.W. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle/Saale (Germany). Inst. of Pathology; Bache, M.; Dunst, J. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle/Saale (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Wuerl, P. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Surgical Clinic

    1998-08-01

    Background: Following therapeutic irradiation after a latency period of many years radiation-induced tumors, often sarcomas, can arise. Results of radiation-induced DNA damage can be 1. p53 over-expression, inducing growth arrest or apoptosis, and 2. occurrence of mutations, frequently including the p53 gene, as one molecular promotor for carcinogenesis. We were interested whether radiation-induced sarcomas are associated with alterations of the p53 status. Material and Methods: Samples from 11 radiation-induced soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) were studied by a non-radioactive PCR-SSCP sequencing analysis and by immunohistochemistry with five antibodies for their p53 status. Results: A tumor of one patient possessed a G>A transition in codon 280 (exon 8). Of 11 tumors, 9 showed nuclear p53 positivity, detected by monoclonal antibody DO-1. Of these 9 patients, 7 died during the observation period, whereas the 2 patients with DO-1 negative tumor samples are still alive. Conclusions: p53 over-expression and p53 mutation occur in radiation-induced STS. p53 status is expected to have prognostic impact for radiation-induced STS. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Als Folge therapeutischer Bestrahlung koennen nach einer laengeren Latenzzeit von mehreren Jahren strahleninduzierte Tumoren, oft Sarkome, entstehen. Als Ergebnis strahleninduzierter DNA-Schaeden kann es 1. zu einer Ueberexprimierung von p53 und damit verbunden zu einer Wachstumsarretierung bzw. Apoptose kommen und 2. zum Auftreten von Mutationen fuehren, die haeufig das p53-Gen betreffen und Promotor fuer eine Kanzerogenese sind. Uns interessierte, ob fuer strahleninduzierte Sarkome ein veraenderter p53-Status vorliegt. Patientengut und Methode: Wir untersuchten Tumorproben von elf strahleninduzierten Weichteilsarkomen in einer nichtradioaktiven PCR-SSCP-Sequenzierungsanalyse und immunhistochemisch mit Hilfe von fuenf p53-Antikoerpern auf Veraenderungen im p53-Status. Ergebnisse: Der Tumor eines Patienten wies eine G

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced macular ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim A Haji

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Shamim A Haji1,2, Ronald EP Frenkel1,2,31Eye Research Foundation, Stuart, FL, USA; 2East Florida Eye Institute, Stuart, FL, USA; 3Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami, FL, USAPurpose: To report a case of radiation-induced macular ischemia where vision and macular perfusion improved after hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy.Methods: A 62-year-old male patient developed radiation-induced macular ischemia after he was treated with radiation for brain glioma. The patient presented with best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA acuity of 20/400 in his right eye. Optical coherence tomography (OCT showed central macular thickness of 468 μm. The patient received focal laser, intravitreal triamcinolone, and HBO therapy.Results: The patient’s vision improved from 20/400 to 20/100 after focal laser and intravitreal triamcinolone. His central macular thickness improved from 468 μm to 132 μm. After receiving HBO therapy, his VA improved to 20/50 and fluorescein angiography showed improvement in macular perfusion.Conclusion: HBO therapy improves macular perfusion in patients with radiation-induced macular ischemia.Keywords: macular ischemia, visual acuity, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, macular perfusion

  2. Detection of the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Chung, Dong Min; Kim, Jin-Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    By definition, the direct effect is referred to interaction between photon and DNA molecule, whereas the indirect effect is mediated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiolysis and subsequent reaction. It has been reported that ROS produced after exposure to IR can react with cellular materials such as DNA, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. ROS is free radicals such as the superoxide anion, hydroxyl radicals and the non-radical hydrogen peroxide. Cells generate ROS during aerobic metabolism. Excessive production of ROS can lead to oxidative stress, genetic alteration and even cell death. It has been reported that ROS plays a critical role in radiation-induced cell injury. Thus, it is of great interest to determine the radiation-induced ROS level. Many kinds of methods to detect the level of ROS have been developed so far. There were random changes of fluorescence intensity in the treatment after irradiation. This result meant that this protocol was not appropriate for determination of radiation-induced ROS. On the other hand, the fluorescence intensity was increased in a dose-dependent manner when the cells were treated with the DCFH-DA solution before irradiation. Conclusions can be drawn from the experimental results of this study. In order to properly measure the ROS level in the cells exposed to ionizing radiation, the cells should be treated with the DCFH-DA solution before irradiation.

  3. The genotoxic effects of DNA lesions induced by artificial UV-radiation and sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2010-06-01

    Solar radiation sustains and affects all life forms on Earth. The increase in solar UV-radiation at environmental levels, due to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, highlights serious issues of social concern. This becomes still more dramatic in tropical and subtropical regions where radiation-intensity is still higher. Thus, there is the need to evaluate the harmful effects of solar UV-radiation on the DNA molecule as a basis for assessing the risks involved for human health, biological productivity and ecosystems. In order to evaluate the profile of DNA damage induced by this form of radiation and its genotoxic effects, plasmid DNA samples were exposed to artificial-UV lamps and directly to sunlight. The induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts (CPDs) and oxidative DNA damage in these molecules were evaluated by means of specific DNA repair enzymes. On the other hand, the biological effects of such lesions were determined through the analysis of the DNA inactivation rate and mutation frequency, after replication of the damaged pCMUT vector in an Escherichia coliMBL50 strain. The results indicated the induction of a significant number of CPDs after exposure to increasing doses of UVC, UVB, UVA radiation and sunlight. Interestingly, these photoproducts are those lesions that better correlate with plasmid inactivation as well as mutagenesis, and the oxidative DNA damages induced present very low correlation with these effects. The results indicated that DNA photoproducts play the main role in the induction of genotoxic effects by artificial UV-radiation sources and sunlight. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimization of induced crystallization reaction in a novel process of nutrients removal coupled with phosphorus recovery from domestic wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Haiming

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus removal and recovery from domestic wastewater is urgent nowadays. A novel process of nutrients removal coupled with phosphorus recovery from domestic sewage was proposed and optimization of induced crystallization reaction was performed in this study. The results showed that 92.3% of phosphorus recovery via induced Hydroxyapatite crystallization was achieved at the optimum process parameters: reaction time of 80 min, seed crystal loads of 60 g/L, pH of 8.5, Ca/P mole ratio of 2.0 and 4.0 L/min aeration rate when the PO43--P concentration was 10 mg/L in the influent, displaying an excellent phosphorus recovery performance. Importantly, it was found that the effect of reaction temperature on induced Hydroxyapatite crystallization was slight, thus favoring practical application of phosphorus recovery method described in this study. From these results, the proposed method of induced HAP crystallization to recover phosphorus combined with nutrients removal can be an economical and effective technology, probably favoring the water pollution control and phosphate rock recycle.

  5. Implication of prostaglandins and histamine h1 and h2 receptors in radiation-induced temperature responses of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Mickley, G.A .

    1988-01-01

    Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy cobalt 60 gamma radiation induced hyperthermia, whereas 20-200 Gy induced hypothermia. Exposure either to the head or to the whole body to 10 Gy induced hyperthermia, while body-only exposure produced hypothermia. This observation indicates that radiation-induced fever is a result of a direct effect on the brain. The hyperthermia due to 10 Gy was significantly attenuated by the pre- or post-treatment with a cyclooxgenase inhibitor, indomethacin. Hyperthermia was also altered by the central administration of a mu receptor antagonist naloxone but only at low doses of radiation. These findings suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia may be mediated through the synthesis and release of prostaglandins in the brain and to a lesser extent to the release of endogenous opioid peptides. The release of histamine acting on H(1) and H(2) receptors may be involved in radiation-induced hypothermia since both the H(1) receptor antagonist, mepyramine, and H(2) receptor antagonist, cimetidine, antagonized the hypothermia. The results of these studies suggested that the release of neurohumoral substances induced by exposure to ionizing radiation is dose dependent and has different consequences on physiological processes such as the regulation of body temperature. Furthermore, the antagonism of radiation-induced hyperthermia by indomethacin may have potential therapeutic implications in the treatment of fever resulting from accidental irradiations.

  6. Implication of prostaglandins and histamine H1 and H2 receptors in radiation-induced temperature responses of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Mickley, G.A.

    1988-04-01

    Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy gamma radiation (/sup 60/Co) induced hyperthermia, whereas 20-200 Gy induced hypothermia. Exposure either to the head or to the whole body to 10 Gy induced hyperthermia, while body-only exposure produced hypothermia. This observation indicates that radiation-induced fever is a result of a direct effect on the brain. The hyperthermia due to 10 Gy was significantly attenuated by the pre- or post-treatment with a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin. Hyperthermia was also altered by the central administration of a mu-receptor antagonist naloxone but only at low doses of radiation. These findings suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia may be mediated through the synthesis and release of prostaglandins in the brain and to a lesser extent to the release of endogenous opioid peptides. The release of histamine acting on H1 and H2 receptors may be involved in radiation-induced hypothermia, since both the H1 receptor antagonist, mepyramine, and H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine, antagonized the hypothermia. The results of these studies suggest that the release of neurohumoral substances induced by exposure to ionizing radiation is dose dependent and has different consequences on physiological processes such as the regulation of body temperature. Furthermore, the antagonism of radiation-induced hyperthermia by indomethacin may have potential therapeutic implications in the treatment of fever resulting from accidental irradiations.

  7. Radionuclides in radiation-induced bystander effect; may it share in radionuclide therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, M

    2017-01-01

    For many years in radiobiology and radiotherapy predominated the conviction that cellular DNA is the main target for ionizing radiation, however, the view has changed in the past 20 years. Nowadays, it is assumed that not only directed (targeted) radiation effect, but also an indirect (non-targeted) effect may contribute to the result of radiation treatment. Non-targeted effect is relatively well recognized after external beam irradiation in vitro and in vivo, and comprises such phenomena like radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), genomic instability, adaptive response and abscopal (out of field) effect. These stress-induced and molecular signaling mediated phenomena appear in non-targeted cells as variety responses resembling that observed in directly hit cells. Bystander effects can be both detrimental and beneficial in dependence on dose, dose-rate, cell type, genetic status and experimental condition. Less is known about radionuclide-induced non-targeted effects in radionuclide therapy, although, based on characteristics of the radionuclide radiation, on experiments in vitro utilizing classical and 3-D cell cultures, and preclinical study on animals it seems obvious that exposure to radionuclide is accompanied by various bystander effects, mostly damaging, less often protective. This review summarizes existing data on radionuclide induced bystander effects comprising radionuclides emitting beta- and alpha-particles and Auger electrons used in tumor radiotherapy and diagnostics. So far, separation of the direct effect of radionuclide decay from crossfire and bystander effects in clinical targeted radionuclide therapy is impossible because of the lack of methods to assess whether, and to what extent bystander effect is involved in human organism. Considerations on this topic are also included.

  8. Gutenberg-Richter-type relation for laboratory fracture-induced electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovitch, A; Frid, V; Bahat, D

    2002-01-01

    The fractal nature of electromagnetic radiation induced by uniaxial and triaxial rock fracture is considered. Both the well-known Gutenberg-Richter-type and the Benioff strain-release relationship, for earthquakes and starquakes, are shown to extend to the microscale (millimeters-centimeters). Results show that both the b value of the Gutenberg-Richter-type law and the slope of the Benioff strain-release relationship of the electromagnetic radiation signals are similar to values known for earthquakes. These results imply that a common mechanism is acting at all scales.

  9. Comparison of radiation damage in silicon induced by proton and neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ruzin, A; Glaser, M; Zanet, A; Lemeilleur, F; Watts, S

    1999-01-01

    The subject of radiation damage to Si detectors induced by 24-GeV/c protons and nuclear reactor neutrons has been studied. Detectors fabricated on single-crystal silicon enriched with various impurities have been tested. Significant differences in electrically active defects have been found between the various types of material. The results of the study suggest for the first time that the widely used nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) factors are insufficient for normalization of the electrically active damage in case of oxygen- and carbon-enriched silicon detectors. It has been found that a deliberate introduction of impurities into the semiconductor can affect the radiation hardness of silicon detectors. (16 refs).

  10. Hyperbaric oxygenation was effective in a case of radiation-induced optic neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Ayumi; Dake, Yoshinori; Amemiya, Tsugio [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-03-01

    A 68-year-old female underwent radiation treatment followed by surgical extirpation for olfactory neuroblastoma in the left ethmoidal sinus. Acute optic neuropathy developed 16 months later in her left eye. The visual acuity was reduced to finger counting at 30 cm. Treatment with systemic corticosteroid and hyperbaric oxygenation for 2 months resulted in improvement in fundus findings and improvement of visual acuity to 0.5. The findings show the potential effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for radiation-induced optic neuropathy. (author).

  11. Genome-wide analysis of radiation-induced mutations in rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zuxin; Lin, Juncheng; Lin, Tongxiang; Xu, Ming; Huang, Zhiwei; Yang, Zhijian; Huang, Xinying; Zheng, Jingui

    2014-04-01

    Radiation has been efficiently used for rice germplasm innovation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which radiation induces mutations are still unclear. In this study, we performed whole genome sequencing to reveal the comprehensive mutations in rice treated with radiation. Red-1 (a rice rich in beneficial ingredients for human health) was derived from rice 9311 after γ-radiation. Solexa sequencing technology was applied to uncover the mutations. Compared with the 9311 genome, 9.19% of genome sequences were altered in the Red-1 genome. Among these alterations, there were 381,403 SNPs, 50,116 1-5 bp Indels, 1279 copy number variations, and 10,026 presence/absence variations. These alterations were located in 14,493 genes, the majority of which contained a kinase domain, leucine rich repeats, or Cyt_P450. Point mutations were the main type of variation in the Red-1 genome. Gene ontology clustering revealed that genes that are associated with cell components, binding function, catalytic activity and metabolic processes were susceptible to γ-radiation. It was also predicted that 8 mutated genes were involved in the biosynthetic pathways of beneficial products or pigment accumulation. We conclude that genome-wide analysis of mutations provides novel insights into the mechanisms by which radiation improves the beneficial ingredients in rice Red-1.

  12. Comet assay as a procedure for detecting possible genotoxicity induced by non-ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Nemeth

    2015-05-01

    In our laboratory we use comet assay for testing genotoxicity of non-ionizing radiation for more than ten years. In the experiments we use whole blood samples (human or dog, cell lines (e.g. H295R cell line or 3 dimensional in vitro skin tissue (epidermis models. In our protocol a slightly modified alkaline Comet assay method of Singh et al. (1988 is used. On our poster there will be presented a brief summary of our experiments with exposure to different types of radiation (ELF, RF, and intermediate frequency. In our protocols the non-ionizing radiation was often combined with ionizing radiation to see whether the non-ionizing radiation can influence the repair of the DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. For the evaluation of the slides mainly Komet 4.0 image analysis system software (Kinetic Imaging, Liverpool, UK was used, but as we got familiarized with other methods for slide evaluation like grading the comets by visual scoring into 5 categories or the CaspLab software, the comparison of these three methods will be also presented.

  13. Corticosteroids and Azathioprine Do Not Prevent Radiation-Induced Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Kwok

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of a man who presented with dyspnea and a dry cough six weeks after mediastinal radiotherapy for malignant thymoma is described. The patient was on prednisone (30 mg/day and azathioprine (100 mg/day throughout the course of radiation. The respiratory difficulties developed as the dose of prednisone was gradually decreased to 20 mg/day postradiation. Chest x-ray showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Computed tomography scan of the thorax confirmed bilateral ground glass opacities, with well-defined lateral margin on the right side corresponding to the field of radiation. However, the airspace opacities extended beyond the radiation field into the periphery of the lungs together with mild airway dilation on the left side compatible with bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP or cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. Bronchoalveolar lavage performed on the nonirradiated area showed an intense lymphocytosis. No cause of BOOP other than radiation was found. Treatment with high dose corticosteroids (80 mg/day resulted in rapid clinical and radiological improvement, and resolution of chest x-ray abnormalities. Focal mediastinal radiation therapy may induce diffuse lung injury including BOOP. In addition, the concurrent use of moderate dose prednisone and azathioprine during the periradiotherapy period does not prevent the development of either BOOP or classic radiation pneumonitis.

  14. The impact of locally multiply damaged sites (LMDS) induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D.; Boucher, D. [Institut Curie-Section de Recherche, UMR2027 CNRS, LCR-V28 du CEA, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have shown that ionising radiations produce a specific type of clustered cell damage called locally multiply damaged sites or LMDS. These lesions consist of closely positioned single-strand breaks, (oxidative) base damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in between one helical turn of DNA. As specific markers of radiation-induced damage these lesions are likely to condition biological responses and are thus of great interest for radiation protection. Calculations indicate that there should be more LMDS induced by high than by low LET radiation, and they should be absent in un-irradiated cells. Processes like K-shell activation and local Auger electron emission can be expected to add complex DSB or LMDS, producing significant chromosomal damage. In the discussion of the specificity of ionising radiation in comparison to other genotoxic agents, many arguments have been put forward that these lesions should be particularly deleterious for living cells. Complex lesions of that type should represent big obstacles for DNA repair and give rise to high lethality. Moreover, cellular attempts to repair them could accentuate harm, leading to mutations, genetic instability and cancer. In vitro experiments with oligonucleotides containing an artificially introduced set of base damage and SSB in different combinations have shown that depending on the close positioning of the damage on DNA, repair enzymes, and even whole cell extracts, are unable to repair properly and may stimulate mis-repair. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in conjunction with enzymatic treatments has been used to detect LMDS in mammalian cells after high and low LET radiation. In order to further define the importance of LMDS for radiation induced cellular responses, we studied the induction of LMDS as a function of radiation dose and dose rate in mammalian cells (CHO and MRC5) using {sup 137}Cs gamma-radiation. Using PFGE and specific glycosylases to convert oxidative damage

  15. Radiation-Induced Noncancer Risks in Interventional Cardiology: Optimisation of Procedures and Staff and Patient Dose Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairuddin Md Yusof, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted. PMID:24027768

  16. Efficacy and survival associated with cystoscopy and clot evacuation for radiation or cyclophosphamide induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Joshua R; Wolf, J Stuart

    2009-02-01

    We assessed the outcome of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis severe enough to require cystoscopy and clot evacuation. We retrospectively evaluated the records of 33 patients with cyclophosphamide or radiation induced hemorrhagic cystitis treated with cystoscopy. Mean followup of living patients was 76 months. Of 33 patients 20 (61%) had resolution of hematuria after single cystoscopy unrelated to hemorrhagic cystitis etiology. Only 4 of 11 patients (36%) had resolution after 2 or more cystoscopies, and all were in the radiation induced hemorrhagic cystitis group (4 of 6, 67%) with none in the cyclophosphamide induced hemorrhagic cystitis group (0 of 5, p = 0.02). Hematuria was refractory to cystoscopy in 9 patients and ileal conduits were created in 4. Kaplan-Meier overall survival at 1, 2 and 5 years was 58%, 51% and 43%, respectively, with survival tending to be worse in patients who received cyclophosphamide for bone marrow transplantation induction. Of the 18 deaths 3 were due to complications of hemorrhagic cystitis, 13 were due to the disease underlying the hemorrhagic cystitis and 2 were unrelated. The response of hemorrhagic cystitis to single cystoscopy and clot evacuation is reasonable but response to subsequent cystoscopy (unless the hemorrhagic cystitis is radiation induced) is less likely, so alternate interventions should be considered if hematuria does not resolve after initial cystoscopy. Patients with hemorrhagic cystitis requiring cystoscopy have a poor prognosis even if hematuria resolves, although most deaths are related to the disease underlying the hemorrhagic cystitis rather than its direct result.

  17. Radiation-induced cranial neuropathy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, X.; Tang, Y.; Lu, K.; Peng, Y. [Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Neurology; Chen, M. [Sun Yat-sen Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the long-term characteristics of radiation-induced cranial nerve injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. We studied cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in 328 NPC patients who received radiotherapy between 1994 and 2006. Follow-up was 93.6% complete as of December 2009. A total of 72 patients with CNP were recruited for analysis (56 men and 16 women). Patients with evidence of residual or recurrent tumor accompanied by CNP were excluded. The characteristics of CNP and the relationship with the radiation fields as well as re-radiotherapy were evaluated. After a mean follow-up of 11.2 years, 72 patients were found to have developed CNP. The latency of palsy ranged from 0.6-16.0 years. For the 67 patients with first course radiation, the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves were the most vulnerable combination, occurring in 57 patients (85.1%). Patients with facial-cervical field radiation had a significantly longer latency comparing with that of patients with facial-cervical split fields (p = 0.021). In the first 5 years, 49.3% of patients developed CNP, while 40.3% presented CNP in the second 5-year period. In patients with first course radiation, 61 patients had more than one CNP. With regard to the 5 patients with re-radiation, most of them had multiple upper cranial nerve injuries. Radiation therapy of NPC patients may lead to cranial neuropathy. Patients with facial-cervical radiation fields had a longer latency for the manifestation of CNP compared with those patients who were treated with split fields. In patients with re-radiotherapy, the frequency of upper cranial nerve injury increased greatly.

  18. Radioactivity of Tobacco Leaves and Radiation Dose Induced from Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastefanou, Constantin

    2009-01-01

    The radioactivity in tobacco leaves collected from 15 different regions of Greece and before cigarette production was studied in order to find out any association between the root uptake of radionuclides from soil ground by the tobacco plants and the effective dose induced to smokers from cigarette tobacco due to the naturally occurring primordial radionuclides, such as 226Ra and 210Pb of the uranium series and 228Ra of the thorium series and/or man-made radionuclides, such as 137Cs of Chernobyl origin. Gamma-ray spectrometry was applied using Ge planar and coaxial type detectors of high resolution and high efficiency. It was concluded that the activities of the radioisotopes of radium, 226Ra and 228Ra in the tobacco leaves reflected their origin from the soil by root uptake rather than fertilizers used in the cultivation of tobacco plants. Lead-210 originated from the air and was deposited onto the tobacco leaves and trapped by the trichomes. Potassium-40 in the tobacco leaves was due to root uptake either from soil or from fertilizer. The cesium radioisotopes 137Cs and 134Cs in tobacco leaves were due to root uptake and not due to deposition onto the leaf foliage as they still remained in soil four years after the Chernobyl reactor accident, but were absent from the atmosphere because of the rain washout (precipitation) and gravitational settling. The annual effective dose due to inhalation for adults (smokers) for 226Ra varied from 42.5 to 178.6 μSv/y (average 79.7 μSv/y), while for 228Ra from 19.3 to 116.0 μSv/y (average 67.1 μSv/y) and for 210Pb from 47.0 to 134.9 μSv/y (average 104.7 μSv/y), that is the same order of magnitude for each radionuclide. The sum of the effective doses of the three radionuclides varied from 151.9 to 401.3 μSv/y (average 251.5 μSv/y). The annual effective dose from 137Cs of Chernobyl origin was three orders of magnitude lower as it varied from 70.4 to 410.4 nSv/y (average 199.3 nSv/y). PMID:19440399

  19. Low concentration of exogenous carbon monoxide protects mammalian cells against proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Liping [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Bao, Lingzhi; Wu, Wenqing; Wang, Hongzhi [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Han, Wei, E-mail: hanw@hfcas.cn [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • We show the possibility of modulate proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect with low concentration carbon monoxide. • Carbon monoxide inhibited proliferation via modulating the transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway. • Exogenous carbon monoxide has potential application in clinical radiotherapy. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has been proposed to have tight relationship with the irradiation-caused secondary cancers beyond the irradiation-treated area after radiotherapy. Our previous studies demonstrated a protective effect of low concentration carbon monoxide (CO) on the genotoxicity of RIBE after α-particle irradiation. In the present work, a significant inhibitory effect of low-dose exogenous CO, generated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer [CO-releasing molecule (CORM-2)], on both RIBE-induced proliferation and chromosome aberration was observed. Further studies on the mechanism revealed that the transforming growth factor β1/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, which mediated RIBE signaling transduction, could be modulated by CO involved in the protective effects. Considering the potential of exogenous CO in clinical applications and its protective effect on RIBE, the present work aims to provide a foundation for potential application of CO in radiotherapy.

  20. Operational strategies and environmental conditions inducing aerobic denitritation in short-cut biological nitrogen removal at side-line treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdirencelebi, Dilek; Koyuncu, Serdar

    2017-06-07

    Factors promoting aerobic denitritation in a pilot-scale short-cut biological nitrogen removal (SBNR) process were investigated. The study implemented optimization of nitrogen removal in the anaerobic reject water (ARW) having a low organic C:N ratio ARW was produced in a large-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Aerobic denitritation occurred consistently during study of a specific period of sequential batch reactor (SBR) where nitrite removal under fully aerobic conditions was obtained with a switch from oxygen to nitrite respiration, creating an aerobic (high oxidation-reduction potential) condition. Specific factors inducing aerobic denitritation were found related to several parameters as ammonium concentration, temperature, feeding mode, duration of the oxic stage and substrate availability due to beta-oxidation of lipid matter. Microbial analyses indicated a higher increase in nitrite reducing than ammonium oxidizing activity, as an evidence for nitrifying denitrifier bacterial dominance in the biomass. The reaction induced a reduction in the inhibitory products of the process as volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and free nitrous oxide (FNA), produced bicarbonate and increased removal efficiency of ammonium and nitrite, thus, total nitrogen. The outcome presents potential ways for further saving on aeration and chemical need via operational means, while taking advantage of the slowly degrading organic matter on SBNR performance.

  1. Gamma radiation-induced conditioned taste aversions in rats: A comparison of the protective effects of area postrema lesions with differing doses of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossenkopp, K.P.; Giugno, L. (Univ. of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1989-10-01

    Lesions which destroy the area postrema (AP) and damage the adjacent nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) attenuate or abolish conditioned taste aversions (CTA) induced by a variety of pharmacological agents as well as exposure to radiation. In the present experiment, 4 groups of male rats received lesions of AP and 4 groups were given sham lesions. One sham-lesioned and one AP-lesioned group were given a single pairing of 1-hr access to a novel 0.10% sodium saccharin solution followed immediately with exposure to 0, 100, 200, or 400 rad of gamma radiation, respectively. Four days later all groups were given daily two-bottle preference tests (saccharin vs. water) on 4 consecutive days. The sham-lesioned groups exposed to the radiation (100, 200, or 400 rad) developed profound aversions to the saccharin on all test days (p less than 0.001). In contrast, all of the AP-lesioned groups as well as the sham-irradiated (0 rad) sham-lesioned group exhibited strong, comparable (p greater than 0.30) preferences for saccharin. Thus, lesion of AP abolished the radiation-induced CTA at all dose levels of radiation. These results raise the possibility of pharmacological intervention at the level of AP to prevent radiation-induced CTA in cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy.

  2. The Development of Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Adverse Health Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The Development of Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Adverse Health Effects Ann R. Kennedy Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 195 John Morgan Building, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA, United States 19104-6072 The development of countermeasures for radiation induced adverse health effects is a lengthy process, particularly when the countermeasure/drug has not yet been evaluated in human trials. One example of a drug developed from the bench to the clinic is the soybean-derived Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), which has been developed as a countermeasure for radiation induced cancer. It was originally identified as a compound/drug that could prevent the radiation induced carcinogenic process in an in vitro assay system in 1975. The first observation that BBI could inhibit carcinogenesis in animals was in 1985. BBI received Investigational New Drug (IND) Status with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1992 (after several years of negotiation with the FDA about the potential IND status of the drug), and human trials began at that time. Phase I, II and III human trials utilizing BBI have been performed under several INDs with the FDA, and an ongoing Phase III trial will be ending in the very near future. Thus, the drug has been in development for 35 years at this point, and it is still not a prescription drug on the market which is available for human use. A somewhat less time-consuming process is to evaluate compounds that are on the GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) list. These compounds would include some over-the-counter medications, such as antioxidant vitamins utilized in human trials at the levels for which Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) have been established. To determine whether GRAS substances are able to have beneficial effects on radiation induced adverse health effects, it is still likely to be a lengthy process involving many years to potentially decades of human trial work. The

  3. Subluminal and superluminal terahertz radiation in metamaterials with electromagnetically induced transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhengyang; Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2013-07-29

    We propose a scheme to design a new type of optical metamaterial that can mimic the functionality of four-state atomic systems of N-type energy-level configuration with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We show that in such metamaterial a transition from a single EIT to a double EIT of terahertz radiation may be easily achieved by actively tuning the intensity of the infrared pump field or passively tuning the geometrical parameters of resonator structures. In addition, the group velocity of the terahertz radiation can be varied from subluminal to superluminal by changing the pump field intensity. The scheme suggested here may be used to construct chip-scale slow and fast light devices and to realize rapidly responded switching of terahertz radiation at room temperature.

  4. Radiation induced deep level defects in bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoming; Yang, Jianqun; Li, Xingji; Ma, Guoliang; Xiao, Liyi; Bollmann, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Bipolar junction transistor (BJT) is sensitive to ionization and displacement radiation effects in space. In this paper, 35 MeV Si ions were used as irradiation source to research the radiation damage on NPN and PNP bipolar transistors. The changing of electrical parameters of transistors was in situ measured with increasing irradiation fluence of 35 MeV Si ions. Using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), defects in the bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions are measured after irradiation. Based on the in situ electrical measurement and DLTS spectra, it is clearly that the bias conditions can affect the concentration of deep level defects, and the radiation damage induced by heavy ions.

  5. Radiation induced deep level defects in bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chaoming; Yang, Jianqun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Xingji, E-mail: lxj0218@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Guoliang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xiao, Liyi [Department of Astronautics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Bollmann, Joachim [Institute of Electronics and Sensor Materials, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, 71691 (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Bipolar junction transistor (BJT) is sensitive to ionization and displacement radiation effects in space. In this paper, 35 MeV Si ions were used as irradiation source to research the radiation damage on NPN and PNP bipolar transistors. The changing of electrical parameters of transistors was in situ measured with increasing irradiation fluence of 35 MeV Si ions. Using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), defects in the bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions are measured after irradiation. Based on the in situ electrical measurement and DLTS spectra, it is clearly that the bias conditions can affect the concentration of deep level defects, and the radiation damage induced by heavy ions.

  6. Index and density changes induced by proton radiation in lanthanum crown glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusarov, A.; Doyle, D.; Hermanne, A.; Berghmans, F.

    2001-05-01

    We studied the refractive index and density changes in cerium-doped lanthanum crown glass irradiated in air with 38.5 MeV protons. At a low proton fluence, the index change is linear with dose, and reaches 2.4×10-5 at 2.7×1012p/cm2 (0.65 Mrad dose). The rate of index change decreases with the proton fluence, but at high total dose (1014p/cm2) radiation-induced surface dilatation and birefringence start to appear. Our results show that the present concept of radiation-hard optical glass should be revised and that a high dose of proton radiation can produce index changes sufficient for the fabrication of integrated optical devices.

  7. Cytoprotective Efficacy of Amifostine Against Radiation- Induced Rectal Toxicity: Objective and Subjective Grading Scales for Radiomucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Kouvaris

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Curative radiation therapy of pelvic malignancies, frequently results in doselimitingtoxicities such as serous, mucoid, or more rarely, bloody diarrhea. Several studieshave evaluated the cytoprotective effects of amifostine in preventing rectal mucositisassociated with radiation treatment. We searched Medline for published comparativestudies that evaluated the use of amifostine to reduce radiation-induced toxicity associatedwith pelvic irradiation. In ten studies there was an evidence-based cytoprotection (P less than 0.05by amifostine. Although results are variable, current evidence suggests that amifostine mayhave a radioprotective effect in the rectal mucosa, particularly when administeredintrarectally. Significant improvements were seen in both symptomatic and objective(rectosigmoidoscopy end points. There is a need to conduct well-designed clinical trialswith sufficient numbers of participants to confirm these findings together with a costbenefitstudy. Objective measurements using rectosigmoidoscopy are superior tosubjective measures such as WHO or RTOG/EORTC toxicity grading scales.

  8. Modelling the pressurization induced by solar radiation on above ground installations of LPG pipeline systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leporini, M.; Terenzi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Giacchetta, G.; Polonara, F.; Corvaro, F.; Cocci Grifoni, R.

    2017-11-01

    Pipelining Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) is a mode of LPG transportation more environmentally-friendly than others due to the lower energy consumption and exhaust emissions. Worldwide, there are over 20000 kilometers of LPG pipelines. There are a number of codes that industry follows for the design, fabrication, construction and operation of liquid LPG pipelines. However, no standards exist to modelling particular critical phenomena which can occur on these lines due to external environmental conditions like the solar radiation pressurization. In fact, the solar radiation can expose above ground pipeline sections at pressure values above the maximum Design Pressure with resulting risks and problems. The present work presents an innovative practice suitable for the Oil & Gas industry to modelling the pressurization induced by the solar radiation on above ground LPG pipeline sections with the application to a real case.

  9. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri Y; Drozdov, Alexander Y; Spasojevic, Maria; Kellerman, Adam C; Usanova, Maria E; Engebretson, Mark J; Agapitov, Oleksiy V; Zhelavskaya, Irina S; Raita, Tero J; Spence, Harlan E; Baker, Daniel N; Zhu, Hui; Aseev, Nikita A

    2016-09-28

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) distribution of electrons up to ultra-relativistic energies. Here we show that although relativistic electrons are enhanced, ultra-relativistic electrons become depleted and distributions of particles show very clear telltale signatures of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-induced loss. Comparisons between observations and modelling of the evolution of the electron flux and pitch angle show that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves provide the dominant loss mechanism at ultra-relativistic energies and produce a profound dropout of the ultra-relativistic radiation belt fluxes.

  10. Protective effect of curcumin, ellagic acid and bixin on radiation induced genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thresiamma, K C; George, J; Kuttan, R

    1998-12-01

    Induction of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations produced by whole body exposure of r-radiation (1.5-3.0 Gy) in mice was found to be significantly inhibited by oral administration of natural antioxidants, curcumin (400 micro moles), ellagic acid (200 micro moles) and bixin (200 micro moles) per kilogram body weight. These antioxidants induced inhibition of micronucleated polychromatic and normochromatic erythrocytes, was comparable with alpha-tocopherol (200 micro moles) administration. Curcumin and ellagic acid were also found to significantly reduce the number of bone marrow cells with chromosomal aberrations and chromosomal fragments as effectively as alpha-tocopherol. Moreover, administration of antioxidants inhibited the DNA strand breaks produced in rat lymphocytes upon radiation as seen from the DNA unwinding studies. These results indicated that antioxidant curcumin, ellagic acid and bixin provide protection against chromosome damage produced by radiation.

  11. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H. [Institute de Recherches Subatomiques, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Fontaine, J.C. [Universite de Haute Alsace, GRPHE, 61 rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P. [Laboratoire PHASE (UPR 292 du CNRS), 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.) 26 refs.

  12. Usage of low-intensity laser radiation for the treatment of the inflammatory processes of the oral cavity mucosa after applying removable plate dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivradzhiyan, Edvard; Lesnykh, Nikolay; Kunin, Vadim; Mutafyan, Mikhail

    1995-04-01

    Effective methods of reveling overload zones of the oral mucosa under the bases of plane dentures, the effect of low intensity laser radiation ont he increase of its resistance are discussed. At present removable plate dentures of different modifications to a certain degree restore aesthetic proportions of the face, phonetics and malfunction of the teeth and jaws. Besides, removable bridge are known not to secure even distribution of mastication pressure along the whole dentures bed which results in the development of inflammatory and dystrophic processes, and, finally in the accelerated atrophy of the oral mucosa and bony tissue of the alveolar process of upper and alveolar parts of the mandible. Many papers are devoted to the anti-inflammatory effect of laser therapy. Improvement of metabolic processes and revascularization of the dentures bed mucosa, normalization of the oral microflora structure, anesthetizing effect is noted too. At the same time there are no papers about studying the therapeutic effect of low intensity laser radiation intraumatic dentures stomatitis, inflammation of the oral mucosa in the literature available for us. To increase the functional effectiveness of removable plate dentures, profilaxy of inflammation and dystrophic phenomena and to decrease adaptation period we have developed methods of early detection of overload zone of oral mucosa at the initial stages of acute inflammation with the help of macrohistochemical reaction. Visible with the naked eye for the timely and precise correction of the dentures.

  13. Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costes, Sylvain V; Chiolo, Irene; Pluth, Janice M.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Jakob, Burkhard

    2009-09-15

    DNA damage sensing proteins have been shown to localize to the sites of DSB within seconds to minutes following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, resulting in the formation of microscopically visible nuclear domains referred to as radiation-induced foci (RIF). This review characterizes the spatio-temporal properties of RIF at physiological doses, minutes to hours following exposure to ionizing radiation, and it proposes a model describing RIF formation and resolution as a function of radiation quality and nuclear densities. Discussion is limited to RIF formed by three interrelated proteins ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated), 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) and ?H2AX (phosphorylated variant histone H2AX). Early post-IR, we propose that RIF mark chromatin reorganization, leading to a local nuclear scaffold rigid enough to keep broken DNA from diffusing away, but open enough to allow the repair machinery. We review data indicating clear kinetic and physical differences between RIF emerging from dense and uncondensed regions of the nucleus. At later time post-IR, we propose that persistent RIF observed days following exposure to ionizing radiation are nuclear ?scars? marking permanent disruption of the chromatin architecture. When DNA damage is resolved, such chromatin modifications should not necessarily lead to growth arrest and it has been shown that persistent RIF can replicate during mitosis. Thus, heritable persistent RIF spanning over tens of Mbp may affect the transcriptome of a large progeny of cells. This opens the door for a non DNA mutation-based mechanism of radiation-induced phenotypes.

  14. Development of radiation-induced mutation techniques and functional genomics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Sub; Kang, Si Yong; Kim, Jin Baek [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-01-15

    This project has been performed to develop plant genetic resources using radiation (gamma-rays, ion-beam, space environments), to conduct functional genomics studies with mutant resources, and to develop new radiation plant breeding techniques using various radiation sources during 3 years. In the first section, we developed flower genetic resources, functional crop resources, and bio-industrial plant resources. In the second section, we cloned several mutated genes and studied mechanisms of gene expression and genetic diversity of mutations induced by gamma-rays. In the third section, we developed new plant breeding techniques using gamma-phytotron, heavy ion-beam, and space environments. Based on these results, a total of 8 cultivars containing Chrysanthemum, Hibiscus, kenaf, rice, and soybean were applied for plant variety protection (PVP) and a total of 4 cultivars were registered for PVP. Also, license agreement for the dwarf type Hibiscus mutant 'Ggoma' was conducted with Supro co. and the manufacturing technology for natural antioxidant pear-grape vinegar was transferred into Enzenic co. Also, 8 gene sequences, such as F3'H and LDOX genes associated with flower color in Chrysanthemum and EPSPS gene from Korean lawn grass, were registered in the database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). In the future study, we will develop new radiation mutation breeding techniques through the mutation spectrum induced by various radiation sources, the studies for mechanism of the cellular response to radiation, and the comparative{center_dot}structural{center_dot}functional genomics studies for useful traits.

  15. Palliative effects of lutein intervention in gamma-radiation-induced cellular damages in Swiss albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudeva, Vidya; Tenkanidiyoor, Yogish Somayaji; Radhakrishna, Vishakh; Shivappa, Pooja; Lakshman, Srikanth Patil; Fernandes, Ronald; Patali, Krishna Ananthapura

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced hematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic damages to the normal cells are major concerns in the field of radiotherapy. The carotenoids and their derivatives have been the source of antioxidants with wide range of medicinal applications. The objective is to evaluate the protective effects of lutein, a carotenoid, against radiation-induced cellular and tissue damages. Swiss albino mice were grouped into 5, 50, 250, and 500 mg/kg b.wt. of lutein treatment groups, a sham and vehicle control group. The groups were irradiated with a lethal dose of 10 Gy y'-radiation. The mortality was recorded for 30 days to optimize the protective dose against radiation. The mice were administered with the compound orally for 15 consecutive days and irradiated with a sublethal dose of 6Gy. The hematological changes in blood and antioxidant parameters were determined in liver, kidney homogenates, and hemolysate/serum. The hematological parameters were recorded using an automated cell counter. The antioxidants such as malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase were spectrophotometrically determined. The red blood cell, white blood cell count, lymphocyte count, hemoglobin, platelet levels, and hematocrit value were found to be decreased in the irradiated groups. Lutein pretreatment maintains near-normal levels of these parameters indicating resistance/recovery from the radiation-induced damages. The antioxidant levels were found to be reduced in all the irradiated groups. However, lutein pretreatment (50 mg/kg b.wt.) has increased the catalase activity of hemolysate. Lutein pretreatment has reduced the MDA levels in hemolysate, when administered at doses of 5, 250, and 500 mg/kg b.wt. in comparison to its control. The study demonstrates the radioprotective potential of lutein by maintaining the hematological and antioxidant homeostasis.

  16. Racial Variations in Radiation-Induced Skin Toxicity Severity: Data From a Prospective Cohort Receiving Postmastectomy Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Jean L., E-mail: jwrigh71@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Takita, Cristiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Reis, Isildinha M. [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Zhao, Wei; Lee, Eunkyung [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Hu, Jennifer J. [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced skin toxicity is one of the most symptomatic side effects of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). We sought to determine whether the severity of acute skin toxicity was greater in black patients in a prospective cohort receiving PMRT and to identify other predictors of more severe skin toxicity. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the first 110 patients in an ongoing prospective study assessing radiation-induced skin toxicity in patients receiving PMRT. We recorded patient demographics, body mass index (BMI), and disease and treatment characteristics. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the effect of potential predictors on the risk of skin toxicity. Results: A total of 23.6% respondents self-identified as black, 5.5% as non-Hispanic white, 69.1% as Hispanic white, and 1.8% as other; 57% were postmenopausal, and 70.9% had BMI of >25. Median chest wall dose was 50 Gy, and mastectomy scar dose was 60 Gy. Most patients, 95.5%, were treated with a 0.5-cm bolus throughout treatment. There were no significant differences in patient characteristics in black versus non-black patients. At RT completion, moist desquamation was more common in black patients (73.1% vs 47.6%, respectively, P=.023), in postmenopausal patients (63.5% vs 40.4%, respectively, P=.016), and in those with BMI of ≥25 (60.3% vs 37.5%, respectively, P=.030). On multivariate analysis, the effects of black race (odds ratio [OR] = 7.46, P=.031), BMI ≥25 (OR = 2.95, P=.043) and postmenopausal status (OR = 8.26, P=.004) remained significant risk factors for moist desquamation. Conclusions: In this prospectively followed, racially diverse cohort of breast cancer patients receiving PMRT delivered in a uniform fashion, including the routine use of chest wall boost and bolus, black race, higher BMI, and postmenopausal status emerged as significant predictors of moist desquamation. There was a high frequency of moist desquamation, particularly in those

  17. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented

  18. The effects of herbs on the radiation-induced apoptosis in intestinal crypt cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; An, Mi Ra; Nah, Seung Yeol; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jae Ha; Shin, Dong Ho [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Sung Kee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jong Sik [Sangju National Univ., Sangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    This study was performed to determine the effect of several herbs on radiation-induced apoptosis in jejunal crypt cells. Longyanrou(Euphoris logana), Suanzaoren(Zizyphus vulgaris), Yuanzhi(Polygala tenuifolia), Rensan(Panax ginseng), Fuling(Poria cocos), Muxiang(Saussurea lappa), Chuanxiong(Cnidium offcinale), Baishaoyao(Paeonia lactifolia), Shengma(Cimicifuga heracleifolia), Chaihu(Bupleurum falcatum) and Dongchongxiacao(Paecilomyces japonica) reduced the frequency of radiation-induced apoptosis(p<0.05). Although the mechanisms of this effect remain to be elucidated, these results indicated that Longyanrou, Suanzaoren, Yuanzhi, Rensan, Fuling, Muxiang, Chuanxiong, Baishaoyao, Shengma, Chaihu and Dongchongxiacao might be useful inhibitors of apoptosis, especially since these are relative nontoxic natural products.

  19. Management of radiation-induced early nasal adhesion after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Liu; Fa-ya, Liang; Ping, Han; Hua, Zou; Qiu-jian, Chen; Xiao-yu, Jiang; Rui-Chen, Li; Xiao-Ming, Huang

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the conservative management of radiation-induced early nasal adhesion after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). From June 2008 to June 2010, patients with bilateral or unilateral early nasal adhesion after radiotherapy for NPC were selected. All patients received endoscopic management and then nasal irrigation daily and nasal steroids spray for at least 3 months. All of the clinical data and follow-up endoscopy were analyzed. There were 40 patients enrolled. The mean follow-up period was 19.6 months (range, 12-24 months) after procedure. Thirty-eight patients (95%) had patent nasal cavity during follow-up. Two patients (5%) had not received endoscopy regularly and developed severe fibrosis. For the whole group, nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea, hyposmia, and xerostomia all were improved from before management according to visual analog score (p sprays and nasal irrigation provides a convenient, simple, effective, and minimally invasive therapy to treat early radiation-induced nasal adhesion patients.

  20. Lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus induced by gamma-ray radiation and their genetic similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.-K.; Chang, H.-H.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, K.-S.

    2000-02-01

    To induce the lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus, the mycelia were irradiated by gamma-ray radiation to doses of 1-2 kGy. Five strains were isolated by the criteria of clamp connection, fruiting body formation, growth rate and activities of extracellular enzymes. All isolated strains were able to form the fruiting bodies and grew similarly to the control. The extracellular enzymes activities in liquid media of isolated strains were up to 10 times higher than the control. Genetic similarities of the isolated strains ranged from 64.4% to 93.3% of the control. From these results, it seems that the genetic diversity of P. ostreatus could be changed and useful strains be induced by gamma-ray radiation to recycle or reuse biowastes.

  1. Lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus induced by gamma-ray radiation and their genetic similarities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y-K. E-mail: yklee@nanum.kaeri.re.kr; Chang, H-H.; Kim, J-S.; Kim, J.K.; Lee, K-S

    2000-02-01

    To induce the lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus, the mycelia were irradiated by gamma-ray radiation to doses of 1-2 kGy. Five strains were isolated by the criteria of clamp connection, fruiting body formation, growth rate and activities of extracellular enzymes. All isolated strains were able to form the fruiting bodies and grew similarly to the control. The extracellular enzymes activities in liquid media of isolated strains were up to 10 times higher than the control. Genetic similarities of the isolated strains ranged from 64.4% to 93.3% of the control. From these results, it seems that the genetic diversity of P. ostreatus could be changed and useful strains be induced by gamma-ray radiation to recycle or reuse biowastes. (author)

  2. Radiation-induced preparation of bimetallic nanoparticles in the films of interpolyelectrolyte complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Dmitry I.; Zezina, Elena A.; Zezin, Sergei B.; Yang, Mingshu; Wang, Feng; Shvedunov, Vasiliy I.; Feldman, Vladimir I.; Zezin, Alexey A.

    2018-01-01

    The bimetallic nanostructures are of considerable interest for various prospective applications. This paper reports a generation of the Cu/Ag and Cu/Au nanoparticles in the interpolyelectrolyte films irradiated in aqueous media. It was shown that the radiation-induced reduction of (Cu/Ag) or (Cu/Au) ions in the matrix of poly(acrylic acid)-polyethylenimine complexes led to formation of the nanoparticles with narrow size distribution. The core-shell structure of nanoparticles was demonstrated by the TEM results. According to the X-ray diffraction data, the nanoparticle cores (Ag or Au) are formed at early stage of irradiation, while increase of the absorbed dose results in the growth of copper shell. It was demonstrated that the radiation-induced reduction could be applied for effective preparation of bimetallic nanoparticles directly in the polymer matrix.

  3. Radiation-induced color centers in La-doped PbWO sub 4 crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Q; Zhu, R Y

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the result of a study on radiation-induced color center densities in La-doped lead tungstate (PbWO sub 4) crystals. The creation and annihilation constants of radiation-induced color centers were determined by using transmittance data measured for a PbWO sub 4 sample before and during sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-ray irradiation at a dose rate of 15 rad/h. Following a model of color center kinetics, these constants were used to calculate color center densities under irradiations at 100 rad/h. The result was found to be in good agreement with experimental data, indicating that the behaviour of PbWO sub 4 crystals under irradiation can be predicted according to this model.

  4. Recombination of charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in silicon doped by transition metals impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, L A

    2003-01-01

    It has been studied the peculiarities of recombination of nonequilibrium charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in received according to Czochralski method p-silicon (p approx 3 - 20 Ohm centre dot cm), doped by one of the impurities of transition metals of the IV-th group of periodic table (titanium, zirconium, hafnium). Experimental results are obtained out of the analysis of temperature and injection dependence of the life time of charge carriers. The results are explained taking into consideration the influences of elastic stress fields created by the aggregates of transition metals atoms on space distribution over the crystal of oxygen and carbon background impurities as well as on the migration of movable radiation-induced defects during irradiation. (authors).